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Sample records for alters mitochondrial distribution

  1. HUMMR, a hypoxia- and HIF-1α–inducible protein, alters mitochondrial distribution and transport

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Lim, Seung; Hoffman, David; Aspenstrom, Pontus; Federoff, Howard J.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial transport is critical for maintenance of normal neuronal function. Here, we identify a novel mitochondria protein, hypoxia up-regulated mitochondrial movement regulator (HUMMR), which is expressed in neurons and is markedly induced by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α (HIF-1α). Interestingly, HUMMR interacts with Miro-1 and Miro-2, mitochondrial proteins that are critical for mediating mitochondrial transport. Interestingly, knockdown of HUMMR or HIF-1 function in neurons exposed to hypoxia markedly reduces mitochondrial content in axons. Because mitochondrial transport and distribution are inextricably linked, the impact of reduced HUMMR function on the direction of mitochondrial transport was also explored. Loss of HUMMR function in hypoxia diminished the percentage of motile mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction and enhanced the percentage moving in the retrograde direction. Thus, HUMMR, a novel mitochondrial protein induced by HIF-1 and hypoxia, biases mitochondria transport in the anterograde direction. These findings have broad implications for maintenance of neuronal viability and function during physiological and pathological states. PMID:19528298

  2. Optical Cryoimaging Reveals a Heterogeneous Distribution of Mitochondrial Redox State in ex vivo Guinea Pig Hearts and Its Alteration During Ischemia and Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Motlagh, Mohammad Masoudi; Salehpour, Fahimeh; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Heisner, James S.; Dash, Ranjan K.; Camara, Amadou K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of substrates to generate ATP in mitochondria is mediated by redox reactions of NADH and FADH2. Cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury compromises mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. We hypothesize that IR alters the metabolic heterogeneity of mitochondrial redox state of the heart that is only evident in the 3-D optical cryoimaging of the perfused heart before, during, and after IR. The study involved four groups of hearts: time control (TC: heart perfusion without IR), global ischemia (Isch), global ischemia followed by reperfusion (IR) and TC with PCP (a mitochondrial uncoupler) perfusion. Mitochondrial NADH and FAD autofluorescence signals were recorded spectrofluorometrically online in guinea pig ex vivo-perfused hearts in the Langendorff mode. At the end of each specified protocol, hearts were rapidly removed and snap frozen in liquid N2 for later 3-D optical cryoimaging of the mitochondrial NADH, FAD, and NADH/FAD redox ratio (RR). The TC hearts revealed a heterogeneous spatial distribution of NADH, FAD, and RR. Ischemia and IR altered the spatial distribution and caused an overall increase and decrease in the RR by 55% and 64%, respectively. Uncoupling with PCP resulted in the lowest level of the RR (73% oxidation) compared with TC. The 3-D optical cryoimaging of the heart provides novel insights into the heterogeneous distribution of mitochondrial NADH, FAD, RR, and metabolism from the base to the apex during ischemia and IR. This 3-D information of the mitochondrial redox state in the normal and ischemic heart was not apparent in the dynamic spectrofluorometric data. PMID:27574574

  3. Altered Mitochondrial Signalling and Metabolism in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Esita; Roy, Bidyut

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria being the central organelle for metabolism and other cell signalling pathways have remained the topic of interest to tumour biologists. In spite of the wide acceptance of Warburg’s hypothesis, role of mitochondrial metabolism in cancer is still unclear. Uncontrolled growth and proliferation, hallmarks of tumour cells, are maintained when the cells adapt to metabolic reprogramming with the help of altered metabolism of mitochondria. This review has focussed on different aspects of mitochondrial metabolism and inter-related signalling pathways which have been found to be modified in cancer. PMID:28373964

  4. Genetic Ablation of Calcium-independent Phospholipase A2γ Leads to Alterations in Hippocampal Cardiolipin Content and Molecular Species Distribution, Mitochondrial Degeneration, Autophagy, and Cognitive Dysfunction*

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, David J.; Kotzbauer, Paul; Wozniak, David F.; Sims, Harold F.; Jenkins, Christopher M.; Guan, Shaoping; Han, Xianlin; Yang, Kui; Sun, Gang; Malik, Ibrahim; Conyers, Sara; Green, Karen G.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Gross, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic ablation of calcium-independent phospholipase A2γ (iPLA2γ) results in profound alterations in hippocampal phospholipid metabolism and mitochondrial phospholipid homeostasis resulting in enlarged and degenerating mitochondria leading to autophagy and cognitive dysfunction. Shotgun lipidomics demonstrated multiple alterations in hippocampal lipid metabolism in iPLA2γ−/− mice including: 1) a markedly elevated hippocampal cardiolipin content with an altered molecular species composition characterized by a shift to shorter chain length molecular species; 2) alterations in both choline and ethanolamine glycerophospholipids, including a decreased plasmenylethanolamine content; 3) increased oxidized phosphatidylethanolamine molecular species; and 4) an increased content of ceramides. Electron microscopic examination demonstrated the presence of enlarged heteromorphic lamellar structures undergoing degeneration accompanied by the presence of ubiquitin positive spheroid inclusion bodies. Purification of these enlarged heteromorphic lamellar structures by buoyant density centrifugation and subsequent SDS-PAGE and proteomics identified them as degenerating mitochondria. Collectively, these results identify the obligatory role of iPLA2γ in neuronal mitochondrial lipid metabolism and membrane structure demonstrating that iPLA2γ loss of function results in a mitochondrial neurodegenerative disorder characterized by degenerating mitochondria, autophagy, and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:19840936

  5. OSMOTIC AND METABOLIC ALTERATIONS OF MITOCHONDRIAL SIZE.

    PubMed

    LYNN, W S; FORTNEY, S; BROWN, R H

    1964-10-01

    Sustained contraction (dehydration) of rat liver mitochondria can be readily produced by increasing the tonicity of the outside media, provided Ca(++) is removed by EDTA, fatty acids are removed by albumin, and a source of chemical energy (mitochondrial substrate or ATP) is present. This was demonstrated both gravimetrically and turbidimetrically. It was also demonstrated that the net movement of sucrose and H(2)O under altered conditions of tonicity in mitochondria was dependent on the state of the mitochondria; e.g., in the presence of EDTA, diffusion was blocked, both into and out of mitochondria, whereas, in the presence of EDTA and electron-transport substrates, movement of sucrose and water out of mitochondria was increased. In the presence of Ca(++), gramicidin, or fatty acids, diffusion of sucrose into and out of mitochondria is very rapid. Mitochondria obey osmotic law only after Ca(++) and fatty acids are removed from them.

  6. OSMOTIC AND METABOLIC ALTERATIONS OF MITOCHONDRIAL SIZE

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, William S.; Fortney, Sydney; Brown, Rose H.

    1964-01-01

    Sustained contraction (dehydration) of rat liver mitochondria can be readily produced by increasing the tonicity of the outside media, provided Ca++ is removed by EDTA, fatty acids are removed by albumin, and a source of chemical energy (mitochondrial substrate or ATP) is present. This was demonstrated both gravimetrically and turbidimetrically. It was also demonstrated that the net movement of sucrose and H2O under altered conditions of tonicity in mitochondria was dependent on the state of the mitochondria; e.g., in the presence of EDTA, diffusion was blocked, both into and out of mitochondria, whereas, in the presence of EDTA and electron-transport substrates, movement of sucrose and water out of mitochondria was increased. In the presence of Ca++, gramicidin, or fatty acids, diffusion of sucrose into and out of mitochondria is very rapid. Mitochondria obey osmotic law only after Ca++ and fatty acids are removed from them. PMID:14228514

  7. Altered Cytoskeleton as a Mitochondrial Decay Signature in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sripathi, Srinivas R; He, Weilue; Sylvester, O'Donnell; Neksumi, Musa; Um, Ji-Yeon; Dluya, Thagriki; Bernstein, Paul S; Jahng, Wan Jin

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria mediate energy metabolism, apoptosis, and aging, while mitochondrial disruption leads to age-related diseases that include age-related macular degeneration. Descriptions of mitochondrial morphology have been non-systematic and qualitative, due to lack of knowledge on the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial dynamics. The current study analyzed mitochondrial size, shape, and position quantitatively in retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) using a systematic computational model to suggest mitochondrial trafficking under oxidative environment. Our previous proteomic study suggested that prohibitin is a mitochondrial decay biomarker in the RPE. The current study examined the prohibitin interactome map using immunoprecipitation data to determine the indirect signaling on cytoskeletal changes and transcriptional regulation by prohibitin. Immunocytochemistry and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that there is a positive correlation between mitochondrial changes and altered filaments as well as prohibitin interactions with kinesin and unknown proteins in the RPE. Specific cytoskeletal and nuclear protein-binding mechanisms may exist to regulate prohibitin-mediated reactions as key elements, including vimentin and p53, to control apoptosis in mitochondria and the nucleus. Prohibitin may regulate mitochondrial trafficking through unknown proteins that include 110 kDa protein with myosin head domain and 88 kDa protein with cadherin repeat domain. Altered cytoskeleton may represent a mitochondrial decay signature in the RPE. The current study suggests that mitochondrial dynamics and cytoskeletal changes are critical for controlling mitochondrial distribution and function. Further, imbalance of retrograde versus anterograde mitochondrial trafficking may initiate the pathogenic reaction in adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Altered dendritic distribution of dopamine D2 receptors and reduction in mitochondrial number in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Megan L; Chan, June; Mackie, Kenneth; Lupica, Carl R; Pickel, Virginia M

    2012-12-01

    The prelimbic prefrontal cortex (PL) is a brain region integral to complex behaviors that are highly influenced by cannabinoids and by dopamine D2 receptor (D2R)-mediated regulation of fast-firing parvalbumin-containing interneurons. We have recently shown that constitutive deletion of the cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) greatly reduces parvalbumin levels in these neurons. The effects of CB1R deletion on PL parvalbumin interneurons may be ascribed to loss of CB1R-mediated retrograde signaling on mesocortical dopamine transmission, and, in turn, altered expression and/or subcellular distribution of D2R in the PL. Furthermore, diminished parvalbumin expression could indicate metabolic changes in fast-firing interneurons that may be reflected in changes in mitochondrial density in this population. We therefore comparatively examined electron microscopic dual labeling of D2R and parvalbumin in CB1 (-/-) and CB1 (+/+) mice to test the hypothesis that absence of CB1R produces changes in D2R localization and mitochondrial distribution in parvalbumin-containing interneurons of the PL. CB1 (-/-) mice had a significantly lower density of cytoplasmic D2R-immunogold particles in medium parvalbumin-labeled dendrites and a concomitant increase in the density of these particles in small dendrites. These dendrites received both excitatory and inhibitory-type synapses from unlabeled terminals and contained many mitochondria, whose numbers were significantly reduced in CB1 (-/-) mice. Non-parvalbumin dendrites showed no between-group differences in either D2R distribution or mitochondrial number. These results suggest that cannabinoid signaling provides an important determinant of dendritic D2 receptor distribution and mitochondrial availability in fast-spiking interneurons.

  9. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics and TBI Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tara D; Hylin, Michael J; Zhao, Jing; Moore, Anthony N; Waxham, M Neal; Dash, Pramod K

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is intimately linked to cellular survival, growth, and death. Mitochondria not only generate ATP from oxidative phosphorylation, but also mediate intracellular calcium buffering, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptosis. Electron leakage from the electron transport chain, especially from damaged or depolarized mitochondria, can generate excess free radicals that damage cellular proteins, DNA, and lipids. Furthermore, mitochondrial damage releases pro-apoptotic factors to initiate cell death. Previous studies have reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI) reduces mitochondrial respiration, enhances production of ROS, and triggers apoptotic cell death, suggesting a prominent role of mitochondria in TBI pathophysiology. Mitochondria maintain cellular energy homeostasis and health via balanced processes of fusion and fission, continuously dividing and fusing to form an interconnected network throughout the cell. An imbalance of these processes, particularly an excess of fission, can be detrimental to mitochondrial function, causing decreased respiration, ROS production, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission is regulated by the cytosolic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), which translocates to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) to initiate fission. Aberrant Drp1 activity has been linked to excessive mitochondrial fission and neurodegeneration. Measurement of Drp1 levels in purified hippocampal mitochondria showed an increase in TBI animals as compared to sham controls. Analysis of cryo-electron micrographs of these mitochondria also showed that TBI caused an initial increase in the length of hippocampal mitochondria at 24 h post-injury, followed by a significant decrease in length at 72 h. Post-TBI administration of Mitochondrial division inhibitor-1 (Mdivi-1), a pharmacological inhibitor of Drp1, prevented this decrease in mitochondria length. Mdivi-1 treatment also reduced the loss of newborn neurons in the

  10. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics and TBI Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Tara D.; Hylin, Michael J.; Zhao, Jing; Moore, Anthony N.; Waxham, M. Neal; Dash, Pramod K.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is intimately linked to cellular survival, growth, and death. Mitochondria not only generate ATP from oxidative phosphorylation, but also mediate intracellular calcium buffering, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptosis. Electron leakage from the electron transport chain, especially from damaged or depolarized mitochondria, can generate excess free radicals that damage cellular proteins, DNA, and lipids. Furthermore, mitochondrial damage releases pro-apoptotic factors to initiate cell death. Previous studies have reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI) reduces mitochondrial respiration, enhances production of ROS, and triggers apoptotic cell death, suggesting a prominent role of mitochondria in TBI pathophysiology. Mitochondria maintain cellular energy homeostasis and health via balanced processes of fusion and fission, continuously dividing and fusing to form an interconnected network throughout the cell. An imbalance of these processes, particularly an excess of fission, can be detrimental to mitochondrial function, causing decreased respiration, ROS production, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission is regulated by the cytosolic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), which translocates to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) to initiate fission. Aberrant Drp1 activity has been linked to excessive mitochondrial fission and neurodegeneration. Measurement of Drp1 levels in purified hippocampal mitochondria showed an increase in TBI animals as compared to sham controls. Analysis of cryo-electron micrographs of these mitochondria also showed that TBI caused an initial increase in the length of hippocampal mitochondria at 24 h post-injury, followed by a significant decrease in length at 72 h. Post-TBI administration of Mitochondrial division inhibitor-1 (Mdivi-1), a pharmacological inhibitor of Drp1, prevented this decrease in mitochondria length. Mdivi-1 treatment also reduced the loss of newborn neurons in the

  11. Tissue-specific implications of mitochondrial alterations in aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Danhui; Li, Hongzhi; Lu, Jianxin; Bai, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Aging is a multifactorial process during which physiological alterations occur in all tissues. A decline in mitochondrial function plays an important role in the process of aging and in aging-associated diseases. The mitochondrial genome encodes 13 essential subunits of protein complexes belonging to the oxidative phosphorylation system, while most of the mitochondria-related genes are encoded by the nuclear genome. Coordination between the nucleus and mitochondria is crucial for the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function. In this review, we will discuss aging-related mitochondrial dysfunction in various tissues and its implication in aging-related diseases and the aging process. PMID:23277028

  12. Desmin Cytoskeleton Linked to Muscle Mitochondrial Distribution and Respiratory Function

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Derek J.; Mavroidis, Manolis; Weisleder, Noah; Capetanaki, Yassemi

    2000-01-01

    Ultrastructural studies have previously suggested potential association of intermediate filaments (IFs) with mitochondria. Thus, we have investigated mitochondrial distribution and function in muscle lacking the IF protein desmin. Immunostaining of skeletal muscle tissue sections, as well as histochemical staining for the mitochondrial marker enzymes cytochrome C oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase, demonstrate abnormal accumulation of subsarcolemmal clumps of mitochondria in predominantly slow twitch skeletal muscle of desmin-null mice. Ultrastructural observation of desmin-null cardiac muscle demonstrates in addition to clumping, extensive mitochondrial proliferation in a significant fraction of the myocytes, particularly after work overload. These alterations are frequently associated with swelling and degeneration of the mitochondrial matrix. Mitochondrial abnormalities can be detected very early, before other structural defects become obvious. To investigate related changes in mitochondrial function, we have analyzed ADP-stimulated respiration of isolated muscle mitochondria, and ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration in situ using saponin skinned muscle fibers. The in vitro maximal rates of respiration in isolated cardiac mitochondria from desmin-null and wild-type mice were similar. However, mitochondrial respiration in situ is significantly altered in desmin-null muscle. Both the maximal rate of ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption and the dissociation constant (Km) for ADP are significantly reduced in desmin-null cardiac and soleus muscle compared with controls. Respiratory parameters for desmin-null fast twitch gastrocnemius muscle were unaffected. Additionally, respiratory measurements in the presence of creatine indicate that coupling of creatine kinase and the adenine translocator is lost in desmin-null soleus muscle. This coupling is unaffected in cardiac muscle from desmin-null animals. All of these studies indicate that desmin IFs play a significant

  13. Efavirenz Induces Neuronal Autophagy and Mitochondrial Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Purnell, Phillip R.

    2014-01-01

    Efavirenz (EFV) is a non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor in wide use for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Although EFV is generally well tolerated, neuropsychiatric toxicity has been well documented. The toxic effects of EFV in hepatocytes and keratinocytes have been linked to mitochondrial perturbations and changes in autophagy. Here, we studied the effect of EFV on mitochondria and autophagy in neuronal cell lines and primary neurons. In SH-SY5Y cells, EFV induced a drop in ATP production, which coincided with increased autophagy, mitochondrial fragmentation, and mitochondrial depolarization. EFV-induced mitophagy was also detected by colocalization of mitochondria and autophagosomes and use of an outer mitochondrial membrane tandem fluorescent vector. Pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine increased the cytotoxic effect of EFV, suggesting that autophagy promotes cell survival. EFV also reduces ATP production in primary neurons, induces autophagy, and changes mitochondrial morphology. Overall, EFV is able to acutely induce autophagy and mitochondrial changes in neurons. These changes may be involved in the mechanism leading to central nervous system toxicity observed in clinical EFV use. PMID:25161171

  14. Alterations in Mitochondrial Quality Control in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qian; Tammineni, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the earliest and most prominent features in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. Recent studies suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD. Neurons are metabolically active cells, causing them to be particularly dependent on mitochondrial function for survival and maintenance. As highly dynamic organelles, mitochondria are characterized by a balance of fusion and fission, transport, and mitophagy, all of which are essential for maintaining mitochondrial integrity and function. Mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy can therefore be identified as key pathways in mitochondrial quality control. Tremendous progress has been made in studying changes in these key aspects of mitochondrial biology in the vulnerable neurons of AD brains and mouse models, and the potential underlying mechanisms of such changes. This review highlights recent findings on alterations in the mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy in AD and discusses how these abnormalities impact mitochondrial quality control and thus contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction in AD. PMID:26903809

  15. Mitochondrial damage associated with long-term antiretroviral treatment: associated alteration or causal disorder?

    PubMed

    Vittecoq, Daniel; Jardel, Claude; Barthélémy, Cyrille; Escaut, Lélia; Cheminot, Nathalie; Chapin, Sandrine; Sternberg, Damien; Maisonobe, Thierry; Lombès, Anne

    2002-11-01

    Combination of antiretroviral drugs has dramatically improved the prognosis of human HIV infection but is also associated with many adverse effects, the mitochondrial origin of which is discussed. In this study using extensive diagnostic procedures set up for inherited mitochondrial disorders, we analyzed HIV patients under active antiretroviral therapy who complained of severe adverse symptoms unexplained by HIV. All these patients had been treated for at least 5 years. They all had significant mitochondrial damage as evidenced by the diverse combination of lactate accumulation in blood or cerebrospinal fluid, mitochondrial morphologic alterations in muscle, and biochemical defects in muscle and liver, which designated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as the main target of the toxic mechanisms. Southern blot and/or polymerase chain reaction -based analyses disclosed multiple deletions of the muscle mtDNA and reduction of the muscle and/or liver mtDNA copy number in a majority of the patients. In opposition to muscle and liver, blood mononuclear cells were devoid of significant biochemical or genetic alterations. Whether the mitochondrial toxicity is directly responsible for the patients' adverse symptoms remains disputable, because the investigations were transversal. Its severity argues for its clinical relevance, however. The skewed tissue distribution of mitochondrial alterations indicates potential pitfalls in the needed future prospective studies.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA content, an inaccurate biomarker of mitochondrial alteration in human immunodeficiency virus-related lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Ji; Jardel, Claude; Barthélémy, Cyrille; Jan, Véronique; Bastard, Jean Philippe; Fillaut-Chapin, Sandrine; Houry, Sydney; Capeau, Jacqueline; Lombès, Anne

    2008-05-01

    Lipoatrophy is a prevalent side effect of antiretroviral treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Its mechanisms are still disputed but include mitochondrial toxicity and, in particular, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion induced by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. To obtain an integrated evaluation of the mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophy, we investigated the DNA, RNA, and protein levels in 15 samples of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue from HIV-infected patients with peripheral lipoatrophy and compared the results with those for 15 samples from age- and body mass index-matched controls. The DNA and RNA analyses used PCR-based techniques, while proteins were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and measurement of activities with spectrophotometric assays. Depletion of mtDNA and mtDNA-encoded MT-CO2 mRNA was present, but normal levels of mtDNA-dependent activity (cytochrome c oxidase) and protein (MT-CO2p) showed that it was compensated for. An increase in nuclear-DNA-dependent mitochondrial activities (citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) and protein (COX4I1p), as well as transcriptional up-regulation of nuclear-DNA-encoded mitochondrial genes (COX4I1 and UCP2), demonstrated increased mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the expression of the known transcription factors of mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF1, GABPA, PPARGC1A, PPARGC1B, and PPRC1) was normal or decreased. Increased amounts of activated caspase 3 and of DDIT3 mRNA showed the induction of apoptosis and oxidative stress, respectively. The mtDNA content did not correlate with any other mitochondrial parameter. In conclusion, mtDNA content does not appear to be an accurate biomarker of mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophic adipose tissue. The preservation of mtDNA-dependent mitochondrial functions occurred despite severe mtDNA depletion. The presence of significant oxidative stress and apoptosis did not correlate with the mtDNA content.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA Content, an Inaccurate Biomarker of Mitochondrial Alteration in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lipodystrophy▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ji; Jardel, Claude; Barthélémy, Cyrille; Jan, Véronique; Bastard, Jean Philippe; Fillaut-Chapin, Sandrine; Houry, Sydney; Capeau, Jacqueline; Lombès, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Lipoatrophy is a prevalent side effect of antiretroviral treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Its mechanisms are still disputed but include mitochondrial toxicity and, in particular, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion induced by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. To obtain an integrated evaluation of the mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophy, we investigated the DNA, RNA, and protein levels in 15 samples of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue from HIV-infected patients with peripheral lipoatrophy and compared the results with those for 15 samples from age- and body mass index-matched controls. The DNA and RNA analyses used PCR-based techniques, while proteins were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and measurement of activities with spectrophotometric assays. Depletion of mtDNA and mtDNA-encoded MT-CO2 mRNA was present, but normal levels of mtDNA-dependent activity (cytochrome c oxidase) and protein (MT-CO2p) showed that it was compensated for. An increase in nuclear-DNA-dependent mitochondrial activities (citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) and protein (COX4I1p), as well as transcriptional up-regulation of nuclear-DNA-encoded mitochondrial genes (COX4I1 and UCP2), demonstrated increased mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the expression of the known transcription factors of mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF1, GABPA, PPARGC1A, PPARGC1B, and PPRC1) was normal or decreased. Increased amounts of activated caspase 3 and of DDIT3 mRNA showed the induction of apoptosis and oxidative stress, respectively. The mtDNA content did not correlate with any other mitochondrial parameter. In conclusion, mtDNA content does not appear to be an accurate biomarker of mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophic adipose tissue. The preservation of mtDNA-dependent mitochondrial functions occurred despite severe mtDNA depletion. The presence of significant oxidative stress and apoptosis did not correlate with the mtDNA content. PMID

  18. Altered Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Proteome As the Basis of Disruption of Mitochondrial Function in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zabielski, Piotr; Lanza, Ian R.; Gopala, Srinivas; Holtz Heppelmann, Carrie J.; Bergen, H. Robert; Dasari, Surendra

    2016-01-01

    Insulin plays pivotal role in cellular fuel metabolism in skeletal muscle. Despite being the primary site of energy metabolism, the underlying mechanism on how insulin deficiency deranges skeletal muscle mitochondrial physiology remains to be fully understood. Here we report an important link between altered skeletal muscle proteome homeostasis and mitochondrial physiology during insulin deficiency. Deprivation of insulin in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice decreased mitochondrial ATP production, reduced coupling and phosphorylation efficiency, and increased oxidant emission in skeletal muscle. Proteomic survey revealed that the mitochondrial derangements during insulin deficiency were related to increased mitochondrial protein degradation and decreased protein synthesis, resulting in reduced abundance of proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and β-oxidation. However, a paradoxical upregulation of proteins involved in cellular uptake of fatty acids triggered an accumulation of incomplete fatty acid oxidation products in skeletal muscle. These data implicate a mismatch of β-oxidation and fatty acid uptake as a mechanism leading to increased oxidative stress in diabetes. This notion was supported by elevated oxidative stress in cultured myotubes exposed to palmitate in the presence of a β-oxidation inhibitor. Together, these results indicate that insulin deficiency alters the balance of proteins involved in fatty acid transport and oxidation in skeletal muscle, leading to impaired mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress. PMID:26718503

  19. Alterations of the mitochondrial proteome caused by the absence of mitochondrial DNA: A proteomic view

    PubMed Central

    Chevallet, Mireille; Lescuyer, Pierre; Diemer, Hélène; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    The proper functioning of mitochondria requires that both the mitochondrial and the nuclear genome are functional. To investigate the importance of the mitochondrial genome, which encodes only 13 subunits of the respiratory complexes, the mitochondrial rRNAs and a few tRNAs, we performed a comparative study on the 143B cell line and on its Rho-0 counterpart, i.e. devoid of mitochondrial DNA. Quantitative differences were found, of course in the respiratory complexes subunits, but also in the mitochondrial translation apparatus, mainly mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and in the ion and protein import system, i.e. including membrane proteins. Various mitochondrial metabolic processes were also altered, especially electron transfer proteins and some dehydrogenases, but quite often on a few proteins for each pathway. This study also showed variations in some hypothetical or poorly characterized proteins, suggesting a mitochondrial localization for these proteins. Examples include a stomatin-like protein and a protein sharing homologies with bacterial proteins implicated in tyrosine catabolism. Proteins involved in apoptosis control are also found modulated in Rho-0 mitochondria. PMID:16548050

  20. Ultrastructural mitochondrial alterations in equine myopathies of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Van Driessche, K; Ducatelle, R; Chiers, K; Van Coster, R; van der Kolk, J H; van der Kolk, H

    2015-03-01

    Very few mitochondrial myopathies have been described in horses. To examine the ultrastructure of muscle mitochondria in equine cases of myopathy of unknown origin. Biopsies of vastus lateralis of the Musculus quadriceps femoris were taken predominantly immediately post mortem and processed for transmission electron microscopy. As a result, electron micrographs of 90 horses in total were available for analysis comprising 4 control horses, 16 horses suffering from myopathy and 70 otherwise diseased horses. Following a thorough clinical and laboratory work-up, four out of five patients that did not fit into the usual algorithm to detect known causes of myopathy showed ultrastructural mitochondrial alterations. Small mitochondria with zones with complete disruption of cristae associated with lactic acidemia were detected in a 17-year-old pony mare, extremely long and slender mitochondria with longitudinal cristae in a 5-year-old Quarter horse stallion, a mixture of irregular extremely large mitochondria (measuring 2500 by 800 nm) next to smaller ones in an 8-year-old Hanoverian mare and round mitochondria with only few cristae in a 11-year-old pony gelding. It remains uncertain whether the subsarcolemmal mitochondrial accumulations observed in the fifth patient have any pathological significance. Ultrastructural alterations in mitochondria were detected in at least four horses. To conclude that these are due to mitochondrial dysfuntions, biochemical tests should be performed. The possibility of a mitochondrial myopathy should be included in the differential diagnosis of muscle weakness.

  1. Altered brain energetics induces mitochondrial fission arrest in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Trushin, Sergey; Christensen, Trace A; Bachmeier, Benjamin V; Gateno, Benjamin; Schroeder, Andreas; Yao, Jia; Itoh, Kie; Sesaki, Hiromi; Poon, Wayne W; Gylys, Karen H; Patterson, Emily R; Parisi, Joseph E; Diaz Brinton, Roberta; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Trushina, Eugenia

    2016-01-05

    Altered brain metabolism is associated with progression of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Mitochondria respond to bioenergetic changes by continuous fission and fusion. To account for three dimensional architecture of the brain tissue and organelles, we applied 3-dimensional electron microscopy (3D EM) reconstruction to visualize mitochondrial structure in the brain tissue from patients and mouse models of AD. We identified a previously unknown mitochondrial fission arrest phenotype that results in elongated interconnected organelles, "mitochondria-on-a-string" (MOAS). Our data suggest that MOAS formation may occur at the final stages of fission process and was not associated with altered translocation of activated dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria but with reduced GTPase activity. Since MOAS formation was also observed in the brain tissue of wild-type mice in response to hypoxia or during chronological aging, fission arrest may represent fundamental compensatory adaptation to bioenergetic stress providing protection against mitophagy that may preserve residual mitochondrial function. The discovery of novel mitochondrial phenotype that occurs in the brain tissue in response to energetic stress accurately detected only using 3D EM reconstruction argues for a major role of mitochondrial dynamics in regulating neuronal survival.

  2. Mild metabolic perturbations alter succinylation of mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huanlian; Xu, Hui; Potash, Samuel; Starkov, Anatoly; Belousov, Vsevolod V; Bilan, Dmitry S; Denton, Travis T; Gibson, Gary E

    2017-06-20

    Succinylation of proteins is widespread, modifies both the charge and size of the molecules, and can alter their function. For example, liver mitochondrial proteins have 1,190 unique succinylation sites representing multiple metabolic pathways. Succinylation is sensitive to both increases and decreases of the NAD(+) -dependent desuccinylase, SIRT5. Although the succinyl group for succinylation is derived from metabolism, the effects of systematic variation of metabolism on mitochondrial succinylation are not known. Changes in succinylation of mitochondrial proteins following variations in metabolism were compared against the mitochondrial redox state as estimated by the mitochondrial NAD(+) /NADH ratio using fluorescent probes. The ratio was decreased by reduced glycolysis and/or glutathione depletion (iodoacetic acid; 2-deoxyglucose), depressed tricarboxylic acid cycle activity (carboxyethyl ester of succinyl phosphonate), and impairment of electron transport (antimycin) or ATP synthase (oligomycin), while uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazine or tyrphostin) increased the NAD(+) /NADH ratio. All of the conditions decreased succinylation. In contrast, reducing the oxygen from 20% to 2.4% increased succinylation. The results demonstrate that succinylation varies with metabolic states, is not correlated to the mitochondrial NAD(+) /NADH ratio, and may help coordinate the response to metabolic challenge. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Mitochondrial function is altered in horse atypical myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Hélène; Boemer, François; van Galen, Gaby; Serteyn, Didier; Amory, Hélène; Baise, Etienne; Cassart, Dominique; van Loon, Gunther; Marcillaud-Pitel, Christel; Votion, Dominique-M

    2016-09-01

    Equine atypical myopathy in Europe is a fatal rhabdomyolysis syndrome that results from the ingestion of hypoglycin A contained in seeds and seedlings of Acer pseudoplatanus (sycamore maple). Acylcarnitine concentrations in serum and muscle OXPHOS capacity were determined in 15 atypical myopathy cases. All but one acylcarnitine were out of reference range and mitochondrial respiratory capacity was severely decreased up to 49% as compared to 10 healthy controls. The hallmark of atypical myopathy thus consists of a severe alteration in the energy metabolism including a severe impairment in muscle mitochondrial respiration that could contribute to its high death rate.

  4. Low-dose, Chronic Exposure to Silver Nanoparticles Causes Mild Mitochondrial Alterations in the Liver of Sprague-Dawley Rat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-10

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2014-0032 Low-dose, chronic exposure to silver nanoparticles causes mild mitochondrial alterations in the liver...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Low-dose, chronic exposure to silver nanoparticles causes mild mitochondrial alterations in the liver of Sprague-Dawley rat 5a...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Nanoparticles (NPs) are, by definition

  5. Human Misato regulates mitochondrial distribution and morphology.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masashi; Okano, Yukio

    2007-04-15

    Misato of Drosophila melanogaster and Saccharomyces cerevisiae DML1 are conserved proteins having a homologous region with a part of the GTPase family that includes eukaryotic tubulin and prokaryotic FtsZ. We characterized human Misato sharing homology with Misato of D. melanogaster and S. cerevisiae DML1. Tissue distribution of Misato exhibited ubiquitous distribution. Subcellular localization of the protein studied using anti-Misato antibody suggested that it is localized to the mitochondria. Further experiments of fractionating mitochondria revealed that Misato was localized to the outer membrane. The transfection of Misato siRNA led to growth deficiencies compared with control siRNA transfected HeLa cells, and the Misato-depleted HeLa cells showed apoptotic nuclear fragmentation resulting in cell death. After silencing of Misato, the filamentous mitochondrial network disappeared and fragmented mitochondria were observed, indicating human Misato has a role in mitochondrial fusion. To examine the effects of overexpression, COS-7 cells were transfected with cDNA encoding EGFP-Misato. Its overexpression resulted in the formation of perinuclear aggregations of mitochondria in these cells. The Misato-overexpressing cells showed low viability and had no nuclei or a small and structurally unusual ones. These results indicated that human Misato has a role(s) in mitochondrial distribution and morphology and that its unregulated expression leads to cell death.

  6. Human Misato regulates mitochondrial distribution and morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Masashi . E-mail: yo@gifu-u.ac.jp; Okano, Yukio

    2007-04-15

    Misato of Drosophila melanogaster and Saccharomyces cerevisiae DML1 are conserved proteins having a homologous region with a part of the GTPase family that includes eukaryotic tubulin and prokaryotic FtsZ. We characterized human Misato sharing homology with Misato of D. melanogaster and S. cerevisiae DML1. Tissue distribution of Misato exhibited ubiquitous distribution. Subcellular localization of the protein studied using anti-Misato antibody suggested that it is localized to the mitochondria. Further experiments of fractionating mitochondria revealed that Misato was localized to the outer membrane. The transfection of Misato siRNA led to growth deficiencies compared with control siRNA transfected HeLa cells, and the Misato-depleted HeLa cells showed apoptotic nuclear fragmentation resulting in cell death. After silencing of Misato, the filamentous mitochondrial network disappeared and fragmented mitochondria were observed, indicating human Misato has a role in mitochondrial fusion. To examine the effects of overexpression, COS-7 cells were transfected with cDNA encoding EGFP-Misato. Its overexpression resulted in the formation of perinuclear aggregations of mitochondria in these cells. The Misato-overexpressing cells showed low viability and had no nuclei or a small and structurally unusual ones. These results indicated that human Misato has a role(s) in mitochondrial distribution and morphology and that its unregulated expression leads to cell death.

  7. Specific changes in mitochondrial lipidome alter mitochondrial proteome and increase the geroprotective efficiency of lithocholic acid in chronologically aging yeast

    PubMed Central

    Leonov, Anna; Arlia-Ciommo, Anthony; Bourque, Simon D.; Koupaki, Olivia; Kyryakov, Pavlo; Dakik, Pam鼳la; McAuley, M鼳lissa; Medkour, Younes; Mohammad, Karamat; Maulo, Tamara Di; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2017-01-01

    We have previously found that exogenously added lithocholic acid delays yeast chronological aging. We demonstrated that lithocholic acid enters the yeast cell, is sorted to mitochondria, resides in both mitochondrial membranes, changes the relative concentrations of different membrane phospholipids, triggers changes in the concentrations of many mitochondrial proteins, and alters some key aspects of mitochondrial functionality. We hypothesized that the lithocholic acid-driven changes in mitochondrial lipidome may have a causal role in the remodeling of mitochondrial proteome, which may in turn alter the functional state of mitochondria to create a mitochondrial pattern that delays yeast chronological aging. Here, we test this hypothesis by investigating how the ups1?, ups2? and psd1? mutations that eliminate enzymes involved in mitochondrial phospholipid metabolism influence the mitochondrial lipidome. We also assessed how these mutations affect the mitochondrial proteome, influence mitochondrial functionality and impinge on the efficiency of aging delay by lithocholic acid. Our findings provide evidence that 1) lithocholic acid initially creates a distinct pro-longevity pattern of mitochondrial lipidome by proportionally decreasing phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin concentrations to maintain equimolar concentrations of these phospholipids, and by increasing phosphatidic acid concentration; 2) this pattern of mitochondrial lipidome allows to establish a specific, aging-delaying pattern of mitochondrial proteome; and 3) this pattern of mitochondrial proteome plays an essential role in creating a distinctive, geroprotective pattern of mitochondrial functionality. PMID:28410198

  8. Huntington's disease and mitochondrial alterations: emphasis on experimental models.

    PubMed

    Pérez-De la Cruz, Verónica; Carrillo-Mora, Paul; Santamaría, Abel

    2010-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inheritable neurological disorder coursing with degeneration of basal ganglia and producing chorea and dementia. One common factor accounting for neurodegeneration in this disorder is mitochondrial deterioration at both morphologic and functional levels. The development of experimental models in animals or cell preparations to resemble pathologic and pathogenic conditions of this disorder has served for more than four decades to describe part of the mechanistic alterations that could be occurring in mitochondria of HD patients, and the subsequent design of therapeutic alternatives where mitochondrial alterations are the primary target. In this minireview we describe some of the most relevant studies at the experimental level, giving support to the hypothesis that mitochondria play a central role in HD pathogenesis.

  9. Curcumin Attenuates Gentamicin-Induced Kidney Mitochondrial Alterations: Possible Role of a Mitochondrial Biogenesis Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Negrette-Guzmán, Mario; García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Tapia, Edilia; Zazueta, Cecilia; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Aparicio-Trejo, Omar Emiliano; Madero, Magdalena; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that curcumin (CUR), a polyphenol derived from Curcuma longa, exerts a protective effect against gentamicin- (GM-) induced nephrotoxicity in rats, associated with a preservation of the antioxidant status. Although mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark in the GM-induced renal injury, the role of CUR in mitochondrial protection has not been studied. In this work, LLC-PK1 cells were preincubated 24 h with CUR and then coincubated 48 h with CUR and 8 mM GM. Treatment with CUR attenuated GM-induced drop in cell viability and led to an increase in nuclear factor (erythroid-2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear accumulation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) cell expression attenuating GM-induced losses in these proteins. In vivo, Wistar rats were injected subcutaneously with GM (75 mg/Kg/12 h) during 7 days to develop kidney mitochondrial alterations. CUR (400 mg/Kg/day) was administered orally 5 days before and during the GM exposure. The GM-induced mitochondrial alterations in ultrastructure and bioenergetics as well as decrease in activities of respiratory complexes I and IV and induction of calcium-dependent permeability transition were mostly attenuated by CUR. Protection of CUR against GM-induced nephrotoxicity could be in part mediated by maintenance of mitochondrial functions and biogenesis with some participation of the nuclear factor Nrf2. PMID:26345660

  10. Curcumin Attenuates Gentamicin-Induced Kidney Mitochondrial Alterations: Possible Role of a Mitochondrial Biogenesis Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Negrette-Guzmán, Mario; García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Tapia, Edilia; Zazueta, Cecilia; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Aparicio-Trejo, Omar Emiliano; Madero, Magdalena; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that curcumin (CUR), a polyphenol derived from Curcuma longa, exerts a protective effect against gentamicin- (GM-) induced nephrotoxicity in rats, associated with a preservation of the antioxidant status. Although mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark in the GM-induced renal injury, the role of CUR in mitochondrial protection has not been studied. In this work, LLC-PK1 cells were preincubated 24 h with CUR and then coincubated 48 h with CUR and 8 mM GM. Treatment with CUR attenuated GM-induced drop in cell viability and led to an increase in nuclear factor (erythroid-2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear accumulation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) cell expression attenuating GM-induced losses in these proteins. In vivo, Wistar rats were injected subcutaneously with GM (75 mg/Kg/12 h) during 7 days to develop kidney mitochondrial alterations. CUR (400 mg/Kg/day) was administered orally 5 days before and during the GM exposure. The GM-induced mitochondrial alterations in ultrastructure and bioenergetics as well as decrease in activities of respiratory complexes I and IV and induction of calcium-dependent permeability transition were mostly attenuated by CUR. Protection of CUR against GM-induced nephrotoxicity could be in part mediated by maintenance of mitochondrial functions and biogenesis with some participation of the nuclear factor Nrf2.

  11. Mitochondrial alteration caused by cnidarian toxins: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Arillo, A; Burlando, B; Carli, A M; Mariottini, G L

    1994-12-01

    Cnidarians contain different toxins causing cytotoxic and cytolytic effects probably due to cell membrane alterations. Mitochondria were used here as an experimental model system to characterize the action of cnidarian toxins. Toxin from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata affects the function of rat liver mitochondria. Effects are dose- and time-dependent and they disappear when Ca2+ is absent. This toxin could therefore have a phospholipase-like action, as reported for other cnidarians. Mitochondrial alterations by cnidarian toxins could therefore be a particular case of a general mechanism of toxicity directed towards biological membranes.

  12. Curcumin prevents paracetamol-induced liver mitochondrial alterations.

    PubMed

    Granados-Castro, Luis Fernando; Rodríguez-Rangel, Daniela Sarai; Fernández-Rojas, Berenice; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Eugenio-Pérez, Dianelena; Pinzón, Enrique; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2016-02-01

    In the present study was evaluated if curcumin is able to attenuate paracetamol (PCM)-induced mitochondrial alterations in liver of mice. Mice (n = 5-6/group) received curcumin (35, 50 or 100 mg/kg bw) 90 min before PCM injection (350 mg/kg bw). Plasma activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was measured; histological analyses were done; and measurement of mitochondrial oxygen consumption, mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP synthesis, aconitase activity and activity of respiratory complexes was carried out. Curcumin prevented in a dose-dependent manner PCM-induced liver damage. Curcumin (100 mg/kg) attenuated PCM-induced liver histological damage (damaged hepatocytes from 28.3 ± 7.7 to 8.3 ± 0.7%) and increment in plasma ALT (from 2300 ± 150 to 690 ± 28 U/l) and AST (from 1603 ± 43 to 379 ± 22 U/l) activity. Moreover, curcumin attenuated the decrease in oxygen consumption using either succinate or malate/glutamate as substrates (evaluated by state 3, respiratory control ratio, uncoupled respiration and adenosine diphosphate/oxygen ratio), in membrane potential, in ATP synthesis, in aconitase activity and in the activity of respiratory complexes I, III and IV. These results indicate that the protective effect of curcumin in PCM-induced hepatotoxicity is associated with attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  13. Altered metabolism and mitochondrial genome in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dakubo, G D; Parr, R L; Costello, L C; Franklin, R B; Thayer, R E

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA are frequent in cancer and the accompanying mitochondrial dysfunction and altered intermediary metabolism might contribute to, or signal, tumour pathogenesis. The metabolism of human prostate peripheral zone glandular epithelial cells is unique. Compared with many other soft tissues, these glandular epithelial cells accumulate high concentrations of zinc, which inhibits the activity of m‐aconitase, an enzyme involved in citrate metabolism through Krebs cycle. This causes Krebs cycle truncation and accumulation of high concentrations of citrate to be secreted in prostatic fluid. The accumulation of zinc also inhibits terminal oxidation. Therefore, these cells exhibit inefficient energy production. In contrast, malignant transformation of the prostate is associated with an early metabolic switch, leading to decreased zinc accumulation and increased citrate oxidation. The efficient energy production in these transformed cells implies increased electron transport chain activity, increased oxygen consumption, and perhaps, excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production compared with normal prostate epithelial cells. Because ROS have deleterious effects on DNA, proteins, and lipids, the altered intermediary metabolism may be linked with ROS production and accelerated mitochondrial DNA mutations in prostate cancer. PMID:16394275

  14. ER-associated mitochondrial division links the distribution of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA in yeast.

    PubMed

    Murley, Andrew; Lackner, Laura L; Osman, Christof; West, Matthew; Voeltz, Gia K; Walter, Peter; Nunnari, Jodi

    2013-05-14

    Mitochondrial division is important for mitochondrial distribution and function. Recent data have demonstrated that ER-mitochondria contacts mark mitochondrial division sites, but the molecular basis and functions of these contacts are not understood. Here we show that in yeast, the ER-mitochondria tethering complex, ERMES, and the highly conserved Miro GTPase, Gem1, are spatially and functionally linked to ER-associated mitochondrial division. Gem1 acts as a negative regulator of ER-mitochondria contacts, an activity required for the spatial resolution and distribution of newly generated mitochondrial tips following division. Previous data have demonstrated that ERMES localizes with a subset of actively replicating mitochondrial nucleoids. We show that mitochondrial division is spatially linked to nucleoids and that a majority of these nucleoids segregate prior to division, resulting in their distribution into newly generated tips in the mitochondrial network. Thus, we postulate that ER-associated division serves to link the distribution of mitochondria and mitochondrial nucleoids in cells. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00422.001.

  15. Alterations in Lipid Levels of Mitochondrial Membranes Induced by Amyloid-β: A Protective Role of Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Corral, Sergio A.; Lopez-Armas, Gabriela; Cruz-Ramos, Jose; Melnikov, Valery G.; Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Munoz, Ruben; Reiter, Russel J.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer pathogenesis involves mitochondrial dysfunction, which is closely related to amyloid-β (Aβ) generation, abnormal tau phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Alterations in membranal components, including cholesterol and fatty acids, their characteristics, disposition, and distribution along the membranes, have been studied as evidence of cell membrane alterations in AD brain. The majority of these studies have been focused on the cytoplasmic membrane; meanwhile the mitochondrial membranes have been less explored. In this work, we studied lipids and mitochondrial membranes in vivo, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ). The purpose was to determine how Aβ may be responsible for beginning of a vicious cycle where oxidative stress and alterations in cholesterol, lipids and fatty acids, feed back on each other to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We observed changes in mitochondrial membrane lipids, and fatty acids, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar Aβ in aged Wistar rats. Melatonin, a well-known antioxidant and neuroimmunomodulator indoleamine, reversed some of these alterations and protected mitochondrial membranes from obvious damage. Additionally, melatonin increased the levels of linolenic and n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid, in the same site where amyloid β was injected, favoring an endogenous anti-inflammatory pathway. PMID:22666620

  16. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Anthony L.; Rooney, John P.; Kubik, Laura L.; Gonzalez, Claudia P.; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes. PMID:26106885

  17. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes.

    PubMed

    Luz, Anthony L; Rooney, John P; Kubik, Laura L; Gonzalez, Claudia P; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes.

  18. Multiple mitochondrial alterations in a case of myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, H; Tandler, B; Cohen, M; Koontz, D; Hoppel, C L

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial alterations are the most common feature of human myopathies. A biopsy of quadriceps muscle from a 50-year-old woman exhibiting myopathic symptoms was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Biopsied fibers from quadriceps muscle displayed numerous subsarcolemmal mitochondria that contained crystalloids. Numbering 1-6 per organelle, these consisted of rows of punctuate densities measuring ∼0.34 nm; the parallel rows of these dots had a periodicity of ∼0.8 nm. The crystalloids were ensconced within cristae or in the outer compartment. Some mitochondria without crystalloids had circumferential cristae, leaving a membrane-free center that was filled with a farinaceous material. Other scattered fibrocyte defects included disruption of the contractile apparatus or its sporadic replacement by a finely punctuate material in some myofibers. Intramitochondrial crystalloids, although morphologically striking, do not impair organelle physiology to a significant degree, so the muscle weakness of the patient must originate elsewhere.

  19. A mitochondrial location for haemoglobins--dynamic distribution in ageing and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Freya; Greville-Heygate, Oliver; Marsh, Oliver; Anderson, Susan; Chakrabarti, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Haemoglobins are iron-containing proteins that transport oxygen in the blood of most vertebrates. The mitochondrion is the cellular organelle which consumes oxygen in order to synthesise ATP. Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in neurodegeneration and ageing. We find that α and β haemoglobin (Hba and Hbb) proteins are altered in their distribution in mitochondrial fractions from degenerating brain. We demonstrate that both Hba and Hbb are co-localised with the mitochondrion in mammalian brain. The precise localisation of the Hbs is within the inner membrane space and associated with inner mitochondrial membrane. Relative mitochondrial to cytoplasmic ratios of Hba and Hbb show changing distributions of these proteins during the process of neurodegeneration in the pcd(5j) mouse brain. A significant difference in mitochondrial Hba and Hbb content in the mitochondrial fraction is seen at 31 days after birth, this corresponds to a stage when dynamic neuronal loss is measured to be greatest in the Purkinje Cell Degeneration mouse. We also report changes in mitochondrial Hba and Hbb levels in ageing brain and muscle. Significant differences in mitochondrial Hba and Hbb can be seen when comparing aged brain to muscle, suggesting tissue specific functions of these proteins in the mitochondrion. In muscle there are significant differences between Hba levels in old and young mitochondria. To understand whether the changes detected in mitochondrial Hbs are of clinical significance, we examined Parkinson's disease brain, immunohistochemistry studies suggest that cell bodies in the substantia nigra accumulate mitochondrial Hb. However, western blotting of mitochondrial fractions from PD and control brains indicates significantly less Hb in PD brain mitochondria. One explanation could be a specific loss of cells containing mitochondria loaded with Hb proteins. Our study opens the door to an examination of the role of Hb function, within the context of the mitochondrion

  20. A mitochondrial location for haemoglobins—Dynamic distribution in ageing and Parkinson's disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, Freya; Greville-Heygate, Oliver; Marsh, Oliver; Anderson, Susan; Chakrabarti, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Haemoglobins are iron-containing proteins that transport oxygen in the blood of most vertebrates. The mitochondrion is the cellular organelle which consumes oxygen in order to synthesise ATP. Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in neurodegeneration and ageing. We find that α and β haemoglobin (Hba and Hbb) proteins are altered in their distribution in mitochondrial fractions from degenerating brain. We demonstrate that both Hba and Hbb are co-localised with the mitochondrion in mammalian brain. The precise localisation of the Hbs is within the inner membrane space and associated with inner mitochondrial membrane. Relative mitochondrial to cytoplasmic ratios of Hba and Hbb show changing distributions of these proteins during the process of neurodegeneration in the pcd5j mouse brain. A significant difference in mitochondrial Hba and Hbb content in the mitochondrial fraction is seen at 31 days after birth, this corresponds to a stage when dynamic neuronal loss is measured to be greatest in the Purkinje Cell Degeneration mouse. We also report changes in mitochondrial Hba and Hbb levels in ageing brain and muscle. Significant differences in mitochondrial Hba and Hbb can be seen when comparing aged brain to muscle, suggesting tissue specific functions of these proteins in the mitochondrion. In muscle there are significant differences between Hba levels in old and young mitochondria. To understand whether the changes detected in mitochondrial Hbs are of clinical significance, we examined Parkinson's disease brain, immunohistochemistry studies suggest that cell bodies in the substantia nigra accumulate mitochondrial Hb. However, western blotting of mitochondrial fractions from PD and control brains indicates significantly less Hb in PD brain mitochondria. One explanation could be a specific loss of cells containing mitochondria loaded with Hb proteins. Our study opens the door to an examination of the role of Hb function, within the context of the mitochondrion

  1. Abnormal intermediate filament organization alters mitochondrial motility in giant axonal neuropathy fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Jason; Jain, Nikhil; Kuczmarski, Edward R.; Mahammad, Saleemulla; Goldman, Anne; Gelfand, Vladimir I.; Opal, Puneet; Goldman, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare disease caused by mutations in the GAN gene, which encodes gigaxonin, an E3 ligase adapter that targets intermediate filament (IF) proteins for degradation in numerous cell types, including neurons and fibroblasts. The cellular hallmark of GAN pathology is the formation of large aggregates and bundles of IFs. In this study, we show that both the distribution and motility of mitochondria are altered in GAN fibroblasts and this is attributable to their association with vimentin IF aggregates and bundles. Transient expression of wild-type gigaxonin in GAN fibroblasts reduces the number of IF aggregates and bundles, restoring mitochondrial motility. Conversely, silencing the expression of gigaxonin in control fibroblasts leads to changes in IF organization similar to that of GAN patient fibroblasts and a coincident loss of mitochondrial motility. The inhibition of mitochondrial motility in GAN fibroblasts is not due to a global inhibition of organelle translocation, as lysosome motility is normal. Our findings demonstrate that it is the pathological changes in IF organization that cause the loss of mitochondrial motility. PMID:26700320

  2. Abnormal intermediate filament organization alters mitochondrial motility in giant axonal neuropathy fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Jason; Jain, Nikhil; Kuczmarski, Edward R; Mahammad, Saleemulla; Goldman, Anne; Gelfand, Vladimir I; Opal, Puneet; Goldman, Robert D

    2016-02-15

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare disease caused by mutations in the GAN gene, which encodes gigaxonin, an E3 ligase adapter that targets intermediate filament (IF) proteins for degradation in numerous cell types, including neurons and fibroblasts. The cellular hallmark of GAN pathology is the formation of large aggregates and bundles of IFs. In this study, we show that both the distribution and motility of mitochondria are altered in GAN fibroblasts and this is attributable to their association with vimentin IF aggregates and bundles. Transient expression of wild-type gigaxonin in GAN fibroblasts reduces the number of IF aggregates and bundles, restoring mitochondrial motility. Conversely, silencing the expression of gigaxonin in control fibroblasts leads to changes in IF organization similar to that of GAN patient fibroblasts and a coincident loss of mitochondrial motility. The inhibition of mitochondrial motility in GAN fibroblasts is not due to a global inhibition of organelle translocation, as lysosome motility is normal. Our findings demonstrate that it is the pathological changes in IF organization that cause the loss of mitochondrial motility.

  3. A novel algorithm identifies stress-induced alterations in mitochondrial connectivity and inner membrane structure from confocal images.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Mathieu; Guillebaud, Gérald; Gervais, Valerie; Lupien St-Pierre, David; Germain, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Mitochondria exist as a highly interconnected network that is exquisitely sensitive to variations in nutrient availability, as well as a large array of cellular stresses. Changes in length and connectivity of this network, as well as alterations in the mitochondrial inner membrane (cristae), regulate cell fate by controlling metabolism, proliferation, differentiation, and cell death. Given the key roles of mitochondrial dynamics, the process by which mitochondria constantly fuse and fragment, the measure of mitochondrial length and connectivity provides crucial information on the health and activity of various cell populations. However, despite the importance of accurately measuring mitochondrial networks, the tools required to rapidly and accurately provide this information are lacking. Here, we developed a novel probabilistic approach to automatically measure mitochondrial length distribution and connectivity from confocal images. This method accurately identified mitochondrial changes caused by starvation or the inhibition of mitochondrial function. In addition, we successfully used the algorithm to measure changes in mitochondrial inner membrane/matrix occurring in response to Complex III inhibitors. As cristae rearrangements play a critical role in metabolic regulation and cell survival, this provides a rapid method to screen for proteins or compounds affecting this process. The algorithm will thus provide a robust tool to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the key roles of mitochondria in the regulation of cell fate.

  4. Mitochondrial alterations in livers of Sod1-/- mice fed alcohol.

    PubMed

    Kessova, Irina G; Cederbaum, Arthur I

    2007-05-15

    Chronic alcohol consumption induced liver injury in Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase-deficient mice (Sod1-/-), with extensive centrilobular necrosis and inflammation and a reduction in hepatic ATP content. Mechanisms by which ethanol decreased ATP in these mice remain unclear. We investigated alterations in mitochondria of Sod1-/- mice produced by chronic ethanol treatment. These mitochondria had an increase in State 4 oxygen consumption with succinate and especially with glutamate plus malate compared to mitochondria from pair-fed Sod1-/- mice or mitochondria from wild-type mice fed dextrose or ethanol. This uncoupling was associated with a decrease in ADP/O and respiratory control ratios, a decline in mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced mitochondrial permeability transition, and decreased aconitase activity. Total thiols and uncoupling protein 2 levels were elevated in the pair-fed Sod1-/- mitochondria, perhaps an adaptive response to oxidant stress. However, no such increases were found with the ethanol-fed Sod1-/- mitochondria, suggesting a failure to develop these adaptations. The mitochondria from the ethanol-fed Sod1-/- mice had elevated levels of cleaved Bax, Bak, Bcl-xl, and adenine nucleotide translocator. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed increased association of Bax and Bak with the adenine nucleotide translocator. ADP-ATP exchange was very low in the ethanol-fed Sod1-/- mitochondria. These results suggest that ethanol treatment of Sod1-/- mice produces uncoupling and a decline in Deltapsi, swelling, increased association of proapoptotic proteins involved in the permeability transition, and decreased adenine nucleotide translocator activity, which may be responsible for the decline in ATP levels and development of necrosis in this model of alcohol-induced liver injury.

  5. Repeated sprints alter signaling related to mitochondrial biogenesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Serpiello, Fabio R; McKenna, Michael J; Bishop, David J; Aughey, Robert J; Caldow, Marissa K; Cameron-Smith, David; Stepto, Nigel K

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the effects of acute and chronic repeated-sprint exercise (RSE) on the skeletal muscle messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and protein abundance/phosphorylation associated with mitochondrial biogenesis. Ten healthy young adults (seven males, three females) performed the RSE trial, comprising three sets of 5 × 4-s maximal sprints on a nonmotorized treadmill, with a 20-s recovery between sprints and 4.5 min between sets. After 4 wk of repeated-sprint training, three times per week, participants repeated the RSE. A vastus lateralis muscle biopsy was obtained at rest, immediately after, and 1 and 4 h after RSE, before and after training. Venous blood lactate and glucose were measured at rest and during recovery. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot techniques were used to measure mRNA expression and protein abundance, respectively. Acute RSE increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (86%, effect size (ES) = 1.4 ± 0.8, P < 0.001) and Ca calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (69%, ES = 0.7 ± 0.6). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α; 208%, ES = 1.5 ± 0.7, P < 0.001) and nuclear respiratory factor 1 (92%, ES = 0.7 ± 0.8) mRNA expression was increased after RSE. Four weeks of training increased the abundance of PGC-1α protein at rest (33%, ES = 0.9 ± 0.7). Both acute and chronic RSE, despite only 60 s and 12 min of exercise, respectively, altered the molecular signaling associated with mitochondrial adaptations and PGC-1α mRNA expression in skeletal muscle. However, the small-to-moderate changes in resting PGC-1α protein abundance after training, together with the absence of changes in aerobic fitness, require further research to understand the functional significance of PGC-1α in response to RSE.

  6. Distribution of mitochondrial nucleoids upon mitochondrial network fragmentation and network reintegration in HEPG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Jan; Dlasková, Andrea; Šantorová, Jitka; Smolková, Katarína; Alán, Lukáš; Špaček, Tomáš; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is organized in nucleoids in complex with accessory proteins, proteins of mtDNA replication and gene expression machinery. A robust mtDNA genome is represented by hundreds to thousands of nucleoids in cell mitochondrion. Detailed information is lacking about the dynamics of nucleoid distribution within the mitochondrial network upon physiological and pathological events. Therefore, we used confocal microscopy to study mitochondrial nucleoid redistribution upon mitochondrial fission and following reintegration of the mitochondrial network. Fission was induced by oxidative stress at respiration inhibition by rotenone or upon elimination of the protonmotive force by uncoupling or upon canceling its electrical component, ΔΨ(m), by valinomycin; and by silencing of mitofusin MFN2. Agent withdrawal resulted in concomitant mitochondrial network reintegration. We found two major principal morphological states: (i) a tubular state of the mitochondrial network with equidistant nucleoid spacing, 1.10±0.2 nucleoids per μm, and (ii) a fragmented state of solitary spheroid objects in which several nucleoids were clustered. We rarely observed singular mitochondrial fragments with a single nucleoid inside and very seldom we observed empty fragments. Reintegration of fragments into the mitochondrial network re-established the tubular state with equidistant nucleoid spacing. The two major morphological states coexisted at intermediate stages. These observations suggest that both mitochondrial network fission and reconnection of the disintegrated network are nucleoid-centric, i.e., fission and new mitochondrial tubule formation are initiated around nucleoids. Analyses of combinations of these morphological icons thus provide a basis for a future mitochondrial morphology diagnostics.

  7. Mitochondrial alteration in type 2 diabetes and obesity: an epigenetic link.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhiyong; Almeida, Fabio A

    2014-01-01

    The growing epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity is largely attributed to the current lifestyle of over-consumption and physical inactivity. As the primary platform controlling metabolic and energy homeostasis, mitochondria show aberrant changes in T2DM and obese subjects. While the underlying mechanism is under extensive investigation, epigenetic regulation is now emerging to play an important role in mitochondrial biogenesis, function, and dynamics. In line with lifestyle modifications preventing mitochondrial alterations and metabolic disorders, exercise has been shown to change DNA methylation of the promoter of PGC1α to favor gene expression responsible for mitochondrial biogenesis and function. In this article we discuss the epigenetic mechanism of mitochondrial alteration in T2DM and obesity, and the effects of lifestyle on epigenetic regulation. Future studies designed to further explore and integrate the epigenetic mechanisms with lifestyle modification may lead to interdisciplinary interventions and novel preventive options for mitochondrial alteration and metabolic disorders.

  8. Resistance Exercise Training Alters Mitochondrial Function in Human Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Porter, Craig; Reidy, Paul T; Bhattarai, Nisha; Sidossis, Labros S; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2015-09-01

    Loss of mitochondrial competency is associated with several chronic illnesses. Therefore, strategies that maintain or increase mitochondrial function will likely be of benefit in numerous clinical settings. Endurance exercise has long been known to increase mitochondrial function in the skeletal muscle. Comparatively little is known regarding the effect of resistance exercise training (RET) on skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of chronic resistance training on skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity and function. Here, we studied the effect of a 12-wk RET program on skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in 11 young healthy men. Muscle biopsies were collected before and after the 12-wk training program, and mitochondrial respiratory capacity was determined in permeabilized myofibers by high-resolution respirometry. RET increased lean body mass and quadriceps muscle strength by 4% and 15%, respectively (P < 0.001). Coupled mitochondrial respiration supported by complex I, and complex I and II substrates increased by 2- and 1.4-fold, respectively (P < 0.01). The ratio of coupled complex I-supported respiration to maximal respiration increased with RET (P < 0.05), as did complex I protein abundance (P < 0.05), whereas the substrate control ratio for succinate was reduced after RET (P < 0.001). Transcripts responsible for proteins critical to electron transfer and NAD production increased with training (P < 0.05), whereas transcripts involved in mitochondrial biogenesis were unaltered. Collectively, 12 wk of RET resulted in qualitative and quantitative changes in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration. This adaptation was accompanied by modest changes in mitochondrial proteins and transcript expression. RET seems to be a means to augment the respiratory capacity and intrinsic function of skeletal muscle mitochondria.

  9. Mitochondrial morphology is altered in atrophied skeletal muscle of aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Leduc-Gaudet, Jean-Philippe; Picard, Martin; Pelletier, Félix St-Jean; Sgarioto, Nicolas; Auger, Marie-Joëlle; Vallée, Joanne; Robitaille, Richard; St-Pierre, David H.; Gouspillou, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle aging is associated with a progressive decline in muscle mass and strength, a process termed sarcopenia. Evidence suggests that accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunction plays a causal role in sarcopenia, which could be triggered by impaired mitophagy. Mitochondrial function, mitophagy and mitochondrial morphology are interconnected aspects of mitochondrial biology, and may coordinately be altered with aging. However, mitochondrial morphology has remained challenging to characterize in muscle, and whether sarcopenia is associated with abnormal mitochondrial morphology remains unknown. Therefore, we assessed the morphology of SubSarcolemmal (SS) and InterMyoFibrillar (IMF) mitochondria in skeletal muscle of young (8-12wk-old) and old (88-96wk-old) mice using a quantitative 2-dimensional transmission electron microscopy approach. We show that sarcopenia is associated with larger and less circular SS mitochondria. Likewise, aged IMF mitochondria were longer and more branched, suggesting increased fusion and/or decreased fission. Accordingly, although no difference in the content of proteins regulating mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1, Mfn2, Opa1 and Drp1) was observed, a mitochondrial fusion index (Mfn2-to-Drp1 ratio) was significantly increased in aged muscles. Our results reveal that sarcopenia is associated with complex changes in mitochondrial morphology that could interfere with mitochondrial function and mitophagy, and thus contribute to aging-related accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunction and sarcopenia. PMID:26053100

  10. Mitochondrial morphology is altered in atrophied skeletal muscle of aged mice.

    PubMed

    Leduc-Gaudet, Jean-Philippe; Picard, Martin; St-Jean Pelletier, Félix; Sgarioto, Nicolas; Auger, Marie-Joëlle; Vallée, Joanne; Robitaille, Richard; St-Pierre, David H; Gouspillou, Gilles

    2015-07-20

    Skeletal muscle aging is associated with a progressive decline in muscle mass and strength, a process termed sarcopenia. Evidence suggests that accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunction plays a causal role in sarcopenia, which could be triggered by impaired mitophagy. Mitochondrial function, mitophagy and mitochondrial morphology are interconnected aspects of mitochondrial biology, and may coordinately be altered with aging. However, mitochondrial morphology has remained challenging to characterize in muscle, and whether sarcopenia is associated with abnormal mitochondrial morphology remains unknown. Therefore, we assessed the morphology of SubSarcolemmal (SS) and InterMyoFibrillar (IMF) mitochondria in skeletal muscle of young (8-12wk-old) and old (88-96wk-old) mice using a quantitative 2-dimensional transmission electron microscopy approach. We show that sarcopenia is associated with larger and less circular SS mitochondria. Likewise, aged IMF mitochondria were longer and more branched, suggesting increased fusion and/or decreased fission. Accordingly, although no difference in the content of proteins regulating mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1, Mfn2, Opa1 and Drp1) was observed, a mitochondrial fusion index (Mfn2-to-Drp1 ratio) was significantly increased in aged muscles. Our results reveal that sarcopenia is associated with complex changes in mitochondrial morphology that could interfere with mitochondrial function and mitophagy, and thus contribute to aging-related accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunction and sarcopenia.

  11. Mitochondrial genes are altered in blood early in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lunnon, Katie; Keohane, Aoife; Pidsley, Ruth; Newhouse, Stephen; Riddoch-Contreras, Joanna; Thubron, Elisabeth B; Devall, Matthew; Soininen, Hikka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Schalkwyk, Leonard; Dobson, Richard; Malik, Afshan N; Powell, John; Lovestone, Simon; Hodges, Angela

    2017-01-07

    Although mitochondrial dysfunction is a consistent feature of Alzheimer's disease in the brain and blood, the molecular mechanisms behind these phenomena are unknown. Here we have replicated our previous findings demonstrating reduced expression of nuclear-encoded oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) subunits and subunits required for the translation of mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS genes in blood from people with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment. Interestingly this was accompanied by increased expression of some mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS genes, namely those residing closest to the transcription start site of the polycistronic heavy chain mitochondrial transcript (MT-ND1, MT-ND2, MT-ATP6, MT-CO1, MT-CO2, MT-C03) and MT-ND6 transcribed from the light chain. Further we show that mitochondrial DNA copy number was unchanged suggesting no change in steady-state numbers of mitochondria. We suggest that an imbalance in nuclear and mitochondrial genome-encoded OXPHOS transcripts may drive a negative feedback loop reducing mitochondrial translation and compromising OXPHOS efficiency, which is likely to generate damaging reactive oxygen species.

  12. Fourier analysis of mitochondrial distribution in oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollmann, Joseph L.; Brooks, Dana H.; Newmark, Judith A.; Warner, Carol M.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to quantifying mitochondrial patterns which are typically described using the qualitative terms "diffuse" "aggregated" and are potentially key indicators for an oocyte's health and survival potential post-implantation. An oocyte was isolated in a confocal image and a coarse grid was superimposed upon it. The spatial spectrum was calculated and an aggregation factor was generated. A classifier for healthy cells was developed and verified. The aggregation factor showed a clear distinction between the healthy and unhealthy oocytes. The ultimate goal is to screen oocytes for viability preimplantation, thus improving the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments.

  13. Supplementation with Vitamin E and Vitamin C inversely alters mitochondrial copy number and mitochondrial protein in obese, exercising rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Controversy exists as to whether supplementation with the antioxidants vitamin E (VE) and vitamin C (VC) blocks adaptation to exercise. Exercise is a first-line means to treat obesity and its complications. While obesity alters mitochondrial (MT) function and induces insulin resistance (IR), no data...

  14. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction and altered autophagy in cardiovascular aging and disease: from mechanisms to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Csiszar, Anna; Dutta, Debapriya; Balagopal, Gauthami; Calvani, Riccardo; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-08-15

    Advanced age is associated with a disproportionate prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Intrinsic alterations in the heart and the vasculature occurring over the life course render the cardiovascular system more vulnerable to various stressors in late life, ultimately favoring the development of CVD. Several lines of evidence indicate mitochondrial dysfunction as a major contributor to cardiovascular senescence. Besides being less bioenergetically efficient, damaged mitochondria also produce increased amounts of reactive oxygen species, with detrimental structural and functional consequences for the cardiovascular system. The age-related accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondrial likely results from the combination of impaired clearance of damaged organelles by autophagy and inadequate replenishment of the cellular mitochondrial pool by mitochondriogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about relevant mechanisms and consequences of age-related mitochondrial decay and alterations in mitochondrial quality control in the cardiovascular system. The involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular conditions especially prevalent in late life and the emerging connections with neurodegeneration are also illustrated. Special emphasis is placed on recent discoveries on the role played by alterations in mitochondrial dynamics (fusion and fission), mitophagy, and their interconnections in the context of age-related CVD and endothelial dysfunction. Finally, we discuss pharmacological interventions targeting mitochondrial dysfunction to delay cardiovascular aging and manage CVD.

  15. Inflammation-induced alteration of astrocyte mitochondrial dynamics requires autophagy for mitochondrial network maintenance.

    PubMed

    Motori, Elisa; Puyal, Julien; Toni, Nicolas; Ghanem, Alexander; Angeloni, Cristina; Malaguti, Marco; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Berninger, Benedikt; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Götz, Magdalena; Winklhofer, Konstanze F; Hrelia, Silvana; Bergami, Matteo

    2013-12-03

    Accumulating evidence suggests that changes in the metabolic signature of astrocytes underlie their response to neuroinflammation, but how proinflammatory stimuli induce these changes is poorly understood. By monitoring astrocytes following acute cortical injury, we identified a differential and region-specific remodeling of their mitochondrial network: while astrocytes within the penumbra of the lesion undergo mitochondrial elongation, those located in the core-the area invaded by proinflammatory cells-experience transient mitochondrial fragmentation. In brain slices, proinflammatory stimuli reproduced localized changes in mitochondrial dynamics, favoring fission over fusion. This effect was triggered by Drp1 phosphorylation and ultimately resulted in reduced respiratory capacity. Furthermore, maintenance of the mitochondrial architecture critically depended on the induction of autophagy. Deletion of Atg7, required for autophagosome formation, prevented the reestablishment of tubular mitochondria, leading to marked reactive oxygen species accumulation and cell death. Thus, our data reveal autophagy to be essential for regenerating astrocyte mitochondrial networks during inflammation.

  16. Alteration in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake disrupts insulin signaling in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Tomás; Parra, Valentina; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Pennanen, Christian; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Vasquez-Trincado, César; Morales, Pablo E; Lopez-Crisosto, Camila; Sotomayor-Flores, Cristian; Chiong, Mario; Rothermel, Beverly A; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-11-07

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by alterations in both cardiac bioenergetics and insulin sensitivity. Insulin promotes glucose uptake by cardiomyocytes and its use as a substrate for glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidation in order to maintain the high cardiac energy demands. Insulin stimulates Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum, however, how this translates to changes in mitochondrial metabolism in either healthy or hypertrophic cardiomyocytes is not fully understood. In the present study we investigated insulin-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) signaling in normal and norepinephrine or insulin like growth factor-1-induced hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. Using mitochondrion-selective Ca(2+)-fluorescent probes we showed that insulin increases mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels. This signal was inhibited by the pharmacological blockade of either the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor or the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter, as well as by siRNA-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter knockdown. Norepinephrine-stimulated cardiomyocytes showed a significant decrease in endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial contacts compared to either control or insulin like growth factor-1-stimulated cells. This resulted in a reduction in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, Akt activation, glucose uptake and oxygen consumption in response to insulin. Blocking mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake was sufficient to mimic the effect of norepinephrine-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy on insulin signaling. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is a key event in insulin signaling and metabolism in cardiomyocytes.

