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Sample records for altitude training considerations

  1. Altitude training considerations for the winter sport athlete.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Robert F; Stickford, Jonathon L; Levine, Benjamin D

    2010-03-01

    Winter sports events routinely take place at low to moderate altitudes, and nearly all Winter Olympic Games have had at least one venue at an altitude >1000 m. The acute and chronic effects of altitude can have a substantial effect on performance outcomes. Acutely, the decline in oxygen delivery to working muscle decreases maximal oxygen uptake, negatively affecting performance in endurance events, such as cross-country skiing and biathlon. The reduction in air resistance at altitude can dramatically affect sports involving high velocities and technical skill components, such as ski jumping, speed skating, figure skating and ice hockey. Dissociation between velocity and sensations usually associated with work intensity (ventilation, metabolic signals in skeletal muscle and heart rate) may impair pacing strategy and make it difficult to determine optimal race pace. For competitions taking place at altitude, a number of strategies may be useful, depending on the altitude of residence of the athlete and ultimate competition altitude, as follows. First, allow extra time and practice (how much is yet undetermined) for athletes to adjust to the changes in projectile motion; hockey, shooting, figure skating and ski jumping may be particularly affected. These considerations apply equally in the reverse direction; that is, for athletes practising at altitude but competing at sea level. Second, allow time for acclimatization for endurance sports: 3-5 days if possible, especially for low altitude (500-2000 m); 1-2 weeks for moderate altitude (2000-3000 m); and at least 2 weeks if possible for high altitude (>3000 m). Third, increase exercise-recovery ratios as much as possible, with 1:3 ratio probably optimal, and consider more frequent substitutions for sports where this is allowed, such as ice hockey. Fourth, consider the use of supplemental O(2) on the sideline (ice hockey) or in between heats (skating and Alpine skiing) to facilitate recovery. For competitions at sea

  2. Altitude and endurance training.

    PubMed

    Rusko, Heikki K; Tikkanen, Heikki O; Peltonen, Juha E

    2004-10-01

    The benefits of living and training at altitude (HiHi) for an improved altitude performance of athletes are clear, but controlled studies for an improved sea-level performance are controversial. The reasons for not having a positive effect of HiHi include: (1) the acclimatization effect may have been insufficient for elite athletes to stimulate an increase in red cell mass/haemoglobin mass because of too low an altitude (< 2000-2200 m) and/or too short an altitude training period (<3-4 weeks); (2) the training effect at altitude may have been compromised due to insufficient training stimuli for enhancing the function of the neuromuscular and cardiovascular systems; and (3) enhanced stress with possible overtraining symptoms and an increased frequency of infections. Moreover, the effects of hypoxia in the brain may influence both training intensity and physiological responses during training at altitude. Thus, interrupting hypoxic exposure by training in normoxia may be a key factor in avoiding or minimizing the noxious effects that are known to occur in chronic hypoxia. When comparing HiHi and HiLo (living high and training low), it is obvious that both can induce a positive acclimatization effect and increase the oxygen transport capacity of blood, at least in 'responders', if certain prerequisites are met. The minimum dose to attain a haematological acclimatization effect is > 12 h a day for at least 3 weeks at an altitude or simulated altitude of 2100-2500 m. Exposure to hypoxia appears to have some positive transfer effects on subsequent training in normoxia during and after HiLo. The increased oxygen transport capacity of blood allows training at higher intensity during and after HiLo in subsequent normoxia, thereby increasing the potential to improve some neuromuscular and cardiovascular determinants of endurance performance. The effects of hypoxic training and intermittent short-term severe hypoxia at rest are not yet clear and they require further study.

  3. Endurance training at altitude.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Philo U; Pyne, David B; Gore, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1968 Olympic Games when the effects of altitude on endurance performance became evident, moderate altitude training ( approximately 2000 to 3000 m) has become popular to improve competition performance both at altitude and sea level. When endurance athletes are exposed acutely to moderate altitude, a number of physiological responses occur that can comprise performance at altitude; these include increased ventilation, increased heart rate, decreased stroke volume, reduced plasma volume, and lower maximal aerobic power ((.)Vo(2max)) by approximately 15% to 20%. Over a period of several weeks, one primary acclimatization response is an increase in the volume of red blood cells and consequently of (.)Vo(2max). Altitudes > approximately 2000 m for >3 weeks and adequate iron stores are required to elicit these responses. However, the primacy of more red blood cells for superior sea-level performance is not clear-cut since the best endurance athletes in the world, from Ethiopia (approximately 2000 to 3000 m), have only marginally elevated hemoglobin concentrations. The substantial reduction in (.)Vo(2max) of athletes at moderate altitude implies that their training should include adequate short-duration (approximately 1 to 2 min), high-intensity efforts with long recoveries to avoid a reduction in race-specific fitness. At the elite level, athlete performance is not dependent solely on (.)Vo(2max), and the "smallest worthwhile change" in performance for improving race results is as little as 0.5%. Consequently, contemporary statistical approaches that utilize the concept of the smallest worthwhile change are likely to be more appropriate than conventional statistical methods when attempting to understand the potential benefits and mechanisms of altitude training.

  4. Dietary Recommendations for Cyclists during Altitude Training.

    PubMed

    Michalczyk, Małgorzata; Czuba, Miłosz; Zydek, Grzegorz; Zając, Adam; Langfort, Józef

    2016-06-18

    The concept of altitude or hypoxic training is a common practice in cycling. However, several strategies for training regimens have been proposed, like "live high, train high" (LH-TH), "live high, train low" (LH-TL) or "intermittent hypoxic training" (IHT). Each of them combines the effect of acclimatization and different training protocols that require specific nutrition. An appropriate nutrition strategy and adequate hydration can help athletes achieve their fitness and performance goals in this unfriendly environment. In this review, the physiological stress of altitude exposure and training will be discussed, with specific nutrition recommendations for athletes training under such conditions. However, there is little research about the nutrition demands of athletes who train at moderate altitude. Our review considers energetic demands and body mass or body composition changes due to altitude training, including respiratory and urinary water loss under these conditions. Carbohydrate intake recommendations and hydration status are discussed in detail, while iron storage and metabolism is also considered. Last, but not least the risk of increased oxidative stress under hypoxic conditions and antioxidant supplementation suggestions are presented.

  5. Dietary Recommendations for Cyclists during Altitude Training

    PubMed Central

    Michalczyk, Małgorzata; Czuba, Miłosz; Zydek, Grzegorz; Zając, Adam; Langfort, Józef

    2016-01-01

    The concept of altitude or hypoxic training is a common practice in cycling. However, several strategies for training regimens have been proposed, like “live high, train high” (LH-TH), “live high, train low” (LH-TL) or “intermittent hypoxic training” (IHT). Each of them combines the effect of acclimatization and different training protocols that require specific nutrition. An appropriate nutrition strategy and adequate hydration can help athletes achieve their fitness and performance goals in this unfriendly environment. In this review, the physiological stress of altitude exposure and training will be discussed, with specific nutrition recommendations for athletes training under such conditions. However, there is little research about the nutrition demands of athletes who train at moderate altitude. Our review considers energetic demands and body mass or body composition changes due to altitude training, including respiratory and urinary water loss under these conditions. Carbohydrate intake recommendations and hydration status are discussed in detail, while iron storage and metabolism is also considered. Last, but not least the risk of increased oxidative stress under hypoxic conditions and antioxidant supplementation suggestions are presented. PMID:27322318

  6. Paschen Considerations for High Altitude Airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.; Hillard, G. B.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, there have been several proposals submitted to funding agencies for long-lived high altitude (about 70,000 feet) airships for communications, surveillance, etc. In order for these airships to remain at altitude, high power, high efficiency, lightweight solar arrays must be used, and high efficiency power management and distribution systems must be employed. The needs for high power and high efficiency imply high voltage systems. However, the air pressure at these extreme altitudes is such that electrical power systems will be near the Paschen discharge minimum over a wide range of electrode separations. In this paper, preliminary calculations are made for acceptable high voltage design practices under ambient, hydrogen and helium gas atmospheres.

  7. Application of altitude/hypoxic training by elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Randall L

    2007-09-01

    At the Olympic level, differences in performance are typically less than 0.5%. This helps explain why many contemporary elite endurance athletes in summer and winter sport incorporate some form of altitude/hypoxic training within their year-round training plan, believing that it will provide the "competitive edge" to succeed at the Olympic level. The purpose of this paper is to describe the practical application of altitude/hypoxic training as used by elite athletes. Within the general framework of the paper, both anecdotal and scientific evidence will be presented relative to the efficacy of several contemporary altitude/hypoxic training models and devices currently used by Olympic-level athletes for the purpose of legally enhancing performance. These include the three primary altitude/hypoxic training models: 1) live high+train high (LH+TH), 2) live high+train low (LH+TL), and 3) live low+train high (LL+TH). The LH+TL model will be examined in detail and will include its various modifications: natural/terrestrial altitude, simulated altitude via nitrogen dilution or oxygen filtration, and hypobaric normoxia via supplemental oxygen. A somewhat opposite approach to LH+TL is the altitude/hypoxic training strategy of LL+TH, and data regarding its efficacy will be presented. Recently, several of these altitude/hypoxic training strategies and devices underwent critical review by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) for the purpose of potentially banning them as illegal performance-enhancing substances/methods. This paper will conclude with an update on the most recent statement from WADA regarding the use of simulated altitude devices.

  8. Enhancing team-sport athlete performance: is altitude training relevant?

    PubMed

    Billaut, François; Gore, Christopher J; Aughey, Robert J

    2012-09-01

    Field-based team sport matches are composed of short, high-intensity efforts, interspersed with intervals of rest or submaximal exercise, repeated over a period of 60-120 minutes. Matches may also be played at moderate altitude where the lower oxygen partial pressure exerts a detrimental effect on performance. To enhance run-based performance, team-sport athletes use varied training strategies focusing on different aspects of team-sport physiology, including aerobic, sprint, repeated-sprint and resistance training. Interestingly, 'altitude' training (i.e. living and/or training in O(2)-reduced environments) has only been empirically employed by athletes and coaches to improve the basic characteristics of speed and endurance necessary to excel in team sports. Hypoxia, as an additional stimulus to training, is typically used by endurance athletes to enhance performance at sea level and to prepare for competition at altitude. Several approaches have evolved in the last few decades, which are known to enhance aerobic power and, thus, endurance performance. Altitude training can also promote an increased anaerobic fitness, and may enhance sprint capacity. Therefore, altitude training may confer potentially-beneficial adaptations to team-sport athletes, which have been overlooked in contemporary sport physiology research. Here, we review the current knowledge on the established benefits of altitude training on physiological systems relevant to team-sport performance, and conclude that current evidence supports implementation of altitude training modalities to enhance match physical performances at both sea level and altitude. We hope that this will guide the practice of many athletes and stimulate future research to better refine training programmes.

  9. Altitude training for elite endurance performance: a 2012 update.

    PubMed

    Fudge, Barry W; Pringle, Jamie S M; Maxwell, Neil S; Turner, Gareth; Ingham, Stephen A; Jones, Andrew M

    2012-01-01

    Altitude training is commonly used by endurance athletes and coaches in pursuit of enhancement of performance on return to sea level. The purpose of the current review article was to update and evaluate recent literature relevant to the practical application of altitude training for endurance athletes. Consequently, the literature can be considered in either of two categories: performance-led investigations or mechanistic advancements/insights. Each section discusses the relevant literature and proposes future directions where appropriate.

  10. Physiological implications of altitude training for endurance performance at sea level: a review.

    PubMed

    Bailey, D M; Davies, B

    1997-09-01

    Acclimatisation to environmental hypoxia initiates a series of metabolic and musculocardio-respiratory adaptations that influence oxygen transport and utilisation, or better still, being born and raised at altitude, is necessary to achieve optimal physical performance at altitude, scientific evidence to support the potentiating effects after return to sea level is at present equivocal. Despite this, elite athletes continue to spend considerable time and resources training at altitude, misled by subjective coaching opinion and the inconclusive findings of a large number of uncontrolled studies. Scientific investigation has focused on the optimisation of the theoretically beneficial aspects of altitude acclimatisation, which include increases in blood haemoglobin concentration, elevated buffering capacity, and improvements in the structural and biochemical properties of skeletal muscle. However, not all aspects of altitude acclimatisation are beneficial; cardiac output and blood flow to skeletal muscles decrease, and preliminary evidence has shown that hypoxia in itself is responsible for a depression of immune function and increased tissue damage mediated by oxidative stress. Future research needs to focus on these less beneficial aspects of altitude training, the implications of which pose a threat to both the fitness and the health of the elite competitor. Paul Bert was the first investigator to show that acclimatisation to a chronically reduced inspiratory partial pressure of oxygen (P1O2) invoked a series of central and peripheral adaptations that served to maintain adequate tissue oxygenation in healthy skeletal muscle, physiological adaptations that have been subsequently implicated in the improvement in exercise performance during altitude acclimatisation. However, it was not until half a century later that scientists suggested that the additive stimulus of environmental hypoxia could potentially compound the normal physiological adaptations to endurance

  11. Determinants of team-sport performance: implications for altitude training by team-sport athletes

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, David J; Girard, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Team sports are increasingly popular, with millions of participants worldwide. Athletes engaged in these sports are required to repeatedly produce skilful actions and maximal or near-maximal efforts (eg, accelerations, changes in pace and direction, sprints, jumps and kicks), interspersed with brief recovery intervals (consisting of rest or low-intensity to moderate-intensity activity), over an extended period of time (1–2 h). While performance in most team sports is dominated by technical and tactical proficiencies, successful team-sport athletes must also have highly-developed, specific, physical capacities. Much effort goes into designing training programmes to improve these physical capacities, with expected benefits for team-sport performance. Recently, some team sports have introduced altitude training in the belief that it can further enhance team-sport physical performance. Until now, however, there is little published evidence showing improved team-sport performance following altitude training, despite the often considerable expense involved. In the absence of such studies, this review will identify important determinants of team-sport physical performance that may be improved by altitude training, with potential benefits for team-sport performance. These determinants can be broadly described as factors that enhance either sprint performance or the ability to recover from maximal or near-maximal efforts. There is some evidence that some of these physical capacities may be enhanced by altitude training, but further research is required to verify that these adaptations occur, that they are greater than what could be achieved by appropriate sea-level training and that they translate to improved team-sport performance. PMID:24282200

  12. Determinants of team-sport performance: implications for altitude training by team-sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Bishop, David J; Girard, Olivier

    2013-12-01

    Team sports are increasingly popular, with millions of participants worldwide. Athletes engaged in these sports are required to repeatedly produce skilful actions and maximal or near-maximal efforts (eg, accelerations, changes in pace and direction, sprints, jumps and kicks), interspersed with brief recovery intervals (consisting of rest or low-intensity to moderate-intensity activity), over an extended period of time (1-2 h). While performance in most team sports is dominated by technical and tactical proficiencies, successful team-sport athletes must also have highly-developed, specific, physical capacities. Much effort goes into designing training programmes to improve these physical capacities, with expected benefits for team-sport performance. Recently, some team sports have introduced altitude training in the belief that it can further enhance team-sport physical performance. Until now, however, there is little published evidence showing improved team-sport performance following altitude training, despite the often considerable expense involved. In the absence of such studies, this review will identify important determinants of team-sport physical performance that may be improved by altitude training, with potential benefits for team-sport performance. These determinants can be broadly described as factors that enhance either sprint performance or the ability to recover from maximal or near-maximal efforts. There is some evidence that some of these physical capacities may be enhanced by altitude training, but further research is required to verify that these adaptations occur, that they are greater than what could be achieved by appropriate sea-level training and that they translate to improved team-sport performance.

  13. Adult Learners: Considerations for Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kistler, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    As more and more adults seek out education and training programs to help them become more competitive in the job market, it provides an opportunity for career and technical education. Those who teach adult learners should take into consideration their particular learning traits. This article highlights a framework of core principles to be…

  14. Effect of altitude training on serum creatine kinase activity and serum cortisol concentration in triathletes.

    PubMed

    Wilber, R L; Drake, S D; Hesson, J L; Nelson, J A; Kearney, J T; Dallam, G M; Williams, L L

    2000-01-01

    In this investigation we evaluated the effect of a 5-week training program at 1860 m on serum creatine kinase (CK) activity and serum cortisol concentration in national-caliber triathletes for the purpose of monitoring the response to training in a hypobaric hypoxic environment. Subjects included 16 junior-level female (n = 8) and male (n = 8) triathletes who were training for the International Triathlon Union (ITU) World Championships. After an initial acclimatization period, training intensity and/or volume were increased progressively during the 5-week altitude training camp. Resting venous blood samples were drawn at 0700 hours following a 12-h overnight fast and were analyzed for serum CK activity and serum cortisol concentration. Subjects were evaluated before [7-10 days pre-altitude (SL 1)] and after [7-10 days post-altitude (SL 2)] the 5-week training camp at 1860 m. At altitude, subjects were evaluated within 24-36 h after arrival (ALT 1), 7 days after arrival (ALT 2), 18 days after arrival (ALT 3), and 24-36 h prior to leaving the altitude training camp (ALT 4). A repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to evaluate differences over time from SL 1 to SL 2. Compared to SL 1, serum CK activity increased approximately threefold (P < 0.05) within the initial 24-36 h at altitude (ALT 1), and increased by an additional 70% (P < 0.05) after the 1st week of altitude training (ALT 2). Serum CK activity remained significantly elevated over the duration of the experimental period compared to pre-altitude baseline levels. Serum cortisol concentration was increased (P < 0.05) at the end of the 5-week altitude training period (ALT 4) relative to SL 1, ALT 1 and ALT 3. These data suggest that: (1) the initial increase in serum CK activity observed in the first 24-36 h at altitude was due primarily to acute altitude exposure and was independent of increased training intensity and/or training volume, (2) the subsequent increases in serum CK activity observed over

  15. Defining the "dose" of altitude training: how high to live for optimal sea level performance enhancement.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Robert F; Karlsen, Trine; Resaland, Geir K; Ge, R-L; Harber, Matthew P; Witkowski, Sarah; Stray-Gundersen, James; Levine, Benjamin D

    2014-03-15

    Chronic living at altitudes of ∼2,500 m causes consistent hematological acclimatization in most, but not all, groups of athletes; however, responses of erythropoietin (EPO) and red cell mass to a given altitude show substantial individual variability. We hypothesized that athletes living at higher altitudes would experience greater improvements in sea level performance, secondary to greater hematological acclimatization, compared with athletes living at lower altitudes. After 4 wk of group sea level training and testing, 48 collegiate distance runners (32 men, 16 women) were randomly assigned to one of four living altitudes (1,780, 2,085, 2,454, or 2,800 m). All athletes trained together daily at a common altitude from 1,250-3,000 m following a modified live high-train low model. Subjects completed hematological, metabolic, and performance measures at sea level, before and after altitude training; EPO was assessed at various time points while at altitude. On return from altitude, 3,000-m time trial performance was significantly improved in groups living at the middle two altitudes (2,085 and 2,454 m), but not in groups living at 1,780 and 2,800 m. EPO was significantly higher in all groups at 24 and 48 h, but returned to sea level baseline after 72 h in the 1,780-m group. Erythrocyte volume was significantly higher within all groups after return from altitude and was not different between groups. These data suggest that, when completing a 4-wk altitude camp following the live high-train low model, there is a target altitude between 2,000 and 2,500 m that produces an optimal acclimatization response for sea level performance.

  16. Altitude training for elite endurance athletes: A review for the travel medicine practitioner.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Gerard; O'Connor, Rory; Johnston, Niall

    2016-01-01

    High altitude training is regarded as an integral component of modern athletic preparation, especially for endurance sports such as middle and long distance running. It has rapidly achieved popularity among elite endurance athletes and their coaches. Increased hypoxic stress at altitude facilitates key physiological adaptations within the athlete, which in turn may lead to improvements in sea-level athletic performance. Despite much research in this area to date, the exact mechanisms which underlie such improvements remain to be fully elucidated. This review describes the current understanding of physiological adaptation to high altitude training and its implications for athletic performance. It also discusses the rationale and main effects of different training models currently employed to maximise performance. Athletes who travel to altitude for training purposes are at risk of suffering the detrimental effects of altitude. Altitude illness, weight loss, immune suppression and sleep disturbance may serve to limit athletic performance. This review provides an overview of potential problems which an athlete may experience at altitude, and offers specific training recommendations so that these detrimental effects are minimised.

  17. Medical considerations in dance training for children.

    PubMed

    Hardaker, W T; Erickson, L C

    1987-05-01

    Parents may consult family physicians about the safety of dance training for their children. Injuries in dance training are characteristically associated with improper technique, a poor training environment and fatigue. Many dance injuries can be prevented through attention to the physical and emotional maturity of the child, the quality of the instruction and the training environment. Quality dance training is safe and beneficial for children of any age.

  18. Considerations for integrating fitness into dance training.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    In recent years it has frequently been suggested that dancers may not be sufficiently prepared for the physical demands of dance. The majority of researchers have arrived at the conclusion that there are gaps in the structure of dance training programs that could be filled with the type of physical training that has benefited other elite athletes. This article reviews some recommendations in light of current research for the supplementation of dance training and the inclusion of fitness concepts in traditional dance classes.

  19. Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism in a Mountain Guide: Awareness, Diagnostic Challenges, and Management Considerations at Altitude.

    PubMed

    Hull, Claire M; Rajendran, Dévan; Fernandez Barnes, Arturo

    2016-03-01

    High intensity exercise is associated with several potentially thrombogenic risk factors, including dehydration and hemoconcentration, vascular trauma, musculoskeletal injuries, inflammation, long-distance travel, and contraceptive usage. These are well documented in case reports of venous thrombosis in track and field athletes. For mountaineers and those working at high altitude, additional risks exist. However, despite there being a high degree of vigilance for "classic" conditions encountered at altitude (eg, acute mountain sickness, high altitude pulmonary edema, and high altitude cerebral edema), mainstream awareness regarding thrombotic conditions and their complications in mountain athletes is relatively low. This is significant because thromboembolic events (including deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and cerebral vascular thrombosis) are not uncommon at altitude. We describe a case of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in a male mountain guide and discuss the diagnostic issues encountered by his medical practitioners. Potential risk factors affecting blood circulation (eg, seated car travel and compression of popliteal vein) and blood hypercoagulability (eg, hypoxia, environmental and psychological stressors [avalanche risk, extreme cold]) relevant to the subject of this report and mountain athletes in general are identified. Considerations for mitigating and managing thrombosis in addition to personalized care planning at altitude are discussed. The prevalence of thrombosis in mountain athletes is uncharted, but lowlanders increasingly go to high altitude to trek, ski, or climb. Blood clots can and do occur in physically active people, and thrombosis prevention and recognition will demand heightened awareness among participants, healthcare practitioners, and the altitude sport/leisure industry at large.

  20. Extravehicular Activity training and hardware design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuot, Pierre J.; Harbaugh, Gregory J.

    1993-01-01

    Designing hardware that can be successfully operated by EVA astronauts for EVA tasks required to assemble and maintain Space Station Freedom requires a thorough understanding of human factors and of the capabilities and limitations of the space-suited astronaut, as well as of the effect of microgravity environment on the crew member's capabilities and on the overhead associated with EVA. This paper describes various training methods and facilities that are being designed for training EVA astronauts for Space Station assembly and maintenance, taking into account the above discussed factors. Particular attention is given to the user-friendly hardware design for EVA and to recent EVA flight experience.

  1. Load management in elite German distance runners during 3-weeks of high-altitude training.

    PubMed

    Sperlich, Billy; Achtzehn, Silvia; de Marées, Markus; von Papen, Henning; Mester, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    There is a debate on the optimal way of monitoring training loads in elite endurance athletes especially during altitude training camps. In this case report, including nine members of the German national middle distance running team, we describe a practical approach to monitor the psychobiological stress markers during 21 days of altitude training (~2100 m above sea-level) to estimate the training load and to control muscle damage, fatigue, and/or chronic overreaching. Daily examination included: oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, resting heart rate, body mass, body and sleep perception, capillary blood concentration of creatine kinase. Every other day, venous serum concentration of blood urea nitrogen, venous blood concentration of hemoglobin, hematocrit, red and white blood cell were measured. If two or more of the above-mentioned stress markers were beyond or beneath the athlete's normal individual range, the training load of the subsequent training session was reduced. Running speed at 3 mmol L(-1) blood lactate (V3) improved and no athlete showed any signs of underperformance, chronic muscle damage, decrease body and sleep perception as well as activated inflammatory process during the 21 days. The dense screening of biomarkers in the present case study may stimulate further research to identify candidate markers for load monitoring in elite middle- and long-distance runners during a training camp at altitude.

  2. The effect of ski training at altitude and racing on pituitary, adrenal and testicular function in men.

    PubMed

    Vasankari, T J; Rusko, H; Kujala, U M; Huhtaniemi, I T

    1993-01-01

    The effect of similar prolonged exercise on hormonal changes was studied at sea level and at moderate altitude. Four cross-country skiers participated in a 30-km race and five biathlonists in a 20-km race at sea level in Finland and during altitude training and racing at 1650 m in Les Saisies, France. Venous blood samples were taken at both altitudes before the race between 0800 and 0900 hours and 25-35 min after the race. Resting blood samples were also taken before and after the altitude training and the period of racing. Serum testosterone concentration was higher before the race at altitude than at sea level (19%, P < 0.02), and 30 min after the race growth hormone (GH) concentration was higher at sea level than at moderate altitude (P < 0.002). There were not significant differences in serum luteinising hormone between the altitudes. Serum cortisol concentration was higher after the altitude training and the period of racing than before (P < 0.02) but no difference was observed in testosterone. We concluded, that since the profiles of the anabolic-catabolic hormone concentrations measured are indicators of the performance level of athletes, our data indicated that to follow them during altitude training could be beneficial in optimizing training programme for individual athletes. We also concluded, that the lower GH concentration after racing at moderate altitude may have been a consequence of decreased racing speed and/or increased physical performance.

  3. Relationship Between Vertical Jump Height and Swimming Start Performance Before and After an Altitude Training Camp.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, Amador; Padial, Paulino; de la Fuente, Blanca; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan; Feriche, Belén

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed (a) to analyze the development in the squat jump height and swimming start performance after an altitude training camp, (b) to correlate the jump height and swimming start performance before and after the altitude training period, and (c) to correlate the percent change in the squat jump height with the percent change in swimming start performance. Fifteen elite male swimmers from the Spanish Junior National Team (17.1 ± 0.8 years) were tested before and after a 17-day training camp at moderate altitude. The height reached in the squat jump exercise with additional loads of 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% of swimmers' pretest body weight and swimming start performance (time to 5, 10, and 15 m) were the dependent variables analyzed. Significant increases in the jump height (p ≤ 0.05; effect size [ES]: 0.35-0.48) and swimming start performance (p < 0.01; ES: 0.48-0.52) after the training period were observed. The start time had similar correlations with the jump height before training (r = -0.56 to -0.77) and after training (r = -0.50 to -0.71). The change in the squat jump height was inversely correlated with the change in the start time at 5 m (r = -0.47), 10 m (r = -0.73), and 15 m (r = -0.62). These results suggest that altitude training can be suitable to enhance explosive performance. The correlations obtained between the squat jump height and start time in the raw and change scores confirm the relevance of having high levels of lower-body muscular power to optimize swimming start performance.

  4. Increases in .VO2max with "live high-train low" altitude training: role of ventilatory acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Wilhite, Daniel P; Mickleborough, Timothy D; Laymon, Abigail S; Chapman, Robert F

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the percentage of the increase in whole body maximal oxygen consumption (.VO(2max)) that is accounted for by increased respiratory muscle oxygen uptake after altitude training. Six elite male distance runners (.VO(2max) = 70.6 ± 4.5 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) and one elite female distance runner (.VO(2max)) = 64.7 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) completed a 28-day "live high-train low" training intervention (living elevation, 2,150 m). Before and after altitude training, subjects ran at three submaximal speeds, and during a separate session, performed a graded exercise test to exhaustion. A regression equation derived from published data was used to estimate respiratory muscle .VO(2) (.VO(2RM)) using our ventilation (.VE) values. .VO(2RM) was also estimated retrospectively from a larger group of distance runners (n = 22). .VO(2max) significantly (p < 0.05) increased from pre- to post-altitude (196 ± 59 ml min(-1)), while (.VE) at .VO(2max) also significantly (p < 0.05) increased (13.3 ± 5.3 l min(-1)). The estimated .VO(2RM) contributed 37 % of Δ .VO(2max). The retrospective group also saw a significant increase in .VO(2max) from pre- to post-altitude (201 ± 36 ml min(-1)), along with a 10.8 ± 2.1 l min(-1) increase in (.VE), thus requiring an estimated 27 % of Δ .VO(2max) Our data suggest that a substantial portion of the improvement in .VO(2max) with chronic altitude training goes to fuel the respiratory muscles as opposed to the musculature which directly contributes to locomotion. Consequently, the time-course of decay in ventilatory acclimatization following return to sea-level may have an impact on competitive performance.

  5. Reducing body fat with altitude hypoxia training in swimmers: role of blood perfusion to skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Chia, Michael; Liao, Chin-An; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Wen-Chih; Hou, Chien-Wen; Yu, Szu-Hsien; Harris, M Brennan; Hsu, Tung-Shiung; Lee, Shin-Da; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2013-02-28

    Swimmers tend to have greater body fat than athletes from other sports. The purpose of the study was to examine changes in body composition after altitude hypoxia exposure and the role of blood distribution to the skeletal muscle in swimmers. With a constant training volume of 12.3 km/day, young male swimmers (N = 10, 14.8 ± 0.5 years) moved from sea-level to a higher altitude of 2,300 meters. Body composition was measured before and after translocation to altitude using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) along with 8 control male subjects who resided at sea level for the same period of time. To determine the effects of hypoxia on muscle blood perfusion, total hemoglobin concentration (THC) was traced by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in the triceps and quadriceps muscles under glucose-ingested and insulin-secreted conditions during hypoxia exposure (16% O2) after training. While no change in body composition was found in the control group, subjects who trained at altitude had unequivocally decreased fat mass (-1.7 ± 0.3 kg, -11.4%) with increased lean mass (+0.8 ± 0.2 kg, +1.5%). Arterial oxygen saturation significantly decreased with increased plasma lactate during hypoxia recovery mimicking 2,300 meters at altitude (~93% versus ~97%). Intriguingly, hypoxia resulted in elevated muscle THC, and sympathetic nervous activities occurred in parallel with greater-percent oxygen saturation in both muscle groups. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that increased blood distribution to the skeletal muscle under postprandial condition may contribute to the reciprocally increased muscle mass and decreased body mass after a 3-week altitude exposure in swimmers.

  6. The effects of classic altitude training on hemoglobin mass in swimmers.

    PubMed

    Wachsmuth, N B; Völzke, C; Prommer, N; Schmidt-Trucksäss, A; Frese, F; Spahl, O; Eastwood, A; Stray-Gundersen, J; Schmidt, W

    2013-05-01

    Aim of the study was to determine the influence of classic altitude training on hemoglobin mass (Hb-mass) in elite swimmers under the following aspects: (1) normal oscillation of Hb-mass at sea level; (2) time course of adaptation and de-adaptation; (3) sex influences; (4) influences of illness and injury; (5) interaction of Hb-mass and competition performance. Hb-mass of 45 top swimmers (male 24; female 21) was repeatedly measured (~6 times) over the course of 2 years using the optimized CO-rebreathing method. Twenty-five athletes trained between one and three times for 3-4 weeks at altitude training camps (ATCs) at 2,320 m (3 ATCs) and 1,360 m (1 ATC). Performance was determined by analyzing 726 competitions according to the German point system. The variation of Hb-mass without hypoxic influence was 3.0 % (m) and 2.7 % (f). At altitude, Hb-mass increased by 7.2 ± 3.3 % (p < 0.001; 2,320 m) and by 3.8 ± 3.4 % (p < 0.05; 1,360 m). The response at 2,320 m was not sex-related, and no increase was found in ill and injured athletes (n = 8). Hb-mass was found increased on day 13 and was still elevated 24 days after return (4.0 ± 2.7 %, p < 0.05). Hb-mass had only a small positive effect on swimming performance; an increase in performance was only observed 25-35 days after return from altitude. In conclusion, the altitude (2,320 m) effect on Hb-mass is still present 3 weeks after return, it decisively depends on the health status, but is not influenced by sex. In healthy subjects it exceeds by far the oscillation occurring at sea level. After return from altitude performance increases after a delay of 3 weeks.