  17. Alcohol-induced oxidative/nitrosative stress alters brain mitochondrial membrane properties.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vaddi Damodara; Padmavathi, Pannuru; Kavitha, Godugu; Saradamma, Bulle; Varadacharyulu, Nallanchakravarthula

    2013-03-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption causes numerous biochemical and biophysical changes in the central nervous system, in which mitochondria is the primary organelle affected. In the present study, we hypothesized that alcohol alters the mitochondrial membrane properties and leads to mitochondrial dysfunction via mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Alcohol-induced hypoxia further enhances these effects. Administration of alcohol to rats significantly increased the mitochondrial lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation with decreased SOD2 mRNA and protein expression was decreased, while nitric oxide (NO) levels and expression of iNOS and nNOS in brain cortex were increased. In addition, alcohol augmented HIF-1α mRNA and protein expression in the brain cortex. Results from this study showed that alcohol administration to rats decreased mitochondrial complex I, III, IV activities, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity and cardiolipin content with increased anisotropic value. Cardiolipin regulates numerous enzyme activities, especially those related to oxidative phosphorylation and coupled respiration. In the present study, decreased cardiolipin could be ascribed to ROS/RNS-induced damage. In conclusion, alcohol-induced ROS/RNS is responsible for the altered mitochondrial membrane properties, and alcohol-induced hypoxia further enhance these alterations, which ultimately leads to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  18. Phosphatidylethanolamine deficiency in Mammalian mitochondria impairs oxidative phosphorylation and alters mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Tasseva, Guergana; Bai, Helin Daniel; Davidescu, Magdalena; Haromy, Alois; Michelakis, Evangelos; Vance, Jean E

    2013-02-08

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, and metabolic disorders, but the role of phospholipids, particularly the nonbilayer-forming lipid phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), in mitochondrial function is poorly understood. Elimination of mitochondrial PE (mtPE) synthesis via phosphatidylserine decarboxylase in mice profoundly alters mitochondrial morphology and is embryonic lethal (Steenbergen, R., Nanowski, T. S., Beigneux, A., Kulinski, A., Young, S. G., and Vance, J. E. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 40032-40040). We now report that moderate <30% depletion of mtPE alters mitochondrial morphology and function and impairs cell growth. Acute reduction of mtPE by RNAi silencing of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase and chronic reduction of mtPE in PSB-2 cells that have only 5% of normal phosphatidylserine synthesis decreased respiratory capacity, ATP production, and activities of electron transport chain complexes (C) I and CIV but not CV. Blue native-PAGE analysis revealed defects in the organization of CI and CIV into supercomplexes in PE-deficient mitochondria, correlated with reduced amounts of CI and CIV proteins. Thus, mtPE deficiency impairs formation and/or membrane integration of respiratory supercomplexes. Despite normal or increased levels of mitochondrial fusion proteins in mtPE-deficient cells, and no reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondria were extensively fragmented, and mitochondrial ultrastructure was grossly aberrant. In general, chronic reduction of mtPE caused more pronounced mitochondrial defects than did acute mtPE depletion. The functional and morphological changes in PSB-2 cells were largely reversed by normalization of mtPE content by supplementation with lyso-PE, a mtPE precursor. These studies demonstrate that even a modest reduction of mtPE in mammalian cells profoundly alters mitochondrial functions.

  19. Altered Mitochondrial Function and Energy Metabolism Is Associated with a Radioresistant Phenotype in Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lynam-Lennon, Niamh; Maher, Stephen G.; Maguire, Aoife; Phelan, James; Muldoon, Cian; Reynolds, John V.; O’Sullivan, Jacintha

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is increasingly the standard of care for locally advanced oesophageal cancer. A complete pathological response to CRT is associated with a favourable outcome. Radiation therapy is important for local tumour control, however, radioresistance remains a substantial clinical problem. We hypothesise that alterations in mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are involved in the radioresistance of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). To investigate this, we used an established isogenic cell line model of radioresistant OAC. Radioresistant cells (OE33 R) demonstrated significantly increased levels of random mitochondrial mutations, which were coupled with alterations in mitochondrial function, size, morphology and gene expression, supporting a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the radioresistance of this model. OE33 R cells also demonstrated altered bioenergetics, demonstrating significantly increased intracellular ATP levels, which was attributed to enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Radioresistant cells also demonstrated metabolic plasticity, efficiently switching between the glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation energy metabolism pathways, which were accompanied by enhanced clonogenic survival. This data was supported in vivo, in pre-treatment OAC tumour tissue. Tumour ATP5B expression, a marker of oxidative phosphorylation, was significantly increased in patients who subsequently had a poor pathological response to neoadjuvant CRT. This suggests for the first time, a role for specific mitochondrial alterations and metabolic remodelling in the radioresistance of OAC. PMID:24968221

  20. Altered mitochondrial function and energy metabolism is associated with a radioresistant phenotype in oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lynam-Lennon, Niamh; Maher, Stephen G; Maguire, Aoife; Phelan, James; Muldoon, Cian; Reynolds, John V; O'Sullivan, Jacintha

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is increasingly the standard of care for locally advanced oesophageal cancer. A complete pathological response to CRT is associated with a favourable outcome. Radiation therapy is important for local tumour control, however, radioresistance remains a substantial clinical problem. We hypothesise that alterations in mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are involved in the radioresistance of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). To investigate this, we used an established isogenic cell line model of radioresistant OAC. Radioresistant cells (OE33 R) demonstrated significantly increased levels of random mitochondrial mutations, which were coupled with alterations in mitochondrial function, size, morphology and gene expression, supporting a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the radioresistance of this model. OE33 R cells also demonstrated altered bioenergetics, demonstrating significantly increased intracellular ATP levels, which was attributed to enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Radioresistant cells also demonstrated metabolic plasticity, efficiently switching between the glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation energy metabolism pathways, which were accompanied by enhanced clonogenic survival. This data was supported in vivo, in pre-treatment OAC tumour tissue. Tumour ATP5B expression, a marker of oxidative phosphorylation, was significantly increased in patients who subsequently had a poor pathological response to neoadjuvant CRT. This suggests for the first time, a role for specific mitochondrial alterations and metabolic remodelling in the radioresistance of OAC.

  1. Altered mitochondrial gene expression in the nonchromosomal stripe 2 mutant of maize

    PubMed Central

    Feiler, Heidi S.; Newton, Kathleen J.

    1987-01-01

    The genetic and molecular analyses of higher plant mitochondria can be facilitated by studying maternally-inherited mutations, such as the nonchromosomal stripe (NCS) mutants of maize, that have deleterious effects on plant growth. We have previously demonstrated a correlation between specific alterations in mitochondrial DNA and the expression of NCS phenotypes. In the present studies, the effects of the NCS2 mutation on mitochondrial gene expression are evaluated. Proteins synthesized by mitochondria isolated from NCS2 mutants and from related plants with normal growth have been compared. NCS2 mitochondria synthesize much reduced amounts of a single polypeptide. Probes corresponding to the mitochondrial DNA region altered in NCS2 hybridize to an aberrant set of transcripts in NCS2 mitochondria. Transcripts homologous to several previously characterized plant mitochondrial genes are similar in NCS2 and related non-mutant mitochondria. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:16453769

  2. Rapeseed oil-rich diet alters in vitro menadione and nimesulide hepatic mitochondrial toxicity.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, João P; Silva, Ana M; Jurado, Amália S; Oliveira, Paulo J

    2013-10-01

    Diet-induced changes in the lipid composition of mitochondrial membranes have been shown to influence physiological processes. However, the modulation effect of diet on mitochondrially-active drugs has not yet received the deserved attention. Our hypothesis is that modulation of membrane dynamics by diet impacts drug-effects on liver mitochondrial functioning. In a previous work, we have shown that a diet rich in rapeseed oil altered mitochondrial membrane composition and bioenergetics in Wistar rats. In the present work, we investigated the influence of the modified diet on hepatic mitochondrial activity of two drugs, menadione and nimesulide, and FCCP, a classic protonophore, was used for comparison. The results showed that the effects of menadione and nimesulide were less severe on liver mitochondria for rats fed the modified diet than on rats fed the control diet. A specific effect on complex I seemed to be involved in drug-induced mitochondria dysfunction. Liver mitochondria from the modified diet group were more susceptible to nimesulide effects on MPT induction. The present work demonstrates that diet manipulation aimed at modifying mitochondrial membrane properties alters the toxicity of mitochondria active agents. This work highlights that diet may potentiate mitochondrial pharmacologic effects or increase drug-induced liabilities.

  3. Integrity of the yeast mitochondrial genome, but not its distribution and inheritance, relies on mitochondrial fission and fusion.

    PubMed

    Osman, Christof; Noriega, Thomas R; Okreglak, Voytek; Fung, Jennifer C; Walter, Peter

    2015-03-03

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for mitochondrial and cellular function. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mtDNA is organized in nucleoprotein structures termed nucleoids, which are distributed throughout the mitochondrial network and are faithfully inherited during the cell cycle. How the cell distributes and inherits mtDNA is incompletely understood although an involvement of mitochondrial fission and fusion has been suggested. We developed a LacO-LacI system to noninvasively image mtDNA dynamics in living cells. Using this system, we found that nucleoids are nonrandomly spaced within the mitochondrial network and observed the spatiotemporal events involved in mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, cells deficient in mitochondrial fusion and fission distributed and inherited mtDNA normally, pointing to alternative pathways involved in these processes. We identified such a mechanism, where we observed fission-independent, but F-actin-dependent, tip generation that was linked to the positioning of mtDNA to the newly generated tip. Although mitochondrial fusion and fission were dispensable for mtDNA distribution and inheritance, we show through a combination of genetics and next-generation sequencing that their absence leads to an accumulation of mitochondrial genomes harboring deleterious structural variations that cluster at the origins of mtDNA replication, thus revealing crucial roles for mitochondrial fusion and fission in maintaining the integrity of the mitochondrial genome.

  4. Integrity of the yeast mitochondrial genome, but not its distribution and inheritance, relies on mitochondrial fission and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Christof; Noriega, Thomas R.; Okreglak, Voytek; Fung, Jennifer C.; Walter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for mitochondrial and cellular function. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mtDNA is organized in nucleoprotein structures termed nucleoids, which are distributed throughout the mitochondrial network and are faithfully inherited during the cell cycle. How the cell distributes and inherits mtDNA is incompletely understood although an involvement of mitochondrial fission and fusion has been suggested. We developed a LacO-LacI system to noninvasively image mtDNA dynamics in living cells. Using this system, we found that nucleoids are nonrandomly spaced within the mitochondrial network and observed the spatiotemporal events involved in mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, cells deficient in mitochondrial fusion and fission distributed and inherited mtDNA normally, pointing to alternative pathways involved in these processes. We identified such a mechanism, where we observed fission-independent, but F-actin–dependent, tip generation that was linked to the positioning of mtDNA to the newly generated tip. Although mitochondrial fusion and fission were dispensable for mtDNA distribution and inheritance, we show through a combination of genetics and next-generation sequencing that their absence leads to an accumulation of mitochondrial genomes harboring deleterious structural variations that cluster at the origins of mtDNA replication, thus revealing crucial roles for mitochondrial fusion and fission in maintaining the integrity of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:25730886

  5. Targeting oxidative stress attenuates malonic acid induced Huntington like behavioral and mitochondrial alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2010-05-25

    Objective of the present study was to explore the possible role of oxidative stress in the malonic acid induced behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial alterations in rats. In the present study, unilateral single injections of malonic acid at different doses (1.5, 3 and 6 micromol) were made into the ipsilateral striatum in rats. Behavioral parameters were accessed on 1st, 7th and 14th day post malonic acid administration. Oxidative stress parameters and mitochondrial enzyme functions were assessed on day 14 after behavioral observations. Ipsilateral striatal malonic acid (3 and 6 micromol) administration significantly reduced body weight, locomotor activity, motor coordination and caused oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation, nitrite, superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione) in the striatum as compared to sham treated animal. Mitochondrial enzyme complexes and MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolinium bromide) activity were significantly inhibited by malonic acid. Vitamin E treatment (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly reversed the various behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial alterations in malonic acid treated animals. Our findings show that targeting oxidative stress by vitamin E in malonic acid model, results in amelioration of behavioral and mitochondrial alterations are linked to inhibition of oxidative damage. Based upon these finding present study hypothesize that protection exerted by vitamin E on behavioral, mitochondrial markers indicates the possible preservation of the functional status of the striatal neurons by targeting the deleterious actions of oxidative stress.

  6. Curcumin prevents cisplatin-induced renal alterations in mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamic.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Domínguez, Bibiana; Aparicio-Trejo, Omar Emiliano; García-Arroyo, Fernando E; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Tapia, Edilia; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Barrera-Oviedo, Diana; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2017-09-01

    Cisplatin is widely used as chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of diverse types of cancer, however, acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important side effect of this treatment. Diverse mechanisms have been involved in cisplatin-induced AKI, such as oxidative stress, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. On the other hand, curcumin is a polyphenol extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa L. Previous studies have shown that curcumin protects against the cisplatin-induced AKI; however, it is unknown whether curcumin can reduce alterations in mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamic in this model. It was found that curcumin prevents cisplatin-induced: (a) AKI and (b) alterations in the following mitochondrial parameters: bioenergetics, ultrastructure, hydrogen peroxide production and dynamic. In fact, curcumin prevented the increase of mitochondrial fission 1 protein (FIS1), the decrease of optic atrophy 1 protein (OPA1) and the decrease of NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase sirtuin-3 (SIRT3), a mitochondrial dynamic regulator as well as the increase in the mitophagy associated proteins parkin and phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN)-induced putative kinase protein 1 (PINK1). In conclusion, the protective effect of curcumin in cisplatin-induced AKI was associated with the prevention of the alterations in mitochondrial bioenergetics, ultrastructure, redox balance, dynamic, and SIRT3 levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. HIV alters neuronal mitochondrial fission/fusion in the brain during HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Fields, Jerel Adam; Serger, Elisabeth; Campos, Sofia; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Kim, Changyoun; Smith, Kendall; Trejo, Margarita; Adame, Anthony; Spencer, Brian; Rockenstein, Edward; Murphy, Anne N; Ellis, Ronald J; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-02-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) still occur in approximately 50% of HIV patients, and therapies to combat HAND progression are urgently needed. HIV proteins are released from infected cells and cause neuronal damage, possibly through mitochondrial abnormalities. Altered mitochondrial fission and fusion is implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we hypothesized that mitochondrial fission/fusion may be dysregulated in neurons during HAND. We have identified decreased mitochondrial fission protein (dynamin 1-like; DNM1L) in frontal cortex tissues of HAND donors, along with enlarged and elongated mitochondria localized to the soma of damaged neurons. Similar pathology was observed in the brains of GFAP-gp120 tg mice. In vitro, recombinant gp120 decreased total and active DNM1L levels, reduced the level of Mitotracker staining, and increased extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) in primary neurons. DNM1L knockdown enhanced the effects of gp120 as measured by reduced Mitotracker signal in the treated cells. Interestingly, overexpression of DNM1L increased the level of Mitotracker staining in primary rat neurons and reduced neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the GFAP-gp120-tg mice. These data suggest that mitochondrial biogenesis dynamics are shifted towards mitochondrial fusion in brains of HAND patients and this may be due to gp120-induced reduction in DNM1L activity. Promoting mitochondrial fission during HIV infection of the CNS may restore mitochondrial biogenesis and prevent neurodegeneration.

  8. HIV alters neuronal mitochondrial fission/fusion in the brain during HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Jerel Adam; Serger, Elisabeth; Campos, Sofia; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Kim, Changyoun; Smith, Kendall; Trejo, Margarita; Adame, Anthony; Spencer, Brian; Rockenstein, Edward; Murphy, Anne N.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor; Masliah, Eliezer

    2015-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) still occur in approximately 50% of HIV patients, and therapies to combat HAND progression are urgently needed. HIV proteins are released from infected cells and cause neuronal damage, possibly through mitochondrial abnormalities. Altered mitochondrial fission and fusion is implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we hypothesized that mitochondrial fission/fusion may be dysregulated in neurons during HAND. We have identified decreased mitochondrial fission protein (dynamin 1-like; DNM1L) in frontal cortex tissues of HAND donors, along with enlarged and elongated mitochondria localized to the soma of damaged neurons. Similar pathology was observed in the brains of GFAP-gp120 tg mice. In vitro, recombinant gp120 decreased total and active DNM1L levels, reduced the level of Mitotracker staining, and increased extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) in primary neurons. DNM1L knockdown enhanced the effects of gp120 as measured by reduced Mitotracker signal in the treated cells. Interestingly, overexpression of DNM1L increased the level of Mitotracker staining in primary rat neurons and reduced neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the GFAP-gp120-tg mice. These data suggest that mitochondrial biogenesis dynamics are shifted towards mitochondrial fusion in brains of HAND patients and this may be due to gp120-induced reduction in DNM1L activity. Promoting mitochondrial fission during HIV infection of the CNS may restore mitochondrial biogenesis and prevent neurodegeneration. PMID:26611103

  9. Omega-3 supplementation alters mitochondrial membrane composition and respiration kinetics in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Herbst, E A F; Paglialunga, S; Gerling, C; Whitfield, J; Mukai, K; Chabowski, A; Heigenhauser, G J F; Spriet, L L; Holloway, G P

    2014-03-15

    Studies have shown increased incorporation of omega-3 fatty acids into whole skeletal muscle following supplementation, although little has been done to investigate the potential impact on the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes and the functional consequences on mitochondrial bioenergetics. Therefore, we supplemented young healthy male subjects (n = 18) with fish oils [2 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 1 g docosahexanoic acid (DHA) per day] for 12 weeks and skeletal muscle biopsies were taken prior to (Pre) and following (Post) supplementation for the analysis of mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition and various assessments of mitochondrial bioenergetics. Total EPA and DHA content in mitochondrial membranes increased (P < 0.05) ∼450 and ∼320%, respectively, and displaced some omega-6 species in several phospholipid populations. Mitochondrial respiration, determined in permeabilized muscle fibres, demonstrated no change in maximal substrate-supported respiration, or in the sensitivity (apparent Km) and maximal capacity for pyruvate-supported respiration. In contrast, mitochondrial responses during ADP titrations demonstrated an enhanced ADP sensitivity (decreased apparent Km) that was independent of the creatine kinase shuttle. As the content of ANT1, ANT2, and subunits of the electron transport chain were unaltered by supplementation, these data suggest that prolonged omega-3 intake improves ADP kinetics in human skeletal muscle mitochondria through alterations in membrane structure and/or post-translational modification of ATP synthase and ANT isoforms. Omega-3 supplementation also increased the capacity for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species emission without altering the content of oxidative products, suggesting the absence of oxidative damage. The current data strongly emphasize a role for omega-3s in reorganizing the composition of mitochondrial membranes while promoting improvements in ADP sensitivity.

  10. Heterogeneous base distribution in mitochondrial DNA of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, P; Holtrop, M; Kroon, A

    1977-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA of Neurospora crassa has a heterogeneous intramolecular base distribution. A contiguous piece, representing at least 30% of the total genome, has a G+C content that is 6% lower than the overall G+C content of the DNA. The genes for both ribosomal RNAs are contained in the remaining, relatively G+C rich, part of the genome. PMID:141040

  11. Mitochondrial Morphogenesis, Distribution, and Parkinson Disease: Insights From PINK1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yufeng; Lu, Bingwei

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of Parkinson disease (PD) has been assumed to be a complex combination of environmental factors, intrinsic cellular metabolic properties, and susceptible genetic alleles. The primary obstacles to the development of a neuroprotective therapy in PD include uncertainties with regard to the precise cause(s) of neuronal dysfunction and what to target. The discoveries of Mendelian genes associated with inherited forms of PD in the last 10 years have revolutionized the understanding of the cellular pathways leading to neuronal dysfunction. Common themes of the pathogenesis of PD are beginning to emerge with mitochondrial dysfunction at the center stage. In this review, we summarize our knowledge of the pathogenesis of PD, revisit some aspects of mitochondrial biology, and discuss the insights from the study of Pink1, a familial PD-associated gene. We propose that mitochondrial morphogenesis and distribution might be a novel and potential common paradigm for PD and other neurodegenerative disease research and that modulation of such mitochondrial processes may prove to be a valuable therapeutic avenue for PD. PMID:19680148

  12. Mitochondrial morphogenesis, distribution, and Parkinson disease: insights from PINK1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yufeng; Lu, Bingwei

    2009-09-01

    The etiology of Parkinson disease (PD) has been assumed to be a complex combination of environmental factors, intrinsic cellular metabolic properties, and susceptible genetic alleles. The primary obstacles to the development of a neuroprotective therapy in PD include uncertainties with regard to the precise cause(s) of neuronal dysfunction and what to target. The discoveries of Mendelian genes associated with inherited forms of PD in the last 10 years have revolutionized the understanding of the cellular pathways leading to neuronal dysfunction. Common themes of the pathogenesis of PD are beginning to emerge with mitochondrial dysfunction at the center stage. In this review, we summarize our knowledge of the pathogenesis of PD, revisit some aspects of mitochondrial biology, and discuss the insights from the study of Pink1, a familial PD-associated gene. We propose that mitochondrial morphogenesis and distribution might be a novel and potential common paradigm for PD and other neurodegenerative disease research and that modulation of such mitochondrial processes may prove to be a valuable therapeutic avenue for PD.

  13. Mitochondrial bioenergetic alterations after focal traumatic brain injury in the immature brain☆

    PubMed Central

    Kilbaugh, Todd; Karlsson, Michael; Byro, Melissa; Bebee, Ashley; Ralston, Jill; Sullivan, Sarah; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Hansson, Magnus J.; Elmer, Eskil; Margulies, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death in children worldwide. Emerging evidence suggests that alterations in mitochondrial function are critical components of secondary injury cascade initiated by TBI that propogates neurodegeneration and limits neuroregeneration. Unfortunately, there is very little known about the cerebral mitochondrial bioenergetic response from the immature brain triggered by traumatic biomechanical forces. Therefore, the objective of this study was to perform a detailed evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics using high-resolution respirometry in a high-fidelity large animal model of focal controlled cortical impact injury (CCI) 24 h post-injury. This novel approach is directed at analyzing dysfunction in electron transport, ADP phosphorylation and leak respiration to provide insight into potential mechanisms and possible interventions for mitochondrial dysfunction in the immature brain in focal TBI by delineating targets within the electron transport system (ETS). Development and application of these methodologies have several advantages, and adds to the interpretation of previously reported techniques, by having the added benefit that any toxins or neurometabolites present in the ex-vivo samples are not removed during the mitochondrial is olation process, and simulates the in situ tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle by maximizing key substrates for convergent flow of electrons through both complexes I and II. To investigate alterations in mitochondrial function after CCI, ipsilateral tissue near the focal impact site and tissue from the corresponding contralateral side were examined. Respiration per mg of tissue was also related to citrate synthase activity (CS) and calculated flux control ratios (FCR), as an attempt to control for variability in mitochondrial content. Our biochemical analysis of complex interdependent pathways of electron flow through the electron transport system, by most measures, reveals a

  14. Mitochondrial bioenergetic alterations after focal traumatic brain injury in the immature brain.

    PubMed

    Kilbaugh, Todd J; Karlsson, Michael; Byro, Melissa; Bebee, Ashley; Ralston, Jill; Sullivan, Sarah; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Hansson, Magnus J; Elmér, Eskil; Margulies, Susan S

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death in children worldwide. Emerging evidence suggests that alterations in mitochondrial function are critical components of secondary injury cascade initiated by TBI that propogates neurodegeneration and limits neuroregeneration. Unfortunately, there is very little known about the cerebral mitochondrial bioenergetic response from the immature brain triggered by traumatic biomechanical forces. Therefore, the objective of this study was to perform a detailed evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics using high-resolution respirometry in a high-fidelity large animal model of focal controlled cortical impact injury (CCI) 24h post-injury. This novel approach is directed at analyzing dysfunction in electron transport, ADP phosphorylation and leak respiration to provide insight into potential mechanisms and possible interventions for mitochondrial dysfunction in the immature brain in focal TBI by delineating targets within the electron transport system (ETS). Development and application of these methodologies have several advantages, and adds to the interpretation of previously reported techniques, by having the added benefit that any toxins or neurometabolites present in the ex-vivo samples are not removed during the mitochondrial isolation process, and simulates the in situ tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle by maximizing key substrates for convergent flow of electrons through both complexes I and II. To investigate alterations in mitochondrial function after CCI, ipsilateral tissue near the focal impact site and tissue from the corresponding contralateral side were examined. Respiration per mg of tissue was also related to citrate synthase activity (CS) and calculated flux control ratios (FCR), as an attempt to control for variability in mitochondrial content. Our biochemical analysis of complex interdependent pathways of electron flow through the electron transport system, by most measures, reveals a bilateral

  15. IL-15Rα deficiency in skeletal muscle alters respiratory function and the proteome of mitochondrial subpopulations independent of changes to the mitochondrial genome

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Grant C.; Nichols, Cody; Guo, Ge; Croston, Tara L.; Thapa, Dharendra; Hollander, John M.; Pistilli, Emidio E.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-15 receptor alpha knockout (IL15RαKO) mice exhibit a greater skeletal muscle mitochondrial density with an altered mitochondrial morphology. However, the mechanism and functional impact of these changes have not been determined. In this study, we characterized the functional, proteomic, and genomic alterations in mitochondrial subpopulations isolated from the skeletal muscles of IL15RαKO mice and B6129 background control mice. State 3 respiration was greater in interfibrillar mitochondria and whole muscle ATP levels were greater in IL15RαKO mice supporting the increases in respiration rate. However, the state 3/state 4 ratio was lower, suggesting some degree of respiratory uncoupling. Proteomic analyses identified several markers independently in mitochondrial subpopulations that are associated with these functional alterations. Next Generation Sequencing of mtDNA revealed a high degree of similarity between the mitochondrial genomes of IL15RαKO mice and controls in terms of copy number, consensus coding and the presence of minor alleles, suggesting that the functional and proteomic alterations we observed occur independent of alterations to the mitochondrial genome. These data provide additional evidence to implicate IL-15Rα as a regulator of skeletal muscle phenotypes through effects on the mitochondrion, and suggest these effects are driven by alterations to the mitochondrial proteome. PMID:26458787

  16. IL-15Rα deficiency in skeletal muscle alters respiratory function and the proteome of mitochondrial subpopulations independent of changes to the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Grant C; Nichols, Cody; Guo, Ge; Croston, Tara L; Thapa, Dharendra; Hollander, John M; Pistilli, Emidio E

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin-15 receptor alpha knockout (IL15RαKO) mice exhibit a greater skeletal muscle mitochondrial density with an altered mitochondrial morphology. However, the mechanism and functional impact of these changes have not been determined. In this study, we characterized the functional, proteomic, and genomic alterations in mitochondrial subpopulations isolated from the skeletal muscles of IL15RαKO mice and B6129 background control mice. State 3 respiration was greater in interfibrillar mitochondria and whole muscle ATP levels were greater in IL15RαKO mice supporting the increases in respiration rate. However, the state 3/state 4 ratio was lower, suggesting some degree of respiratory uncoupling. Proteomic analyses identified several markers independently in mitochondrial subpopulations that are associated with these functional alterations. Next Generation Sequencing of mtDNA revealed a high degree of similarity between the mitochondrial genomes of IL15RαKO mice and controls in terms of copy number, consensus coding and the presence of minor alleles, suggesting that the functional and proteomic alterations we observed occurred independent of alterations to the mitochondrial genome. These data provide additional evidence to implicate IL-15Rα as a regulator of skeletal muscle phenotypes through effects on the mitochondrion, and suggest these effects are driven by alterations to the mitochondrial proteome.

  17. Hormone deprivation alters mitochondrial function and lipid profile in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zárate, Sandra; Astiz, Mariana; Magnani, Natalia; Imsen, Mercedes; Merino, Florencia; Álvarez, Silvia; Reinés, Analía; Seilicovich, Adriana

    2017-04-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common hallmark in aging. In the female, reproductive senescence is characterized by loss of ovarian hormones, many of whose neuroprotective effects converge upon mitochondria. The functional integrity of mitochondria is dependent on membrane fatty acid and phospholipid composition, which are also affected during aging. The effect of long-term ovarian hormone deprivation upon mitochondrial function and its putative association with changes in mitochondrial membrane lipid profile in the hippocampus, an area primarily affected during aging and highly responsive to ovarian hormones, is unknown. To this aim, Wistar adult female rats were ovariectomized or sham-operated. Twelve weeks later, different parameters of mitochondrial function (O2 uptake, ATP production, membrane potential and respiratory complex activities) as well as membrane phospholipid content and composition were evaluated in hippocampal mitochondria. Chronic ovariectomy reduced mitochondrial O2 uptake and ATP production rates and induced membrane depolarization during active respiration without altering the activity of respiratory complexes. Mitochondrial membrane lipid profile showed no changes in cholesterol levels but higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids and a higher peroxidizability index in mitochondria from ovariectomized rats. Interestingly, ovariectomy also reduced cardiolipin content and altered cardiolipin fatty acid profile leading to a lower peroxidizability index. In conclusion, chronic ovarian hormone deprivation induces mitochondrial dysfunction and changes in the mitochondrial membrane lipid profile comparable to an aging phenotype. Our study provides insights into ovarian hormone loss-induced early lipidomic changes with bioenergetic deficits in the hippocampus that may contribute to the increased risk of Alzheimer's disease and other age-associated disorders observed in postmenopause.

  18. Endotoxemia Engages the RhoA Kinase Pathway to Impair Cardiac Function By Altering Cytoskeleton, Mitochondrial Fission, and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Preau, Sebastien; Delguste, Florian; Yu, Yichi; Remy-Jouet, Isabelle; Richard, Vincent; Saulnier, Fabienne; Boulanger, Eric; Neviere, Remi

    2016-04-01

    The RhoA/ROCK pathway controls crucial biological processes involved in cardiovascular pathophysiology, such as cytoskeleton dynamics, vascular smooth muscle contraction, and inflammation. In this work, we tested whether Rho kinase inhibition would beneficially impact cardiac cytoskeleton organization, bioenergetics, and autophagy in experimental endotoxemia induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) in mice. Fasudil, a potent ROCK inhibitor, prevented LPS-induced cardiac inflammation, oxidative stress, cytoskeleton disarray, and mitochondrial injury. ROCK inhibition prevented phosphorylation of cofilin and dynamin-related protein-1, which promotes stabilization-polymerization of F-actin and mediates mitochondrial fission, respectively. Pyr1, which exclusively alters actin dynamics, prevented LPS-induced myocardial dysfunction, suggesting that beneficial impact of ROCK inhibition was not mainly related to pleiotropic effects of fasudil on cardiac inflammation and oxidative stress. Fasudil reduced mitochondrial fragmentation, stimulated initiation of autophagy, and elicited cardioprotection in LPS heart. Mdivi-1, a potent mitochondria fission inhibitor, converted cardioprotective autophagy to an inefficient form due to cargo loading failure in which autophagic vacuoles fail to trap cytosolic cargo, despite their formation at enhanced rates and lysosomal elimination. In experimental endotoxemia, cardioprotection by RhoA/ROCK inhibition may be related to changes in actin cytoskeleton reorganization and mitochondrial homeostasis. Improvement of LPS-induced mitochondrial dysfunction by fasudil was attributed to inhibition of ROCK-dependent Drp1 phosphorylation and activation of autophagic processes that can limit mitochondrial fragmentation and enhance degradation of damaged mitochondria, respectively. Fasudil prevented LPS-induced heart oxidative stress, abnormal F-actin distribution, and oxidative phosphorylation, which concur to improve cardiac contractile and

  19. In vivo mitochondrial inhibition alters corticostriatal synaptic function and the modulatory effects of neurotrophins.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, E; Miranda-Barrientos, J A; Vázquez-Roque, R A; Morales-Herrera, E; Ruelas, A; De la Rosa, G; Flores, G; Hernández-Echeagaray, E

    2014-11-07

    Experimental evidence has revealed the role of mitochondria in various aspects of neuronal physiology. Mitochondrial failure results in alterations that underlie the pathogeneses of many neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) has been used to model failure; for example, systemic administration of 3-NP imitates the striatal degeneration that is exhibited in the postmortem tissue of patients afflicted with HD. We have demonstrated that low, sub-chronic doses of 3-NP are sufficient to initiate the damage to striatal neurons that is associated with changes in neurotrophin expression levels. However, the mechanisms underlying the alterations in neuronal activity and neurotransmission due to 3-NP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction remain to be elucidated. In this paper, we focus on how corticostriatal transmission and its modulation by neurotrophins are altered in vivo after 5 days of mitochondrial inhibition with 3-NP. Recordings of population spikes and a paired pulse (PP) stimulation protocol were used to document changes in corticostriatal synapses in 3-NP-treated brain slices. The corticostriatal synapses were modulated by neurotrophins but displayed differential amplitude increases in the presence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), or neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4/5) under control conditions. Neurotrophin-mediated synaptic modulation was decreased in slices from 3-NP-treated mice. The protein and mRNA levels of neurotrophins and their receptors were also modified in the 3-NP-treated tissue. Neuronal structural evaluation demonstrated that synaptic length and density were reduced in the 3-NP-treated mice, which partially explained the changes in the amplitudes of the synaptic field responses. Our results demonstrate that corticostriatal synapses are differentially modulated by neurotrophins

  20. Altered brain energetics induces mitochondrial fission arrest in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Trushin, Sergey; Christensen, Trace A.; Bachmeier, Benjamin V.; Gateno, Benjamin; Schroeder, Andreas; Yao, Jia; Itoh, Kie; Sesaki, Hiromi; Poon, Wayne W.; Gylys, Karen H.; Patterson, Emily R.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Diaz Brinton, Roberta; Salisbury, Jeffrey L.; Trushina, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Altered brain metabolism is associated with progression of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Mitochondria respond to bioenergetic changes by continuous fission and fusion. To account for three dimensional architecture of the brain tissue and organelles, we applied 3-dimensional electron microscopy (3D EM) reconstruction to visualize mitochondrial structure in the brain tissue from patients and mouse models of AD. We identified a previously unknown mitochondrial fission arrest phenotype that results in elongated interconnected organelles, “mitochondria-on-a-string” (MOAS). Our data suggest that MOAS formation may occur at the final stages of fission process and was not associated with altered translocation of activated dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria but with reduced GTPase activity. Since MOAS formation was also observed in the brain tissue of wild-type mice in response to hypoxia or during chronological aging, fission arrest may represent fundamental compensatory adaptation to bioenergetic stress providing protection against mitophagy that may preserve residual mitochondrial function. The discovery of novel mitochondrial phenotype that occurs in the brain tissue in response to energetic stress accurately detected only using 3D EM reconstruction argues for a major role of mitochondrial dynamics in regulating neuronal survival. PMID:26729583

  1. Alterations of mitochondrial dynamics allow retrograde propagation of locally initiated axonal insults

    PubMed Central

    Lassus, Benjamin; Magifico, Sebastien; Pignon, Sandra; Belenguer, Pascale; Miquel, Marie-Christine; Peyrin, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    In chronic neurodegenerative syndromes, neurons progressively die through a generalized retraction pattern triggering retrograde axonal degeneration toward the cell bodies, which molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Recent observations suggest that direct activation of pro-apoptotic signaling in axons triggers local degenerative events associated with early alteration of axonal mitochondrial dynamics. This raises the question of the role of mitochondrial dynamics on both axonal vulnerability stress and their implication in the spreading of damages toward unchallenged parts of the neuron. Here, using microfluidic chambers, we assessed the consequences of interfering with OPA1 and DRP1 proteins on axonal degeneration induced by local application of rotenone. We found that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial fission prevented axonal damage induced by rotenone, in low glucose conditions. While alteration of mitochondrial dynamics per se did not lead to spontaneous axonal degeneration, it dramatically enhanced axonal vulnerability to rotenone, which had no effect in normal glucose conditions, and promoted retrograde spreading of axonal degeneration toward the cell body. Altogether, our results suggest a mitochondrial priming effect in axons as a key process of axonal degeneration. In the context of neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, mitochondria fragmentation could hasten neuronal death and initiate spatial dispersion of locally induced degenerative events. PMID:27604820

  2. Insights on altered mitochondrial function and dynamics in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, mitochondria are enriched to provide energy and calcium buffering required for synaptic transmission. Additionally, mitochondria localize to the synapse, where they are critical for the mobilization of reserve pool vesicles and for neurotransmitter release. Previously, functional defects in mitochondria were considered to be downstream effects of neurodegenerative diseases. However, more recent findings suggest mitochondria may serve as key mediators in the onset and progression of some types of neurodegeneration. In this review, we explore the possible roles of altered mitochondrial function and dynamics in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, with a particular focus on Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD), which have highlighted the important role of mitochondria in neurodegeneration. While inheritable diseases like Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A are concretely linked to gene mutations affecting mitochondrial function, the cause of mitochondrial dysfunction in primarily sporadic diseases such as AD and PD is less clear. Neuronal death in PD is associated with defects in mitochondrial function and dynamics arising from mutations in proteins affecting these processes, including α-synuclein, DJ-1, LRRK2, Parkin and Pink1. In the case of AD, however, the connection between mitochondria and the onset of neurodegeneration has been less clear. Recent findings, however, have implicated altered function of ER-mitochondria contact sites and amyloid beta- and/or tau-induced defects in mitochondrial function and dynamics in the pathogenesis of AD, suggesting that mitochondrial defects may act as key mediators in the pathogenesis of AD as well. With recent findings at hand, it may be postulated that defects in mitochondrial processes comprise key events in the onset of neurodegeneration. PMID:23711354

  3. Lost region in amyloid precursor protein (APP) through TALEN-mediated genome editing alters mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajie; Wu, Fengyi; Pan, Haining; Zheng, Wenzhong; Feng, Chi; Wang, Yunfu; Deng, Zixin; Wang, Lianrong; Luo, Jie; Chen, Shi

    2016-02-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the brain. Aβ plaques are produced through sequential β/γ cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP), of which there are three main APP isoforms: APP695, APP751 and APP770. KPI-APPs (APP751 and APP770) are known to be elevated in AD, but the reason remains unclear. Transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) induce mutations with high efficiency at specific genomic loci, and it is thus possible to knock out specific regions using TALENs. In this study, we designed and expressed TALENs specific for the C-terminus of APP in HeLa cells, in which KPI-APPs are predominantly expressed. The KPI-APP mutants lack a 12-aa region that encompasses a 5-aa trans-membrane (TM) region and 7-aa juxta-membrane (JM) region. The mutated KPI-APPs exhibited decreased mitochondrial localization. In addition, mitochondrial morphology was altered, resulting in an increase in spherical mitochondria in the mutant cells through the disruption of the balance between fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including decreased ATP levels, disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential, increased ROS generation and impaired mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, was also found. These results suggest that specific regions of KPI-APPs are important for mitochondrial localization and function.

  4. Maternal High Fat Diet Alters Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Catalytic Activity in Adult Male Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Pileggi, Chantal A.; Hedges, Christopher P.; Segovia, Stephanie A.; Markworth, James F.; Durainayagam, Brenan R.; Gray, Clint; Zhang, Xiaoyuan D.; Barnett, Matthew P. G.; Vickers, Mark H.; Hickey, Anthony J. R.; Reynolds, Clare M.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    A maternal high-fat (HF) diet during pregnancy can lead to metabolic compromise, such as insulin resistance in adult offspring. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction is one mechanism contributing to metabolic impairments in insulin resistant states. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether mitochondrial dysfunction is evident in metabolically compromised offspring born to HF-fed dams. Sprague-Dawley dams were randomly assigned to receive a purified control diet (CD; 10% kcal from fat) or a high fat diet (HFD; 45% kcal from fat) for 10 days prior to mating, throughout pregnancy and during lactation. From weaning, all male offspring received a standard chow diet and soleus muscle was collected at day 150. Expression of the mitochondrial transcription factors nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) were downregulated in HF offspring. Furthermore, genes encoding the mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) respiratory complex subunits were suppressed in HF offspring. Moreover, protein expression of the complex I subunit, NDUFB8, was downregulated in HF offspring (36%), which was paralleled by decreased maximal catalytic linked activity of complex I and III (40%). Together, these results indicate that exposure to a maternal HF diet during development may elicit lifelong mitochondrial alterations in offspring skeletal muscle. PMID:27917127

  5. Coenzyme Q10 ameliorates oxidative stress and prevents mitochondrial alteration in ischemic retinal injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongwook; Kim, Keun-Young; Shim, Myoung Sup; Kim, Sang Yeop; Ellisman, Mark H; Weinreb, Robert N; Ju, Won-Kyu

    2014-04-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) acts by scavenging reactive oxygen species for protecting neuronal cells against oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases. We tested whether a diet supplemented with CoQ10 ameliorates oxidative stress and mitochondrial alteration, as well as promotes retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival in ischemic retina induced by intraocular pressure elevation. A CoQ10 significantly promoted RGC survival at 2 weeks after ischemia. Superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression were significantly increased at 12 h after ischemic injury. In contrast, the CoQ10 significantly prevented the upregulation of SOD2 and HO-1 protein expression in ischemic retina. In addition, the CoQ10 significantly blocked activation of astroglial and microglial cells in ischemic retina. Interestingly, the CoQ10 blocked apoptosis by decreasing caspase-3 protein expression in ischemic retina. Bax and phosphorylated Bad (pBad) protein expression were significantly increased in ischemic retina at 12 h. Interestingly, while CoQ10 significantly decreased Bax protein expression in ischemic retina, CoQ10 showed greater increase of pBad protein expression. Of interest, ischemic injury significantly increased mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) protein expression in the retina at 12 h, however, CoQ10 significantly preserved Tfam protein expression in ischemic retina. Interestingly, there were no differences in mitochondrial DNA content among control- or CoQ10-treated groups. Our findings demonstrate that CoQ10 protects RGCs against oxidative stress by modulating the Bax/Bad-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as well as prevents mitochondrial alteration by preserving Tfam protein expression in ischemic retina. Our results suggest that CoQ10 may provide neuroprotection against oxidative stress-mediated mitochondrial alterations in ischemic retinal injury.

  6. Mitochondrial defects and neuromuscular degeneration caused by altered expression of Drosophila Gdap1: implications for the Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy.

    PubMed

    López Del Amo, Víctor; Seco-Cervera, Marta; García-Giménez, José Luís; Whitworth, Alexander J; Pallardó, Federico V; Galindo, Máximo Ibo

    2015-01-01

    One of the genes involved in Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, an inherited peripheral neuropathy, is GDAP1. In this work, we show that there is a true ortholog of this gene in Drosophila, which we have named Gdap1. By up- and down-regulation of Gdap1 in a tissue-specific manner, we show that altering its levels of expression produces changes in mitochondrial size, morphology and distribution, and neuronal and muscular degeneration. Interestingly, muscular degeneration is tissue-autonomous and not dependent on innervation. Metabolic analyses of our experimental genotypes suggest that alterations in oxidative stress are not a primary cause of the neuromuscular degeneration but a long-term consequence of the underlying mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the role of mitochondria in CMT disease and pave the way to generate clinically relevant disease models to study the relationship between mitochondrial dynamics and peripheral neurodegeneration.

  7. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation alterations in heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fillmore, N; Mori, J; Lopaschuk, G D

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. In many forms of heart disease, including heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathies, changes in cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolism contribute to contractile dysfunction and to a decrease in cardiac efficiency. Specific metabolic changes include a relative increase in cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates and an uncoupling of glycolysis from glucose oxidation. In heart failure, overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism can be impaired while, in ischaemic heart disease, energy production is impaired due to a limitation of oxygen supply. In both of these conditions, residual mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation dominates over mitochondrial glucose oxidation. In diabetes, the ratio of cardiac fatty acid oxidation to glucose oxidation also increases, although primarily due to an increase in fatty acid oxidation and an inhibition of glucose oxidation. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutically regulating cardiac energy metabolism by reducing fatty acid oxidation and/or increasing glucose oxidation can improve cardiac function of the ischaemic heart, the failing heart and in diabetic cardiomyopathies. In this article, we review the cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolic changes that occur in these forms of heart disease, what role alterations in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation have in contributing to cardiac dysfunction and the potential for targeting fatty acid oxidation to treat these forms of heart disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24147975

  8. Altered Glycolysis and Mitochondrial Respiration in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Maneesh G; Rowley, Shane; Fulton, Ruth; Dinday, Matthew T; Baraban, Scott C; Patel, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Altered metabolism is an important feature of many epileptic syndromes but has not been reported in Dravet syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy associated with mutations in a voltage-activated sodium channel, Nav1.1 (SCN1A). To address this, we developed novel methodology to assess real-time changes in bioenergetics in zebrafish larvae between 4 and 6 d postfertilization (dpf). Baseline and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) stimulated glycolytic flux and mitochondrial respiration were simultaneously assessed using a Seahorse Biosciences extracellular flux analyzer. Scn1Lab mutant zebrafish showed a decrease in baseline glycolytic rate and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) compared to controls. A ketogenic diet formulation rescued mutant zebrafish metabolism to control levels. Increasing neuronal excitability with 4-AP resulted in an immediate increase in glycolytic rates in wild-type zebrafish, whereas mitochondrial OCR increased slightly and quickly recovered to baseline values. In contrast, scn1Lab mutant zebrafish showed a significantly slower and exaggerated increase of both glycolytic rates and OCR after 4-AP. The underlying mechanism of decreased baseline OCR in scn1Lab mutants was not because of altered mitochondrial DNA content or dysfunction of enzymes in the electron transport chain or tricarboxylic acid cycle. Examination of glucose metabolism using a PCR array identified five glycolytic genes that were downregulated in scn1Lab mutant zebrafish. Our findings in scn1Lab mutant zebrafish suggest that glucose and mitochondrial hypometabolism contribute to the pathophysiology of DS.

  9. Administration of memantine and imipramine alters mitochondrial respiratory chain and creatine kinase activities in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Stringari, Roberto B; Rezin, Gislaine T; Fraga, Daiane B; Daufenbach, Juliana F; Scaini, Giselli; Benedet, Joana; Rochi, Natália; Streck, Emílio L; Quevedo, João

    2012-04-01

    Several studies have appointed for a role of glutamatergic system and/or mitochondrial function in major depression. In the present study, we evaluated the creatine kinase and mitochondrial respiratory chain activities after acute and chronic treatments with memantine (N-methyl-D: -aspartate receptor antagonist) and imipramine (tricyclic antidepressant) in rats. To this aim, rats were acutely or chronically treated for 14 days once a day with saline, memantine (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) and imipramine (10, 20 and 30 mg/kg). After acute or chronic treatments, we evaluated mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I, II, II-III and IV) and creatine kinase activities in prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Our results showed that both acute and chronic treatments with memantine or imipramine altered respiratory chain complexes and creatine kinase activities in rat brain; however, these alterations were different with relation to protocols (acute or chronic), complex, dose and brain area. Finally, these findings further support the hypothesis that the effects of imipramine and memantine could be involve mitochondrial function modulation.

  10. Altered Glycolysis and Mitochondrial Respiration in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome123

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Maneesh G.; Rowley, Shane; Fulton, Ruth; Dinday, Matthew T.; Baraban, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Altered metabolism is an important feature of many epileptic syndromes but has not been reported in Dravet syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy associated with mutations in a voltage-activated sodium channel, Nav1.1 (SCN1A). To address this, we developed novel methodology to assess real-time changes in bioenergetics in zebrafish larvae between 4 and 6 d postfertilization (dpf). Baseline and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) stimulated glycolytic flux and mitochondrial respiration were simultaneously assessed using a Seahorse Biosciences extracellular flux analyzer. Scn1Lab mutant zebrafish showed a decrease in baseline glycolytic rate and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) compared to controls. A ketogenic diet formulation rescued mutant zebrafish metabolism to control levels. Increasing neuronal excitability with 4-AP resulted in an immediate increase in glycolytic rates in wild-type zebrafish, whereas mitochondrial OCR increased slightly and quickly recovered to baseline values. In contrast, scn1Lab mutant zebrafish showed a significantly slower and exaggerated increase of both glycolytic rates and OCR after 4-AP. The underlying mechanism of decreased baseline OCR in scn1Lab mutants was not because of altered mitochondrial DNA content or dysfunction of enzymes in the electron transport chain or tricarboxylic acid cycle. Examination of glucose metabolism using a PCR array identified five glycolytic genes that were downregulated in scn1Lab mutant zebrafish. Our findings in scn1Lab mutant zebrafish suggest that glucose and mitochondrial hypometabolism contribute to the pathophysiology of DS. PMID:27066534

  11. Maternal diet-induced obesity alters mitochondrial activity and redox status in mouse oocytes and zygotes.

    PubMed

    Igosheva, Natalia; Abramov, Andrey Y; Poston, Lucilla; Eckert, Judith J; Fleming, Tom P; Duchen, Michael R; McConnell, Josie

    2010-04-09

    The negative impact of obesity on reproductive success is well documented but the stages at which development of the conceptus is compromised and the mechanisms responsible for the developmental failure still remain unclear. Recent findings suggest that mitochondria may be a contributing factor. However to date no studies have directly addressed the consequences of maternal obesity on mitochondria in early embryogenesis.Using an established murine model of maternal diet induced obesity and a live cell dynamic fluorescence imaging techniques coupled with molecular biology we have investigated the underlying mechanisms of obesity-induced reduced fertility. Our study is the first to show that maternal obesity prior to conception is associated with altered mitochondria in mouse oocytes and zygotes. Specifically, maternal diet-induced obesity in mice led to an increase in mitochondrial potential, mitochondrial DNA content and biogenesis. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was raised while glutathione was depleted and the redox state became more oxidised, suggestive of oxidative stress. These altered mitochondrial properties were associated with significant developmental impairment as shown by the increased number of obese mothers who failed to support blastocyst formation compared to lean dams. We propose that compromised oocyte and early embryo mitochondrial metabolism, resulting from excessive nutrient exposure prior to and during conception, may underlie poor reproductive outcomes frequently reported in obese women.

  12. Alteration of mitochondrial function in adult rat offspring of malnourished dams

    PubMed Central

    Reusens, Brigitte; Theys, Nicolas; Remacle, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Under-nutrition as well as over-nutrition during pregnancy has been associated with the development of adult diseases such as diabetes and obesity. Both epigenetic modifications and programming of the mitochondrial function have been recently proposed to explain how altered intrauterine metabolic environment may produce such a phenotype. This review aims to report data reported in several animal models of fetal malnutrition due to maternal low protein or low calorie diet, high fat diet as well as reduction in placental blood flow. We focus our overview on the β cell. We highlight that, notwithstanding early nutritional events, mitochondrial dysfunctions resulting from different alteration by diet or gender are programmed. This may explain the higher propensity to develop obesity and diabetes in later life. PMID:21954419

  13. Defective mitochondrial fusion, altered respiratory function, and distorted cristae structure in skin fibroblasts with heterozygous OPA1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Agier, Virginie; Oliviero, Patricia; Lainé, Jeanne; L'Hermitte-Stead, Caroline; Girard, Samantha; Fillaut, Sandrine; Jardel, Claude; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Bulteau, Anne Laure; Lombès, Anne

    2012-10-01

    Deleterious consequences of heterozygous OPA1 mutations responsible for autosomal dominant optic atrophy remain a matter of debate. Primary skin fibroblasts derived from patients have shown diverse mitochondrial alterations that were however difficult to resolve in a unifying scheme. To address the potential use of these cells as disease model, we undertook parallel and quantitative analyses of the diverse reported alterations in four fibroblast lines harboring different OPA1 mutations, nonsense or missense, in the guanosine triphosphatase or the C-terminal coiled-coil domains. We tackled several factors potentially underlying discordant reports and showed that fibroblasts with heterozygous OPA1 mutations present with several mitochondrial alterations. These included defective mitochondrial fusion during pharmacological challenge with the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone, significant mitochondrial elongation with decreased OPA1 and DRP1 proteins, and abnormal mitochondrial fragmentation during glycolysis shortage or exogenous oxidative stress. Respiratory complex IV activity and subunits steady-state were decreased without alteration of the mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid size, amount or transcription. Physical link between OPA1 protein and oxidative phosphorylation was shown by reciprocal immunoprecipitation. Altered cristae structure coexisted with normal response to pro-apoptotic stimuli and expression of Bax or Bcl2 proteins. Skin fibroblasts with heterozygous OPA1 mutations thus share significant mitochondrial remodeling, and may therefore be useful for analyzing disease pathophysiology. Identifying whether the observed alterations are also present in ganglion retinal cells, and which of them underlies their degeneration process remains however an essential goal for therapeutic strategy.

  14. Distribution Patterns of Postmortem Damage in Human Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Willerslev, Eske; Hansen, Anders J.; Barnes, Ian; Rudbeck, Lars; Lynnerup, Niels; Cooper, Alan

    2003-01-01

    The distribution of postmortem damage in mitochondrial DNA retrieved from 37 ancient human DNA samples was analyzed by cloning and was compared with a selection of published animal data. A relative rate of damage (ρv) was calculated for nucleotide positions within the human hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) and cytochrome oxidase subunit III genes. A comparison of damaged sites within and between the regions reveals that damage hotspots exist and that, in the HVR1, these correlate with sites known to have high in vivo mutation rates. Conversely, HVR1 subregions with known structural function, such as MT5, have lower in vivo mutation rates and lower postmortem-damage rates. The postmortem data also identify a possible functional subregion of the HVR1, termed “low-diversity 1,” through the lack of sequence damage. The amount of postmortem damage observed in mitochondrial coding regions was significantly lower than in the HVR1, and, although hotspots were noted, these did not correlate with codon position. Finally, a simple method for the identification of incorrect archaeological haplogroup designations is introduced, on the basis of the observed spectrum of postmortem damage. PMID:12489041

  15. Compartment-dependent mitochondrial alterations in experimental ALS, the effects of mitophagy and mitochondriogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Natale, Gianfranco; Lenzi, Paola; Lazzeri, Gloria; Falleni, Alessandra; Biagioni, Francesca; Ryskalin, Larisa; Fornai, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by massive loss of motor neurons. Data from ALS patients and experimental models indicate that mitochondria are severely damaged within dying or spared motor neurons. Nonetheless, recent data indicate that mitochondrial preservation, although preventing motor neuron loss, fails to prolong lifespan. On the other hand, the damage to motor axons plays a pivotal role in determining both lethality and disease course. Thus, in the present article each motor neuron compartment (cell body, central, and peripheral axons) of G93A SOD-1 mice was studied concerning mitochondrial alterations as well as other intracellular structures. We could confirm the occurrence of ALS-related mitochondrial damage encompassing total swelling, matrix dilution and cristae derangement along with non-pathological variations of mitochondrial size and number. However, these alterations occur to a different extent depending on motor neuron compartment. Lithium, a well-known autophagy inducer, prevents most pathological changes. However, the efficacy of lithium varies depending on which motor neuron compartment is considered. Remarkably, some effects of lithium are also evident in wild type mice. Lithium is effective also in vitro, both in cell lines and primary cell cultures from the ventral spinal cord. In these latter cells autophagy inhibition within motor neurons in vitro reproduced ALS pathology which was reversed by lithium. Muscle and glial cells were analyzed as well. Cell pathology was mostly severe within peripheral axons and muscles of ALS mice. Remarkably, when analyzing motor axons of ALS mice a subtotal clogging of axoplasm was described for the first time, which was modified under the effects of lithium. The effects induced by lithium depend on several mechanisms such as direct mitochondrial protection, induction of mitophagy and mitochondriogenesis. In this study, mitochondriogenesis induced by lithium was confirmed in situ by a

  16. Compartment-dependent mitochondrial alterations in experimental ALS, the effects of mitophagy and mitochondriogenesis.

    PubMed

    Natale, Gianfranco; Lenzi, Paola; Lazzeri, Gloria; Falleni, Alessandra; Biagioni, Francesca; Ryskalin, Larisa; Fornai, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by massive loss of motor neurons. Data from ALS patients and experimental models indicate that mitochondria are severely damaged within dying or spared motor neurons. Nonetheless, recent data indicate that mitochondrial preservation, although preventing motor neuron loss, fails to prolong lifespan. On the other hand, the damage to motor axons plays a pivotal role in determining both lethality and disease course. Thus, in the present article each motor neuron compartment (cell body, central, and peripheral axons) of G93A SOD-1 mice was studied concerning mitochondrial alterations as well as other intracellular structures. We could confirm the occurrence of ALS-related mitochondrial damage encompassing total swelling, matrix dilution and cristae derangement along with non-pathological variations of mitochondrial size and number. However, these alterations occur to a different extent depending on motor neuron compartment. Lithium, a well-known autophagy inducer, prevents most pathological changes. However, the efficacy of lithium varies depending on which motor neuron compartment is considered. Remarkably, some effects of lithium are also evident in wild type mice. Lithium is effective also in vitro, both in cell lines and primary cell cultures from the ventral spinal cord. In these latter cells autophagy inhibition within motor neurons in vitro reproduced ALS pathology which was reversed by lithium. Muscle and glial cells were analyzed as well. Cell pathology was mostly severe within peripheral axons and muscles of ALS mice. Remarkably, when analyzing motor axons of ALS mice a subtotal clogging of axoplasm was described for the first time, which was modified under the effects of lithium. The effects induced by lithium depend on several mechanisms such as direct mitochondrial protection, induction of mitophagy and mitochondriogenesis. In this study, mitochondriogenesis induced by lithium was confirmed in situ by a

  17. Does high-sucrose diet alter skeletal muscle and liver mitochondrial respiration?

    PubMed

    Lambert, K; Py, G; Robert, E; Mercier, J

    2003-09-01

    A diet high in sucrose or fructose progressively impairs glucose and lipid metabolism, which leads to insulin resistance. As mitochondria are the sites of the oxidation and utilization of these substrates, we hypothesized that a high sucrose diet would alter mitochondrial respiration. Male Wistar rats were fed high-sucrose (SU) or control (CTL) diet for one week; mitochondrial respiration was investigated in mitochondria isolated from liver and both glycolytic and oxidative muscles, with pyruvate and palmitate as substrates. To test for metabolic disturbances, we measured not only glycogen content in muscles and liver, but also lactate, glucose and triglyceride blood concentrations. After one week of high-sucrose intake, we found no change in blood concentration of these variables, but glycogen content was significantly increased in liver (17.28 +/- 2.98 mg/g tissue SU vs 6.47 +/- 1.67 mg/g tissue CTL), oxidative muscle (1.59 +/- 0.21 mg/g tissue SU vs 0.70 +/- 0.24 mg/g tissue CTL) though not in glycolytic muscle (1.72 +/- 0.44 mg/g tissue SU vs 1.52 +/- 0.20 mg/g tissue CTL). State 3 mitochondrial respiration was significantly decreased in SU rats compared with CTL (p < 0.05) with pyruvate, while no change was observed with palmitate. This study shows that 1-week of high-sucrose diet altered mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation in rats and suggests that, in the context of a high-sucrose diet, impaired mitochondrial respiration could contributed to the development of insulin resistance.

  18. Metaxin deficiency alters mitochondrial membrane permeability and leads to resistance to TNF-induced cell killing.

    PubMed

    Ono, Koh; Wang, Xiaofei; Kim, Sung Ouk; Armstrong, Lucas C; Bornstein, Paul; Han, Jiahuai

    2010-02-01

    Metaxin, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, is critical for TNF-induced cell death in L929 cells. Its deficiency, caused by retroviral insertion-mediated mutagenesis, renders L929 cells resistance to TNF killing. In this study, we further characterized metaxin deficiency-caused TNF resistance in parallel with Bcl-X(L) overexpression-mediated death resistance. We did not find obvious change in mitochondria membrane potential in metaxin-deficient (Met(mut)) and Bcl-X(L)-overexpressing cells, but we did find an increase in the release rate of the mitochondrial membrane potential probe rhodamine 123 (Rh123) that was preloaded into mitochondria. In addition, overexpression of a function-interfering mutant of metaxin (MetaΔTM/C) or Bcl-X(L) in MCF-7.3.28 cells also resulted in an acquired resistance to TNF killing and a faster rate of Rh123 release, indicating a close correlation between TNF resistance and higher rates of the dye release from the mitochondria. The release of Rh123 can be controlled by the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (PT) pore, as targeting an inner membrane component of the PT pore by cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibited Rh123 release. However, metaxin deficiency and Bcl-X(L) overexpression apparently affect Rh123 release from a site(s) different from that of CsA, as CsA can overcome their effect. Though both metaxin and Bcl-X(L) appear to function on the outer mitochondrial membrane, they do not interact with each other. They may use different mechanisms to increase the permeability of Rh123, since previous studies have suggested that metaxin may influence certain outer membrane porins while Bcl-X(L) may form pores on the outer membrane. The alteration of the mitochondrial outer membrane properties by metaxin deficiency and Bcl-X(L) overexpression, as indicated by a quicker Rh123 release, may be helpful in maintaining mitochondrial integrity.

  19. ATAD3 gene cluster deletions cause cerebellar dysfunction associated with altered mitochondrial DNA and cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Radha; Frazier, Ann E.; Durigon, Romina; Patel, Harshil; Jones, Aleck W.; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Lake, Nicole J.; Compton, Alison G.; Mountford, Hayley S.; Tucker, Elena J.; Mitchell, Alice L. R.; Jackson, Deborah; Sesay, Abdul; Di Re, Miriam; van den Heuvel, Lambert P.; Burke, Derek; Lunke, Sebastian; McGillivray, George; Mandelstam, Simone; Mochel, Fanny; Keren, Boris; Jardel, Claude; Turner, Anne M.; Ian Andrews, P.; Smeitink, Jan; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Heales, Simon J.; Kohda, Masakazu; Ohtake, Akira; Murayama, Kei; Okazaki, Yasushi; Lombès, Anne; Holt, Ian J.; Thorburn, David R.; Spinazzola, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Although mitochondrial disorders are clinically heterogeneous, they frequently involve the central nervous system and are among the most common neurogenetic disorders. Identifying the causal genes has benefited enormously from advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies; however, once the defect is known, researchers face the challenge of deciphering the underlying disease mechanism. Here we characterize large biallelic deletions in the region encoding the ATAD3C, ATAD3B and ATAD3A genes. Although high homology complicates genomic analysis of the ATAD3 defects, they can be identified by targeted analysis of standard single nucleotide polymorphism array and whole exome sequencing data. We report deletions that generate chimeric ATAD3B/ATAD3A fusion genes in individuals from four unrelated families with fatal congenital pontocerebellar hypoplasia, whereas a case with genomic rearrangements affecting the ATAD3C/ATAD3B genes on one allele and ATAD3B/ATAD3A genes on the other displays later-onset encephalopathy with cerebellar atrophy, ataxia and dystonia. Fibroblasts from affected individuals display mitochondrial DNA abnormalities, associated with multiple indicators of altered cholesterol metabolism. Moreover, drug-induced perturbations of cholesterol homeostasis cause mitochondrial DNA disorganization in control cells, while mitochondrial DNA aggregation in the genetic cholesterol trafficking disorder Niemann-Pick type C disease further corroborates the interdependence of mitochondrial DNA organization and cholesterol. These data demonstrate the integration of mitochondria in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, in which ATAD3 plays a critical role. The dual problem of perturbed cholesterol metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction could be widespread in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28549128

  20. Hyperglycemia-associated alterations in cellular signaling and dysregulated mitochondrial bioenergetics in human metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Challenger, Sean; Kream, Richard M

    2016-12-01

    The severity of untreated or refractory diabetes mellitus has been functionally linked to elevated concentrations of free plasma glucose, clinically defined as hyperglycemia. Operationally, the pathophysiological presentations of prolonged hyperglycemia may be categorized within insulin-dependent and insulin-independent, type 1 and type 2 diabetic phenotypes, respectively. Accordingly, major areas of empirical biomedical research have focused on the elucidation of underlying mechanisms driving key cellular signaling systems that are significantly altered in patients presenting with diabetes-associated chronic hyperglycemia. Presently, we provide a translationally oriented review of key studies evaluating the aberrant effects of hyperglycemia on two major signaling pathways linked to debilitating cellular and systemic effects via targeted disruption of mitochondrial bioenergetics: (1) advanced glycation end-products (AGEs)/and their cognate receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGEs), and (2) the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP). In preclinical models, cultured vascular endothelial cells exposed to hyperglycemic glucose concentrations were observed to produce enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) functionally linked to increased formation of AGEs and expression of their cognate RAGEs. Importantly, inhibitors of AGEs formation, mitochondrial complex II, or un-couplers of oxidative phosphorylation, were observed to significantly reduce the effects of hyperglycemia on ROS production and cellular damage, thereby establishing a critical linkage to multiple levels of mitochondrial functioning. Hyperglycemia-mediated enhancement of mitochondrial ROS/superoxide production in vascular endothelial cells has been functionally linked to the shunting of glucose into the HBP with resultant long-term activation of pro-inflammatory signaling processes. Additionally, exposure of cultured cells to hyperglycemic conditions resulted in enhanced HBP

  1. Size distributions of circular molecules in plant mitochondrial DNAs.

    PubMed

    Bailey-Serres, J; Leroy, P; Jones, S S; Wahleithner, J A; Wolstenholme, D R

    1987-01-01

    Some physicochemical properties of the mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNA) from plants of flax, broad bean and mung bean, and from tissue culture cells of jimson weed, soybean, petunia and tobacco were determined. Circular molecules were observed in electron microscope preparations of each mtDNA. In soybean, petunia, broad bean and mung bean mtDNAs, the circular molecules had a continuous distribution of lengths (ranges between 1 to 36 kb, and 1 to 126 kb), heavily skewed toward smaller molecules. Eighty-six percent of the flax circular molecules were from 27 to 54 kb in size, and 78% of the jimson weed circular molecules were from 4 to 15 kb. Replicative forms of 1.2-1.6 kb circular molecules were observed in electron microscope preparations of broad bean mtDNA.

  2. Differential inhibition/inactivation of mitochondrial complex I implicates its alteration in malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A; Bera, S; Ghosal, S; Ray, S; Basu, A; Ray, M

    2011-09-01

    Methylglyoxal strongly inhibited mitochondrial respiration of a wide variety of malignant tissues including sarcoma of mice, whereas no such significant effect was noted on mitochondrial respiration of normal tissues with the exception of cardiac cells. This inhibition by methylglyoxal was found to be at the level of mitochondrial complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) of the electron transport chain. L-Lactaldehyde, which is structurally and metabolically related to methylglyoxal, could protect against this inhibition. NADH dehydrogenase of submitochondrial particles of malignant and cardiac cells was inhibited by methylglyoxal. This enzyme of these cells was also inactivated by methylglyoxal. The possible involvement of lysine residue(s) for the activity of NADH dehydrogenase was also investigated by using lysine-specific reagents trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) and pyridoxal 5' phosphate (PP). Inactivation of NADH dehydrogenase by both TNBS and PP convincingly demonstrated the involvement of lysine residue(s) for the activity of the sarcoma and cardiac enzymes, whereas both TNBS and PP failed to inactivate the enzymes of skeletal muscle and liver. Together these studies demonstrate a specific effect of methylglyoxal on mitochondrial complex I of malignant cells and importantly some distinct alteration of this complex in cancer cells.

  3. Origin and Evolutionary Alteration of the Mitochondrial Import System in Eukaryotic Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Fukasawa, Yoshinori; Oda, Toshiyuki; Tomii, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Protein transport systems are fundamentally important for maintaining mitochondrial function. Nevertheless, mitochondrial protein translocases such as the kinetoplastid ATOM complex have recently been shown to vary in eukaryotic lineages. Various evolutionary hypotheses have been formulated to explain this diversity. To resolve any contradiction, estimating the primitive state and clarifying changes from that state are necessary. Here, we present more likely primitive models of mitochondrial translocases, specifically the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) complexes, using scrutinized phylogenetic profiles. We then analyzed the translocases’ evolution in eukaryotic lineages. Based on those results, we propose a novel evolutionary scenario for diversification of the mitochondrial transport system. Our results indicate that presequence transport machinery was mostly established in the last eukaryotic common ancestor, and that primitive translocases already had a pathway for transporting presequence-containing proteins. Moreover, secondary changes including convergent and migrational gains of a presequence receptor in TOM and TIM complexes, respectively, likely resulted from constrained evolution. The nature of a targeting signal can constrain alteration to the protein transport complex. PMID:28369657

  4. Postprandial heat production in skeletal muscle is associated with altered mitochondrial function and altered futile calcium cycling.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Scott D; Lee, Kevin; Andrews, Zane B; Bischof, Robert; Fahri, Fahri; Evans, Roger G; Clarke, Iain J; Henry, Belinda A

    2012-11-15

    This study aimed to determine whether postprandial temperature excursions in skeletal muscle are consistent with thermogenesis or altered blood flow. Temperature probes were implanted into the vastus lateralis muscle of ovariectomized ewes, and blood flow was assessed using laser-Doppler flowmetry (tissue flow) and transit-time ultrasound flowmetry (femoral artery flow). The animals were program-fed between 1100 and 1600, and temperature and blood flow were measured during intravenous administration of either isoprenaline or phenylephrine and during feeding and meal anticipation. In addition, muscle biopsies were collected prefeeding and postfeeding to measure uncoupling protein (UCP) expression and mitochondrial function, as well as indices of calcium cycling (ryanodine 1 receptor: RyR1 and sarcoendoplasmic calcium-dependent ATPases SERCA1/ SERCA2a). Isoprenaline increased femoral artery blood flow, whereas phenylephrine reduced blood flow. At high doses only, isoprenaline treatment increased heat production in muscle. Phenylephrine treatment did not alter muscle temperature. Meal anticipation was evoked in fasted animals (previously program-fed) that were housed beside animals that were fed. Increases in muscle temperature were elicited by feeding and meal anticipation, without changes in blood flow during either paradigm. Analyses of respiration in isolated mitochondria indicated that the postprandial increase in heat production was associated with an increase in state 4 respiration, without increased UCP1, UCP2, or UCP3 expression. Feeding increased the expression of RyR1 and SERCA2a. We conclude that excursions in muscle temperature may occur independent of blood flow, suggesting that postprandial heat production is driven by altered mitochondrial function and changes in calcium cycling.

  5. Alcohol alters hepatic FoxO1, p53, and mitochondrial SIRT5 deacetylation function

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, Charles S. Leo, Maria Anna; Wang, Xiaolei; DeCarli, Leonore M.

    2008-08-22

    Chronic alcohol consumption affects the gene expression of a NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirtuis 1 (SIRT1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} coactivator1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}). Our aim was to verify that it also alters the forkhead (FoxO1) and p53 transcription factor proteins, critical in the hepatic response to oxidative stress and regulated by SIRT1 through its deacetylating capacity. Accordingly, rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli alcohol-containing liquid diets for 28 days. Alcohol increased hepatic mRNA expression of FoxO1 (p = 0.003) and p53 (p = 0.001) while corresponding protein levels remained unchanged. However phospho-FoxO1 and phospho-Akt (protein kinase) were both decreased by alcohol consumption (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively) while hepatic p53 was found hyperacetylated (p = 0.017). Furthermore, mitochondrial SIRT5 was reduced (p = 0.0025), and PGC-1{alpha} hyperacetylated (p = 0.027), establishing their role in protein modification. Thus, alcohol consumption disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial interactions by post-translation protein modifications, which contribute to alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis through the newly discovered reduction of SIRT5.

  6. Alterations of mitochondrial DNA in common diseases and disease states: aging, neurodegeneration, heart failure, diabetes, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongchon; Hamasaki, Naotaka

    2005-01-01

    It has long been considered that mitochondrial DNA disease is a rare genetic disorder causing neuromyopathy. However, alterations of mitochondrial DNA recently have been recognized to play an important role in the pathogenesis of so-called common diseases such as heart failure, diabetes, and cancer. Although some of these alterations are inherited, more and more attention is being focused on the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations in somatic cells, particularly terminally differentiated cells such as cardiomyocytes and neurons that occurs with age. Mitochondrial DNA is more vulnerable to alteration than nuclear DNA, mainly for two reasons. First, mitochondria are a major source of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore mitochondrial DNA is under much stronger oxidative stress than is nuclear DNA. Second, mitochondria have a matrix-side negative membrane potential for oxidative phosphorylation. This membrane potential concentrates lipophilic cations inside mitochondria up to approximately 1,000-fold. Unfortunately, some therapeutic reagents are lipophilic cations, and such exogenously added chemicals are prone to damage mitochondria. AZT, an anti-HIV drug, causes mitochondrial myopathy as a side effect, which is a typical example of how chemotherapeutics adversely affect metabolism of mitochondrial DNA. In this review, we focus on ROS and chemical damage of mitochondrial DNA in common diseases.

  7. Structural and functional alterations in mitochondrial membrane in picrotoxin-induced epileptic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Munjal M; Katyare, Surendra S

    2005-03-01

    Mitochondrial function is a key determinant of both excitability and viability of neurons. Present studies were carried out to decipher cerebral mitochondrial oxidative energy metabolism and membrane function in the chronic condition of generalized seizures induced by picrotoxin (PTX) in rats. PTX-induced convulsions resulted in decreased respiration rates (14-41%) with glutamate, pyruvate + malate, and succinate as substrate. The ADP phosphorylation rates were drastically reduced by 44-65%. An opposite trend was observed with ascorbate + N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine [corrected] (TMPD) as substrate. In general, uncoupling of the mitochondrial electron transport was observed after PTX treatment. Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities were decreased by 20-80%; also, there was significant reduction in cytochrome b content after PTX treatment, while the F(o)F(1) ATPase (complex V) activity increased in basal and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP)-stimulated condition, indicating increased membrane fragility. The substrate kinetics analysis had shown that K(m) and V(max) of the higher affinity kinetic component of ATPase increased significantly by 1.2- to 1.4-fold in epileptic condition. Temperature kinetic analysis revealed 1.2-fold increase in energies of activation with decreased transition temperature. The total phospholipid (TPL) and cholesterol (CHL) contents decreased significantly with lowering of diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidylserine (PS), while lysophospholipid (lyso), sphingomyelin (SPM), and phosphatidylcholine components were found to be elevated. Brain mitochondrial membrane was somewhat more fluidized in epileptic animals. Possible consequences of mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) dysfunction are discussed. In conclusion, impairment of MRC function along with structural alterations suggests novel pathophysiological mechanisms important for

  8. Mitochondrial and Morphologic Alterations in Native Human Corneal Endothelial Cells Associated With Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, Benjamin T; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Skeie, Jessica M; Burckart, Kimberlee A; Schmidt, Gregory A; Reed, Cynthia R; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Kruse, Friedrich E; Greiner, Mark A

    2017-04-01

    To characterize changes in the energy-producing metabolic activity and morphologic ultrastructure of corneal endothelial cells associated with diabetes mellitus. Transplant suitable corneoscleral tissue was obtained from donors aged 50 to 75 years. We assayed 3-mm punches of endothelium-Descemet membrane for mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis activity using extracellular flux analysis of oxygen and pH, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy was used to assess qualitative and quantitative ultrastructural changes in corneal endothelial cells and associated Descemet membrane. For purposes of analysis, samples were divided into four groups based on a medical history of diabetes regardless of type: (1) nondiabetic, (2) noninsulin-dependent diabetic, (3) insulin-dependent diabetic, and (4) insulin-dependent diabetic with specified complications due to diabetes (advanced diabetic). In total, 229 corneas from 159 donors were analyzed. Insulin-dependent diabetic samples with complications due to diabetes displayed the lowest spare respiratory values compared to all other groups (P ≤ 0.002). The remaining mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis metrics did not differ significantly among groups. Compared to nondiabetic controls, the endothelium from advanced diabetic samples had alterations in mitochondrial morphology, pronounced Golgi bodies associated with abundant vesicles, accumulation of lysosomal bodies/autophagosomes, and focal production of abnormal long-spacing collagen. Extracellular flux analysis suggests that corneal endothelial cells of donors with advanced diabetes have impaired mitochondrial function. Metabolic findings are supported by observed differences in mitochondrial morphology of advanced diabetic samples but not controls. Additional studies are needed to determine the precise mechanism(s) by which mitochondria become impaired in diabetic corneal endothelial cells.

  9. Ebselen Alters Mitochondrial Physiology and Reduces Viability of Rat Hippocampal Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Santofimia-Castaño, Patricia; Salido, Ginés M.

    2013-01-01

    The seleno-organic compound and radical scavenger ebselen (2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one) have been extensively employed as an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective compound. However, its glutathione peroxidase activity at the expense of cellular thiols groups could underlie certain deleterious actions of the compound on cell physiology. In this study, we have analyzed the effect of ebselen on rat hippocampal astrocytes in culture. Cellular viability, the intracellular free-Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c), the mitochondrial free-Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]m), and mitochondrial membrane potential (ψm) were analyzed. The caspase-3 activity was also assayed. Our results show that cell viability was reduced by treatment of cells with ebselen, depending on the concentration employed. In the presence of ebselen, we observed an initial transient increase in [Ca2+]c that was then followed by a progressive increase to an elevated plateau. We also observed a transient increase in [Ca2+]m in the presence of ebselen that returned toward a value over the prestimulation level. The compound induced depolarization of ψm and altered the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane. Additionally, a disruption of the mitochondrial network was observed. Finally, we did not detect changes in caspase-3 activation in response to ebselen treatment. Collectively, these data support the likelihood of ebselen, depending on the concentration employed, reduces viability of rat hippocampal astrocytes via its action on the mitochondrial activity. These may be early effects that do not involve caspase-3 activation. We conclude that, depending on the concentration used, ebselen might exert deleterious actions on astrocyte physiology that could compromise cell function. PMID:23496767

  10. Deletion or overexpression of mitochondrial NAD+ carriers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae alters cellular NAD and ATP contents and affects mitochondrial metabolism and the rate of glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Agrimi, Gennaro; Brambilla, Luca; Frascotti, Gianni; Pisano, Isabella; Porro, Danilo; Vai, Marina; Palmieri, Luigi

    2011-04-01

    The modification of enzyme cofactor concentrations can be used as a method for both studying and engineering metabolism. We varied Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial NAD levels by altering expression of its specific mitochondrial carriers. Changes in mitochondrial NAD levels affected the overall cellular concentration of this coenzyme and the cellular metabolism. In batch culture, a strain with a severe NAD depletion in mitochondria succeeded in growing, albeit at a low rate, on fully respiratory media. Although the strain increased the efficiency of its oxidative phosphorylation, the ATP concentration was low. Under the same growth conditions, a strain with a mitochondrial NAD concentration higher than that of the wild type similarly displayed a low cellular ATP level, but its growth rate was not affected. In chemostat cultures, when cellular metabolism was fully respiratory, both mutants showed low biomass yields, indicative of impaired energetic efficiency. The two mutants increased their glycolytic fluxes, and as a consequence, the Crabtree effect was triggered at lower dilution rates. Strikingly, the mutants switched from a fully respiratory metabolism to a respirofermentative one at the same specific glucose flux as that of the wild type. This result seems to indicate that the specific glucose uptake rate and/or glycolytic flux should be considered one of the most important independent variables for establishing the long-term Crabtree effect. In cells growing under oxidative conditions, bioenergetic efficiency was affected by both low and high mitochondrial NAD availability, which suggests the existence of a critical mitochondrial NAD concentration in order to achieve optimal mitochondrial functionality.

  11. Genetic ablation of calcium-independent phospholipase A2gamma leads to alterations in mitochondrial lipid metabolism and function resulting in a deficient mitochondrial bioenergetic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, David J; Sims, Harold F; Han, Xianlin; Jenkins, Christopher M; Guan, Shao Ping; Yang, Kui; Moon, Sung Ho; Pietka, Terri; Abumrad, Nada A; Schlesinger, Paul H; Gross, Richard W

    2007-11-30

    Previously, we identified a novel calcium-independent phospholipase, designated calcium-independent phospholipase A(2) gamma (iPLA(2)gamma), which possesses dual mitochondrial and peroxisomal subcellular localization signals. To identify the roles of iPLA(2)gamma in cellular bioenergetics, we generated mice null for the iPLA(2)gamma gene by eliminating the active site of the enzyme through homologous recombination. Mice null for iPLA(2)gamma display multiple bioenergetic dysfunctional phenotypes, including 1) growth retardation, 2) cold intolerance, 3) reduced exercise endurance, 4) greatly increased mortality from cardiac stress after transverse aortic constriction, 5) abnormal mitochondrial function with a 65% decrease in ascorbate-induced Complex IV-mediated oxygen consumption, and 6) a reduction in myocardial cardiolipin content accompanied by an altered cardiolipin molecular species composition. We conclude that iPLA(2)gamma is essential for maintaining efficient bioenergetic mitochondrial function through tailoring mitochondrial membrane lipid metabolism and composition.

  12. Physical exercise improves brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics and alters apoptotic, dynamic and auto(mito)phagy markers.

    PubMed

    Marques-Aleixo, I; Santos-Alves, E; Balça, M M; Rizo-Roca, D; Moreira, P I; Oliveira, P J; Magalhães, J; Ascensão, A

    2015-08-20

    We here investigate the effects of two exercise modalities (endurance treadmill training-TM and voluntary free-wheel activity-FW) on the brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics, permeability transition pore (mPTP), oxidative stress, as well as on proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, apoptosis, and quality control. Eighteen male rats were assigned to sedentary-SED, TM and FW groups. Behavioral alterations and ex vivo brain mitochondrial function endpoints were assessed. Proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, including the adenine nucleotide translocator), oxidative stress markers and regulatory proteins (SIRT3, p66shc, UCP2, carbonyls, MDA, -SH, aconitase, Mn-SOD), as well as proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC1α, TFAM) were evaluated. Apoptotic signaling was measured through quantifying caspase 3, 8 and 9-like activities, Bax, Bcl2, CypD, and cofilin expression. Mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1/2, OPA1 and DRP1) and auto(mito)phagy (LC3II, Beclin1, Pink1, Parkin, p62)-related proteins were also measured by Western blotting. Only the TM exercise group showed increased spontaneous alternation and exploratory activity. Both exercise regimens improved mitochondrial respiratory activity, increased OXPHOS complexes I, III and V subunits in both brain subareas and decreased oxidative stress markers. Increased resistance to mPTP and decreased apoptotic signaling were observed in the brain cortex from TM and in the cerebellum from TM and FW groups. Also, exercise increased the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy and fusion, simultaneous with decreased expression of mitochondrial fission-related protein DRP1. In conclusion, physical exercise improves brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial function, decreasing oxidative stress and apoptotic related markers. It is also possible that favorable alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy signaling induced by exercise

  13. Loss of UCP2 Attenuates Mitochondrial Dysfunction without Altering ROS Production and Uncoupling Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kukat, Alexandra; Dogan, Sukru Anil; Edgar, Daniel; Mourier, Arnaud; Jacoby, Christoph; Maiti, Priyanka; Mauer, Jan; Becker, Christina; Senft, Katharina; Wibom, Rolf; Kudin, Alexei P.; Hultenby, Kjell; Flögel, Ulrich; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Ricquier, Daniel; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Trifunovic, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Although mitochondrial dysfunction is often accompanied by excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, we previously showed that an increase in random somatic mtDNA mutations does not result in increased oxidative stress. Normal levels of ROS and oxidative stress could also be a result of an active compensatory mechanism such as a mild increase in proton leak. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) was proposed to play such a role in many physiological situations. However, we show that upregulation of UCP2 in mtDNA mutator mice is not associated with altered proton leak kinetics or ROS production, challenging the current view on the role of UCP2 in energy metabolism. Instead, our results argue that high UCP2 levels allow better utilization of fatty acid oxidation resulting in a beneficial effect on mitochondrial function in heart, postponing systemic lactic acidosis and resulting in longer lifespan in these mice. This study proposes a novel mechanism for an adaptive response to mitochondrial cardiomyopathy that links changes in metabolism to amelioration of respiratory chain deficiency and longer lifespan. PMID:24945157

  14. Oxidative stress generated during monensin treatment contributes to altered Toxoplasma gondii mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Charvat, Robert A; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo

    2016-03-15

    The ionophore monensin displays potent activities against several coccidian parasites of veterinary and medical importance including the opportunistic pathogen of humans, Toxoplasma gondii. While monensin is used widely in animals, toxicity impedes its use in humans. Nonetheless, given its potency, understanding its mode of action would reveal vulnerable aspects of the parasite that can be exploited for drug development. We previously established that monensin induces Toxoplasma to undergo cell cycle arrest and an autophagy-like cell death. Interestingly, these effects are dependent on the mitochondrion-localized TgMSH-1 protein, suggesting that monensin disrupts mitochondrial function. We demonstrate that monensin treatment results in decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and altered morphology. These effects are mitigated by the antioxidant compound N-acetyl-cysteine suggesting that monensin causes an oxidative stress, which was indeed the case based on direct detection of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, over-expression of the antioxidant proteins glutaredoxin and peroxiredoxin 2 protect Toxoplasma from the deleterious effects of monensin. Thus, our studies show that the effects of monensin on Toxoplasma are due to a disruption of mitochondrial function caused by the induction of an oxidative stress and implicate parasite redox biology as a viable target for the development of drugs against Toxoplasma and related pathogenic parasites.

  15. Oxidative stress generated during monensin treatment contributes to altered Toxoplasma gondii mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Charvat, Robert A.; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The ionophore monensin displays potent activities against several coccidian parasites of veterinary and medical importance including the opportunistic pathogen of humans, Toxoplasma gondii. While monensin is used widely in animals, toxicity impedes its use in humans. Nonetheless, given its potency, understanding its mode of action would reveal vulnerable aspects of the parasite that can be exploited for drug development. We previously established that monensin induces Toxoplasma to undergo cell cycle arrest and an autophagy-like cell death. Interestingly, these effects are dependent on the mitochondrion-localized TgMSH-1 protein, suggesting that monensin disrupts mitochondrial function. We demonstrate that monensin treatment results in decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and altered morphology. These effects are mitigated by the antioxidant compound N-acetyl-cysteine suggesting that monensin causes an oxidative stress, which was indeed the case based on direct detection of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, over-expression of the antioxidant proteins glutaredoxin and peroxiredoxin 2 protect Toxoplasma from the deleterious effects of monensin. Thus, our studies show that the effects of monensin on Toxoplasma are due to a disruption of mitochondrial function caused by the induction of an oxidative stress and implicate parasite redox biology as a viable target for the development of drugs against Toxoplasma and related pathogenic parasites. PMID:26976749

  16. Spaceflight alters immune cell function and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Mandel, Adrian D.; Konstantinova, Irina V.; Berry, Wallace D.; Taylor, Gerald R.; Lesniak, A. T.; Fuchs, Boris B.; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments are described which were performed onboard Cosmos 2044 to determine spaceflight effects on immunologically important cell function and distribution. Results indicate that bone marrow cells from flown and suspended rats exhibited a decreased response to a granulocyte/monocyte colony-stimulating factor compared with the bone marrow cells from control rats. Bone marrow cells showed an increase in the percentage of cells expressing markers for helper T-cells in the myelogenous population and increased percentages of anti-asialo granulocyte/monocyte-1-bearing interleulin-2 receptor bearing pan T- and helper T-cells in the lymphocytic population.

  17. Altered Mitochondrial Respiration and Other Features of Mitochondrial Function in Parkin-Mutant Fibroblasts from Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Chrisna; van der Westhuizen, Francois; van Dyk, Hayley; van der Merwe, Lize; van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Carr, Jonathan; Kinnear, Craig; Bardien, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However, published results reporting on patient-derived parkin-mutant fibroblasts have been inconsistent. This study aimed to functionally compare parkin-mutant fibroblasts from PD patients with wild-type control fibroblasts using a variety of assays to gain a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. To this end, dermal fibroblasts were obtained from three PD patients with homozygous whole exon deletions in parkin and three unaffected controls. Assays of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial network integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell growth were performed as informative markers of mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, it was found that mitochondrial respiratory rates were markedly higher in the parkin-mutant fibroblasts compared to control fibroblasts (p = 0.0093), while exhibiting more fragmented mitochondrial networks (p = 0.0304). Moreover, cell growth of the parkin-mutant fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of controls (p = 0.0001). These unanticipated findings are suggestive of a compensatory mechanism to preserve mitochondrial function and quality control in the absence of parkin in fibroblasts, which warrants further investigation. PMID:27034887

  18. Geographic distributions and origins of human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) based on mitochondrial data.

    PubMed

    Light, Jessica E; Allen, Julie M; Long, Lauren M; Carter, Tamar E; Barrow, Lisa; Suren, Ganbold; Raoult, Didier; Reed, David L

    2008-12-01

    Human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) are subdivided into 3 deeply divergent mitochondrial clades (Clades A, B, and C), each having unique geographical distributions. Determining the evolutionary history and geographic distribution of these mitochondrial clades can elucidate the evolutionary history of the lice as well as their human hosts. Previous data suggest that lice belonging to mitochondrial Clade B may have originated in North America or Asia; however, geographic sampling and sample sizes have been limited. With newly collected lice, we calculate the relative frequency, geographic distribution, and genetic diversity of louse mitochondrial clades to determine the geographic origin of lice belonging to Clade B. In agreement with previous studies, genetic diversity data support a North American origin of Clade B lice. It is likely that lice belonging to this mitochondrial clade recently migrated to other geographic localities, e.g., Europe and Australia, and, if not already present, may disperse further to occupy all geographic regions.

  19. Rat liver mitochondrial membrane characteristics and mitochondrial functions are more profoundly altered by dietary lipid quantity than by dietary lipid quality: effect of different nutritional lipid patterns.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Manar; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Fouret, Gilles; Chabi, Béatrice; Crouzier, David; Ferreri, Carla; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal; Cristol, Jean Paul; Carbonneau, Marie-Annette; Coudray, Charles

    2012-03-01

    Dietary lipids are known to affect the composition of the biological membrane and functions that are involved in cell death and survival. The mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes are membrane protein complexes whose function depends on the composition and fluidity of the mitochondrial membrane lipid. The present study aimed at investigating the impact of different nutritional patterns of dietary lipids on liver mitochondrial functions. A total of forty-eight Wistar male rats were divided into six groups and fed for 12 weeks with a basal diet, lard diet or fish oil diet, containing either 50 or 300 g lipid/kg. The 30 % lipid intake increased liver NEFA, TAG and cholesterol levels, increased mitochondrial NEFA and TAG, and decreased phospholipid (PL) levels. SFA, PUFA and unsaturation index (UI) increased, whereas MUFA and trans-fatty acids (FA) decreased in the mitochondrial membrane PL in 30 % fat diet-fed rats compared with 5 % lipid diet-fed rats. PL UI increased with fish oil diet v. basal and lard-rich diets, and PL trans-FA increased with lard diet v. basal and fish oil diets. The 30 % lipid diet intake increased mitochondrial membrane potential, membrane fluidity, mitochondrial respiration and complex V activity, and decreased complex III and IV activities. With regard to lipid quality effects, β-oxidation decreased with the intake of basal or fish oil diets compared with that of the lard diet. The intake of a fish oil diet decreased complex III and IV activities compared with both the basal and lard diets. In conclusion, the characteristics and mitochondrial functions of the rat liver mitochondrial membrane are more profoundly altered by the quantity of dietary lipid than by its quality, which may have profound impacts on the pathogenesis and development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  20. Exercise mitigates mitochondrial permeability transition pore and quality control mechanisms alterations in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Inês O; Passos, Emanuel; Diogo, Cátia V; Rocha-Rodrigues, Sílvia; Santos-Alves, Estela; Oliveira, Paulo J; Ascensão, António; Magalhães, José

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial quality control and apoptosis have been described as key components in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH); exercise is recognized as a nonpharmacological strategy to counteract NASH-associated consequences. We aimed to analyze the effect of voluntary physical activity (VPA) and endurance training (ET) against NASH-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening and mitochondrial and cellular quality control deleterious alterations. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into standard-diet sedentary (SS, n = 16), standard-diet VPA (n = 8), high-fat diet sedentary (HS, n = 16), and high-fat diet VPA (n = 8). After 9 weeks of diet treatment, half of the SS and HS groups were engaged in an ET program for 8 weeks, 5 days/week, 1 h/day. Liver mPTP susceptibility through osmotic swelling, mPTP-related proteins (cyclophilin D, Sirtuin3, Cofilin-1), markers of mitochondrial biogenesis ((mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator protein (PGC-1α)), dynamics (Mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), Dynamin related protein 1, and Optic atrophy 1)), auto/mitophagy (Beclin-1, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3, p62, PINK1, and Parkin), and apoptotic signaling (Bax, Bcl-2) and caspases-like activities were assessed. HS animals showed an increased susceptibility to mPTP, compromised expression of Tfam, Mfn1, PINK1, and Parkin and an increase in Bax content (HS vs. SS). ET and VPA improved biogenesis-related proteins (PGC-1α) and autophagy signaling (Beclin-1 and Beclin-1/Bcl-2 ratio) and decreased apoptotic signaling (caspases 8 activity, Bax content, and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio). However, only ET decreased mPTP susceptibility and positively modulated Bcl-2, Tfam, Mfn1, Mfn2, PINK1, and Parkin content. In conclusion, exercise reduces the increased susceptibility to mPTP induced by NASH and promotes the increase of auto/mitophagy and mitochondrial

  1. Altered mitochondrial function after acute alteration of the endogenous insulin/glucagon ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Rohweder-Dunn, G.; Aprille, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    Mannoheptulose (MH) affects pancreatic Islet cells to cause a drop in serum insulin and a rise in glucagon. This effect peaks 1 hr after injection and results in a 3-fold increase in serum glucose. Here they examined whether metabolic functions of liver mitochondria (mito) are altered by this change in hormone status. Rats fed ad lib on 12 hr light/dark cycles were given MH (2g/kg) or vehicle i.p. during the first 2 hrs of the light cycle. Liver mito were isolated 1 hr later. Acid-extracts were assayed for ATP+ADP+AMP (nmol/mg prot). Citrulline synthesis and pyruvate carboxylation rates (nmol/min/mg prot) were assayed by following H(/sup 14/C)O/sub 3//sup -/ fixation in appropriate media. State 3 and 2,4-DNP-uncoupled respiratory rates (1/2 nmol O/sub 2//min/mg prot) were assayed polarographically with succinate. The effects of MH on mito are comparable to reported effects of glucagon injection. MH evokes acute reciprocal changes in insulin and glucagon that are highly reproducible. Thus, MH offers an interesting model for studying the effect of endogenous hormones on mito functions.

  2. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis distinctly alters mitochondrial and cytosolic redox poise

    PubMed Central

    Hanafin, William P; Beaudoin, Jessica N; Bica, Denisa E; DiLiberto, Stephen J; Kenis, Paul JA; Gaskins, H Rex

    2014-01-01

    The glutathione couple GSH/GSSG is the most abundant cellular redox buffer and is not at equilibrium among intracellular compartments. Perturbation of glutathione poise has been associated with tumorigenesis; however, due to analytical limitations, the underlying mechanisms behind this relationship are poorly understood. In this regard, we have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real-time glutathione redox potentials in the cytosol and mitochondrial matrix of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells. First, we demonstrated that recovery time in both compartments depended upon the length of exposure to oxidative challenge with diamide, a thiol-oxidizing agent. We then monitored changes in glutathione poise in cytosolic and mitochondrial matrices following inhibition of glutathione (GSH) synthesis with L-buthionine sulphoximine (BSO). The mitochondrial matrix showed higher oxidation in the BSO-treated cells indicating distinct compartmental alterations in redox poise. Finally, the contributory role of the p53 protein in supporting cytosolic redox poise was demonstrated. Inactivation of the p53 pathway by expression of a dominant-negative p53 protein sensitized the cytosol to oxidation in BSO-treated tumor cells. As a result, both compartments of PF161-T + 53DD cells were equally oxidized ≈20 mV by inhibition of GSH synthesis. Conversely, mitochondrial oxidation was independent of p53 status in GSH-deficient tumor cells. Taken together, these findings indicate different redox requirements for the glutathione thiol/disulfide redox couple within the cytosol and mitochondria of resting cells and reveal distinct regulation of their redox poise in response to inhibition of glutathione biosynthesis. PMID:24586100

  3. Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase lowers leaf respiration and alters photorespiration and plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tomaz, Tiago; Bagard, Matthieu; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Lindén, Pernilla; Lee, Chun Pong; Carroll, Adam J; Ströher, Elke; Smith, Steven M; Gardeström, Per; Millar, A Harvey

    2010-11-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes a reversible NAD(+)-dependent-dehydrogenase reaction involved in central metabolism and redox homeostasis between organelle compartments. To explore the role of mitochondrial MDH (mMDH) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), knockout single and double mutants for the highly expressed mMDH1 and lower expressed mMDH2 isoforms were constructed and analyzed. A mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has no detectable mMDH activity but is viable, albeit small and slow growing. Quantitative proteome analysis of mitochondria shows changes in other mitochondrial NAD-linked dehydrogenases, indicating a reorganization of such enzymes in the mitochondrial matrix. The slow-growing mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has elevated leaf respiration rate in the dark and light, without loss of photosynthetic capacity, suggesting that mMDH normally uses NADH to reduce oxaloacetate to malate, which is then exported to the cytosol, rather than to drive mitochondrial respiration. Increased respiratory rate in leaves can account in part for the low net CO(2) assimilation and slow growth rate of mmdh1mmdh2. Loss of mMDH also affects photorespiration, as evidenced by a lower postillumination burst, alterations in CO(2) assimilation/intercellular CO(2) curves at low CO(2), and the light-dependent elevated concentration of photorespiratory metabolites. Complementation of mmdh1mmdh2 with an mMDH cDNA recovered mMDH activity, suppressed respiratory rate, ameliorated changes to photorespiration, and increased plant growth. A previously established inverse correlation between mMDH and ascorbate content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has been consolidated in Arabidopsis and may potentially be linked to decreased galactonolactone dehydrogenase content in mitochondria in the mutant. Overall, a central yet complex role for mMDH emerges in the partitioning of carbon and energy in leaves, providing new directions for bioengineering of plant growth rate and a new insight into the molecular mechanisms

  4. Magnesium regulates neural stem cell proliferation in the mouse hippocampus by altering mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shanshan; Mou, Chengzhi; Ma, Yihe; Han, Ruijie; Li, Xue

    2016-04-01

    In the adult brain, neural stem cells from the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the cortex progress through the following five developmental stages: radial glia-like cells, neural progenitor cells, neuroblasts, immature neurons, and mature neurons. These developmental stages are linked to both neuronal microenvironments and energy metabolism. Neurogenesis is restricted and has been demonstrated to arise from tissue microenvironments. We determined that magnesium, a key nutrient in cellular energy metabolism, affects neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation in cells derived from the embryonic hippocampus by influencing mitochondrial function. Densities of proliferating cells and NSCs both showed their highest values at 0.8 mM [Mg(2+) ]o , whereas lower proliferation rates were observed at 0.4 and 1.4 mM [Mg(2+) ]o . The numbers and sizes of the neurospheres reached the maximum at 0.8 mM [Mg(2+) ]o and were weaker under both low (0.4 mM) and high (1.4 mM) concentrations of magnesium. In vitro experimental evidence demonstrates that extracellular magnesium regulates the number of cultured hippocampal NSCs, affecting both magnesium homeostasis and mitochondrial function. Our findings indicate that the effect of [Mg(2+) ]o on NSC proliferation may lie downstream of alterations in mitochondrial function because mitochondrial membrane potential was highest in the NSCs in the moderate [Mg(2+) ]o (0.8 mM) group and lower in both the low (0.4 mM) and high (1.4 mM) [Mg(2+) ]o groups. Overall, these findings demonstrate a new function for magnesium in the brain in the regulation of hippocampal neural stem cells: affecting their cellular energy metabolism. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  5. KH-TFMDI, a novel sirtuin inhibitor, alters the cytoskeleton and mitochondrial metabolism promoting cell death in Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Verçoza, Brunno Renato Farias; Godinho, Joseane Lima Prado; de Macedo-Silva, Sara Teixeira; Huber, Kilian; Bracher, Franz; de Souza, Wanderley; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes

    2017-07-06

    Treatment of leishmaniasis involves the use of antimonials, miltefosine, amphotericin B or pentamidine. However, the side effects of these drugs and the reports of drug-resistant parasites demonstrate the need for new treatments that are safer and more efficacious. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are a new class of compounds with potential to treat leishmaniasis. Herein, we evaluated the effects of KH-TFMDI, a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, on Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes. The IC50 values of this compound for promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes were 1.976 and 1.148 μM, respectively, after 72 h of treatment. Microscopic analyses revealed that promastigotes became elongated and thinner in response to KH-TFMDI, indicating changes in cytoskeleton organization. Immunofluorescence microscopy, western blotting and flow cytometry using an anti-acetylated tubulin antibody revealed an increase in the expression of acetylated tubulin. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy revealed several ultrastructural changes, such as (a) mitochondrial swelling, followed by the formation of many vesicles inside the matrix; (b) presence of lipid bodies randomly distributed through the cytoplasm; (c) abnormal chromatin condensation; and (d) formation of blebs on the plasma membrane. Physiological studies for mitochondrial function, flow cytometry with propidium iodide and TUNEL assay confirmed the alterations in the mitochondrial metabolism, cell cycle, and DNA fragmentation, respectively, which could result to cell death by mechanisms related to apoptosis-like. All these together indicate that histone deacetylases are promising targets for the development of new drugs to treat Leishmania, and KH-TFMDI is a promising drug candidate that should be tested in vivo.

  6. Dietary ω-3 Fatty Acids Alter Cardiac Mitochondrial Phospholipid Composition and Delay Ca2+-Induced Permeability Transition

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, Karen M.; Khairallah, Ramzi J.; Sparagna, Genevieve C.; Xu, Wenhong; Hecker, Peter A.; Robillard-Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine; Kristian, Tibor; Murphy, Robert C.; Fiskum, Gary; Stanley, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Consumption of ω-3 fatty acids from fish oil, specifically eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), decreases risk for heart failure and attenuates pathologic cardiac remodeling in response to pressure overload. Dietary supplementation with EPA+DHA may also impact cardiac mitochondrial function and energetics through alteration of membrane phospholipids. We assessed the role of EPA+DHA supplementation on left ventricular (LV) function, cardiac mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition, respiration, and sensitivity to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening in normal and infarcted myocardium. Rats were subjected to sham surgery or myocardial infarction by coronary artery ligation (n=10–14), and fed a standard diet, or supplemented with EPA+DHA (2.3% of energy intake) for 12 weeks. EPA+DHA altered fatty acid composition of total mitochondrial phospholipids and cardiolipin by reducing arachidonic acid content and increasing DHA incorporation. EPA+DHA significantly increased calcium uptake capacity in both subsarcolemmal and intrafibrillar mitochondria from sham rats. This treatment effect persisted with the addition of cyclosporin A, and was not accompanied by changes in mitochondrial respiration or coupling, or cyclophilin D protein expression. Myocardial infarction resulted in heart failure as evidenced by LV dilation and contractile dysfunction. Infarcted LV myocardium had decreased mitochondrial protein yield and activity of mitochondrial marker enzymes, however respiratory function of isolated mitochondria was normal. EPA+DHA had no effect on LV function, mitochondrial respiration, or MPTP opening in rats with heart failure. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with EPA+DHA altered mitochondrial membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition in normal and infarcted hearts, but delayed MPTP opening only in normal hearts. PMID:19703463

  7. Mitochondrial gene polymorphisms alter hepatic cellular energy metabolism and aggravate diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Torsten; Kucharczyk, David; Bär, Florian; Pagel, René; Derer, Stefanie; Jendrek, Sebastian Torben; Sünderhauf, Annika; Brethack, Ann-Kathrin; Hirose, Misa; Möller, Steffen; Künstner, Axel; Bischof, Julia; Weyers, Imke; Heeren, Jörg; Koczan, Dirk; Schmid, Sebastian Michael; Divanovic, Senad; Giles, Daniel Aaron; Adamski, Jerzy; Fellermann, Klaus; Lehnert, Hendrik; Köhl, Jörg; Ibrahim, Saleh; Sina, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease and is associated with an enhanced risk for liver and cardiovascular diseases and mortality. NAFLD can progress from simple hepatic steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). However, the mechanisms predisposing to this progression remain undefined. Notably, hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction is a common finding in patients with NASH. Due to a lack of appropriate experimental animal models, it has not been evaluated whether this mitochondrial dysfunction plays a causative role for the development of NASH. To determine the effect of a well-defined mitochondrial dysfunction on liver physiology at baseline and during dietary challenge, C57BL/6J-mt(FVB/N) mice were employed. This conplastic inbred strain has been previously reported to exhibit decreased mitochondrial respiration likely linked to a non-synonymous gene variation (nt7778 G/T) of the mitochondrial ATP synthase protein 8 (mt-ATP8). At baseline conditions, C57BL/6J-mt(FVB/N) mice displayed hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by decreased ATP production and increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, genes affecting lipid metabolism were differentially expressed, hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol levels were changed in these animals, and various acyl-carnitines were altered, pointing towards an impaired mitochondrial carnitine shuttle. However, over a period of twelve months, no spontaneous hepatic steatosis or inflammation was observed. On the other hand, upon dietary challenge with either a methionine and choline deficient diet or a western-style diet, C57BL/6J-mt(FVB/N) mice developed aggravated steatohepatitis as characterized by lipid accumulation, ballooning of hepatocytes and infiltration of immune cells. We observed distinct metabolic alterations in mice with a mitochondrial polymorphism associated hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction. However, a second hit, such as dietary stress

  8. Wide Distribution of Mitochondrial Genome Rearrangements in Wild Strains of the Cultivated Basidiomycete Agrocybe aegerita

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, G.; Blesa, S.; Labarere, J.

    1995-01-01

    We used restriction fragment length polymorphisms to examine mitochondrial genome rearrangements in 36 wild strains of the cultivated basidiomycete Agrocybe aegerita, collected from widely distributed locations in Europe. We identified two polymorphic regions within the mitochondrial DNA which varied independently: one carrying the Cox II coding sequence and the other carrying the Cox I, ATP6, and ATP8 coding sequences. Two types of mutations were responsible for the restriction fragment length polymorphisms that we observed and, accordingly, were involved in the A. aegerita mitochondrial genome evolution: (i) point mutations, which resulted in strain-specific mitochondrial markers, and (ii) length mutations due to genome rearrangements, such as deletions, insertions, or duplications. Within each polymorphic region, the length differences defined only two mitochondrial types, suggesting that these length mutations were not randomly generated but resulted from a precise rearrangement mechanism. For each of the two polymorphic regions, the two molecular types were distributed among the 36 strains without obvious correlation with their geographic origin. On the basis of these two polymorphisms, it is possible to define four mitochondrial haplotypes. The four mitochondrial haplotypes could be the result of intermolecular recombination between allelic forms present in the population long enough to reach linkage equilibrium. All of the 36 dikaryotic strains contained only a single mitochondrial type, confirming the previously described mitochondrial sorting out after cytoplasmic mixing in basidiomycetes. PMID:16534984

  9. Altered carnitine homeostasis is associated with decreased mitochondrial function and altered nitric oxide signaling in lambs with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Sud, Neetu; Wiseman, Dean A.; Carter, A. Lee; Kumar, Sanjiv; Hou, Yali; Rau, Thomas; Wilham, Jason; Harmon, Cynthia; Oishi, Peter; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Utilizing aortopulmonary vascular graft placement in the fetal lamb, we have developed a model (shunt) of pulmonary hypertension that mimics congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow. Our previous studies have identified a progressive development of endothelial dysfunction in shunt lambs that is dependent, at least in part, on decreased nitric oxide (NO) signaling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible role of a disruption in carnitine metabolism in shunt lambs and to determine the effect on NO signaling. Our data indicate that at 2 wk of age, shunt lambs have significantly reduced expression (P < 0.05) of the key enzymes in carnitine metabolism: carnitine palmitoyltransferases 1 and 2 as well as carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT). In addition, we found that CrAT activity was inhibited due to increased nitration. Furthermore, free carnitine levels were significantly decreased whereas acylcarnitine levels were significantly higher in shunt lambs (P < 0.05). We also found that alterations in carnitine metabolism resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, since shunt lambs had significantly decreased pyruvate, increased lactate, and a reduced pyruvate/lactate ratio. In pulmonary arterial endothelial cells cultured from juvenile lambs, we found that mild uncoupling of the mitochondria led to a decrease in cellular ATP levels and a reduction in both endothelial NO synthase-heat shock protein 90 (eNOS-HSP90) interactions and NO signaling. Similarly, in shunt lambs we found a loss of eNOS-HSP90 interactions that correlated with a progressive decrease in NO signaling. Our data suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a role in the development of endothelial dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension and increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:18024721

  10. Down-regulation of OPA1 alters mouse mitochondrial morphology, PTP function, and cardiac adaptation to pressure overload

    PubMed Central

    Piquereau, Jerome; Caffin, Fanny; Novotova, Marta; Prola, Alexandre; Garnier, Anne; Mateo, Philippe; Fortin, Dominique; Huynh, Le Ha; Nicolas, Valérie; Alavi, Marcel V.; Brenner, Catherine; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Veksler, Vladimir; Joubert, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Aims The optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) protein is an essential protein involved in the fusion of the mitochondrial inner membrane. Despite its high level of expression, the role of OPA1 in the heart is largely unknown. We investigated the role of this protein in Opa1+/− mice, having a 50% reduction in OPA1 protein expression in cardiac tissue. Methods and Results In mutant mice, cardiac function assessed by echocardiography was not significantly different from that of the Opa1+/+. Electron and fluorescence microscopy revealed altered morphology of the Opa1+/− mitochondrial network; unexpectedly, mitochondria were larger with the presence of clusters of fused mitochondria and altered cristae. In permeabilized mutant ventricular fibers, mitochondrial functional properties were maintained, but direct energy channeling between mitochondria and myofilaments was weakened. Importantly, the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) opening in isolated permeabilized cardiomyocytes and in isolated mitochondria was significantly less sensitive to mitochondrial calcium accumulation. Finally, 6 weeks after transversal aortic constriction (TAC), Opa1+/− hearts demonstrated hypertrophy almost two-fold higher (p<0.01) than in wild type mice with altered ejection fraction (decrease of 43% versus 22% in Opa1+/+ mice, p<0.05). Conclusions These results suggest that, in adult cardiomyocytes, OPA1 plays an important role in mitochondrial morphology and PTP functioning. These properties may be critical for cardiac function under conditions of chronic pressure overload. PMID:22406748

  11. Physical activity prevents alterations in mitochondrial ultrastructure and glucometabolic parameters in a high-sugar diet model.

    PubMed

    Barbosa de Queiroz, Karina; Honorato-Sampaio, Kinulpe; Rossoni Júnior, Joamyr Victor; Andrade Leal, Diego; Pinto, Angélica Barbosa G; Kappes-Becker, Lenice; Evangelista, Elisio Alberto; Guerra-Sá, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Endurance exercise is a remarkable intervention for the treatment of many diseases. Mitochondrial changes on skeletal muscle are likely important for many of the benefits provided by exercise. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects that a regular physical activity (swimming without workload) has on mitochondrial morphological alterations and glucometabolic parameters induced by a high-sugar diet (HSD). Weaned male Wistar rats fed with a standard diet or a HSD (68% carbohydrate) were subjected to 60 minutes of regular physical activity by swimming (without workload) for four- (20 sessions) or eight-week (40 sessions) periods. After training, animals were euthanized and the sera, adipose tissues, and skeletal muscles were collected for further analysis. The HSD increased body weight after an 8-week period; it also increased the fat pads and the adipose index, resulting in glucose intolerance and insulin resistance (IR). Transmission electron microscopy showed an increase in alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure in the gastrocnemius muscle, as well as a decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and an increase in protein carbonylation. Regular physical activity partially reverted these alterations in rats fed a HSD, preventing mitochondrial morphological alterations and IR. Moreover, we observed a decrease in Pgc1α expression (qPCR analysis) in STD-EXE group and a less pronounced reduction in HSD-EXE group after an 8-week period. Thus, regular physical activity (swimming without workload) in rats fed a HSD can prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and IR, highlighting the crucial role for physical activity on metabolic homeostasis.

  12. Proteomic alterations of distinct mitochondrial subpopulations in the type 1 diabetic heart: contribution of protein import dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Baseler, Walter A.; Dabkowski, Erinne R.; Williamson, Courtney L.; Croston, Tara L.; Thapa, Dharendra; Powell, Matthew J.; Razunguzwa, Trust T.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is associated with increased risk of heart failure in type 1 diabetic patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction is suggested as an underlying contributor to diabetic cardiomyopathy. Cardiac mitochondria are characterized by subcellular spatial locale, including mitochondria located beneath the sarcolemma, subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM), and mitochondria situated between the myofibrils, interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM). The goal of this study was to determine whether type 1 diabetic insult in the heart influences proteomic make-up of spatially distinct mitochondrial subpopulations and to evaluate the role of nuclear encoded mitochondrial protein import. Utilizing multiple proteomic approaches (iTRAQ and two-dimensional-differential in-gel electrophoresis), IFM proteomic make-up was impacted by type 1 diabetes mellitus to a greater extent than SSM, as evidenced by decreased abundance of fatty acid oxidation and electron transport chain proteins. Mitochondrial phosphate carrier and adenine nucleotide translocator, as well as inner membrane translocases, were decreased in the diabetic IFM (P < 0.05 for both). Mitofilin, a protein involved in cristae morphology, was diminished in the diabetic IFM (P < 0.05). Posttranslational modifications, including oxidations and deamidations, were most prevalent in the diabetic IFM. Mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 (mtHsp70) was significantly decreased in diabetic IFM (P < 0.05). Mitochondrial protein import was decreased in the diabetic IFM with no change in the diabetic SSM (P < 0.05). Taken together, these results indicate that mitochondrial proteomic alterations in the type 1 diabetic heart are more pronounced in the IFM. Further, proteomic alterations are associated with nuclear encoded mitochondrial protein import dysfunction and loss of an essential mitochondrial protein import constituent, mtHsp70, implicating this process in the pathogenesis of the diabetic heart. PMID:21048079

  13. Kalpaamruthaa ameliorates mitochondrial and metabolic alterations in diabetes mellitus induced cardiovascular damage.

    PubMed

    Latha, Raja; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanadham

    2014-12-01

    Efficacy of Kalpaamruthaa on the activities of lipid and carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, electron transport chain complexes and mitochondrial ATPases were studied in heart and liver of experimental rats. Cardiovascular damage (CVD) was developed in 8 weeks after type 2 diabetes mellitus induction with high fat diet (2 weeks) and low dose of streptozotocin (2 × 35 mg/kg b.w. i.p. in 24 hr interval). In CVD-induced rats, the activities of total lipase, cholesterol ester hydrolase and cholesterol ester synthetase were increased, while lipoprotein lipase and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activities were decreased. The activities of lipid-metabolizing enzymes were altered by Kalpaamruthaa in CVD-induced rats towards normal. Kalpaamruthaa modulated the activities of glycolytic enzymes (hexokinase, phosphogluco-isomerase, aldolase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), gluconeogenic enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase) and glycogenolytic enzyme (glycogen phosphorylase) along with increased glycogen content in the liver of CVD-induced rats. The activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, Complexes and ATPases (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase) were decreased in CVD-induced rats, which were ameliorated by the treatment with Kalpaamruthaa. This study ascertained the efficacy of Kalpaamruthaa for the treatment of CVD in diabetes through the modulation of metabolizing enzymes and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  14. Isolation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants with altered mitochondrial respiration by chlorophyll fluorescence measurement.

    PubMed

    Massoz, Simon; Larosa, Véronique; Horrion, Bastien; Matagne, René F; Remacle, Claire; Cardol, Pierre

    2015-12-10

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism for studying energetic metabolism. Most mitochondrial respiratory-deficient mutants characterized to date have been isolated on the basis of their reduced ability to grow in heterotrophic conditions. Mitochondrial deficiencies are usually partly compensated by adjustment of photosynthetic activity and more particularly by transition to state 2. In this work, we explored the opportunity to select mutants impaired in respiration and/or altered in dark metabolism by measuring maximum photosynthetic efficiency by chlorophyll fluorescence analyses (FV/FM). Out of about 2900 hygromycin-resistant insertional mutants generated from wild type or from a mutant strain deficient in state transitions (stt7 strain), 22 were found to grow slowly in heterotrophic conditions and 8 of them also showed a lower FV/FM value. Several disrupted coding sequences were identified, including genes coding for three different subunits of respiratory-chain complex I (NUO9, NUOA9, NUOP4) or for isocitrate lyase (ICL1). Overall, the comparison of respiratory mutants obtained in wild-type or stt7 genetic backgrounds indicated that the FV/FM value can be used to isolate mutants severely impaired in dark metabolism.

  15. Alteration of Fatty-Acid-Metabolizing Enzymes Affects Mitochondrial Form and Function in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Christelle; Nawara, Magdalena; Salih, Mustafa A.M.; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Zaki, Maha S.; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Schule, Rebecca; Mignot, Cyril; Obre, Emilie; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Durand, Christelle M.; Oteyza, Andrés Caballero; El-Hachimi, Khalid H.; Al Drees, Abdulmajeed; Bouslam, Naima; Lamari, Foudil; Elmalik, Salah A.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Esteves, Typhaine; Gaussen, Marion; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Gyapay, Gabor; Lechner, Doris; Gonzalez, Michael; Depienne, Christel; Mochel, Fanny; Lavie, Julie; Schols, Ludger; Lacombe, Didier; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Al Abdulkareem, Ibrahim; Zuchner, Stephan; Yamashita, Atsushi; Benomar, Ali; Goizet, Cyril; Durr, Alexandra; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Darios, Frederic; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is considered one of the most heterogeneous groups of neurological disorders, both clinically and genetically. The disease comprises pure and complex forms that clinically include slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity resulting from degeneration of the corticospinal tract. At least 48 loci accounting for these diseases have been mapped to date, and mutations have been identified in 22 genes, most of which play a role in intracellular trafficking. Here, we identified mutations in two functionally related genes (DDHD1 and CYP2U1) in individuals with autosomal-recessive forms of HSP by using either the classical positional cloning or a combination of whole-genome linkage mapping and next-generation sequencing. Interestingly, three subjects with CYP2U1 mutations presented with a thin corpus callosum, white-matter abnormalities, and/or calcification of the basal ganglia. These genes code for two enzymes involved in fatty-acid metabolism, and we have demonstrated in human cells that the HSP pathophysiology includes alteration of mitochondrial architecture and bioenergetics with increased oxidative stress. Our combined results focus attention on lipid metabolism as a critical HSP pathway with a deleterious impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic function. PMID:23176821

  16. Chloroplast Structure and Function Is Altered in the NCS2 Maize Mitochondrial Mutant 1

    PubMed Central

    Roussell, Deborah L.; Thompson, Deborah L.; Pallardy, Steve G.; Miles, Donald; Newton, Kathleen J.

    1991-01-01

    The nonchromosomal stripe 2 (NCS2) mutant of maize (Zea mays L.) has a DNA rearrangement in the mitochondrial genome that segregates with the abnormal growth phenotype. Yet, the NCS2 characteristic phenotype includes striped sectors of pale-green tissue on the leaves. This suggests a chloroplast abnormality. To characterize the chloroplasts present in the mutant sectors, we examined the chloroplast structure by electron microscopy, chloroplast function by radiolabeled carbon dioxide fixation and fluorescence induction kinetics, and thylakoid protein composition by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The data from these analyses suggest abnormal or prematurely arrested chloroplast development. Deleterious effects of the NCS2 mutant mitochondria upon the cells of the leaf include structural and functional alterations in the both the bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:16668157

  17. Alterations of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Telomere Length with Early Adversity and Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Tyrka, Audrey R.; Parade, Stephanie H.; Price, Lawrence H.; Kao, Hung-Teh; Porton, Barbara; Philip, Noah S.; Welch, Emma S.; Carpenter, Linda L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Telomere shortening and alterations of mitochondrial biogenesis are involved in cellular aging. Childhood adversity is associated with telomere shortening, and several investigations have shown short telomeres in psychiatric disorders. Recent studies have examined whether mitochondria might be involved in neuropsychiatric conditions; findings are limited and no prior work has examined this in relation to stress exposure. Methods Two-hundred and ninety healthy adults provided information on childhood parental loss and maltreatment and completed diagnostic interviews. Participants were categorized into four groups based upon the presence or absence of childhood adversity and the presence or absence of lifetime psychopathology (depressive, anxiety, and substance use disorders). Telomere length and mtDNA copy number were measured from leukocyte DNA by qPCR. Results Childhood adversity and lifetime psychopathology were each associated with shorter telomeres (p < .01) and higher mtDNA copy numbers (p < .001). Significantly higher mtDNA copy numbers and shorter telomeres were seen in individuals with major depression, depressive disorders, and anxiety disorders, as well as those with parental loss and childhood maltreatment. A history of substance disorders was also associated with significantly higher mtDNA copy numbers. Conclusion This study provides the first evidence of an alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis with early life stress and with anxiety and substance use disorders. We replicate prior work on telomere length and psychopathology, and show that this effect is not secondary to medication use or comorbid medical illness. Finally, we show that early life stress and psychopathology are each associated with these markers of cellular aging. PMID:25749099

  18. Proteomic alteration of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 in sepsis regulated by heat shock response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiang-Wen; Kuo, Hung-Tien; Hwang, Long-Chih; Kuo, Mei-Fang; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2007-12-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the proteomic alteration of hepatic mitochondria during sepsis and to explore the possible effects induced by heat shock treatment. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture in Sprague-Dawley rats. Liver mitochondrial proteins were isolated and evaluated by 2-dimensional electrophoresis with broad pH-ranged (pH 3 - 10) immobile DryStrip and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The protein spots were visualized with silver stain and analyzed by Bio-2D software. Results showed that around 120 dominant spots could be separated and visualized distinctly by 2-dimensional electrophoresis analysis. Among them, three spots with the same molecular weight (56.4 kd), mitochondrial protein 1 (MP1), MP2, and MP3, were significantly altered in septic specimens. When analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, the three spots all revealed to be an identical enzyme: aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2, EC 1.2.1.3). During sepsis, MP1 and MP2 were downregulated, whereas MP3 was upregulated concomitantly. Interestingly, heat shock treatment could reverse this phenomenon. Phosphoprotein staining showed that the degree of phosphorylation is higher in MP1 and MP2 than that in MP3. The enzyme activity assay showed that ALDH2 activity was downregulated in nonheated septic rats of 18 h after cecal ligation and puncture operation, and preserved in heated septic rats. The results of this study suggest that posttranslation modification, highly possible the phosphorylation, in ALDH2 may play a functional role in the pathogenesis of sepsis and provide a novel protective mechanism of heat shock treatment.

  19. The formation and functional consequences of heterogeneous mitochondrial distributions in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pathi, B.; Kinsey, S. T.; Howdeshell, M. E.; Priester, C.; McNeill, R. S.; Locke, B. R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Diffusion plays a prominent role in governing both rates of aerobic metabolic fluxes and mitochondrial organization in muscle fibers. However, there is no mechanism to explain how the non-homogeneous mitochondrial distributions that are prevalent in skeletal muscle arise. We propose that spatially variable degradation with dependence on O2 concentration, and spatially uniform signals for biogenesis, can account for observed distributions of mitochondria in a diversity of skeletal muscle. We used light and transmission electron microscopy and stereology to examine fiber size, capillarity and mitochondrial distribution in fish red and white muscle, fish white muscle that undergoes extreme hypertrophic growth, and four fiber types in mouse muscle. The observed distributions were compared with those generated using a coupled reaction-diffusion/cellular automata (CA) mathematical model of mitochondrial function. Reaction-diffusion analysis of metabolites such as oxygen, ATP, ADP and PCr involved in energy metabolism and mitochondrial function were considered. Coupled to the reaction-diffusion approach was a CA approach governing mitochondrial life cycles in response to the metabolic state of the fiber. The model results were consistent with the experimental observations and showed higher mitochondrial densities near the capillaries because of the sometimes steep gradients in oxygen. The present study found that selective removal of mitochondria in the presence of low prevailing local oxygen concentrations is likely the primary factor dictating the spatial heterogeneity of mitochondria in a diversity of fibers. The model results also suggest decreased diffusional constraints corresponding to the heterogeneous mitochondrial distribution assessed using the effectiveness factor, defined as the ratio of the reaction rate in the system with finite rates of diffusion to that in the absence of any diffusion limitation. Thus, the non-uniform distribution benefits the

  20. Altered mitochondrial morphology and defective protein import reveal novel roles for Bax and/or Bak in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Iqbal, Sobia; O'Leary, Michael F N; Menzies, Keir J; Saleem, Ayesha; Ding, Shuzhe; Hood, David A

    2013-09-01

    The function Bax and/or Bak in constituting a gateway for mitochondrial apoptosis in response to apoptotic stimuli has been unequivocally demonstrated. However, recent work has suggested that Bax/Bak may have unrecognized nonapoptotic functions related to mitochondrial function in nonstressful environments. Wild-type (WT) and Bax/Bak double knockout (DKO) mice were used to determine alternative roles for Bax and Bak in mitochondrial morphology and protein import in skeletal muscle. The absence of Bax and/or Bak altered mitochondrial dynamics by regulating protein components of the organelle fission and fusion machinery. Moreover, DKO mice exhibited defective mitochondrial protein import, both into the matrix and outer membrane compartments, which was consistent with our observations of impaired membrane potential and attenuated expression of protein import machinery (PIM) components in intermyofibrillar mitochondria. Furthermore, the cytosolic chaperones heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) were markedly increased with the deletion of Bax/Bak, indicating that the cytosolic environment related to protein folding may be changed in DKO mice. Interestingly, endurance training fully restored the deficiency of protein import in DKO mice, likely via the upregulation of PIM components and through improved cytosolic chaperone protein expression. Thus our results emphasize novel roles for Bax and/or Bak in mitochondrial function and provide evidence, for the first time, of a curative function of exercise training in ameliorating a condition of defective mitochondrial protein import.

  1. Calcium-induced alteration of mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial-endoplasmic reticulum contacts in rat brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Golic, I; Velickovic, K; Markelic, M; Stancic, A; Jankovic, A; Vucetic, M; Otasevic, V; Buzadzic, B; Korac, B; Korac, A

    2014-09-09

    Mitochondria are key organelles maintaining cellular bioenergetics and integrity, and their regulation of [Ca2+]i homeostasis has been investigated in many cell types. We investigated the short-term Ca-SANDOZ® treatment on brown adipocyte mitochondria, using imaging and molecular biology techniques. Two-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: Ca-SANDOZ® drinking or tap water (control) drinking for three days. Alizarin Red S staining showed increased Ca2+ level in the brown adipocytes of treated rats, and potassium pyroantimonate staining localized electron-dense regions in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and around lipid droplets. Ca-SANDOZ® decreased mitochondrial number, but increased their size and mitochondrial cristae volume. Transmission electron microscopy revealed numerous enlarged and fusioned-like mitochondria in the Ca-SANDOZ® treated group compared to the control, and megamitochondria in some brown adipocytes. The Ca2+ diet affected mitochondrial fusion as mitofusin 1 (MFN1) and mitofusin 2 (MFN2) were increased, and mitochondrial fission as dynamin related protein 1 (DRP1) was decreased. Confocal microscopy showed a higher colocalization rate between functional mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The level of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) was elevated, which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. These results suggest that Ca-SANDOZ® stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial-ER contacts and the thermogenic capacity of brown adipocytes.

  2. Calcium-Induced Alteration of Mitochondrial Morphology and Mitochondrial-Endoplasmic Reticulum Contacts in Rat Brown Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Golic, I.; Velickovic, K.; Markelic, M.; Stancic, A.; Jankovic, A.; Vucetic, M.; Otasevic, V.; Buzadzic, B.; Korac, B.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are key organelles maintaining cellular bioenergetics and integrity, and their regulation of [Ca2+]i homeostasis has been investigated in many cell types. We investigated the short-term Ca-SANDOZ® treatment on brown adipocyte mitochondria, using imaging and molecular biology techniques. Two-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: Ca-SANDOZ® drinking or tap water (control) drinking for three days. Alizarin Red S staining showed increased Ca2+ level in the brown adipocytes of treated rats, and potassium pyroantimonate staining localized electron-dense regions in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and around lipid droplets. Ca-SANDOZ® decreased mitochondrial number, but increased their size and mitochondrial cristae volume. Transmission electron microscopy revealed numerous enlarged and fusioned-like mitochondria in the Ca-SANDOZ® treated group compared to the control, and megamitochondria in some brown adipocytes. The Ca2+ diet affected mitochondrial fusion as mitofusin 1 (MFN1) and mitofusin 2 (MFN2) were increased, and mitochondrial fission as dynamin related protein 1 (DRP1) was decreased. Confocal microscopy showed a higher colocalization rate between functional mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The level of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) was elevated, which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. These results suggest that Ca-SANDOZ® stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial-ER contacts and the thermogenic capacity of brown adipocytes. PMID:25308841

  3. Alterations in mitochondrial Ca2+ flux by the antibiotic X-537A (lasalocid-A).

    PubMed

    Antonio, R V; da Silva, L P; Vercesi, A E

    1991-02-08

    A previous communication (Pereira da Silva, L., Bernardes, C.F. and Vercesi, A.E. (1984) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 124, 80-86) presented evidence that lasalocid-A, at concentrations far below those required to act as a Ca2+ ionophore, significantly inhibits Ca2+ efflux from liver mitochondria. In the present work we have studied the mechanism of this inhibition in liver and heart mitochondria. It was observed that lasalocid-A (25-250 nM), like nigericin, promotes the electroneutral exchange of K+ for H+ across the inner mitochondrial membrane and as a consequence can cause significant alterations in delta pH and delta psi. An indirect effect of these changes that might lead to inhibition of mitochondrial Ca2+ release was ruled out by experiments showing that the three observed patterns of lasalocid-A effect depend on the size of the mitochondrial Ca2+ load. At low Ca2+ loads (5-70 nmol Ca2+/mg protein), under experimental conditions in which Ca2+ release is supposed to be mediated by a Ca2+/2H+ antiporter, the kinetic data indicate that lasalocid-A inhibits the efflux of the cation by a competitive mechanism. The Ca2+/2Na+ antiporter, the dominant pathway for Ca2+ efflux from heart mitochondria, is not affected by lasalocid-A. At intermediate Ca2+ loads (70-110 nmol Ca2+/mg protein), lasalocid-A slightly stimulates Ca2+ release. This effect appears to be due to an increase in membrane permeability caused by the displacement of a pool of membrane bound Mg2+ possibly involved in the maintenance of membrane structure. Finally, at high Ca2+ loads (110-140 nmol Ca2+/mg protein) lasalocid-A enhances Ca2+ retention by liver mitochondria even in the presence of Ca2(+)-releasing agents such as phosphate and oxidants of the mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides. The maintenance of a high membrane potential under these conditions may indicate that lasalocid-A is a potent inhibitor of the Ca2(+)-induced membrane permeabilization. Nigericin, whose chemical structure resembles

  4. FRIENDLY Regulates Mitochondrial Distribution, Fusion, and Quality Control in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    El Zawily, Amr M.; Schwarzländer, Markus; Finkemeier, Iris; Johnston, Iain G.; Benamar, Abdelilah; Cao, Yongguo; Gissot, Clémence; Meyer, Andreas J.; Wilson, Ken; Datla, Raju; Macherel, David; Jones, Nick S.; Logan, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are defining components of most eukaryotes. However, higher plant mitochondria differ biochemically, morphologically, and dynamically from those in other eukaryotes. FRIENDLY, a member of the CLUSTERED MITOCHONDRIA superfamily, is conserved among eukaryotes and is required for correct distribution of mitochondria within the cell. We sought to understand how disruption of FRIENDLY function in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leads to mitochondrial clustering and the effects of this aberrant chondriome on cell and whole-plant physiology. We present evidence for a role of FRIENDLY in mediating intermitochondrial association, which is a necessary prelude to mitochondrial fusion. We demonstrate that disruption of mitochondrial association, motility, and chondriome structure in friendly affects mitochondrial quality control and leads to mitochondrial stress, cell death, and strong growth phenotypes. PMID:25165398

  5. Distribution of mitochondrial DNA fragments in the nuclear genome of the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Du, W X; Qin, Y C

    2015-10-27

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts), which originated from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) insertions in the nuclear genome, have been detected in many species. The distribution of numts in the honeybee nuclear genome has not yet been fully reported. By referring to the whole honeybee mtDNA sequence and to the recent version of the honeybee nuclear genome, 236 reference sequences were identified by BLAST, with 90 unmapped. The size of the numts ranged from 219 to 3788 bp, and the homologous identity between numts and their corresponding mtDNA fragments varied from 71 to 93%. Furthermore, identified honeybee numts covered nearly all mitochondrial genes and were distributed over all chromosomes. This study provides useful information for further research related to mitochondrial genes and the evolution of the honeybee.

  6. Physical exercise mitigates doxorubicin-induced brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial alterations and cellular quality control signaling.

    PubMed

    Marques-Aleixo, I; Santos-Alves, E; Balça, M M; Moreira, P I; Oliveira, P J; Magalhães, J; Ascensão, A

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly effective anti-neoplastic agent, whose clinical use is limited by a dose-dependent mitochondrial toxicity in non-target tissues, including the brain. Here we analyzed the effects of distinct exercise modalities (12-week endurance treadmill-TM or voluntary free-wheel activity-FW) performed before and during sub-chronic DOX treatment on brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics, oxidative stress, permeability transition pore (mPTP), and proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, apoptosis and auto(mito)phagy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into saline-sedentary (SAL+SED), DOX-sedentary (DOX+SED; 7-week DOX (2 mg · kg(-1)per week)), DOX+TM and DOX+FW. Animal behavior and post-sacrifice mitochondrial function were assessed. Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) subunits, oxidative stress markers or related proteins (SIRT3, p66shc, UCP2, carbonyls, MDA, -SH, aconitase, Mn-SOD), as well as proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC1α and TFAM) were evaluated. Apoptotic signaling was followed through caspases 3, 8 and 9-like activities, Bax, Bcl2, CypD, ANT and cofilin expression. Mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1, Mfn2, OPA1 and DRP1) and auto(mito)phagy (LC3II, Beclin1, Pink1, Parkin and p62)-related proteins were measured by semi-quantitative Western blotting. DOX impaired behavioral performance, mitochondrial function, including lower resistance to mPTP and increased apoptotic signaling, decreased the content in OXPHOS complex subunits and increased oxidative stress in brain cortex and cerebellum. Molecular markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy were also altered by DOX treatment in both brain subareas. Generally, TM and FW were able to mitigate DOX-related impairments in brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial activity, mPTP and apoptotic signaling. We conclude that the alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy markers induced by exercise performed before and during

  7. Low oxygen alters mitochondrial function and response to oxidative stress in human neural progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Lages, Yury M.; Nascimento, Juliana M.; Lemos, Gabriela A.; Galina, Antonio; Castilho, Leda R.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen concentration should be carefully regulated in all living tissues, beginning at the early embryonic stages. Unbalances in oxygen regulation can lead to cell death and disease. However, to date, few studies have investigated the consequences of variations in oxygen levels for fetal-like cells. Therefore, in the present work, human neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from pluripotent stem cells grown in 3% oxygen (v/v) were compared with NPCs cultured in 21% (v/v) oxygen. Low oxygen concentrations altered the mitochondrial content and oxidative functions of the cells, which led to improved ATP production, while reducing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). NPCs cultured in both conditions showed no differences in proliferation and glucose metabolism. Furthermore, antioxidant enzymatic activity was not altered in NPCs cultured in 3% oxygen under normal conditions, however, when exposed to external agents known to induce oxidative stress, greater susceptibility to DNA damage was observed. Our findings indicate that the management of oxygen levels should be considered for in vitro models of neuronal development and drug screening. PMID:26713239

  8. Altered mitochondrial function, capacitative calcium entry and contractions in the aorta of hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Méndez-López, Iago; Bomfim, Guilherme H S; Musial, Diego C; Arranz-Tagarro, Juan A; Velasco-Martín, Juan P; Regadera, Javier; Jurkiewicz, Neide H; Jurkiewicz, Aron; García, Antonio G; Padín, J Fernando

    2017-08-01

    It has been suggested that Ca entry through store-operated Ca channels (SOCs) is regulated by a dynamic interplay between the endoplasmic reticulum Ca stores and the mitochondria. These relationships drive the activation and inactivation of SOCs, yet it remains unclear whether this regulation of SOCs by mitochondria is altered in the aorta of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). We performed a thorough study of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the ability of mitochondria to deal with cytosolic Ca, capacitative Ca entry (CCE), and stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) and calcium release-activated calcium modulator 1 (orai1) protein expression, as well as the contractile capacity of aortic rings, in normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKYs) and SHRs. Changes were observed in aortic tissue and cultured vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from SHRs relative to WKYs, including more depolarized mitochondria, stronger CCE upon the addition of Ca, larger cytosolic Ca transients (cytosolic Ca concentration) or aortic ring contraction elicited by endoplasmic reticulum depletion and a significant increase in STIM1 protein expression but not of orai1. These results suggest that the impaired Ca buffering capacity of partially depolarized mitochondria dysregulates CCE, leading to overfilling of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca store through enhanced STIM1/orai1 interactions and an increase in aorta contractions in SHRs. Thus, understanding the implications of the alterations to STIM1/orai1, and their relationship to mitochondria, may aid drug development and therapeutic strategies to treat hypertension, as well as its long-term sequelae in poorly controlled patients.

  9. Systems biology analysis of the proteomic alterations induced by MPP+, a Parkinson's disease-related mitochondrial toxin

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Chiara; Bondi, Heather; Urbani, Andrea; Fasano, Mauro; Alberio, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease whose etiology has not been completely characterized. Many cellular processes have been proposed to play a role in the neuronal damage and loss: defects in the proteosomal activity, altered protein processing, increased reactive oxygen species burden. Among them, the involvement of a decreased activity and an altered disposal of mitochondria is becoming more and more evident. The mitochondrial toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), an inhibitor of complex I, has been widely used to reproduce biochemical alterations linked to PD in vitro and its precursor, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine hydrochloride (MPTP), to induce a Parkinson-like syndrome in vivo. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of the literature of all the proteomic investigations of neuronal alterations due to MPP+ treatment and compared it with our results obtained with a mitochondrial proteomic analysis of SH-SY5Y cells treated with MPP+. By using open-source bioinformatics tools, we identified the biochemical pathways and the molecular functions mostly affected by MPP+, i.e., ATP production, the mitochondrial unfolded stress response, apoptosis, autophagy, and, most importantly, the synapse funcionality. Eventually, we generated protein networks, based on physical or functional interactions, to highlight the relationships among the molecular actors involved. In particular, we identified the mitochondrial protein HSP60 as the central hub in the protein-protein interaction network. As a whole, this analysis clarified the cellular responses to MPP+, the specific mitochondrial proteome alterations induced and how this toxic model can recapitulate some pathogenetic events of PD. PMID:25698928

  10. A Mutation in a Novel Yeast Proteasomal Gene, RPN11/MPR1, Produces a Cell Cycle Arrest, Overreplication of Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA, and an Altered Mitochondrial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Teresa; Ricci, Carlo; Porro, Danilo; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique; Frontali, Laura

    1998-01-01

    We report here the functional characterization of an essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, MPR1, coding for a regulatory proteasomal subunit for which the name Rpn11p has been proposed. For this study we made use of the mpr1-1 mutation that causes the following pleiotropic defects. At 24°C growth is delayed on glucose and impaired on glycerol, whereas no growth is seen at 36°C on either carbon source. Microscopic observation of cells growing on glucose at 24°C shows that most of them bear a large bud, whereas mitochondrial morphology is profoundly altered. A shift to the nonpermissive temperature produces aberrant elongated cell morphologies, whereas the nucleus fails to divide. Flow cytometry profiles after the shift to the nonpermissive temperature indicate overreplication of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Consistently with the identification of Mpr1p with a proteasomal subunit, the mutation is complemented by the human POH1 proteasomal gene. Moreover, the mpr1-1 mutant grown to stationary phase accumulates ubiquitinated proteins. Localization of the Rpn11p/Mpr1p protein has been studied by green fluorescent protein fusion, and the fusion protein has been found to be mainly associated to cytoplasmic structures. For the first time, a proteasomal mutation has also revealed an associated mitochondrial phenotype. We actually showed, by the use of [rho°] cells derived from the mutant, that the increase in DNA content per cell is due in part to an increase in the amount of mitochondrial DNA. Moreover, microscopy of mpr1-1 cells grown on glucose showed that multiple punctate mitochondrial structures were present in place of the tubular network found in the wild-type strain. These data strongly suggest that mpr1-1 is a valuable tool with which to study the possible roles of proteasomal function in mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:9763452

  11. Early Stress History Alters Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 and Impairs Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Adult Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Banerjee, K K; Vaidya, V A; Kolthur-Seetharam, U

    2016-09-01

    Early-life adversity is associated with an enhanced risk for adult psychopathology. Psychiatric disorders such as depression exhibit comorbidity for metabolic dysfunction, including obesity and diabetes. However, it is poorly understood whether, besides altering anxiety and depression-like behaviour, early stress also evokes dysregulation of metabolic pathways and enhances vulnerability for metabolic disorders. We used the rodent model of the early stress of maternal separation (ES) to examine the effects of early stress on serum metabolites, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 signalling, and muscle mitochondrial content. Adult ES animals exhibited dyslipidaemia, decreased serum IGF1 levels, increased expression of liver IGF binding proteins, and a decline in the expression of specific metabolic genes in the liver and muscle, including Pck1, Lpl, Pdk4 and Hmox1. These changes occurred in the absence of alterations in body weight, food intake, glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance or insulin levels. ES animals also exhibited a decline in markers of muscle mitochondrial content, such as mitochondrial DNA levels and expression of TFAM (transcription factor A, mitochondrial). Furthermore, the expression of several genes involved in mitochondrial function, such as Ppargc1a, Nrf1, Tfam, Cat, Sesn3 and Ucp3, was reduced in skeletal muscle. Adult-onset chronic unpredictable stress resulted in overlapping and distinct consequences from ES, including increased circulating triglyceride levels, and a decline in the expression of specific metabolic genes in the liver and muscle, with no change in the expression of genes involved in muscle mitochondrial function. Taken together, our results indicate that a history of early adversity can evoke persistent changes in circulating IGF-1 and muscle mitochondrial function and content, which could serve to enhance predisposition for metabolic dysfunction in adulthood. © 2016 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  12. Kinetics of plasma membrane and mitochondrial alterations in cells undergoing apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lizard, G.; Fournel, S.; Genestier, L.; Dhedin, N.