  7. Rhodiola crenulata- and Cordyceps sinensis-based supplement boosts aerobic exercise performance after short-term high altitude training.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chung-Yu; Hou, Chien-Wen; Bernard, Jeffrey R; Chen, Chiu-Chou; Hung, Ta-Cheng; Cheng, Lu-Ling; Liao, Yi-Hung; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2014-09-01

    High altitude training is a widely used strategy for improving aerobic exercise performance. Both Rhodiola crenulata (R) and Cordyceps sinensis (C) supplements have been reported to improve exercise performance. However, it is not clear whether the provision of R and C during high altitude training could further enhance aerobic endurance capacity. In this study, we examined the effect of R and C based supplementation on aerobic exercise capacity following 2-week high altitude training. Alterations to autonomic nervous system activity, circulatory hormonal, and hematological profiles were investigated. Eighteen male subjects were divided into two groups: Placebo (n=9) and R/C supplementation (RC, n=9). Both groups received either RC (R: 1400 mg+C: 600 mg per day) or the placebo during a 2-week training period at an altitude of 2200 m. After 2 weeks of altitude training, compared with Placebo group, the exhaustive run time was markedly longer (Placebo: +2.2% vs. RC: +5.7%; p<0.05) and the decline of parasympathetic (PNS) activity was significantly prevented in RC group (Placebo: -51% vs. RC: -41%; p<0.05). Red blood cell, hematocrit, and hemoglobin levels were elevated in both groups to a comparable extent after high altitude training (p<0.05), whereas the erythropoietin (EPO) level remained higher in the Placebo group (∼48% above RC values; p<0.05). The provision of an RC supplement during altitude training provides greater training benefits in improving aerobic performance. This beneficial effect of RC treatment may result from better maintenance of PNS activity and accelerated physiological adaptations during high altitude training.

  8. The Effect of an Altitude Training Camp on Swimming Start Time and Loaded Squat Jump Performance

    PubMed Central

    Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Calderón, Carmen; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan; Tomazin, Katja; Strumbelj, Boro; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of an altitude training (AT) camp on swimming start time and loaded squat jump performance. To accomplish this goal, 13 international swimmers (8 women, 5 men) were allocated to both the control (Sea Level Training, SLT) and experimental conditions (AT, 2320 m above sea level) that were separated by a one year period. All tests (15 m freestyle swimming start and loaded squat jumps with additional loads of 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of swimmers’ body weight) were performed before and after a concurrent 3-week strength and endurance training program prescribed by the national coach. Following the SLT camp, significant impairments in swimming start times to 10 (+3.1%) and 15 m (+4.0%) were observed (P < 0.05), whereas no significant changes for the same distances were detected following the AT camp (-0.89%; P > 0.05). Trivial changes in peak velocity were obtained during the loaded squat jump after both training periods (effect sizes: < 0.20). Based on these results we can conclude that a traditional training high—living high strategy concurrent training of 3 weeks does not adversely affect swimming start time and loaded squat jump performance in high level swimmers, but further studies are necessary to assess the effectiveness of power-oriented resistance training in the development of explosive actions. PMID:27467760

  9. The Effect of an Altitude Training Camp on Swimming Start Time and Loaded Squat Jump Performance.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Calderón, Carmen; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan; Tomazin, Katja; Strumbelj, Boro; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of an altitude training (AT) camp on swimming start time and loaded squat jump performance. To accomplish this goal, 13 international swimmers (8 women, 5 men) were allocated to both the control (Sea Level Training, SLT) and experimental conditions (AT, 2320 m above sea level) that were separated by a one year period. All tests (15 m freestyle swimming start and loaded squat jumps with additional loads of 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of swimmers' body weight) were performed before and after a concurrent 3-week strength and endurance training program prescribed by the national coach. Following the SLT camp, significant impairments in swimming start times to 10 (+3.1%) and 15 m (+4.0%) were observed (P < 0.05), whereas no significant changes for the same distances were detected following the AT camp (-0.89%; P > 0.05). Trivial changes in peak velocity were obtained during the loaded squat jump after both training periods (effect sizes: < 0.20). Based on these results we can conclude that a traditional training high-living high strategy concurrent training of 3 weeks does not adversely affect swimming start time and loaded squat jump performance in high level swimmers, but further studies are necessary to assess the effectiveness of power-oriented resistance training in the development of explosive actions.

  10. Increased Hypoxic Dose After Training at Low Altitude with 9h Per Night at 3000m Normobaric Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Carr, Amelia J; Saunders, Philo U; Vallance, Brent S; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Gore, Christopher J

    2015-12-01

    This study examined effects of low altitude training and a live-high: train-low protocol (combining both natural and simulated modalities) on haemoglobin mass (Hbmass), maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), time to exhaustion, and submaximal exercise measures. Eighteen elite-level race-walkers were assigned to one of two experimental groups; lowHH (low Hypobaric Hypoxia: continuous exposure to 1380 m for 21 consecutive days; n = 10) or a combined low altitude training and nightly Normobaric Hypoxia (lowHH+NHnight: living and training at 1380 m, plus 9 h.night(-1) at a simulated altitude of 3000 m using hypoxic tents; n = 8). A control group (CON; n = 10) lived and trained at 600 m. Measurement of Hbmass, time to exhaustion and VO2max was performed before and after the training intervention. Paired samples t-tests were used to assess absolute and percentage change pre and post-test differences within groups, and differences between groups were assessed using a one-way ANOVA with least significant difference post-hoc testing. Statistical significance was tested at p < 0.05. There was a 3.7% increase in Hbmass in lowHH+NHnight compared with CON (p = 0.02). In comparison to baseline, Hbmass increased by 1.2% (±1.4%) in the lowHH group, 2.6% (±1.8%) in lowHH+NHnight, and there was a decrease of 0.9% (±4.9%) in CON. VO2max increased by ~4% within both experimental conditions but was not significantly greater than the 1% increase in CON. There was a ~9% difference in pre and post-intervention values in time to exhaustion after lowHH+NH-night (p = 0.03) and a ~8% pre to post-intervention difference (p = 0.006) after lowHH only. We recommend low altitude (1380 m) combined with sleeping in altitude tents (3000 m) as one effective alternative to traditional altitude training methods, which can improve Hbmass. Key pointsIn some countries, it may not be possible to perform classical altitude training effectively, due to the low elevation at altitude training venues. An

  11. Verification Testing to Confirm VO2max in Altitude-Residing, Endurance-Trained Runners.

    PubMed

    Weatherwax, R M; Richardson, T B; Beltz, N M; Nolan, P B; Dalleck, L

    2016-06-01

    We sought to explore the utility of the verification trial to confirm individual attainment of 'true' VO2max in altitude-residing, endurance-trained runners during treadmill exercise. 24 elite endurance-trained men and women runners (age=21.5±3.3 yr, ht=174.8±9.3 cm, body mass=60.5±6.7 kg, PR 800 m 127.5±13.1 s) completed a graded exercise test (GXT) trial (VO2max=60.0±5.8 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)), and returned 20 min after incremental exercise to complete a verification trial (VO2max=59.6±5.7 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) of constant load, supramaximal exercise. The incidence of 'true' VO2max confirmation using the verification trial was 24/24 (100%) with all participants revealing differences in VO2max≤3% (the technical error of our equipment) between the GXT and verification trials. These findings support use of the verification trial to confirm VO2max attainment in altitude-residing, endurance-trained runners.

  12. Comparison of Live High: Train Low Altitude and Intermittent Hypoxic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Humberstone-Gough, Clare E.; Saunders, Philo U.; Bonetti, Darrell L.; Stephens, Shaun; Bullock, Nicola; Anson, Judith M.; Gore, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Live High:Train Low (LHTL) altitude training is a popular ergogenic aid amongst athletes. An alternative hypoxia protocol, acute (60-90 min daily) Intermittent Hypoxic Exposure (IHE), has shown potential for improving athletic performance. The aim of this study was to compare directly the effects of LHTL and IHE on the running and blood characteristics of elite triathletes. Changes in total haemoglobin mass (Hbmass), maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), velocity at VO2max (vVO2max), time to exhaustion (TTE), running economy, maximal blood lactate concentration ([La]) and 3 mM [La] running speed were compared following 17 days of LHTL (240 h of hypoxia), IHE (10.2 h of hypoxia) or Placebo treatment in 24 Australian National Team triathletes (7 female, 17 male). There was a clear 3.2 ± 4.8% (mean ± 90% confidence limits) increase in Hbmass following LHTL compared with Placebo, whereas the corresponding change of -1.4 ± 4.5% in IHE was unclear. Following LHTL, running economy was 2.8 ± 4.4% improved compared to IHE and 3mM [La] running speed was 4.4 ± 4.5% improved compared to Placebo. After IHE, there were no beneficial changes in running economy or 3mM [La] running speed compared to Placebo. There were no clear changes in VO2max, vVO2max and TTE following either method of hypoxia. The clear difference in Hbmass response between LHTL and IHE indicated that the dose of hypoxia in IHE was insufficient to induce accelerated erythropoiesis. Improved running economy and 3mM [La] running speed following LHTL suggested that this method of hypoxic exposure may enhance performance at submaximal running speeds. Overall, there was no evidence to support the use of IHE in elite triathletes. Key Points Despite a clear 3.2% increase in haemoglobin mass following 17 days of Live High: Train Low altitude training, no change in maximal aerobic capacity was observed. There were positive changes in running economy and the lactate-speed relationship at submaximal running speeds

  13. Position statement--altitude training for improving team-sport players' performance: current knowledge and unresolved issues.

    PubMed

    Girard, Olivier; Amann, Markus; Aughey, Robert; Billaut, François; Bishop, David J; Bourdon, Pitre; Buchheit, Martin; Chapman, Robert; D'Hooghe, Michel; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Gore, Christopher J; Millet, Grégoire P; Roach, Gregory D; Sargent, Charli; Saunders, Philo U; Schmidt, Walter; Schumacher, Yorck O

    2013-12-01

    Despite the limited research on the effects of altitude (or hypoxic) training interventions on team-sport performance, players from all around the world engaged in these sports are now using altitude training more than ever before. In March 2013, an Altitude Training and Team Sports conference was held in Doha, Qatar, to establish a forum of research and practical insights into this rapidly growing field. A round-table meeting in which the panellists engaged in focused discussions concluded this conference. This has resulted in the present position statement, designed to highlight some key issues raised during the debates and to integrate the ideas into a shared conceptual framework. The present signposting document has been developed for use by support teams (coaches, performance scientists, physicians, strength and conditioning staff) and other professionals who have an interest in the practical application of altitude training for team sports. After more than four decades of research, there is still no consensus on the optimal strategies to elicit the best results from altitude training in a team-sport population. However, there are some recommended strategies discussed in this position statement to adopt for improving the acclimatisation process when training/competing at altitude and for potentially enhancing sea-level performance. It is our hope that this information will be intriguing, balanced and, more importantly, stimulating to the point that it promotes constructive discussion and serves as a guide for future research aimed at advancing the bourgeoning body of knowledge in the area of altitude training for team sports.

  14. Rhodiola crenulata- and Cordyceps sinensis-Based Supplement Boosts Aerobic Exercise Performance after Short-Term High Altitude Training

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chung-Yu; Hou, Chien-Wen; Bernard, Jeffrey R.; Chen, Chiu-Chou; Hung, Ta-Cheng; Cheng, Lu-Ling; Liao, Yi-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Chen, Chung-Yu, Chien-Wen Hou, Jeffrey R. Bernard, Chiu-Chou Chen, Ta-Cheng Hung, Lu-Ling Cheng, Yi-Hung Liao, and Chia-Hua Kuo. Rhodiola crenulata- and Cordyceps sinensis-based supplement boosts aerobic exercise performance after short-term high altitude training. High Alt Med Biol 15:371–379, 2014.—High altitude training is a widely used strategy for improving aerobic exercise performance. Both Rhodiola crenulata (R) and Cordyceps sinensis (C) supplements have been reported to improve exercise performance. However, it is not clear whether the provision of R and C during high altitude training could further enhance aerobic endurance capacity. In this study, we examined the effect of R and C based supplementation on aerobic exercise capacity following 2-week high altitude training. Alterations to autonomic nervous system activity, circulatory hormonal, and hematological profiles were investigated. Eighteen male subjects were divided into two groups: Placebo (n=9) and R/C supplementation (RC, n=9). Both groups received either RC (R: 1400 mg+C: 600 mg per day) or the placebo during a 2-week training period at an altitude of 2200 m. After 2 weeks of altitude training, compared with Placebo group, the exhaustive run time was markedly longer (Placebo: +2.2% vs. RC: +5.7%; p<0.05) and the decline of parasympathetic (PNS) activity was significantly prevented in RC group (Placebo: −51% vs. RC: −41%; p<0.05). Red blood cell, hematocrit, and hemoglobin levels were elevated in both groups to a comparable extent after high altitude training (p<0.05), whereas the erythropoietin (EPO) level remained higher in the Placebo group (∼48% above RC values; p<0.05). The provision of an RC supplement during altitude training provides greater training benefits in improving aerobic performance. This beneficial effect of RC treatment may result from better maintenance of PNS activity and accelerated physiological adaptations during high altitude training. PMID

  15. Yin and yang, or peas in a pod? Individual-sport versus team-sport athletes and altitude training.

    PubMed

    Aughey, Robert J; Buchheit, Martin; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Roach, Gregory D; Sargent, Charli; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C; Bourdon, Pitre C; Gore, Christopher J

    2013-12-01

    The question of whether altitude training can enhance subsequent sea-level performance has been well investigated over many decades. However, research on this topic has focused on athletes from individual or endurance sports, with scant number of studies on team-sport athletes. Questions that need to be answered include whether this type of training may enhance team-sport athlete performance, when success in team-sport is often more based on technical and tactical ability rather than physical capacity per se. This review will contrast and compare athletes from two sports representative of endurance (cycling) and team-sports (soccer). Specifically, we draw on the respective competition schedules, physiological capacities, activity profiles and energetics of each sport to compare the similarities between athletes from these sports and discuss the relative merits of altitude training for these athletes. The application of conventional live-high, train-high; live-high, train-low; and intermittent hypoxic training for team-sport athletes in the context of the above will be presented. When the above points are considered, we will conclude that dependent on resources and training objectives, altitude training can be seen as an attractive proposition to enhance the physical performance of team-sport athletes without the need for an obvious increase in training load.