    1995-11-01

    Programmed cell death or apoptosis is characterized by typical morphological alterations. By transmission electron microscopy, apoptotic cells are identified by condensation of the chromatin in tight apposition to the nuclear envelope, alteration of the nuclear envelope and fragmentation of the nucleus, whereas integrity of the plasma membrane and organelles is preserved. Conversely cells undergoing necrosis display and early desintegration of cytoplasmic membrane and swelling of mitochondria. In this study we assessed by flow cytometry the sequential alterations of forward angle light scatter, 90{degrees} light scatter, and fluorescence associated with fluorescein diacetate, rhodamine 123, and propidium iodide in two human B cell lines undergoing apoptosis induced by the topoisomerase II inhibitor VP-16. The kinetics of these modifications were compared to those of cells undergoing necrosis induced by the topoisomerase II inhibitor VP-16. The kinetics of these modifications were compared to those of cells undergoing necrosis induced by sodium azide. At the same time intervals, cells were examined by transmission electron microscopy and by UV microscopy after staining with Hoechst 33342. We report that sequential changes in light scatters and fluorescein diacetate are similar in cells undergoing apoptosis or necrosis, whereas apoptosis is characterized by a slightly delayed decrease of mitochondrial activity as assessed by rhodamine 123 staining. Surprisingly, a part of cells undergoing apoptosis displayed an early uptake of propidium iodide followed by a condensation and then a fragmentation of their nuclei. It is concluded that uptake of propidium iodide is a very early marker of cell death which does not discriminate between necrosis and apoptosis. Along with biochemical criteria, nuclear morphology revealed by staining with Hoechst 33342 would seem to be of the most simple and most discriminative assay of apoptosis. 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Short-term training alters the control of mitochondrial respiration rate before maximal oxidative ATP synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Layec, Gwenael; Haseler, Luke J.; Hoff, Jan; Hart, Corey R.; Liu, Xin; Le Fur, Yann; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Richardson, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim Short-term exercise training may induce metabolic and performance adaptations before any changes in mitochondrial enzyme potential. However, there has not been a study that has directly assessed changes in mitochondrial oxidative capacity or metabolic control as a consequence of such training in vivo. Therefore, we used 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) to examine the effect of short-term plantar flexion exercise training on phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery kinetics and the control of respiration rate. Method To this aim, we investigated 12 healthy men, experienced with this exercise modality (TRA), and 7 time-control subjects (TC). Results After 5 days of training, maximum work rate during incremental plantar flexion exercise was significantly improved (P < 0.01). During the recovery period, the maximal rate of oxidative ATP synthesis (PRE: 28 ± 13 mM.min−1; POST: 26 ± 15 mM.min−1) and the PCr recovery time constant (PRE: 31 ± 19 s; POST: 29 ± 16) were not significantly altered. In contrast, the Hill coefficient (nH) describing the cooperativity between respiration rate and ADP was significantly increased in TRA (PRE:nH = 2.7 ± 1.4; POST: nH = 3.4 ± 1.9, P < 0.05). Meanwhile, there were no systematic variations in any of these variables in TC. Conclusion This study reveals that 5 days of training induces rapid adaptation in the allosteric control of respiration rate by ADP before any substantial improvement in muscle oxidative capacity occurs. PMID:23582030

  14. Altered signaling for mitochondrial and myofibrillar biogenesis in skeletal muscles of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Dominique; Wens, Inez; Vandenabeele, Frank; Verboven, Kenneth; Eijnde, Bert O

    2015-07-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) experience muscle weakness and lowered muscle oxidative capacity. To explore the etiology for the development of such muscle phenotype we studied skeletal muscle adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase phosphorylation (phospho-AMPKα, governing mitochondrial biogenesis) and mammalian target of rapamycin phosphorylation (phospho-mTOR, governing myofibrillar biogenesis) in pwMS. After assessment of body composition, muscle strength, exercise tolerance, and muscle fiber type, muscle phospho-AMPKα and phospho-mTOR were assessed in 14 pwMS and 10 healthy controls (part 1). Next, an endurance exercise bout was executed by 9 pwMS and 7 healthy subjects, with assessment of changes in muscle phospho-AMPKα and phospho-mTOR (part 2). Increased basal muscle phospho-AMPKα and phospho-mTOR were present in MS (P < 0.01) and independently related to MS. Correlations between muscle phospho-AMPKα or phospho-mTOR and whole-body fat mass, peak oxygen uptake, and expanded disability status scale (P < 0.05) were found. After endurance exercise muscle phospho-AMPKα and phospho-mTOR remained increased in pwMS (P < 0.01). Muscle signaling cascades for mitochondrial and myofibrillar biogenesis are altered in MS and related to the impairment and disability level. These findings indicate a link between muscle signaling cascades and the level of disability and impairment, and thus may open a new area for the development of novel therapies for peripheral muscle impairment in MS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mutations in nuclear genes alter post-transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial genes.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nuclear gene products are required for the expression of mitochondrial genes and elaboration of functional mitochondrial protein complexes. To better understand the roles of these nuclear genes, we exploited the mitochondrial encoded S-type of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS-S) and developed a nove...

  16. Lipoprotein alterations, abdominal fat distribution and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schreier, L E; Berg, G A; Basilio, F M; Lopez, G I; Etkin, A E; Wikinski, R L

    1999-04-01

    Plasma lipid profile and abdominal obesity have been associated with breast cancer risk, however published results have been inconsistent. To clarify these associations we studied lipid and lipoprotein alterations, obesity degree and body fat distribution, in 30 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients without treatment and 30 controls matched by age and menopausal status. Both pre and postmenopausal breast cancer patients presented higher body mass index, waist/hip ratio and insulin levels than their matched controls. An increase in triglycerides and a decrease in HDL-cholesterol, especially in the HDL2 subfraction, were observed in patients with breast cancer. Besides, HDL particle from these patients showed increased apo A1/HDL-cholesterol ratio. These alterations were correlated with waist/hip ratio. The association between lipoprotein alterations and abdominal obesity independent of menopausal status, in untreated newly diagnosed breast cancer patients is reported for the first time in this study.

  17. Mitochondrial structure alteration in human prostate cancer cells upon initial interaction with a chemopreventive agent phenethyl isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chengsen; Pasolli, Hilda A; Piscopo, Irene; Gros, Daniel J; Liu, Christina; Chen, Yamei; Chiao, Jen Wei

    2014-03-31

    Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), present naturally in cruciferous vegetables, is a chemopreventive agent. It blocks initiation and post-initiation progression of carcinogenesis. Mechanism study in human prostate cancer cells revealed that PEITC is a dual inhibitor of aberrant DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylases, reactivating silenced genes and regulating the androgen-mediated growth of tumor cells. The identity of the cellular organelle that initially interacts with PEITC has not been fully described. Human prostate cancer LNCaP cells were exposed to PEITC and the effects on cellular fine structure examined by transmission electron microscopic studies. Alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release were evaluated as early events of apoptosis, and the TUNEL method for quantifying apoptotic cells. Mitochondria were isolated for determining their protein expression. Ultrastructural analyses have revealed condensed mitochondria and a perturbed mitochondrial cristae structure, which assumed a rounded and dilated shape within 4-hours of PEITC contact, and became more pronounced with longer PEITC exposure. They presented as the most prominent intracellular alterations in the early hours. Mitochondria structure alterations were demonstrated, for the first time, with the isothiocyanates. An increase in the number of smooth endoplasmic reticulum and vacuoles were also noted that is consistent with the presence of autophagy. Early events of apoptosis were detected, with cytochrome c released along with the appearance of mitochondrial alteration. Mitochondrial membrane potential was disrupted within 18 hours of PEITC exposure, preceding the appearance of apoptotic cells with DNA strand breaks. In parallel, the expression of the mitochondrial class III ß-tubulin in the outer membrane, which associates with the permeability transition pore, was significantly reduced as examined with isolated mitochondria. Mitochondria may represent the

  18. Physical activity prevents alterations in mitochondrial ultrastructure and glucometabolic parameters in a high-sugar diet model

    PubMed Central

    Honorato-Sampaio, Kinulpe; Rossoni Júnior, Joamyr Victor; Andrade Leal, Diego; Pinto, Angélica Barbosa G.; Kappes-Becker, Lenice; Evangelista, Elisio Alberto; Guerra-Sá, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Endurance exercise is a remarkable intervention for the treatment of many diseases. Mitochondrial changes on skeletal muscle are likely important for many of the benefits provided by exercise. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects that a regular physical activity (swimming without workload) has on mitochondrial morphological alterations and glucometabolic parameters induced by a high-sugar diet (HSD). Weaned male Wistar rats fed with a standard diet or a HSD (68% carbohydrate) were subjected to 60 minutes of regular physical activity by swimming (without workload) for four- (20 sessions) or eight-week (40 sessions) periods. After training, animals were euthanized and the sera, adipose tissues, and skeletal muscles were collected for further analysis. The HSD increased body weight after an 8-week period; it also increased the fat pads and the adipose index, resulting in glucose intolerance and insulin resistance (IR). Transmission electron microscopy showed an increase in alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure in the gastrocnemius muscle, as well as a decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and an increase in protein carbonylation. Regular physical activity partially reverted these alterations in rats fed a HSD, preventing mitochondrial morphological alterations and IR. Moreover, we observed a decrease in Pgc1α expression (qPCR analysis) in STD-EXE group and a less pronounced reduction in HSD-EXE group after an 8-week period. Thus, regular physical activity (swimming without workload) in rats fed a HSD can prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and IR, highlighting the crucial role for physical activity on metabolic homeostasis. PMID:28199417

  19. UBIAD1 Mutation Alters a Mitochondrial Prenyltransferase to Cause Schnyder Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Michael L.; Kostiha, Brittany N.; Brandt, Wolfgang; Fredericks, William; Xu, Ke-Ping; Yu, Fu-Shin; Gold, Bert; Chodosh, James; Goldberg, Marc; Lu, Da Wen; Yamada, Masakazu; Tervo, Timo M.; Grutzmacher, Richard; Croasdale, Chris; Hoeltzenbein, Maria; Sutphin, John; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Wessjohann, Ludger; Kruth, Howard S.; Dean, Michael; Weiss, Jayne S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in a novel gene, UBIAD1, were recently found to cause the autosomal dominant eye disease Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD). SCD is characterized by an abnormal deposition of cholesterol and phospholipids in the cornea resulting in progressive corneal opacification and visual loss. We characterized lesions in the UBIAD1 gene in new SCD families and examined protein homology, localization, and structure. Methodology/Principal Findings We characterized five novel mutations in the UBIAD1 gene in ten SCD families, including a first SCD family of Native American ethnicity. Examination of protein homology revealed that SCD altered amino acids which were highly conserved across species. Cell lines were established from patients including keratocytes obtained after corneal transplant surgery and lymphoblastoid cell lines from Epstein-Barr virus immortalized peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These were used to determine the subcellular localization of mutant and wild type protein, and to examine cholesterol metabolite ratios. Immunohistochemistry using antibodies specific for UBIAD1 protein in keratocytes revealed that both wild type and N102S protein were localized sub-cellularly to mitochondria. Analysis of cholesterol metabolites in patient cell line extracts showed no significant alteration in the presence of mutant protein indicating a potentially novel function of the UBIAD1 protein in cholesterol biochemistry. Molecular modeling was used to develop a model of human UBIAD1 protein in a membrane and revealed potentially critical roles for amino acids mutated in SCD. Potential primary and secondary substrate binding sites were identified and docking simulations indicated likely substrates including prenyl and phenolic molecules. Conclusions/Significance Accumulating evidence from the SCD familial mutation spectrum, protein homology across species, and molecular modeling suggest that protein function is likely down-regulated by SCD mutations

  20. Alteration of Antiviral Signalling by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) of Mitochondrial Antiviral Signalling Protein (MAVS)

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fei; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Hayakari, Ryo; Yoshida, Hidemi; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation is associated with diseases. As a type of genetic variation occurring with certain regularity and frequency, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is attracting more and more attention because of its great value for research and real-life application. Mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) acts as a common adaptor molecule for retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), which can recognize foreign RNA, including viral RNA, leading to the induction of type I interferons (IFNs). Therefore, MAVS is thought to be a crucial molecule in antiviral innate immunity. We speculated that genetic variation of MAVS may result in susceptibility to infectious diseases. To assess the risk of viral infection based on MAVS variation, we tested the effects of twelve non-synonymous MAVS coding-region SNPs from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database that result in amino acid substitutions. We found that five of these SNPs exhibited functional alterations. Additionally, four resulted in an inhibitory immune response, and one had the opposite effect. In total, 1,032 human genomic samples obtained from a mass examination were genotyped at these five SNPs. However, no homozygous or heterozygous variation was detected. We hypothesized that these five SNPs are not present in the Japanese population and that such MAVS variations may result in serious immune diseases. PMID:26954674

  1. Hepatic Mitochondrial Alterations and Increased Oxidative Stress in Nutritional Diabetes-Prone Psammomys obesus Model

    PubMed Central

    Bouderba, Saida; Sanz, M. Nieves; Sánchez-Martín, Carlos; El-Mir, M. Yehia; Villanueva, Gloria R.; Detaille, Dominique; Koceïr, E. Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered to be a pivotal component of insulin resistance and associated metabolic diseases. Psammomys obesus is a relevant model of nutritional diabetes since these adult animals exhibit a state of insulin resistance when fed a standard laboratory chow, hypercaloric for them as compared to their natural food. In this context, alterations in bioenergetics were studied. Using liver mitochondria isolated from these rats fed such a diet for 18 weeks, oxygen consumption rates, activities of respiratory complexes, and content in cytochromes were examined. Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and gluthatione (GSH) were measured in tissue homogenates. Diabetic Psammomys showed a serious liver deterioration (hepatic mass accretion, lipids accumulation), accompanied by an enhanced oxidative stress (MDA increased, GSH depleted). On the other hand, both ADP-dependent and uncoupled respirations greatly diminished below control values, and the respiratory flux to cytochrome oxydase was mildly lowered. Furthermore, an inhibition of complexes I and III together with an activation of complex II were found. With emergence of oxidative stress, possibly related to a defect in oxidative phosphorylation, some molecular adjustments could contribute to alleviate, at least in part, the deleterious outcomes of insulin resistance in this gerbil species. PMID:22675340

  2. Altered age-related changes in bioenergetic properties and mitochondrial morphology in fibroblasts from sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Allen, Scott P; Duffy, Lynn M; Shaw, Pamela J; Grierson, Andrew J

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in aging, which is a well-established risk factor in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We have previously modeled metabolic dysregulation in ALS using fibroblasts isolated from sporadic ALS (SALS) and familial ALS patients. In the present study, we show that fibroblasts from SALS patients have an altered metabolic response to aging. Control fibroblasts demonstrated increased mitochondrial network complexity and spare respiratory capacity with age which was not seen in the SALS cases. SALS cases displayed an increase in uncoupled mitochondrial respiration, which was not evident in control cases. Unlike SALS cases, controls showed a decrease in glycolysis and an increase in the oxygen consumption rate/extracellular acidification rate ratio, indicating an increased reliance on mitochondrial function. Switching to a more oxidative state by removing glucose with in the culture media resulted in a loss of the mitochondrial interconnectivity and spare respiratory capacity increases observed in controls grown in glucose. Glucose removal also led to an age-independent increase in glycolysis in the SALS cases. This study is, to the best our knowledge, the first to assess the effect of aging on both mitochondrial and glycolytic function simultaneously in intact human fibroblasts and demonstrates that the SALS disease state shifts the cellular metabolic response to aging to a more glycolytic state compared with age-matched control fibroblasts. This work highlights that ALS alters the metabolic equilibrium even in peripheral tissues outside the central nervous system. Elucidating at a molecular level how this occurs and at what stage in the disease process is crucial to understanding why ALS affects cellular energy metabolism and how the disease alters the natural cellular response to aging.

  3. Chronic Stress Causes Sex-Specific and Structure-Specific Alterations in Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Activity in Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    de Souza Mota, Carina; Weis, Simone Nardin; Almeida, Roberto Farina; Dalmaz, Carla; Guma, Fátima Therezinha Costa; Pettenuzzo, Letícia Ferreira

    2017-09-14

    Chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces a variety of changes in brain function, some of which are mediated by glucocorticoids. The response to stress occurs in a sex-specific way, and may include mitochondrial and synaptic alterations. The synapse is highly dependent on mitochondrial energy supply, and when mitochondria become dysfunctional, they orchestrate cell death. This study aimed to investigate the CRS effects on mitochondrial respiratory chain activity, as well as mitochondrial potential and mass in cell body and synapses using hippocampus, cortex and striatum of male and female rats. Rats were divided into non-stressed (control) and stressed group (CRS during 40 days). Results showed that CRS increased complex I-III activity in hippocampus. We also observed an interaction between CRS and sex in the striatal complex II activity, since CRS induced a reduction in complex II activity in males, while in females this activity was increased. Also an interaction was observed between stress and sex in cortical complex IV activity, since CRS induced increased activity in females, while it was reduced in males. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) content in cortex and hippocampus was sexually dimorphic, with female rats presenting higher levels compared to males. No changes were observed in GR content, mitochondrial potential or mass of animals submitted to CRS. It was concluded that CRS induced changes in respiratory chain complex activities, and some of these changes are sex-dependent: these activities are increased in the striatal mitochondria by CRS protocol mainly in females, while in males it is decreased.

  4. Selenium suppresses glutamate-induced cell death and prevents mitochondrial morphological dynamic alterations in hippocampal HT22 neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan-Mei; Ibeanu, Gordon; Wang, Li-Yao; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Chang, Yue; Dong, Jian-Da; Li, P Andy; Jing, Li

    2017-01-19

    Previous studies have indicated that selenium supplementation may be beneficial in neuroprotection against glutamate-induced cell damage, in which mitochondrial dysfunction is considered a major pathogenic feature. However, the exact mechanisms by which selenium protects against glutamate-provoked mitochondrial perturbation remain ambiguous. In this study glutamate exposed murine hippocampal neuronal HT22 cell was used as a model to investigate the underlying mechanisms of selenium-dependent protection against mitochondria damage. We find that glutamate-induced cytotoxicity was associated with enhancement of superoxide production, activation of caspase-9 and -3, increases of mitochondrial fission marker and mitochondrial morphological changes. Selenium significantly resolved the glutamate-induced mitochondria structural damage, alleviated oxidative stress, decreased Apaf-1, caspases-9 and -3 contents, and altered the autophagy process as observed by a decline in the ratio of the autophagy markers LC3-I and LC3-II. These findings suggest that the protection of selenium against glutamate stimulated cell damage of HT22 cells is associated with amelioration of mitochondrial dynamic imbalance.

  5. Quadriceps exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the potential role of altered skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Jayson R.; Trinity, Joel D.; Layec, Gwenael; Garten, Ryan S.; Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J.; Larsen, Steen; Dela, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to determine if qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration, associated with decreased mitochondrial efficiency, contribute to exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using permeabilized muscle fibers from the vastus lateralis of 13 patients with COPD and 12 healthy controls, complex I (CI) and complex II (CII)-driven State 3 mitochondrial respiration were measured separately (State 3:CI and State 3:CII) and in combination (State 3:CI+CII). State 2 respiration was also measured. Exercise tolerance was assessed by knee extensor exercise (KE) time to fatigue. Per milligram of muscle, State 3:CI+CII and State 3:CI were reduced in COPD (P < 0.05), while State 3:CII and State 2 were not different between groups. To determine if this altered pattern of respiration represented qualitative changes in mitochondrial function, respiration states were examined as percentages of peak respiration (State 3:CI+CII), which revealed altered contributions from State 3:CI (Con 83.7 ± 3.4, COPD 72.1 ± 2.4%Peak, P < 0.05) and State 3:CII (Con 64.9 ± 3.2, COPD 79.5 ± 3.0%Peak, P < 0.05) respiration, but not State 2 respiration in COPD. Importantly, a diminished contribution of CI-driven respiration relative to the metabolically less-efficient CII-driven respiration (CI/CII) was also observed in COPD (Con 1.28 ± 0.09, COPD 0.81 ± 0.05, P < 0.05), which was related to exercise tolerance of the patients (r = 0.64, P < 0.05). Overall, this study indicates that COPD is associated with qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondria that affect the contribution of CI and CII-driven respiration, which potentially contributes to the exercise intolerance associated with this disease. PMID:26272320

  6. Quadriceps exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the potential role of altered skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Jayson R; Trinity, Joel D; Layec, Gwenael; Garten, Ryan S; Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Larsen, Steen; Dela, Flemming; Richardson, Russell S

    2015-10-15

    This study sought to determine if qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration, associated with decreased mitochondrial efficiency, contribute to exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using permeabilized muscle fibers from the vastus lateralis of 13 patients with COPD and 12 healthy controls, complex I (CI) and complex II (CII)-driven State 3 mitochondrial respiration were measured separately (State 3:CI and State 3:CII) and in combination (State 3:CI+CII). State 2 respiration was also measured. Exercise tolerance was assessed by knee extensor exercise (KE) time to fatigue. Per milligram of muscle, State 3:CI+CII and State 3:CI were reduced in COPD (P < 0.05), while State 3:CII and State 2 were not different between groups. To determine if this altered pattern of respiration represented qualitative changes in mitochondrial function, respiration states were examined as percentages of peak respiration (State 3:CI+CII), which revealed altered contributions from State 3:CI (Con 83.7 ± 3.4, COPD 72.1 ± 2.4%Peak, P < 0.05) and State 3:CII (Con 64.9 ± 3.2, COPD 79.5 ± 3.0%Peak, P < 0.05) respiration, but not State 2 respiration in COPD. Importantly, a diminished contribution of CI-driven respiration relative to the metabolically less-efficient CII-driven respiration (CI/CII) was also observed in COPD (Con 1.28 ± 0.09, COPD 0.81 ± 0.05, P < 0.05), which was related to exercise tolerance of the patients (r = 0.64, P < 0.05). Overall, this study indicates that COPD is associated with qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondria that affect the contribution of CI and CII-driven respiration, which potentially contributes to the exercise intolerance associated with this disease.

  7. Dysregulation of the Axonal Trafficking of Nuclear-encoded Mitochondrial mRNA alters Neuronal Mitochondrial Activity and Mouse Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Amar N.; Sun, Ching-Yu; Reichard, Kathryn; Gervasi, Noreen M.; Pickel, James; Nakazawa, Kazu; Gioio, Anthony E.; Kaplan, Barry B.

    2014-01-01

    Local translation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs is essential for mitochondrial activity, yet there is little insight into the role that axonal trafficking of these transcripts play in neuronal function and behavior. Previously, we identified a 38 nucleotide stem-loop structure (zipcode) in the 3′ untranslated region of the Cytochrome C oxidase IV (COXIV) mRNA that directs the transport of a reporter mRNA to the axon of superior cervical ganglion neurons (SCG). Over-expression of a chimeric reporter mRNA with the COXIV zipcode competed with the axonal trafficking of endogenous COXIV mRNA, and led to attenuated axon growth in SCG neurons. Here, we show that exogenous expression of the COXIV zipcode in cultured SCG neurons also results in the reduction of local ATP levels and increases levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the axon. We took advantage of this “competition” phenotype to investigate the in vivo significance of axonal transport of COXIV mRNA. Towards this end, we generated transgenic mice expressing a fluorescent reporter fused to COXIV zipcode under a forebrain-specific promoter. Immunohistological analyses and RT-PCR analyses of RNA from the transgenic mouse brain showed expression of the reporter in the deep layer neurons in the pre-frontal and frontal cortex. Consistent with the in vitro studies, we observed increased ROS levels in neurons of these transgenic animals. A battery of behavioral tests on transgenic mice expressing the COXIV zipcode revealed an “anxiety-like” behavioral phenotype, suggesting an important role for axonal trafficking of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs in neuronal physiology and animal behavior. PMID:24151253

  8. Role of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Alteration in Human Renal Cell Carcinoma †

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen-Sung; Lee, Hui-Ting; Lee, Ming-Huei; Pan, Siao-Cian; Ke, Chen-Yeh; Chiu, Allen Wen-Hsiang; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number alteration in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The mtDNA copy numbers of paired cancer and non-cancer parts from five resected RCC kidneys after radical nephrectomy were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). An RCC cell line, 786-O, was infected by lentiviral particles to knock down mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM). Null target (NT) and TFAM-knockdown (TFAM-KD) represented the control and knockdown 786-O clones, respectively. Protein or mRNA expression levels of TFAM; mtDNA-encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1), ND6 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (COX-2); nuclear DNA (nDNA)-encoded succinate dehydrogenase subunit A (SDHA); v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 gene (AKT)-encoded AKT and v-myc myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog gene (c-MYC)-encoded MYC; glycolytic enzymes including hexokinase II (HK-II), glucose 6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), phosphofructokinase (PFK), and lactate dehydrogenase subunit A (LDHA); and hypoxia-inducible factors the HIF-1α and HIF-2α, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), and pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component α subunit (PDHA1) were analyzed by Western blot or Q-PCR. Bioenergetic parameters of cellular metabolism, basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (mOCRB) and basal extracellular acidification rate (ECARB), were measured by a Seahorse XFe-24 analyzer. Cell invasiveness was evaluated by a trans-well migration assay and vimentin expression. Doxorubicin was used as a chemotherapeutic agent. The results showed a decrease of mtDNA copy numbers in resected RCC tissues (p = 0.043). The TFAM-KD clone expressed lower mtDNA copy number (p = 0.034), lower mRNA levels of TFAM (p = 0.008), ND1 (p = 0.007), and ND6 (p = 0.017), and lower protein levels of TFAM and COX-2 than did the NT clone. By contrast, the protein levels of HIF-2α, HK-II, PFK, LDHA, AKT, MYC and vimentin; trans-well migration activity (p = 0

  9. Role of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Alteration in Human Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen-Sung; Lee, Hui-Ting; Lee, Ming-Huei; Pan, Siao-Cian; Ke, Chen-Yeh; Chiu, Allen Wen-Hsiang; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2016-05-25

    We investigated the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number alteration in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The mtDNA copy numbers of paired cancer and non-cancer parts from five resected RCC kidneys after radical nephrectomy were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). An RCC cell line, 786-O, was infected by lentiviral particles to knock down mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM). Null target (NT) and TFAM-knockdown (TFAM-KD) represented the control and knockdown 786-O clones, respectively. Protein or mRNA expression levels of TFAM; mtDNA-encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1), ND6 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (COX-2); nuclear DNA (nDNA)-encoded succinate dehydrogenase subunit A (SDHA); v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 gene (AKT)-encoded AKT and v-myc myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog gene (c-MYC)-encoded MYC; glycolytic enzymes including hexokinase II (HK-II), glucose 6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), phosphofructokinase (PFK), and lactate dehydrogenase subunit A (LDHA); and hypoxia-inducible factors the HIF-1α and HIF-2α, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), and pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component α subunit (PDHA1) were analyzed by Western blot or Q-PCR. Bioenergetic parameters of cellular metabolism, basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (mOCRB) and basal extracellular acidification rate (ECARB), were measured by a Seahorse XF(e)-24 analyzer. Cell invasiveness was evaluated by a trans-well migration assay and vimentin expression. Doxorubicin was used as a chemotherapeutic agent. The results showed a decrease of mtDNA copy numbers in resected RCC tissues (p = 0.043). The TFAM-KD clone expressed lower mtDNA copy number (p = 0.034), lower mRNA levels of TFAM (p = 0.008), ND1 (p = 0.007), and ND6 (p = 0.017), and lower protein levels of TFAM and COX-2 than did the NT clone. By contrast, the protein levels of HIF-2α, HK-II, PFK, LDHA, AKT, MYC and vimentin; trans-well migration activity (p = 0

  10. γ-Rays-generated ROS induce apoptosis via mitochondrial and cell cycle alteration in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Claro, Sandra; Oshiro, Maria Etsuko Miyamoto; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Pereira, Gustavo José Silva; Smaili, Soraya Soubhi; Ferreira, Alice Teixeira

    2014-10-01

    γ-rays (IR) cause an increase in intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)], alters contractility and triggers apoptosis via the activation of protein kinase C in intestinal guinea pig smooth muscle cells. The present study investigated the role of the mitochondria in these processes and characterized proteins involved in IR-induced apoptosis. Intestinal smooth muscle cells were exposed to 10-50 Gy from a (60)Co γ-source. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were measured by colourimetry with a fluorescente probe. Protein expression was analyzed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. Apoptosis was inhibited by glutathione, possible by inhibiting the generation or scavenging ROS. Apoptosis was mediated by the mitochondria releasing cytochrome c leading to caspase 3 activation. IR increased the expression of the cyclins A, B2 and E and led to unbalanced cellular growth in an absorption dose-dependent manner. However, radiation did not induce alterations in the mitochondrial ultrastructure or in transmembrane electric potential. In contrast, IR increased the nuclear expression of cytoplasmic proteins and cyclins A and E. Smooth muscle cells subjected to IR undergo mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis that involves oncoproteins activation and preserves mitochondrial structure. IR also cause alterations in the expression and localization of both pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins.

  11. Metabolic Stress and Disorders Related to Alterations in Mitochondrial Fission or Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Babbar, Mansi; Sheikh, M. Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial morphology and metabolism play an important role in cellular homeostasis. Recent studies have shown that the fidelity of mitochondrial morphology is important in maintaining mitochondrial shape, number, size, membrane potential, ATP synthesis, mtDNA, motility, signaling, quality control, response to cellular stress, mitophagy and apoptosis. This article provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of the fission and fusion machinery with a focus on the mechanisms underlying the regulation of the mitochondrial morphology and cellular energy state. Several lines of evidence indicate that dysregulation of mitochondrial fission or fusion is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, which in turn impacts mitophagy and apoptosis. Metabolic disorders are also associated with dysregulation of fission or fusion and the available lines of evidence point to a bidirectional interplay between the mitochondrial fission or fusion reactions and bioenergetics. Clearly, more in-depth studies are needed to fully elucidate the mechanisms that control mitochondrial fission and fusion. It is envisioned that the outcome of such studies will improve the understanding of the molecular basis of related metabolic disorders and also facilitate the development of better therapeutics. PMID:24533171

  12. Disease causing mutations of troponin alter regulated actin state distributions.

    PubMed

    Chalovich, Joseph M

    2012-12-01

    Striated muscle contraction is regulated primarily through the action of tropomyosin and troponin that are bound to actin. Activation requires Ca(2+) binding to troponin and/or binding of high affinity myosin complexes to actin. Mutations within components of the regulatory complex may lead to familial cardiomyopathies and myopathies. In several cases examined, either physiological or pathological changes in troponin alter the distribution among states of actin-tropomyosin-troponin that differ in their abilities to stimulate myosin ATPase activity. These observations open possibilities for managing disorders of the troponin complex. Furthermore, analyses of mutant forms of troponin give insights into the regulation of striated muscle contraction.

  13. Bitter taste receptor agonists alter mitochondrial function and induce autophagy in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shi; Sharma, Pawan; Shah, Sushrut D; Deshpande, Deepak A

    2017-07-01

    Airway remodeling, including increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, is a hallmark feature of asthma and COPD. We previously identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) on human ASM cells and demonstrated that known TAS2R agonists could promote ASM relaxation and bronchodilation and inhibit mitogen-induced ASM growth. In this study, we explored cellular mechanisms mediating the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists on human ASM cells. Pretreatment of ASM cells with TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine resulted in inhibition of cell survival, which was largely reversed by bafilomycin A1, an autophagy inhibitor. Transmission electron microscope studies demonstrated the presence of double-membrane autophagosomes and deformed mitochondria. In ASM cells, TAS2R agonists decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased mitochondrial ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation. Inhibiting dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1) reversed TAS2R agonist-induced mitochondrial membrane potential change and attenuated mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death. Furthermore, the expression of mitochondrial protein BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) and mitochondrial localization of DLP1 were significantly upregulated by TAS2R agonists. More importantly, inhibiting Bnip3 mitochondrial localization by dominant-negative Bnip3 significantly attenuated cell death induced by TAS2R agonist. Collectively the TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine modulate mitochondrial structure and function, resulting in ASM cell death. Furthermore, Bnip3 plays a central role in TAS2R agonist-induced ASM functional changes via a mitochondrial pathway. These findings further establish the cellular mechanisms of antimitogenic effects of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and pathways that can be targeted to mitigate airway remodeling as well as bronchoconstriction in obstructive airway diseases. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological

  14. Inflammation in adult women with a history of child maltreatment: The involvement of mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Boeck, Christina; Koenig, Alexandra Maria; Schury, Katharina; Geiger, Martha Leonie; Karabatsiakis, Alexander; Wilker, Sarah; Waller, Christiane; Gündel, Harald; Fegert, Jörg Michael; Calzia, Enrico; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

    2016-09-01

    The experience of maltreatment during childhood is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation in adulthood. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this pro-inflammatory phenotype remain unclear. Mitochondria were recently found to principally coordinate inflammatory processes via both inflammasome activation and inflammasome-independent pathways. To this end, we hypothesized that alterations in immune cell mitochondrial functioning and oxidative stress might be at the interface between the association of maltreatment experiences during childhood and inflammation. We analyzed pro-inflammatory biomarkers (levels of C-reactive protein, cytokine secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro, PBMC composition, lysophosphatidylcholine levels), serum oxidative stress levels (arginine:citrulline ratio, l-carnitine and acetylcarnitine levels) and mitochondrial functioning (respiratory activity and density of mitochondria in PBMC) in peripheral blood samples collected from 30 women (aged 22-44years) with varying degrees of maltreatment experiences in form of abuse and neglect during childhood. Exposure to maltreatment during childhood was associated with an increased ROS production, higher levels of oxidative stress and an increased mitochondrial activity in a dose-response relationship. Moreover, the increase in mitochondrial activity and ROS production were positively associated with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by PBMC. Decreased serum levels of lysophosphatidylcholines suggested higher inflammasome activation with increasing severity of child maltreatment experiences. Together these findings offer preliminary evidence for the association of alterations in immune cell mitochondrial functioning, oxidative stress and the pro-inflammatory phenotype observed in individuals with a history of maltreatment during childhood. The results emphasize that the early prevention of child abuse and neglect warrants more attention, as the

  15. Altered Expression of Human Mitochondrial Branched Chain Aminotransferase in Dementia with Lewy Bodies and Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Emma L; Kierzkowska, Marta; Hull, Jonathon; Kehoe, Patrick G; Hutson, Susan M; Conway, Myra E

    2017-01-01

    Cytosolic and mitochondrial human branched chain aminotransferase (hBCATc and hBCATm, respectively) play an integral role in brain glutamate metabolism. Regional increased levels of hBCATc in the CA1 and CA4 region of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain together with increased levels of hBCATm in frontal and temporal cortex of AD brains, suggest a role for these proteins in glutamate excitotoxicity. Glutamate toxicity is a key pathogenic feature of several neurological disorders including epilepsy associated dementia, AD, vascular dementia (VaD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). To further understand if these increases are specific to AD, the expression profiles of hBCATc and hBCATm were examined in other forms of dementia including DLB and VaD. Similar to AD, levels of hBCATm were significantly increased in the frontal and temporal cortex of VaD cases and in frontal cortex of DLB cases compared to controls, however there were no observed differences in hBCATc between groups in these areas. Moreover, multiple forms of hBCATm were observed that were particular to the disease state relative to matched controls. Real-time PCR revealed similar expression of hBCATm mRNA in frontal and temporal cortex for all cohort comparisons, whereas hBCATc mRNA expression was significantly increased in VaD cases compared to controls. Collectively our results suggest that hBCATm protein expression is significantly increased in the brains of DLB and VaD cases, similar to those reported in AD brain. These findings indicate a more global response to altered glutamate metabolism and suggest common metabolic responses that might reflect shared neurodegenerative mechanisms across several forms of dementia.

  16. Dietary pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) alters indicators of inflammation and mitochondrial-related metabolism in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Harris, Calliandra B; Chowanadisai, Winyoo; Mishchuk, Darya O; Satre, Mike A; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Rucker, Robert B

    2013-12-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) influences energy-related metabolism and neurologic functions in animals. The mechanism of action involves interactions with cell signaling pathways and mitochondrial function. However, little is known about the response to PQQ in humans. Using a crossover study design, 10 subjects (5 females, 5 males) ingested PQQ added to a fruit-flavored drink in two separate studies. In study 1, PQQ was given in a single dose (0.2 mg PQQ/kg). Multiple measurements of plasma and urine PQQ levels and changes in antioxidant potential [based on total peroxyl radical-trapping potential and thiobarbituric acid reactive product (TBAR) assays] were made throughout the period of 48 h. In study 2, PQQ was administered as a daily dose (0.3 mg PQQ/kg). After 76 h, measurements included indices of inflammation [plasma C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-6 levels], standard clinical indices (e.g., cholesterol, glucose, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, etc.) and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance estimates of urinary metabolites related in part to oxidative metabolism. The standard clinical indices were normal and not altered by PQQ supplementation. However, dietary PQQ exposure (Study 1) resulted in apparent changes in antioxidant potential based on malonaldehyde-related TBAR assessments. In Study 2, PQQ supplementation resulted in significant decreases in the levels of plasma C-reactive protein, IL-6 and urinary methylated amines such as trimethylamine N-oxide, and changes in urinary metabolites consistent with enhanced mitochondria-related functions. The data are among the first to link systemic effects of PQQ in animals to corresponding effects in humans. © 2013.

  17. Maternal low-protein diet alters pancreatic islet mitochondrial function in a sex-specific manner in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Theys, Nicolas; Bouckenooghe, Thomas; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Remacle, Claude; Reusens, Brigitte

    2009-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction may be a long-term consequence of a poor nutritional environment during early life. Our aim was to investigate whether a maternal low-protein (LP) diet may program mitochondrial dysfunction in islets of adult progeny before glucose intolerance ensues. To address this, pregnant Wistar rats were fed isocaloric diets containing either 20% protein (control) or 8% protein (LP diet) throughout gestation. From birth, offspring received the control diet. The mitochondrial function was analyzed in islets of 3-mo-old offspring. Related to their basal insulin release, cultured islets from both male and female LP offspring presented a lower response to glucose challenge and a blunted ATP production compared with control offspring. The expression of malate dehydrogenase as well as the subunit 6 of the ATP synthase encoded by mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) was lower in these islets, reducing the capacity of ATP production through the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. However, mtDNA content was unchanged in LP islets compared with control. Several consequences of protein restriction during fetal life were more marked in male offspring. Only LP males showed an increased reactive oxygen species production associated with a higher expression of mitochondrial subunits of the electron transport chain NADH-ubiquinone oxireductase subunit 4L, an overexpression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma and uncoupling protein-2, and a strongly reduced beta-cell mass. In conclusion, mitochondrial function is clearly altered in islets from LP adult offspring in a sex-specific manner. That may provide a cellular explanation for the earlier development of glucose intolerance in male than in female offspring of dams fed an LP diet.

  18. Lack of mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits of complex I and alteration of the respiratory chain in Nicotiana sylvestris mitochondrial deletion mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gutierres, Sophie; Sabar, Mohammed; Lelandais, Christine; Chetrit, Philippe; Diolez, Philippe; Degand, Hervé; Boutry, Marc; Vedel, Fernand; de Kouchkovsky, Yaroslav; De Paepe, Rosine

    1997-01-01

    We previously have shown that Nicotiana sylvestris cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) mutants I and II present large mtDNA deletions and that the NAD7 subunit of complex I (the main dehydrogenase of the mitochondrial respiratory chain) is absent in CMS I. Here, we show that, despite a large difference in size in the mtDNA deletion, CMS I and II display similar alterations. Both have an impaired development from germination to flowering, with partial male sterility that becomes complete under low light. Besides NAD7, two other complex I subunits are missing (NAD9 and the nucleus-encoded, 38-kDa subunit), identified on two-dimensional patterns of mitochondrial proteins. Mitochondria isolated from CMS leaves showed altered respiration. Although their succinate oxidation through complex II was close to that of the wild type, oxidation of glycine, a priority substrate of plant mitochondria, was significantly reduced. The remaining activity was much less sensitive to rotenone, indicating the breakdown of Complex I activity. Oxidation of exogenous NADH (coupled to proton gradient generation and partly sensitive to rotenone) was strongly increased. These results suggest respiratory compensation mechanisms involving additional NADH dehydrogenases to complex I. Finally, the capacity of the cyanide-resistant alternative oxidase pathway was enhanced in CMS, and higher amounts of enzyme were evidenced by immunodetection. PMID:9096412

  19. Nitrite attenuates ischemia-reperfusion-induced microcirculatory alterations and mitochondrial dysfunction in the microvasculature of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei Z; Fang, Xin-Hua; Stephenson, Linda L; Zhang, Xinlan; Williams, Shelley J; Baynosa, Richard C; Khiabani, Kayvan T; Zamboni, William A

    2011-10-01

    Recently, nitrite has been rediscovered as a physiologically relevant storage reservoir of nitric oxide in blood and it can readily be converted to nitric oxide under hypoxic and acidic conditions. In this study, the authors evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of nitrite on reperfusion-induced microcirculatory alterations and mitochondrial dysfunction in the microvasculature of skeletal muscle. The authors used a vascular pedicle isolated rat cremaster model that underwent 4 hours of warm ischemia followed by 2 hours or 17 hours of reperfusion. At 5 minutes before reperfusion, normal saline, sodium nitrite (0.20 μM/minute/kg), or nitrite mixed with 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-3-oxide-1-oxyl (potassium salt) (0.2 mg/minute/kg) was infused into the microcirculation of ischemic cremaster by means of intraarterial infusion. Ischemia-reperfusion-induced microcirculatory alterations were measured after 2 hours of reperfusion. Microvasculature of the cremaster muscle including the vascular pedicle was harvested to determine the mitochondrial dysfunction. The blood concentration of methemoglobin was also measured to determine the toxicity of nitrite. The authors found that nitrite significantly attenuated ischemia-reperfusion-induced vasoconstriction, arteriole stagnation, and capillary no-reflow in the early phase of reperfusion and the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release in the late phase of reperfusion. Nitrite-induced protection was significantly blocked by a nitric oxide scavenger (potassium salt). The methemoglobin results showed that the doses of nitrite we used in the present study were safe. The supplementation of a low dose of nitrite, directly into the microcirculation of ischemic muscle through local intraarterial infusion, significantly attenuated ischemia-reperfusion-induced microcirculatory alterations in vivo and mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro in the microvasculature of skeletal

  20. Sexual Dimorphism in the Alterations of Cardiac Muscle Mitochondrial Bioenergetics Associated to the Ageing Process.

    PubMed

    Colom, Bartomeu; Oliver, Jordi; Garcia-Palmer, Francisco J

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of cardiac disease is age and sex dependent, but the mechanisms governing these associations remain poorly understood. Mitochondria are the organelles in charge of producing energy for the cells, and their malfunction has been linked to cardiovascular disease and heart failure. Interestingly, heart mitochondrial content and functionality are also age and sex dependent. Here we investigated the combinatory effects of age and sex in mitochondrial bioenergetics that could help to understand their role on cardiac disease. Cardiac mitochondria from 6- and 24-month-old male and female Wistar rats were isolated, and the enzymatic activities of the oxidative-phosphorylative complexes I, III, and IV and ATPase, as well as the protein levels of complex IV, β-ATPase, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were measured. Furthermore, heart DNA content, citrate synthase activity, mitochondrial protein content, oxygen consumption, and H2O2 generation were also determined. Results showed a reduction in heart mitochondrial mass and functionality with age that correlated with increased H2O2 generation. Moreover, sex-dependent differences were found in several of these parameters. In particular, old females exhibited a significant loss of mitochondrial function and increased relative H2O2 production compared with their male counterparts. The results demonstrate a sex dimorphism in the age-associated defects on cardiac mitochondrial function.

  1. Copper alters the effect of temperature on mitochondrial bioenergetics in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Sappal, Ravinder; Macdougald, Michelle; Stevens, Don; Fast, Mark D; Kamunde, Collins

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the interaction of temperature and copper (Cu) on mitochondrial bioenergetics to gain insight into how temperature fluctuations imposed by natural phenomena or anthropogenic activities would modulate the effects of Cu on cellular energy homeostasis. Mitochondria were isolated from rainbow trout livers and, in the first set of experiments, exposed to Cu (0-2.5 mM) at 5, 11, and 25 °C with measurement of mitochondrial complex II (mtCII)-driven respiration. In the second set of experiments, unenergized mitochondria were incubated for 30 or 60 min with lower concentrations (0-160 μM) of Cu to measure the effects on mtCII enzyme activity. Whereas maximal (state 3) respiration was inhibited by high Cu exposure, low Cu doses stimulated and high Cu doses inhibited resting (state 4) and 4ol (proton leak) respirations. High temperature alone increased mitochondrial respiration in all states. The Q10 values for state 3, state 4, and proton leak respirations suggested active processes with state 4 respiration and proton leak exhibiting greater thermal sensitivity than state 3 respiration. The differential thermal sensitivity of resting relative to phosphorylating mitochondrial state led to uncoupling and limitation of mitochondrial oxidative capacity at both high temperature and doses of Cu. Moreover, exposure to high Cu caused loss of thermal dependence of the mitochondrial bioenergetics culminating in Q10 values well below unity and decreased activation energies (E a) for both maximal and resting respiration rates. In addition, mtCII activity was increased by low and decreased by high doses of Cu indicating that direct effects on this enzyme contribute to Cu-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, it appears that the substrate oxidation (electron transport chain and tricarboxylic acid cycle) and proton leak subsystems are targets of the deleterious effects of Cu and increased temperature on mitochondrial bioenergetics. However, mitochondrial

  2. Order within a mosaic distribution of mitochondrial c-type cytochrome biogenesis systems?

    PubMed

    Allen, James W A; Jackson, Andrew P; Rigden, Daniel J; Willis, Antony C; Ferguson, Stuart J; Ginger, Michael L

    2008-05-01

    Mitochondrial cytochromes c and c(1) are present in all eukaryotes that use oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor in the respiratory chain. Maturation of c-type cytochromes requires covalent attachment of the heme cofactor to the protein, and there are at least five distinct biogenesis systems that catalyze this post-translational modification in different organisms and organelles. In this study, we use biochemical data, comparative genomic and structural bioinformatics investigations to provide a holistic view of mitochondrial c-type cytochrome biogenesis and its evolution. There are three pathways for mitochondrial c-type cytochrome maturation, only one of which is present in prokaryotes. We analyze the evolutionary distribution of these biogenesis systems, which include the Ccm system (System I) and the enzyme heme lyase (System III). We conclude that heme lyase evolved once and, in many lineages, replaced the multicomponent Ccm system (present in the proto-mitochondrial endosymbiont), probably as a consequence of lateral gene transfer. We find no evidence of a System III precursor in prokaryotes, and argue that System III is incompatible with multi-heme cytochromes common to bacteria, but absent from eukaryotes. The evolution of the eukaryotic-specific protein heme lyase is strikingly unusual, given that this protein provides a function (thioether bond formation) that is also ubiquitous in prokaryotes. The absence of any known c-type cytochrome biogenesis system from the sequenced genomes of various trypanosome species indicates the presence of a third distinct mitochondrial pathway. Interestingly, this system attaches heme to mitochondrial cytochromes c that contain only one cysteine residue, rather than the usual two, within the heme-binding motif. The isolation of single-cysteine-containing mitochondrial cytochromes c from free-living kinetoplastids, Euglena and the marine flagellate Diplonema papillatum suggests that this unique form of heme attachment

  3. Mitochondrial proteome: toward the detection and profiling of disease associated alterations.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Paul C; Herrmann, E Clifford

    2012-01-01

    Existing at the heart of cellular energy metabolism, the mitochondrion is uniquely positioned to have a major impact on human disease processes. Examples of mitochondrial impact on human pathology abound and include etiologies ranging from inborn errors of metabolism to the site of activity of a variety of toxic compounds. In this review, the unique aspects of the mechanisms related to the mitochondrial proteome are discussed along with an overview of the literature related to mitochondrial proteomic exploration. The review includes discussion of potential areas for exploration and advantages of applying proteomic techniques to the study of mitochondria.

  4. Analysis of Nuclear Mitochondrial DNA Segments of Nine Plant Species: Size, Distribution, and Insertion Loci

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial DNA segment (Numt) insertion describes a well-known phenomenon of mitochondrial DNA transfer into a eukaryotic nuclear genome. However, it has not been well understood, especially in plants. Numt insertion patterns vary from species to species in different kingdoms. In this study, the patterns were surveyed in nine plant species, and we found some tip-offs. First, when the mitochondrial genome size is relatively large, the portion of the longer Numt is also larger than the short one. Second, the whole genome duplication event increases the ratio of the shorter Numt portion in the size distribution. Third, Numt insertions are enriched in exon regions. This analysis may be helpful for understanding plant evolution. PMID:27729838

  5. Pseudouridine synthase 1 deficient mice, a model for Mitochondrial Myopathy with Sideroblastic Anemia, exhibit muscle morphology and physiology alterations

    PubMed Central

    Mangum, Joshua E.; Hardee, Justin P.; Fix, Dennis K.; Puppa, Melissa J.; Elkes, Johnathon; Altomare, Diego; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Campagna, Dean R.; Schmidt, Paul J.; Sendamarai, Anoop K.; Lidov, Hart G. W.; Barlow, Shayne C.; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Fleming, Mark D.; Carson, James A.; Patton, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy with lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) is an oxidative phosphorylation disorder, with primary clinical manifestations of myopathic exercise intolerance and a macrocytic sideroblastic anemia. One cause of MLASA is recessive mutations in PUS1, which encodes pseudouridine (Ψ) synthase 1 (Pus1p). Here we describe a mouse model of MLASA due to mutations in PUS1. As expected, certain Ψ modifications were missing in cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs from Pus1−/− animals. Pus1−/− mice were born at the expected Mendelian frequency and were non-dysmorphic. At 14 weeks the mutants displayed reduced exercise capacity. Examination of tibialis anterior (TA) muscle morphology and histochemistry demonstrated an increase in the cross sectional area and proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIB and low succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) expressing myofibers, without a change in the size of MHC IIA positive or high SDH myofibers. Cytochrome c oxidase activity was significantly reduced in extracts from red gastrocnemius muscle from Pus1−/− mice. Transmission electron microscopy on red gastrocnemius muscle demonstrated that Pus1−/− mice also had lower intermyofibrillar mitochondrial density and smaller mitochondria. Collectively, these results suggest that alterations in muscle metabolism related to mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity may account for the reduced exercise capacity in Pus1−/− mice. PMID:27197761

  6. Number and Brightness analysis of alpha-synuclein oligomerization and the associated mitochondrial morphology alterations in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Plotegher, N.; Gratton, E.; Bubacco, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alpha-synuclein oligomerization is associated to Parkinson's disease etiopathogenesis. The study of alpha-synuclein oligomerization properties in live cell and the definition of their effects on cellular viability are among fields expected to provide the knowledge required to unravel the mechanism(s) of toxicity that lead to the disease. Methods We used Number and Brightness method, which is a method based on fluorescence fluctuation analysis, to monitor alpha-synuclein tagged with EGFP aggregation in living SH-SY5Y cells. The presence of alpha-synuclein oligomers detected with this method was associated with intracellular structure conditions, evaluated by fluorescence confocal imaging. Results Cells overexpressing alpha-synuclein-EGFP present a heterogeneous ensemble of oligomers constituted by less than 10 monomers, when the protein approaches a threshold concentration value of about 90 nM in the cell cytoplasm. We show that the oligomeric species are partially sequestered by lysosomes and that the mitochondria morphology is altered in cells presenting oligomers, suggesting that these mitochondria may be dysfunctional. Conclusions We showed that alpha-synuclein overexpression in SH-SY5Y causes the formation of alpha-synuclein oligomeric species, whose presence is associated with mitochondrial fragmentation and autophagic-lysosomal pathway activation in live cells. General significance The unique capability provided by the Number and Brightness analysis to study alpha-synuclein oligomers distribution and properties, and the study their association to intracellular components in single live cells is important to forward our understanding of the molecular mechanisms Parkinson’s disease and it may be of general significance when applied to the study of other aggregating proteins in cellular models. PMID:24561157

  7. Mitochondrial and cytoskeletal alterations are involved in the pathogenesis of hydronephrosis in ICR/Mlac-hydro mice.

    PubMed

    Isarangkul, Duangnate; Wiyakrutta, Suthep; Kengkoom, Kanchana; Reamtong, Onrapak; Ampawong, Sumate

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of congenital hydronephrosis in laboratory animals has been studied for many years, yet little is known about the underlying mechanism of this disease. In this study, we investigated a MS-based comparative proteomics approach to characterize the differently expressed proteins between kidney tissue samples of ICR/Mlac-hydro and wild-type mice. Interestingly, proteomic results exhibited several mitochondrial protein alterations especially the up-regulation of 60 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp60), stress-70 protein (GRP75) dysfunction, and down-regulation of voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC-1). The results demonstrated that mitochondrial alteration may lead to inadequate energy-supply to maintain normal water reabsorption from the renal tubule, causing hydronephrosis. Moreover, the alteration of cytoskeleton proteins in the renal tubule, in particular the up-regulation of tubulin beta-4B chain (Tb4B) and N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 protein (Ndr-1) may also be related due to their fundamental roles in maintaining cell morphology and tissue stability. In addition, cytoskeletal alterations may consequence to the reduction of glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), cytoplasmic enzyme, which modulates the capacity of structural proteins. Our findings highlight a number of target proteins that may play a crucial role in congenital hydronephrosis and emphasize that the disorder of mitochondria and cytoskeleton proteins may be involved.

  8. Mitochondrial and cytoskeletal alterations are involved in the pathogenesis of hydronephrosis in ICR/Mlac-hydro mice

    PubMed Central

    Isarangkul, Duangnate; Wiyakrutta, Suthep; Kengkoom, Kanchana; Reamtong, Onrapak; Ampawong, Sumate

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of congenital hydronephrosis in laboratory animals has been studied for many years, yet little is known about the underlying mechanism of this disease. In this study, we investigated a MS-based comparative proteomics approach to characterize the differently expressed proteins between kidney tissue samples of ICR/Mlac-hydro and wild-type mice. Interestingly, proteomic results exhibited several mitochondrial protein alterations especially the up-regulation of 60 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp60), stress-70 protein (GRP75) dysfunction, and down-regulation of voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC-1). The results demonstrated that mitochondrial alteration may lead to inadequate energy-supply to maintain normal water reabsorption from the renal tubule, causing hydronephrosis. Moreover, the alteration of cytoskeleton proteins in the renal tubule, in particular the up-regulation of tubulin beta-4B chain (Tb4B) and N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 protein (Ndr-1) may also be related due to their fundamental roles in maintaining cell morphology and tissue stability. In addition, cytoskeletal alterations may consequence to the reduction of glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), cytoplasmic enzyme, which modulates the capacity of structural proteins. Our findings highlight a number of target proteins that may play a crucial role in congenital hydronephrosis and emphasize that the disorder of mitochondria and cytoskeleton proteins may be involved. PMID:26309577

  9. Metabolic dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamics in the utrophin-dystrophin deficient mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pant, Meghna; Sopariwala, Danesh H; Bal, Naresh C; Lowe, Jeovanna; Delfín, Dawn A; Rafael-Fortney, Jill; Periasamy, Muthu

    2015-01-01

    The utrophin-dystrophin deficient (DKO) mouse model has been widely used to understand the progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). However, it is unclear as to what extent muscle pathology affects metabolism. Therefore, the present study was focused on understanding energy expenditure in the whole animal and in isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and to determine changes in metabolic enzymes. Our results show that the 8 week-old DKO mice consume higher oxygen relative to activity levels. Interestingly the EDL muscle from DKO mouse consumes higher oxygen per unit integral force, generates less force and performs better in the presence of pyruvate thus mimicking a slow twitch muscle. We also found that the expression of hexokinase 1 and pyruvate kinase M2 was upregulated several fold suggesting increased glycolytic flux. Additionally, there is a dramatic increase in dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp 1) and mitofusin 2 protein levels suggesting increased mitochondrial fission and fusion, a feature associated with increased energy demand and altered mitochondrial dynamics. Collectively our studies point out that the dystrophic disease has caused significant changes in muscle metabolism. To meet the increased energetic demand, upregulation of metabolic enzymes and regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission is observed in the dystrophic muscle. A better understanding of the metabolic demands and the accompanied alterations in the dystrophic muscle can help us design improved intervention therapies along with existing drug treatments for the DMD patients.

  10. Alteration of ROS homeostasis and decreased lifespan in S. cerevisiae elicited by deletion of the mitochondrial translocator FLX1.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Dipalo, Emilia; Miccolis, Angelica; Boles, Eckhard; Caselle, Michele; Barile, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the control exerted by the mitochondrial translocator FLX1, which catalyzes the movement of the redox cofactor FAD across the mitochondrial membrane, on the efficiency of ATP production, ROS homeostasis, and lifespan of S. cerevisiae. The deletion of the FLX1 gene resulted in respiration-deficient and small-colony phenotype accompanied by a significant ATP shortage and ROS unbalance in glycerol-grown cells. Moreover, the flx1Δ strain showed H2O2 hypersensitivity and decreased lifespan. The impaired biochemical phenotype found in the flx1Δ strain might be justified by an altered expression of the flavoprotein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme in bioenergetics and cell regulation. A search for possible cis-acting consensus motifs in the regulatory region upstream SDH1-ORF revealed a dozen of upstream motifs that might respond to induced metabolic changes by altering the expression of Flx1p. Among these motifs, two are present in the regulatory region of genes encoding proteins involved in flavin homeostasis. This is the first evidence that the mitochondrial flavin cofactor status is involved in controlling the lifespan of yeasts, maybe by changing the cellular succinate level. This is not the only case in which the homeostasis of redox cofactors underlies complex phenotypical behaviours, as lifespan in yeasts.

  11. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics induced by tebufenpyrad and pyridaben in a dopaminergic neuronal cell culture model

    PubMed Central

    Charli, Adhithiya; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2015-01-01

    Tebufenpyrad and pyridaben are two agro-chemically important acaricides that function like the known mitochondrial toxicant rotenone. Although these two compounds have been commonly used to kill populations of mites and ticks in commercial greenhouses, their neurotoxic profiles remain largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effects of these two pesticides on mitochondrial structure and function in an in vitro cell culture model using the Seahorse bioanalyzer and confocal fluorescence imaging. The effects were compared with rotenone. Exposing rat dopaminergic neuronal cells (N27 cells) to tebufenpyrad and pyridaben for 3 h induced dose-dependent cell death with an EC50 of 3.98 μM and 3.77 μM, respectively. Also, tebufenpyrad and pyridaben (3 μM) exposure induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and m-aconitase damage, suggesting that the pesticide toxicity is associated with oxidative damage. Morphometric image analysis with the MitoTracker red fluorescent probe indicated that tebufenpyrad and pyridaben, as well as rotenone, caused abnormalities in mitochondrial morphology, including reduced mitochondrial length and circularity. Functional bioenergetic experiments using the Seahorse XF96 analyzer revealed that tebufenpyrad and pyridaben very rapidly suppressed the basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate similar to that of rotenone. Further analysis of bioenergetic curves also revealed dose-dependent decreases in ATP-linked respiration and respiratory capacity. The luminescence-based ATP measurement further confirmed that pesticide-induced mitochondrial inhibition of respiration is accompanied by the loss of cellular ATP. Collectively, our results suggest that exposure to the pesticides tebufenpyrad and pyridaben induces neurotoxicity by rapidly initiating mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Our findings also reveal that monitoring the kinetics of mitochondrial respiration with Seahorse could be used

  12. Mitochondrial proteomic alterations caused by long-term low-dose copper exposure in mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xuemei; Wei, Gang; Huang, Zhijun; Qu, Zhongsen; Huang, Xinfeng; Xu, Hua; Liu, Jianjun; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Yang, Xifei

    2016-11-30

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in neurotoxicity caused by exposure of various chemicals such as copper. However, the effects of long-term low-dose copper exposure on mitochondrial proteome remain unclear. In this study, we found the treatment of copper (0.13ppm copper sulfate in drinking water) for 12 months caused abnormal expression of a total of 13 mitochondrial proteins (7 up-regulated and 6 down-regulated) as revealed by two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry in mouse cortex. Protein functional analysis revealed that these differentially expressed proteins mainly included apoptosis-associated proteins, axon guidance-associated proteins, axonogenesis-associated proteins and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex. Among these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins, GRP75 (75kDa glucose-regulated protein) and GRP78 (78kDa glucose-regulated protein) were found to be significantly down-regulated as confirmed by Western-blot analysis. The down-regulation of GRP75 was shown to promote apoptosis. The down-regulation of GRP78/BiP could up-regulate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress mediators and thus cause apoptosis. Our study suggested that these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins such as GRP75 and GRP78 could be involved in neurotoxicity caused by long-term low-dose copper exposure and serve as potential molecular targets for the treatment of copper neurotoxicity.

  13. Altered Mitochondrial DNA Methylation Pattern in Alzheimer Disease-Related Pathology and in Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Blanch, Marta; Mosquera, Jose Luis; Ansoleaga, Belén; Ferrer, Isidre; Barrachina, Marta

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is linked with the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles essential for cell viability and are characterized by the presence of the mitochondrial (mt)DNA. DNA methylation is a well-known epigenetic mechanism that regulates nuclear gene transcription. However, mtDNA methylation is not the subject of the same research attention. The present study shows the presence of mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine in CpG and non-CpG sites in the entorhinal cortex and substantia nigra of control human postmortem brains, using the 454 GS FLX Titanium pyrosequencer. Moreover, increased mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine levels are found in the D-loop region of mtDNA in the entorhinal cortex in brain samples with Alzheimer disease-related pathology (stages I to II and stages III to IV of Braak and Braak; n = 8) with respect to control cases. Interestingly, this region shows a dynamic pattern in the content of mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine in amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 mice along with Alzheimer disease pathology progression (3, 6, and 12 months of age). Finally, a loss of mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine levels in the D-loop region is found in the substantia nigra in Parkinson disease (n = 10) with respect to control cases. In summary, the present findings suggest mtDNA epigenetic modulation in human brain is vulnerable to neurodegenerative disease states.

  14. Mitochondrial Alterations in Peripheral Mononuclear Blood Cells from Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients.

    PubMed

    Delbarba, A; Abate, G; Prandelli, C; Marziano, M; Buizza, L; Arce Varas, N; Novelli, A; Cuetos, F; Martinez, C; Lanni, C; Memo, M; Uberti, D

    2016-01-01

    It is well recognized that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to neurodegeneration occurring in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, evidences of mitochondrial defects in AD peripheral cells are still inconclusive. Here, some mitochondrial-encoded and nuclear-encoded proteins, involved in maintaining the correct mitochondria machine, were investigated in terms of protein expression and enzymatic activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from AD and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients and healthy subjects. In addition mitochondrial DNA copy number was measured by real time PCR. We found some differences and some similarities between AD and MCI patients when compared with healthy subjects. For example, cytochrome C and cytochrome B were decreased in AD, while MCI showed only a statistical reduction of cytochrome C. On the other hand, both AD and MCI blood cells exhibited highly nitrated MnSOD, index of a prooxidant environment inside the mitochondria. TFAM, a regulator of mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, was decreased in both AD and MCI patients' blood cells. Moreover also the mitochondrial DNA amount was reduced in PBMCs from both patient groups. In conclusion these data confirmed peripheral mitochondria impairment in AD and demonstrated that TFAM and mtDNA amount reduction could be two features of early events occurring in AD pathogenesis.

  15. Loss of Drp1 function alters OPA1 processing and changes mitochondrial membrane organization

    SciTech Connect

    Moepert, Kristin; Hajek, Petr; Frank, Stephan; Chen, Christiane; Kaufmann, Joerg; Santel, Ansgar

    2009-08-01

    RNAi mediated loss of Drp1 function changes mitochondrial morphology in cultured HeLa and HUVEC cells by shifting the balance of mitochondrial fission and fusion towards unopposed fusion. Over time, inhibition of Drp1 expression results in the formation of a highly branched mitochondrial network along with 'bulge'-like structures. These changes in mitochondrial morphology are accompanied by a reduction in levels of Mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) and 2 (Mfn2) and a modified proteolytic processing of OPA1 isoforms, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, our data imply that bulge formation is driven by Mfn1 action along with particular proteolytic short-OPA1 (s-OPA1) variants: Loss of Mfn2 in the absence of Drp1 results in an increase of Mfn1 levels along with processed s-OPA1-isoforms, thereby enhancing continuous 'fusion' and bulge formation. Moreover, bulge formation might reflect s-OPA1 mitochondrial membrane remodeling activity, resulting in the compartmentalization of cytochrome c deposits. The proteins Yme1L and PHB2 appeared not associated with the observed enhanced OPA1 proteolysis upon RNAi of Drp1, suggesting the existence of other OPA1 processing controlling proteins. Taken together, Drp1 appears to affect the activity of the mitochondrial fusion machinery by unbalancing the protein levels of mitofusins and OPA1.

  16. Altered skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis but improved endurance capacity in trained OPA1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Caffin, F; Prola, A; Piquereau, J; Novotova, M; David, D J; Garnier, A; Fortin, D; Alavi, M V; Veksler, V; Ventura-Clapier, R; Joubert, F

    2013-12-01

    The role of OPA1, a GTPase dynamin protein mainly involved in the fusion of inner mitochondrial membranes, has been studied in many cell types, but only a few studies have been conducted on adult differentiated tissues such as cardiac or skeletal muscle cells. Yet OPA1 is highly expressed in these cells, and could play different roles, especially in response to an environmental stress like exercise. Endurance exercise increases energy demand in skeletal muscle and repeated activity induces mitochondrial biogenesis and activation of fusion-fission cycles for the synthesis of new mitochondria. But currently no study has clearly shown a link between mitochondrial dynamics and biogenesis. Using a mouse model of haploinsufficiency for the Opa1 gene (Opa1(+/-)), we therefore studied the impact of OPA1 deficiency on the adaptation ability of fast skeletal muscles to endurance exercise training. Our results show that, surprisingly, Opa1(+/-) mice were able to perform the same physical activity as control mice. However, the adaptation strategies of both strains after training differed: while in control mice mitochondrial biogenesis was increased as expected, in Opa1(+/-) mice this process was blunted. Instead, training in Opa1(+/-) mice led to an increase in endurance capacity, and a specific adaptive response involving a metabolic remodelling towards enhanced fatty acid utilization. In conclusion, OPA1 appears necessary for the normal adaptive response and mitochondrial biogenesis of skeletal muscle to training. This work opens new perspectives on the role of mitochondrial dynamics in skeletal muscle cells and during adaptation to stress.

  17. Subcellular Distribution of Mitochondrial Ribosomal RNA in the Mouse Oocyte and Zygote

    PubMed Central

    Ninomiya, Youichirou; Ichinose, Shizuko

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal RNAs (mtrRNAs) have been reported to translocate extra-mitochondrially and localize to the germ cell determinant of oocytes and zygotes in some metazoa except mammals. To address whether the mtrRNAs also localize in the mammals, expression and distribution of mitochondrion-encoded RNAs in the mouse oocytes and zygotes was examined by whole-mount in situ hybridization (ISH). Both 12S and 16S rRNAs were predominantly distributed in the animal hemisphere of the mature oocyte. This distribution pattern was rearranged toward the second polar body in zygotes after fertilization. The amount of mtrRNAs decreased around first cleavage, remained low during second cleavage and increased after third cleavage. Staining intensity of the 12S rRNA was weaker than that of the 16S rRNA throughout the examined stages. Similar distribution dynamics of the 16S rRNA was observed in strontium-activated haploid parthenotes, suggesting the distribution rearrangement does not require a component from sperm. The distribution of 16S rRNAs did not coincide with that of mitochondrion-specific heat shock protein 70, suggesting that the mtrRNA is translocated from mitochondria. The ISH-scanning electron microscopy confirms the extra-mitochondrial mtrRNA in the mouse oocyte. Chloramphenicol (CP) treatment of late pronuclear stage zygotes perturbed first cleavage as judged by the greater than normal disparity in size of blastomeres of 2-cell conceptuses. Two-third of the CP-treated zygotes arrested at either 2-cell or 3-cell stage even after the CP was washed out. These findings indicate that the extra-mitochondrial mtrRNAs are localized in the mouse oocyte and implicated in correct cytoplasmic segregation into blastomeres through cleavages of the zygote. PMID:18043748

  18. Climate shaped the worldwide distribution of human mitochondrial DNA sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Balloux, François; Handley, Lori-Jayne Lawson; Jombart, Thibaut; Liu, Hua; Manica, Andrea

    2009-10-07

    There is an ongoing discussion in the literature on whether human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) evolves neutrally. There have been previous claims for natural selection on human mtDNA based on an excess of non-synonymous mutations and higher evolutionary persistence of specific mitochondrial mutations in Arctic populations. However, these findings were not supported by the reanalysis of larger datasets. Using a geographical framework, we perform the first direct test of the relative extent to which climate and past demography have shaped the current spatial distribution of mtDNA sequences worldwide. We show that populations living in colder environments have lower mitochondrial diversity and that the genetic differentiation between pairs of populations correlates with difference in temperature. These associations were unique to mtDNA; we could not find a similar pattern in any other genetic marker. We were able to identify two correlated non-synonymous point mutations in the ND3 and ATP6 genes characterized by a clear association with temperature, which appear to be plausible targets of natural selection producing the association with climate. The same mutations have been previously shown to be associated with variation in mitochondrial pH and calcium dynamics. Our results indicate that natural selection mediated by climate has contributed to shape the current distribution of mtDNA sequences in humans.

  19. N-acetyl Glucosamine Distribution and Mitochondrial Activity of Tumor Cell Exposed to Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Pinto, G P; Lopes, K A R; Salles, N G; Pacheco-Soares, C

    2016-11-01

    The use of lectins can play an important role for tracking modification on cell surface components, since lectins can be easily complexed with radioisotopes, biotin or fluorescein, facilitating the evaluation of carbohydrates distribution in the cell and mitochondrial activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate photodynamic therapy effects on indirect distribution of N-acetyl-glucosamine terminal glycoproteins, in human laryngeal carcinoma HEp-2 cell line surface, using lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and on mitochondrial activity, for the same cell line, using MitoTracker. The photosensitizer Aluminum Phthalocyanine Tetrasulfonate (AlPcS4) was administrated at 10 μM/mL, followed by an incubation period for its accumulation in the tumor cells, which were irradiated with laser diode λ = 685 nm and energy density of 4.5 J/cm(2). Our results indicated that, after Photodynamic Therapy (PDT), it was observed N-acetyl glucosamine terminal glycoprotein expression and mitochondrial O2 production, compared to the control group. Based on these results, we suggest that PDT influences the O2 mitochondrial production and the presence of surface glycoproteins N-acetyl glucosamine terminals.

  20. Mitochondrial Bioenergetic Alterations in Mouse Neuroblastoma Cells Infected with Sindbis Virus: Implications to Viral Replication and Neuronal Death

    PubMed Central

    Silva da Costa, Leandro; Pereira da Silva, Ana Paula; Da Poian, Andrea T.; El-Bacha, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic resources crucial for viral replication are provided by the host. Details of the mechanisms by which viruses interact with host metabolism, altering and recruiting high free-energy molecules for their own replication, remain unknown. Sindbis virus, the prototype of and most widespread alphavirus, causes outbreaks of arthritis in humans and serves as a model for the study of the pathogenesis of neurological diseases induced by alphaviruses in mice. In this work, respirometric analysis was used to evaluate the effects of Sindbis virus infection on mitochondrial bioenergetics of a mouse neuroblastoma cell lineage, Neuro 2a. The modulation of mitochondrial functions affected cellular ATP content and this was synchronous with Sindbis virus replication cycle and cell death. At 15 h, irrespective of effects on cell viability, viral replication induced a decrease in oxygen consumption uncoupled to ATP synthesis and a 36% decrease in maximum uncoupled respiration, which led to an increase of 30% in the fraction of oxygen consumption used for ATP synthesis. Decreased proton leak associated to complex I respiration contributed to the apparent improvement of mitochondrial function. Cellular ATP content was not affected by infection. After 24 h, mitochondria dysfunction was clearly observed as maximum uncoupled respiration reduced 65%, along with a decrease in the fraction of oxygen consumption used for ATP synthesis. Suppressed respiration driven by complexes I- and II-related substrates seemed to play a role in mitochondrial dysfunction. Despite the increase in glucose uptake and glycolytic flux, these changes were followed by a 30% decrease in ATP content and neuronal death. Taken together, mitochondrial bioenergetics is modulated during Sindbis virus infection in such a way as to favor ATP synthesis required to support active viral replication. These early changes in metabolism of Neuro 2a cells may form the molecular basis of neuronal dysfunction and Sindbis

  1. Mitochondrial dynamics and bioenergetic dysfunction is associated with synaptic alterations in mutant SOD1 motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Magrané, Jordi; Sahawneh, Mary Anne; Przedborski, Serge; Estévez, Álvaro G.; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), a rapidly fatal motor neuron disease. Mutant SOD1 has pleiotropic toxic effects on motor neurons, among which mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as one of the contributing factors in motor neuron demise. Mitochondria are highly dynamic in neurons; they are constantly reshaped by fusion and move along neurites to localize at sites of high-energy utilization, such as synapses. The finding of abnormal mitochondria accumulation in neuromuscular junctions, where the SOD1-FALS degenerative process is though to initiate, suggests that impaired mitochondrial dynamics in motor neurons may be involved in pathogenesis. We addressed this hypothesis by live imaging microscopy of photo-switchable fluorescent mitoDendra in transgenic rat motor neurons expressing mutant or wild type human SOD1. We demonstrate that mutant SOD1 motor neurons have impaired mitochondrial fusion in axons and cell bodies. Mitochondria also display selective impairment of retrograde axonal transport, with reduced frequency and velocity of movements. Fusion and transport defects are associated with smaller mitochondrial size, decreased mitochondrial density, and defective mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, mislocalization of mitochondria at synapses among motor neurons, in vitro, correlates with abnormal synaptic number, structure, and function. Dynamics abnormalities are specific to mutant SOD1 motor neuron mitochondria, since they are absent in wild type SOD1 motor neurons, they do not involve other organelles, and they are not found in cortical neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that impaired mitochondrial dynamics may contribute to the selective degeneration of motor neurons in SOD1-FALS. PMID:22219285

  2. Local populations and inaccuracies: Determining the relevant mitochondrial haplotype distributions for North West European cats.

    PubMed

    Wesselink, Monique; Desmyter, Stijn; Kuiper, Irene

    2017-09-01

    Typing of different portions of the feline mitochondrial control region has illustrated pronounced differences in haplotype distributions between cats from the Netherlands and other parts of the world. To gain a better understanding of the haplotype distribution of North West Continental Europe, 605bp of mitochondrial DNA was typed from randomly selected cats from the Netherlands (N=146), Belgium (N=64) and South West Germany (N=128). The genetic differences between these randomly sampled European populations correlate to the geographical distances, with the Dutch and the South West German populations furthest apart and the Belgian population as an intermediate (Fst values 0.01-0.03). Comparison of North West European mainland distributions to published feline mitochondrial haplotype distributions illustrated moderate to large genetic differentiation (Fst values 0.01-0.32). In this comparison, the correlation between geographical and genetic distance was absent, leading to founder effects and human impact on cat population structure and dispersion being considered as important parameters. When an accurate estimation of feline haplotype distribution is required in forensics, care should be taken when deciding whether extrapolating the frequency data from a certain source to a larger area (country/continent) is justified or whether additional typing of local populations is necessary. This may differ from case to case as local frequencies can be relevant, but can also be deceitful. To improve the applicability of forensic feline mitochondrial DNA studies, documentation and publishing of sampling strategies is advised, as is the implementation of measures to help eliminate potentially erroneous haplotypes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mitochondrial physiology and reactive oxygen species production are altered by hypoxia acclimation in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    Du, Sherry N N; Mahalingam, Sajeni; Borowiec, Brittney G; Scott, Graham R

    2016-04-15

    Many fish encounter hypoxia in their native environment, but the role of mitochondrial physiology in hypoxia acclimation and hypoxia tolerance is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of hypoxia acclimation on mitochondrial respiration, O2kinetics, emission of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and antioxidant capacity in the estuarine killifish ( ITALIC! Fundulus heteroclitus). Killifish were acclimated to normoxia, constant hypoxia (5 kPa O2) or intermittent diel cycles of nocturnal hypoxia (12 h:12 h normoxia:hypoxia) for 28-33 days and mitochondria were isolated from liver. Neither pattern of hypoxia acclimation affected the respiratory capacities for oxidative phosphorylation or electron transport, leak respiration, coupling control or phosphorylation efficiency. Hypoxia acclimation also had no effect on mitochondrial O2kinetics, but ITALIC! P50(the O2tension at which hypoxia inhibits respiration by 50%) was lower in the leak state than during maximal respiration, and killifish mitochondria endured anoxia-reoxygenation without any impact on mitochondrial respiration. However, both patterns of hypoxia acclimation reduced the rate of ROS emission from mitochondria when compared at a common O2tension. Hypoxia acclimation also increased the levels of protein carbonyls and the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in liver tissue (the latter only occurred in constant hypoxia). Our results suggest that hypoxia acclimation is associated with changes in mitochondrial physiology that decrease ROS production and may help improve hypoxia tolerance. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Acute focal brain damage alters mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy in axotomized neurons.

    PubMed

    Cavallucci, V; Bisicchia, E; Cencioni, M T; Ferri, A; Latini, L; Nobili, A; Biamonte, F; Nazio, F; Fanelli, F; Moreno, S; Molinari, M; Viscomi, M T; D'Amelio, M

    2014-11-27

    Mitochondria are key organelles for the maintenance of life and death of the cell, and their morphology is controlled by continual and balanced fission and fusion dynamics. A balance between these events is mandatory for normal mitochondrial and neuronal function, and emerging evidence indicates that mitochondria undergo extensive fission at an early stage during programmed cell death in several neurodegenerative diseases. A pathway for selective degradation of damaged mitochondria by autophagy, known as mitophagy, has been described, and is of particular importance to sustain neuronal viability. In the present work, we analyzed the effect of autophagy stimulation on mitochondrial function and dynamics in a model of remote degeneration after focal cerebellar lesion. We provided evidence that lesion of a cerebellar hemisphere causes mitochondria depolarization in axotomized precerebellar neurons associated with PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 accumulation and Parkin translocation to mitochondria, block of mitochondrial fusion by Mfn1 degradation, increase of calcineurin activity and dynamin-related protein 1 translocation to mitochondria, and consequent mitochondrial fission. Here we suggest that the observed neuroprotective effect of rapamycin is the result of a dual role: (1) stimulation of autophagy leading to damaged mitochondria removal and (2) enhancement of mitochondria fission to allow their elimination by mitophagy. The involvement of mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy in brain injury, especially in the context of remote degeneration after acute focal brain damage, has not yet been investigated, and these findings may offer new target for therapeutic intervention to improve functional outcomes following acute brain damage.

  5. Decreased mitochondrial activities of malate dehydrogenase and fumarase in tomato lead to altered root growth and architecture via diverse mechanisms.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Margaretha J; Osorio, Sonia; Moritz, Thomas; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2009-02-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants in which either mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase or fumarase was antisense inhibited have previously been characterized to exhibit altered photosynthetic metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that these manipulations also resulted in differences in root growth, with both transgenics being characterized by a dramatic reduction of root dry matter deposition and respiratory activity but opposite changes with respect to root area. A range of physiological, molecular, and biochemical experiments were carried out in order to determine whether changes in root morphology were due to altered metabolism within the root itself, alterations in the nature of the transformants' root exudation, consequences of alteration in the efficiency of photoassimilate delivery to the root, or a combination of these factors. Grafting experiments in which the transformants were reciprocally grafted to wild-type controls suggested that root length and area were determined by the aerial part of the plant but that biomass was not. Despite the transgenic roots displaying alteration in the expression of phytohormone-associated genes, evaluation of the levels of the hormones themselves revealed that, with the exception of gibberellins, they were largely unaltered. When taken together, these combined experiments suggest that root biomass and growth are retarded by root-specific alterations in metabolism and gibberellin contents. These data are discussed in the context of current models of root growth and biomass partitioning.

  6. Telomeric repeats of Tetrahymena malaccensis mitochondrial DNA: a multimodal distribution that fluctuates erratically during growth.

    PubMed

    Morin, G B; Cech, T R

    1988-10-01

    The linear mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Tetrahymena malaccensis has tandem 52-base-pair repeats at its telomeres. The mtDNA has a multimodal distribution of telomeres. Different groups in the distribution have different numbers of telomeric repeats. The standard deviation of the size of each end group is independent of the mean size of the end group. The two sides of the mtDNA have different multimodal distributions of repeats. Cloned cell lines have multimodal distributions of mtDNA telomeres distinct from that of the original cell line. The number of telomere end groups and the average size of the end groups change in an erratic fashion as the cells are passaged and do not reach a stable equilibrium distribution in 185 generations. We propose that the mean size of a telomere end group and the size distribution of an end group are independently regulated. The system controlling the average size of end groups may be defective in T. malaccensis, since a closely related species (T. thermophila) does not have a multimodal distribution of mtDNA telomeres. T. hyperangularis, which has different telomeric repeats on each side of its mtDNA, has a multimodal distribution of mtDNA telomeres on only one side, suggesting that the mechanism controlling the average number of repeats in an end group can be sequence specific. These mitochondrial telomeres provide a new example of the more general phenomenon of expansion and contraction of arrays of repeated sequences seen, for example, with simple-sequence "satellite" DNAs; however, the mitochondrial telomeres change on a very short time scale.

  7. Telomeric repeats of Tetrahymena malaccensis mitochondrial DNA: a multimodal distribution that fluctuates erratically during growth.

    PubMed Central

    Morin, G B; Cech, T R

    1988-01-01

    The linear mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Tetrahymena malaccensis has tandem 52-base-pair repeats at its telomeres. The mtDNA has a multimodal distribution of telomeres. Different groups in the distribution have different numbers of telomeric repeats. The standard deviation of the size of each end group is independent of the mean size of the end group. The two sides of the mtDNA have different multimodal distributions of repeats. Cloned cell lines have multimodal distributions of mtDNA telomeres distinct from that of the original cell line. The number of telomere end groups and the average size of the end groups change in an erratic fashion as the cells are passaged and do not reach a stable equilibrium distribution in 185 generations. We propose that the mean size of a telomere end group and the size distribution of an end group are independently regulated. The system controlling the average size of end groups may be defective in T. malaccensis, since a closely related species (T. thermophila) does not have a multimodal distribution of mtDNA telomeres. T. hyperangularis, which has different telomeric repeats on each side of its mtDNA, has a multimodal distribution of mtDNA telomeres on only one side, suggesting that the mechanism controlling the average number of repeats in an end group can be sequence specific. These mitochondrial telomeres provide a new example of the more general phenomenon of expansion and contraction of arrays of repeated sequences seen, for example, with simple-sequence "satellite" DNAs; however, the mitochondrial telomeres change on a very short time scale. Images PMID:3185556

  8. Comprehensive scanning of somatic mitochondrial DNA alterations in acute leukemia developing from myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Linnartz, Bjoern; Anglmayer, Roswitha; Zanssen, Stefanie

    2004-03-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal myeloid disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis resulting in refractory cytopenias. Transformation resulting in acute myeloblastic leukemia is the final stage in the multistep process of MDS evolution. Functional relevant mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been related to sideroblastic anemia and MDS. To investigate the role of mtDNA in malignant transformation to acute leukemia, we used high-resolution techniques such as single-strand conformational polymorphism and fluorescence sequencing for investigation of the whole mitochondrial genome from blood cells of 10 patients with MDS. Functionally relevant point mutations in mitochondrial RNA and polypeptide-encoding genes were detected in 50% of patients with MDS. Their increasing mutation load connects MDS and the developing acute myeloid leukemias. Several point mutations of mtDNA, including secondary point mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, occur in one bone marrow and may synergically affect bone marrow stem cells by an apoptotic pathway.

  9. Tyrosine kinase inhibition in leukemia induces an altered metabolic state sensitive to mitochondrial perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Calderon, Francesca; Gregory, Mark A.; Pham-Danis, Catherine; DeRyckere, Deborah; Stevens, Brett M.; Zaberezhnyy, Vadym; Hill, Amanda A.; Gemta, Lelisa; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Vijay; Wempe, Michael F.; Pollyea, Daniel A.; Jordan, Craig T.; Serkova, Natalie J.; Graham, Douglas K.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) can be effective therapies for leukemia, they fail to fully eliminate leukemic cells and achieve durable remissions for many patients with advanced BCR-ABL+ leukemias or acute myeloid leukemias (AML). Through a large-scale synthetic lethal RNAi screen, we identified pyruvate dehydrogenase, the limiting enzyme for pyruvate entry into the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle, as critical for the survival of chronic myeloid leukemia cells upon BCR-ABL inhibition. Here we examined the role of mitochondrial metabolism in the survival of Ph+ leukemia and AML upon TK inhibition. Experimental Design Ph+ cancer cell lines, AML cell lines, leukemia xenografts, cord blood, patient samples were examined. Results We showed that the mitochondrial ATP-synthase inhibitor oligomycin-A greatly sensitized leukemia cells to TKI in vitro. Surprisingly, oligomycin-A sensitized leukemia cells to BCR-ABL inhibition at concentrations 100–1000-fold below those required for inhibition of respiration. Oligomycin-A treatment rapidly led to mitochondrial membrane depolarization and reduced ATP levels, and promoted superoxide production and leukemia cell apoptosis when combined with TKI. Importantly, oligomycin-A enhanced elimination of BCR-ABL+ leukemia cells by TKI in a mouse model and in primary blast crisis CML samples. Moreover, oligomycin-A also greatly potentiated the elimination of FLT3-dependent AML cells when combined with a FLT3 TKI, both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions TKI therapy in leukemia cells creates a novel metabolic state that is highly sensitive to particular mitochondrial perturbations. Targeting mitochondrial metabolism as an adjuvant therapy could therefore improve therapeutic responses to TKI for patients with BCR-ABL+ and FLT3ITD leukemias. PMID:25547679

  10. Micromolar changes in lysophosphatidylcholine concentration cause minor effects on mitochondrial permeability but major alterations in function.

    PubMed

    Hollie, Norris I; Cash, James G; Matlib, M Abdul; Wortman, Matthew; Basford, Joshua E; Abplanalp, William; Hui, David Y

    2014-06-01

    Mice deficient in group 1b phospholipase A2 have decreased plasma lysophosphatidylcholine and increased hepatic oxidation that is inhibited by intraperitoneal lysophosphatidylcholine injection. This study sought to identify a mechanism for lysophosphatidylcholine-mediated inhibition of hepatic oxidative function. Results showed that in vitro incubation of isolated mitochondria with 40-200μM lysophosphatidylcholine caused cyclosporine A-resistant swelling in a concentration-dependent manner. However, when mitochondria were challenged with 220μM CaCl2, cyclosporine A protected against permeability transition induced by 40μM, but not 80μM lysophosphatidylcholine. Incubation with 40-120μM lysophosphatidylcholine also increased mitochondrial permeability to 75μM CaCl2 in a concentration-dependent manner. Interestingly, despite incubation with 80μM lysophosphatidylcholine, the mitochondrial membrane potential was steady in the presence of succinate, and oxidation rates and respiratory control indices were similar to controls in the presence of succinate, glutamate/malate, and palmitoyl-carnitine. However, mitochondrial oxidation rates were inhibited by 30-50% at 100μM lysophosphatidylcholine. Finally, while 40μM lysophosphatidylcholine has no effect on fatty acid oxidation and mitochondria remained impermeable in intact hepatocytes, 100μM lysophosphatidylcholine inhibited fatty acid stimulated oxidation and caused intracellular mitochondrial permeability. Taken together, these present data demonstrated that LPC concentration dependently modulates mitochondrial microenvironment, with low micromolar concentrations of lysophosphatidylcholine sufficient to change hepatic oxidation rate whereas higher concentrations are required to disrupt mitochondrial integrity.

  11. Altered skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis but improved endurance capacity in trained OPA1-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Caffin, F; Prola, A; Piquereau, J; Novotova, M; David, DJ; Garnier, A; Fortin, D; Alavi, MV; Veksler, V; Ventura-Clapier, R; Joubert, F

    2013-01-01

    The role of OPA1, a GTPase dynamin protein mainly involved in the fusion of inner mitochondrial membranes, has been studied in many cell types, but only a few studies have been conducted on adult differentiated tissues such as cardiac or skeletal muscle cells. Yet OPA1 is highly expressed in these cells, and could play different roles, especially in response to an environmental stress like exercise. Endurance exercise increases energy demand in skeletal muscle and repeated activity induces mitochondrial biogenesis and activation of fusion–fission cycles for the synthesis of new mitochondria. But currently no study has clearly shown a link between mitochondrial dynamics and biogenesis. Using a mouse model of haploinsufficiency for the Opa1 gene (Opa1+/−), we therefore studied the impact of OPA1 deficiency on the adaptation ability of fast skeletal muscles to endurance exercise training. Our results show that, surprisingly, Opa1+/− mice were able to perform the same physical activity as control mice. However, the adaptation strategies of both strains after training differed: while in control mice mitochondrial biogenesis was increased as expected, in Opa1+/− mice this process was blunted. Instead, training in Opa1+/− mice led to an increase in endurance capacity, and a specific adaptive response involving a metabolic remodelling towards enhanced fatty acid utilization. In conclusion, OPA1 appears necessary for the normal adaptive response and mitochondrial biogenesis of skeletal muscle to training. This work opens new perspectives on the role of mitochondrial dynamics in skeletal muscle cells and during adaptation to stress. PMID:24042504

  12. Alterations in mitochondrial respiratory functions, redox metabolism and apoptosis by oxidant 4-hydroxynonenal and antioxidants curcumin and melatonin in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, Haider John, Annie; Brown, Eric M.; Benedict, Sheela; Kambal, Amr

    2008-01-15

    Cellular oxidative stress and alterations in redox metabolisms have been implicated in the etiology and pathology of many diseases including cancer. Antioxidant treatments have been proven beneficial in controlling these diseases. We have recently shown that 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a by-product of lipid peroxidation, induces oxidative stress in PC12 cells by compromising the mitochondrial redox metabolism. In this study, we have further investigated the deleterious effects of 4-HNE on mitochondrial respiratory functions and apoptosis using the same cell line. In addition, we have also compared the effects of two antioxidants, curcumin and melatonin, used as chemopreventive agents, on mitochondrial redox metabolism and respiratory functions in these cells. 4-HNE treatment has been shown to cause a reduction in glutathione (GSH) pool, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein carbonylation and apoptosis. A marked inhibition in the activities of the mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, cytochrome c oxidase and aconitase was observed after 4-HNE treatment. Increased nuclear translocation of NF-kB/p65 protein was also observed after 4-HNE treatment. Curcumin and melatonin treatments, on the other hand, maintained the mitochondrial redox and respiratory functions without a marked effect on ROS production and cell viability. These results suggest that 4-HNE-induced cytotoxicity may be associated, at least in part, with the altered mitochondrial redox and respiratory functions. The alterations in mitochondrial energy metabolism and redox functions may therefore be critical in determining the difference between cell death and survival.

  13. Neuroprotective effects of melatonin as evidenced by abrogation of oxaliplatin induced behavioral alterations, mitochondrial dysfunction and neurotoxicity in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Mohammad; Tabassum, Heena; Parvez, Suhel

    2016-09-01

    Neurotoxicity is a burdensome consequence of platinum-based chemotherapy that neutralizes the administration of effective dosage and often prompts treatment withdrawal. Oxaliplatin (Oxa), a third-era platinum analogue that is active against both early-organize and progressed colorectal growth, produces critical neurotoxicity. It has been reported that the Melatonin (Mel) is a pineal hormone its metabolites display important antioxidant properties in nervous system. There is dearth of literature involving the role of mitochondria and cytosolic compartments mediated Oxa-induced neurotoxicity and its underlying mechanisms are still debatable. Rats were pre-treated with Mel (10mg/kg b.wt., i.p.) and treated with Oxa (4mg/kg b.wt. i.p.) for 5 consecutive days. For neurobehavioral performances, decreased locomotor activity and muscular strength were observed in rats. Treatment with Mel in Oxa treated rats could protect the Oxa induced alterations in motor activity and muscular strength. For painful neuropathy, thermal hyperalgesia/nociceptive tests were evaluated. In addition, pre-treatment of Mel could block or alter the inactivation of Bcl-2, caspase 3 apoptotic protein and alterations Cytochrome c (Cyt c) release in an Oxa rich environment. Pre-treatment of Mel have shown an alteration in hyperalgesia behaviour in Oxa treated rats. Oxidative stress biomarkers, levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants and mitochondrial complexes were evaluated against neurotoxicity induced by Oxa. Mel pre-treatment replenished the mitochondrial lipid peroxidation levels and protein carbonyl content induced by Oxa. Mel also modulated altered non-enzymatic, enzymatic antioxidants and complex enzymes of mitochondria. Futures studies are also required to identify other molecular markers involved in neurotoxicity induced by Oxa and possible action of Mel in its modulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Altered patterns of cardiac intercellular junction distribution in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, R.; Severs, N. J.; Gourdie, R. G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the distribution pattern of intercellular junctions (the mechanically coupling desmosomes and the electrically coupling gap junctions) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) hearts showing myofibre disarray. DESIGN: Samples from six necropsied hearts were studied, representing the interventricular septum and the free walls of the left and right ventricles. Immunohistochemical labelling of desmoplakin was used as a marker for desmosomes, and of connexin43 as a marker for gap junctions, in single and double stainings. The slides were examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. RESULTS: Marked disorganisation of intercalated discs was observed in areas featuring myofibre disarray. Besides overall derangement, localised abnormalities in desmosome organisation were evident, which included: (1) the formation of abnormally enlarged megadiscs; (2) the presence of intersecting disc structures; and (3) aberrant side to side desmosomal connections. Gap junctional abnormalities included: (1) random distribution of gap junctions over the surface of myocytes, rather than localisation to intercalated discs; (2) abundant side to side gap junction connections between adjacent myocytes; and (3) formation of abnormally shaped gap junctions. Circles of myocytes continuously interconnected by gap junctions were also observed. Regions of the diseased hearts lacking myofibre disarray, and control hearts of normal patients and patients with other cardiac diseases, did not show these alterations. CONCLUSIONS: The disorganisation of the intercellular junctions associated with myofibre disarray in HCM may play an important role in the pathophysiological manifestations of the disease. The remodelling of gap junction distribution may underlie the formation of an arrhythmogenic substrate, thereby contributing to the generation and maintenance of cardiac arrhythmias associated with HCM. Images PMID:8944586

  15. Spatial distribution of mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA variation in Daubenton's bat within Scotland.

    PubMed

    Ngamprasertwong, Thongchai; Mackie, Iain J; Racey, Paul A; Piertney, Stuart B

    2008-07-01

    Daubenton's bat (Myotis daubentonii) is a known reservoir for European bat lyssavirus type 2 (EBLV-2). An appreciation of the potential for epidemiological spread and disease risk requires an understanding of the dispersal of the primary host, and any large-scale geographical barriers that may impede gene flow. The spatial pattern of microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA variation was examined to infer patterns of dispersal of bats among 35 populations across Scotland. DNA sequence variation at the mitochondrial control region and ND1 genes revealed two distinct phylogeographical clades, with generally nonoverlapping geographical distributions except for a small number of populations where both matrilines were found in sympatry. Such discontinuity suggests that Scotland was recolonized twice following the retreat of the Pleistocene ice sheet with little subsequent matrilineal introgression. However, eight microsatellite loci showed low levels of genetic divergence among populations, even between populations from the two distinct mitochondrial DNA clades. An overall, macrogeographical genetic isolation-by-distance pattern was observed, with high levels of gene flow among local populations. Apparently contrasting patterns of mitochondrial and microsatellite divergence at different scales could be explained by sex-specific differences in gene flow at large scales.

  16. RNS60, a charge-stabilized nanostructure saline alters Xenopus Laevis oocyte biophysical membrane properties by enhancing mitochondrial ATP production

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Duk-Soo; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2015-01-01

    We have examined the effects of RNS60, a 0.9% saline containing charge-stabilized oxygen nanobubble-based structures. RNS60 is generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor–Couette–Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. This study, implemented in Xenopus laevis oocytes, addresses both the electrophysiological membrane properties and parallel biological processes in the cytoplasm. Intracellular recordings from defolliculated X. laevis oocytes were implemented in: (1) air oxygenated standard Ringer's solution, (2) RNS60-based Ringer's solution, (3) RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen)-based Ringer's, and (4) ONS60 (saline containing high pressure oxygen without TCP modification)-based Ringer's. RNS60-based Ringer's solution induced membrane hyperpolarization from the resting membrane potential. This effect was prevented by: (1) ouabain (a blocker of the sodium/potassium ATPase), (2) rotenone (a mitochondrial electron transfer chain inhibitor preventing usable ATP synthesis), and (3) oligomycin A (an inhibitor of ATP synthase) indicating that RNS60 effects intracellular ATP levels. Increased intracellular ATP levels following RNS60 treatment were directly demonstrated using luciferin/luciferase photon emission. These results indicate that RNS60 alters intrinsic the electrophysiological properties of the X. laevis oocyte membrane by increasing mitochondrial-based ATP synthesis. Ultrastructural analysis of the oocyte cytoplasm demonstrated increased mitochondrial length in the presence of RNS60-based Ringer's solution. It is concluded that the biological properties of RNS60 relate to its ability to optimize ATP synthesis. PMID:25742953

  17. Prolonged exposure to (R)-bicalutamide generates a LNCaP subclone with alteration of mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Pignatta, Sara; Arienti, Chiara; Zoli, Wainer; Di Donato, Marzia; Castoria, Gabriella; Gabucci, Elisa; Casadio, Valentina; Falconi, Mirella; De Giorgi, Ugo; Silvestrini, Rosella; Tesei, Anna

    2014-01-25

    Advanced prostate cancers, initially sensitive to androgen deprivation therapy, frequently progress to the castration-resistant prostate cancer phenotype (CRPC) through mechanisms not yet fully understood. In this study we investigated mitochondrial involvement in the establishment of refractoriness to hormone therapy. Two human prostate cancer cell lines were used, the parental LNCaP and the resistant LNCaP-Rbic, the latter generated after continuous exposure to 20 μM of (R)-bicalutamide, the active enantiomer of Casodex®. We observed a significant decrease in mtDNA content and a lower expression of 8 mitochondria-encoded gene transcripts involved in respiratory chain complexes in both cell lines. We also found that (R)-bicalutamide differentially modulated dynamin-related protein (Drp-1) expression in LNCaP and LNCaP-Rbic cells. These data seem to indicate that the androgen-independent phenotype in our experimental model was due, at least in part, to alterations in mitochondrial dynamics and to a breakdown in the Drp-1-mediated mitochondrial network.

  18. A hypertension-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation alters the tertiary interaction and function of tRNA(Leu(UUR)).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Wang, Meng; Xue, Ling; Lin, Zhi; He, Qiufen; Shi, Wenwen; Chen, Yaru; Jin, Xiaofen; Li, Haiying; Jiang, Pingping; Guan, Min-Xin

    2017-08-25

    Several mitochondrial tRNA mutations have been associated with hypertension, but their pathophysiology remains poorly understood. In this report, we identified a novel homoplasmic 3253T→C mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene in a Han Chinese family with maternally inherited hypertension. The m.3253T→C mutation affected a highly conserved uridine at position 22 at the D-stem of tRNA(Leu(UUR)), introducing a G-C base pairing (G13-C22) at the D-stem and a tertiary base pairing (C22-G46) between the D-stem and the variable loop. We therefore hypothesized that the m.3253T→C mutation altered both the structure and function of tRNA(Leu(UUR)) Using cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) cell lines derived from this Chinese family, we demonstrated that the m.3253T→C mutation perturbed the conformation and stability of tRNA(Leu(UUR)), as suggested by faster electrophoretic mobility of mutated tRNA relative to the wild-type molecule. Northern blot analysis revealed an ∼45% decrease in the steady-state level of tRNA(Leu(UUR)) in the mutant cell lines carrying the m.3253T→C mutation, as compared with control cell lines. Moreover, an ∼35% reduction in aminoacylation efficiency of tRNA(Leu(UUR)) was observed in the m.3253T→C mutant cells. These alterations in tRNA(Leu(UUR)) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for those polypeptides with a high proportion of Leu(UUR) codons, such as ND6. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the m.3253T→C mutation decreased the activities of mitochondrial complexes I and V, markedly diminished mitochondrial ATP levels and membrane potential, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species in the cells. In conclusion, our findings may provide new insights into the pathophysiology of maternally inherited hypertension. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Sensitivity to Alternaria alternata toxin in citrus because of altered mitochondrial RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Kouhei; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Akimitsu, Kazuya

    2002-01-01

    Specificity in the interaction between rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.) and the fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata rough lemon pathotype is determined by a host-selective toxin, ACR-toxin. Mitochondria from rough lemon are sensitive to ACR-toxin whereas mitochondria from resistant plants, including other citrus species, are resistant. We have identified a C. jambhiri mitochondrial DNA sequence, designated ACRS (ACR-toxin sensitivity gene), that confers toxin sensitivity to Escherichia coli. ACRS is located in the group II intron of the mitochondrial tRNA-Ala and is translated into a SDS-resistant oligomeric protein in C. jambhiri mitochondria but is not translated in the toxin-insensitive mitochondria. ACRS is present in the mitochondrial genome of both toxin-sensitive and -insensitive citrus. However, in mitochondria of toxin-insensitive plants, the transcripts from ACRS are shorter than those in mitochondria of sensitive plants. These results demonstrate that sensitivity to ACR-toxin and hence specificity of the interaction between A. alternata rough lemon pathotype and C. jambhiri is due to differential posttranscriptional processing of a mitochondrial gene. PMID:11842194

  20. Sensitivity to Alternaria alternata toxin in citrus because of altered mitochondrial RNA processing.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Kouhei; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Akimitsu, Kazuya

    2002-02-19

    Specificity in the interaction between rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.) and the fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata rough lemon pathotype is determined by a host-selective toxin, ACR-toxin. Mitochondria from rough lemon are sensitive to ACR-toxin whereas mitochondria from resistant plants, including other citrus species, are resistant. We have identified a C. jambhiri mitochondrial DNA sequence, designated ACRS (ACR-toxin sensitivity gene), that confers toxin sensitivity to Escherichia coli. ACRS is located in the group II intron of the mitochondrial tRNA-Ala and is translated into a SDS-resistant oligomeric protein in C. jambhiri mitochondria but is not translated in the toxin-insensitive mitochondria. ACRS is present in the mitochondrial genome of both toxin-sensitive and -insensitive citrus. However, in mitochondria of toxin-insensitive plants, the transcripts from ACRS are shorter than those in mitochondria of sensitive plants. These results demonstrate that sensitivity to ACR-toxin and hence specificity of the interaction between A. alternata rough lemon pathotype and C. jambhiri is due to differential posttranscriptional processing of a mitochondrial gene.

  1. Alterations in voltage-sensing of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in ANT1-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Doczi, Judit; Torocsik, Beata; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Mousson de Camaret, Bénédicte; Starkov, Anatoly; Starkova, Natalia; Gál, Aniko; Molnár, Mária J; Kawamata, Hibiki; Manfredi, Giovanni; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The probability of mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) pore opening is inversely related to the magnitude of the proton electrochemical gradient. The module conferring sensitivity of the pore to this gradient has not been identified. We investigated mPT’s voltage-sensing properties elicited by calcimycin or H2O2 in human fibroblasts exhibiting partial or complete lack of ANT1 and in C2C12 myotubes with knocked-down ANT1 expression. mPT onset was assessed by measuring in situ mitochondrial volume using the ‘thinness ratio’ and the ‘cobalt-calcein’ technique. De-energization hastened calcimycin-induced swelling in control and partially-expressing ANT1 fibroblasts, but not in cells lacking ANT1, despite greater losses of mitochondrial membrane potential. Matrix Ca2+ levels measured by X-rhod-1 or mitochondrially-targeted ratiometric biosensor 4mtD3cpv, or ADP-ATP exchange rates did not differ among cell types. ANT1-null fibroblasts were also resistant to H2O2-induced mitochondrial swelling. Permeabilized C2C12 myotubes with knocked-down ANT1 exhibited higher calcium uptake capacity and voltage-thresholds of mPT opening inferred from cytochrome c release, but intact cells showed no differences in calcimycin-induced onset of mPT, irrespective of energization and ANT1 expression, albeit the number of cells undergoing mPT increased less significantly upon chemically-induced hypoxia than control cells. We conclude that ANT1 confers sensitivity of the pore to the electrochemical gradient. PMID:27221760

  2. Alterations in voltage-sensing of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in ANT1-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Doczi, Judit; Torocsik, Beata; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Mousson de Camaret, Bénédicte; Starkov, Anatoly; Starkova, Natalia; Gál, Aniko; Molnár, Mária J; Kawamata, Hibiki; Manfredi, Giovanni; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2016-05-25

    The probability of mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) pore opening is inversely related to the magnitude of the proton electrochemical gradient. The module conferring sensitivity of the pore to this gradient has not been identified. We investigated mPT's voltage-sensing properties elicited by calcimycin or H2O2 in human fibroblasts exhibiting partial or complete lack of ANT1 and in C2C12 myotubes with knocked-down ANT1 expression. mPT onset was assessed by measuring in situ mitochondrial volume using the 'thinness ratio' and the 'cobalt-calcein' technique. De-energization hastened calcimycin-induced swelling in control and partially-expressing ANT1 fibroblasts, but not in cells lacking ANT1, despite greater losses of mitochondrial membrane potential. Matrix Ca(2+) levels measured by X-rhod-1 or mitochondrially-targeted ratiometric biosensor 4mtD3cpv, or ADP-ATP exchange rates did not differ among cell types. ANT1-null fibroblasts were also resistant to H2O2-induced mitochondrial swelling. Permeabilized C2C12 myotubes with knocked-down ANT1 exhibited higher calcium uptake capacity and voltage-thresholds of mPT opening inferred from cytochrome c release, but intact cells showed no differences in calcimycin-induced onset of mPT, irrespective of energization and ANT1 expression, albeit the number of cells undergoing mPT increased less significantly upon chemically-induced hypoxia than control cells. We conclude that ANT1 confers sensitivity of the pore to the electrochemical gradient.

  3. Altering Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Nutritional Status Modulates Mitochondrial, Lipid, and Energy Metabolism in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bauerly, Kathryn; Harris, Calliandra; Chowanadisai, Winyoo; Graham, James; Havel, Peter J.; Tchaparian, Eskouhie; Satre, Mike; Karliner, Joel S.; Rucker, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    We have reported that pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) improves reproduction, neonatal development, and mitochondrial function in animals by mechanisms that involve mitochondrial related cell signaling pathways. To extend these observations, the influence of PQQ on energy and lipid relationships and apparent protection against ischemia reperfusion injury are described herein. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a nutritionally complete diet with PQQ added at either 0 (PQQ−) or 2 mg PQQ/Kg diet (PQQ+). Measurements included: 1) serum glucose and insulin, 2) total energy expenditure per metabolic body size (Wt3/4), 3) respiratory quotients (in the fed and fasted states), 4) changes in plasma lipids, 5) the relative mitochondrial amount in liver and heart, and 6) indices related to cardiac ischemia. For the latter, rats (PQQ− or PQQ+) were subjected to left anterior descending occlusions followed by 2 h of reperfusion to determine PQQ's influence on infarct size and myocardial tissue levels of malondialdehyde, an indicator of lipid peroxidation. Although no striking differences in serum glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid levels were observed, energy expenditure was lower in PQQ− vs. PQQ+ rats and energy expenditure (fed state) was correlated with the hepatic mitochondrial content. Elevations in plasma di- and triacylglyceride and β-hydroxybutryic acid concentrations were also observed in PQQ− rats vs. PQQ+ rats. Moreover, PQQ administration (i.p. at 4.5 mg/kg BW for 3 days) resulted in a greater than 2-fold decrease in plasma triglycerides during a 6-hour fast than saline administration in a rat model of type 2 diabetes. Cardiac injury resulting from ischemia/reperfusion was more pronounced in PQQ− rats than in PQQ+ rats. Collectively, these data demonstrate that PQQ deficiency impacts a number of parameters related to normal mitochondrial function. PMID:21814553

  4. Chronic low-level domoic acid exposure alters gene transcription and impairs mitochondrial function in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Hiolski, Emma M; Kendrick, Preston S; Frame, Elizabeth R; Myers, Mark S; Bammler, Theo K; Beyer, Richard P; Farin, Federico M; Wilkerson, Hui-wen; Smith, Donald R; Marcinek, David J; Lefebvre, Kathi A

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid is an algal-derived seafood toxin that functions as a glutamate agonist and exerts excitotoxicity via overstimulation of glutamate receptors (AMPA, NMDA) in the central nervous system (CNS). At high (symptomatic) doses, domoic acid is well-known to cause seizures, brain lesions and memory loss; however, a significant knowledge gap exists regarding the health impacts of repeated low-level (asymptomatic) exposure. Here, we investigated the impacts of low-level repetitive domoic acid exposure on gene transcription and mitochondrial function in the vertebrate CNS using a zebrafish model in order to: 1) identify transcriptional biomarkers of exposure; and 2) examine potential pathophysiology that may occur in the absence of overt excitotoxic symptoms. We found that transcription of genes related to neurological function and development were significantly altered, and that asymptomatic exposure impaired mitochondrial function. Interestingly, the transcriptome response was highly-variable across the exposure duration (36 weeks), with little to no overlap of specific genes across the six exposure time points (2, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 weeks). Moreover, there were no apparent similarities at any time point with the gene transcriptome profile exhibited by the glud1 mouse model of chronic moderate excess glutamate release. These results suggest that although the fundamental mechanisms of toxicity may be similar, gene transcriptome responses to domoic acid exposure do not extrapolate well between different exposure durations. However, the observed impairment of mitochondrial function based on respiration rates and mitochondrial protein content suggests that repetitive low-level exposure does have fundamental cellular level impacts that could contribute to chronic health consequences. PMID:25033243

  5. Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenase Lowers Leaf Respiration and Alters Photorespiration and Plant Growth in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Tomaz, Tiago; Bagard, Matthieu; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Lindén, Pernilla; Lee, Chun Pong; Carroll, Adam J.; Ströher, Elke; Smith, Steven M.; Gardeström, Per; Millar, A. Harvey

    2010-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes a reversible NAD+-dependent-dehydrogenase reaction involved in central metabolism and redox homeostasis between organelle compartments. To explore the role of mitochondrial MDH (mMDH) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), knockout single and double mutants for the highly expressed mMDH1 and lower expressed mMDH2 isoforms were constructed and analyzed. A mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has no detectable mMDH activity but is viable, albeit small and slow growing. Quantitative proteome analysis of mitochondria shows changes in other mitochondrial NAD-linked dehydrogenases, indicating a reorganization of such enzymes in the mitochondrial matrix. The slow-growing mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has elevated leaf respiration rate in the dark and light, without loss of photosynthetic capacity, suggesting that mMDH normally uses NADH to reduce oxaloacetate to malate, which is then exported to the cytosol, rather than to drive mitochondrial respiration. Increased respiratory rate in leaves can account in part for the low net CO2 assimilation and slow growth rate of mmdh1mmdh2. Loss of mMDH also affects photorespiration, as evidenced by a lower postillumination burst, alterations in CO2 assimilation/intercellular CO2 curves at low CO2, and the light-dependent elevated concentration of photorespiratory metabolites. Complementation of mmdh1mmdh2 with an mMDH cDNA recovered mMDH activity, suppressed respiratory rate, ameliorated changes to photorespiration, and increased plant growth. A previously established inverse correlation between mMDH and ascorbate content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has been consolidated in Arabidopsis and may potentially be linked to decreased galactonolactone dehydrogenase content in mitochondria in the mutant. Overall, a central yet complex role for mMDH emerges in the partitioning of carbon and energy in leaves, providing new directions for bioengineering of plant growth rate and a new insight into the molecular mechanisms linking

  6. Gestational Diabetes Is Characterized by Reduced Mitochondrial Protein Expression and Altered Calcium Signaling Proteins in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Kristen E.; Hwang, Hyonson; Janssen, Rachel C.; DeVente, James M.; Barbour, Linda A.; Hernandez, Teri L.; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Lappas, Martha; Friedman, Jacob E.

    2014-01-01

    The rising prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects up to 18% of pregnant women with immediate and long-term metabolic consequences for both mother and infant. Abnormal glucose uptake and lipid oxidation are hallmark features of GDM prompting us to use an exploratory proteomics approach to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying differences in skeletal muscle metabolism between obese pregnant women with GDM (OGDM) and obese pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance (ONGT). Functional validation was performed in a second cohort of obese OGDM and ONGT pregnant women. Quantitative proteomic analysis in rectus abdominus skeletal muscle tissue collected at delivery revealed reduced protein content of mitochondrial complex I (C-I) subunits (NDUFS3, NDUFV2) and altered content of proteins involved in calcium homeostasis/signaling (calcineurin A, α1-syntrophin, annexin A4) in OGDM (n = 6) vs. ONGT (n = 6). Follow-up analyses showed reduced enzymatic activity of mitochondrial complexes C-I, C-III, and C-IV (−60–75%) in the OGDM (n = 8) compared with ONGT (n = 10) subjects, though no differences were observed for mitochondrial complex protein content. Upstream regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation were not different between groups. However, AMPK phosphorylation was dramatically reduced by 75% in the OGDM women. These data suggest that GDM is associated with reduced skeletal muscle oxidative phosphorylation and disordered calcium homeostasis. These relationships deserve further attention as they may represent novel risk factors for development of GDM and may have implications on the effectiveness of physical activity interventions on both treatment strategies for GDM and for prevention of type 2 diabetes postpartum. PMID:25216282

  7. [Pathophysiology of human mitochondrial diseases].

    PubMed

    Lombès, Anne; Auré, Karine; Jardel, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases, defined as the diseases due to oxidative phosphorylation defects, are the most frequent inborn errors of metabolism. Their clinical presentation is highly diverse. Their diagnosis is difficult. It relies on metabolic parameters, histological anomalies and enzymatic assays showing defective activity, all of which are both inconstant and relatively unspecific. Most mitochondrial diseases have a genetic origin. Candidate genes are very numerous, located either in the mitochondrial genome or the nuclear DNA. Pathophysiological mechanisms of mitochondrial diseases are still the matter of much debate. Those underlying the tissue-specificity of diseases due to the alterations of a ubiquitously expressed gene are discussed including (i) quantitative aspect of the expression of the causal gene or its partners when appropriate, (ii) quantitative aspects of the bioenergetic function in each tissue, and (iii) tissue distribution of heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA alterations.

  8. Regulation of mitochondrial ceramide distribution by members of the BCL-2 family[S

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tejia; Barclay, Lauren; Walensky, Loren D.; Saghatelian, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is an intricately regulated cellular process that proceeds through different cell type- and signal-dependent pathways. In the mitochondrial apoptotic program, mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization by BCL-2 proteins leads to the release of apoptogenic factors, caspase activation, and cell death. In addition to protein components of the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery, an interesting role for lipids and lipid metabolism in BCL-2 family-regulated apoptosis is also emerging. We used a comparative lipidomics approach to uncover alterations in lipid profile in the absence of the proapoptotic proteins BAX and BAK in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). We detected over 1,000 ions in these experiments and found changes in an ion with an m/z of 534.49. Structural elucidation of this ion through tandem mass spectrometry revealed that this molecule is a ceramide with a 16-carbon N-acyl chain and sphingadiene backbone (d18:2/16:0 ceramide). Targeted LC/MS analysis revealed elevated levels of additional sphingadiene-containing ceramides (d18:2-Cers) in BAX, BAK-double knockout MEFs. Elevated d18:2-Cers are also found in immortalized baby mouse kidney epithelial cells lacking BAX and BAK. These results support the existence of a distinct biochemical pathway for regulating ceramides with different backbone structures and suggest that sphingadiene-containing ceramides may have functions that are distinct from the more common sphingosine-containing species. PMID:26059977

  9. Influence of seasonal migration on geographic distribution of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in humpback whales.

    PubMed

    Baker, C S; Palumbi, S R; Lambertsen, R H; Weinrich, M T; Calambokidis, J; O'Brien, S J

    1990-03-15

    Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) migrate nearly 10,000 km each year between summer feeding grounds in temperate or near-polar waters and winter breeding grounds in shallow tropical waters. Observations of marked individuals suggest that major oceanic populations of humpback whales are divided into a number of distinct seasonal subpopulations which are not separated by obvious geographic barriers. To test whether these observed patterns of distribution and migration are reflected in the genetic structure of populations, we looked for variation in the mitochondrial DNA of 84 individual humpback whales on different feeding and wintering grounds of the North Pacific and western North Atlantic oceans. On the basis of restriction-fragment analysis, we now report a marked segregation of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes among subpopulations as well as between the two oceans. We interpret this segregation to be the consequence of maternally directed fidelity to migratory destinations.

  10. Comparison of the glycopattern alterations of mitochondrial proteins in cerebral cortex between rat Alzheimer’s disease and the cerebral ischemia model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Houyou; Yang, Changwei; Chen, Shi; Huang, Yang; Liu, Chuanming; Liu, Jian; Yin, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and ischemic brain injury are two major neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondrial dysfunction commonly occurs in AD and ischemic brain injury. Currently, little attention has been paid to the glycans on mitochondrial glycoproteins, which may play vital roles during the process of mitochondrial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to illustrate and compare the glycopattern alterations of mitochondrial glycoproteins extracted from the cerebral cortex of the rat models of these two diseases using High-throughput lectin microarrays. The results shown that the number of lectins with significant differences compared to normal brains was nine for the rat sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (SAD) model and eighteen for the rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model. Interestingly, five lectins showed opposite expression patterns between the SAD and MCAO rat models. We conclude that glycopattern alterations of mitochondrial glycoproteins in the cerebral cortex may provide vital information to help understand mitochondrial dysfunction in AD and ischemic brain injury. In addition, glycans recognized by diverse lectins with opposite expression patterns between these two diseases hints at the different pathomechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction in AD and ischemic brain injury. PMID:28071664

  11. Alterations of motor performance and brain cortex mitochondrial function during ethanol hangover.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Juanita; Karadayian, Analia G; Lores-Arnaiz, Silvia; Cutrera, Rodolfo A

    2012-08-01

    Ethanol has been known to affect various behavioral parameters in experimental animals, even several hours after ethanol (EtOH) is absent from blood circulation, in the period known as hangover. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of acute ethanol hangover on motor performance in association with the brain cortex energetic metabolism. Evaluation of motor performance and brain cortex mitochondrial function during alcohol hangover was performed in mice 6 hours after a high ethanol dose (hangover onset). Animals were injected i.p. either with saline (control group) or with ethanol (3.8 g/kg BW) (hangover group). Ethanol hangover group showed a bad motor performance compared with control animals (p < .05). Oxygen uptake in brain cortex mitochondria from hangover animals showed a 34% decrease in the respiratory control rate as compared with the control group. Mitochondrial complex activities were decreased being the complex I-III the less affected by the hangover condition; complex II-III was markedly decreased by ethanol hangover showing 50% less activity than controls. Complex IV was 42% decreased as compared with control animals. Hydrogen peroxide production was 51% increased in brain cortex mitochondria from the hangover group, as compared with the control animals. Quantification of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential indicated that ethanol injected animals presented 17% less ability to maintain the polarized condition as compared with controls. These results indicate that a clear decrease in proton motive force occurs in brain cortex mitochondria during hangover conditions. We can conclude that a decreased motor performance observed in the hangover group of animals could be associated with brain cortex mitochondrial dysfunction and the resulting impairment of its energetic metabolism.

  12. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation transcriptome alterations in human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis spinal cord and blood.

    PubMed

    Ladd, Amy C; Keeney, Paula M; Govind, Maria M; Bennett, James P

    2014-12-01

    Origins of onset and progression of motor neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are not clearly known, but may include impairment of mitochondrial bioenergetics. We used quantitative PCR approaches to analyze the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) transcriptomes of spinal cord tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from persons with sporadic ALS compared with those without neurological disease. Expression measurements of 88 different nuclear (n) and mitochondrial (mt) DNA-encoded OXPHOS genes showed mtDNA-encoded respiratory gene expression was significantly decreased in ALS spinal cord by 78-84% (ANOVA p < 0.002). We observed the same phenomenon in freshly isolated PBMC from ALS patients (reduced 24-35%, ANOVA p < 0.001) and reproduced it in a human neural stem cell model treated with 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC) (reduced 52-78%, ANOVA p < 0.001). nDNA-encoded OXPHOS genes showed heterogeneously and mostly decreased expression in ALS spinal cord tissue. In contrast, ALS PBMC and ddC-treated stem cells showed no significant change in expression of nDNA OXPHOS genes compared with controls. Genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α, TFAM, ERRα, NRF1, NRF2 and POLG) were queried with inconclusive results. Here, we demonstrate there is a systemic decrease in mtDNA gene expression in ALS central and peripheral tissues that support pursuit of bioenergetic-enhancing therapies. We also identified a combined nDNA and mtDNA gene set (n = 26), downregulated in spinal cord tissue that may be useful as a biomarker in the development of cell-based ALS models.

  13. Single-walled carbon nanotubes alter cytochrome c electron transfer and modulate mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Li-Hua; Wang, Li-Rong; Xue, Xue; Sun, Ji-Hong; Wu, Yan; Zou, Guozhang; Wu, Xia; Wang, Paul C; Wamer, Wayne G; Yin, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-12-21

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are broadly used for various biomedical applications such as drug delivery, in vivo imaging, and cancer photothermal therapy due to their unique physiochemical properties. However, once they enter the cells, the effects of SWCNTs on the intracellular organelles and macromolecules are not comprehensively understood. Cytochrome c (Cyt c), as a key component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria, plays an essential role in cellular energy consumption, growth, and differentiation. In this study, we found the mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial oxygen uptake were greatly decreased in human epithelial KB cells treated with SWCNTs, which accompanies the reduction of Cyt c. SWCNTs deoxidized Cyt c in a pH-dependent manner, as evidenced by the appearance of a 550 nm characteristic absorption peak, the intensity of which increased as the pH increased. Circular dichroism measurement confirmed the pH-dependent conformational change, which facilitated closer association of SWCNTs with the heme pocket of Cyt c and thus expedited the reduction of Cyt c. The electron transfer of Cyt c is also disturbed by SWCNTs, as measured with electron spin resonance spectroscopy. In conclusion, the redox activity of Cyt c was affected by SWCNTs treatment due to attenuated electron transfer and conformational change of Cyt c, which consequently changed mitochondrial respiration of SWCNTs-treated cells. This work is significant to SWCNTs research because it provides a novel understanding of SWCNTs' disruption of mitochondria function and has important implications for biomedical applications of SWCNTs.

  14. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Alter Cytochrome C Electron Transfer and Modulate Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Li-Hua; Wang, Li-Rong; Xue, Xue; Sun, Ji-Hong; Wu, Yan; Zou, Guozhang; Wu, Xia; Wang, Paul C.; Wamer, Wayne G.; Yin, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are broadly used for various biomedical applications such as drug delivery, in vivo imaging and cancer photothermal therapy due to their unique physiochemical properties. However, once they enter the cells, the effects of SWCNTs to the intracellular organelles and macromolecules are not comprehensively understood. Cytochrome c (Cyt c), as a key component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria, plays an essential role in cellular energy consumption, growth and differentiation. In this study, we found the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mitochondrial oxygen uptake were greatly decreased in human epithelial KB cells treated with SWCNTs, which accompanies the reduction of Cyt c. SWCNTs deoxidized Cyt c in a pH dependent manner as evidenced by the appearance of a 550 nm characteristic absorption peak, which intensity increased as pH increase. Circular dichroism measurement confirmed the pH-dependent conformational change, which facilitated closer association of SWCNTs with the heme pocket of Cyt c and thus expedited the reduction of Cyt c. The electron transfer of Cyt c is also disturbed by SWCNTs, as measured with electron spin resonance spectroscopy. In conclusion, the redox activity of Cyt c was affected by SWCNTs treatment due to attenuated electron transfer and conformational change of Cyt c, which consequently changed mitochondrial respiration of SWCNTs treated cells. This work is significant to SWCNTs research because it provided novel understanding to the disruption of SWCNTs to the mitochondria and has important implications for biomedical applications of SWCNTs. PMID:23171082

  15. Glycated human albumin alters mitochondrial respiration in preadipocyte 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Baret, Pascal; Le Sage, Fanny; Planesse, Cynthia; Meilhac, Olivier; Devin, Anne; Bourdon, Emmanuel; Rondeau, Philippe

    2017-07-08

    Diabetes and obesity are strongly associated with increased levels of circulating advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). These two molecular phenomena affect the physiology of adipose tissue, a biological driver of the metabolic syndrome, leading to an inflammatory profile and insulin resistance, which could contribute to obesity/diabetes-associated complications, such as cardiovascular diseases. Herein, we investigated the impact of AGEs on mitochondrial bioenergetics in murine preadipocyte cells (3T3-L1) and cellular redox homeostasis. We show that incubation of preadipocytes with AGEs stimulates mitochondrial activity and respiration while inducing oxidative stress. This AGE-induced intracellular ROS production was blocked by diphenylene iodonium, an NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor. In parallel, antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase) were found to be activated upon AGE treatment. Our results suggest that AGE-induced oxidative stress is generated by NAD(P)H oxidase and leads to a cellular proliferation arrest associated with enhanced mitochondrial metabolism and biogenesis, and with increased levels of ROS-detoxifying enzymes, as well. These new data show how AGEs may be involved in hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damage in preadipocytes and their potential links to diabetes progression. © 2017 BioFactors, 43(4):577-592, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  16. Telmisartan enhances mitochondrial activity and alters cellular functions in human coronary artery endothelial cells via AMP-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Hirofumi; Sugiyama, Seigo; Nozaki, Toshimitsu; Sugamura, Koichi; Toyama, Kensuke; Matsubara, Junichi; Fujisue, Koichiro; Ohba, Keisuke; Maeda, Hirofumi; Konishi, Masaaki; Akiyama, Eiichi; Sumida, Hitoshi; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Yasuda, Osamu; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Ogawa, Hisao

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in cellular senescence and impaired function of vascular endothelium, resulted in cardiovascular diseases. Telmisartan is a unique angiotensin II type I receptor blocker that has been shown to prevent cardiovascular events in high risk patients. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a critical role in mitochondrial biogenesis and endothelial function. This study assessed whether telmisartan enhances mitochondrial function and alters cellular functions via AMPK in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). In cultured HCAECs, telmisartan significantly enhanced mitochondrial activity assessed by mitochondrial reductase activity and intracellular ATP production and increased the expression of mitochondria related genes. Telmisartan prevented cellular senescence and exhibited the anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenic properties. The expression of genes related anti-oxidant and pro-angiogenic properties were increased by telmisartan. Telmisartan increased endothelial NO synthase and AMPK phosphorylation. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling was not involved in telmisartan-induced improvement of mitochondrial function. All of these effects were abolished by inhibition of AMPK. Telmisartan enhanced mitochondrial activity and exhibited anti-senescence effects and improving endothelial function through AMPK in HCAECs. Telmisartan could provide beneficial effects on vascular diseases via enhancement of mitochondrial activity and modulating endothelial function through AMPK activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamic changes in mitochondrial DNA, distribution and activity within cat oocytes during folliculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Songsasen, N; Henson, L H; Tipkantha, W; Thongkittidilok, C; Henson, J H; Chatdarong, K; Comizzoli, P

    2017-04-01

    Mitochondria play fundamental roles during oocyte development. The accumulation and spatial redistribution of these energy-producing organelles have been linked to the developmental competence of mammalian oocytes. Here, we assessed the copy number, distribution and activity of mitochondria within cat oocytes during folliculogenesis. In Experiment 1, oocytes were recovered from primordial (n = 152), primary (112), secondary (95), early (131), small (118), antral (86) and advanced antral (5) stages follicles, and mitochondria DNA extracted and quantified using qPCR. In Experiment 2, oocytes from pre-antral (n = 44), early antral (n = 66), small antral (n = 59), antral (n = 41) and advanced antral (n = 21) follicles were isolated and stained with CMXRos MitoTracker dye to assess mitochondrial distribution pattern and activity levels. Oocyte's mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) copy numbers gradually increased as folliculogenesis progressed, with a significant shift at the small antral stage (0.5 to <1 mm in diameter). The location of mitochondria gradually shifted from a homogeneous distribution throughout the cytoplasm in pre-antral oocytes to a pericortical concentration in the advanced antral stage. Quantification of CMXRos fluorescent intensity revealed a progressive increase in mitochondrial activity in oocytes from the pre-antral to the large antral follicles. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that cat oocytes undergo dynamic changes in mitochondrial copy number, distribution and activity during folliculogenesis. These significant modifications to this crucial cytoplasmic organelle are likely associated with the acquisition of developmental competency by cat oocytes.

  18. [Genetic structure of sable (Martes zibellina L.) from Eurasia based on distribution of mitochondrial lineages].

    PubMed

    Rozhnov, V V; Pishchulina, S L; Meshcherskiĭ, I G; Simakin, L V; Lazebnyĭ, O E; Kashtanov, S N

    2013-02-01

    The phylogeography of the sable, which is a commercially valuable species, is extremely complicated and poorly investigated. Specifically, the effects of factors such as the range dynamics of the sable during the Pleistocene Epoch, the localization of glacial refugia, species distribution pattern in Holocene, and recent dramatic population decline, along with massive reacclimatization measures, on the species phylogeography remain unclear. Based on the sequence analysis of the control region of mitochondrial DNA from sables that inhabit different parts of the species range, a suggestion was made of the considerably high Pleistocene genetic diversity in sable, which was subsequently lost. The initial diversity of mitochondrial lineages is mostly preserved in the Urals, while in the eastern part of the range, it seems to have been depleted as early as before the last glacial maximum. On the other hand, the even greater depletion of the mitochondrial lineages observed in some populations of central Siberia can be associated with the dramatic population decline at the turn of the 20th century.

  19. Correlative light and electron microscopic analyses of mitochondrial distribution in blastomeres of early fish embryos.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongming; Li, Mingyou; Hong, Ni; Hong, Yunhan

    2014-02-01

    Early embryos of vertebrates undergo remarkable dynamic molecular events, such as embryonic gradient, cellular polarity, and asymmetry necessary for cell fate decisions. Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is a powerful tool to investigate rare or dynamic molecular events and has been developed for relatively small cells in culture and tissues but is not yet available for large cells of early development stage embryos. Here we report the capability of CLEM in blastomeres of medaka fish by using the mitochondria detection system. A short N-terminal signal peptide of the mitochondrial protein Tom20 was linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP), resulting in a fusion protein termed Tom20:GFP. The subcellular location of Tom20:GFP in medaka blastomeres reveals the lack of mitochondrial distribution in pseudopodia as well as inconspicuous redistribution during divisions. Blastomeres, after sample preparation procedures including high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution, are able to preserve fluorescence, antigenicity, and fine structures, which allows for precise correlation between the Tom20:GFP fluorescence and mitochondria on merged light and electron micrographs. Furthermore, nanogold immunostaining for Tom20:GFP and endogenous Tom20 revealed their specific localization on the mitochondrial outer membrane. Our results extend the CLEM approach to early development stage embryos of a vertebrate.

  20. Carvedilol exacerbate gentamicin-induced kidney mitochondrial alterations in adult rat.

    PubMed

    Félix, Luís; Oliveira, M M; Videira, Romeu; Maciel, Elisabete; Alves, Nuno D; Nunes, Fernando M; Alves, Anabela; Almeida, José M; Domingues, M Rosário M; Peixoto, Francisco P

    2017-02-01

    Gentamicin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic widely used to treat many types of bacterial infections. Although its properties, his clinical use is limited due to the occurrence of nephrotoxicity, which has been related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Carvedilol, an antihypertensive drug with strong antioxidant properties, has been tested in order to prevent gentamicin nephrotoxicity. This study aimed to test this hypothesis using a rat model of gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Animals were treated subcutaneously with DMSO (control) (0.4%/kg/24h bw) for 11days; with carvedilol (2mg/kg/24h bw) for 11days; with gentamicin (60mg/kg/24h bw) for the last 8days and with carvedilol (2mg/kg/24h bw) for 11days and with gentamicin (60mg/kg/24h bw) for the last 8days. Estimations of urine creatinine, urine carboxylic acids, blood urea, serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate were carried out after the last administered dose of gentamicin. Mitochondria functionality was analyzed by monitoring its bioenergetics function and cardiolipin oxidized products were analyzed by ESI-MS. The kidneys were also examined for morphological changes. Gentamicin caused marked nephrotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction as evidenced by several mitochondrial parameters. Carvedilol did not induce significant changes while the co-treatment exacerbated the negative effect of gentamicin although maintaining ATP levels and membrane potential. Kidneys from gentamicin treated rats, with and without carvedilol, showed necrosis of tubular cells in renal cortex. Higher values on relative abundance of cardiolipin oxidation products identified as [M-2H](2-) ions, at m/z 771 were observed in the groups treated with gentamicin. The observed effects were associated to a possible interaction of carvedilol with F1F0-ATP synthase that merit further investigation. In conclusion, carvedilol may contribute to the exacerbation of renal dysfunction induced by gentamicin, at least in some physiological and

  1. Distribution of nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes in three pollinator fig wasps associated with Ficus pumila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Liu, Min; Compton, Stephen G.; Chen, Xiao-Yong

    2014-05-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (NUMTs) are nuclear sequences transferred from mitochondrial genomes. Although widespread, their distribution patterns among populations or closely related species are rarely documented. We amplified and sequenced the mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cytb) gene to check for NUMTs in three fig wasp species that pollinate Ficus pumila (Wiebesia sp. 1, 2 and 3) in Southeastern China using direct and cloned sequencing. Unambiguous sequences (332) of 487 bp in length belonging to 33 haplotypes were found by direct sequencing. Their distribution was highly concordant with those of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI). Obvious signs of co-amplification of NUMTs were indicated by their uneven distribution. NUMTs were observed in all individuals of 12 populations of Wiebesia sp. 3, and 13 individuals of three northern populations of Wiebesia sp. 1. Sequencing clones of potential co-amplification products confirmed that they were NUMTs. These NUMTs either clustered as NUMT clades basal to mtDNA Cytb clades (basal NUMTs), or together with Cytb haplotypes. Basal NUMTs had either stop codons or frame-shifting mutations resulting from deletion of a 106 bp fragment. In addition, no third codon or synonymous substitutions were detected within each NUMT clade. The phylogenetic tree indicated that basal NUMTs had been inserted into nuclei before divergence of the three species. No significant pairwise differences were detected in their ratios of third codon substitutions, suggesting that these NUMTs originated from one transfer event, with duplication in the nuclear genome resulting in the coexistence of the 381 bp copy. No significant substitution differences were detected between Cytb haplotypes and NUMTs that clustered with Cytb haplotypes. However, these NUMTs coexisted with Cytb haplotypes in multiple populations, suggesting that these NUMT haplotypes were recently inserted into the nuclear genome. Both basal and recently inserted NUMTs were rare

  2. RNS60, a charge-stabilized nanostructure saline alters Xenopus Laevis oocyte biophysical membrane properties by enhancing mitochondrial ATP production.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Duk-Soo; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2015-03-01

    We have examined the effects of RNS60, a 0.9% saline containing charge-stabilized oxygen nanobubble-based structures. RNS60 is generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. This study, implemented in Xenopus laevis oocytes, addresses both the electrophysiological membrane properties and parallel biological processes in the cytoplasm. Intracellular recordings from defolliculated X. laevis oocytes were implemented in: (1) air oxygenated standard Ringer's solution, (2) RNS60-based Ringer's solution, (3) RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen)-based Ringer's, and (4) ONS60 (saline containing high pressure oxygen without TCP modification)-based Ringer's. RNS60-based Ringer's solution induced membrane hyperpolarization from the resting membrane potential. This effect was prevented by: (1) ouabain (a blocker of the sodium/potassium ATPase), (2) rotenone (a mitochondrial electron transfer chain inhibitor preventing usable ATP synthesis), and (3) oligomycin A (an inhibitor of ATP synthase) indicating that RNS60 effects intracellular ATP levels. Increased intracellular ATP levels following RNS60 treatment were directly demonstrated using luciferin/luciferase photon emission. These results indicate that RNS60 alters intrinsic the electrophysiological properties of the X. laevis oocyte membrane by increasing mitochondrial-based ATP synthesis. Ultrastructural analysis of the oocyte cytoplasm demonstrated increased mitochondrial length in the presence of RNS60-based Ringer's solution. It is concluded that the biological properties of RNS60 relate to its ability to optimize ATP synthesis. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  3. Coenzyme Q10 Inhibits Glutamate Excitotoxicity and Oxidative Stress–Mediated Mitochondrial Alteration in a Mouse Model of Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongwook; Shim, Myoung Sup; Kim, Keun-Young; Noh, You Hyun; Kim, Heemin; Kim, Sang Yeop; Weinreb, Robert N.; Ju, Won-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To test whether a diet supplemented with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) ameliorates glutamate excitotoxicity and oxidative stress–mediated retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration by preventing mitochondrial alterations in the retina of glaucomatous DBA/2J mice. Methods. Preglaucomatous DBA/2J and age-matched control DBA/2J-Gpnmb+ mice were fed with CoQ10 (1%) or a control diet daily for 6 months. The RGC survival and axon preservation were measured by Brn3a and neurofilament immunohistochemistry and by conventional transmission electron microscopy. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO1), N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NR) 1 and 2A, and Bax and phosphorylated Bad (pBad) protein expression was measured by Western blot analysis. Apoptotic cell death was assessed by TUNEL staining. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)/oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex IV protein expression were measured by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Results. Coenzyme Q10 promoted RGC survival by approximately 29% and preserved the axons in the optic nerve head (ONH), as well as inhibited astroglial activation by decreasing GFAP expression in the retina and ONH of glaucomatous DBA/2J mice. Intriguingly, CoQ10 significantly blocked the upregulation of NR1 and NR2A, as well as of SOD2 and HO1 protein expression in the retina of glaucomatous DBA/2J mice. In addition, CoQ10 significantly prevented apoptotic cell death by decreasing Bax protein expression or by increasing pBad protein expression. More importantly, CoQ10 preserved mtDNA content and Tfam/OXPHOS complex IV protein expression in the retina of glaucomatous DBA/2J mice. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that CoQ10 may be a promising therapeutic strategy for ameliorating glutamate excitotoxicity and oxidative stress in glaucomatous neurodegeneration. PMID:24458150

  4. Therapeutic Approaches in Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Proteolysis, and Structural Alterations of Diaphragm and Gastrocnemius in Rats With Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Esther; Puig-Vilanova, Ester; Marin-Corral, Judith; Chacón-Cabrera, Alba; Salazar-Degracia, Anna; Mateu, Xavier; Puente-Maestu, Luis; García-Arumí, Elena; Andreu, Antoni L; Molina, Luis

    2016-07-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) experience exercise intolerance, fatigue and muscle wasting, which negatively influence their survival. We hypothesized that treatment with either the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib of rats with monocrotaline-induced CHF may restore inspiratory and limb muscle mass, function, and structure through several molecular mechanisms involved in protein breakdown and metabolism in the diaphragm and gastrocnemius. In these muscles of CHF-cachectic rats with and without treatment with NAC or bortezomib (N = 10/group) and non-cachectic controls, proteolysis (tyrosine release, proteasome activities, ubiquitin-proteasome markers), oxidative stress, inflammation, mitochondrial function, myosin, NF-κB transcriptional activity, muscle structural abnormalities, and fiber morphometry were analyzed together with muscle and cardiac functions. In diaphragm and gastrocnemius of CHF-cachectic rats, tyrosine release, proteasome activity, protein ubiquitination, atrogin-1, MURF-1, NF-κB activity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and structural abnormalities were increased, while muscle and cardiac functions, myosin content, slow- and fast-twitch fiber sizes, and mitochondrial activity were decreased. Concomitant treatment of CHF-cachectic rats with NAC or bortezomib improved protein catabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, muscle fiber sizes, function and damage, superoxide dismutase and myosin levels, mitochondrial function (complex I, gastrocnemius), cardiac function and decreased NF-κB transcriptional activity in both muscles. Treatment of CHF-cachectic animals with NAC or bortezomib attenuated the functional (heart, muscles), biological, and structural alterations in muscles. Nonetheless, future studies conducted in actual clinical settings are warranted in order to assess the potential beneficial effects and safety concerns of these pharmacological agents on muscle mass loss and wasting in

  5. Progressive dopaminergic alterations and mitochondrial abnormalities in LRRK2 G2019S knock in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yue, M.; Hinkle, K.; Davies, P.; Trushina, E.; Fiesel, F.; Christenson, T.; Schroeder, A.; Zhang, L.; Bowles, E.; Behrouz, B.; Lincoln, S.; Beevers, J.; Milnerwood, A.; Kurti, A.; McLean, P. J.; Fryer, J. D.; Springer, W.; Dickson, D.; Farrer, M.; Melrose, H.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 gene represent the most common genetic cause of late onset Parkinson’s disease. The physiological and pathological roles of LRRK2 are yet to be fully determined but evidence points towards LRRK2 mutations causing a gain in kinase function, impacting on neuronal maintenance, vesicular dynamics and neurotransmitter release. To explore the role of physiological levels of mutant LRRK2, we created knock in mice harboring the most common LRRK2 mutation G2019S in their own genome. We have performed comprehensive dopaminergic, behavioral and neuropathological analyses in this model up to 24 months of age. We find elevated kinase activity in the brain of both heterozygous and homozygous mice. Although normal at 6 months, by 12 months of age, basal and pharmacologically induced extracellular release of dopamine is impaired in both heterozygous and homozygous mice, corroborating previous findings in transgenic models over-expressing mutant LRRK2. Via in vivo microdialysis measurement of basal and drug- evoked extracellular release of dopamine and its metabolites, our findings indicate that exocytotic release from the vesicular pool is impaired. Furthermore, profound mitochondrial abnormalities are evident in the striatum of older homozygous G2019S mice, which are consistent with mitochondrial fission arrest. We anticipate the G2019S will be a useful pre-clinical model for further evaluation of early mechanistic events in LRRK2 pathogenesis and for second-hit approaches to model disease progression. PMID:25836420

  6. Identification of rat hippocampal mRNAs altered by the mitochondrial toxicant, 3-NPA.

    PubMed

    Przybyla-Zawislak, Beata D; Thorn, Brett T; Ali, Syed F; Dennis, Richard A; Amato, Antonino; Virmani, Ashraf; Binienda, Zbigniew K

    2005-08-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) is a model mitochondrial inhibitor that causes selective neurodegeneration in brain. 3-NPA-induced neurodegeneration occurs via a secondary neurotoxicity, caused initially by ATP depletion and redox changes in the cell. It is known that the hippocampal degeneration caused by mitochondrial dysfunction affects learning and memory, cognitive functions commonly disturbed in neurodegenerative diseases. The 3-NPA- treated animal model can be used to study molecular mechanisms underlying selective degeneration in the brain. In this study, a microarray approach was utilized to define changes in the expression of 530 genes in the rat hippocampus after acute exposure to 3-NPA at 30 mg/kg, sc. The microarray data were collected at 30 min, 2 h, and 4 h post-3-NPA. Statistical modeling using an ANOVA mixed model applied to Van der Waerden scores of rank-transformed intensity data was used to assign statistical significance to 44 transcripts. These transcripts represent genes associated with energy metabolism, calcium homeostasis, the cytoskeleton, neurotransmitter metabolism, and other cellular functions. Changes in the transcripts of genes encoding 2 transporters [blood-brain specific anion transporter (Slco1c1) and sodium-dependent inorganic phosphate cotransporter (Slc17a7)] were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. In conclusion, this study identified 2 new potential targets for enhancement of neuroprotection or inhibition of neurodegeneration associated with ATP depletion in the hippocampus.

  7. Propionate Increases Hepatic Pyruvate Cycling and Anaplerosis and Alters Mitochondrial Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Perry, Rachel J; Borders, Candace B; Cline, Gary W; Zhang, Xian-Man; Alves, Tiago C; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Rothman, Douglas L; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-06-03

    In mammals, pyruvate kinase (PK) plays a key role in regulating the balance between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis; however, in vivo regulation of PK flux by gluconeogenic hormones and substrates is poorly understood. To this end, we developed a novel NMR-liquid chromatography/tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to directly assess pyruvate cycling relative to mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism (VPyr-Cyc/VMito) in vivo using [3-(13)C]lactate as a tracer. Using this approach, VPyr-Cyc/VMito was only 6% in overnight fasted rats. In contrast, when propionate was infused simultaneously at doses previously used as a tracer, it increased VPyr-Cyc/VMito by 20-30-fold, increased hepatic TCA metabolite concentrations 2-3-fold, and increased endogenous glucose production rates by 20-100%. The physiologic stimuli, glucagon and epinephrine, both increased hepatic glucose production, but only glucagon suppressed VPyr-Cyc/VMito These data show that under fasting conditions, when hepatic gluconeogenesis is stimulated, pyruvate recycling is relatively low in liver compared with VMito flux and that liver metabolism, in particular pyruvate cycling, is sensitive to propionate making it an unsuitable tracer to assess hepatic glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and mitochondrial metabolism in vivo.

  8. Alterations of plasma antioxidants and mitochondrial DNA mutation in hair follicles of smokers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chin-San; Chen, Haw-Wen; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Tsai, Ching-Shan; Kuo, Chen-Ling; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2002-01-01

    The effects of long-term smoking on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions in hair follicles were investigated in subjects with different antioxidant capacity. Twenty-two male smokers with a smoking index of greater than 5 pack-years and without any known systemic diseases were recruited for this study. Forty healthy nonsmoking males were included as controls. We found that the concentrations of ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol and the activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase in blood plasma were significantly decreased in smokers. The levels of glutathione and protein thiols in whole blood and the incidence of a 4,977 bp deletion of mtDNA (dmtDNA) in hair follicles were significantly increased in smokers. A significantly higher incidence of the 4,977 bp dmtDNA was found in smokers with plasma GST activity less than 5.66 U/l (OR = 7.2, P = 0.020). Using multiple covariate ANOVA and logistic regression, we found that age and low plasma GST activity were the only two risk factors for the 4,977 bp dmtDNA. These results suggest that smoking depletes antioxidants and causes mtDNA deletions and that plasma GST may play an important role in the preservation of the mitochondrial genome in tissue cells of smokers.