  16. Yin and yang, or peas in a pod? Individual-sport versus team-sport athletes and altitude training

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Robert J; Buchheit, Martin; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Roach, Gregory D; Sargent, Charli; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C; Bourdon, Pitre C; Gore, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether altitude training can enhance subsequent sea-level performance has been well investigated over many decades. However, research on this topic has focused on athletes from individual or endurance sports, with scant number of studies on team-sport athletes. Questions that need to be answered include whether this type of training may enhance team-sport athlete performance, when success in team-sport is often more based on technical and tactical ability rather than physical capacity per se. This review will contrast and compare athletes from two sports representative of endurance (cycling) and team-sports (soccer). Specifically, we draw on the respective competition schedules, physiological capacities, activity profiles and energetics of each sport to compare the similarities between athletes from these sports and discuss the relative merits of altitude training for these athletes. The application of conventional live-high, train-high; live-high, train-low; and intermittent hypoxic training for team-sport athletes in the context of the above will be presented. When the above points are considered, we will conclude that dependent on resources and training objectives, altitude training can be seen as an attractive proposition to enhance the physical performance of team-sport athletes without the need for an obvious increase in training load. PMID:24255910

  17. Pathogenesis of ascites in broilers raised at low altitude: aetiological considerations based on echocardiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Olkowski, A A; Abbott, J A; Classen, H L

    2005-05-01

    This study reports novel insight into the aetiology of pulmonary hypertension and ascites in broiler chickens. The scope of measurements was focused on anatomical and functional parameters, and blood flow patterns in leghorns (resistant to ascites), fast-growing broilers (susceptible to ascites), broilers developing ascites, and ascitic broilers evaluated in vivo using echocardiography, and further examined in the context of postmortem findings. Both, in vivo observed features and postmortem findings, showed clear differences between broilers and leghorns, and between normal and ascitic broilers. Abnormalities in the heart chamber geometry and blood flow patterns were detected upon echocardiographic examination in all ascitic broilers. Right and left atrio-ventricular (AV) valve regurgitation were common findings in ascitic broilers and some apparently normal broilers, with left AV valve insufficiency being a predominant feature with respect to degree and frequency of occurrence. Blood flow disturbances were not detected in leghorns. Left ventricular fractional shortening (functional parameter) was considerably reduced (P < 0.01) in ascitic birds (mean: 21.7 +/- 2.0 SE) in comparison with normal broilers (mean: 39.1 +/- 3.6 SE), or leghorns (mean: 43.3 +/- 2.4 SE). The presented findings indicate that pathological and functional changes in the left ventricle and atrium play a significant role in the pathogenesis of ascites in broilers. Severe dilation of the left atrium and pulmonary veins seen on postmortem examination, as well as regurgitant blood flow in the left atrium, demonstrated by Doppler study in ascitic birds, provide evidence that chronically elevated pressure in the left atrium is involved in the aetiology of pulmonary hypertension and ascites in fast-growing broilers.

  18. Ethical considerations in clinical training, care and research in psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Strous, Rael D

    2011-04-01

    Psychopharmacology is a powerful tool in psychiatry; however, it is one that demands responsibility in order to deal with the ethical complexities that accompany advances in the field. It is important that questions are asked and that ethical mindfulness and sensitivity are developed along with clinical skills. In order to cultivate and deepen ethical awareness and subsequently solve issues in optimal fashion, investment should be made in the development of an ethical decision-making process as well as in education in the ethics of psychopharmacology to trainees in the field at all stages of their educational development. A clear approach to identifying ethical problems, engaging various ethical concepts in considering solutions and then applying these principles in problem resolution is demanded. An openness in identifying and exploring issues has become crucial to the future development and maturation of psychopharmacologists, both research and clinical. Consideration must be given to the social implications of psychopharmacological practice, with the best interests of patients always paramount. From both a research and clinical perspective, psychopharmacology has to be practised with fairness, sensitivity and ethical relevance to all. While ethical issues related to psychopharmacological practice are varied and plentiful, this review focuses on advances in technology and biological sciences, personal integrity, special populations, and education and training.

  19. Beetroot juice does not enhance altitude running performance in well-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Josh Timothy; Oliver, Samuel James; Lewis-Jones, Tammy Maria; Wylie, Lee John; Macdonald, Jamie Hugo

    2015-06-01

    We hypothesized that acute dietary nitrate (NO3(-)) provided as concentrated beetroot juice supplement would improve endurance running performance of well-trained runners in normobaric hypoxia. Ten male runners (mean (SD): sea level maximal oxygen uptake, 66 (7) mL·kg(-1)·min(-1); 10 km personal best, 36 (2) min) completed incremental exercise to exhaustion at 4000 m and a 10-km treadmill time-trial at 2500 m simulated altitude on separate days after supplementation with ∼7 mmol NO3(-) and a placebo at 2.5 h before exercise. Oxygen cost, arterial oxygen saturation, heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were determined during the incremental exercise test. Differences between treatments were determined using means [95% confidence intervals], paired sample t tests, and a probability of individual response analysis. NO3(-) supplementation increased plasma nitrite concentration (NO3(-), 473 (226) nmol·L(-1) vs. placebo, 61 (37) nmol·L(-1), P < 0.001) but did not alter time to exhaustion during the incremental test (NO3(-), 402 (80) s vs. placebo 393 (62) s, P = 0.5) or time to complete the 10-km time-trial (NO3(-), 2862 (233) s vs. placebo, 2874 (265) s, P = 0.6). Further, no practically meaningful beneficial effect on time-trial performance was observed as the 11 [-60 to 38] s improvement was less than the a priori determined minimum important difference (51 s), and only 3 runners experienced a "likely, probable" performance improvement. NO3(-) also did not alter oxygen cost, arterial oxygen saturation, heart rate, or RPE. Acute dietary NO3(-) supplementation did not consistently enhance running performance of well-trained athletes in normobaric hypoxia.

  20. Adaptive Training Considerations for Use in Simulation-Based Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    ABSTRACT In this report, we examine theoretical and empirical papers that describe adaptive training (AT). When applied effectively, AT has the...the effectiveness of various instructional techniques and methods. In the current report, we examine theoretical and empirical papers that describe...this report, we examine theoretical and empirical papers that describe one such advanced training method, Adaptive Training (AT). In AT, some

  1. Instructor Considerations in the Design of Optimal Training Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-18

    instructors ( Polzella , 1983; Osborne, Semple, & Obermayer, 1983). This in turn, causes excessive overhead time in the student training exercises on the...Three reviews of the instructional support system (ISS) concept. (Technical Report 81-C-0081-1). Orlando, FL: Naval Training Equipment Center. Polzella

  2. Children and Adolescents: Physiological Considerations during Exercise Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawbridge, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Because children and adolescents are not just miniature adults, it is important to know that children might be vulnerable to injury and may not respond positively to certain types or intensities of training. It is also important to recognize how training can positively affect growth and development, so it can be judiciously applied at critical…

  3. [Contributions of training in biomedical ethics. Investigations, considerations and prospects].

    PubMed

    Waelchli, M; Foppa, C

    2012-01-01

    The testimonies of healthcare professionals who have received introductory training in biomedial ethics show a perceived improvement in their competence in managing complex situations that involve ethical stakes. The resources acquired in this way should make it possible to prevent and reduce the appearance of moral distress, a phenomenon the consequences and persistence of which can lead to burnout and to giving up the profession. These observations encourage establishments to reinforce the resources intended for ethical awareness courses for their fellow workers.

  4. Athletes at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Khodaee, Morteza; Grothe, Heather L.; Seyfert, Jonathan H.; VanBaak, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Context: Athletes at different skill levels perform strenuous physical activity at high altitude for a variety of reasons. Multiple team and endurance events are held at high altitude and may place athletes at increased risk for developing acute high altitude illness (AHAI). Training at high altitude has been a routine part of preparation for some of the high level athletes for a long time. There is a general belief that altitude training improves athletic performance for competitive and recreational athletes. Evidence Acquisition: A review of relevant publications between 1980 and 2015 was completed using PubMed and Google Scholar. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: AHAI is a relatively uncommon and potentially serious condition among travelers to altitudes above 2500 m. The broad term AHAI includes several syndromes such as acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). Athletes may be at higher risk for developing AHAI due to faster ascent and more vigorous exertion compared with nonathletes. Evidence regarding the effects of altitude training on athletic performance is weak. The natural live high, train low altitude training strategy may provide the best protocol for enhancing endurance performance in elite and subelite athletes. High altitude sports are generally safe for recreational athletes, but they should be aware of their individual risks. Conclusion: Individualized and appropriate acclimatization is an essential component of injury and illness prevention. PMID:26863894

  5. The effects of altitude/hypoxic training on oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity in elite athletes – a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hun-young; Hwang, Hyejung; Park, Jonghoon; Lee, Seongno; Lim, Kiwon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was designed as a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing effectiveness of altitude/hypoxic training (experimental) versus sea-level training (control) on oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity of elite athletes in Korea. [Methods] Databases (Research Information Service System, Korean studies Information Service System, National Assembly Library) were for randomized controlled trials comparing altitude/hypoxic training versus sea-level training in elite athletes. Studies published in Korea up to December 2015 were eligible for inclusion. Oxygen delivery capacity of the blood was quantified by red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), erythropoietin (EPO); and aerobic exercise capacity was quantified by maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). RBC, Hb, Hct, VO2max represented heterogeneity and compared post-intervention between altitude/hypoxic training and sea-level training in elite athletes by a random effect model meta-analysis. EPO represented homogeneity and meta-analysis performed by a fixed effect model. Eight independent studies with 156 elite athletes (experimental: n = 82, control: n = 74) were included in the metaanalysis. [Results] RBC (4.499×105 cell/ul, 95 % CI: 2.469 to 6.529), Hb (5.447 g/dl, 95 % CI: 3.028 to 7.866), Hct (3.639 %, 95 % CI: 1.687 to 5.591), EPO (0.711 mU/mL, 95% CI: 0.282 to 1.140), VO2max (1.637 ml/kg/min, 95% CI: 0.599 to 1.400) showed significantly greater increase following altitude/hypoxic training, as compared with sea-level training. [Conclusion] For elite athletes in Korea, altitude/ hypoxic training appears more effective than sea-level training for improvement of oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity. PMID:27298808

  6. The feasibility of a high-altitude aircraft platform with consideration of technological and societal constraints. Thesis - Kansas Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, E. B.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of remotely piloted aircraft performing year around missions at an altitude of 70,000 feet is determined. Blimp and airplane type vehicles employing solar-voltaic, microwave, or nuclear propulsion systems were considered. A payload weighing 100 pounds and requiring 1000 watts of continuous power was assumed for analysis purposes. Results indicate that a solar powered aircraft requires more solar cell area than is available on conventional aircraft configurations if designed for the short days and high wind speeds associated with the winter season. A conventionally shaped blimp that uses solar power appears feasible if maximum airspeed is limited to about 100 ft/s. No viable airplane configuration that uses solar power and designed to withstand the winter environment was found. Both a conventionally shaped blimp and airplane appear feasible using microwave power. Nuclear powered aircraft of these type are also feasible. Societal attitudes toward the use of solar power in high altitude aircraft appear favorable. The use of microwave power for this purpose is controversial, even though the ground station required would transmit power at levels comparable to existing satellite communications stations.

  7. Relative Match Intensities at High Altitude in Highly-Trained Young Soccer Players (ISA3600)

    PubMed Central

    Buchheit, Martin; Hammond, Kristal; Bourdon, Pitre C.; Simpson, Ben M.; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A.; Schmidt, Walter F.; Gore, Christopher J.; Aughey, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    To compare relative match intensities of sea-level versus high-altitude native soccer players during a 2-week camp at 3600 m, data from 7 sea-level (Australian U17 National team, AUS) and 6 high-altitude (a Bolivian U18 team, BOL) native soccer players were analysed. Two matches were played at sea-level and three at 3600 m on Days 1, 6 and 13. The Yo-Yo Intermittent recovery test (vYo-YoIR1) was performed at sea-level, and on Days 3 and 10. Match activity profiles were measured via 10-Hz GPS. Distance covered >14.4 km.h-1 (D>14.4 km·h-1) and >80% of vYo-YoIR1 (D>80%vYo-YoIR1) were examined. Upon arrival at altitude, there was a greater decrement in vYo-YoIR1 (Cohen’s d +1.0, 90%CL ± 0.8) and D>14.4 km·h-1 (+0.5 ± 0.8) in AUS. D>14.4 km.h-1 was similarly reduced relative to vYo-YoIR1 in both groups, so that D>80%vYo-YoIR1 remained similarly unchanged (-0.1 ± 0.8). Throughout the altitude sojourn, vYo-YoIR1 and D>14.4 km·h-1 increased in parallel in AUS, so that D>80%vYo-YoIR1 remained stable in AUS (+6.0%/match, 90%CL ± 6.7); conversely D>80%vYo-YoIR1 decreased largely in BOL (-12.2%/match ± 6.2). In sea-level natives competing at high-altitude, changes in match running performance likely follow those in high-intensity running performance. Bolivian data confirm that increases in ‘fitness’ do not necessarily translate into greater match running performance, but rather in reduced relative exercise intensity. Key points When playing at high-altitude, players may alter their activities during matches in relation to their transient maximal physical capacities, possibly to maintain a ‘tolerable’ relative exercise intensity. While there is no doubt that running performance per se in not the main determinant of match outcomes (Carling, 2013), fitness levels influence relative match intensity (Buchheit et al., 2012, Mendez-Villanueva et al., 2013), which in-turn may impact on decision making and skill performance (Rampinini et al., 2008). In the context of

  8. [Study of variations in hematologic parameters in rugby players undergoing physical training at a high altitude].

    PubMed

    Bizzaro, N

    1989-05-01

    Thirty-three well-trained rugby players, ranging in age from 18 to 30 years, were studied during basal training for one year. Peripheral blood parameters and iron metabolism indices were investigated before, during and at the end of the season. The hematologic status showed no substantial changes with respect to physical activity even if considered by age and team-role. However, a significant reduction (P less than 0.001) in RBC count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, serum iron, plasma transferrin and ferritin, was observed when compared with those obtained from a group of healthy untrained controls. Since the decrease in serum iron and ferritin concentrations was significant so as to justify a similar reduction in Hb and Ht values, two pathogenic mechanisms must be considered: e.g., a moderate hemodilution secondary to plasma expansion combined with a decrease in iron stores caused by chronic iron loss through feces, profound sweat and urine. The present study demonstrates that mild anemia (sports anemia) may develop in well-trained rugby players with heavy physical work load, due to increased plasma volume with a relative thinning of RBCs. This pseudo-anemic condition is associated with a reduction in iron stores which can lead to a true iron-deficiency anemia. A yearly blood test and, if necessary, iron supplementation could prevent this condition.

  9. Training of Teacher-Researcher as Prior Consideration of Professional Training of Pedagogues in Great Britain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozubovska, Iryna; Popovych, Iryna

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to the problem of professional training of pedagogues in foreign countries. Special attention has been paid to the experience of Great Britain. It has been underlined that the teacher has to acquire thorough knowledge in profession as well as to master the methods of teaching. Nevertheless, this is not enough to reach…

  10. How Is Working Memory Training Likely to Influence Academic Performance? Current Evidence and Methodological Considerations.

    PubMed

    Bergman Nutley, Sissela; Söderqvist, Stina

    2017-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is one of our core cognitive functions, allowing us to keep information in mind for shorter periods of time and then work with this information. It is the gateway that information has to pass in order to be processed consciously. A well-functioning WM is therefore crucial for a number of everyday activities including learning and academic performance (Gathercole et al., 2003; Bull et al., 2008), which is the focus of this review. Specifically, we will review the research investigating whether improving WM capacity using Cogmed WM training can lead to improvements on academic performance. Emphasis is given to reviewing the theoretical principles upon which such investigations rely, in particular the complex relation between WM and mathematical and reading abilities during development and how these are likely to be influenced by training. We suggest two possible routes in which training can influence academic performance, one through an effect on learning capacity which would thus be evident with time and education, and one through an immediate effect on performance on reading and mathematical tasks. Based on the theoretical complexity described we highlight some methodological issues that are important to take into consideration when designing and interpreting research on WM training and academic performance, but that are nonetheless often overlooked in the current research literature. Finally, we will provide some suggestions for future research for advancing the understanding of WM training and its potential role in supporting academic attainment.