  9. Propionate Increases Hepatic Pyruvate Cycling and Anaplerosis and Alters Mitochondrial Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Rachel J.; Borders, Candace B.; Cline, Gary W.; Zhang, Xian-Man; Alves, Tiago C.; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Rothman, Douglas L.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, pyruvate kinase (PK) plays a key role in regulating the balance between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis; however, in vivo regulation of PK flux by gluconeogenic hormones and substrates is poorly understood. To this end, we developed a novel NMR-liquid chromatography/tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to directly assess pyruvate cycling relative to mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism (VPyr-Cyc/VMito) in vivo using [3-13C]lactate as a tracer. Using this approach, VPyr-Cyc/VMito was only 6% in overnight fasted rats. In contrast, when propionate was infused simultaneously at doses previously used as a tracer, it increased VPyr-Cyc/VMito by 20–30-fold, increased hepatic TCA metabolite concentrations 2–3-fold, and increased endogenous glucose production rates by 20–100%. The physiologic stimuli, glucagon and epinephrine, both increased hepatic glucose production, but only glucagon suppressed VPyr-Cyc/VMito. These data show that under fasting conditions, when hepatic gluconeogenesis is stimulated, pyruvate recycling is relatively low in liver compared with VMito flux and that liver metabolism, in particular pyruvate cycling, is sensitive to propionate making it an unsuitable tracer to assess hepatic glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and mitochondrial metabolism in vivo. PMID:27002151

  10. The mitochondrial genome can be altered or lost without lethal effect in the petite-negative yeast Debaryomyces (Schwanniomyces) occidentalis.

    PubMed

    Fernet, Caroline S; Clark-Walker, G Desmond; Claisse, Maurice L

    2002-11-01

    The nature of mutations affecting several cytochrome-deficient mutants of Debaryomyces (Schwanniomyces) occidentalis has been characterized. The DR12 mutant, which is deficient in cytochrome b, and the B10Mn mutant, which is deficient in cytochromes b and a, a3, are deleted in the mitochondrial CYB and COX1 genes respectively. The B10 strain, which is partially deficient in cytochrome b, has no detectable change in its mitochondrial DNA and possibly carries nuclear lesion(s). These three mutants, unlike the rho(-) and rho degrees "petite" mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, can still grow on non-fermentable substrates, due to the development of a salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM)-sensitive alternative pathway linked to phosphorylation at site 1. A gly(-) mutant lacking mtDNA and respiratory capacity has been isolated. For the first time, it is demonstrated that mtDNA can be altered or even lost without lethal consequence in D. occidentalis, although this yeast was classified as a petite-negative species.

  11. Role of metabolic modulator Bet-CA in altering mitochondrial hyperpolarization to suppress cancer associated angiogenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Suchandrima; Ghosh, Monisankar; Dutta, Samir Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumors characteristically reflect a metabolic switching from glucose oxidation to glycolysis that plays a fundamental role in angiogenesis and metastasis to facilitate aggressive tumor outcomes. Hyperpolarized mitochondrial membrane potential is a manifestation of malignant cells that compromise the intrinsic pathways of apoptosis and confer a suitable niche to promote the cancer associated hallmark traits. We have previously reported that co-drug Bet-CA selectively targets cancer cells by inducing metabolic catastrophe without a manifest in toxicity. Here we report that the same molecule at a relatively lower concentration deregulates the cardinal phenotypes associated with angiogenesis and metastasis. In mice syngeneic 4T1 breast cancer model, Bet-CA exhibited effective abrogation of angiogenesis and concomitantly obliterated lung metastasis consistent with altered mitochondrial bioenergetics. Furthermore, Bet-CA significantly lowered vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels and obviated matrix metalloproteases (MMP-2/9) production directly to the criterion where abrogation of autocrine VEGF/VEGFR2 signalling loop was documented. In vitro studies anticipatedly documented the role of Bet-CA in inhibiting actin remodeling, lamellipodia formation and cell membrane ruffling to constitutively suppress cell motility and invasion. Results comprehensively postulate that Bet-CA, a mitochondria targeting metabolic modulator may serve as an excellent candidate for combating angiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:27003027

  12. Autophagy and mitochondrial alterations in human retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by ethanol: implications of 4-hydroxy-nonenal

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Bellver, M; Bonet-Ponce, L; Barcia, J M; Garcia-Verdugo, J M; Martinez-Gil, N; Saez-Atienzar, S; Sancho-Pelluz, J; Jordan, J; Galindo, M F; Romero, F J

    2014-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium has a crucial role in the physiology and pathophysiology of the retina due to its location and metabolism. Oxidative damage has been demonstrated as a pathogenic mechanism in several retinal diseases, and reactive oxygen species are certainly important by-products of ethanol (EtOH) metabolism. Autophagy has been shown to exert a protective effect in different cellular and animal models. Thus, in our model, EtOH treatment increases autophagy flux, in a concentration-dependent manner. Mitochondrial morphology seems to be clearly altered under EtOH exposure, leading to an apparent increase in mitochondrial fission. An increase in 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, such as 4-hydroxy-nonenal (4-HNE), among others were confirmed. The characterization of these structures confirmed their nature as aggresomes. Hence, autophagy seems to have a cytoprotective role in ARPE-19 cells under EtOH damage, by degrading fragmented mitochondria and 4-HNE aggresomes. Herein, we describe the central implication of autophagy in human retinal pigment epithelial cells upon oxidative stress induced by EtOH, with possible implications for other conditions and diseases. PMID:25032851

  13. Vitamin C supplementation does not alter high-intensity endurance training-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in rat epitrochlearis muscle.

    PubMed

    Yada, Koichi; Matoba, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether vitamin C supplementation prevents high-intensity intermittent endurance training-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in the skeletal muscle. Male Wistar-strain rats were assigned to one of five groups: a control group, training group, small dose vitamin C supplemented training group, middle dose vitamin C supplemented training group, and large dose vitamin C supplemented training group. The rats of the trained groups were subjected to intense intermittent swimming training. The vitamin C supplemented groups were administrated vitamin C for the pretraining and training periods. High-intensity intermittent swimming training without vitamin C supplementation significantly increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α protein content and citrate synthase activity in the epitrochlearis muscle. The vitamin C supplementation did not alter the training-induced increase of these regardless of the dose of vitamin C supplementation. The results demonstrate that vitamin C supplementation does not prevent high-intensity intermittent training-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in the skeletal muscle.

  14. Mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress in an acute transient mouse model of muscle degeneration: implications for muscular dystrophy and related muscle pathologies.

    PubMed

    Ramadasan-Nair, Renjini; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Mishra, Sudha; Sunitha, Balaraju; Mythri, Rajeswara Babu; Nalini, Atchayaram; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Harsha, Hindalahalli Chandregowda; Kolthur-Seetharam, Ullas; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2014-01-03

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) and inflammatory myopathies (IMs) are debilitating skeletal muscle disorders characterized by common pathological events including myodegeneration and inflammation. However, an experimental model representing both muscle pathologies and displaying most of the distinctive markers has not been characterized. We investigated the cardiotoxin (CTX)-mediated transient acute mouse model of muscle degeneration and compared the cardinal features with human MDs and IMs. The CTX model displayed degeneration, apoptosis, inflammation, loss of sarcolemmal complexes, sarcolemmal disruption, and ultrastructural changes characteristic of human MDs and IMs. Cell death caused by CTX involved calcium influx and mitochondrial damage both in murine C2C12 muscle cells and in mice. Mitochondrial proteomic analysis at the initial phase of degeneration in the model detected lowered expression of 80 mitochondrial proteins including subunits of respiratory complexes, ATP machinery, fatty acid metabolism, and Krebs cycle, which further decreased in expression during the peak degenerative phase. The mass spectrometry (MS) data were supported by enzyme assays, Western blot, and histochemistry. The CTX model also displayed markers of oxidative stress and a lowered glutathione reduced/oxidized ratio (GSH/GSSG) similar to MDs, human myopathies, and neurogenic atrophies. MS analysis identified 6 unique oxidized proteins from Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples (n = 6) (versus controls; n = 6), including two mitochondrial proteins. Interestingly, these mitochondrial proteins were down-regulated in the CTX model thereby linking oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that mitochondrial alterations and oxidative damage significantly contribute to CTX-mediated muscle pathology with implications for human muscle diseases.

  15. Transcriptome alterations of mitochondrial and coagulation function in schizophrenia by cortical sequencing analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcriptome sequencing of brain samples provides detailed enrichment analysis of differential expression and genetic interactions for evaluation of mitochondrial and coagulation function of schizophrenia. It is implicated that schizophrenia genetic and protein interactions may give rise to biological dysfunction of energy metabolism and hemostasis. These findings may explain the biological mechanisms responsible for negative and withdraw symptoms of schizophrenia and antipsychotic-induced venous thromboembolism. We conducted a comparison of schizophrenic candidate genes from literature reviews and constructed the schizophrenia-mediator network (SCZMN) which consists of schizophrenic candidate genes and associated mediator genes by applying differential expression analysis to BA22 RNA-Seq brain data. The network was searched against pathway databases such as PID, Reactome, HumanCyc, and Cell-Map. The candidate complexes were identified by MCL clustering using CORUM for potential pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Results Published BA22 RNA-Seq brain data of 9 schizophrenic patients and 9 controls samples were analyzed. The differentially expressed genes in the BA22 brain samples of schizophrenia are proposed as schizophrenia candidate marker genes (SCZCGs). The genetic interactions between mitochondrial genes and many under-expressed SCZCGs indicate the genetic predisposition of mitochondria dysfunction in schizophrenia. The biological functions of SCZCGs, as listed in the Pathway Interaction Database (PID), indicate that these genes have roles in DNA binding transcription factor, signal and cancer-related pathways, coagulation and cell cycle regulation and differentiation pathways. In the query-query protein-protein interaction (QQPPI) network of SCZCGs, TP53, PRKACA, STAT3 and SP1 were identified as the central "hub" genes. Mitochondrial function was modulated by dopamine inhibition of respiratory complex I activity. The genetic interaction between

  16. Enhancement of Muscle Mitochondrial Oxidative Capacity and Alterations in Insulin Action Are Lipid Species Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Nigel; Hariharan, Krit; TidAng, Jennifer; Frangioudakis, Georgia; Beale, Susan M.; Wright, Lauren E.; Zeng, Xiao Yi; Leslie, Simon J.; Li, Jing-Ya; Kraegen, Edward W.; Cooney, Gregory J.; Ye, Ji-Ming

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) have been reported to be less obesogenic than long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs); however, relatively little is known regarding their effect on insulin action. Here, we examined the tissue-specific effects of MCFAs on lipid metabolism and insulin action. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS C57BL6/J mice and Wistar rats were fed either a low-fat control diet or high-fat diets rich in MCFAs or LCFAs for 4–5 weeks, and markers of mitochondrial oxidative capacity, lipid levels, and insulin action were measured. RESULTS Mice fed the MCFA diet displayed reduced adiposity and better glucose tolerance than LCFA-fed animals. In skeletal muscle, triglyceride levels were increased by the LCFA diet (77%, P < 0.01) but remained at low-fat diet control levels in the MCFA-fed animals. The LCFA diet increased (20–50%, P < 0.05) markers of mitochondrial metabolism in muscle compared with low-fat diet–fed controls; however; the increase in oxidative capacity was substantially greater in MCFA-fed animals (50–140% versus low-fat–fed controls, P < 0.01). The MCFA diet induced a greater accumulation of liver triglycerides than the LCFA diet, likely due to an upregulation of several lipogenic enzymes. In rats, isocaloric feeding of MCFA or LCFA high-fat diets induced hepatic insulin resistance to a similar degree; however, insulin action was preserved at the level of low-fat diet–fed controls in muscle and adipose from MCFA-fed animals. CONCLUSIONS MCFAs reduce adiposity and preserve insulin action in muscle and adipose, despite inducing steatosis and insulin resistance in the liver. Dietary supplementation with MCFAs may therefore be beneficial for preventing obesity and peripheral insulin resistance. PMID:19720794

  17. Moderate traumatic brain injury is linked to acute behaviour deficits and long term mitochondrial alterations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Chan, Yik Lung; Nguyen, Long The; Mao, Yilin; de Rosa, Alicia; Beh, Ing Tsyr; Chee, Candice; Oliver, Brian; Herok, George; Saad, Sonia; Gorrie, Catherine

    2016-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Mild TBI may lead to neuropsychiatric sequelae, including memory loss and motor impairment. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have a contributory role in several neurological disorders; however, their association with mitophagy in mild TBI is unclear. TBI was induced in female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats using a New York University Impactor (10 g, impactor head 2.5 mm diameter, weight drop 50 mm) and compared to sham surgery controls. The novel object recognition and error ladder tests were performed at 24 hours and for 6 weeks post injury, and the brains were examined histologically to confirm the extent of injury. Mitochondria manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes I-V (CI-CV), as well as mitophagy markers, dynamin related protein 1 (DRP-1), LC3A/B and PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK-1), were measured in the penumbra by western blot. At 24 hours sham rats performed as expected on a novel object recognition test while TBI rats showed cognitive deficits at the early time points. TBI rats also showed more early motor deficits on a horizontal ladder, compared with the sham rats. MnSOD, OXPHOS CI, CIII and CV protein levels were significantly lower in the TBI group at 24 hours. DRP-1, LC3A/B I and II, and PINK-1 were increased at 6 weeks suggesting abnormal mitophagy. Moderate TBI caused immediate cognitive and mild motor functional deficits in the rats that did not persist. Reduced antioxidative capacity and possibly compromised mitochondrial function may affect the long term functional recovery. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Mitochondrial Diversity and Distribution of African Green Monkeys (Chlorocebus Gray, 1870)

    PubMed Central

    Haus, Tanja; Akom, Emmanuel; Agwanda, Bernard; Hofreiter, Michael; Roos, Christian; Zinner, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    African green monkeys (Chlorocebus) represent a widely distributed and morphologically diverse primate genus in sub-Saharan Africa. Little attention has been paid to their genetic diversity and phylogeny. Based on morphological data, six species are currently recognized, but their taxonomy remains disputed. Here, we aim to characterize the mitochondrial (mt) DNA diversity, biogeography and phylogeny of African green monkeys. We analyzed the complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of 126 samples using feces from wild individuals and material from zoo and museum specimens with clear geographical provenance, including several type specimens. We found evidence for nine major mtDNA clades that reflect geographic distributions rather than taxa, implying that the mtDNA diversity of African green monkeys does not conform to existing taxonomic classifications. Phylogenetic relationships among clades could not be resolved suggesting a rapid early divergence of lineages. Several discordances between mtDNA and phenotype indicate that hybridization may have occurred in contact zones among species, including the threatened Bale monkey (Chlorocebus djamdjamensis). Our results provide both valuable data on African green monkeys’ genetic diversity and evolution and a basis for further molecular studies on this genus. Am. J. Primatol. 75:350-360, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23307319

  19. Pore Pressure Distribution and Flank Instability in Hydrothermally Altered Stratovolcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. L.; Taron, J.; Hurwitz, S.; Reid, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Field and geophysical investigations of stratovolcanoes with long-lived hydrothermal systems commonly reveal that initially permeable regions (such as brecciated layers of pyroclastic material) can become both altered and water-bearing. Hydrothermal alteration in these regions, including clay formation, can turn them into low-permeability barriers to fluid flow, which could increase pore fluid pressures resulting in flank slope instability. We examined elevated pore pressure conditions using numerical models of hydrothermal flow in stratovolcanoes, informed by geophysical data about internal structures and deposits. Idealized radially symmetric meshes were developed based on cross-sectional profiles and alteration/permeability structures of Cascade Range stratovolcanoes. We used the OpenGeoSys model to simulate variably saturated conditions in volcanoes heated only by regional heat fluxes, as well as 650°C intrusions at two km depth below the surface. Meteoric recharge was estimated from precipitation rates in the Cascade Range. Preliminary results indicate zones of elevated pore pressures form: 1) where slopes are underlain by continuous low-permeability altered layers, or 2) when the edifice has an altered core with saturated, less permeable limbs. The first scenario might control shallow collapses on the slopes above the altered layers. The second could promote deeper flank collapses that are initially limited to the summit and upper slopes, but could progress to the core of an edifice. In both scenarios, pore pressures can be further elevated by shallow intrusions, or evolve over longer time scales under forcing from regional heat flux. Geometries without confining low-permeability layers do not show these pressure effects. Our initial scenarios use radially symmetric models, but we are also simulating hydrothermal flow under real 3D geometries with asymmetric subsurface structures (Mount Adams). Simulation results will be used to inform 3D slope

  20. Estimating the distribution of selection coefficients from phylogenetic data with applications to mitochondrial and viral DNA.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Yang, Ziheng

    2003-08-01

    The distribution of selection coefficients of new mutations is of key interest in population genetics. In this paper we explore how codon-based likelihood models can be used to estimate the distribution of selection coefficients of new amino acid replacement mutations from phylogenetic data. To obtain such estimates we assume that all mutations at the same site have the same selection coefficient. We first estimate the distribution of selection coefficients from two large viral data sets under the assumption that the viral population size is the same along all lineages of the phylogeny and that the selection coefficients vary among sites. We then implement several new models in which the lineages of the phylogeny may have different population sizes. We apply the new models to a data set consisting of the coding regions from eight primate mitochondrial genomes. The results suggest that there might be little power to determine the exact shape of the distribution of selection coefficient but that the normal and gamma distributions fit the data significantly better than the exponential distribution.

  1. Tracing glacial refugia of Triturus newts based on mitochondrial DNA phylogeography and species distribution modeling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The major climatic oscillations during the Quaternary Ice Age heavily influenced the distribution of species and left their mark on intraspecific genetic diversity. Past range shifts can be reconstructed with the aid of species distribution modeling and phylogeographical analyses. We test the responses of the different members of the genus Triturus (i.e. the marbled and crested newts) as the climate shifted from the previous glacial period (the Last Glacial Maximum, ~21 Ka) to the current interglacial. Results We present the results of a dense mitochondrial DNA phylogeography (visualizing genetic diversity within and divergence among populations) and species distribution modeling (using two different climate simulations) for the nine Triturus species on composite maps. Conclusions The combined use of species distribution modeling and mitochondrial phylogeography provides insight in the glacial contraction and postglacial expansion of Triturus. The combined use of the two independent techniques yields a more complete understanding of the historical biogeography of Triturus than both approaches would on their own. Triturus newts generally conform to the ‘southern richness and northern purity’ paradigm, but we also find more intricate patterns, such as the absence of genetic variation and suitable area at the Last Glacial Maximum (T. dobrogicus), an ‘extra-Mediterranean’ refugium in the Carpathian Basin (T. cristatus), and areas where species displaced one another postglacially (e.g. T. macedonicus and western T. karelinii). We provide a biogeographical scenario for Triturus, showing the positions of glacial refugia, the regions that were postglacially colonized and the areas where species displaced one another as they shifted their ranges. PMID:23514662

  2. Caffeine alters mitochondrial dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase activity of human gingival fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bozchaloei, Shabnam Soltani; Gong, Siew-Ging; Dehpour, Ahmad R; Farrokh, Parisa; Khoshayand, Mohammad R; Oskoui, Mahvash

    2013-11-01

    Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed behaviorally active substances in the world. Although its effects on the central nervous system and bone metabolism have been documented, as yet there is no report on its effect on tissues in the oral cavity. In this study we analyzed the viability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzyme activity after exposure to different concentrations of caffeine for different exposure time periods. The HGF were cultured with different concentrations of caffeine. Viability of cells exposed to caffeine was analyzed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay to assess mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. The activity of ALP was analyzed at specific time intervals after caffeine addition. Our results showed that caffeine of concentrations <1 mm did not affect the viability of HGF and the ALP enzyme activity. Nevertheless, caffeine at 5 and 10 mm dramatically decreased the viability and ALP activity of the cells after 4 days such that, by day 9, the viability of cells declined to near zero in the 10 mm group. These results provided evidence that caffeine in high concentrations can decrease cellular viability and ALP activity in HGF. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Plant growth in elevated CO2 alters mitochondrial number and chloroplast fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Kevin L.; Anderson, O. Roger; Gastrich, Mary D.; Lewis, James D.; Lin, Guanghui; Schuster, William; Seemann, Jeffrey R.; Tissue, David T.; Turnbull, Matthew H.; Whitehead, David

    2001-01-01

    With increasing interest in the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on plant growth and the global carbon balance, there is a need for greater understanding of how plants respond to variations in atmospheric partial pressure of CO2. Our research shows that elevated CO2 produces significant fine structural changes in major cellular organelles that appear to be an important component of the metabolic responses of plants to this global change. Nine species (representing seven plant families) in several experimental facilities with different CO2-dosing technologies were examined. Growth in elevated CO2 increased numbers of mitochondria per unit cell area by 1.3–2.4 times the number in control plants grown in lower CO2 and produced a statistically significant increase in the amount of chloroplast stroma (nonappressed) thylakoid membranes compared with those in lower CO2 treatments. There was no observable change in size of the mitochondria. However, in contrast to the CO2 effect on mitochondrial number, elevated CO2 promoted a decrease in the rate of mass-based dark respiration. These changes may reflect a major shift in plant metabolism and energy balance that may help to explain enhanced plant productivity in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. PMID:11226263

  4. Alteration of plant mitochondrial proton conductance by free fatty acids. Uncoupling protein involvement.

    PubMed

    Hourton-Cabassa, Cecile; Mesneau, Agnes; Miroux, Bruno; Roussaux, Jean; Ricquier, Daniel; Zachowski, Alain; Moreau, Francois

    2002-11-01

    We characterized the uncoupling activity of the plant uncoupling protein from Solanum tuberosum (StUCP) using mitochondria from intact potato tubers or from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) expressing the StUCP gene. Compared with mitochondria from transfected yeast, StUCP is present at very low levels in intact potato mitochondrial membranes (at least thirty times lower) as shown by immunodetection with anti-UCP1 antibodies. Under conditions that ruled out undesirable effects of nucleotides and free fatty acids on uncoupling activity measurement in plant mitochondria, the linoleic acid-induced depolarization in potato mitochondria was insensitive to the nucleotides ATP, GTP, or GDP. In addition, sensitivity to linoleic acid was similar in potato and in control yeast mitochondria, suggesting that uncoupling occurring in potato mitochondria was because of a UCP-independent proton diffusion process. By contrast, yeast mitochondria expressing StUCP exhibited a higher sensitivity to free fatty acids than those from the control yeast and especially a marked proton conductance in the presence of low amounts of linoleic acid. However, this fatty acid-induced uncoupling was also insensitive to nucleotides. Altogether, these results suggest that uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation and heat production cannot be the dominant feature of StUCP expressed in native potato tissues. However, it could play a role in preventing reactive oxygen species production as proposed for mammalian UCP2 and UCP3.

  5. HSP70 of Leishmania amazonensis alters resistance to different stresses and mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Codonho, Bárbara Santoni; Costa, Solange dos Santos; Peloso, Eduardo de Figueiredo; Joazeiro, Paulo Pinto; Gadelha, Fernanda Ramos; Giorgio, Selma

    2016-01-01

    The 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) is a molecular chaperone that assists the parasite Leishmania in returning to homeostasis after being subjected to different types of stress during its life cycle. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of HSP70 transfection of L. amazonensis promastigotes (pTEX-HSP70) in terms of morphology, resistance, infectivity and mitochondrial bioenergetics. The pTEX-HSP70 promastigotes showed no ultrastructural morphological changes compared to control parasites. Interestingly, the pTEX-HSP70 promastigotes are resistant to heat shock, H2O2-induced oxidative stress and hyperbaric environments. Regarding the bioenergetics parameters, the pTEX-HSP70 parasites had higher respiratory rates and released less H2O2 than the control parasites. Nevertheless, the infectivity capacity of the parasites did not change, as verified by the infection of murine peritoneal macrophages and human macrophages, as well as the infection of BALB/c mice. Together, these results indicate that the overexpression of HSP70 protects L. amazonensis from stress, but does not interfere with its infective capacity. PMID:27304024

  6. Acyl-CoA synthetase 1 deficiency alters cardiolipin species and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Martin, Sarah A.; Katunga, Lalage; Cooper, Daniel E.; Anderson, Ethan J.; Murphy, Robert C.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) contributes more than 90% of total cardiac ACSL activity, but its role in phospholipid synthesis has not been determined. Mice with an inducible knockout of ACSL1 (Acsl1T−/−) have impaired cardiac fatty acid oxidation and rely on glucose for ATP production. Because ACSL1 exhibited a strong substrate preference for linoleate, we investigated the composition of heart phospholipids. Acsl1T−/− hearts contained 83% less tetralinoleoyl-cardiolipin (CL), the major form present in control hearts. A stable knockdown of ACSL1 in H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes resulted in low incorporation of linoleate into CL and in diminished incorporation of palmitate and oleate into other phospholipids. Overexpression of ACSL1 in H9c2 and HEK-293 cells increased incorporation of linoleate into CL and other phospholipids. To determine whether increasing the content of linoleate in CL would improve mitochondrial respiratory function in Acsl1T−/− hearts, control and Acsl1T−/− mice were fed a high-linoleate diet; this diet normalized the amount of tetralinoleoyl-CL but did not improve respiratory function. Thus, ACSL1 is required for the normal composition of several phospholipid species in heart. Although ACSL1 determines the acyl-chain composition of heart CL, a high tetralinoleoyl-CL content may not be required for normal function. PMID:26136511

  7. Rosuvastatin safety: An experimental study of myotoxic effects and mitochondrial alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Ganainy, Samar O; El-Mallah, Ahmed; Abdallah, Dina; Khattab, Mahmoud M; Mohy El-Din, Mahmoud M; El-Khatib, Aiman S

    2017-01-04

    Myopathy is the most commonly reported adverse effect of statins. All statins are associated with myopathy, though with different rates. Rosuvastatin is a potent statin reported to induce myopathy comparable to earlier statins. However, in clinical practice most patients could tolerate rosuvastatin over other statins. This study aimed to evaluate the myopathic pattern of rosuvastatin in rats using biochemical, functional and histopathological examinations. The possible deleterious effects of rosuvastatin on muscle mitochondria were also examined. The obtained results were compared to myopathy induced by atorvastatin in equimolar dose. Results showed that rosuvastatin induced a rise in CK, a slight increase in myoglobin level together with mild muscle necrosis. Motor activity, assessed by rotarod, showed that rosuvastatin decreased rats' performance. All these manifestations were obviously mild compared to the prominent effects of atorvastatin. Parallel results were obtained in mitochondrial dysfunction parameters. Rosuvastatin only induced a slight increase in LDH and a minor decrease in ATP (∼14%) and pAkt (∼12%). On the other hand, atorvastatin induced an increase in LDH, lactate/pyruvate ratio and a pronounced decline in ATP (∼80%) and pAkt (∼65%). These findings showed that rosuvastatin was associated with mild myotoxic effects in rats, especially when compared to atorvastatin.

  8. Alteration of dark respiration and reduction of phototrophic growth in a mitochondrial DNA deletion mutant of Chlamydomonas lacking cob, nd4, and the 3' end of nd5.

    PubMed Central

    Duby, F; Matagne, R F

    1999-01-01

    We describe here a new type of mitochondrial mutation (dum24; for dark uniparental minus inheritance) of the unicellular photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The mutant fails to grow under heterotrophic conditions and displays reduced growth under both photoautotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. In reciprocal crosses between mutant and wild-type cells, the meiotic progeny only inherit the phenotype of the mating-type minus parent, indicating that the dum24 mutation exclusively affects the mitochondrial genome. Digestion with various restriction enzymes followed by DNA gel blot hybridizations with specific probes demonstrated that dum24 cells contain four types of altered mitochondrial genomes: deleted monomers lacking cob, nd4, and the 3' end of the nd5 gene; deleted monomers deprived of cob, nd4, nd5, and the 5' end of the cox1 coding sequence; and two types of dimers produced by end-to-end fusions between monomers similarly or differently deleted. Due to these mitochondrial DNA alterations, complex I activity, the cytochrome pathway of respiration, and presumably, the three phosphorylation sites associated with these enzyme activities are lacking in the mutant. The low respiratory rate of the dum24 cells results from the activities of rotenone-resistant NADH dehydrogenase, complex II, and alternative oxidase, with none of these enzymes being coupled to ATP production. To our knowledge, this type of mitochondrial mutation has never been described for photosynthetic organisms or more generally for obligate aerobes. PMID:9878636

  9. Nanoscale distribution of mitochondrial import receptor Tom20 is adjusted to cellular conditions and exhibits an inner-cellular gradient.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Christian A; Neumann, Daniel; Lauterbach, Marcel A; Harke, Benjamin; Egner, Alexander; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2011-08-16

    The translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM) complex is the main import pore for nuclear-encoded proteins into mitochondria, yet little is known about its spatial distribution within the outer membrane. Super-resolution stimulated emission depletion microscopy was used to determine quantitatively the nanoscale distribution of Tom20, a subunit of the TOM complex, in more than 1,000 cells. We demonstrate that Tom20 is located in clusters whose nanoscale distribution is finely adjusted to the cellular growth conditions as well as to the specific position of a cell within a microcolony. The density of the clusters correlates to the mitochondrial membrane potential. The distributions of clusters of Tom20 and of Tom22 follow an inner-cellular gradient from the perinuclear to the peripheral mitochondria. We conclude that the nanoscale distribution of the TOM complex is finely adjusted to the cellular conditions, resulting in distribution gradients both within single cells and between adjacent cells.

  10. Treatment of human astrocytoma U87 cells with silicon dioxide nanoparticles lowers their survival and alters their expression of mitochondrial and cell signaling proteins.

    PubMed

    Lai, James C K; Ananthakrishnan, Gayathri; Jandhyam, Sirisha; Dukhande, Vikas V; Bhushan, Alok; Gokhale, Mugdha; Daniels, Christopher K; Leung, Solomon W

    2010-10-05

    Recent evidence suggests silicon dioxide micro- and nanoparticles induce cytotoxic effects on lung cells. Thus, there is an increasing concern regarding their potential health hazard. Nevertheless, the putative toxicity of nanoparticles in mammalian cells has not yet been systematically investigated. We previously noted that several metallic oxide nanoparticles exert differential cytotoxic effects on human neural and nonneural cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that silicon dioxide nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity in U87 cells by lowering their survival by decreasing cell survival signaling and disturbing mitochondrial function. To investigate this hypothesis, we determined the activities of the key mitochondrial enzymes, citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase, in astrocytoma U87 cells treated with silicon dioxide nanoparticles. In addition, we studied the expression of the mitochondrial DNA-encoded proteins, cytochrome C oxidase II and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) dehydrogenase subunit 6, and cell signaling pathway protein extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphorylated ERK in treated U87 cells. The activated form of ERK controls cell growth, differentiation, and proliferation. In parallel, we determined survival of U87 cells after treating them with various concentrations of silicon dioxide nanoparticles. Our results indicated that treatment with silicon dioxide nanoparticles induced decreases in U87 cell survival in a dose-related manner. The activities of citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase in treated U87 cells were increased, possibly due to an energetic compensation in surviving cells. However, the expression of mitochondrial DNA-encoded cytochrome C oxidase subunit II and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 and the cell signaling protein ERK and phosphorylated ERK were altered in the treated U87 cells, suggesting that silicon dioxide nanoparticles induced disruption of mitochondrial DNA-encoded protein expression, leading to

  11. Treatment of human astrocytoma U87 cells with silicon dioxide nanoparticles lowers their survival and alters their expression of mitochondrial and cell signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lai, James CK; Ananthakrishnan, Gayathri; Jandhyam, Sirisha; Dukhande, Vikas V; Bhushan, Alok; Gokhale, Mugdha; Daniels, Christopher K; Leung, Solomon W

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests silicon dioxide micro- and nanoparticles induce cytotoxic effects on lung cells. Thus, there is an increasing concern regarding their potential health hazard. Nevertheless, the putative toxicity of nanoparticles in mammalian cells has not yet been systematically investigated. We previously noted that several metallic oxide nanoparticles exert differential cytotoxic effects on human neural and nonneural cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that silicon dioxide nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity in U87 cells by lowering their survival by decreasing cell survival signaling and disturbing mitochondrial function. To investigate this hypothesis, we determined the activities of the key mitochondrial enzymes, citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase, in astrocytoma U87 cells treated with silicon dioxide nanoparticles. In addition, we studied the expression of the mitochondrial DNA-encoded proteins, cytochrome C oxidase II and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) dehydrogenase subunit 6, and cell signaling pathway protein extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphorylated ERK in treated U87 cells. The activated form of ERK controls cell growth, differentiation, and proliferation. In parallel, we determined survival of U87 cells after treating them with various concentrations of silicon dioxide nanoparticles. Our results indicated that treatment with silicon dioxide nanoparticles induced decreases in U87 cell survival in a dose-related manner. The activities of citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase in treated U87 cells were increased, possibly due to an energetic compensation in surviving cells. However, the expression of mitochondrial DNA-encoded cytochrome C oxidase subunit II and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 and the cell signaling protein ERK and phosphorylated ERK were altered in the treated U87 cells, suggesting that silicon dioxide nanoparticles induced disruption of mitochondrial DNA-encoded protein expression, leading to

  12. Copper deficiency alters cell bioenergetics and induces mitochondrial fusion through up-regulation of MFN2 and OPA1 in erythropoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Rodrigo I; Jensen, Erik L; Ruiz, Lina M; Rivera, Salvador; Ruiz, Sebastián; Simon, Felipe; Riedel, Claudia; Ferrick, David; Elorza, Alvaro A

    2013-08-02

    Copper is essential in cell physiology, participating in numerous enzyme reactions. In mitochondria, copper is a cofactor for respiratory complex IV, the cytochrome c oxidase. Low copper content is associated with anemia and the appearance of enlarged mitochondria in erythropoietic cells. These findings suggest a connection between copper metabolism and bioenergetics, mitochondrial dynamics and erythropoiesis, which has not been explored so far. Here, we describe that bathocuproine disulfonate-induced copper deficiency does not alter erythropoietic cell proliferation nor induce apoptosis. However it does impair erythroid differentiation, which is associated with a metabolic switch between the two main energy-generating pathways. That is, from mitochondrial function to glycolysis. Switching off mitochondria implies a reduction in oxygen consumption and ROS generation along with an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential. Mitochondrial fusion proteins MFN2 and OPA1 were up-regulated along with the ability of mitochondria to fuse. Morphometric analysis of mitochondria did not show changes in total mitochondrial biomass but rather bigger mitochondria because of increased fusion. Similar results were also obtained with human CD34+, which were induced to differentiate into red blood cells. In all, we have shown that adequate copper levels are important for maintaining proper mitochondrial function and for erythroid differentiation where the energy metabolic switch plus the up-regulation of fusion proteins define an adaptive response to copper deprivation to keep cells alive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Disruption of F-Actin Polymerization, and Transcriptomic Alterations in Zebrafish Larvae Exposed to Trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Wirbisky, Sara E; Damayanti, Nur P; Mahapatra, Cecon T; Sepúlveda, Maria S; Irudayaraj, Joseph; Freeman, Jennifer L

    2016-02-15

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is primarily used as an industrial degreasing agent and has been in use since the 1940s. TCE is released into the soil, surface, and groundwater. From an environmental and regulatory standpoint, more than half of Superfund hazardous waste sites on the National Priority List are contaminated with TCE. Occupational exposure to TCE occurs primarily via inhalation, while environmental TCE exposure also occurs through ingestion of contaminated drinking water. Current literature links TCE exposure to various adverse health effects including cardiovascular toxicity. Current studies aiming to address developmental cardiovascular toxicity utilized rodent and avian models, with the majority of studies using relatively higher parts per million (mg/L) doses. In this study, to further investigate developmental cardiotoxicity of TCE, zebrafish embryos were treated with 0, 10, 100, or 500 parts per billion (ppb; μg/L) TCE during embryogenesis and/or through early larval stages. After the appropriate exposure period, angiogenesis, F-actin, and mitochondrial function were assessed. A significant dose-response decrease in angiogenesis, F-actin, and mitochondrial function was observed. To further complement this data, a transcriptomic profile of zebrafish larvae was completed to identify gene alterations associated with the 10 ppb TCE exposure. Results from the transcriptomic data revealed that embryonic TCE exposure caused significant changes in genes associated with cardiovascular disease, cancer, and organismal injury and abnormalities with a number of targets in the FAK signaling pathway. Overall, results from our study support TCE as a developmental cardiovascular toxicant, provide molecular targets and pathways for investigation in future studies, and indicate a need for continued priority for environmental regulation.

  14. Mitochondrial evidence for panmixia despite perceived barriers to gene flow in a widely distributed waterbird.

    PubMed

    Oomen, Rebekah A; Reudink, Matthew W; Nocera, Joseph J; Somers, Christopher M; Green, M Clay; Kyle, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    We examined the mitochondrial genetic structure of American white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) to: 1) verify or refute whether American white pelicans are panmictic and 2) understand if any lack of genetic structure is the result of contemporary processes or historical phenomena. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region haplotypes of 367 individuals from 19 colonies located across their North American range revealed a lack of population genetic or phylogeographic structure. This lack of structure was unexpected because: 1) Major geographic barriers such as the North American Continental Divide are thought to limit dispersal; 2) Differences in migratory behavior are expected to promote population differentiation; and 3) Many widespread North American migratory bird species show historic patterns of differentiation resulting from having inhabited multiple glacial refugia. Further, high haplotype diversity and many rare haplotypes are maintained across the species' distribution, despite frequent local extinctions and recolonizations that are expected to decrease diversity. Our findings suggest that American white pelicans have a high effective population size and low natal philopatry. We suggest that the rangewide panmixia we observed in American white pelicans is due to high historical and contemporary gene flow, enabled by high mobility and a lack of effective physical or behavioral barriers.

  15. Mitotane alters mitochondrial respiratory chain activity by inducing cytochrome c oxidase defect in human adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Hescot, Ségolène; Slama, Abdelhamid; Lombès, Anne; Paci, Angelo; Remy, Hervé; Leboulleux, Sophie; Chadarevian, Rita; Trabado, Séverine; Amazit, Larbi; Young, Jacques; Baudin, Eric; Lombès, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Mitotane, 1,1-dichloro-2-(o-chlorophenyl)-2-(p-chlorophenyl)ethane is the most effective medical therapy for adrenocortical carcinoma, but its molecular mechanism of action remains poorly understood. Although mitotane is known to have mitochondrial (mt) effects, a direct link to mt dysfunction has never been established. We examined the functional consequences of mitotane exposure on proliferation, steroidogenesis, and mt respiratory chain, biogenesis and morphology, in two human adrenocortical cell lines, the steroid-secreting H295R line and the non-secreting SW13 line. Mitotane inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and a time-dependent manner. At the concentration of 50 μM (14 mg/l), which corresponds to the threshold for therapeutic efficacy, mitotane drastically reduced cortisol and 17-hydroxyprogesterone secretions by 70%. This was accompanied by significant decreases in the expression of genes encoding mt proteins involved in steroidogenesis (STAR, CYP11B1, and CYP11B2). In both H295R and SW13 cells, 50 μM mitotane significantly inhibited (50%) the maximum velocity of the activity of the respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase (COX)). This effect was associated with a drastic reduction in steady-state levels of the whole COX complex as revealed by blue native PAGE and reduced mRNA expression of both mtDNA-encoded COX2 (MT-CO2) and nuclear DNA-encoded COX4 (COX4I1) subunits. In contrast, the activity and expression of respiratory chain complexes II and III were unaffected by mitotane treatment. Lastly, mitotane exposure enhanced mt biogenesis (increase in mtDNA content and PGC1α (PPARGC1A) expression) and triggered fragmentation of the mt network. Altogether, our results provide first evidence that mitotane induced a mt respiratory chain defect in human adrenocortical cells.

  16. Hts1 Encodes Both the Cytoplasmic and Mitochondrial Histidyl-Trna Synthetase of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae: Mutations Alter the Specificity of Compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, M. I.; Mason, T. L.; Fink, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical evidence shows that a single nuclear gene HTS1 encodes both the mitochondrial and cytoplasmic histidyl-tRNA synthetases (Hts). The gene specifies two messages, one with two in-frame ATGs (-60 and +1) and another with only the downstream ATG (+1). We have made a new set of mutations that enables us to express only the mitochondrial or the cytoplasmic form and compared the subcellular distribution of the Hts1 protein in these mutants and wild type, using an antibody that interacts with both the mitochondrial and cytoplasmic Hts1 as well as Hts1::LacZ fusions. Mutations in the upstream ATG (-60) or frameshift mutations in the presequence affect only the mitochondrial enzyme and not the cytoplasmic enzyme. Mutations in the downstream ATG (+1 ATG to ATC) destroy the function of the cytosolic enzyme, but do not affect the function of the mitochondrial enzyme. Overexpression of this construct restores cytoplasmic function. Cells expressing a truncated form of Hts containing a deletion of the first 20 amino-terminal residues (Htsc) produce a functional cytoplasmic enzyme, which does not provide mitochondrial function. Overexpression of this truncated cytoplasmic protein provides mitochondrial function and produces detectable levels of the synthetase in the mitochondrion. These experiments suggest that Hts1 contains two domains that together allow efficient localization of Htsm to the mitochondrion: an amino-terminal presequence in the mitochondrial precursor that is likely cleaved upon delivery to the mitochondrion and a second amino-terminal sequence (residues 21-53) present in both the precursor and the cytoplasmic form. Neither one by itself is sufficient to act as an efficient mitochondrial targeting signal. Using our antibody we have been able to detect a protein of increased molecular mass that corresponds to that of the predicted precursor. Taken together these studies show that the specificity of compartmentation of the Hts protein depends

  17. Spatial Distributions of Red Blood Cells Significantly Alter Local Haemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Joseph M.; Holmes, David; Kaliviotis, Efstathios; Balabani, Stavroula

    2014-01-01

    Although bulk changes in red blood cell concentration between vessels have been well characterised, local distributions are generally overlooked. Red blood cells aggregate, deform and migrate within vessels, forming heterogeneous distributions which have considerable effect on local haemodynamics. The present study reports data on the local distribution of human red blood cells in a sequentially bifurcating microchannel, representing the branching geometry of the microvasculature. Imaging methodologies with simple extrapolations are used to infer three dimensional, time-averaged velocity and haematocrit distributions under a range of flow conditions. Strong correlation between the bluntness of the velocity and haematocrit profiles in the parent branch of the geometry is observed and red blood cell aggregation has a notable effect on the observed trends. The two branches of the first bifurcation show similar characteristics in terms of the shapes of the profiles and the extent of plasma skimming, despite the difference in geometric configuration. In the second bifurcation, considerable asymmetry between the branches in the plasma skimming relationship is observed, and elucidated by considering individual haematocrit profiles. The results of the study highlight the importance of considering local haematocrit distributions in the analysis of blood flow and could lead to more accurate computational models of blood flow in microvascular networks. The experimental approaches developed in this work provide a foundation for further examining the characteristics of microhaemodynamics. PMID:24950214

  18. Alterations to mitochondrial fatty-acid use in skeletal muscle after chronic exposure to hypoxia depend on metabolic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Malgoyre, Alexandra; Chabert, Clovis; Tonini, Julia; Koulmann, Nathalie; Bigard, Xavier; Sanchez, Hervé

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the effects of chronic hypoxia on the maximal use of and sensitivity of mitochondria to different substrates in rat slow-oxidative (soleus, SOL) and fast-glycolytic (extensor digitorum longus, EDL) muscles. We studied mitochondrial respiration in situ in permeabilized myofibers, using pyruvate, octanoate, palmitoyl-carnitine (PC), or palmitoyl-coenzyme A (PCoA). The hypophagia induced by hypoxia may also alter metabolism. Therefore, we used a group of pair-fed rats (reproducing the same caloric restriction, as observed in hypoxic animals), in addition to the normoxic control fed ad libitum. The resting respiratory exchange ratio decreased after 21 days of exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (simulated elevation of 5,500 m). The respiration supported by pyruvate and octanoate were unaffected. In contrast, the maximal oxidative respiratory rate for PCoA, the transport of which depends on carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT-1), decreased in the rapid-glycolytic EDL and increased in the slow-oxidative SOL, although hypoxia improved affinity for this substrate in both muscle types. PC and PCoA were oxidized similarly in normoxic EDL, whereas chronic hypoxia limited transport at the CPT-1 step in this muscle. The effects of hypoxia were mediated by caloric restriction in the SOL and by hypoxia itself in the EDL. We conclude that improvements in mitochondrial affinity for PCoA, a physiological long-chain fatty acid, would facilitate fatty-acid use at rest after chronic hypoxia independently of quantitative alterations of mitochondria. Conversely, decreasing the maximal oxidation of PCoA in fast-glycolytic muscles would limit fatty-acid use during exercise.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Affinity for low concentrations of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) in mitochondria skeletal muscles increases after chronic hypoxia. Combined with a lower respiratory exchange ratio, this suggests facility for fatty acid utilization at rest. This fuel preference is related to caloric

  19. Disruption of a nuclear gene encoding a mitochondrial gamma carbonic anhydrase reduces complex I and supercomplex I + III2 levels and alters mitochondrial physiology in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Perales, Mariano; Eubel, Holger; Heinemeyer, Jesco; Colaneri, Alejandro; Zabaleta, Eduardo; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2005-07-08

    Mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase (complex I) of plants includes quite a number of plant-specific subunits, some of which exhibit sequence similarity to bacterial gamma-carbonic anhydrases. A homozygous Arabidopsis knockout mutant carrying a T-DNA insertion in a gene encoding one of these subunits (At1g47260) was generated to investigate its physiological role. Isolation of mitochondria and separation of mitochondrial protein complexes by Blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation revealed drastically reduced complex I levels. Furthermore, the mitochondrial I + III2 supercomplex was very much reduced in mutant plants. Remaining complex I had normal molecular mass, suggesting substitution of the At1g47260 protein by one or several of the structurally related subunits of this respiratory protein complex. Immune-blotting experiments using polyclonal antibodies directed against the At1g47260 protein indicated its presence within complex I, the I + III2 supercomplex and smaller protein complexes, which possibly represent subcomplexes of complex I. Changes within the mitochondrial proteome of mutant cells were systematically monitored by fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis using 2D Blue-native/SDS and 2D isoelectric focussing/SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Complex I subunits are largely absent within the mitochondrial proteome. Further mitochondrial proteins are reduced in mutant plants, like mitochondrial ferredoxin, others are increased, like formate dehydrogenase. Development of mutant plants was normal under standard growth conditions. However, a suspension cell culture generated from mutant plants exhibited clearly reduced growth rates and respiration. In summary, At1g47260 is important for complex I assembly in plant mitochondria and respiration. A role of At1g47260 in mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism is supported by micro-array analyses.

  20. Silencing of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-associated gene GDAP1 induces abnormal mitochondrial distribution and affects Ca2+ homeostasis by reducing store-operated Ca2+ entry.

    PubMed

    Pla-Martín, David; Rueda, Carlos B; Estela, Anna; Sánchez-Piris, Maribel; González-Sánchez, Paloma; Traba, Javier; de la Fuente, Sergio; Scorrano, Luca; Renau-Piqueras, Jaime; Alvarez, Javier; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Palau, Francesc

    2013-07-01

    GDAP1 is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein that acts as a regulator of mitochondrial dynamics. Mutations of the GDAP1 gene cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy. We show that GDAP1 interacts with the vesicle-organelle trafficking proteins RAB6B and caytaxin, which suggests that GDAP1 may participate in the mitochondrial movement within the cell. GDAP1 silencing in the SH-SY5Y cell line induces abnormal distribution of the mitochondrial network, reduces the contact between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and alters the mobilization of mitochondria towards plasma membrane upon depletion of ER-Ca(2+) stores. GDAP1 silencing does not affect mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, ER-Ca(2+), or Ca(2+) flow from ER to mitochondria, but reduces Ca(2+) inflow through store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) following mobilization of ER-Ca(2+) and SOCE-driven Ca(2+) entry in mitochondria. Our studies suggest that the pathophysiology of GDAP1-related CMT neuropathies may be associated with abnormal distribution and movement of mitochondria throughout cytoskeleton towards the ER and subplasmalemmal microdomains, resulting in a decrease in SOCE activity and impaired SOCE-driven Ca(2+) uptake in mitochondria.

  1. Phylogeny and distribution of crested gibbons (genus Nomascus) based on mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequence data.

    PubMed

    Thinh, Van Ngoc; Rawson, Benjamin; Hallam, Chris; Kenyon, Marina; Nadler, Tilo; Walter, Lutz; Roos, Christian

    2010-12-01

    Crested gibbons, genus Nomascus, are endemic to the Indochinese bioregion and occur only in Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, and southern China. However, knowledge about the number of species to be recognized and their exact geographical distributions is still limited. To further elucidate the evolutionary history of crested gibbon species and to settle their distribution ranges, we analyzed the complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene from 79 crested gibbon individuals from known locations. Based on our findings, crested gibbons should be classified into seven species. Within N. concolor, we recognize two subspecies, N. concolor concolor and N. concolor lu. Phylogenetic reconstructions indicate that the northernmost species, N. hainanus, N. nasutus, and N. concolor branched off first, suggesting that the genus originated in the north and successively migrated to the south. The most recent splits within Nomascus occurred between N. leucogenys and N. siki, and between Nomascus sp. and N. gabriellae. Based on our data, the currently postulated distributions of the latter four species have to be revised. Our study shows that molecular methods are a useful tool to elucidate phylogenetic relationships among crested gibbons and to determine species boundaries. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-10-15

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-{kappa}B in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear

  3. The inner-mitochondrial distribution of Oxa1 depends on the growth conditions and on the availability of substrates.

    PubMed

    Stoldt, Stefan; Wenzel, Dirk; Hildenbeutel, Markus; Wurm, Christian A; Herrmann, Johannes M; Jakobs, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    The Oxa1 protein is a well-conserved integral protein of the inner membrane of mitochondria. It mediates the insertion of both mitochondrial- and nuclear-encoded proteins from the matrix into the inner membrane. We investigated the distribution of budding yeast Oxa1 between the two subdomains of the contiguous inner membrane--the cristae membrane (CM) and the inner boundary membrane (IBM)--under different physiological conditions. We found that under fermentable growth conditions, Oxa1 is enriched in the IBM, whereas under nonfermentable (respiratory) growth conditions, it is predominantly localized in the CM. The enrichment of Oxa1 in the CM requires mitochondrial translation; similarly, deletion of the ribosome-binding domain of Oxa1 prevents an enrichment of Oxa1 in the CM. The predominant localization in the IBM under fermentable growth conditions is prevented by inhibiting mitochondrial protein import. Furthermore, overexpression of the nuclear-encoded Oxa1 substrate Mdl1 shifts the distribution of Oxa1 toward the IBM. Apparently, the availability of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded substrates influences the inner-membrane distribution of Oxa1. Our findings show that the distribution of Oxa1 within the inner membrane is dynamic and adapts to different physiological needs.

  4. Mitochondrial and cytosolic thiol redox state are not detectably altered in isolated human NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Verkaart, Sjoerd; Koopman, Werner J H; Cheek, Julia; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet E; van den Heuvel, Lambertus W P J; Smeitink, Jan A M; Willems, Peter H G M

    2007-09-01

    Isolated complex I deficiency is the most common enzymatic defect of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system, causing a wide range of clinical phenotypes. We reported before that the rates at which reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive dyes are converted into their fluorescent oxidation products are markedly increased in cultured skin fibroblasts of patients with nuclear-inherited isolated complex I deficiency. Using video-imaging microscopy we show here that these cells also display a marked increase in NAD(P)H autofluorescence. Linear regression analysis revealed a negative correlation with the residual complex I activity and a positive correlation with the oxidation rates of the ROS-sensitive dyes 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein and hydroethidine for a cohort of 10 patient cell lines. On the other hand, video-imaging microscopy of cells expressing reduction-oxidation sensitive GFP1 in either the mitochondrial matrix or cytosol showed the absence of any detectable change in thiol redox state. In agreement with this result, neither the glutathione nor the glutathione disulfide content differed significantly between patient and healthy fibroblasts. Finally, video-rate confocal microscopy of cells loaded with C11-BODIPY(581/591) demonstrated that the extent of lipid peroxidation, which is regarded as a measure of oxidative damage, was not altered in patient fibroblasts. Our results indicate that fibroblasts of patients with isolated complex I deficiency maintain their thiol redox state despite marked increases in ROS production.

  5. Hepatic mitochondrial alteration in CD1 mice associated with prenatal exposures to low doses of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)

    PubMed Central

    Quist, Erin M.; Filgo, Adam J.; Cummings, Connie A.; Kissling, Grace E.; Hoenerhoff, Mark J.; Fenton, Suzanne E.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a perfluoroalkyl acid primarily used as an industrial surfactant. It persists in the environment and has been linked to potentially toxic and/or carcinogenic effects in animals and people. As a known activator of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), PFOA exposure can induce defects in fatty acid oxidation, lipid transport, and inflammation. Here, pregnant CD-1 mice were orally gavaged with 0, 0.01, 0.1, 0.3 and 1 mg/kg of PFOA from gestation days (GD) 1 through 17. On postnatal day (PND) 21, histopathologic changes in the livers of offspring included hepatocellular hypertrophy and periportal inflammation that increased in severity by PND 91 in an apparent dose-dependent response. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of selected liver sections from PND 91 mice revealed PFOA-induced cellular damage and mitochondrial abnormalities with no evidence of peroxisome proliferation. Within hypertrophied hepatocytes, mitochondria were not only increased in number, but also exhibited altered morphologies suggestive of increased and/or uncontrolled fission and fusion reactions. These findings suggest that peroxisome proliferation is not a component of PFOA-induced hepatic toxicity in animals that are prenatally exposed to low doses of PFOA. PMID:25326589

  6. Alteration of NF-κB activity leads to mitochondrial apoptosis after infection with pathological prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Bourteele, Soizic; Oesterle, Katja; Weinzierl, Andreas O; Paxian, Stephan; Riemann, Marc; Schmid, Roland M; Planz, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a key regulator of the immune response, but in almost the same manner it is involved in induction of inflammation, proliferation and regulation of apoptosis. In the central nervous system activated NF-κB plays a neuroprotective role. While in some neurodegenerative disorders the role of NF-κB is well characterized, there is poor knowledge on the role of NF-κB in prion disease. We found binding but no transcriptional activity of the transcription factor in vitro. Characterizing the mechanism of cell death after infection with pathological prion protein increased caspase-9 and caspase-3 activity was detected and the lack of NF-κB activity resulted in the inability to activate target genes that usually play an important role in neuroprotection. Additionally, we investigated the role of NF-κB after prion infection of Nfkb1–/–, Nfkb2–/– and Bcl3–/– mice and central nervous system-specific p65-deleted mice revealing an accelerated prion disease in NF-κB2- and Bcl-3-deficient mice, which is in line with a reduced neuroprotective activity in prion infection. Based on our findings, we propose a model whereby the alteration of NF-κB activity at the early stages of infection with pathological prion protein leads to neuronal cell death mediated by mitochondrial apoptosis. PMID:17573907

  7. Ultrastructural and biochemical aspects of liver mitochondria during recovery from ethanol-induced alterations. Experimental evidence of mitochondrial division.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, O. R.; Roatta de Conti, L. L.; Bolaños, L. P.; Stoppani, A. O.

    1978-01-01

    To study the morphologic and biochemical changes occuring in liver mitochondria during recovery from ethanol-induced injury, rats fed a 6-month high-alcohol regimen plus a nutritionally adequate diet which did not induce fatty liver were compared with isocalorically fed controls. After this period the alcohol-fed animals displayed striking ultrastructural changes of liver mitochondria and a decreased respiratory activity with succinate or malate-glutamate as substrate. On the contrary, the respiratory rate with I-glycerophosphate was 50% increased. Regression changes were studied after alcohol was withdrawn from the diet. Enlarged mitochondria rapidly disappeared (in 24 hours), although a few megamitochondria were still present after 8 days of abstinence. A similar recovery was observed for the functional alterations. At the end of the experimental period, only a slight decrease of the maximal respiratory rate using malate-glutamate as a substrate was noted. The ultrastructural findings and the morphometric data suggest that the way in which mitochondrial normalization takes place is based on partition of these organelles. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 13 PMID:623205

  8. A deafness-associated tRNAAsp mutation alters the m1G37 modification, aminoacylation and stability of tRNAAsp and mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Peng, Yanyan; Zheng, Jing; Zheng, Binjiao; Jin, Xiaofen; Liu, Hao; Wang, Yong; Tang, Xiaowen; Huang, Taosheng; Jiang, Pingping; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we investigated the pathogenic mechanism underlying the deafness-associated mitochondrial(mt) tRNAAsp 7551A > G mutation. The m.7551A > G mutation is localized at a highly conserved nucleotide(A37), adjacent (3′) to the anticodon, which is important for the fidelity of codon recognition and stabilization in functional tRNAs. It was anticipated that the m.7551A > G mutation altered the structure and function of mt-tRNAAsp. The primer extension assay demonstrated that the m.7551A > G mutation created the m1G37 modification of mt-tRNAAsp. Using cybrid cell lines generated by transferring mitochondria from lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from a Chinese family into mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA)-less (ρo) cells, we demonstrated the significant decreases in the efficiency of aminoacylation and steady-state level of mt-tRNAAsp in mutant cybrids, compared with control cybrids. A failure in metabolism of mt-tRNAAsp caused the variable reductions in mtDNA-encoded polypeptides in mutant cybrids. Impaired mitochondrial translation led to the respiratory phenotype in mutant cybrids. The respiratory deficiency lowed mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate production and increased the production of oxidative reactive species in mutant cybrids. Our data demonstrated that mitochondrial dysfunctions caused by the m.7551A > G mutation are associated with deafness. Our findings may provide new insights into the pathophysiology of maternally transmitted deafness that was manifested by altered nucleotide modification of mitochondrial tRNA. PMID:27536005

  9. Hierridin B Isolated from a Marine Cyanobacterium Alters VDAC1, Mitochondrial Activity, and Cell Cycle Genes on HT-29 Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Sara; Martins, Rosário; Costa, Margarida; Leão, Pedro N.; Vitorino, Rui; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Urbatzka, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hierridin B was isolated from a marine cyanobacterium Cyanobium sp. strain and induced cytotoxicity selectively in HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells. The underlying molecular mechanism was not yet elucidated. Methods: HT-29 cells were exposed to the IC50 concentration of hierridin B (100.2 μM) for 48 h. Non-targeted proteomics was performed using 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. The mRNA expression of apoptotic and cell cycle genes were analyzed by real-time PCR. Automated quantification of 160 cytoplasm and mitochondrial parameter was done by fluorescence microscopy using CellProfiler software. Results: Proteomics identified 21 significant different proteins, which belonged to protein folding/synthesis and cell structure amongst others. Increase of VDAC1 protein responsible for formation of mitochondrial channels was confirmed by mRNA expression. A 10-fold decrease of cytoskeleton proteins (STMN1, TBCA) provided a link to alterations of the cell cycle. CCNB1 and CCNE mRNA were decreased two-fold, and P21CIP increased 10-fold, indicative of cell cycle arrest. Morphological analysis of mitochondrial parameter confirmed a reduced mitochondrial activity. Conclusion: Hierridin B is a potential anticancer compound that targets mitochondrial activity and function. PMID:27589771

  10. Defective mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced AP endonuclease 1 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Scott; Hejl, Anne-Mette; Dinh, Thuan-Son T; Keijzers, Guido; Hansen, Åse M; Desler, Claus; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Bürkle, Alexander; Rasmussen, Lene J; Waldemar, Gunhild; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-10-01

    Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are badly needed. Recent reports suggest that dysfunctional mitochondria and DNA damage are associated with AD development. In this report, we measured various cellular parameters, related to mitochondrial bioenergetics and DNA damage, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of AD and control participants, for biomarker discovery. PBMCs were isolated from 53 patients with AD of mild to moderate degree and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Tests were performed on the PBMCs from as many of these participants as possible. We measured glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration fluxes using the Seahorse Bioscience flux analyzer, mitochondrial ROS production using flow cytometry, dNTP levels by way of a DNA polymerization assay, DNA strand breaks using the Fluorometric detection of Alkaline DNA Unwinding (FADU) assay, and APE1 incision activity (in cell lysates) on a DNA substrate containing an AP site (to estimate DNA repair efficiency). In the PBMCs of AD patients, we found reduced basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption, reduced proton leak, higher dATP level, and lower AP endonuclease 1 activity, depending on adjustments for gender and/or age. This study reveals impaired mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced DNA repair activity in PBMCs of AD patients, thus suggesting that these biochemical activities may be useful as biomarkers for AD.

  11. Altering the Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Synthesis (mtFASII) Pathway Modulates Cellular Metabolic States and Bioactive Lipid Profiles as Revealed by Metabolomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Hayley B.; Parl, Angelika K.; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Singh, Larry; Bell, Lauren N.; Murdock, Deborah G.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presence of a cytosolic fatty acid synthesis pathway, mitochondria have retained their own means of creating fatty acids via the mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (mtFASII) pathway. The reason for its conservation has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, to better understand the role of mtFASII in the cell, we used thin layer chromatography to characterize the contribution of the mtFASII pathway to the fatty acid composition of selected mitochondrial lipids. Next, we performed metabolomic analysis on HeLa cells in which the mtFASII pathway was either hypofunctional (through knockdown of mitochondrial acyl carrier protein, ACP) or hyperfunctional (through overexpression of mitochondrial enoyl-CoA reductase, MECR). Our results indicate that the mtFASII pathway contributes little to the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial lipid species examined. Additionally, loss of mtFASII function results in changes in biochemical pathways suggesting alterations in glucose utilization and redox state. Interestingly, levels of bioactive lipids, including lysophospholipids and sphingolipids, directly correlate with mtFASII function, indicating that mtFASII may be involved in the regulation of bioactive lipid levels. Regulation of bioactive lipid levels by mtFASII implicates the pathway as a mediator of intracellular signaling. PMID:26963735

  12. Dietary Supplementation with Docosahexaenoic Acid, but Not Eicosapentanoic Acid, Dramatically Alters Cardiac Mitochondrial Phospholipid Fatty Acid Composition and Prevents Permeability Transition

    PubMed Central

    Khairallah, Ramzi J.; Sparagna, Genevieve C.; Khanna, Nishanth; O’Shea, Karen M.; Hecker, Peter A.; Kristian, Tibor; Fiskum, Gary; Rosiers, Christine Des; Polster, Brian M.; Stanley, William C.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment with the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) docosahexanoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) exerts cardioprotective effects, and suppresses Ca2+-induced opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). These effects are associated with increased DHA and EPA, and lower arachidonic acid (ARA) in cardiac phospholipids. While clinical studies suggest the triglyceride lowering effects of DHA and EPA are equivalent, little is known about the independent effects of DHA and EPA on mitochondria function. We compared the effects of dietary supplementation with the ω-3 PUFAs DHA and EPA on cardiac mitochondrial phospholipid fatty acid composition and Ca2+-induced MPTP opening. Rats were fed a standard lab diet with either normal low levels of ω-3 PUFA, or DHA or EPA at 2.5% of energy intake for 8 weeks, and cardiac mitochondria were isolated and analyzed for Ca2+-induced MPTP opening and phospholipid fatty acyl composition. DHA supplementation increased both DHA and EPA and decreased ARA in mitochondrial phospholipid, and significantly delayed MPTP opening as assessed by increased Ca2+ retention capacity and decreased Ca2+-induced mitochondria swelling. EPA supplementation increased EPA in mitochondrial phospholipids, but did not affect DHA, only modestly lowered ARA, and did not affect MPTP opening. In summary, dietary supplementation with DHA but not EPA, profoundly altered mitochondrial phospholipid fatty acid composition and delayed Ca2+-induced MPTP opening. PMID:20471951

  13. Cold exposure induces alterations in porcine triiodothyronine tissue distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Quesada, M.H.; Reed, H.L.; Hesslink, R.; Licauco, G.; Castro, S.; Homer, L.; Young, B. Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton )

    1991-03-11

    Evidence suggests that thyroid hormone plays an active role in modulation of tissue metabolism in response to cold challenge. In an attempts to identify tissues that may have increased capacity for triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) and be actively involved in the thermogenic process, the authors investigated the T{sub 3} tissue distribution in 5 month old swine exposed to cold (4C) (N = 5) for three weeks, compared with controls at a thermoneutral temperature (20C) (N = 4). Both groups were injected I.V. with ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} three hours before sacrifice. ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} was organically extracted from heart, kidney, thyroid gland, adrenal, brain, 4 different types of striated muscles and fat tissues and counted to determine the CPM/gm of tissue. Serum total T{sub 3} and free T{sub 3} were elevated. The bulk of the tissue/serum ratios of cold exposed swine compared with controls were unchanged. However, calculation of the T{sub 3} organ pools revealed that the majority was elevated 2 to 3 times over control. Increases in tissue distribution volume (TVD) occurred in hip fat. Body and organ weights tended to increase but not to a significant degree except for the thyroid gland, which increased 66% over the average control value. The physiological significance of the cold associated augmented organ pool and the increased TCD in hip fat needs to be explored.

  14. Arsenic alters uptake and distribution of sulphur in Pteris vittata.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiro; Kouho, Ran; Katayose, Tomo; Kitajima, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Shinano, Takuro; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight thiol (LMWT) synthesis has been reported to be directly induced by arsenic (As) in Pteris vittata, an As hyperaccumulator. Sulphur (S) is a critical component of LMWTs. Here, the effect of As treatment on the uptake and distribution of S in P. vittata was investigated. In P. vittata grown under low S conditions, the presence of As in the growth medium enhanced the uptake of SO4(2-), which was used for LMWT synthesis in fronds. In contrast, As application did not affect SO4(2-) uptake in Nephrolepis exaltata, an As non-hyperaccumulator. Moreover, the isotope microscope system revealed that S absorbed with As accumulated locally in a vacuole-like organelle in epidermal cells, whereas S absorbed alone was distributed uniformly. These results suggest that S is involved in As transport and/or accumulation in P. vittata. X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis revealed that the major As species in the fronds and roots of P. vittata were inorganic As(III) and As(V), respectively, and that As-LMWT complexes occurred as a minor species. Consequently, in case of As accumulation in P. vittata, S possibly acts as a temporary ligand for As in the form of LMWTs in intercellular and/or intracellular transport (e.g. vacuolar sequestration).

  15. A Genetic Discontinuity in a Continuously Distributed Species: Mitochondrial DNA in the American Oyster, Crassostrea Virginica

    PubMed Central

    Reeb, C. A.; Avise, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    Restriction site variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica) was surveyed in continuously distributed populations sampled from the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada, to Brownsville, Texas. mtDNA clonal diversity was high, with 82 different haplotypes revealed among 212 oysters with 13 endonucleases. The mtDNA clones grouped into two distinct genetic arrays (estimated to differ by about 2.6% in nucleotide sequence) that characterized oysters collected north vs. south of a region on the Atlantic mid-coast of Florida. The population genetic ``break'' in mtDNA contrasts with previous reports of near uniformity of nuclear (allozyme) allele frequencies throughout the range of the species, but agrees closely with the magnitude and pattern of mtDNA differentiation reported in other estuarine species in the southeastern United States. This concordance of mtDNA phylogenetic pattern across independently evolving species provides strong evidence for vicariant biogeographic processes in initiating intraspecific population structure. The post-Miocene ecological history of the region suggests that reduced precipitation levels in an enlarged Floridian peninsula may have created discontinuities in suitable estuarine habitat for oysters during glacial periods, and that today such population separations are maintained by the combined influence of ecological gradients and oceanic currents on larval dispersal. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that historical vicariant events, in conjunction with contemporary environmental influences on gene flow, can result in genetic discontinuities in continuously distributed species with high dispersal capability. PMID:1968412

  16. Alterations to the expression level of mitochondrial transcription factor A, TFAM, modify the mode of mitochondrial DNA replication in cultured human cells

    PubMed Central

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L. O.; Wanrooij, Sjoerd; Hyvärinen, Anne K.; Goffart, Steffi; Holt, Ian J.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is an abundant mitochondrial protein of the HMG superfamily, with various putative roles in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) metabolism. In this study we have investigated the effects on mtDNA replication of manipulating TFAM expression in cultured human cells. Mammalian mtDNA replication intermediates (RIs) fall into two classes, whose mechanistic relationship is not properly understood. One class is characterized by extensive RNA incorporation on the lagging strand, whereas the other has the structure of products of conventional, strand-coupled replication. TFAM overexpression increased the overall abundance of RIs and shifted them substantially towards those of the conventional, strand-coupled type. The shift was most pronounced in the rDNA region and at various replication pause sites and was accompanied by a drop in the relative amount of replication-termination intermediates, a substantial reduction in mitochondrial transcripts, mtDNA decatenation and progressive copy number depletion. TFAM overexpression could be partially phenocopied by treatment of cells with dideoxycytidine, suggesting that its effects are partially attributable to a decreased rate of fork progression. TFAM knockdown also resulted in mtDNA depletion, but RIs remained mainly of the ribosubstituted type, although termination intermediates were enhanced. We propose that TFAM influences the mode of mtDNA replication via its combined effects on different aspects of mtDNA metabolism. PMID:17062618

  17. Enhanced Neuroplasticity by the Metabolic Enhancer Piracetam Associated with Improved Mitochondrial Dynamics and Altered Permeability Transition Pore Function

    PubMed Central

    Stockburger, Carola; Miano, Davide; Pallas, Thea; Müller, Walter E.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial cascade hypothesis of dementia assumes mitochondrial dysfunction leading to reduced energy supply, impaired neuroplasticity, and finally cell death as one major pathomechanism underlying the continuum from brain aging over mild cognitive impairment to initial and advanced late onset Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, improving mitochondrial function has become an important strategy to treat the early stages of this continuum. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been proposed as possible prototype for those compounds by increasing impaired mitochondrial function and related aspects like mechanisms of neuroplasticity. We here report that piracetam at therapeutically relevant concentrations improves neuritogenesis in the human cell line SH-SY5Y over conditions mirroring the whole spectrum of age-associated cognitive decline. These effects go parallel with improvement of impaired mitochondrial dynamics shifting back fission and fusion balance to the energetically more favorable fusion site. Impaired fission and fusion balance can also be induced by a reduction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) function as atractyloside which indicates the mPTP has similar effects on mitochondrial dynamics. These changes are also reduced by piracetam. These findings suggest the mPTP as an important target for the beneficial effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function. PMID:27747106

  18. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics Contributes to Propofol-Induced Cell Death in Human Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Twaroski, Danielle M.; Yan, Yasheng; Zaja, Ivan; Clark, Eric; Bosnjak, Zeljko J.; Bai, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies in developing animals have shown that when anesthetic agents are administered early in life, it can lead to neuronal cell death and learning disabilities. Development of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neurons has provided a valuable tool for understanding the effects of anesthetics on developing human neurons. Unbalanced mitochondrial fusion/fission leads to various pathological conditions including neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to dissect the role of mitochondrial dynamics in propofol-induced neurotoxicity. Methods TUNEL staining was used to assess cell death in hESC-derived neurons. Mitochondrial fission was assessed using TOM20 staining and electron microscopy. Expression of mitochondrial fission-related proteins was assessed by Western blot and confocal microscopy was used to assess opening time of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Results Exposure to 6 hours of 20 μg/mL propofol increased cell death from 3.18±0.17% in the control-treated group to 9.6±0.95% and led to detrimental increases in mitochondrial fission (n=5 coverslips/group) accompanied by increased expression of activated dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), key proteins responsible for mitochondrial fission. Propofol exposure also induced earlier opening of the mPTP from 118.9±3.1 seconds in the control-treated group to 73.3±1.6 seconds. Pretreatment of the cells with mdivi-1, a mitochondrial fission blocker rescued the propofol-induced toxicity, mitochondrial fission and mPTP opening time (n=75 cells/group). Inhibiting CDK1 attenuated the increase in cell death and fission and the increase in expression of activated Drp1. Conclusions These data demonstrate for the first time that propofol-induced neurotoxicity occurs through a mitochondrial fission/mPTP-mediated pathway. PMID:26352374

  19. miR-210 is overexpressed in late stages of lung cancer and mediates mitochondrial alterations associated with modulation of HIF-1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Puisségur, M-P; Mazure, N M; Bertero, T; Pradelli, L; Grosso, S; Robbe-Sermesant, K; Maurin, T; Lebrigand, K; Cardinaud, B; Hofman, V; Fourre, S; Magnone, V; Ricci, J E; Pouysségur, J; Gounon, P; Hofman, P; Barbry, P; Mari, B

    2011-01-01

    Following the identification of a set of hypoxia-regulated microRNAs (miRNAs), recent studies have highlighted the importance of miR-210 and of its transcriptional regulation by the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). We report here that miR-210 is overexpressed at late stages of non-small cell lung cancer. Expression of miR-210 in lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells caused an alteration of cell viability associated with induction of caspase-3/7 activity. miR-210 induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and the apparition of an aberrant mitochondrial phenotype. The expression profiling of cells overexpressing miR-210 revealed a specific signature characterized by enrichment for transcripts related to ‘cell death' and ‘mitochondrial dysfunction', including several subunits of the electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I and II. The transcript coding for one of these ETC components, SDHD, subunit D of succinate dehydrogenase complex (SDH), was validated as a bona fide miR-210 target. Moreover, SDHD knockdown mimicked miR-210-mediated mitochondrial alterations. Finally, miR-210-dependent targeting of SDHD was able to activate HIF-1, in line with previous studies linking loss-of-function SDH mutations to HIF-1 activation. miR-210 can thus regulate mitochondrial function by targeting key ETC component genes with important consequences on cell metabolism, survival and modulation of HIF-1 activity. These observations help explain contradictory data regarding miR-210 expression and its putative function in solid tumors. PMID:20885442

  20. Growth hormone alters the glutathione S-transferase and mitochondrial thioredoxin systems in long-living Ames dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Rakoczy, Sharlene; Brown-Borg, Holly M

    2014-10-01

    Ames dwarf mice are deficient in growth hormone (GH), prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone and live significantly longer than their wild-type (WT) siblings. The lack of GH is associated with stress resistance and increased longevity. However, the mechanism underlying GH's actions on cellular stress defense have yet to be elucidated. In this study, WT or Ames dwarf mice were treated with saline or GH (WT saline, Dwarf saline, and Dwarf GH) two times daily for 7 days. The body and liver weights of Ames dwarf mice were significantly increased after 7 days of GH administration. Mitochondrial protein levels of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozymes, K1 and M4 (GSTK1 and GSTM4), were significantly higher in dwarf mice (Dwarf saline) when compared with WT mice (WT saline). GH administration downregulated the expression of GSTK1 proteins in dwarf mice. We further investigated GST activity from liver lysates using different substrates. Substrate-specific GST activity (bromosulfophthalein, dichloronitrobenzene, and 4-hydrox-ynonenal) was significantly reduced in GH-treated dwarf mice. In addition, GH treatment attenuated the activity of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin in liver mitochondria of Ames mice. Importantly, GH treatment suppressed Trx2 and TrxR2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that GH has a role in stress resistance by altering the functional capacity of the GST system through the regulation of specific GST family members in long-living Ames dwarf mice. It also affects the regulation of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, factors that regulate posttranslational modification of proteins and redox balance, thereby further influencing stress resistance.

  1. Aberrant Alterations of Mitochondrial Factors Drp1 and Opa1 in the Brains of Scrapie Experiment Rodents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao -Dong; Shi, Qi; Sun, Jing; Lv, Yan; Ma, Yue; Chen, Cao; Xiao, Kang; Zhou, Wei; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2017-03-01

    The abnormal mitochondrial dynamics has been reported in the brains of some neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), but limitedly described in prion disease. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drpl) and optic atrophy protein 1 (Opa1) are two essential elements for mitochondria fission and fusion. To evaluate possible changes of mitochondria dynamics during prion infection, the situations of brain Drp1 and Opa1 of scrapie strains 139A, ME7, and S15 mice, as well as 263K-infected hamsters, were analyzed. Significant decreases of brain Drp1 were observed in scrapie-infected rodents at terminal stage by Western blots and immunohistochemical assays, while the levels of Opa1 also showed declined tendency in the brains of scrapie-infected rodents. Immunofluorescent assays illustrated well localization of Drp1 or Opa1 within NeuN-positive cells. Moreover, the S-nitrosylated forms of Drp1significantly increased in the brain tissues of 139A- and ME7-infected mice at terminal stage. Dynamic analysis of Drp1 and SNO-Dpr1 in the brains collected at different time points within the incubation period of 139A-infected mice demonstrated that the whole Drp1 decreased at all tested samples, whereas the SNO-Drp1 remarkably increased in the sample of 90-day post-infection (dpi), reached to the peak in that of 120 dpi and dropped down but still maintained at higher level at the end of disease. The levels of apoptotic factors cleaved caspase 9, caspase 3, and Bax were also markedly increased in the brain tissues of the mice infected with agents 139A and ME7. Our data indicate a disorder of mitochondria dynamics in the brains of prion infection, largely depending on the abnormal alteration of brain Drp1.

  2. Growth Hormone Alters the Glutathione S-Transferase and Mitochondrial Thioredoxin Systems in Long-Living Ames Dwarf Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Rakoczy, Sharlene

    2014-01-01

    Ames dwarf mice are deficient in growth hormone (GH), prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone and live significantly longer than their wild-type (WT) siblings. The lack of GH is associated with stress resistance and increased longevity. However, the mechanism underlying GH’s actions on cellular stress defense have yet to be elucidated. In this study, WT or Ames dwarf mice were treated with saline or GH (WT saline, Dwarf saline, and Dwarf GH) two times daily for 7 days. The body and liver weights of Ames dwarf mice were significantly increased after 7 days of GH administration. Mitochondrial protein levels of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozymes, K1 and M4 (GSTK1 and GSTM4), were significantly higher in dwarf mice (Dwarf saline) when compared with WT mice (WT saline). GH administration downregulated the expression of GSTK1 proteins in dwarf mice. We further investigated GST activity from liver lysates using different substrates. Substrate-specific GST activity (bromosulfophthalein, dichloronitrobenzene, and 4-hydrox-ynonenal) was significantly reduced in GH-treated dwarf mice. In addition, GH treatment attenuated the activity of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin in liver mitochondria of Ames mice. Importantly, GH treatment suppressed Trx2 and TrxR2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that GH has a role in stress resistance by altering the functional capacity of the GST system through the regulation of specific GST family members in long-living Ames dwarf mice. It also affects the regulation of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, factors that regulate posttranslational modification of proteins and redox balance, thereby further influencing stress resistance. PMID:24285747

  3. The role of alterations in mitochondrial dynamics and PGC-1α over-expression in fast muscle atrophy following hindlimb unloading

    PubMed Central

    Cannavino, Jessica; Brocca, Lorenza; Sandri, Marco; Grassi, Bruno; Bottinelli, Roberto; Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms triggering disuse muscle atrophy remain of debate. It is becoming evident that mitochondrial dysfunction may regulate pathways controlling muscle mass. We have recently shown that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a major role in disuse atrophy of soleus, a slow, oxidative muscle. Here we tested the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading-induced atrophy could be due to mitochondrial dysfunction in fast muscles too, notwithstanding their much lower mitochondrial content. Gastrocnemius displayed atrophy following both 3 and 7 days of unloading. SOD1 and catalase up-regulation, no H2O2 accumulation and no increase of protein carbonylation suggest the antioxidant defence system efficiently reacted to redox imbalance in the early phases of disuse. A defective mitochondrial fusion (Mfn1, Mfn2 and OPA1 down-regulation) occurred together with an impairment of OXPHOS capacity. Furthermore, at 3 days of unloading higher acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation was found, suggesting AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway activation. To test the role of mitochondrial alterations we used Tg-mice overexpressing PGC-1α because of the known effect of PGC-1α on stimulation of Mfn2 expression. PGC-α overexpression was sufficient to prevent (i) the decrease of pro-fusion proteins (Mfn1, Mfn2 and OPA1), (ii) activation of the AMPK pathway, (iii) the inducible expression of MuRF1 and atrogin1 and of authopagic factors, and (iv) any muscle mass loss in response to disuse. As the effects of increased PGC-1α activity were sustained throughout disuse, compounds inducing PGC-1α expression could be useful to treat and prevent muscle atrophy also in fast muscles. PMID:25565653

  4. Copper deficiency alters cell bioenergetics and induces mitochondrial fusion through up-regulation of MFN2 and OPA1 in erythropoietic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bustos, Rodrigo I.; Jensen, Erik L.; Ruiz, Lina M.; Rivera, Salvador; Ruiz, Sebastián; Simon, Felipe; Riedel, Claudia; Ferrick, David; Elorza, Alvaro A.

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •In copper deficiency, cell proliferation is not affected. In turn, cell differentiation is impaired. •Enlarged mitochondria are due to up-regulation of MNF2 and OPA1. •Mitochondria turn off respiratory chain and ROS production. •Energy metabolism switch from mitochondria to glycolysis. -- Abstract: Copper is essential in cell physiology, participating in numerous enzyme reactions. In mitochondria, copper is a cofactor for respiratory complex IV, the cytochrome c oxidase. Low copper content is associated with anemia and the appearance of enlarged mitochondria in erythropoietic cells. These findings suggest a connection between copper metabolism and bioenergetics, mitochondrial dynamics and erythropoiesis, which has not been explored so far. Here, we describe that bathocuproine disulfonate-induced copper deficiency does not alter erythropoietic cell proliferation nor induce apoptosis. However it does impair erythroid differentiation, which is associated with a metabolic switch between the two main energy-generating pathways. That is, from mitochondrial function to glycolysis. Switching off mitochondria implies a reduction in oxygen consumption and ROS generation along with an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential. Mitochondrial fusion proteins MFN2 and OPA1 were up-regulated along with the ability of mitochondria to fuse. Morphometric analysis of mitochondria did not show changes in total mitochondrial biomass but rather bigger mitochondria because of increased fusion. Similar results were also obtained with human CD34+, which were induced to differentiate into red blood cells. In all, we have shown that adequate copper levels are important for maintaining proper mitochondrial function and for erythroid differentiation where the energy metabolic switch plus the up-regulation of fusion proteins define an adaptive response to copper deprivation to keep cells alive.

  5. Persistent Mitochondrial Hyperpolarization, Increased Reactive Oxygen Intermediate Production, and Cytoplasmic Alkalinization Characterize Altered IL-10 Signaling in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus1

    PubMed Central

    Gergely, Peter; Niland, Brian; Gonchoroff, Nick; Pullmann, Rudolf; Phillips, Paul E.; Perl, Andras

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal death signaling in lymphocytes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients has been associated with elevation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm) and increased production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). The resultant ATP depletion sensitizes T cells for necrosis that may significantly contribute to inflammation in patients with SLE. In the present study, the role of mitochondrial signal processing in T cell activation was investigated. CD3/CD28 costimulation of PBL elicited transient mitochondrial hyperpolarization and intracellular pH (pHi) elevation, followed by increased ROI production. Baseline Δψm, ROI production, and pHi were elevated, while T cell activation-induced changes were blunted in 15 patients with SLE in comparison with 10 healthy donors and 10 rheumatoid arthritis patients. Similar to CD3/CD28 costimulation, treatment of control PBL with IL-3, IL-10, TGF-β1, and IFN-γ led to transient Δψm elevation. IL-10 had diametrically opposing effects on mitochondrial signaling in lupus and control donors. Unlike healthy or rheumatoid arthritis PBL, cells of lupus patients were resistant to IL-10-induced mitochondrial hyperpolarization. By contrast, IL-10 enhanced ROI production and cell death in lupus PBL without affecting ROI levels and survival of control PBL. Ab-mediated IL-10 blockade or stimulation with antagonistic lymphokine IL-12 normalized baseline and CD3/CD28-induced changes in ROI production and pHi with no impact on Δψm of lupus PBL. The results suggest that mitochondrial hyperpolarization, increased ROI production, and cytoplasmic alkalinization play crucial roles in altered IL-10 responsiveness in SLE. PMID:12097418

  6. Protective effect of montelukast against quinolinic acid/malonic acid induced neurotoxicity: possible behavioral, biochemical, mitochondrial and tumor necrosis factor-α level alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, H; Kumar, P; Kumar, A; Nehru, B

    2010-11-24

    The present study has been designed to explore the protective effect of montelukast (leukotriene receptor antagonist) against intrastriatal quinolinic acid (QA; 300 nmol) and malonic acid (MA; 6 μmol) induced Huntington's like symptoms in rats. Quinolinic acid has been reported to induce excitotoxicity by stimulating the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, causing calcium overload which in turn leads to the neurodegeneration. On the other hand, MA, being a reversible inhibitor of mitochondrial enzyme complex-II, leads to energy crisis and free radical generation. Recent studies have reported the therapeutic potential of leukotriene receptor antagonists in different neurodegenerative disorders. However, their exact role is yet to be established. The present study accordingly, is an attempt to investigate the effect of montelukast against QA and MA induced behavioral, biochemical and molecular alterations in rat striatum. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial enzyme complex and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were evaluated on day 21st and 14th post intrastriatal QA and MA treatment, respectively. Findings of the present study demonstrate significant alteration in the locomotor activity and motor coordination as well as oxidative burden (increased lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration and decreased endogenous antioxidants), mitochondrial enzyme complex (I, II and IV) activities and TNF-α level, in both intrastriatal QA and MA treated animals. Further, montelukast (0.4, 0.8 mg/kg p.o.) treatment for 21 and 14 days respectively, attenuated the behavioral alterations, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and TNF-α level in these models of Huntington's disease in a significant manner. In conclusion, the present study emphasizes the neuroprotective potential of montelukast in the therapeutic management of Huntington like symptoms.

  7. Altered Mitochondrial Structure and Motion Dynamics in Living Cells with Energy Metabolism Defects Revealed by Real Time Microscope Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Nhu-An; Richardson, Tim; Cameron, Jessie; Chue, Bruno; Robinson, Brian H.

    2004-04-01

    Using the real time microscope (RTM), a system applying new developments in light microscopy, we documented the spatial and temporal dynamics of mitochondrial behavior in human cultured skin fibroblasts. Without the use of stains or probes, we resolved fibroblast mitochondria as dark slender filaments of approximately 0.2 [mu]m wide and up to 10 [mu]m long, as well as a few smaller ovoid forms. In the living cell, the three most common mitochondrial movements were: (1) small oscillatory movements; (2) larger movements including filament extension, retraction, and branching as well as combinations of these actions; and (3) whole transit movements of single mitochondrial filaments. Skin fibroblasts from patients with mitochondrial complex I deficiency and normal fibroblasts during incubation with rotenone, or antimycin A, contained higher proportions of mitochondria in the swollen filamentous forms, nodal filaments, and ovoid forms rather than the slender filamentous forms in normal cells. Interestingly, decreased motility was observed with the more ovoid mitochondrial forms compared to the filamentous forms. We conclude that mitochondrial morphology and dynamic motion are strongly associated with changes in mitochondrial energy metabolism. Images documenting our observations are presented both at single time points and as QuickTime videos. a

  8. Altered mitochondrial structure and motion dynamics in living cells with energy metabolism defects revealed by real time microscope imaging.

    PubMed

    Pham, Nhu-An; Richardson, Tim; Cameron, Jessie; Chue, Bruno; Robinson, Brian H

    2004-04-01

    Using the real time microscope (RTM), a system applying new developments in light microscopy, we documented the spatial and temporal dynamics of mitochondrial behavior in human cultured skin fibroblasts. Without the use of stains or probes, we resolved fibroblast mitochondria as dark slender filaments of approximately 0.2 m wide and up to 10 m long, as well as a few smaller ovoid forms. In the living cell, the three most common mitochondrial movements were: (1) small oscillatory movements; (2) larger movements including filament extension, retraction, and branching as well as combinations of these actions; and (3) whole transit movements of single mitochondrial filaments. Skin fibroblasts from patients with mitochondrial complex I deficiency and normal fibroblasts during incubation with rotenone, or antimycin A, contained higher proportions of mitochondria in the swollen filamentous forms, nodal filaments, and ovoid forms rather than the slender filamentous forms in normal cells. Interestingly, decreased motility was observed with the more ovoid mitochondrial forms compared to the filamentous forms. We conclude that mitochondrial morphology and dynamic motion are strongly associated with changes in mitochondrial energy metabolism. Images documenting our observations are presented both at single time points and as QuickTime videos.

  9. Aging-induced alterations in gene transcripts and functional activity of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complexes in the heart.

    PubMed

    Preston, Claudia C; Oberlin, Andrew S; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Gupta, Anu; Sagar, Sandeep; Syed, Rashad H Khazi; Siddiqui, Sabeeh A; Raghavakaimal, Sreekumar; Terzic, Andre; Jahangir, Arshad

    2008-06-01

    Aging is associated with progressive decline in energetic reserves compromising cardiac performance and tolerance to injury. Although deviations in mitochondrial functions have been documented in senescent heart, the molecular bases for the decline in energy metabolism are only partially understood. Here, high-throughput transcription profiles of genes coding for mitochondrial proteins in ventricles from adult (6-months) and aged (24-months) rats were compared using microarrays. Out of 614 genes encoding for mitochondrial proteins, 94 were differentially expressed with 95% downregulated in the aged. The majority of changes affected genes coding for proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation (39), substrate metabolism (14) and tricarboxylic acid cycle (6). Compared to adult, gene expression changes in aged hearts translated into a reduced mitochondrial functional capacity, with decreased NADH-dehydrogenase and F(0)F(1) ATPase complex activities and capacity for oxygen-utilization and ATP synthesis. Expression of genes coding for transcription co-activator factors involved in the regulation of mitochondrial metabolism and biogenesis were downregulated in aged ventricles without reduction in mitochondrial density. Thus, aging induces a selective decline in activities of oxidative phosphorylation complexes I and V within a broader transcriptional downregulation of mitochondrial genes, providing a substrate for reduced energetic efficiency associated with senescence.

  10. Aging-Induced Alterations in Gene Transcripts and Functional Activity of Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation Complexes in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Claudia C.; Oberlin, Andrew S.; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L.; Gupta, Anu; Sagar, Sandeep; Khazi Syed, Rashad H.; Siddiqui, Sabeeh; Raghavakaimal, Sreekumar; Terzic, Andre; Jahangir, Arshad

    2008-01-01

    Aging is associated with progressive decline in energetic reserves compromising cardiac performance and tolerance to injury. Although deviations in mitochondrial functions have been documented in senescent heart, the molecular bases for the decline in energy metabolism are only partially understood. Here, high-throughput transcription profiles of genes coding for mitochondrial proteins in ventricles from adult (6-months) and aged (24-months) rats were compared using microarrays. Out of 614 genes encoding for mitochondrial proteins, 94 were differentially expressed with 95% downregulated in the aged. The majority of changes affected genes coding for proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation (39), substrate metabolism (14) and tricarboxylic acid cycle (6). Compared to adult, gene expression changes in aged hearts translated into a reduced mitochondrial functional capacity, with decreased NADH-dehydrogenase and F0F1-ATPase complex activities and capacity for oxygen-utilization and ATP synthesis. Expression of genes coding for transcription co-activator factors involved in the regulation of mitochondrial metabolism and biogenesis were downregulated in aged ventricles without reduction in mitochondrial density. Thus, aging induces a selective decline in activities of oxidative phosphorylation complexes I and V within a broader transcriptional downregulation of mitochondrial genes, providing a substrate for reduced energetic efficiency associated with senescence. PMID:18400259

  11. Chronic ethanol exposure alters the lung proteome and leads to mitochondrial dysfunction in alveolar type 2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Alli, Abdel A.; Brewer, Elizabeth M.; Montgomery, Darrice S.; Ghant, Marcus S.; Eaton, Douglas C.; Brown, Lou Ann

    2014-01-01

    The lungs can undergo irreversible damage from chronic alcohol consumption. Herein, we developed an animal model predisposed for edematous lung injury following chronic ingestion of alcohol to better understand the etiology of alcohol-related disorders. Using animal modeling, alongside high-throughput proteomic and microarray assays, we identified changes in lung protein and transcript in mice and rats, respectively, following chronic alcohol ingestion or a caloric control diet. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry identified several mitochondrial-related proteins in which the expression was upregulated following long-term alcohol ingestion in mice. Consistent with these observations, rat gene chip microarray analysis of alveolar cells obtained from animals maintained on a Lieber-DeCarli liquid alcohol diet confirmed significant changes in mitochondrial-related transcripts in the alcohol lung. Transmission electron microscopy revealed significant changes in the mitochondrial architecture in alcohol mice, particularly following lipopolysaccharide exposure. Chronic alcohol ingestion was also shown to worsen mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial membrane polarization, and NAD+-to-NADH ratios in alveolar type 2 cells. In summary, our studies show causal connection between chronic alcohol ingestion and mitochondrial dysfunction, albeit the specific role of each of the mitochondrial-related proteins and transcripts identified in our study requires additional study. PMID:24682449

  12. GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION OF MITOCHONDRIAL DNA VARIANTS AND THE HISTORICAL BIOGEOGRAPHY OF THE SPOTTED SALAMANDER, AMBYSTOMA MACULATUM.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christopher A

    1994-06-01

    I analyzed geographic partitioning of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction-site variants in the spotted salamander, Ambystoma maculatum. Two highly divergent and geographically separate genetic lineages were identified that differed by a minimum of 19 restriction sites (6% sequence divergence). One of the lineages has a disjunct distribution with very closely related haplotypes occurring in Missouri, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Virginia. The other lineage is found in Michigan, Illinois, and Alabama. The geographic separation of highly divergent mtDNA haplotypes, a pattern that was predicted based on the sedentary nature of these salamanders, is evidence for long-term barriers to gene flow. In contrast, the large-scale disjunction of very similar haplotypes suggests recent, long-distance gene flow and does not match the phylogeographic expectation for a small terrestrial vertebrate. I explain this potential contradiction in the level of importance assigned to gene flow by a scenario in which historical barriers to gene flow account for the two divergent mtDNA assemblages, but stochastic sorting of ancestral polymorphism is responsible for the large-scale geographic disjunction. Ten of 16 populations collected in the Ozark Highlands were fixed for the same haplotype. I attribute this lack of detectable variation to recent colonization of this area, a hypothesis that is supported by paleoecological data and demonstrates the potential benefits of combining data from paleobotany, geology, and other disciplines to reconstruct the historical biogeography of a species. © 1994 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  13. Genetic Structure of Wild Bonobo Populations: Diversity of Mitochondrial DNA and Geographical Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Shoko; Sakamaki, Tetsuya; Hart, John A.; Hart, Terese B.; Tokuyama, Nahoko; Reinartz, Gay E.; Guislain, Patrick; Dupain, Jef; Cobden, Amy K.; Mulavwa, Mbangi N.; Yangozene, Kumugo; Darroze, Serge; Devos, Céline; Furuichi, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Bonobos (Pan paniscus) inhabit regions south of the Congo River including all areas between its southerly tributaries. To investigate the genetic diversity and evolutionary relationship among bonobo populations, we sequenced mitochondrial DNA from 376 fecal samples collected in seven study populations located within the eastern and western limits of the species’ range. In 136 effective samples from different individuals (range: 7–37 per population), we distinguished 54 haplotypes in six clades (A1, A2, B1, B2, C, D), which included a newly identified clade (D). MtDNA haplotypes were regionally clustered; 83 percent of haplotypes were locality-specific. The distribution of haplotypes across populations and the genetic diversity within populations thus showed highly geographical patterns. Using population distance measures, seven populations were categorized in three clusters: the east, central, and west cohorts. Although further elucidation of historical changes in the geological setting is required, the geographical patterns of genetic diversity seem to be shaped by paleoenvironmental changes during the Pleistocene. The present day riverine barriers appeared to have a weak effect on gene flow among populations, except for the Lomami River, which separates the TL2 population from the others. The central cohort preserves a high genetic diversity, and two unique clades of haplotypes were found in the Wamba/Iyondji populations in the central cohort and in the TL2 population in the eastern cohort respectively. This knowledge may contribute to the planning of bonobo conservation. PMID:23544084

  14. Genetic structure of wild bonobo populations: diversity of mitochondrial DNA and geographical distribution.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Yoshi; Takemoto, Hiroyuki; Higuchi, Shoko; Sakamaki, Tetsuya; Hart, John A; Hart, Terese B; Tokuyama, Nahoko; Reinartz, Gay E; Guislain, Patrick; Dupain, Jef; Cobden, Amy K; Mulavwa, Mbangi N; Yangozene, Kumugo; Darroze, Serge; Devos, Céline; Furuichi, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Bonobos (Pan paniscus) inhabit regions south of the Congo River including all areas between its southerly tributaries. To investigate the genetic diversity and evolutionary relationship among bonobo populations, we sequenced mitochondrial DNA from 376 fecal samples collected in seven study populations located within the eastern and western limits of the species' range. In 136 effective samples from different individuals (range: 7-37 per population), we distinguished 54 haplotypes in six clades (A1, A2, B1, B2, C, D), which included a newly identified clade (D). MtDNA haplotypes were regionally clustered; 83 percent of haplotypes were locality-specific. The distribution of haplotypes across populations and the genetic diversity within populations thus showed highly geographical patterns. Using population distance measures, seven populations were categorized in three clusters: the east, central, and west cohorts. Although further elucidation of historical changes in the geological setting is required, the geographical patterns of genetic diversity seem to be shaped by paleoenvironmental changes during the Pleistocene. The present day riverine barriers appeared to have a weak effect on gene flow among populations, except for the Lomami River, which separates the TL2 population from the others. The central cohort preserves a high genetic diversity, and two unique clades of haplotypes were found in the Wamba/Iyondji populations in the central cohort and in the TL2 population in the eastern cohort respectively. This knowledge may contribute to the planning of bonobo conservation.

  15. Differences in mtDNA haplogroup distribution among 3 Jewish populations alter susceptibility to T2DM complications

    PubMed Central

    Feder, Jeanette; Blech, Ilana; Ovadia, Ofer; Amar, Shirly; Wainstein, Julio; Raz, Itamar; Dadon, Sarah; Arking, Dan E; Glaser, Benjamin; Mishmar, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association studies searching for candidate susceptibility loci for common complex diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its common complications have uncovered novel disease-associated genes. Nevertheless these large-scale population screens often overlook the tremendous variation in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) and its involvement in complex disorders. Results We have analyzed the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genetic variability in Ashkenazi (Ash), Sephardic (Seph) and North African (NAF) Jewish populations (total n = 1179). Our analysis showed significant differences (p < 0.001) in the distribution of mtDNA genetic backgrounds (haplogroups) among the studied populations. To test whether these differences alter the pattern of disease susceptibility, we have screened our three Jewish populations for an association of mtDNA genetic haplogroups with T2DM complications. Our results identified population-specific susceptibility factors of which the best example is the Ashkenazi Jewish specific haplogroup N1b1, having an apparent protective effect against T2DM complications in Ash (p = 0.006), being absent in the NAF population and under-represented in the Seph population. We have generated and analyzed whole mtDNA sequences from the disease associated haplogroups revealing mutations in highly conserved positions that are good candidates to explain the phenotypic effect of these genetic backgrounds. Conclusion Our findings support the possibility that recent bottleneck events leading to over-representation of minor mtDNA alleles in specific genetic isolates, could result in population-specific susceptibility loci to complex disorders. PMID:18445251

  16. Brain mitochondrial ATP-insensitive large conductance Ca⁺²-activated K⁺ channel properties are altered in a rat model of amyloid-β neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jafari, A; Noursadeghi, E; Khodagholi, F; Saghiri, R; Sauve, R; Aliaghaei, A; Eliassi, A

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid-beta (Aβ)-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the underlying mechanism of how Aβ affects mitochondrial function remains uncertain. Because mitochondrial potassium channels have been involved in several mitochondrial functions including cytoprotection, apoptosis and calcium homeostasis, a study was undertaken to investigate whether the gating behavior of the mitochondrial ATP- and ChTx-insensitive-IbTx-sensitive Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel (mitoBKCa) is altered in a rat model of Aβ neurotoxicity. Aβ1-42 (4 μg/μl) was intracerebroventricularly injected in male Wistar rats (220-250 g). Brain Aβ accumulation was confirmed two weeks later on the basis of an immunohistochemistry staining assay, and physiological impacts measured in passive avoidance task cognitive performance experiments. Brain mitochondrial inner membranes were then extracted and membrane vesicles prepared for channel incorporation into bilayer lipid. Purity of the cell fraction was confirmed by Western blot using specific markers of mitochondria, plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi. Our results first provide evidence for differences in mitoBKCa ion permeation properties with channels coming from Aβ vesicle preparations characterized by an inward rectifying I-V curve, in contrast to control mitoBKCa channels which showed a linear I-V relationship under the same ionic conditions (200 mM cis/50mM trans). More importantly the open probability of channels from Aβ vesicles appeared 1.5 to 2.5 smaller compared to controls, the most significant decrease being observed at depolarizing potentials (30 mV to 50 mV). Because BKCa-β4 subunit has been documented to shift the BKCa channel voltage dependence curve, a Western blot analysis was undertaken where expression of mitoBKCa α and β4 subunits was estimated using anti-α and β4 subunit antibodies. Our results indicated a significant increase in mito

  17. Loss of mitochondrial protease OMA1 alters processing of the GTPase OPA1 and causes obesity and defective thermogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Quirós, Pedro M; Ramsay, Andrew J; Sala, David; Fernández-Vizarra, Erika; Rodríguez, Francisco; Peinado, Juan R; Fernández-García, Maria Soledad; Vega, José A; Enríquez, José A; Zorzano, Antonio; López-Otín, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic subcellular organelles that convert nutrient intermediates into readily available energy equivalents. Optimal mitochondrial function is ensured by a highly evolved quality control system, coordinated by protein machinery that regulates a process of continual fusion and fission. In this work, we provide in vivo evidence that the ATP-independent metalloprotease OMA1 plays an essential role in the proteolytic inactivation of the dynamin-related GTPase OPA1 (optic atrophy 1). We also show that OMA1 deficiency causes a profound perturbation of the mitochondrial fusion–fission equilibrium that has important implications for metabolic homeostasis. Thus, ablation of OMA1 in mice results in marked transcriptional changes in genes of lipid and glucose metabolic pathways and substantial alterations in circulating blood parameters. Additionally, Oma1-mutant mice exhibit an increase in body weight due to increased adipose mass, hepatic steatosis, decreased energy expenditure and impaired thermogenenesis. These alterations are especially significant under metabolic stress conditions, indicating that an intact OMA1-OPA1 system is essential for developing the appropriate adaptive response to different metabolic stressors such as a high-fat diet or cold-shock. This study provides the first description of an unexpected role in energy metabolism for the metalloprotease OMA1 and reinforces the importance of mitochondrial quality control for normal metabolic function. PMID:22433842

  18. 4-Nitrobenzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone: a new compound derived from S-(-)-limonene that induces mitochondrial alterations in epimastigotes and trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Britta, Elizandra Aparecida; Scariot, Débora Botura; Falzirolli, Hugo; da Silva, Cleuza Conceição; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Borsali, Redouane; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2015-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, a parasitic disease that remains a serious health concern with unsatisfactory treatment. Drugs that are currently used to treat Chagas' disease are partially effective in the acute phase but ineffective in the chronic phase of the disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antitrypanosomal activity and morphological, ultrastructural and biochemical alterations induced by a new molecule, 4-nitrobenzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (BZTS), derived from S-(-)-limonene against epimastigote, trypomastigote and intracellular amastigote forms of T. cruzi. BZTS inhibited the growth of epimastigotes (IC50 = 9·2 μ m), intracellular amastigotes (IC50 = 3·23 μ m) and inhibited the viability of trypomastigotes (EC50 = 1·43 μ m). BZTS had a CC50 of 37·45 μ m in LLCMK2 cells. BZTS induced rounding and distortion of the cell body and severely damaged parasite mitochondria, reflected by extensive swelling and disorganization in the inner mitochondrial membrane and the presence of concentric membrane structures inside the organelle. Cytoplasmic vacuolization, endoplasmic reticulum that surrounded organelles, the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and increased mitochondrial O2 •- production were also observed. Our results suggest that BZTS alters the ultrastructure and physiology of mitochondria, which could be closely related to parasite death.

  19. Loss of mitochondrial protease OMA1 alters processing of the GTPase OPA1 and causes obesity and defective thermogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Quirós, Pedro M; Ramsay, Andrew J; Sala, David; Fernández-Vizarra, Erika; Rodríguez, Francisco; Peinado, Juan R; Fernández-García, Maria Soledad; Vega, José A; Enríquez, José A; Zorzano, Antonio; López-Otín, Carlos

    2012-05-02

    Mitochondria are dynamic subcellular organelles that convert nutrient intermediates into readily available energy equivalents. Optimal mitochondrial function is ensured by a highly evolved quality control system, coordinated by protein machinery that regulates a process of continual fusion and fission. In this work, we provide in vivo evidence that the ATP-independent metalloprotease OMA1 plays an essential role in the proteolytic inactivation of the dynamin-related GTPase OPA1 (optic atrophy 1). We also show that OMA1 deficiency causes a profound perturbation of the mitochondrial fusion-fission equilibrium that has important implications for metabolic homeostasis. Thus, ablation of OMA1 in mice results in marked transcriptional changes in genes of lipid and glucose metabolic pathways and substantial alterations in circulating blood parameters. Additionally, Oma1-mutant mice exhibit an increase in body weight due to increased adipose mass, hepatic steatosis, decreased energy expenditure and impaired thermogenenesis. These alterations are especially significant under metabolic stress conditions, indicating that an intact OMA1-OPA1 system is essential for developing the appropriate adaptive response to different metabolic stressors such as a high-fat diet or cold-shock. This study provides the first description of an unexpected role in energy metabolism for the metalloprotease OMA1 and reinforces the importance of mitochondrial quality control for normal metabolic function.

  20. The Protective Effect of Icariin on Mitochondrial Transport and Distribution in Primary Hippocampal Neurons from 3× Tg-AD Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yijing; Han, Shuangxue; Huang, Xiuxian; Ni, Jiazuan; He, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-27

    Icariin, a pharmacologically active component isolated from the Chinese herb Epimedium, has been shown to improve spatial learning and memory abilities in Alzheimer's disease (AD) rats through inhibition of Aβ production and tau protein hyperphosphorylation. However, the potential mechanism of icariin-induced protective effects against mitochondrial dysfunctions in AD still remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effect of icariin on the modulation of mitochondrial transport and distribution in primary hippocampal cultures from triple-transgenic (3× Tg) AD mice. The results showed that icariin enhanced mitochondrial motility and increased mitochondrial index and mitochondrial length and size in the diseased neurons. Additionally, the expression of the key mitochondrial enzyme, pyruvate dehydrogenase-E1α (PDHE1α), and the post synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), was preserved in AD neurons after icariin treatment, accompanied by a downregulation of Aβ and phosphorylated tau expression in the corresponding areas. Further study showed that icariin treatment resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and an increase in fusion protein Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2). These data indicate that icariin can promote mitochondrial transport, protect mitochondria against fragmentation and preserve the expression of mitochondrial and synaptic functional proteins in AD neurons. Thus, icariin may be a potential therapeutic complement for AD and other mitochondrial malfunction-related neuronal degenerative diseases.

  1. Homeostatic effect of p-chloro-diphenyl diselenide on glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function alterations induced by monosodium glutamate administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Quines, Caroline B; Rosa, Suzan G; Chagas, Pietro M; da Rocha, Juliana T; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Carvalho, Nélson R; Soares, Félix A; da Luz, Sônia C Almeida; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a group of metabolic alterations considered a worldwide public health problem. Organic selenium compounds have been reported to have many different pharmacological actions, such as anti-hypercholesterolemic and anti-hyperglycemic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of p-chloro-diphenyl diselenide (p-ClPhSe)2, an organic selenium compound, in a model of obesity induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) administration in rats. The rats were treated during the first ten postnatal days with MSG and received (p-ClPhSe)2 (10 mg/kg, intragastrically) from 45th to 51 th postnatal day. Glucose, lipid and lactate levels were determined in plasma of rats. Glycogen levels and activities of tyrosine aminotransferase, hexokinase, citrate synthase and glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) were determined in livers of rats. Renal G-6-Pase activity was also determined. The purine content [Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate] and mitochondrial functionality in the liver were also investigated. p-(ClPhSe)2 did not alter the reduction in growth performance and in the body weight caused by MSG but reduced epididymal fat deposition of rats. p-(ClPhSe)2 restored glycemia, triglycerides, cholesterol and lactate levels as well as the glucose metabolism altered in rats treated with MSG. p-(ClPhSe)2 restored hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction and the decrease in citrate synthase activity and ATP and ADP levels caused by MSG in rats. In summary, (p-ClPhSe)2 had homeostatic effects on glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function alterations induced by MSG administration to rats.

  2. Nuclear responses to depletion of mitochondrial DNA in human cells.

    PubMed

    Li, K; Neufer, P D; Williams, R S

    1995-11-01

    The derivation of human cell lines devoid of mitochondrial (mt) DNA (rho 0) provides an opportunity to study nuclear responses to a chronic impairment of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Expression of several nuclear genes is induced in human rho 0 cells, including those encoding integral proteins of the mitochondrial inner membrane, intermediate filaments, and ribosomes. In contrast to conditions in which mitochondrial respiration is altered acutely, expression of heat shock proteins and immediate early genes is not induced. Mitochondria from rho 0 cells maintain a transmembrane electrochemical potential and are distributed within the cytoplasm of these cells in a manner indistinguishable from that of wild-type cells. We conclude that a chronic deficiency of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation produced by elimination of mtDNA is associated with a different pattern of gene induction than that provoked by other acute or subacute conditions that impair mitochondrial respiration or create energy demands in excess of mitochondrial respiratory capacity.

  3. Effects of Zidovudine Treatment on Heart mRNA Expression and Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Associated with Alterations in Deoxynucleoside Triphosphate Composition in a Neonatal Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Snowdin, Jacob W; Hsiung, Chia-Heng; Kesterson, Daniel G; Kamath, Vasudeva G; McKee, Edward E

    2015-10-01

    The prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV is a crucial component in HIV therapy. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), primarily 3'-azido-3'-thymidine (AZT [zidovudine]), have been used to treat both mothers and neonates. While AZT is being replaced with less toxic drugs in treating mothers in MTCT prevention, it is still commonly used to treat neonates. Problems related to mitochondrial toxicity and potential mutagenesis associated with AZT treatment have been reported in treated cohorts. Yet little is known concerning the metabolism and potential toxicity of AZT on embryonic and neonatal tissues, especially considering that the enzymes of nucleoside metabolism change dramatically as many tissues convert from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth during this period. AZT is known to inhibit thymidine phosphorylation and potentially alter deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools in adults. This study examines the effects of AZT on dNTP pools, mRNA expression of deoxynucleoside/deoxynucleotide metabolic enzymes, and mitochondrial DNA levels in a neonatal rat model. Results show that AZT treatment dramatically altered dNTP pools in the first 7 days of life after birth, which normalized to age-matched controls in the second and third weeks. Additionally, AZT treatment dramatically increased the mRNA levels of many enzymes involved in deoxynucleotide synthesis and mitochondrial biogenesis during the first week of life, which normalized to age-matched controls by the third week. These results were correlated with depletion of mitochondrial DNA noted in the second week. Taken together, results demonstrated that AZT treatment has a powerful effect on the deoxynucleotide synthesis pathways that may be associated with toxicity and mutagenesis.

  4. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  5. Sickness behavior induced by cisplatin chemotherapy and radiotherapy in a murine head and neck cancer model is associated with altered mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G; Molkentine, Jessica M; Vermeer, Daniel W; Walker, Adam K; Feng, Rebekah; Holder, Gerard; Luu, Katherine; Mason, Ryan M; Saligan, Leo; Heijnen, Cobi J; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Mason, Kathy A; Lee, John H; Dantzer, Robert

    2016-01-15

    The present study was undertaken to explore the possible mechanisms of the behavioral alterations that develop in response to cancer and to cancer therapy. For this purpose we used a syngeneic heterotopic mouse model of human papilloma virus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer in which cancer therapy is curative. Mice implanted or not with HPV+ tumor cells were exposed to sham treatment or a regimen of cisplatin and radiotherapy (chemoradiation). Sickness was measured by body weight loss and reduced food intake. Motivation was measured by burrowing, a highly prevalent species specific behavior. Tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual decrease in burrowing over time and increased brain and liver inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression by 28 days post tumor implantation. Chemoradiation administered to healthy mice resulted in a mild decrease in burrowing, body weight, and food intake. Chemoradiation in tumor-bearing mice decreased tumor growth and abrogated liver and brain inflammation, but failed to attenuate burrowing deficits. PCR array analysis of selected hypoxia and mitochondrial genes revealed that both the tumor and chemoradiation altered the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial energy metabolism within the liver and brain and increased expression of genes related to HIF-1α signaling within the brain. The most prominent changes in brain mitochondrial genes were noted in tumor-bearing mice treated with chemoradiation. These findings indicate that targeting mitochondrial dysfunction following cancer and cancer therapy may be a strategy for prevention of cancer-related symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S. R. Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B.; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  7. Oxidative stress-induced alterations in PPAR-γ and associated mitochondrial destabilization contribute to kidney cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Small, David M; Morais, Christudas; Coombes, Jeff S; Bennett, Nigel C; Johnson, David W; Gobe, Glenda C

    2014-10-01

    The mechanism(s) underlying renoprotection by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonists in diabetic and nondiabetic kidney disease are not well understood. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress contribute to kidney disease. PPAR-γ upregulates proteins required for mitochondrial biogenesis. Our aim was to determine whether PPAR-γ has a role in protecting the kidney proximal tubular epithelium (PTE) against mitochondrial destabilisation and oxidative stress. HK-2 PTE cells were subjected to oxidative stress (0.2-1.0 mM H₂O₂) for 2 and 18 h and compared with untreated cells for apoptosis, mitosis (morphology/biomarkers), cell viability (MTT), superoxide (dihydroethidium), mitochondrial function (MitoTracker red and JC-1), ATP (luminescence), and mitochondrial ultrastructure. PPAR-γ, phospho-PPAR-γ, PPAR-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α, Parkin (Park2), p62, and light chain (LC)3β were investigated using Western blots. PPAR-γ was modulated using the agonists rosiglitazone, pioglitazone, and troglitazone. Mitochondrial destabilization increased with H₂O₂concentration, ATP decreased (2 and 18 h; P < 0.05), Mitotracker red and JC-1 fluorescence indicated loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and superoxide increased (18 h, P < 0.05). Electron microscopy indicated sparse mitochondria, with disrupted cristae. Mitophagy was evident at 2 h (Park2 and LC3β increased; p62 decreased). Impaired mitophagy was indicated by p62 accumulation at 18 h (P < 0.05). PPAR-γ expression decreased, phospho-PPAR-γ increased, and PGC-1α decreased (2 h), indicating aberrant PPAR-γ activation and reduced mitochondrial biogenesis. Cell viability decreased (2 and 18 h, P < 0.05). PPAR-γ agonists promoted further apoptosis. In summary, oxidative stress promoted mitochondrial destabilisation in kidney PTE, in association with increased PPAR-γ phosphorylation. PPAR-γ agonists failed to protect PTE. Despite positive effects in other tissues, PPAR

  8. Mild reductions in mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity result in altered nitrate assimilation and pigmentation but do not impact growth.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Sulpice, Ronan; Osorio, Sonia; Krahnert, Ina; Leisse, Andrea; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Hodges, Michael; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were generated expressing a fragment of the mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (SlIDH1) in the antisense orientation. The transgenic plants displayed a mild reduction in the activity of the target enzyme in the leaves but essentially no visible alteration in growth from the wild-type. Fruit size and yield were, however, reduced. These plants were characterized by relatively few changes in photosynthetic parameters, but they displayed a minor decrease in maximum photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm). Furthermore, a clear reduction in flux through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was observed in the transformants. Additionally, biochemical analyses revealed that the transgenic lines exhibited considerably altered metabolism, being characterized by slight decreases in the levels of amino acids, intermediates of the TCA cycle, photosynthetic pigments, starch, and NAD(P)H levels, but increased levels of nitrate and protein. Results from these studies show that even small changes in mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity lead to noticeable alterations in nitrate assimilation and suggest the presence of different strategies by which metabolism is reprogrammed to compensate for this deficiency.

  9. Mild Reductions in Mitochondrial NAD-Dependent Isocitrate Dehydrogenase Activity Result in Altered Nitrate Assimilation and Pigmentation But Do Not Impact Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Sulpice, Ronan; Osorio, Sonia; Krahnert, Ina; Leisse, Andrea; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Hodges, Michael; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were generated expressing a fragment of the mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (SlIDH1) in the antisense orientation. The transgenic plants displayed a mild reduction in the activity of the target enzyme in the leaves but essentially no visible alteration in growth from the wild-type. Fruit size and yield were, however, reduced. These plants were characterized by relatively few changes in photosynthetic parameters, but they displayed a minor decrease in maximum photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm). Furthermore, a clear reduction in flux through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was observed in the transformants. Additionally, biochemical analyses revealed that the transgenic lines exhibited considerably altered metabolism, being characterized by slight decreases in the levels of amino acids, intermediates of the TCA cycle, photosynthetic pigments, starch, and NAD(P)H levels, but increased levels of nitrate and protein. Results from these studies show that even small changes in mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity lead to noticeable alterations in nitrate assimilation and suggest the presence of different strategies by which metabolism is reprogrammed to compensate for this deficiency. PMID:20035036

  10. 27 CFR 70.311 - Authority for establishment, alteration, and distribution of stamps, marks, or labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Authority for establishment, alteration, and distribution of stamps, marks, or labels. 70.311 Section 70.311 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  11. Constriction of the mitochondrial inner compartment is a priming event for mitochondrial division

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Bongki; Cho, Hyo Min; Jo, Youhwa; Kim, Hee Dae; Song, Myungjae; Moon, Cheil; Kim, Hyongbum; Kim, Kyungjin; Sesaki, Hiromi; Rhyu, Im Joo; Kim, Hyun; Sun, Woong

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial division is critical for the maintenance and regulation of mitochondrial function, quality and distribution. This process is controlled by cytosolic actin-based constriction machinery and dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) on mitochondrial outer membrane (OMM). Although mitochondrial physiology, including oxidative phosphorylation, is also important for efficient mitochondrial division, morphological alterations of the mitochondrial inner-membrane (IMM) have not been clearly elucidated. Here we report spontaneous and repetitive constriction of mitochondrial inner compartment (CoMIC) associated with subsequent division in neurons. Although CoMIC is potentiated by inhibition of Drp1 and occurs at the potential division spots contacting the endoplasmic reticulum, it appears on IMM independently of OMM. Intra-mitochondrial influx of Ca2+ induces and potentiates CoMIC, and leads to K+-mediated mitochondrial bulging and depolarization. Synergistically, optic atrophy 1 (Opa1) also regulates CoMIC via controlling Mic60-mediated OMM–IMM tethering. Therefore, we propose that CoMIC is a priming event for efficient mitochondrial division. PMID:28598422

  12. Alterations in intrinsic mitochondrial function with aging are fiber type-specific and do not explain differential atrophy between muscles.

    PubMed

    Picard, Martin; Ritchie, Darmyn; Thomas, Melissa M; Wright, Kathryn J; Hepple, Russell T

    2011-12-01

    To determine whether mitochondrial dysfunction is causally related to muscle atrophy with aging, we examined respiratory capacity, H(2) O(2) emission, and function of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) in permeabilized myofibers prepared from four rat muscles that span a range of fiber type and degree of age-related atrophy. Muscle atrophy with aging was greatest in fast-twitch gastrocnemius (Gas) muscle (-38%), intermediate in both the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus (Sol) muscles (-21%), and non-existent in adductor longus (AL) muscle (+47%). In contrast, indices of mitochondrial dysfunction did not correspond to this differential degree of atrophy. Specifically, despite higher protein expression for oxidative phosphorylation (oxphos) system in fast Gas and EDL, state III respiratory capacity per myofiber wet weight was unchanged with aging, whereas the slow Sol showed proportional decreases in oxphos protein, citrate synthase activity, and state III respiration. Free radical leak (H(2) O(2) emission per O(2) flux) under state III respiration was higher with aging in the fast Gas, whereas state II free radical leak was higher in the slow AL. Only the fast muscles had impaired mPTP function with aging, with lower mitochondrial calcium retention capacity in EDL and shorter time to mPTP opening in Gas and EDL. Collectively, our results underscore that the age-related changes in muscle mitochondrial function depend largely upon fiber type and are unrelated to the severity of muscle atrophy, suggesting that intrinsic changes in mitochondrial function are unlikely to be causally involved in aging muscle atrophy. © 2011 The Authors. Aging Cell © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. Altered Redox Mitochondrial Biology in the Neurodegenerative Disorder Fragile X-Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome: Use of Antioxidants in Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gyu; Napoli, Eleonora; Wong, Sarah; Hagerman, Randi; Liu, Siming; Tassone, Flora; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    A 55–200 expansion of the CGG nucleotide repeat in the 5’-UTR of the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1) is the hallmark of the triplet nucleotide disease known as the “premutation” as opposed to those with >200 repeats, known as the full mutation or fragile X syndrome. Originally, premutation carriers were thought to be free of phenotypic traits; however, some are diagnosed with emotional and neurocognitive issues and, later in life, with the neurodegenerative disease fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). Considering that mitochondrial dysfunction has been observed in fibroblasts and post-mortem brain samples from carriers of the premutation, we hypothesized that mitochondrial dysfunction-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) may result in cumulative oxidative-nitrative damage. Fibroblasts from premutation carriers (n = 31, all FXTAS-free except 8), compared with age- and sex-matched controls (n = 25), showed increased mitochondrial ROS production, impaired Complex I activity, lower expression of MIA40 (rate-limiting step of the redox-regulated mitochondrial-disulfide-relay-system), increased mtDNA deletions and increased biomarkers of lipid and protein oxidative-nitrative damage. Most of the outcomes were more pronounced in FXTAS-affected individuals. Significant recovery of mitochondrial mass and/or function was obtained with superoxide or hydroxyl radicals’ scavengers, a glutathione peroxidase analog, or by overexpressing MIA40. The effects of ethanol (a hydroxyl radical scavenger) were deleterious, while others (by N-acetyl-cysteine, quercetin and epigallocatechin-3-gallate) were outcome- and/or carrier- specific. The use of antioxidants in the context of precision medicine is discussed with the goal of improving mitochondrial function in carriers with the potential of decreasing the morbidity and/or delaying FXTAS onset. PMID:27385396

  14. Mitochondrial DNA Variant in COX1 Subunit Significantly Alters Energy Metabolism of Geographically Divergent Wild Isolates in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Dingley, Stephen D.; Polyak, Erzsebet; Ostrovsky, Julian; Srinivasan, Satish; Lee, Icksoo; Rosenfeld, Amy B.; Tsukikawa, Mai; Xiao, Rui; Selak, Mary A.; Coon, Joshua J.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Grimsrud, Paul A.; Kwon, Young Joon; Pagliarini, David J.; Gai, Xiaowu; Schurr, Theodore G.; Hüttemann, Maik; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Falk, Marni J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation can influence the penetrance of complex diseases and climatic adaptation. While studies in geographically defined human populations suggest that mtDNA mutations become fixed when they have conferred metabolic capabilities optimally suited for a specific environment, it has been challenging to definitively assign adaptive functions to specific mtDNA sequence variants in mammals. We investigated whether mtDNA genome variation functionally influences Caenorhabditis elegans wild isolates of distinct mtDNA lineages and geographic origins. We found that, relative to N2 (England) wild-type nematodes, CB4856 wild isolates from a warmer native climate (Hawaii) had a unique p.A12S amino acid substitution in the mtDNA-encoded COX1 core catalytic subunit of mitochondrial complex IV (CIV). Relative to N2, CB4856 worms grown at 20 °C had significantly increased CIV enzyme activity, mitochondrial matrix oxidant burden, and sensitivity to oxidative stress but had significantly reduced lifespan and mitochondrial membrane potential. Interestingly, mitochondrial membrane potential was significantly increased in CB4856 grown at its native temperature of 25 °C. A transmitochondrial cybrid worm strain, chpIR (M, CB4856 > N2), was bred as homoplasmic for the CB4856 mtDNA genome in the N2 nuclear background. The cybrid strain also displayed significantly increased CIV activity, demonstrating that this difference results from the mtDNA-encoded p.A12S variant. However, chpIR (M, CB4856 > N2) worms had significantly reduced median and maximal lifespan relative to CB4856, which may relate to their nuclear– mtDNA genome mismatch. Overall, these data suggest that C. elegans wild isolates of varying geographic origins may adapt to environmental challenges through mtDNA variation to modulate critical aspects of mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:24534730

  15. Development of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) lines with altered starch granule size distribution.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Sarita; Båga, Monica; Ahuja, Geetika; Rossnagel, Brian G; Chibbar, Ravindra N

    2014-03-12

    Microscope analysis of starches prepared from 139 barley genotypes identified a Japanese genotype, Kinai Kyoshinkai-2 (KK-2), with altered starch granule size distribution. Compared to normal barley starch, KK-2 produced consistently higher volumes of starch granules with 5-15 μm diameter and reduced volumes of starch granules with >15 μm diameter when grown in different environments. A cross between KK-2 and normal starch cultivar CDC Kendall was made and led to the production of 154 F5 lines with alterations to the normal 7:3:1 distribution for A-:B-:C-type starch granule volumes. Three F5 lines showed unimodal starch granule size distribution due to apparent lack of very small (<5.0 μm diameter) C-type starch granules, but the phenotype was accompanied by reduced grain weight and total starch concentration. Five F5 lines produced a significantly larger population of large (>15 μm diameter) A-type starch granules as compared to normal starch and showed on average a 10:4:1 distribution for A-:B-:C-type starch granule volumes. The unusual starch phenotypes displayed by the F5 lines confirm starch granule size distribution in barley can be genetically altered.

  16. Sodium Butyrate, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Reverses Behavioral and Mitochondrial Alterations in Animal Models of Depression Induced by Early- or Late-life Stress.

    PubMed

    Valvassori, Samira S; Resende, Wilson R; Budni, Josiane; Dal-Pont, Gustavo C; Bavaresco, Daniela V; Réus, Gislaine Z; Carvalho, André F; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Furlanetto, Camila B; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of sodium butyrate on depressive-like behavior and mitochondrial alteration parameters in animal models of depression induced by maternal deprivation or chronic mild stress in Wistar rats. maternal deprivation was established by separating pups from their mothers for 3 h daily from postnatal day 1 to day 10. Chronic mild stress was established by water deprivation, food deprivation, restraint stress, isolation and flashing lights. Sodium butyrate or saline was administered twice a day for 7 days before the behavioral tests. Depressive behavior was evaluated using the forced swim test. The activity of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes (succinate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase) and of mitochondrial chain complexes (I, II, II-III and IV) was measured in the striatum of rats. From these analyses it can be observed that sodium butyrate reversed the depressive-like behavior observed in both animal models of depression. Additionally, maternal deprivation and chronic mild stress inhibited mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and increased the activity of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. Sodium butyrate treatment reversed -maternal deprivation and chronic mild stress- induced dysfunction in the striatum of rats. In conclusion, sodium butyrate showed antidepressant effects in maternal deprivation and chronic mild stress-treated rats, and this effect can be attributed to its action on the neurochemical pathways related to depression.

  17. Altered neuronal mitochondrial coenzyme A synthesis in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation caused by abnormal processing, stability, and catalytic activity of mutant pantothenate kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Kotzbauer, Paul T; Truax, Adam C; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2005-01-19

    Mutations in the pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) gene have been identified in patients with neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA; formerly Hallervorden-Spatz disease). However, the mechanisms by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration are unclear, especially given the existence of multiple pantothenate kinase genes in humans and multiple PanK2 transcripts with potentially different subcellular localizations. We demonstrate that PanK2 protein is localized to mitochondria of neurons in human brain, distinguishing it from other pantothenate kinases that do not possess mitochondrial-targeting sequences. PanK2 protein translated from the most 5' start site is sequentially cleaved at two sites by the mitochondrial processing peptidase, generating a long-lived 48 kDa mature protein identical to that found in human brain extracts. The mature protein catalyzes the initial step in coenzyme A (CoA) synthesis but displays feedback inhibition in response to species of acyl CoA rather than CoA itself. Some, but not all disease-associated point mutations result in significantly reduced catalytic activity. The most common mutation, G521R, results in marked instability of the intermediate PanK2 isoform and reduced production of the mature isoform. These results suggest that NBIA is caused by altered neuronal mitochondrial lipid metabolism caused by mutations disrupting PanK2 protein levels and catalytic activity.

  18. RE-EVALUATION OF THE GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION AND PHYLOGEOGRAPHY OF THE SIGMODON HISPIDUS COMPLEX BASED ON MITOCHONDRIAL DNA SEQUENCES.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Robert D; Henson, Dallas D; Durish, Nevin D

    2008-09-01

    Geographic distribution among members of the Sigmodon hispidus complex (Sigmodon hirsutus, S. hispidus, and S. toltecus) were examined using DNA sequences from the mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene. Geographic distribution of each taxon was defined based on DNA sequences obtained from 69 samples (19 newly obtained and 50 from previous studies) collected from North, Central, and South America. These data indicated that S. hispidus is restricted to the southern one-half of the United States and northeastern Mexico (Nuevo León and Tamaulipas), S. toltecus occupies the eastern one-third of Mexico (central Tamaulipas) to northern Honduras, and S. hirsutus is distributed from central Chiapas and southeastern Oaxaca to northern South America (Venezuela). The newly collected data extend distributions of S. hispidus from the southern United States southward into northeastern Mexico and that of S. toltecus from Chiapas, Mexico, southward to Honduras. Genetic divergence and patterns of phylogeography were examined within each taxon.

  19. RE-EVALUATION OF THE GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION AND PHYLOGEOGRAPHY OF THE SIGMODON HISPIDUS COMPLEX BASED ON MITOCHONDRIAL DNA SEQUENCES

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Robert D.; Henson, Dallas D.; Durish, Nevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Geographic distribution among members of the Sigmodon hispidus complex (Sigmodon hirsutus, S. hispidus, and S. toltecus) were examined using DNA sequences from the mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene. Geographic distribution of each taxon was defined based on DNA sequences obtained from 69 samples (19 newly obtained and 50 from previous studies) collected from North, Central, and South America. These data indicated that S. hispidus is restricted to the southern one-half of the United States and northeastern Mexico (Nuevo León and Tamaulipas), S. toltecus occupies the eastern one-third of Mexico (central Tamaulipas) to northern Honduras, and S. hirsutus is distributed from central Chiapas and southeastern Oaxaca to northern South America (Venezuela). The newly collected data extend distributions of S. hispidus from the southern United States southward into northeastern Mexico and that of S. toltecus from Chiapas, Mexico, southward to Honduras. Genetic divergence and patterns of phylogeography were examined within each taxon. PMID:20613884

  20. Aeromonas caviae alters the cytosolic and mitochondrial creatine kinase activities in experimentally infected silver catfish: Impairment on renal bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Baldissera, Matheus D; Souza, Carine F; Júnior, Guerino B; Verdi, Camila Marina; Moreira, Karen L S; da Rocha, Maria Izabel U M; da Veiga, Marcelo L; Santos, Roberto C V; Vizzotto, Bruno S; Baldisserotto, Bernardo

    2017-09-01

    Cytosolic and mitochondrial creatine kinases (CK), through the creatine kinase-phosphocreatine (CK/PCr) system, provide a temporal and spatial energy buffer to maintain cellular energy homeostasis. However, the effects of bacterial infections on the kidney remain poorly understood and are limited only to histopathological analyses. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of cytosolic and mitochondrial CK activities in renal energetic homeostasis in silver catfish experimentally infected with Aeromonas caviae. Cytosolic CK activity decreased in infected animals, while mitochondrial CK activity increased compared to uninfected animals. Moreover, the activity of the sodium-potassium pump (Na(+), K(+)-ATPase) decreased in infected animals compared to uninfected animals. Based on this evidence, it can be concluded that the inhibition of cytosolic CK activity by A. caviae causes an impairment on renal energy homeostasis through the depletion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels. This contributes to the inhibition of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity, although the mitochondrial CK activity acted in an attempt to restore the cytosolic ATP levels through a feedback mechanism. In summary, A. caviae infection causes a severe energetic imbalance in infected silver catfish, which may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Aging-dependent alterations in gene expression and a mitochondrial signature of responsiveness to human influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Thakar, Juilee; Mohanty, Subhasis; West, A Phillip; Joshi, Samit R; Ueda, Ikuyo; Wilson, Jean; Meng, Hailong; Blevins, Tamara P; Tsang, Sui; Trentalange, Mark; Siconolfi, Barbara; Park, Koonam; Gill, Thomas M; Belshe, Robert B; Kaech, Susan M; Shadel, Gerald S; Kleinstein, Steven H; Shaw, Albert C

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate gene expression pathways underlying age-associated impairment in influenza vaccine response, we screened young (age 21-30) and older (age≥65) adults receiving influenza vaccine in two consecutive seasons and identified those with strong or absent response to vaccine, including a subset of older adults meeting criteria for frailty. PBMCs obtained prior to vaccination (Day 0) and at day 2 or 4, day 7 and day 28 post-vaccine were subjected to gene expression microarray analysis. We defined a response signature and also detected induction of a type I interferon response at day 2 and a plasma cell signature at day 7 post-vaccine in young responders. The response signature was dysregulated in older adults, with the plasma cell signature induced at day 2, and was never induced in frail subjects (who were all non-responders). We also identified a mitochondrial signature in young vaccine responders containing genes mediating mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation that was consistent in two different vaccine seasons and verified by analyses of mitochondrial content and protein expression. These results represent the first genome-wide transcriptional profiling analysis of age-associated dynamics following influenza vaccination, and implicate changes in mitochondrial biogenesis and function as a critical factor in human vaccine responsiveness.

  2. Training-induced alterations of skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis proteins in non-insulin-dependent type 2 diabetic men.

    PubMed

    Chung, Nana; Kreutz, Thorsten; Schiffer, Thorsten; Opitz, David; Hermann, Robin; Gehlert, Sebastian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Brixius, Klara; Brinkmann, Christian

    2012-12-01

    This study investigates whether regular physical activity (moderate endurance or resistance training twice a week for 3 months) influences the key regulatory molecules of mitochondrial biogenesis (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC1α), nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF1), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM)) in patients suffering from non-insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (n = 16, years = 62 ± 7, body mass index (BMI) = 30 ± 4 kg/m(2)). Seven T2DM men took part in endurance training, and 9 men participated in resistance training. BMI-matched non-diabetic male control subjects (CON) (n = 7, years = 53 ± 6, BMI = 30 ± 4 kg/m(2)) were studied for comparison. The protein contents of PGC1α, NRF1, and TFAM were determined using immunohistochemical staining methods on biopsies taken from the musculus vastus lateralis. At baseline, no differences were observed in NRF1-density between the T2DM men and the CON, while the contents of PGC1α and TFAM were decreased in the T2DM men. PGC1α and TFAM contents were not changed in the T2DM patients after the training period, but NRF1 was decreased. The down-regulation of mitochondrial signaling molecules might explain the patho-physiological reduction in mitochondrial biogenesis found in T2DM. Physical training, as performed in our study, did not reverse the down-regulation of mitochondrial signaling molecules--at least not after 3 months. [corrected].

  3. Hesperidin potentiates the neuroprotective effects of diazepam and gabapentin against pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in mice: Possible behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial alterations

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Lalitha, Sree; Mishra, Jitendriya

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder with complex pathophysiology. Several evidences suggest a role of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in pathophysiology of epilepsy. Hesperidin (Hesp) acts as a powerful anti-oxidant agent against superoxide, singlet oxygen, and hydroxyl radicals. Thus, this study was undertaken to evaluate the possible neuroprotective mechanism of Hesp against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsions in mice. Materials and Methods: Sixty males Laca mice (20-25 g) were randomly divided into 10 treatment groups (n = 6). Seven days pretreatment of Hesp (100, 200 mg/kg, p.o.) was carried out before PTZ (80 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]) challenge, whereas diazepam (DZP) (0.2, 0.5 mg/kg) and gabapentin (Gbp) (10, 20 mg/kg) were administered i.p. 30 min before PTZ administration, that is, on 7th day. Following PTZ challenge, severity of convulsions (onset of jerks, myoclonic seizures, extensor phase and death), brain anti-oxidant enzyme levels and mitochondrial complex enzymes activities were estimated. Results: Single i.p. PTZ (80 mg/kg) challenge demonstrated severe convulsions, oxidative damage (raised lipid peroxidation [LPO], nitrite concentration as well as depleted reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase levels), and depletion of mitochondrial enzyme Complex (I, II, IV) activities. Hesp (200 mg/kg), DZP (0.5 mg/kg) and Gbp (20 mg/kg) pretreatments attenuated PTZ induced behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial alterations. However, administration of Hesp (100 mg/kg) in combination with DZP (0.2 mg/kg) or Gbp (10 mg/kg) potentiated their neuroprotective effect, which was significant as compared to their effects in PTZ treated animals. Conclusion: Hesp possesses potent anticonvulsant activity which might be mediated through modulation of gamma-amino butyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor action. PMID:24987179

  4. The role of alterations in mitochondrial dynamics and PGC-1α over-expression in fast muscle atrophy following hindlimb unloading.

    PubMed

    Cannavino, Jessica; Brocca, Lorenza; Sandri, Marco; Grassi, Bruno; Bottinelli, Roberto; Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta

    2015-04-15

    carbonylation suggest the antioxidant defence system efficiently reacted to redox imbalance in the early phases of disuse. A defective mitochondrial fusion (Mfn1, Mfn2 and OPA1 down-regulation) occurred together with an impairment of OXPHOS capacity. Furthermore, at 3 days of unloading higher acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation was found, suggesting AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway activation. To test the role of mitochondrial alterations we used Tg-mice overexpressing PGC-1α because of the known effect of PGC-1α on stimulation of Mfn2 expression. PGC-α overexpression was sufficient to prevent (i) the decrease of pro-fusion proteins (Mfn1, Mfn2 and OPA1), (ii) activation of the AMPK pathway, (iii) the inducible expression of MuRF1 and atrogin1 and of authopagic factors, and (iv) any muscle mass loss in response to disuse. As the effects of increased PGC-1α activity were sustained throughout disuse, compounds inducing PGC-1α expression could be useful to treat and prevent muscle atrophy also in fast muscles. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  5. Altered Crossover Distribution and Frequency in Spermatocytes of Infertile Men with Azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Ren, He; Ferguson, Kyle; Kirkpatrick, Gordon; Vinning, Tanya; Chow, Victor; Ma, Sai

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair to facilitate the exchange of DNA at crossover sites along the chromosomes. The frequency and distribution of crossover formation are tightly regulated to ensure the proper progression of meiosis. Using immunofluorescence techniques, our group and others have studied the meiotic proteins in spermatocytes of infertile men, showing that this population displays a reduced frequency of crossovers compared to fertile men. An insufficient number of crossovers is thought to promote chromosome missegregation, in which case the faulty cell may face meiotic arrest or contribute to the production of aneuploid sperm. Increasing evidence in model organisms has suggested that the distribution of crossovers may also be important for proper chromosome segregation. In normal males, crossovers are shown to be rare near centromeres and telomeres, while frequent in subtelomeric regions. Our study aims to characterize the crossover distribution in infertile men with non-obstructive (NOA) and obstructive azoospermia (OA) along chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. Eight of the 16 NOA men and five of the 21 OA men in our study displayed reduced crossover frequency compared to control fertile men. Seven NOA men and nine OA men showed altered crossover distributions on at least one of the chromosome arms studied compared to controls. We found that although both NOA and OA men displayed altered crossover distributions, NOA men may be at a higher risk of suffering both altered crossover frequencies and distributions compared to OA men. Our data also suggests that infertile men display an increase in crossover formation in regions where they are normally inhibited, specifically near centromeres and telomeres. Finally, we demonstrated a decrease in crossovers near subtelomeres, as well as increased average crossover distance to telomeres in infertile men. As telomere-guided mechanisms are speculated to play a role in crossover formation in subtelomeres, future

  6. Experimental support that natural selection has shaped the latitudinal distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes in Australian Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Camus, M Florencia; Wolff, Jonci N; Sgrò, Carla M; Dowling, Damian K

    2017-06-20

    Cellular metabolism is regulated by enzyme complexes within the mitochondrion, the function of which are sensitive to the prevailing temperature. Such thermal sensitivity, coupled with the observation that population frequencies of mitochondrial haplotypes tend to associate with latitude, altitude or climatic regions across species distributions, led to the hypothesis that thermal selection has played a role in shaping standing variation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence. This hypothesis, however, remains controversial, and requires evidence that the distribution of haplotypes observed in nature corresponds with the capacity of these haplotypes to confer differences in thermal tolerance. Specifically, haplotypes predominating in tropical climates are predicted to encode increased tolerance to heat stress, but decreased tolerance to cold stress. We present direct evidence for these predictions, using mtDNA haplotypes sampled from the Australian distribution of Drosophila melanogaster. We show that the ability of flies to tolerate extreme thermal challenges is affected by sequence variation across mtDNA haplotypes, and that the thermal performance associated with each haplotype corresponds with its latitudinal prevalence. The haplotype that predominates at low (subtropical) latitudes confers greater resilience to heat stress, but lower resilience to cold stress, than haplotypes predominating at higher (temperate) latitudes. We explore molecular mechanisms that might underlie these responses, presenting evidence that the effects are in part regulated by SNPs that do not change the protein sequence. Our findings suggest that standing variation in the mitochondrial genome can be shaped by thermal selection, and could therefore contribute to evolutionary adaptation under climatic stress. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e

  7. Mitochondrial fusion, fission, and mitochondrial toxicity.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Joel N; Leuthner, Tess C; Luz, Anthony L

    2017-08-05

    Mitochondrial dynamics are regulated by two sets of opposed processes: mitochondrial fusion and fission, and mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation (including mitophagy), as well as processes such as intracellular transport. These processes maintain mitochondrial homeostasis, regulate mitochondrial form, volume and function, and are increasingly understood to be critical components of the cellular stress response. Mitochondrial dynamics vary based on developmental stage and age, cell type, environmental factors, and genetic background. Indeed, many mitochondrial homeostasis genes are human disease genes. Emerging evidence indicates that deficiencies in these genes often sensitize to environmental exposures, yet can also be protective under certain circumstances. Inhibition of mitochondrial dynamics also affects elimination of irreparable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and transmission of mtDNA mutations. We briefly review the basic biology of mitodynamic processes with a focus on mitochondrial fusion and fission, discuss what is known and unknown regarding how these processes respond to chemical and other stressors, and review the literature on interactions between mitochondrial toxicity and genetic variation in mitochondrial fusion and fission genes. Finally, we suggest areas for future research, including elucidating the full range of mitodynamic responses from low to high-level exposures, and from acute to chronic exposures; detailed examination of the physiological consequences of mitodynamic alterations in different cell types; mechanism-based testing of mitotoxicant interactions with interindividual variability in mitodynamics processes; and incorporating other environmental variables that affect mitochondria, such as diet and exercise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. POLG2 disease variants: analyses reveal a dominant negative heterodimer, altered mitochondrial localization and impaired respiratory capacity

    PubMed Central

    Young, Matthew J.; Humble, Margaret M.; DeBalsi, Karen L.; Sun, Kathie Y.; Copeland, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is replicated and repaired by the mtDNA polymerase gamma, polγ. Polγ is composed of three subunits encoded by two nuclear genes: (1) POLG codes for the 140-kilodalton (kDa) catalytic subunit, p140 and (2) POLG2 encodes the ∼110-kDa homodimeric accessory subunit, p55. Specific mutations are associated with POLG- or POLG2-related disorders. During DNA replication the p55 accessory subunit binds to p140 and increases processivity by preventing polγ's dissociation from the template. To date, studies have demonstrated that homodimeric p55 disease variants are deficient in the ability to stimulate p140; however, all patients currently identified with POLG2-related disorders are heterozygotes. In these patients, we expect p55 to occur as 25% wild-type (WT) homodimers, 25% variant homodimers and 50% heterodimers. We report the development of a tandem affinity strategy to isolate p55 heterodimers. The WT/G451E p55 heterodimer impairs polγ function in vitro, demonstrating that the POLG2 c.1352G>A/p.G451E mutation encodes a dominant negative protein. To analyze the subcellular consequence of disease mutations in HEK293 cells, we designed plasmids encoding p55 disease variants tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP). P205R and L475DfsX2 p55 variants exhibit irregular diffuse mitochondrial fluorescence and unlike WT p55, they fail to form distinct puncta associated with mtDNA nucleoids. Furthermore, homogenous preparations of P205R and L475DfsX2 p55 form aberrant reducible multimers. We predict that abnormal protein folding or aggregation or both contribute to the pathophysiology of these disorders. Examination of mitochondrial bioenergetics in stable cell lines overexpressing GFP-tagged p55 variants revealed impaired mitochondrial reserve capacity. PMID:26123486

  9. iTRAQ-based analysis of progerin expression reveals mitochondrial dysfunction, reactive oxygen species accumulation and altered proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Jesús; Landeira-Abia, Arancha; Fafián-Labora, Juan Antonio; Fernández-Pernas, Pablo; Lesende-Rodríguez, Iván; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Delmiro, Aitor; Martín, Miguel A; Blanco, Francisco J; Arufe, María C

    2015-06-12

    Nuclear accumulation of a mutant form of the nuclear protein Lamin-A, called Progerin (PG) or Lamin AΔ50, occurs in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) or Progeria, an accelerated aging disease. One of the main symptoms of this genetic disorder is a loss of sub-cutaneous fat due to a dramatic lipodystrophy. We stably induced the expression of human PG and GFP -Green Fluorescent Protein- as control in 3T3L1 cells using a lentiviral system to study the effect of PG expression in the differentiation capacity of this cell line, one of the most used adipogenic models. Quantitative proteomics (iTRAQ) was done to study the effect of the PG accumulation. Several of the modulated proteins were validated by immunoblotting and real-time PCR. Mitochondrial function was analyzed by measurement of a) the mitochondrial basal activity, b) the superoxide anion production and c) the individual efficiency of the different complex of the respiratory chain. We found that over-expression PG by lentiviral gene delivery leads to a decrease in the proliferation rate and to defects in adipogenic capacity when compared to the control. Quantitative proteomics analysis showed 181 proteins significantly (p<0.05) modulated in PG-expressing preadipocytes. Mitochondrial function is impaired in PG-expressing cells. Specifically, we have detected an increase in the activity of the complex I and an overproduction of Superoxide anion. Incubation with Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) scavenger agents drives to a decrease in autophagic proteolysis as revealed by LC3-II/LC3-I ratio. PG expression in 3T3L1 cells promotes changes in several Biological Processes, including structure of cytoskeleton, lipid metabolism, calcium regulation, translation, protein folding and energy generation by the mitochondria. Our data strengthen the contribution of ROS accumulation to the premature aging phenotype and establish a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of proteostasis in HGPS.