  11. How Is Working Memory Training Likely to Influence Academic Performance? Current Evidence and Methodological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Bergman Nutley, Sissela; Söderqvist, Stina

    2017-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is one of our core cognitive functions, allowing us to keep information in mind for shorter periods of time and then work with this information. It is the gateway that information has to pass in order to be processed consciously. A well-functioning WM is therefore crucial for a number of everyday activities including learning and academic performance (Gathercole et al., 2003; Bull et al., 2008), which is the focus of this review. Specifically, we will review the research investigating whether improving WM capacity using Cogmed WM training can lead to improvements on academic performance. Emphasis is given to reviewing the theoretical principles upon which such investigations rely, in particular the complex relation between WM and mathematical and reading abilities during development and how these are likely to be influenced by training. We suggest two possible routes in which training can influence academic performance, one through an effect on learning capacity which would thus be evident with time and education, and one through an immediate effect on performance on reading and mathematical tasks. Based on the theoretical complexity described we highlight some methodological issues that are important to take into consideration when designing and interpreting research on WM training and academic performance, but that are nonetheless often overlooked in the current research literature. Finally, we will provide some suggestions for future research for advancing the understanding of WM training and its potential role in supporting academic attainment. PMID:28223948

  12. Developing maximal neuromuscular power: part 2 - training considerations for improving maximal power production.

    PubMed

    Cormie, Prue; McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Robert U

    2011-02-01

    This series of reviews focuses on the most important neuromuscular function in many sport performances: the ability to generate maximal muscular power. Part 1, published in an earlier issue of Sports Medicine, focused on the factors that affect maximal power production while part 2 explores the practical application of these findings by reviewing the scientific literature relevant to the development of training programmes that most effectively enhance maximal power production. The ability to generate maximal power during complex motor skills is of paramount importance to successful athletic performance across many sports. A crucial issue faced by scientists and coaches is the development of effective and efficient training programmes that improve maximal power production in dynamic, multi-joint movements. Such training is referred to as 'power training' for the purposes of this review. Although further research is required in order to gain a deeper understanding of the optimal training techniques for maximizing power in complex, sports-specific movements and the precise mechanisms underlying adaptation, several key conclusions can be drawn from this review. First, a fundamental relationship exists between strength and power, which dictates that an individual cannot possess a high level of power without first being relatively strong. Thus, enhancing and maintaining maximal strength is essential when considering the long-term development of power. Second, consideration of movement pattern, load and velocity specificity is essential when designing power training programmes. Ballistic, plyometric and weightlifting exercises can be used effectively as primary exercises within a power training programme that enhances maximal power. The loads applied to these exercises will depend on the specific requirements of each particular sport and the type of movement being trained. The use of ballistic exercises with loads ranging from 0% to 50% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) and

  13. Effects of 12-Week Endurance Training at Natural Low Altitude on the Blood Redox Homeostasis of Professional Adolescent Athletes: A Quasi-Experimental Field Trial.

    PubMed

    Tong, Tomas K; Kong, Zhaowei; Lin, Hua; He, Yeheng; Lippi, Giuseppe; Shi, Qingde; Zhang, Haifeng; Nie, Jinlei

    2016-01-01

    This field study investigated the influences of exposure to natural low altitude on endurance training-induced alterations of redox homeostasis in professional adolescent runners undergoing 12-week off-season conditioning program at an altitude of 1700 m (Alt), by comparison with that of their counterparts completing the program at sea-level (SL). For age-, gender-, and Tanner-stage-matched comparison, 26 runners (n = 13 in each group) were selected and studied. Following the conditioning program, unaltered serum levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and superoxide dismutase accompanied with an increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and decreases of xanthine oxidase, reduced glutathione (GSH), and GSH/GSSG ratio were observed in both Alt and SL groups. Serum glutathione peroxidase and catalase did not change in SL, whereas these enzymes, respectively, decreased and increased in Alt. Uric acid (UA) decreased in SL and increased in Alt. Moreover, the decreases in GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio in Alt were relatively lower compared to those in SL. Further, significant interindividual correlations were found between changes in catalase and TBARS, as well as between UA and T-AOC. These findings suggest that long-term training at natural low altitude is unlikely to cause retained oxidative stress in professional adolescent runners.

  14. Space Station Freedom altitude strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Brian M.; Teplitz, Scott B.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom (SSF) altitude strategy provides guidelines and assumptions to determine an altitude profile for Freedom. The process for determining an altitude profile incorporates several factors such as where the Space Shuttle will rendezvous with the SSF, when reboosts must occur, and what atmospheric conditions exist causing decay. The altitude strategy has an influence on all areas of SSF development and mission planning. The altitude strategy directly affects the micro-gravity environment for experiments, propulsion and control system sizing, and Space Shuttle delivery manifests. Indirectly the altitude strategy influences almost every system and operation within the Space Station Program. Evolution of the SSF altitude strategy has been a very dynamic process over the past few years. Each altitude strategy in turn has emphasized a different consideration. Examples include a constant Space Shuttle rendezvous altitude for mission planning simplicity, or constant micro-gravity levels with its inherent emphasis on payloads, or lifetime altitudes to provide a safety buffer to loss of control conditions. Currently a new altitude strategy is in development. This altitude strategy will emphasize Space Shuttle delivery optimization. Since propellant is counted against Space Shuttle payload-to-orbit capacity, lowering the rendezvous altitude will not always increase the net payload-to-orbit, since more propellant would be required for reboost. This altitude strategy will also consider altitude biases to account for Space Shuttle launch slips and an unexpected worsening of atmospheric conditions. Safety concerns will define a lower operational altitude limit, while radiation levels will define upper altitude constraints. The evolution of past and current SSF altitude strategies and the development of a new altitude strategy which focuses on operational issues as opposed to design are discussed.

  15. High Altitude Headache and Acute Mountain Sickness at Moderate Elevations in a Military Population During Battalion-Level Training Exercises

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    headache and at least one other symptom: anorexia, fatigue , insomnia, or dizziness after arrival at high altitude.’’’° If advanced AMS is unrecognized...various blood markers like hematocrit, hemoglobin, blood lactate , and blood glucose, and AMS symptoms.’’^ Mea- surement of intracranial pressure using the

  16. Design considerations for high-altitude, long-endurance, microwave-powered aircraft. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ., Washington, D.C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. Q.

    1985-01-01

    The sizing and performance analyses have been conducted in the design of long-endurance, high-altitude airplanes. These airplanes receive power either continuously beamed from a phased array transmitter or intermittently beamed from a dish transmitter. Results are presented for the cases of flight in zero wind speed and nonzero wind speed. Sensitivity studies indicate that the vehicle size is relatively insensitive to changes in the transmitter size. Cost estimates were made using models that excluded the airplane cost. Using a reference payload, results obtained from array and dish configurations were compared. Comparisons showed savings in cost as well as smaller vehicle sizes when an array transmitter was used.

  17. Towards Culturally Relevant Preventive Interventions: The Consideration of Racial Socialization in Parent Training with African American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coard, Stephanie I.; Wallace, Scyatta A.; Stevenson, Howard C.; Brotman, Laurie M.

    2004-01-01

    We present a rationale for the inclusion of culture-based parenting practices (i.e., racial socialization) in the design and implementation of empirically based parenting programs with African American families. We begin with a discussion of the limitations of the current parent training literature related to cultural considerations. Second, we…

  18. Medicine at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alex D

    2006-01-01

    Medicine at high altitude provides important insights into the acute and chronic effects of hypoxia. Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common syndrome occurring after acute ascent to over 2,500 m and is caused by increased capillary permeability. A number of factors have been identified that increase the risk of AMS, in particular exercise. Avoiding rapid ascent, undue exercise and the use of acetazolamide are useful preventative measures but severe symptoms may require oxygen, dexamethasone and descent. Acute mountain sickness is usually self-limiting but may progress into the serious syndromes of pulmonary and cerebral oedema. Acclimatisation and adaptation are important for workers and residents at high altitude and the improvement seen in maximum exercise has been incorporated into some training schedules for endurance athletes. Chronic and subacute high-altitude diseases largely result from polycythemia and pulmonary hypertension.

  19. High-altitude-nuclear electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) environment simulation public health and safety considerations. Technical report, 1 Oct 89-31 May 91

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, K.

    1992-03-01

    The existence of electromagnetic fields external to the working volumes of high-altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) environment simulators has raised both environmental and public-health concerns regarding the safety of HEMP environment simulator operations. This report contains a review of what HEMP is, what its effects on defense systems are, and why and how HEMP environment simulation testing is conducted. The state of present knowledge concerning the external simulator fields and their possible effects on biological and electronic systems is summarized. Research initiatives are identified to aid in answering the most important questions regarding the continued environmental safety of HEMP simulator operations. These initiatives are intended to support (1) development of options for modification and/or relocation of HEMP environment simulator facilities and (2) determination of safe exposure levels for biological and electronic systems. Recommendations for specific DoD actions are given.

  20. Global circulation of the Earth's atmosphere at altitudes from 0 to 135 Km simulated with the ARM model. Consideration of the solar activity contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivolutsky, A. A.; Cherepanova, L. A.; Dement'eva, A. V.; Repnev, A. I.; Klyuchnikova, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    The results of simulations of the global circulation and temperature regime in the altitude range from the lower tropospheric layers to 135 km are presented. They were obtained with the Atmospheric Research Model (ARM), an advanced modification of a version of the Cologne Middle Atmosphere Model (COMMA). The ARM is characterized by higher spatial resolution and better parameterizations of the radiation sources and heat sinks. At the lower boundary of the model, wavy sources of perturbations, which are caused by internal gravity waves and planetary waves, are specified. The results of the modeling of the global temperature and wind fields for the mean solar activity level are presented, and their changes, which are caused by variations of the UV-radiation fluxes in the solar activity cycle and by solar proton flares, are also considered.

  1. Integrating the EMPD with an Alpine altitudinal training set to reconstruct climate variables in Holocene pollen records from high-altitude peat bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlanetto, Giulia; Badino, Federica; Brunetti, Michele; Champvillair, Elena; De Amicis, Mattia; Maggi, Valter; Pini, Roberta; Ravazzi, Cesare; Vallé, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Temperatures and precipitation are the main environmental factors influencing vegetation and pollen production. Knowing the modern climate optima and tolerances of those plants represented in fossil assemblages and assuming that the relationships between plants and climate in the past are not dissimilar from the modern ones, fossil pollen records offer many descriptors to reconstruct past climate variables. The aim of our work is to investigate the potential of high-altitude pollen records from an Alpine peat bog (TBValter, close to the Ruitor Glacier, Western Italian Alps) for quantitative paleoclimate estimates. The idea behind is that high-altitude ecosystems are more sensitive to climate changes, especially to changes in July temperatures that severely affect the timberline ecotone. Meantime, we met with difficulties when considering the factors involved in pollen dispersal over a complex altitudinal mountain pattern, such as the Alps. We used the EMPD-European Modern Pollen Database (Davis et al., 2013) as modern training set to be compared with our high-altitude fossil site. The EMPD dataset is valuable in that it provides a large geographic coverage of main ecological and climate gradients (at sub-continental scale) but lacks in sampling of altitudinal gradients and high-altitude sites in the Alps. We therefore designed an independent altitudinal training set for the alpine valley hosting our fossil site. 27 sampling plots were selected along a 1700m-elevational transect. In a first step, each plot was provided with (i) 3 moss polsters collected following the guidelines provided by Cañellas-Boltà et al. (2009) and analyzed separately to account for differences in pollen deposition at small scale, (ii) morphometrical parameters obtained through a high-resolution DEM, and (iii) temperature and precipitation were estimated by means of weighted linear regression of the meteorological variable versus elevation, locally evaluated for each site (Brunetti et al

  2. Alternative considerations for environmental oversight training: Results from a needs assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.; Hensley, J.

    1995-11-01

    For staff to perform their jobs effectively and efficiently, they must be adequately trained. Well-trained staff are also more likely to be satisfied with their jobs and to remain with a given organization. In addition to hiring staff with relevant backgrounds and skills, critical steps in maintaining adequately trained staff are to analyze skill levels needed for the various tasks that personnel are required to perform and to provide training to improve staff s skill base. This first analysis is commonly referred to as a training needs assessment. Training needs are usually determined by defining the tasks required for a particular job and the associated knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to adequately accomplish these tasks. The Office of Northwestern Area Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) oversees environmental remediation activities in the Chicago, Idaho, Oakland, and Richland Operations Offices. For this organization to effectively carry out its mission, its staff need to be as proficient as possible in the appropriate knowledge and skills. Therefore, a training needs assessment was conducted to determine staff`s level of knowledge and proficiency in various skills. The purpose of the assessment was to: (1) Examine the types of activities or tasks in which staff are involved, (2) Determine the skills needed to perform relevant tasks, and (3) Assess gaps in knowledge and skills for the tasks performed in order to suggest opportunities for skill development.

  3. [Classification of altitude decompression sickness].

    PubMed

    Katuntsev, V P

    2000-01-01

    The article is devoted to the discussion of principles of and approaches to classification of altitude decompression sickness (DCS), one of the most methodically formidable aspects of the problem. Based on his own multiyear experience in altitude DCS investigations and critical review of literature, the author reasons his concept of clinical classification of altitude DCS. The author's concept places emphasis on obligatory consideration of three stages in DCS development: A--pre-disease (the premorbid syndrome), B--uncomplicated (light) and C--complicated (severe) forms. The objective sign of the premorbid state is "silent" gas bubbles in organism detectable by ultrasonic devices. Signs of uncomplicated altitude DCS are musculoarticular pains, local edema and skin itching. Complicated altitude DCS is diagnosed by systemic (respiratory, neurological and cardiovascular) disorders.

  4. Physiological and Neural Adaptations to Eccentric Exercise: Mechanisms and Considerations for Training

    PubMed Central

    Hedayatpour, Nosratollah; Falla, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Eccentric exercise is characterized by initial unfavorable effects such as subcellular muscle damage, pain, reduced fiber excitability, and initial muscle weakness. However, stretch combined with overload, as in eccentric contractions, is an effective stimulus for inducing physiological and neural adaptations to training. Eccentric exercise-induced adaptations include muscle hypertrophy, increased cortical activity, and changes in motor unit behavior, all of which contribute to improved muscle function. In this brief review, neuromuscular adaptations to different forms of exercise are reviewed, the positive training effects of eccentric exercise are presented, and the implications for training are considered. PMID:26543850

  5. Physiological and Neural Adaptations to Eccentric Exercise: Mechanisms and Considerations for Training.

    PubMed

    Hedayatpour, Nosratollah; Falla, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Eccentric exercise is characterized by initial unfavorable effects such as subcellular muscle damage, pain, reduced fiber excitability, and initial muscle weakness. However, stretch combined with overload, as in eccentric contractions, is an effective stimulus for inducing physiological and neural adaptations to training. Eccentric exercise-induced adaptations include muscle hypertrophy, increased cortical activity, and changes in motor unit behavior, all of which contribute to improved muscle function. In this brief review, neuromuscular adaptations to different forms of exercise are reviewed, the positive training effects of eccentric exercise are presented, and the implications for training are considered.

  6. Altitude preexposure recommendations for inducing acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Muza, Stephen R; Beidleman, Beth A; Fulco, Charles S

    2010-01-01

    For many low-altitude (<1500 m) residents, their travel itineraries may cause them to ascend rapidly to high (>2400 m) altitudes without having the time to develop an adequate degree of altitude acclimatization. Prior to departing on these trips, low-altitude residents can induce some degree of altitude acclimatization by ascending to moderate (>1500 m) or high altitudes during either continuous or intermittent altitude preexposures. Generally, the degree of altitude acclimatization developed is proportional to the altitude attained and the duration of exposure. The available evidence suggests that continuous residence at 2200 m or higher for 1 to 2 days or daily 1.5- to 4-h exposures to >4000 m induce ventilatory acclimatization. Six days at 2200 m substantially decreases acute mountain sickness (AMS) and improves work performance after rapid ascent to 4300 m. There is evidence that 5 or more days above 3000 m within the last 2 months will significantly decrease AMS during a subsequent rapid ascent to 4500 m. Exercise training during the altitude preexposures may augment improvement in physical performance. The persistence of altitude acclimatization after return to low altitude appears to be proportional to the degree of acclimatization developed. The subsequent ascent to high altitude should be scheduled as soon as possible after the last altitude preexposure.