  10. Pollen Fertility Restoration by Nuclear Gene Fr in Cms Bean: Nuclear-Directed Alteration of a Mitochondrial Population

    PubMed Central

    He, S.; Lyznik, A.; Mackenzie, S.

    1995-01-01

    Two nuclear genes, Fr and Fr2, have been identified that restore pollen fertility to cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) by apparently distinct mechanisms. Whereas Fr2 appears to suppress the expression of a male sterility associated mitochondrial sequence (designated pvs), Fr restores pollen fertility by causing the elimination of this unusual mitochondrial DNA segment. To further investigate the mechanism of Fr action, Fr and Fr2 were cointroduced into the nucleus of a bean line containing the sterility inducing cytoplasm. When the effect of pvs was suppressed by Fr2, the presence of Fr no longer directed the elimination of the mitochondrial pvs sequence. This result suggests that the Fr function is dependent on proper expression of the pvs sequence. To evaluate the temporal and spatial patterns of Fr action, we undertook a polymerase chain reaction-based approach to trace the fate of the pvs sequence in different tissues of F(2) and F(3) fertile-restored plants derived from a genetic cross between a cytoplasmic male sterile line of common bean, CMS-Sprite (frfr), and fertility restorer line R351 (FrFr). We demonstrate that the Fr-directed disappearance of pvs sequence occurs during flower development. Elimination of the pvs sequence from developing megaspores results in permanent fertility restoration in the following generations. Genetic analysis demonstrated that permanent fertility restoration, that is, the complete elimination of pvs from reproductive tissues requires two doses of the Fr allele or the absence of fr in F(2) individuals. The effect of Fr was reversible until full fertility was achieved. On the basis of these results, we propose a model for the mechanism of pvs elimination by the Fr gene and discuss the dynamics of pvs-containing mitochondrial transmission in the presence of the Fr gene. PMID:7713444

  11. Elevation of Pollen Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number by WHIRLY2: Altered Respiration and Pollen Tube Growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiang; Guo, Liang; Shen, Zhao-Rui; Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen

    2015-09-01

    In plants, the copy number of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be much lower than the number of mitochondria. The biological significance and regulatory mechanisms of this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, using the pollen vegetative cell, we examined the role of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mtDNA-binding protein WHIRLY2 (AtWHY2). AtWHY2 decreases during pollen development, in parallel with the rapid degradation of mtDNA; to examine the importance of this decrease, we used the pollen vegetative cell-specific promoter Lat52 to express AtWHY2. The transgenic plants (LWHY2) had very high mtDNA levels in pollen, more than 10 times more than in the wild type (ecotype Columbia-0). LWHY2 plants were fertile, morphologically normal, and set seeds; however, reciprocal crosses with heterozygous plants showed reduced transmission of LWHY2-1 through the male and slower growth of LWHY2-1 pollen tubes. We found that LWHY2-1 pollen had significantly more reactive oxygen species and less ATP compared with the wild type, indicating an effect on mitochondrial respiration. These findings reveal that AtWHY2 affects mtDNA copy number in pollen and suggest that low mtDNA copy numbers might be the normal means by which plant cells maintain mitochondrial genetic information. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Elevation of Pollen Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number by WHIRLY2: Altered Respiration and Pollen Tube Growth in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiang; Guo, Liang; Shen, Zhao-Rui; Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen

    2015-01-01

    In plants, the copy number of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be much lower than the number of mitochondria. The biological significance and regulatory mechanisms of this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, using the pollen vegetative cell, we examined the role of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mtDNA-binding protein WHIRLY2 (AtWHY2). AtWHY2 decreases during pollen development, in parallel with the rapid degradation of mtDNA; to examine the importance of this decrease, we used the pollen vegetative cell-specific promoter Lat52 to express AtWHY2. The transgenic plants (LWHY2) had very high mtDNA levels in pollen, more than 10 times more than in the wild type (ecotype Columbia-0). LWHY2 plants were fertile, morphologically normal, and set seeds; however, reciprocal crosses with heterozygous plants showed reduced transmission of LWHY2-1 through the male and slower growth of LWHY2-1 pollen tubes. We found that LWHY2-1 pollen had significantly more reactive oxygen species and less ATP compared with the wild type, indicating an effect on mitochondrial respiration. These findings reveal that AtWHY2 affects mtDNA copy number in pollen and suggest that low mtDNA copy numbers might be the normal means by which plant cells maintain mitochondrial genetic information. PMID:26195569

  13. Cellular transformation by cigarette smoke extract involves alteration of glycolysis and mitochondrial function in esophageal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Sook; Huang, Yiping; Lee, Juna; Zhong, Xiaoli; Jiang, Wei-Wen; Ratovitski, Edward A; Sidransky, David

    2010-07-15

    Cigarette-smoking increases the risk of developing various types of human cancers including esophageal cancers. To test the effects of chronic cigarette smoke exposure directly on esophageal epithelium, cellular resistance to mainstream extract (MSE), or sidestream smoke extract (SSE) was developed in chronically exposed nonmalignant Het-1A cells. Anchorage-independent growth, in vitro invasion capacity and proliferation of the resistant cells increased compared with the unexposed, sensitive cells. An epithelial marker E-cadherin was down-regulated and mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and vimentin were up-regulated in the resistant cells. Het-1A cells resistant to MSE or SSE consumed more glucose, and produced more lactate than the sensitive cells. The increased anchorage-independent cell growth of the resistant cells was suppressed by a glycolysis inhibitor, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, indicating that these cells are highly dependent on the glycolytic pathway for survival. Decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production in the resistant cells indicate the presence of mitochondrial dysfunction induced by chronic exposure of cigarette smoke extract. Increased expression of nuclear genes in the glycolytic pathway and decreased levels of mitochondrial genes in the resistant cells support the notion that cigarette smoking significantly contributes to the transformation of nonmalignant esophageal epithelial cells into a tumorigenic phenotype.

  14. Pyrroloquinoline quinone nutritional status alters lysine metabolism and modulates mitochondrial DNA content in the mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Bauerly, K A; Storms, D H; Harris, C B; Hajizadeh, S; Sun, M Y; Cheung, C P; Satre, M A; Fascetti, A J; Tchaparian, E; Rucker, R B

    2006-11-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) added to purified diets devoid of PQQ improves indices of perinatal development in rats and mice. Herein, PQQ nutritional status and lysine metabolism are described, prompted by a report that PQQ functions as a vitamin-like enzymatic cofactor important in lysine metabolism (Nature 422 [2003] 832). Alternatively, we propose that PQQ influences lysine metabolism, but by mechanisms that more likely involve changes in mitochondrial content. PQQ deprivation in both rats and mice resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial content. In rats, alpha-aminoadipic acid (alphaAA), which is derived from alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde (alphaAAS) and made from lysine in mitochondria, and the plasma levels of amino acids known to be oxidized in mitochondria (e.g., Thr, Ser, and Gly) were correlated with changes in the liver mitochondrial content of PQQ-deprived rats, but not PQQ-supplemented rats. In contrast, the levels of NAD dependent alpha-aminoadipate-delta-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (AASDH), a cytosolic enzyme important to alphaAA production from alphaAAS, was not influenced by PQQ dietary status. Moreover, the levels of U26 mRNA were not significantly changed even when diets differed markedly in PQQ and dietary lysine content. U26 mRNA levels were measured, because of U26's proposed, albeit questionable role as a PQQ-dependent enzyme involved in alphaAA formation.

  15. Altered /sup 67/Ga citrate distribution in patients with multiple red blood cell transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Engelstad, B.; Luk, S.S.; Hattner, R.S.

    1982-10-01

    Gallium-67 citrate studies from four patients who received multiple red blood cell transfusions were reviewed. Increased kidney, bladder, or bone localization was associated with decreased liver and colon activity. The findings suggest altered distribution due to competition with iron for receptor binding. Identification of inflammatory disease in two patients was possible. However, the effect of transfusions on detection of inflammatory or neoplastic diseases requires further evaluation.

  16. Altered /sup 67/Ga citrate distribution in patients with multiple red blood cell transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Engelstad, B.; Luk, S.S.; Hattner, R.S.

    1982-10-01

    Gallium-67 citrate studies from four patients who received multiple red blood cell transfusions were reviewed. Increased kidney, bladder or bone localization was associated with decreased liver and colon activity. The findings suggest altered distribution due to competition with iron for receptor binding. Identification of inflammatory disease in two patients was possible. However, the effect of transfusions on detection of inflammatory or neoplastic diseases requires further evaluation.

  17. Distribution of buried hydrothermal alteration deduced from high-resolution magnetic surveys in Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouligand, Claire; Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Blakely, Richard J.

    2014-04-01

    Yellowstone National Park (YNP) displays numerous and extensive hydrothermal features. Although hydrothermal alteration in YNP has been extensively studied, the volume, geometry, and type of rock alteration at depth remain poorly constrained. In this study, we use high-resolution airborne and ground magnetic surveys and measurements of remanent and induced magnetization of field and drill core samples to provide constraints on the geometry of hydrothermal alteration within the subsurface of three thermal areas in YNP (Firehole River, Smoke Jumper Hot Springs, and Norris Geyser Basin). We observe that hydrothermal zones from both liquid- and vapor-dominated systems coincide with magnetic lows observed in aeromagnetic surveys and with a decrease of the amplitude of short-wavelength anomalies seen in ground magnetic surveys. This suggests a strong demagnetization of both the shallow and deep substratum within these areas associated with the removal of magnetic minerals by hydrothermal alteration processes. Such demagnetization is confirmed by measurements of rock samples from hydrothermal areas which display significantly decreased total magnetization. A pronounced negative anomaly is observed over the Lone Star Geyser and suggests a significant demagnetization of the substratum associated with areas displaying large-scale fluid flow. The ground and airborne magnetic surveys are used to evaluate the distribution of magnetization in the subsurface. This study shows that significant demagnetization occurs over a thickness of at least a few hundred meters in hydrothermal areas at YNP and that the maximum degree or maximum thickness of demagnetization correlates closely with the location of hydrothermal activity and mapped alteration.

  18. Rag1 aphid resistant soybeans alter the movement and distribution of soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Whalen, Rebecca; Harmon, Jason P

    2012-12-01

    Herbivorous insects often move and distribute according to the quality of the plant they are on, and this behavior could influence interactions with plants bred for herbivore resistance. However, when an insect is normally considered sedentary, less is known about the potential importance of movement. We performed experiments to determine if a resistant soybean variety alters the movement and distribution, both within and between plants, of the soybean aphid Aphis glycines Matsumura. We did this by counting apterous aphids on leaves of resistant and susceptible soybean plants across several days. In individual plant tests aphid distribution was different between susceptible and resistant soybeans. Most notably aphids on resistant plants were quickly found off the original leaf on which they were placed and were ultimately distributed throughout the resistant soybean. Aphids on susceptible plants, however, tended to stay on their initial leaf of placement. Follow up experiments indicated this was primarily because of the movement of individuals and not differential demography on various plant parts. In experiments where aphids were able to walk to an adjacent plant there appeared to be a net movement of aphids off resistant plants and on to susceptible plants. Aphid populations on susceptible plants were higher when the plant was adjacent to a resistant plant than when adjacent to another susceptible plant. The effect of resistant plants on aphid movement and distribution could lead to unintended side-effects such as greater spread of plant viruses or altered effectiveness of biological control agents.

  19. Distribution of the PBC-specific- (M2) and the naturally-occurring mitochondrial antigen- (NOMAg) systems in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, P; Klein, R; Becker, E W; Berg, P A

    1992-01-01

    In previous studies it was demonstrated that antibodies in sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and their relatives can recognize two different antigen systems in the ATPase fraction prepared from beef heart mitochondria, namely the PBC-related M2- and the naturally occurring mitochondrial antigen (NOMAg)-related epitopes. Since separation of these two antigen systems could not be achieved using mammalian mitochondria, mitochondria from a wide spectrum of plants were analysed with respect to the presence of mitochondrial antigens. Mitochondria from 29 species of plants were prepared and tested by ELISA and Western blot using marker sera from patients with PBC reacting in the Western blot with M2a,b,c,d (alpha-ketoacid-dehydrogenase complex) and NOMAg-specific sera recognizing the three major epitopes epsilon, zeta, and eta at 65, 61 and 58 kD. Naturally occurring mitochondrial antibody (NOMA)-positive marker sera reacted in the ELISA with mitochondria from all plants, and the zeta/eta positive sera gave also a positive reaction at 61/58 kD in the Western blot while the epsilon epitope could not be visualized by this method. In contrast, the M2 antigen was detected preferentially in lower plants such as algae, fungi, and ferns. Analysing these data with respect to the evolution of proteins one would have to assume that the M2 antigen was lost in most higher plants or underwent some structural alterations. Furthermore, considering the fact that the M2- and the NOMAg-related epitopes could be only partially separated, i.e. there were no plant mitochondria showing only M2 but no NOMAg, one could speculate that anti-M2 antibodies are derived from the pool of naturally occurring antibodies. Images Fig. 2 PMID:1281057

  20. Differential mitochondrial distribution in human pronuclear embryos leads to disproportionate inheritance between blastomeres: relationship to microtubular organization, ATP content and competence.

    PubMed

    Van Blerkom, J; Davis, P; Alexander, S

    2000-12-01

    It has been suggested that mitochondrial DNA defects that effect metabolic capacity may be a proximal cause of failures in oocyte maturation, fertilization, or early embryonic development. Here, the distribution of mitochondria was examined by scanning laser confocal microscopy in living human pronuclear oocytes and cleavage stage embryos, followed either by measurements of the net ATP content of individual blastomeres or anti-tubulin immunofluorescence to determine the relationship between mitochondrial distribution and microtubular organization. The results indicate that specific patterns of perinuclear mitochondrial aggregation and microtubular organization are related, and that asymmetrical mitochondrial distributions at the pronuclear stage can result in some proportion of blastomeres with reduced mitochondrial inheritance and diminished ATP generating capacity. While the inability to divide appears to be a development consequence for an affected blastomere, for the embryo, reduced competence may occur during cleavage if several blastomeres inherit a mitochondrial complement inadequate to support normal cellular functions. The findings provide a possible epigenetic explanation for the variable developmental ability expressed within cohorts of morphologically normal early cleavage stage human embryos obtained by in-vitro fertilization.

  1. Deleterious variants in TRAK1 disrupt mitochondrial movement and cause fatal encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Barel, Ortal; Christine V Malicdan, May; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Kandel, Judith; Pri-Chen, Hadass; Stephen, Joshi; Castro, Inês G; Metz, Jeremy; Atawa, Osama; Moshkovitz, Sharon; Ganelin, Eti; Barshack, Iris; Polak-Charcon, Sylvie; Nass, Dvora; Marek-Yagel, Dina; Amariglio, Ninette; Shalva, Nechama; Vilboux, Thierry; Ferreira, Carlos; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Heimer, Gali; Hoffmann, Chen; Yardeni, Tal; Nissenkorn, Andreea; Avivi, Camila; Eyal, Eran; Kol, Nitzan; Glick Saar, Efrat; Wallace, Douglas C; Gahl, William A; Rechavi, Gideon; Schrader, Michael; Eckmann, David M; Anikster, Yair

    2017-03-01

    Cellular distribution and dynamics of mitochondria are regulated by several motor proteins and a microtubule network. In neurons, mitochondrial trafficking is crucial because of high energy needs and calcium ion buffering along axons to synapses during neurotransmission. The trafficking kinesin proteins (TRAKs) are well characterized for their role in lysosomal and mitochondrial trafficking in cells, especially neurons. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified homozygous truncating variants in TRAK1 (NM_001042646:c.287-2A > C), in six lethal encephalopathic patients from three unrelated families. The pathogenic variant results in aberrant splicing and significantly reduced gene expression at the RNA and protein levels. In comparison with normal cells, TRAK1-deficient fibroblasts showed irregular mitochondrial distribution, altered mitochondrial motility, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, and diminished mitochondrial respiration. This study confirms the role of TRAK1 in mitochondrial dynamics and constitutes the first report of this gene in association with a severe neurodevelopmental disorder.

  2. Glacial history of the European marine mussels Mytilus, inferred from distribution of mitochondrial DNA lineages

    PubMed Central

    Śmietanka, B; Burzyński, A; Hummel, H; Wenne, R

    2014-01-01

    Mussels of the genus Mytilus have been used to assess the circumglacial phylogeography of the intertidal zone. These mussels are representative components of the intertidal zone and have rapidly evolving mitochondrial DNA, suitable for high resolution phylogeographic analyses. In Europe, the three Mytilus species currently share mitochondrial haplotypes, owing to the cases of extensive genetic introgression. Genetic diversity of Mytilus edulis, Mytilus trossulus and Mytilus galloprovincialis was studied using a 900-bp long part of the most variable fragment of the control region from one of their two mitochondrial genomes. To this end, 985 specimens were sampled along the European coasts, at sites ranging from the Black Sea to the White Sea. The relevant DNA fragments were amplified, sequenced and analyzed. Contrary to the earlier findings, our coalescence and nested cladistics results show that only a single M. edulis glacial refugium existed in the Atlantic. Despite that, the species survived the glaciation retaining much of its diversity. Unsurprisingly, M. galloprovincialis survived in the Mediterranean Sea. In a relatively short time period, around the climatic optimum at 10 ky ago, the species underwent rapid expansion coupled with population differentiation. Following the expansion, further contemporary gene flow between populations was limited. PMID:24619178

  3. Glacial history of the European marine mussels Mytilus, inferred from distribution of mitochondrial DNA lineages.

    PubMed

    Smietanka, B; Burzyński, A; Hummel, H; Wenne, R

    2014-09-01

    Mussels of the genus Mytilus have been used to assess the circumglacial phylogeography of the intertidal zone. These mussels are representative components of the intertidal zone and have rapidly evolving mitochondrial DNA, suitable for high resolution phylogeographic analyses. In Europe, the three Mytilus species currently share mitochondrial haplotypes, owing to the cases of extensive genetic introgression. Genetic diversity of Mytilus edulis, Mytilus trossulus and Mytilus galloprovincialis was studied using a 900-bp long part of the most variable fragment of the control region from one of their two mitochondrial genomes. To this end, 985 specimens were sampled along the European coasts, at sites ranging from the Black Sea to the White Sea. The relevant DNA fragments were amplified, sequenced and analyzed. Contrary to the earlier findings, our coalescence and nested cladistics results show that only a single M. edulis glacial refugium existed in the Atlantic. Despite that, the species survived the glaciation retaining much of its diversity. Unsurprisingly, M. galloprovincialis survived in the Mediterranean Sea. In a relatively short time period, around the climatic optimum at 10 ky ago, the species underwent rapid expansion coupled with population differentiation. Following the expansion, further contemporary gene flow between populations was limited.

  4. Mitochondrial Dynamics: Coupling Mitochondrial Fitness with Healthy Aging.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, David; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in mitochondrial function and the accumulation of abnormal mitochondria. However, the precise mechanisms by which aging promotes these mitochondrial alterations and the role of the latter in aging are still not fully understood. Mitochondrial dynamics is a key process regulating mitochondrial function and quality. Altered expression of some mitochondrial dynamics proteins has been recently associated with aging and with age-related alterations in yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans, mice, and humans. Here, we review the link between alterations in mitochondrial dynamics, aging, and age-related impairment. We propose that the dysregulation of mitochondrial dynamics leads to age-induced accumulation of unhealthy mitochondria and contributes to alterations linked to aging, such as diabetes and neurodegeneration.

  5. Early alterations in platelet mitochondrial function are associated with survival and organ failure in patients with septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Puskarich, Michael A.; Kline, Jeffrey A.; Watts, John A.; Shirey, Kristin; Hosler, Jonathan; Jones, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To determine if changes platelet mitochondrial function in patients with sepsis are present early following presentation, and the association of these changes with clinical outcomes and systemic metabolic function. Materials and Methods Prospective observational cohort study of a convenience sample of patients with severe sepsis. Mitochondrial function of intact, non-permeabilized platelets suspended in their own plasma was estimated using high resolution respirometry. Unstimulated basal respiration, oligomycin-induced state 4 (state 4o) and maximal respiratory rate following serial titrations of FCCP were measured. Organ failure was estimated using SOFA score, and patients were followed until 28 days to determine survival. Lactate levels were measured in all patients, and a subset of patients had lactate:pyruvate ratios measured. Results 28 patients were enrolled, 21 of whom survived. Initial SOFA score and lactate levels were 8.5 (IQR 6, 10) and 2.3 (IQR 1.2, 3.5) respectively, while the median L/P ratio was 23.4 (IQR 15.2, 38). Basal and maximal respiratory rates were significantly higher among non-survivors compared to survivors (p=0.02 and 0.04), while oligomycin-induced state 4 respiration was not statistically different between groups (p = 0.15). We found a significant association between maximal respiration and organ failure (p = 0.03), and both basal and maximal rates with initial lactate level (p = 0.04, 0.02), but not with lactate:pyruvate ratio. Conclusions Differences in platelet mitochondrial function between survivors and non-survivors are present very early in the hospital course and are associated with organ failure and lactate. PMID:26511963

  6. Two ovine mitochondrial DNAs harboring a fifth 75/76 bp repeat motif without altered gene expression in Northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Oceja, A; Gamarra, D; Cardoso, S; Palencia-Madrid, L; Juste, R A; De Pancorbo, M M

    2017-03-01

    The Basque Country is home to the Latxa sheep breed, which is divided in several varieties such as Latxa Black Face (LBKF) and Latxa Blonde Face (LBLF). Mitochondrial DNA control region analysis of 174 male sheep (97 LBKF and 77 LBLF) was performed with the objective of characterizing the maternal lineages of these two varieties that are the basis to produce the cheese with Idiazabal quality label. The percentage of unique haplotypes was 77.32% in LBKF and 67.53% in LBLF. Most of the individuals were classified into B haplogroup (98.85%), while A haplogroup was much less frequent. Two Latxa individuals (one LBKF and one LBLF), both belonging to B haplogroup, displayed an additional 75/76 bp tandem repeat motif. Only 33 other sequences with this repeat motif were found among 11 061 sheep sequences included in the GenBank database. Gene expression was analyzed in peripheral blood leukocytes since the additional 75/76 bp repeat motif falls within ETAS1, a domain with a possible function in regulation of replication and transcription. The mRNA expression from four mitochondrial genes (COI, cyt b, ND1, and ND2) was analyzed in the two individuals of this study with a fifth repeat motif and in four without it. Although lower transcription was observed when the additional 75/76 bp repeat motif was present, no statistically significant differences were observed. Therefore, the variation in the number of the 75/76 repeat motif does not seem to modify the gene expression rate in mitochondrial genes.

  7. Altered frequency distribution in the electroencephalogram is correlated to the analgesic effect of remifentanil.

    PubMed

    Graversen, Carina; Malver, Lasse P; Kurita, Geana P; Staahl, Camilla; Christrup, Lona L; Sjøgren, Per; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2015-05-01

    Opioids alter resting state brain oscillations by multiple and complex factors, which are still to be elucidated. To increase our knowledge, multi-channel electroencephalography (EEG) was subjected to multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), to identify the most descriptive frequency bands and scalp locations altered by remifentanil in healthy volunteers. Sixty-two channels of resting EEG followed by independent measures of pain scores to heat and bone pain were recorded in 21 healthy males before and during remifentanil infusion in a placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study. EEG frequency distributions were extracted by a continuous wavelet transform and normalized into delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma bands. Alterations relative to pre-treatment responses were calculated for all channels and used as input to the MVPA. Compared to placebo, remifentanil increased the delta band and decreased the theta and alpha band oscillations as a mean over all channels (all p ≤ 0.007). The most discriminative channels in these frequency bands were F1 in delta (83.33%, p = 0.0023) and theta bands (95.24%, p < 0.0001), and C6 in the alpha band (80.95%, p = 0.0054). These alterations were correlated to individual changes in heat pain in the delta (p = 0.045), theta (p = 0.038) and alpha (p = 0.039) bands and to bone pain in the alpha band (p = 0.0092). Hence, MVPA of multi-channel EEG was able to identify frequency bands and corresponding channels most sensitive to altered brain activity during remifentanil treatment. As the EEG alterations were correlated to the analgesic effect, the approach may prove to be a novel methodology for monitoring individual efficacy to opioids. © 2014 Nordic Pharmacological Society.

  8. Administration of flutamide alters sperm ultrastructure, sperm plasma membrane integrity and its stability, and sperm mitochondrial oxidative capability in the boar: in vivo and in vitro approach.

    PubMed

    Lydka, M; Piasecka, M; Gaczarzewicz, D; Koziorowski, M; Bilinska, B

    2012-08-01

    Our previous work has shown that an anti-androgen flutamide administered pre- and post-natally induced adverse effects on the epididymal morphology and function of adult boars. The present investigation is aimed to understand the effect of flutamide and its metabolite on changes in sperm plasma membrane integrity and its stability, changes in mitochondrial oxidative capability and frequency of abnormal sperm. In vivo effects of flutamide (50 mg/kg b.w.) on sperm ultrastructure were examined by electron microscopic observations. In vitro effects of 5, 50 and 100 μg/ml hydroxyflutamide, administered for 2 and 24 h, on sperm plasma membrane integrity were measured by LIVE/DEAD Sperm Vitality kit, while those on sperm membrane stability and mitochondrial oxidoreductive activity were investigated using Merocyanine 540 and NADH tests, respectively. The incidence of abnormal spermatozoa increased significantly (p < 0.05) in flutamide-treated boars compared with controls. In an in vitro approach, low dose of hydroxyflutamide in 2-h incubations appeared less effective in altering the sperm plasma membrane integrity and its stability than two higher doses used (p < 0.05). No further decrease in the membrane integrity was found when the effect of anti-androgen lasted for 24 h. On the other hand, a decrease in sperm membrane destabilization and mitochondrial oxidoreductive activity was strengthened after 24 h of hydroxyflutamide administration (p < 0.05). Characterization of sperm parameters with regard to oxidative capability of mitochondria, plasma membrane changes and sperm ultrastructure provides novel data on the boar sperm sensitivity to anti-androgen action. Results indicate high sensitivity of boar spermatozoa to androgen withdrawal.

  9. Developmental exposure to second-hand smoke increases adult atherogenesis and alters mitochondrial DNA copy number and deletions in apoE(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Fetterman, Jessica L; Pompilius, Melissa; Westbrook, David G; Uyeminami, Dale; Brown, Jamelle; Pinkerton, Kent E; Ballinger, Scott W

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. While many studies have focused upon the effects of adult second-hand smoke exposure on cardiovascular disease development, disease development occurs over decades and is likely influenced by childhood exposure. The impacts of in utero versus neonatal second-hand smoke exposure on adult atherosclerotic disease development are not known. The objective of the current study was to determine the effects of in utero versus neonatal exposure to a low dose (1 mg/m(3) total suspended particulate) of second-hand smoke on adult atherosclerotic lesion development using the apolipoprotein E null mouse model. Consequently, apolipoprotein E null mice were exposed to either filtered air or second-hand smoke: (i) in utero from gestation days 1-19, or (ii) from birth until 3 weeks of age (neonatal). Subsequently, all animals were exposed to filtered air and sacrificed at 12-14 weeks of age. Oil red-O staining of whole aortas, measures of mitochondrial damage, and oxidative stress were performed. Results show that both in utero and neonatal second-hand smoke exposure significantly increased adult atherogenesis in mice compared to filtered air controls. These changes were associated with changes in aconitase and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase activities consistent with increased oxidative stress in the aorta, changes in mitochondrial DNA copy number and deletion levels. These studies show that in utero or neonatal exposure to second-hand smoke significantly influences adult atherosclerotic lesion development and results in significant alterations to the mitochondrion and its genome that may contribute to atherogenesis.

  10. Transcranial laser therapy alters amyloid precursor protein processing and improves mitochondrial function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Thomas; Yu, Jin; El-Amouri, Salim; Gattoni-Celli, Sebastiano; Richieri, Steve; De Taboada, Luis; Streeter, Jackson; Kindy, Mark S.

    2011-03-01

    Transcranial laser therapy (TLT) using a near-infrared energy laser system was tested in the 2x Tg amyloid precursor protein (APP) mouse model of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). TLT was administered 3 times/week at escalating doses, starting at 3 months of age, and was compared to a control group which received no laser treatment. Treatment sessions were continued for a total of six months. The brains were examined for amyloid plaque burden, Aβ peptides (Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 ), APP cleavage products (sAPPα, CTFβ) and mitochondrial activity. Administration of TLT was associated with a significant, dose-dependent reduction in amyloid load as indicated by the numbers of Aβ plaques. Levels of Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 levels were likewise reduced in a dose-dependent fashion. All TLT doses produced an increase in brain sAPPα and a decrease in CTFβ levels consistent with an increase in α-secretase activity and a decrease in β-secretase activity. In addition, TLT increased ATP levels and oxygen utilization in treated animals suggesting improved mitochondrial function. These studies suggest that TLT is a potential candidate for treatment of AD.

  11. Type 2 diabetic patients and their offspring show altered parameters of iron status, oxidative stress and genes related to mitochondrial activity.

    PubMed

    Le Blanc, Solange; Villarroel, Pia; Candia, Valeria; Gavilán, Natalia; Soto, Néstor; Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Arredondo, Miguel

    2012-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is directly related to alterations in iron status, oxidative stress and decreased mitochondrial activity, but the possible interaction of these parameters among T2D patients and their offspring is unclear. The whole study included 301 subjects: 77 T2D patients and one of their offspring and 51 control subjects with one of their offspring. The offspring were older than 20 years old. We measured parameters of iron status (serum iron, ferritin and transferrin receptor), diabetes (pre and post-prandial glucose, insulin, lipids), oxidative stress (Heme oxygenase activity, TBARS, SOD, GSH, Vitamin E), as well as the expression of genes in blood leukocytes related to mitochondrial apopotosis (mitofusin and Bcl/Bax ratios). The offspring of T2D patients had increased levels of serum ferritin (P < 0.01) and lower transferrin receptor (P < 0.008); higher insulin (P < 0.03) and total and LDL cholesterol; higher heme oxygenase and SOD activities increased TBARS and lower GSH; decreased mitofusin and Bcl/Bax expression ratios compared to offspring of normal subjects. These results suggest that the offspring of T2D patients could have an increased metabolic risk of develop a cardiovascular disease mediated by oxidative stress and iron status.

  12. Effect of vitrification on meiotic maturation, mitochondrial distribution and glutathione synthesis in immature silver fox cumulus oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinyan; Li, Jingchun; Xue, Hailong; Wang, Shiyong; Zhao, Weigang; Du, Zhanyu; Yang, Yifeng; Yue, Zhigang

    2017-03-15

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of vitrifying oocytes obtained from silver foxes on nuclear maturation, mitochondrial distribution and glutathione (GSH) synthesis after in vitro culture for 72 h. Immature oocytes were randomly divided into three groups: (1) fresh GV (germinal vesicle) oocytes (Control group), (2) exposure to the equilibration and vitrification solution but without being plunged into liquid nitrogen (exposed group), and (3) vitrification by the cryoloop method (vitrified-warmed group). The number of survival oocytes was not decreased by either being exposed to the cryoprotectant or being vitrified-warmed compared with the control group (P > 0.05). After IVM, the percentage of resumption of meiosis for vitrified-warmed oocytes (41.9%) was significantly lower than in the control (81.2%) and exposed (79.1%) groups (P < 0.05). However, the proportion of oocytes reaching the metaphase II (MII) stage was similar among the different groups (11.4%, 9.3% and 5.2%, respectively, P > 0.05). The translocation of active mitochondria during fox oocyte maturation was revealed using MitoTracker Red staining and confocal laser microscopy. For fresh oocytes at the GV stage, active mitochondria were distributed around the entire cortex with small granulations and various-sized cavities (no MitoTracker signals). After IVM, the mitochondria formed large granulations and clumps throughout the cytoplasm. Vitrification significantly decreased the proportion of MII oocytes with normal mitochondrial distribution compared with the control and exposed groups (35.4%, 71.9% and 59.2%, respectively, P < 0.05). Similarly, the GSH content was significantly lower in vitrified-warmed oocytes compared with the control and exposed oocytes after IVM (3.4, 5.7 and 4.7 pM/oocyte, respectively, P < 0.05). However, no significant difference was observed between the cryoprotectant exposed and control groups with regard to the normal mitochondrial

  13. Dynamics of Mitochondrial Transport in Axons

    PubMed Central

    Niescier, Robert F.; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Joo, Se Hun; Chang, Karen T.; Min, Kyung-Tai

    2016-01-01

    The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons. PMID:27242435

  14. Incongruence between primary sequence data and the distribution of a mitochondrial atp1 group II intron among ferns and horsetails.

    PubMed

    Wikström, Niklas; Pryer, Kathleen M

    2005-09-01

    Using DNA sequence data from multiple genes (often from more than one genome compartment) to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships has become routine. Augmenting this approach with genomic structural characters (e.g., intron gain and loss, changes in gene order) as these data become available from comparative studies already has provided critical insight into some long-standing questions about the evolution of land plants. Here we report on the presence of a group II intron located in the mitochondrial atp1 gene of leptosporangiate and marattioid ferns. Primary sequence data for the atp1 gene are newly reported for 27 taxa, and results are presented from maximum likelihood-based phylogenetic analyses using Bayesian inference for 34 land plants in three data sets: (1) single-gene mitochondrial atp1 (exon+intron sequences); (2) five combined genes (mitochondrial atp1 [exon only]; plastid rbcL, atpB, rps4; nuclear SSU rDNA); and (3) same five combined genes plus morphology. All our phylogenetic analyses corroborate results from previous fern studies that used plastid and nuclear sequence data: the monophyly of euphyllophytes, as well as of monilophytes; whisk ferns (Psilotidae) sister to ophioglossoid ferns (Ophioglossidae); horsetails (Equisetopsida) sister to marattioid ferns (Marattiidae), which together are sister to the monophyletic leptosporangiate ferns. In contrast to the results from the primary sequence data, the genomic structural data (atp1 intron distribution pattern) would seem to suggest that leptosporangiate and marattioid ferns are monophyletic, and together they are the sister group to horsetails--a topology that is rarely reconstructed using primary sequence data.

  15. Multifractal magnetic susceptibility distribution models of hydrothermally altered rocks in the Needle Creek Igneous Center of the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility was measured for 700 samples of drill core from thirteen drill holes in the porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit of the Stinkingwater mining district in the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming. The magnetic susceptibility measurements, chemical analyses, and alteration class provided a database for study of magnetic susceptibility in these altered rocks. The distribution of the magnetic susceptibilities for all samples is multi-modal, with overlapping peaked distributions for samples in the propylitic and phyllic alteration class, a tail of higher susceptibilities for potassic alteration, and an approximately uniform distribution over a narrow range at the highest susceptibilities for unaltered rocks. Samples from all alteration and mineralization classes show susceptibilities across a wide range of values. Samples with secondary (supergene) alteration due to oxidation or enrichment show lower susceptibilities than primary (hypogene) alteration rock. Observed magnetic susceptibility variations and the monolithological character of the host rock suggest that the variations are due to varying degrees of alteration of blocks of rock between fractures that conducted hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of rock from the fractures inward progressively reduces the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the rock. The model introduced in this paper consists of a simulation of the fracture pattern and a simulation of the alteration of the rock between fractures. A multifractal model generated from multiplicative cascades with unequal ratios produces distributions statistically similar to the observed distributions. The reduction in susceptibility in the altered rocks was modelled as a diffusion process operating on the fracture distribution support. The average magnetic susceptibility was then computed for each block. For the purpose of comparing the model results with observation, the simulated magnetic susceptibilities were then averaged over the same interval as the

  16. Modeling human Coenzyme A synthase mutation in yeast reveals altered mitochondrial function, lipid content and iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Berti, Camilla C.; Dallabona, Cristina; Lazzaretti, Mirca; Dusi, Sabrina; Tosi, Elena; Tiranti, Valeria; Goffrini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes associated with defective coenzyme A biosynthesis have been identified as responsible for some forms of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA), namely PKAN and CoPAN. PKAN are defined by mutations in PANK2, encoding the pantothenate kinase 2 enzyme, that account for about 50% of cases of NBIA, whereas mutations in CoA synthase COASY have been recently reported as the second inborn error of CoA synthesis leading to CoPAN. As reported previously, yeast cells expressing the pathogenic mutation exhibited a temperature-sensitive growth defect in the absence of pantothenate and a reduced CoA content. Additional characterization revealed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes, higher iron content, increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and reduced amount of lipid droplets, thus partially recapitulating the phenotypes found in patients and establishing yeast as a potential model to clarify the pathogenesis underlying PKAN and CoPAN diseases. PMID:28357284

  17. Mitochondrial DNA Mutations Provoke Dominant Inhibition of Mitochondrial Inner Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sauvanet, Cécile; Duvezin-Caubet, Stéphane; Salin, Bénédicte; David, Claudine; Massoni-Laporte, Aurélie; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Rojo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that continuously move, fuse and divide. Mitochondrial dynamics modulate overall mitochondrial morphology and are essential for the proper function, maintenance and transmission of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We have investigated mitochondrial fusion in yeast cells with severe defects in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) due to removal or various specific mutations of mtDNA. We find that, under fermentative conditions, OXPHOS deficient cells maintain normal levels of cellular ATP and ADP but display a reduced mitochondrial inner membrane potential. We demonstrate that, despite metabolic compensation by glycolysis, OXPHOS defects are associated to a selective inhibition of inner but not outer membrane fusion. Fusion inhibition was dominant and hampered the fusion of mutant mitochondria with wild-type mitochondria. Inhibition of inner membrane fusion was not systematically associated to changes of mitochondrial distribution and morphology, nor to changes in the isoform pattern of Mgm1, the major fusion factor of the inner membrane. However, inhibition of inner membrane fusion correlated with specific alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure, notably with the presence of aligned and unfused inner membranes that are connected to two mitochondrial boundaries. The fusion inhibition observed upon deletion of OXPHOS related genes or upon removal of the entire mtDNA was similar to that observed upon introduction of point mutations in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene that are associated to neurogenic ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) or to maternally inherited Leigh Syndrome (MILS) in humans. Our findings indicate that the consequences of mtDNA mutations may not be limited to OXPHOS defects but may also include alterations in mitochondrial fusion. Our results further imply that, in healthy cells, the dominant inhibition of fusion could mediate the exclusion of OXPHOS-deficient mitochondria from the network of

  18. Mitochondrial DNA mutations provoke dominant inhibition of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Sauvanet, Cécile; Duvezin-Caubet, Stéphane; Salin, Bénédicte; David, Claudine; Massoni-Laporte, Aurélie; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Rojo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that continuously move, fuse and divide. Mitochondrial dynamics modulate overall mitochondrial morphology and are essential for the proper function, maintenance and transmission of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We have investigated mitochondrial fusion in yeast cells with severe defects in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) due to removal or various specific mutations of mtDNA. We find that, under fermentative conditions, OXPHOS deficient cells maintain normal levels of cellular ATP and ADP but display a reduced mitochondrial inner membrane potential. We demonstrate that, despite metabolic compensation by glycolysis, OXPHOS defects are associated to a selective inhibition of inner but not outer membrane fusion. Fusion inhibition was dominant and hampered the fusion of mutant mitochondria with wild-type mitochondria. Inhibition of inner membrane fusion was not systematically associated to changes of mitochondrial distribution and morphology, nor to changes in the isoform pattern of Mgm1, the major fusion factor of the inner membrane. However, inhibition of inner membrane fusion correlated with specific alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure, notably with the presence of aligned and unfused inner membranes that are connected to two mitochondrial boundaries. The fusion inhibition observed upon deletion of OXPHOS related genes or upon removal of the entire mtDNA was similar to that observed upon introduction of point mutations in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene that are associated to neurogenic ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) or to maternally inherited Leigh Syndrome (MILS) in humans. Our findings indicate that the consequences of mtDNA mutations may not be limited to OXPHOS defects but may also include alterations in mitochondrial fusion. Our results further imply that, in healthy cells, the dominant inhibition of fusion could mediate the exclusion of OXPHOS-deficient mitochondria from the network of

  19. Administration of Harmine and Imipramine Alters Creatine Kinase and Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Activities in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Réus, Gislaine Z.; Stringari, Roberto B.; Gonçalves, Cinara L.; Scaini, Giselli; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Jeremias, Gabriela C.; Jeremias, Isabela C.; Ferreira, Gabriela K.; Streck, Emílio L.; Hallak, Jaime E.; Zuardi, Antônio W.; Crippa, José A.; Quevedo, João

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated mitochondrial respiratory chain and creatine kinase activities after administration of harmine (5, 10, and 15 mg/kg) and imipramine (10, 20, and 30 mg/kg) in rat brain. After acute treatment occurred an increase of creatine kinase in the prefrontal with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) and harmine in all doses, in the striatum with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) and harmine (5 and 10 mg/kg); harmine (15 mg/kg) decreased creatine kinase. In the chronic treatment occurred an increase of creatine kinase with imipramine (20 mg/kg), harmine (5 mg/kg) in the prefrontal with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) and harmine (5 and 10 mg/kg) in the striatum. In the acute treatment, the complex I increased in the prefrontal with harmine (15 mg/kg) and in the striatum with harmine (10 mg/kg); the complex II decreased with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) in the striatum; the complex IV increased with imipramine (30 mg/kg) in the striatum. In the chronic treatment, the complex I increased with harmine (5 mg/kg) in the prefrontal; the complex II increased with imipramine (20 mg/kg) in the prefrontal; the complex IV increased with harmine (5 mg/kg) in the striatum. Finally, these findings further support the hypothesis that harmine and imipramine could be involved in mitochondrial function. PMID:21969912

  20. Synergistic effect of cAMP and palmitate in promoting altered mitochondrial function and cell death in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linxia; Seitz, Linsey C.; Abramczyk, Amy M.; Chan, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Saturated free fatty acids (FFAs), e.g. palmitate, have long been shown to induce toxicity and cell death in various types of cells. In this study, we demonstrate that cAMP synergistically amplifies the effect of palmitate on the induction of cell death in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, HepG2 cells. Elevation of cAMP level in palmitate treated cells led to enhanced mitochondrial fragmentation, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and mitochondrial biogenesis. Mitochondrial fragmentation precedes mitochondrial ROS generation and mitochondrial biogenesis, and may contribute to mitochondrial ROS overproduction and subsequent mitochondrial biogenesis. Fragmentation of mitochondria also facilitated the release of cytotoxic mitochondrial proteins, such as Smac, from the mitochondria and subsequent activation of caspases. However, cell death induced by palmitate and cAMP was caspase-independent and mainly necrotic. PMID:20026039

  1. Altered distribution of mitochondria in rat soleus muscle fibers after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Gordon J.; Martin, Thomas P.; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.; Oganov, V. S.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of an exposure to microgravity on the distribution of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity throughout the soleus muscle fibers was investigated by measuring SDH activity throughout the cross section of 20-30 fibers each of the slow-twitch oxidative and fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic types of fibers in rats exposed to 12.5 days in space aboard Cosmos 1887. It was found that, after the spaceflight, the entire regional distribution of SDH activity was significantly altered (as compared to ground controls) in the slow-twitch oxidative fibers, whereas the fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic fibers from muscles of flown rats exhibited a significantly lower SDH activity only in their subsarcolemmal region.

  2. Altered distribution of mitochondria in rat soleus muscle fibers after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Gordon J.; Martin, Thomas P.; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.; Oganov, V. S.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of an exposure to microgravity on the distribution of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity throughout the soleus muscle fibers was investigated by measuring SDH activity throughout the cross section of 20-30 fibers each of the slow-twitch oxidative and fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic types of fibers in rats exposed to 12.5 days in space aboard Cosmos 1887. It was found that, after the spaceflight, the entire regional distribution of SDH activity was significantly altered (as compared to ground controls) in the slow-twitch oxidative fibers, whereas the fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic fibers from muscles of flown rats exhibited a significantly lower SDH activity only in their subsarcolemmal region.

  3. A pivotal role for PINK1 and autophagy in mitochondrial quality control: implications for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Chu, Charleen T

    2010-04-15

    The PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) is a mitochondrially targeted serine-threonine kinase, which is linked to autosomal recessive familial parkinsonism. Current literature implicates PINK1 as a pivotal regulator of mitochondrial quality control, promoting maintenance of respiring mitochondrial networks through cristae stabilization, phosphorylation of chaperones and possibly regulation of mitochondrial transport or autophagy. Pulse-chase studies indicate that PINK1 is rapidly processed into at least two shorter forms, which are distributed in both mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments. Through indirect regulation of mitochondrial proteases and Drp1, PINK1 may act to facilitate localized repair and fusion in response to minor mitochondrial stress. With severe mitochondrial damage, PINK1 facilitates aggregation and clearance of depolarized mitochondria through interactions with Parkin and possibly Beclin1. This switch in function most probably involves altered processing, post-translational modification and/or localization of PINK1, as overexpression of full-length PINK1 is required for mitochondrial Parkin recruitment. Under conditions of PINK1 deficiency, dysregulation of reactive oxygen species, electron transport chain function and calcium homeostasis trigger altered mitochondrial dynamics, indicating compromise of mitochondrial quality control mechanisms. Nevertheless, Parkin- and Beclin1-regulated mitochondrial autophagy remains effective at recycling PINK1-deficient mitochondria; failure of this final tier of mitochondrial quality control contributes to cell death. Thus, PINK1 plays a pivotal, multifactorial role in mitochondrial homeostasis. As autophagic recycling represents the final tier of mitochondrial quality control, whether PINK1 levels are enhanced or reduced, strategies to promote selective mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis may prove effective for multiple forms of Parkinson's disease.

  4. Volitional regulation of emotions produces distributed alterations in connectivity between visual, attention control, and default networks

    PubMed Central

    Sripada, Chandra; Angstadt, Michael; Kessler, Daniel; Phan, K. Luan; Liberzon, Israel; Evans, Gary W.; Welsh, Robert; Kim, Pilyoung; Swain, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to volitionally regulate emotions is critical to health and well-being. While patterns of neural activation during emotion regulation have been well characterized, patterns of connectivity between regions remain less explored. It is increasingly recognized that the human brain is organized into large-scale intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) whose interrelationships are altered in characteristic ways during psychological tasks. In this fMRI study of 54 healthy individuals, we investigated alterations in connectivity within and between ICNs produced by the emotion regulation strategy of reappraisal. In order to gain a comprehensive picture of connectivity changes, we utilized connectomic psychophysiological interactions (PPI), a whole-brain generalization of standard single-seed PPI methods. In particular, we quantified PPI connectivity pair-wise across 837 ROIs placed throughout the cortex. We found that compared to maintaining one’s emotional responses, engaging in reappraisal produced robust and distributed alterations in functional connections involving visual, dorsal attention, frontoparietal, and default networks. Visual network in particular increased connectivity with multiple ICNs including dorsal attention and default networks. We interpret these findings in terms of the role of these networks in mediating critical constituent processes in emotion regulation, including visual processing, stimulus salience, attention control, and interpretation and contextualization of stimuli. Our results add a new network perspective to our understanding of the neural underpinnings of emotion regulation, and highlight that connectomic methods can play a valuable role in comprehensively investigating modulation of connectivity across task conditions. PMID:24246489

  5. Chronic ketamine produces altered distribution of parvalbumin-positive cells in the hippocampus of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Murtishaw, Andrew S; Bolton, Monica M; Heaney, Chelcie F; Langhardt, Michael; Kinney, Jefferson W

    2013-08-29

    The underlying mechanisms of schizophrenia pathogenesis are not well understood. Increasing evidence supports the glutamatergic hypothesis that posits a hypofunction of the N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor on specific gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA)-ergic neurons may be responsible for the disorder. Alterations in the GABAergic system have been observed in schizophrenia, most notably a change in the expression of parvalbumin (PV) in the cortex and hippocampus. Several reports also suggest abnormal neuronal migration may play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. The current study examined the positioning and distribution of PV-positive cells in the hippocampus following chronic treatment with the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. A robust increase was found in the number of PV-positive interneurons located outside the stratum oriens (SO), the layer where most of these cells are normally localized, as well as an overall numerical increase in CA3 PV cells. These results suggest ketamine leads to an abnormal distribution of PV-positive cells, which may be indicative of aberrant migratory activity and possibly related to the Morris water maze deficits observed. These findings may also be relevant to alterations observed in schizophrenia populations.

  6. Molecular Identification of Paramecium bursaria Syngens and Studies on Geographic Distribution using Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit I (COI).

    PubMed

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria is composed of five syngens that are morphologically indistinguishable but sexually isolated. The aim of the present study was to confirm by molecular methods (analyses of mitochondrial COI) the identification of P. bursaria syngens originating from different geographical locations. Phylograms constructed using both the neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood methods based on a comparison of 34 sequences of P. bursaria strains and P. multimicronucleatum, P. caudatum and P.calkinsi strains used as outgroups revealed five clusters which correspond to results obtained previously by mating reaction. Our analysis shows the existence of 24 haplotypes for the COI gene sequence in the studied strains. The interspecies haplotype diversity was Hd = 0.967. We confirmed genetic differentiation between strains of P. bursaria and the occurrence of a correlation between geographical distribution and the correspondent syngen.

  7. Role and Treatment of Mitochondrial DNA-Related Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Sporadic Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2012-01-01

    Several sporadic neurodegenerative diseases display phenomena that directly or indirectly relate to mitochondrial function. Data suggesting altered mitochondrial function in these diseases could arise from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are reviewed. Approaches for manipulating mitochondrial function and minimizing the downstream consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction are discussed. PMID:21902672

  8. The influence of chronic fluorosis on mitochondrial dynamics morphology and distribution in cortical neurons of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lou, Di-Dong; Guan, Zhi-Zhong; Liu, Yan-Jie; Liu, Yan-Fei; Zhang, Kai-Lin; Pan, Ji-Gang; Pei, Jin-Jing

    2013-03-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of chronic fluorosis on the dynamics (including fusion and fission proteins), fragmentation, and distribution of mitochondria in the cortical neurons of the rat brain in an attempt to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the brain damage associated with excess accumulation of fluoride. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into three groups of 20 each, that is, the untreated control group (drinking water naturally containing <0.5 mg fluoride/l, NaF), the low-fluoride group (whose drinking water was supplemented with 10 mg fluoride/l) and the high-fluoride group (50 mg fluoride/l). After 6 months of exposure, the expression of mitofusin-1 (Mfn1), fission-1 (Fis1), and dynamin-related protein-1 (Drp1) at both the protein and mRNA levels were detected by Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and real-time PCR, respectively. Moreover, mitochondrial morphology and distribution in neurons were observed by transmission electron or fluorescence microscopy. In the cortices of the brains of rats with chronic fluorosis, the level of Mfn1 protein was clearly reduced, whereas the levels of Fis1 and Drp1 were elevated. The alternations of expression of the mRNAs encoding all three of these proteins were almost the same as the corresponding changes at the protein levels. The mitochondria were fragmented and the redistributed away from the axons of the cortical neurons. These findings indicate that chronic fluorosis induces abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, which might in turn result in a high level of oxidative stress.

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans par2.1/mtssb-1 is essential for mitochondrial DNA replication and its defect causes comprehensive transcriptional alterations including a hypoxia response

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Tomoko; Mori, Chihiro; Takanami, Takako; Sasagawa, Yohei; Saito, Rumiko; Ichiishi, Eiichiro; Higashitani, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    DNA polymerase {gamma} and mtSSB are key components of the mtDNA replication machinery. To study the biological influences of defects in mtDNA replication, we used RNAi to deplete the gene for a putative mtSSB, par2.1, in Caenorhabditis elegans. In previous systematic RNAi screens, downregulation of this gene has not caused any clearly defective phenotypes. Here, we continuously fed a dsRNA targeting par2.1 to C. elegans over generations. Seventy-nine percent of F1 progeny produced 60-72 h after feeding grew to adulthood but were completely sterile, with an arrest of germline cell proliferation. Analyses of mtDNA copy number and cell cytology indicated that the sterile hermaphrodites had fewer mitochondria. These results indicated that par2.1 essentially functions for germline cell proliferation through mtDNA replication; we therefore termed it mtssb-1. Comprehensive transcriptional alterations including hypoxia response induction dependent on and independent of hif-1 function, occurred by RNAi depletion of mtssb-1. Treatment with ethidium bromide, which impairs mtDNA replication and transcription, caused similar transcriptional alterations. In addition, the frequency of apoptosis in the germline cells was reduced in fertile progeny with a partial RNAi effect. These suggest that RNAi depletion of C. elegans mtssb-1 is useful as a model system of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  10. Altered postnatal development of cortico-hippocampal neuronal electric activity in mice deficient for the mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate transporter.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Galán, Marta; Makarova, Julia; Llorente-Folch, Irene; Saheki, Takeyori; Pardo, Beatriz; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Herreras, Oscar

    2012-02-01

    The deficiency in the mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate transporter Aralar/AGC1 results in a loss of the malate-aspartate NADH shuttle in the brain neurons, hypomyelination, and additional defects in the brain metabolism. We studied the development of cortico/hippocampal local field potential (LFP) in Aralar/AGC1 knockout (KO) mice. Laminar profiles of LFP, evoked potentials, and unit activity were recorded under anesthesia in young (P15 to P22) Aralar-KO and control mice as well as control adults. While LFP power increased 3 to 7 times in both cortex and hippocampus of control animals during P15 to P22, the Aralar-KO specimens hardly progressed. The divergence was more pronounced in the CA3/hilus region. In parallel, spontaneous multiunit activity declined severely in KO mice. Postnatal growth of hippocampal-evoked potentials was delayed in KO mice, and indicated abnormal synaptic and spike electrogenesis and reduced output at P20 to P22. The lack of LFP development in KO mice was accompanied by the gradual appearance of epileptic activity in the CA3/hilus region that evolved to status epilepticus. Strikingly, CA3 bursts were poorly conducted to the CA1 field. We conclude that disturbed substrate supply to neuronal mitochondria impairs development of cortico-hippocampal LFPs. Aberrant neuronal electrogenesis and reduced neuron output may explain circuit dysfunction and phenotype deficiencies.

  11. Regulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition in kidney proximal tubules and its alteration during hypoxia-reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Feldkamp, Thorsten; Park, Jeong Soon; Pasupulati, Ratna; Amora, Daniela; Roeser, Nancy F; Venkatachalam, M A; Weinberg, Joel M

    2009-12-01

    Development of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) can importantly contribute to lethal cell injury from both necrosis and apoptosis, but its role varies considerably with both the type of cell and type of injury, and it can be strongly opposed by the normally abundant endogenous metabolites ADP and Mg(2+). To better characterize the MPT in kidney proximal tubule cells and assess its contribution to injury to them, we have refined and validated approaches to follow the process in whole kidney proximal tubules and studied its regulation in normoxic tubules and after hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R). Physiological levels of ADP and Mg(2+) greatly decreased sensitivity to the MPT. Inhibition of cyclophilin D by cyclosporine A (CsA) effectively opposed the MPT only in the presence of ADP and/or Mg(2+). Nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) had a large role in the decreased resistance to the MPT seen after H/R irrespective of the available substrate or the presence of ADP, Mg(2+), or CsA, but removal of NEFA was less effective at restoring normal resistance to the MPT in the presence of electron transport complex I-dependent substrates than with succinate. The data indicate that the NEFA accumulation that occurs during both hypoxia in vitro and ischemic acute kidney injury in vivo is a critical sensitizing factor for the MPT that overcomes the antagonistic effect of endogenous metabolites and cyclophilin D inhibition, particularly in the presence of complex I-dependent substrates, which predominate in vivo.

  12. Sodium Fluoride Induces Apoptosis in H9c2 Cardiomyocytes by Altering Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Intracellular ROS Level.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoyan; Yang, Xia; Hao, Xianhui; Ren, Qiurong; Gao, Jiping; Wang, Yu; Chang, Na; Qiu, Yulan; Song, Guohua

    2015-08-01

    Chronic excessive fluoride intake is known to be toxic, and effects of long-term fluorosis on different organ systems have been examined. However, there are few studies about the effects of fluorosis on cardiovascular systems. Here, we studied the fluoride-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells and determined the underlying molecular mechanisms including the cell viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, the changes of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and the cell apoptosis. Sodium fluoride (NaF) at concentrations of 0, 2, 4, 8, and 16 mg/L was administered to cultured H9c2 cells for up to 48 h. After the treatment, H9c2 cells were collected and the associated parameters were measured by flow cytometry. Our study found that fluoride not only inhibited H9c2 cell proliferation but also induced cell apoptosis. With the increment of NaF concentration, the apoptotic rates and ROS generation were increased, while the ΔΨm was decreased. In summary, these data suggested that NaF-induced H9c2 cell apoptosis is mediated by direct increased intracellular ROS and downregulated ΔΨm.

  13. Alterations in Glutathione Redox Metabolism, Oxidative Stress, and Mitochondrial Function in the Left Ventricle of Elderly Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie; Howarth, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    The Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat is a genetic model in which the homozygous (FA/FA) male animals develop obesity and type 2 diabetes. Morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular complications, due to increased oxidative stress and inflammatory signals, are the hallmarks of type 2 diabetes. The precise molecular mechanism of contractile dysfunction and disease progression remains to be clarified. Therefore, we have investigated molecular and metabolic targets in male ZDF (30–34 weeks old) rat heart compared to age matched Zucker lean (ZL) controls. Hyperglycemia was confirmed by a 4-fold elevation in non-fasting blood glucose (478.43 ± 29.22 mg/dL in ZDF vs. 108.22 ± 2.52 mg/dL in ZL rats). An increase in reactive oxygen species production, lipid peroxidation and oxidative protein carbonylation was observed in ZDF rats. A significant increase in CYP4502E1 activity accompanied by increased protein expression was also observed in diabetic rat heart. Increased expression of other oxidative stress marker proteins, HO-1 and iNOS was also observed. GSH concentration and activities of GSH-dependent enzymes, glutathione S-transferase and GSH reductase, were, however, significantly increased in ZDF heart tissue suggesting a compensatory defense mechanism. The activities of mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, Complex I and Complex IV were significantly reduced in the heart ventricle of ZDF rats in comparison to ZL rats. Western blot analysis has also suggested a decreased expression of IκB-α and phosphorylated-JNK in diabetic heart tissue. Our results have suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress in ZDF rats might be associated, at least in part, with altered NF-κB/JNK dependent redox cell signaling. These results might have implications in the elucidation of the mechanism of disease progression and designing strategies for diabetes prevention. PMID:23203193

  14. Regulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition in kidney proximal tubules and its alteration during hypoxia-reoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Feldkamp, Thorsten; Park, Jeong Soon; Pasupulati, Ratna; Amora, Daniela; Roeser, Nancy F.; Venkatachalam, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Development of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) can importantly contribute to lethal cell injury from both necrosis and apoptosis, but its role varies considerably with both the type of cell and type of injury, and it can be strongly opposed by the normally abundant endogenous metabolites ADP and Mg2+. To better characterize the MPT in kidney proximal tubule cells and assess its contribution to injury to them, we have refined and validated approaches to follow the process in whole kidney proximal tubules and studied its regulation in normoxic tubules and after hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R). Physiological levels of ADP and Mg2+ greatly decreased sensitivity to the MPT. Inhibition of cyclophilin D by cyclosporine A (CsA) effectively opposed the MPT only in the presence of ADP and/or Mg2+. Nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) had a large role in the decreased resistance to the MPT seen after H/R irrespective of the available substrate or the presence of ADP, Mg2+, or CsA, but removal of NEFA was less effective at restoring normal resistance to the MPT in the presence of electron transport complex I-dependent substrates than with succinate. The data indicate that the NEFA accumulation that occurs during both hypoxia in vitro and ischemic acute kidney injury in vivo is a critical sensitizing factor for the MPT that overcomes the antagonistic effect of endogenous metabolites and cyclophilin D inhibition, particularly in the presence of complex I-dependent substrates, which predominate in vivo. PMID:19741014

  15. Loss of Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenase Activity Alters Seed Metabolism Impairing Seed Maturation and Post-Germination Growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sew, Yun Shin; Ströher, Elke; Fenske, Ricarda; Millar, A Harvey

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; EC 1.1.1.37) has multiple roles; the most commonly described is its catalysis of the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The roles of mMDH in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed development and germination were investigated in mMDH1 and mMDH2 double knockout plants. A significant proportion of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds were nonviable and developed only to torpedo-shaped embryos, indicative of arrested seed embryo growth during embryogenesis. The viable mmdh1mmdh2 seeds had an impaired maturation process that led to slow germination rates as well as retarded post-germination growth, shorter root length, and decreased root biomass. During seed development, mmdh1mmdh2 showed a paler green phenotype than the wild type and exhibited deficiencies in reserve accumulation and reduced final seed biomass. The respiration rate of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds was significantly elevated throughout their maturation, consistent with the previously reported higher respiration rate in mmdh1mmdh2 leaves. Mutant seeds showed a consistently higher content of free amino acids (branched-chain amino acids, alanine, serine, glycine, proline, and threonine), differences in sugar and sugar phosphate levels, and lower content of 2-oxoglutarate. Seed-aging assays showed that quiescent mmdh1mmdh2 seeds lost viability more than 3 times faster than wild-type seeds. Together, these data show the important role of mMDH in the earliest phases of the life cycle of Arabidopsis.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA sequence phylogeny of 4 populations of the widely distributed cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Blancher, Antoine; Bonhomme, Maxime; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Terao, Keiji; Kitano, Takashi; Saitou, Naruya

    2008-01-01

    We studied the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphism of 304 Macaca fascicularis fascicularis (M. f. fascicularis) individuals, representative of 4 cynomolgus macaque populations (Indochina, Indonesia, Philippines, and Mauritius). By sequencing a 590-bp fragment in the hypervariable II region of the D-loop region, we defined 70 haplotypes. The homologous region was also characterized in 22 Chinese Macaca mulatta and 2 Macaca sylvanus. The phylogenetic analysis confirms the monophyly of M. f. fascicularis and defines 2 haplotype groups inside the M. f. fascicularis clade: one "insular," encompassing 6 Philippines, 2 Mauritius, and 31 Indonesian haplotypes, the other "continental" that contains all Indochinese and 6 Indonesian haplotypes. Continental and insular group divergence time was estimated to be approximately 10(6) years before present (BP). Among Indonesian haplotypes, some have a continental origin. This suggests either direct migration from mainland to Indonesia or that remnant lineages from an ancient population genetically close to the mainland (i.e., in the Sunda Shelf, <550 000 years BP) were subsequently brought southward to Indonesia. The low nucleotide diversity in the Philippines population suggests a bottleneck following colonization by Indonesian individuals, around 110 000 years BP. mtDNA and further observations of nuclear genetic data corroborate the mixed origin (Indonesian/continental) hypothesis of Mauritius individuals and a population bottleneck.

  17. Altered distribution of tight junction proteins after intestinal ischaemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiurong; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Chenyang; Liu, Xiaoxiang; Qu, Linlin; Gu, Lili; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2009-01-01

    Tight junction (TJ) disruptions have been demonstrated both in vitro and more recently in vivo in infection. However, the molecular basis for changes of TJ during ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is poorly understood. In the present study, intestinal damage was induced by I/R in an animal model. As assessed by TUNEL and propidium iodide uptake, we showed that I/R injury induced apoptosis as well as necrosis in rat colon, and the frequency of apoptotic and necrotic cells reached the maximum at 5 hrs of reperfusion. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that claudins 1, 3 and 5 are strongly expressed in the surface epithelial cells of the colon; however, labelling of all three proteins was present diffusely within cells and no longer focused at the lateral cell boundaries after I/R. Using Western blot analysis, we found that distribution of TJ proteins in membrane microdomains of TJ was markedly affected in I/R injury rats. Occludin, ZO-1, claudin-1 and claudin-3 were completely displaced from TX-100 insoluble fractions to TX-100 soluble fractions, and claudin-5 was partly displaced. The distribution of lipid raft marker protein caveolin-1 was also changed after I/R. I/R injury results in the disruption of TJs, which characterized by relocalization of the claudins 1, 3 and 5 and an increase in intestinal permeability using molecular tracer measurement. I/R injury altered distribution of TJ proteins in vivo that was associated with functional TJ deficiencies. PMID:19929946

  18. Assessment of Altered 3D Blood Characteristics in Aortic Disease by Velocity Distribution Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Julio; Barker, Alex J; van Ooij, Pim; Schnell, Susanne; Puthumana, Jyothy; Bonow, Robert O; Collins, Jeremy D; Carr, James C; Markl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To test the feasibility of velocity distribution analysis for identifying altered 3D flow characteristics in patients with aortic disease based on 4D flow MRI volumetric analysis. Methods Forty patients with aortic (Ao) dilation (mid ascending aortic diameter MAA=40±7 mm, age=56±17 yr, 11 females) underwent cardiovascular MRI. Four groups were retrospectively defined: mild Ao dilation (n=10, MAA<35 mm); moderate Ao dilation (n=10, 3545 mm); Ao dilation+aortic stenosis AS (n=10, MAA>35 mm and peak velocity >2.5m/s). 3D PC-MR angiograms were computed and used to obtain a 3D segmentation of the aorta which was divided into four segments: root, ascending aorta, arch, descending aorta. Radial chart displays were used to visualize multiple parameters representing segmental changes in the 3D velocity distribution associated with aortic disease. Results Changes in the velocity field and geometry between cohorts resulted in distinct hemodynamic patterns for each aortic segment. Disease progression from mild to Ao dilation+AS resulted in significant differences (P<0.05) in flow parameters across cohorts and increased radial chart size for root and ascending aorta segments by 146% and 99%, respectively. Conclusion Volumetric 4D velocity distribution analysis has the potential to identify characteristic changes in regional blood flow patterns in patients with aortic disease. PMID:25252029

  19. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Chi; Tseng, Ling-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated cellular energetics was one of the cancer hallmarks. Several underlying mechanisms of deregulated cellular energetics are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations, mitochondrial enzyme defects, or altered oncogenes/tumor suppressors. In this review, we summarize the current understanding about the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression. Point mutations and copy number changes are the two most common mitochondrial DNA alterations in cancers, and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by chemical depletion of mitochondrial DNA or impairment of mitochondrial respiratory chain in cancer cells promotes cancer progression to a chemoresistance or invasive phenotype. Moreover, defects in mitochondrial enzymes, such as succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase, are associated with both familial and sporadic forms of cancer. Deregulated mitochondrial deacetylase sirtuin 3 might modulate cancer progression by regulating cellular metabolism and oxidative stress. These mitochondrial defects during oncogenesis and tumor progression activate cytosolic signaling pathways that ultimately alter nuclear gene expression, a process called retrograde signaling. Changes in the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species, Ca2+, or oncometabolites are important in the mitochondrial retrograde signaling for neoplastic transformation and cancer progression. In addition, altered oncogenes/tumor suppressors including hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and tumor suppressor p53 regulate mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism by modulating the expression of their target genes. We thus suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in cancer progression and that targeting mitochondrial alterations and mitochondrial retrograde signaling might be a promising strategy for the development of selective anticancer therapy. PMID:27022139

  20. Inhibition of ERK-DLP1 signaling and mitochondrial division alleviates mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease cybrid cell.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xueqi; Huang, Shengbin; Wu, Long; Wang, Yongfu; Hu, Gang; Li, Guangyue; Zhang, Hongju; Yu, Haiyang; Swerdlow, Russell Howard; Chen, John Xi; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is an early pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The underlying mechanisms and strategies to repair it remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the direct consequences and potential mechanisms of mitochondrial functional defects associated with abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in AD. Using cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) neurons with incorporated platelet mitochondria from AD and age-matched non-AD human subjects into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted neuronal cells, we observed that AD cybrid cells had significant changes in morphology and function; such changes associate with altered expression and distribution of dynamin-like protein (DLP1) and mitofusin 2 (Mfn2). Treatment with antioxidant protects against AD mitochondria-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation and mitochondrial fission-fusion imbalances. Notably, inhibition of ERK activation not only attenuates aberrant mitochondrial morphology and function but also restores the mitochondrial fission and fusion balance. These effects suggest a role of oxidative stress-mediated ERK signal transduction in modulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion events. Further, blockade of the mitochondrial fission protein DLP1 by a genetic manipulation with a dominant negative DLP1 (DLP1(K38A)), its expression with siRNA-DLP1, or inhibition of mitochondrial division with mdivi-1 attenuates mitochondrial functional defects observed in AD cybrid cells. Our results provide new insights into mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from changes in the ERK-fission/fusion (DLP1) machinery and signaling pathway. The protective effect of mdivi-1 and inhibition of ERK signaling on maintenance of normal mitochondrial structure and function holds promise as a potential novel therapeutic strategy for AD.

  1. Inhibition of ERK-DLP1 signaling and mitochondrial division alleviates mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease cybrid cell

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Xueqi; Huang, Shengbin; Wu, Long; Wang, Yongfu; Hu, Gang; Li, Guangyue; Zhang, Hongju; Yu, Haiyang; Swerdlow, Russell Howard; Chen, John Xi; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is an early pathological feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The underlying mechanisms and strategies to repair it remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the direct consequences and potential mechanisms of mitochondrial functional defects associated with abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in AD. Using cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) neurons with incorporated platelet mitochondria from AD and age-matched non-AD human subjects into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted neuronal cells, we observed that AD cybrid cells had significant changes in morphology and function; such changes associate with altered expression and distribution of dynamin-like protein (DLP1) and mitofusin 2 (Mfn2). Treatment with antioxidant protects against AD mitochondria-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation and mitochondrial fission-fusion imbalances. Notably, inhibition of ERK activation not only attenuates aberrant mitochondrial morphology and function but also restores the mitochondrial fission and fusion balance. These effects suggest a role of oxidative stress-mediated ERK signal transduction in modulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion events. Further, blockade of the mitochondrial fission protein DLP1 by a genetic manipulation with a dominant negative DLP1 (DLP1K38A), its expression with siRNA-DLP1, or inhibition of mitochondrial division with mdivi-1 attenuates mitochondrial functional defects observed in AD cybrid cells. Our results provide new insights into mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from changes in the ERK-fission/fusion (DLP1) machinery and signaling pathw