  7. Acceleration of Deep Neural Network Training with Resistive Cross-Point Devices: Design Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Gokmen, Tayfun; Vlasov, Yurii

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, deep neural networks (DNN) have demonstrated significant business impact in large scale analysis and classification tasks such as speech recognition, visual object detection, pattern extraction, etc. Training of large DNNs, however, is universally considered as time consuming and computationally intensive task that demands datacenter-scale computational resources recruited for many days. Here we propose a concept of resistive processing unit (RPU) devices that can potentially accelerate DNN training by orders of magnitude while using much less power. The proposed RPU device can store and update the weight values locally thus minimizing data movement during training and allowing to fully exploit the locality and the parallelism of the training algorithm. We evaluate the effect of various RPU device features/non-idealities and system parameters on performance in order to derive the device and system level specifications for implementation of an accelerator chip for DNN training in a realistic CMOS-compatible technology. For large DNNs with about 1 billion weights this massively parallel RPU architecture can achieve acceleration factors of 30, 000 × compared to state-of-the-art microprocessors while providing power efficiency of 84, 000 GigaOps∕s∕W. Problems that currently require days of training on a datacenter-size cluster with thousands of machines can be addressed within hours on a single RPU accelerator. A system consisting of a cluster of RPU accelerators will be able to tackle Big Data problems with trillions of parameters that is impossible to address today like, for example, natural speech recognition and translation between all world languages, real-time analytics on large streams of business and scientific data, integration, and analysis of multimodal sensory data flows from a massive number of IoT (Internet of Things) sensors. PMID:27493624

  8. Acceleration of Deep Neural Network Training with Resistive Cross-Point Devices: Design Considerations.

    PubMed

    Gokmen, Tayfun; Vlasov, Yurii

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, deep neural networks (DNN) have demonstrated significant business impact in large scale analysis and classification tasks such as speech recognition, visual object detection, pattern extraction, etc. Training of large DNNs, however, is universally considered as time consuming and computationally intensive task that demands datacenter-scale computational resources recruited for many days. Here we propose a concept of resistive processing unit (RPU) devices that can potentially accelerate DNN training by orders of magnitude while using much less power. The proposed RPU device can store and update the weight values locally thus minimizing data movement during training and allowing to fully exploit the locality and the parallelism of the training algorithm. We evaluate the effect of various RPU device features/non-idealities and system parameters on performance in order to derive the device and system level specifications for implementation of an accelerator chip for DNN training in a realistic CMOS-compatible technology. For large DNNs with about 1 billion weights this massively parallel RPU architecture can achieve acceleration factors of 30, 000 × compared to state-of-the-art microprocessors while providing power efficiency of 84, 000 GigaOps∕s∕W. Problems that currently require days of training on a datacenter-size cluster with thousands of machines can be addressed within hours on a single RPU accelerator. A system consisting of a cluster of RPU accelerators will be able to tackle Big Data problems with trillions of parameters that is impossible to address today like, for example, natural speech recognition and translation between all world languages, real-time analytics on large streams of business and scientific data, integration, and analysis of multimodal sensory data flows from a massive number of IoT (Internet of Things) sensors.

  9. Supporting Online AP Students: The Rural Facilitator and Considerations for Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Nicole; Degner, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Online courses supplemented by on-site facilitators help many rural students pursue advanced coursework, but research is warranted to better understand facilitator role and training needs. This study examined facilitation experiences, demographic characteristics, and professional development activities of rural on-site facilitators associated with…

  10. Navigating Social Networking and Social Media in School Psychology: Ethical and Professional Considerations in Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pham, Andy V.

    2014-01-01

    Social networking and social media have undoubtedly proliferated within the past decade, allowing widespread communication and dissemination of user-generated content and information. Some psychology graduate programs, including school psychology, have started to embrace social networking and media for instructional and training purposes; however,…

  11. Conducting Research into European Union Education and Training Policy: Some Theoretical and Methodological Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, David; Economou, Anastasia

    1999-01-01

    Discusses PRESTIGE, the project funded by the European Commission within its Training and Mobility Researchers program, describing the research design of the Oxford part of the project. Describes a comparative study of the implementation of the 'European Dimension' in education in England, Scotland, and Wales. Considers the methodological and…

  12. Parental Social Cognitions: Considerations in the Acceptability of and Engagement in Behavioral Parent Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mah, Janet W. T.; Johnston, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    Behavioral parent training (BPT) is a widely used, evidence-based treatment for externalizing child behaviors. However, the ability of BPT programs to be maximally effective remains limited by relatively low rates of acceptance, attendance, and adherence to treatment. Previous reviews have focused on a variety of demographic and mental health…

  13. Counseling Psychology in the Era of Genetic Testing: Considerations for Practice, Research, and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaut, Kevin P.

    2006-01-01

    The field of genetics and the process of testing for genetic disorders have advanced considerably over the past half century, ushering in significant improvements in certain areas of medical diagnosis and disease prediction. However, genetic discoveries are accompanied by many social, emotional, and psychological implications, and counseling…

  14. Work Scheduling by Use of Worker Model in Consideration of Learning by On-The-Job Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateno, Toshitake; Shimizu, Keiko

    This paper deals with a method of scheduling manual work in consideration of learning by on-the-job training (OJT). In skilled work such as maintenance of trains and airplanes, workers must learn many tasks by OJT. While the work processing time of novice workers is longer than that of experts, the time will be reduced with repeated OJT. Therefore, OJT is important for maintaining the skill level and the long-term work efficiency of an organization. In order to devise a schedule considering OJT, the scheduler must incorporate a management function of workers to trace dynamically changing work experience. In this paper, after the relationship between scheduling problems and worker management problems is defined, a simulation method, in which a worker model and an agent-based mechanism are utilized, is proposed to derive the optimal OJT strategy toward high long-term performance. Finally, we present some case studies showing the effectiveness of OJT planning based on the simulation.

  15. Automated disambiguation of acronyms and abbreviations in clinical texts: window and training size considerations.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sungrim; Pakhomov, Serguei; Melton, Genevieve B

    2012-01-01

    Acronyms and abbreviations within electronic clinical texts are widespread and often associated with multiple senses. Automated acronym sense disambiguation (WSD), a task of assigning the context-appropriate sense to ambiguous clinical acronyms and abbreviations, represents an active problem for medical natural language processing (NLP) systems. In this paper, fifty clinical acronyms and abbreviations with 500 samples each were studied using supervised machine-learning techniques (Support Vector Machines (SVM), Naïve Bayes (NB), and Decision Trees (DT)) to optimize the window size and orientation and determine the minimum training sample size needed for optimal performance. Our analysis of window size and orientation showed best performance using a larger left-sided and smaller right-sided window. To achieve an accuracy of over 90%, the minimum required training sample size was approximately 125 samples for SVM classifiers with inverted cross-validation. These findings support future work in clinical acronym and abbreviation WSD and require validation with other clinical texts.

  16. Training the Developing Brain Part II: Cognitive Considerations for Youth Instruction and Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Adam M.; Kiefer, Adam W.; Lesnick, Samantha; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Myer, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Growing numbers of youth participating in competitive, organized physical activity has led to a concern for the risk of sports related injuries during important periods of human development. Recent studies have demonstrated the ability of Integrative Neuromuscular Training (INT) to enhance athletic performance and to reduce the risk of sports related injuries in youth. Successful implementation of INT necessitates instruction from knowledgeable and qualified instructors who understand the unique physical, cognitive and psychosocial characteristics of youth to provide appropriate training instruction and feedback. Principles of a classical theory of cognitive development provide a useful context for discussion of developmentally appropriate methods and strategies for INT instruction of youth. INT programs that consider these developmentally appropriate approaches will provide a controlled, efficacious environment for youth to improve athletic performance and to reduce risk of sports related injury; thus, promoting a healthy, active lifestyle beyond an individual’s formative years. PMID:25968858

  17. Survey of Current Doctrine, Training, and Special Considerations for Military Operations on Urbanized Terrain (MOUT).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    a) enter an upper floor with the help of a pole under the supervison of the C1 b) throw the rope with bar under the supervision X of the Al 60-90...ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The present research was conducted under the monitorship of Mr. Hal Strasel, ARI Field Unit, Fort Benning, Georgia, and under the...demographic "growth of Western Europe since World War II. The SURVEY OF CURRENT MOUT TRAINING section discusses the major factors influencing MOUT planning

  18. High-Altitude Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... high-altitude illness:Acute mountain sicknessHigh-altitude pulmonary edema (also called HAPE), which affects the lungsHigh-altitude cerebral edema (also called HACE), which affects the brainThese illnesses ...

  19. Clinical management of immuno-suppression in athletes associated with exercise training: sports medicine considerations.

    PubMed

    Hackney, Anthony Carl

    2013-01-01

    The Overtraining Syndrome (OTS) is a physically debilitating medical condition that results in athletes being totally compromised in their capacity to perform and compete. Many physiological systems are affected by the process of overtraining and the development of the OTS which results from it; but one system in particular, the immune, is highly susceptible to degradation resulting in a reduction in overall health and physical performance. The aim of this paper is to review; 1) the evidence-based proactive steps and actions to take to greatly reduce the risk of development of an infection or a compromised immune system in athletes; and 2) the course of action for clinicians to take when they are dealing with an athlete displaying overt signs of an infection and, or inflammation. Evidenced reported here within support that it is essential for clinicians to take practical preventative and management steps - actions with athletes (involved in intensive exercise training) in order to help preserve and maintain a healthy and robust immune system if they are going to perform optimally.

  20. Operational Physical Performance and Fitness in Military Women: Physiological, Musculoskeletal Injury, and Optimized Physical Training Considerations for Successfully Integrating Women Into Combat-Centric Military Occupations.

    PubMed

    Nindl, Bradley C; Jones, Bruce H; Van Arsdale, Stephanie J; Kelly, Karen; Kraemer, William J

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes presentations from a 2014 United States Department of Defense (DoD) Health Affairs Women in Combat symposium addressing physiological, musculoskeletal injury, and optimized physical training considerations from the operational physical performance section. The symposium was held to provide a state-of-the-science meeting on the U.S. DoD's rescinding of the ground combat exclusion policy opening up combat-centric occupations to women. Physiological, metabolic, body composition, bone density, cardiorespiratory fitness, and thermoregulation differences between men and women were briefly reviewed. Injury epidemiological data are presented within military training and operational environments demonstrating women to be at a higher risk for musculoskeletal injuries than men. Physical training considerations for improved muscle strength and power, occupational task performance, load carriage were also reviewed. Particular focus of this article was given to translating physiological and epidemiological findings from the literature on these topics toward actionable guidance and policy recommendations for military leaders responsible for military physical training doctrine: (1) inclusion of resistance training with special emphasis on strength and power development (i.e., activation of high-threshold motor units and recruitment of type II high-force muscle fibers), upper-body strength development, and heavy load carriage, (2) moving away from "field expediency" as the major criteria for determining military physical training policy and training implementation, (3) improvement of load carriage ability with emphasis placed on specific load carriage task performance, combined with both resistance and endurance training, and (4) providing greater equipment resources, coaching assets, and increased training time dedicated to physical readiness training.

  1. The Use of Dexamethasone in Support of High-Altitude Ground Operations: Review of the Literature & Current Training of U.S. Special Operations Medical Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-14

    capacity even in normoxic conditions. For example, high dosages of dexamethasone are used in aerobic endurance sports to enhance physical performance. This...is why the World Anti- Doping Agency prohibits the administration of any glucosteroids during competitions [25]. Fischler and colleagues [24...Medicine; 2004. Technical Note TN04-05. 4. Bärtsch P, Saltin B. General introduction to altitude adaptation and mountain sickness. Scand J Med Sci Sports

  2. Venus Altitude Cycling Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, M. L.

    2015-04-01

    A novel balloon concept is demonstrated that uses mechanical compression as altitude control mechanism to sustain long duration balloon probe flight in the cloud level region of Venus’ atmosphere between 45 and 58 km altitude.

  3. Performance of Portable Ventilators at Altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-30

    Deploying ventilators that can maintain a consistent tidal volume ( VT ) delivery at various altitudes is imperative for lung protection when...and adult VT (250-750 mL) at 0 and 20 cm H2O positive end expiratory pressure and at inspired oxygen of 0.21 and 1.0. Airway pressure, volume, and...calibrated pneumotachograph connected to a training test lung in an altitude chamber. Set VT and delivered VT and changes in VT at each altitude were

  4. Effect of altitude on some blood factors and its stability after leaving the altitude.

    PubMed

    Hematy, Yones; Setorki, Mahbubeh; Razavi, Akram; Doudi, Monir

    2014-09-01

    The underlying mechanisms of altitude training are still a matter of controversial discussion. The aim of this study was to compare the hemoglobin concentration, red blood cell count and volume between normal and high altitude situations and their persistence after returning back from higher altitudes. The study population included male students of Ardal Branch, Islamic Azad University. Twelve apparently healthy individual with high level of physical activity, mean age of 22.6 ± 1.50 years were selected through purposive and available sampling method. In this study, blood samples were collected at different time and altitudes in order to compare the changes of Red Blood Cell (RBC), Mean Cell Hemoglobin (MCH), Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC) and Mean Cell Volume (MCV). The first blood sampling was conducted at the altitude of 1830 m. The subsequent blood samplings were conducted 48 and 72 h after reaching the altitude of 4000 m and 24, 48 and 72 h after returning back to the altitude of 1830 m. The statistical method used in this study was repeated measurement ANOVA. Red Blood Cell (RBC) changes between onset of climbing to 1830 m and 24, 48 and 2 h after sojourn at 1830 m height (after returning from 4000 m altitude) was significant. Mean Cell Hemoglobin (MCH) showed no significant change in any of the altitudes. MCHC changes between onset of moving toward altitude 1830 meters and 24, 48 and 72 h after sojourn at 1830 m height (after returning from 4000 m altitude) was also significant in addition, MCHC showed a significant difference between 24 h staying at 1830 m altitude with 48 and 72 h staying at 4000 m altitude. Mean Cell Volume (MCV) showed no significant difference between 48 and 72 h staying at 4000 m altitude and also between 24, 48 and 72 h staying at 1830 m altitude; however, there was a significant difference between onset of moving toward 1830 m altitude with 24, 48 and 72 h staying at 1830 m altitude and also 48 and 72 h staying at

  5. High altitude syndromes at intermediate altitudes: a pilot study in the Australian Alps.

    PubMed

    Slaney, Graham; Cook, Angus; Weinstein, Philip

    2013-10-01

    Our hypothesis is that symptoms of high altitude syndromes are detectable even at intermediate altitudes, as commonly encountered under Australian conditions (<2500 m above sea level). High altitude medicine has long recognised several syndromes associated with rapid ascent to altitudes above 2500 m, including high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE), high altitude cerebral oedema (HACE) and high altitude flatus expulsion (HAFE). Symptoms of high altitude syndromes are of growing concern because of the global trend toward increasing numbers of tourists and workers exposed to both rapid ascent and sustained physical activity at high altitude. However, in Australia, high altitude medicine has almost no profile because of our relatively low altitudes by international standards. Three factors lead us to believe that altitude sickness in Australia deserves more serious consideration: Australia is subject to rapid growth in alpine recreational industries; altitude sickness is highly variable between individuals, and some people do experience symptoms already at 1500 m; and there is potential for an occupational health and safety issue amongst workers. To test this hypothesis we examined the relationship between any high altitude symptoms and a rapid ascent to an intermediate altitude (1800 m) by undertaking an intervention study in a cohort of eight medical clinic staff, conducted during July of the 2012 (Southern Hemisphere) ski season, using self-reporting questionnaires, at Mansfield (316 m above sea level) and at the Ski Resort of Mt Buller (1800 m), Victoria, Australia. The intervention consisted of ascent by car from Mansfield to Mt Buller (approx. 40 min drive). Participants completed a self-reporting questionnaire including demographic data and information on frequency of normal homeostatic processes (fluid intake and output, food intake and output, symptoms including thirst and headaches, and frequency of passing wind or urine). Data were recorded in hourly periods

  6. Is hypoxia training good for muscles and exercise performance?

    PubMed

    Vogt, Michael; Hoppeler, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Altitude training has become very popular among athletes as a means to further increase exercise performance at sea level or to acclimatize to competition at altitude. Several approaches have evolved during the last few decades, with "live high-train low" and "live low-train high" being the most popular. This review focuses on functional, muscular, and practical aspects derived from extensive research on the "live low-train high" approach. According to this, subjects train in hypoxia but remain under normoxia for the rest of the time. It has been reasoned that exercising in hypoxia could increase the training stimulus. Hypoxia training studies published in the past have varied considerably in altitude (2300-5700 m) and training duration (10 days to 8 weeks) and the fitness of the subjects. The evidence from muscle structural, biochemical, and molecular findings point to a specific role of hypoxia in endurance training. However, based on the available performance capacity data such as maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) and (maximal) power output, hypoxia as a supplement to training is not consistently found to be advantageous for performance at sea level. Stronger evidence exists for benefits of hypoxic training on performance at altitude. "Live low-train high" may thus be considered when altitude acclimatization is not an option. In addition, the complex pattern of gene expression adaptations induced by supplemental training in hypoxia, but not normoxia, suggest that muscle tissue specifically responds to hypoxia. Whether and to what degree these gene expression changes translate into significant changes in protein concentrations that are ultimately responsible for observable structural or functional phenotypes remains open. It is conceivable that the global functional markers such as Vo(2)max and (maximal) power output are too coarse to detect more subtle changes that might still be functionally relevant, at least to high-level athletes.

  7. High altitude reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yazdo, Renee Anna; Moller, David

    1990-01-01

    At the equator the ozone layer ranges from 65,000 to 130,000 plus feet, which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. The Universities Space Research Association, in cooperation with NASA, is sponsoring an undergraduate program which is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to cruise at 130,000 feet for six hours at Mach 0.7, while carrying 3,000 lbs. of payload. In addition, the aircraft must have a minimum range of 6,000 miles. In consideration of the novel nature of this project, the pilot must be able to take control in the event of unforeseen difficulties. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable - a joined-wing, a biplane, and a twin-boom conventional airplane. The performance of each configuration was analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the project.

  8. Training considerations for the intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags in fish with a summary of common surgical errors

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Steven J.; Wagner, Glenn N.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Training is a fundamental part of all scientific and technical disciplines. This is particularly true for all types of surgeons. For surgical procedures, a number of skills are necessary to reduce mistakes. Trainees must learn an extensive yet standardized set of problem-solving and technical skills to handle challenges as they arise. There are currently no guidelines or consistent training methods for those intending to implant electronic tags in fish; this is surprising, considering documented cases of negative consequences of fish surgeries and information from studies having empirically tested fish surgical techniques. Learning how to do fish surgery once is insufficient for ensuring the maintenance or improvement of surgical skill. Assessment of surgical skills is rarely incorporated into training, and is needed. Evaluation provides useful feedback that guides future learning, fosters habits of self-reflection and self-remediation, and promotes access to advanced training. Veterinary professionals should be involved in aspects of training to monitor basic surgical principles. We identified attributes related to knowledge, understanding, and skill that surgeons must demonstrate prior to performing fish surgery including a “hands-on” assessment using live fish. Included is a summary of common problems encountered by fish surgeons. We conclude by presenting core competencies that should be required as well as outlining a 3-day curriculum for training surgeons to conduct intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags. This curriculum could be offered through professional fisheries societies as professional development courses.

  9. Effects of simulated and real altitude exposure in elite swimmers.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Eileen Y; Aughey, Robert J; Anson, Judith M; Hopkins, Will G; Pyne, David B

    2010-02-01

    The effect of repeated exposures to natural and simulated moderate altitude on physiology and competitive performance of elite athletes warrants further investigation. This study quantified changes in hemoglobin mass, performance tests, and competitive performance of elite swimmers undertaking a coach-prescribed program of natural and simulated altitude training. Nine swimmers (age 21.1 +/- 1.4 years, mean +/- SD) completed up to four 2-week blocks of combined living and training at moderate natural altitude (1,350 m) and simulated live high-train low (2,600-600 m) altitude exposure between 2 National Championships. Changes in hemoglobin mass (Hbmass), 4-mM lactate threshold velocity, and 2,000 m time trial were measured. Competition performance of these swimmers was compared with that of 9 similarly trained swimmers (21.1 +/- 4.1 years) who undertook no altitude training. Each 2-week altitude block on average produced the following improvements: Hbmass, 0.9% (90% confidence limits, +/-0.8%); 4-mM lactate threshold velocity, 0.9% (+/-0.8%); and 2,000 m time trial performance, 1.2% (+/-1.6%). The increases in Hbmass had a moderate correlation with time trial performance (r = 0.47; +/-0.41) but an unclear correlation with lactate threshold velocity (r = -0.23; +/-0.48). The altitude group did not swim faster at National Championships compared with swimmers who did not receive any altitude exposure, the difference between the groups was not substantial (-0.5%; +/-1.0%). A coach-prescribed program of repeated altitude training and exposure elicited modest changes in physiology but did not substantially improve competition performance of elite swimmers. Sports should investigate the efficacy of their altitude training program to justify the investment.

  10. Guide to Altitude Decompression Sickness Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    altitude exposure ONLY. Subjects were not given a Physiological Training Card (AF Form 1274; orange ) after completion of this training. Successful...remove any user-installed programs such as x-form. 5) Turn on the arm power by rotating the arm power switch to the right. The orange light will...that results of these breath, blood and/or urine tests shall be made available to the Company and its designated employees or agents . THE

  11. Considerations for the Use of the Observation Experience to Aid in Early Socialization and Retention of Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Context: Retention of quality students in athletic training programs (ATPs) is important. Many factors contribute to retention of students, including their motivation level, peer support, positive interactions with instructors, clinical integration, and mentorship. Objective: Highlight the use of the observation period for preparatory athletic…

  12. Interdisciplinary Doctoral Leadership Training in Early Intervention: Considerations for Research and Practice in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Juliann; Snyder, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This article examines issues associated with the preparation of doctoral-level personnel to assume interdisciplinary scholarship and leadership roles in early intervention (EI). Following a review of national reports focused on EI doctoral leadership training, the preparation of educational researchers, and interdisciplinary doctoral programs in…

  13. Integrating Anatomy Training into Radiation Oncology Residency: Considerations for Developing a Multidisciplinary, Interactive Learning Module for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labranche, Leah; Johnson, Marjorie; Palma, David; D'Souza, Leah; Jaswal, Jasbir

    2015-01-01

    Radiation oncologists require an in-depth understanding of anatomical relationships for modern clinical practice, although most do not receive formal anatomy training during residency. To fulfill the need for instruction in relevant anatomy, a series of four multidisciplinary, interactive learning modules were developed for a cohort of radiation…

  14. Use of virtual reality technique for the training of motor control in the elderly. Some theoretical considerations.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, E D; Schoene, D; Pichierri, G; Smith, S T

    2010-08-01

    Virtual augmented exercise, an emerging technology that can help to promote physical activity and combine the strengths of indoor and outdoor exercise, has recently been proposed as having the potential to increase exercise behavior in older adults. By creating a strong presence in a virtual, interactive environment, distraction can be taken to greater levels while maintaining the benefits of indoor exercises which may result in a shift from negative to positive thoughts about exercise. Recent findings on young participants show that virtual reality training enhances mood, thus, increasing enjoyment and energy. For older adults virtual, interactive environments can influence postural control and fall events by stimulating the sensory cues that are responsible in maintaining balance and orientation. However, the potential of virtual reality training has yet to be explored for older adults. This manuscript describes the potential of dance pad training protocols in the elderly and reports on the theoretical rationale of combining physical game-like exercises with sensory and cognitive challenges in a virtual environment.

  15. APOLLO 16 COMMANDER JOHN YOUNG ENTERS ALTITUDE CHAMBER FOR TESTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Apollo 16 commander John W. Young prepares to enter the lunar module in an altitude chamber in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building at the spaceport prior to an altitude run. During the altitude run, in which Apollo 16 lunar module pilot Charles M. Duke also participated, the chamber was pumped down to simulate pressure at an altitude in excess of 200,000 feet. Young, Duke and command module pilot Thomas K. Mattingly II, are training at the Kennedy Space Center for the Apollo 16 mission. Launch is scheduled from Pad 39A, March 17, 1972.

  16. High Altitude Pilgrimage Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Religious pilgrims have been going to high altitude pilgrimages long before trekkers and climbers sojourned in high altitude regions, but the medical literature about high altitude pilgrimage is sparse. Gosainkunda Lake (4300 m) near Kathmandu, Nepal, and Shri Amarnath Yatra (3800 m) in Sri Nagar, Kashmir, India, are the two sites in the Himalayas from where the majority of published reports of high altitude pilgrimage have originated. Almost all travels to high altitude pilgrimages are characterized by very rapid ascents by large congregations, leading to high rates of acute mountain sickness (AMS). In addition, epidemiological studies of pilgrims from Gosainkunda Lake show that some of the important risk factors for AMS in pilgrims are female sex and older age group. Studies based on the Shri Amarnath Yatra pilgrims show that coronary artery disease, complications of diabetes, and peptic ulcer disease are some of the common, important reasons for admission to hospital during the trip. In this review, the studies that have reported these and other relevant findings will be discussed and appropriate suggestions made to improve pilgrims' safety at high altitude. PMID:25330393

  17. CAT altitude avoidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, B. L. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for indicating the altitude of the tropopause or of an inversion layer wherein clear air turbulence (CAT) may occur, and the likely severity of any such CAT, includes directing a passive microwave radiometer on the aircraft at different angles with respect to the horizon. The microwave radiation measured at a frequency of about 55 GHz represents the temperature of the air at an ""average'' range of about 3 kilometers, so that the sine of the angle of the radiometer times 3 kilometers equals the approximate altitude of the air whose temperature is measured. A plot of altitude (with respect to the aircraft) versus temperature of the air at that altitude, can indicate when an inversion layer is present and can indicate the altitude of the tropopause or of such an inversion layer. The plot can also indicate the severity of any CAT in an inversion layer. If CAT has been detected in the general area, then the aircraft can be flown at an altitude to avoid the tropopause or inversion layer.

  18. Exhaled nitric oxide concentration upon acute exposure to moderate altitude.

    PubMed

    Caspersen, C; Stang, J; Thorsen, E; Stensrud, T

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess immediate changes in the partial pressure of nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled gas (PE NO ) in healthy trained subjects who were acutely exposed to moderate altitude. One group of nine and another group of 20 healthy subjects were exposed to an ambient pressure of 728 hPa (546 mmHg) corresponding to an altitude of 2800 m for 5 and 90 min, respectively, in an altitude chamber. PE NO was measured offline by sampling exhaled gas in tight metal foil bags at 5, 30, 60, and 90 min. A correction for increased expiratory flow rate due to gas density effects at altitude was performed (PE NO corr). PE NO was significantly decreased by 13-16%, while the fraction of NO in exhaled gas (FE NO) was increased by 16-19% compared to sea level. There was no significant change in PE NO corr after exposure to altitude for 5, 30, 60, and 90 min. We conclude that there was no change in PENO upon arrival at altitude after correcting for gas density effects on expiratory flow rate. Corrections for altitude effects must be done before comparing measurements performed at different altitudes when using measurements of FENO to monitor athletes who have asthma during training at altitude.

  19. Speech privacy and annoyance considerations in the acoustic environment of passenger cars of high-speed trains.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Hong, Joo Young; Jang, Hyung Suk; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2015-12-01

    It is necessary to consider not only annoyance of interior noises but also speech privacy to achieve acoustic comfort in a passenger car of a high-speed train because speech from other passengers can be annoying. This study aimed to explore an optimal acoustic environment to satisfy speech privacy and reduce annoyance in a passenger car. Two experiments were conducted using speech sources and compartment noise of a high speed train with varying speech-to-noise ratios (SNRA) and background noise levels (BNL). Speech intelligibility was tested in experiment I, and in experiment II, perceived speech privacy, annoyance, and acoustic comfort of combined sounds with speech and background noise were assessed. The results show that speech privacy and annoyance were significantly influenced by the SNRA. In particular, the acoustic comfort was evaluated as acceptable when the SNRA was less than -6 dB for both speech privacy and noise annoyance. In addition, annoyance increased significantly as the BNL exceeded 63 dBA, whereas the effect of the background-noise level on the speech privacy was not significant. These findings suggest that an optimal level of interior noise in a passenger car might exist between 59 and 63 dBA, taking normal speech levels into account.

  20. Altitude Modulates Concussion Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David W.; Myer, Gregory D.; Currie, Dustin W.; Comstock, R. Dawn; Clark, Joseph F.; Bailes, Julian E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent research indicates that the volume and/or pressure of intracranial fluid, a physiology affected by one’s altitude (ie, elevation above sea level), may be associated with the likelihood and/or severity of a concussion. The objective was to employ an epidemiological field investigation to evaluate the relationship between altitude and concussion rate in high school sports. Hypothesis: Because of the physiologies that occur during acclimatization, including a decline in intracranial compliance (a “tighter fit”), increased altitude may be related to a reduction in concussion rates in high school athletes. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data on concussions and athlete exposures (AEs) between 2005-2006 and 2011-2012 were obtained from a large national sample of high schools (National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System [High School RIO]) and were used to calculate total, competition, and practice concussion rates for aggregated sports and for football only. Results: Altitude of participating schools ranged from 7 to 6903 ft (median, 600 ft), and a total of 5936 concussions occurred in 20,618,915 exposures (2.88 per 10,000 AEs). When concussion rates were dichotomized by altitude using the median, elevated altitude was associated with a reduction in concussion rates overall (rate ratio [RR], 1.31; P < .001), in competition (RR, 1.31; P < .001), and in practice (RR, 1.29; P < .001). Specifically, high school sports played at higher altitude demonstrated a 31% reduction (95% confidence interval [CI], 25%-38%) in the incidence of total reported concussions. Likewise, concussion rates at increased altitude were reduced 30% for overall exposures, 27% for competition exposures, and 28% for practice exposures in football players (P < .001). Conclusion: The results of this epidemiological investigation indicate increased physiological responses to altitude may be associated with a reduction in sports

  1. High Altitude Medical Problems

    PubMed Central

    Hultgren, Herbert N.

    1979-01-01

    Increased travel to high altitude areas by mountaineers and nonclimbing tourists has emphasized the clinical problems associated with rapid ascent. Acute mountain sickness affects most sojourners at elevations above 10,000 feet. Symptoms are usually worse on the second or third day after arrival. Gradual ascent, spending one to three days at an intermediate altitude, and the use of acetazolamide (Diamox) will prevent or ameliorate symptoms in most instances. Serious and potentially fatal problems, such as high altitude pulmonary edema or cerebral edema, occur in approximately 0.5 percent to 1.0 percent of visitors to elevations above 10,000 feet—especially with heavy physical exertion on arrival, such as climbing or skiing. Early recognition, high flow oxygen therapy and prompt descent are crucially important in management. Our knowledge of the causes of these and other high altitude problems, such as retinal hemorrhage, systemic edema and pulmonary hypertension, is still incomplete. Even less is known of the effect of high altitudes on medical conditions common at sea level or on the action of commonly used drugs. ImagesFigure 2. PMID:483805

  2. Preparation for football competition at moderate to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gore, C J; McSharry, P E; Hewitt, A J; Saunders, P U

    2008-08-01

    Analysis of approximately 100 years of home-and-away South American World Cup matches illustrate that football competition at moderate/high altitude (>2000 m) favors the home team, although this is more than compensated by the likelihood of sea-level teams winning at home against the same opponents who have descended from altitude. Nevertheless, the home team advantage at altitudes above approximately 2000 m may reflect that traditionally, teams from sea level or low altitude have not spent 1-2 weeks acclimatizing at altitude. Despite large differences between individuals, in the first few days at high altitude (e.g. La Paz, 3600 m) some players experience symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) such as headache and disrupted sleep, and their maximum aerobic power (VO2max) is approximately 25% reduced while their ventilation, heart rate and blood lactate during submaximal exercise are elevated. Simulated altitude for a few weeks before competition at altitude can be used to attain partial ventilatory acclimation and ameliorated symptoms of AMS. The variety of simulated altitude exposures usually created with enriched nitrogen mixtures of air include resting or exercising for a few hours per day or sleeping approximately 8 h/night in hypoxia. Preparation for competition at moderate/high altitude by training at altitude is probably superior to simulated exposure; however, the optimal duration at moderate/high altitude is unclear. Preparing for 1-2 weeks at moderate/high altitude is a reasonable compromise between the benefits associated with overcoming AMS and partial restoration of VO2max vs the likelihood of detraining.

  3. Integrating anatomy training into radiation oncology residency: considerations for developing a multidisciplinary, interactive learning module for adult learners.

    PubMed

    Labranche, Leah; Johnson, Marjorie; Palma, David; D'Souza, Leah; Jaswal, Jasbir

    2015-01-01

    Radiation oncologists require an in-depth understanding of anatomical relationships for modern clinical practice, although most do not receive formal anatomy training during residency. To fulfill the need for instruction in relevant anatomy, a series of four multidisciplinary, interactive learning modules were developed for a cohort of radiation oncology and medical physics residents. Instructional design was based on established learning theories, with the intent of integrating knowledge of specific anatomical regions with radiology and radiation oncology practice. Each session included presentations by a radiologist and a radiation oncologist, as well as hands-on exploration of anatomical specimens with guidance from anatomists. Pre- and post-tests distributed during each session showed significant short-term knowledge retention. According to qualitative surveys and exit interviews, participants felt more comfort' with delineating structures, gross anatomy, and radiograph interpretation at the end of each session. Overall participant experience was positive, and the modules were considered effective for learning radiologic anatomy. Suggestions for future interventions include more time, increased clinical application, additional contouring practice and feedback, and improved coordination between each of the three disciplines. Results and conclusions from this study will be used to inform the design of a future multi-day national workshop for Canadian radiation oncology residents.

  4. Environmental dynamics at orbital altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of real satellite aerodynamics on the determination of upper atmospheric density was investigated. A method of analysis of satellite drag data is presented which includes the effect of satellite lift and the variation in aerodynamic properties around the orbit. The studies indicate that satellite lift may be responsible for the observed orbit precession rather than a super rotation of the upper atmosphere. The influence of simplifying assumptions concerning the aerodynamics of objects in falling sphere analysis were evaluated and an improved method of analysis was developed. Wind tunnel data was used to develop more accurate drag coefficient relationships for studying altitudes between 80 and 120 Km. The improved drag coefficient relationships revealed a considerable error in previous falling sphere drag interpretation. These data were reanalyzed using the more accurate relationships. Theoretical investigations of the drag coefficient in the very low speed ratio region were also conducted.

  5. Anaerobic performance at altitude.

    PubMed

    Coudert, J

    1992-10-01

    Anaerobic metabolism is usually evaluated by the determination of the anaerobic capacity and the maximal anaerobic mechanical external power (Wmax). Conflicting results are reported on anaerobic capacity evaluated by maximal oxygen deficit and debt, and maximal blood lactate concentration during acute or chronic hypoxia (acclimatized subjects). Data on muscle biopsies (lactate concentration, changes in ATP, phosphocreatine and glycogen stores, glycolytic enzyme activities) and the few studies on lactate flux give in most cases evidence of a non-alteration of the anaerobic capacity for altitudes up to 5,500 m. No differences are observed in Wmax measured at high altitudes up to 5,200 m during intense short-term exercises: (1) jumps on a force platform which is a good indicator of alactic Wmax, and (2) 7-10 s sprints (i.e. force-velocity test) which solicit alactic metabolism but also lactic pathway. For exercises of duration equal or more than 30 s (i.e. Wingate test), there are conflicting results because a lower participation of aerobic metabolism during this test at high altitude can interfere with anaerobic performance. In conclusion, we can admit that anaerobic performances are not altered by high altitudes up to 5,200 m if the length of exposure does not exceed 5 weeks. After this period, muscle mass begins to decrease.

  6. Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine position statement: athletes at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Koehle, Michael S; Cheng, Ivy; Sporer, Benjamin

    2014-03-01

    Many sports incorporate training at altitude as a key component of their athlete training plan. Furthermore, many sports are required to compete at high altitude venues. Exercise at high altitude provides unique challenges to the athlete and to the sport medicine clinician working with these athletes. These challenges include altitude illness, alterations in training intensity and performance, nutritional and hydration difficulties, and challenges related to the austerity of the environment. Furthermore, many of the strategies that are typically utilized by visitors to altitude may have implications from an anti-doping point of view.This position statement was commissioned and approved by the Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine. The purpose of this statement was to provide an evidence-based, best practices summary to assist clinicians with the preparation and management of athletes and individuals travelling to altitude for both competition and training.

  7. Cardiovascular medicine at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2014-07-01

    Altitude physiology began with Paul Bert in 1878. Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) was defined by Carlos Monge in the 1940s in the Peruvian Andes as consisting of excess polycythemia. Hurtado et al performed studies in the Peruvian Andes in the 1950s to 1960s which defined acclimatization in healthy altitude natives, including polycythemia, moderate pulmonary hypertension, and low systemic blood pressure (BP). Electrocardiographic changes of right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) were noted. Acclimatization of newcomers to altitude involves hyperventilation stimulated by hypoxia and is usually benign. Acute mountain sickness (AMS) in travelers to altitude is characterized by hypoxia-induced anorexia, dyspnea, headache, insomnia, and nausea. The extremes of AMS are high-altitude cerebral edema and high-altitude pulmonary edema. The susceptible high-altitude resident can lose their tolerance to altitude and develop CMS, also referred to as Monge disease. The CMS includes extreme polycythemia, severe RVH, excess pulmonary hypertension, low systemic BP, arterial oxygen desaturation, and hypoventilation.

  8. Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Drinking Water Academy provides online training and information to ensure that water professionals, public officials, and involved citizens have the knowledge and skills necessary to protect our drinking water supply.

  9. High Altitude Cerebral Edema

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    English literature and Hultgren et al (3.1) described four more cases of HAPE within the next year. In 1960, Chiodi (5) first reported on a Peruvian...altitude and treatment with steroids and diuretics, CSF pressure was 85 mm H 0. In 1960, Chiodi .(5) described a patient 2 suffering with HACE who...Biol. Chem., 157, 297-302, 1945. 5. Chiodi H: "Mal de montana a forma cerebral; possible mecanismo etiopathogenico," An. Fac. Med. Lima., 43, 437

  10. High altitude diving depths.

    PubMed

    Paulev, Poul-Erik; Zubieta-Calleja, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    In order to make any sea level dive table usable during high altitude diving, a new conversion factor is created. We introduce the standardized equivalent sea depth (SESD), which allows conversion of the actual lake diving depth (ALDD) to an equivalent sea dive depth. SESD is defined as the sea depth in meters or feet for a standardized sea dive, equivalent to a mountain lake dive at any altitude, such that [image omitted] [image omitted] [image omitted] Mountain lakes contain fresh water with a relative density that can be standardized to 1,000 kg m(-3), and sea water can likewise be standardized to a relative density of 1,033 kg m(-3), at the general gravity of 9.80665 m s(-2). The water density ratio (1,000/1,033) refers to the fresh lake water and the standardized sea water densities. Following calculation of the SESD factor, we recommend the use of our simplified diving table or any acceptable sea level dive table with two fundamental guidelines: 1. The classical decompression stages (30, 20, and 10 feet or 9, 6, and 3 m) are corrected to the altitude lake level, dividing the stage depth by the SESD factor. 2. Likewise, the lake ascent rate during diving is equal to the sea ascent rate divided by the SESD factor.

  11. Improving oxygenation at high altitude: acclimatization and O2 enrichment.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2003-01-01

    When lowlanders go to high altitude, the resulting oxygen deprivation impairs mental and physical performance, quality of sleep, and general well-being. This paper compares the effects of ventilatory acclimatization and oxygen enrichment of room air on the improvement of oxygenation as judged by the increase in the alveolar P(O2) and the reduction in equivalent altitude. The results show that, on the average, complete ventilatory acclimatization at an altitude of 5000 m increases the alveolar P(O2) by nearly 8 torr, which corresponds to a reduction in equivalent altitude of about 1000 m, although there is considerable individual variability. By comparison, oxygen enrichment to 27% at 5000 m can easily reduce the equivalent altitude to 3200 m, which is generally well tolerated. Because full ventilatory acclimatization at altitudes up to about 3600 m reduces the equivalent altitude to about 3000 m, oxygen enrichment is not justified for well-acclimatized persons. At an altitude of 4200 m, where several telescopes are located on the summit of Mauna Kea, full acclimatization reduces the equivalent altitude to about 3400 m, but the pattern of commuting probably would not allow this. Therefore, at this altitude, oxygen enrichment would be beneficial but is not essential. At higher altitudes such as 5050 m, where other telescopes are located or planned, the gain in oxygenation from acclimatization is insufficient to produce an adequate mental or physical performance for most work, and oxygen enrichment is highly desirable. Full ventilatory acclimatization requires at least a week of continuous exposure, although much of the improvement is seen in the first 2 days.

  12. Jupiter's High-Altitude Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) snapped this incredibly detailed picture of Jupiter's high-altitude clouds starting at 06:00 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, when the spacecraft was only 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from the solar system's largest planet. Features as small as 50 kilometers (30 miles) are visible. The image was taken through a narrow filter centered on a methane absorption band near 890 nanometers, a considerably redder wavelength than what the eye can see. Images taken through this filter preferentially pick out clouds that are relatively high in the sky of this gas giant planet because sunlight at the wavelengths transmitted by the filter is completely absorbed by the methane gas that permeates Jupiter's atmosphere before it can reach the lower clouds.

    The image reveals a range of diverse features. The south pole is capped with a haze of small particles probably created by the precipitation of charged particles into the polar regions during auroral activity. Just north of the cap is a well-formed anticyclonic vortex with rising white thunderheads at its core. Slightly north of the vortex are the tendrils of some rather disorganized storms and more pinpoint-like thunderheads. The dark 'measles' that appear a bit farther north are actually cloud-free regions where light is completely absorbed by the methane gas and essentially disappears from view. The wind action considerably picks up in the equatorial regions where giant plumes are stretched into a long wave pattern. Proceeding north of the equator, cirrus-like clouds are shredded by winds reaching speeds of up to 400 miles per hour, and more pinpoint-like thunderheads are visible. Although some of the famous belt and zone structure of Jupiter's atmosphere is washed out when viewed at this wavelength, the relatively thin North Temperate Belt shows up quite nicely, as does a series of waves just north of the belt. The north polar region of

  13. Satellite altitude determination uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siry, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Satellite altitude determination uncertainties will be discussed from the standpoint of the GEOS-C satellite, from the longer range viewpoint afforded by the Geopause concept. Data are focused on methods for short-arc tracking which are essentially geometric in nature. One uses combinations of lasers and collocated cameras. The other method relies only on lasers, using three or more to obtain the position fix. Two typical locales are looked at, the Caribbean area, and a region associated with tracking sites at Goddard, Bermuda and Canada which encompasses a portion of the Gulf Stream in which meanders develop.

  14. Brain Food at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Scenic view at high altitude is a pleasure to the eyes, but it has some shortcoming effects as well. High altitude can be divided into different categories, i.e., high altitude (3000-5000 ft), very high altitude (5000-8000 ft), and extreme altitude (above 8000 ft). Much of the population resides at high altitude, and others go there for tourism. Military personnel are also posted there to defend boundaries. As we ascent to high altitude, partial pressure of oxygen reduces, whereas concentration remains the same; this reduces the availability of oxygen to different body parts. This pathophysiological condition is known as hypobaric hypoxia (HH) which leads to oxidative stress and further causes cognitive dysfunction in some cases. Hypoxia causes neurodegeneration in different brain regions; however, the hippocampus is found to be more prone in comparison to other brain regions. As the hippocampus is affected most, therefore, spatial memory is impaired most during such condition. This chapter will give a brief review of the damaging effect of high altitude on cognition and also throw light on possible herbal interventions at high altitude, which can improve cognitive performance as well as provide protection against the deteriorating effect of hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude.

  15. Altitude-related illness in two California national parks.

    PubMed

    Weichenthal, L A; Hendey, G

    1998-01-01

    High-altitude illness encompasses a spectrum of disorders related to the hypoxia experienced by individuals at elevation. Altitude-related illness has been well described in the United States, but there are no studies published in the medical literature looking at the occurrence of high-altitude illness within the US National Parks system. The purpose of this study is to describe the incidence, treatment, and outcomes of visitors to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks who presented to emergency medical services (EMS) personnel with signs and symptoms consistent with high-altitude illness. We conducted a retrospective review of all EMS patient care records (PCRs) from Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks during the study period of June 1992 to August 1995. There were 23 cases of altitude-related illness identified by EMS personnel in the parks during the 38-month study period, including five cases of high-altitude pulmonary edema and 19 cases of acute mountain sickness. One patient died, nine patients were transported to local hospitals, nine patients were assisted in their descent and then released from medical care, and four patients were treated and then allowed to continue their travels. There was an average of 5.9 cases per year of high-altitude illness and an incidence of one case per 27 EMS contacts. We conclude that altitude-related illness does occur in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks and, although high-altitude illness accounts for only 4% of EMS contacts, caring for these patients uses a significant amount of national park resources. We suggest continued training of emergency medical technicians and park medics in the recognition and treatment of these disorders. We also support education of hikers to reduce or prevent the morbidity associated with altitude-related illness.

  16. Infectious Diseases at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Buddha; Starling, Jennifer M

    2015-08-01

    Travel to elevations above 2,500 m is an increasingly common activity undertaken by a diverse population of individuals. These may be trekkers, climbers, miners in high-altitude sites in South America, and more recently, soldiers deployed for high-altitude duty in remote areas of the world. What is also being increasingly recognized is the plight of the millions of pilgrims, many with comorbidities, who annually ascend to high-altitude sacred areas. There are also 400 million people who reside permanently in high mountain ranges, which cover one-fifth of the Earth's surface. Many of these high-altitude areas are in developing countries, for example, the Himalayan range in South Asia. Although high-altitude areas may not harbor any specific infectious disease agents, it is important to know about the pathogens encountered in the mountains to be better able to help both the ill sojourner and the native high-altitude dweller. Often the same pathogens prevalent in the surrounding lowlands are found at high altitude, but various factors such as immunomodulation, hypoxia, poor physiological adaptation, and harsh environmental stressors at high altitude may enhance susceptibility to these pathogens. Against this background, various gastrointestinal, respiratory, dermatological, neurological, and other infections encountered at high altitude are discussed.

  17. Altitude release mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Kulhanek, Frank C.

    1977-01-01

    An altitude release mechanism for releasing a radiosonde or other measuring instrument from a balloon carrying it up into the atmosphere includes a bottle partially filled with water, a tube sealed into the bottle having one end submerged in the water in the bottle and the free end extending above the top of the bottle and a strip of water-disintegrable paper held within the free end of the tube linking the balloon to the remainder of the package. As the balloon ascends, the lowered atmospheric air pressure causes the air in the bottle to expand, forcing the water in the bottle up the tubing to wet and disintegrate the paper, releasing the package from the balloon.

  18. Medical continuing education: reform of teaching methods about high altitude disease in China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongjun; Zhou, Qiquan; Huang, Jianjun; Luo, Rong; Yang, Xiaohong; Gao, Yuqi

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of high altitude continuing medical education is to adapt knowledge and skills for practical application on the plateau. Most trainees have experience with academic education and grassroots work experience on the plateau, so they want knowledge about new advances in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of high altitude disease. As such, traditional classroom teaching methods are not useful to them. Training objects, content, and methods should attempt to conduct a variety of teaching practices. Through continuing medical education on high altitude disease, the authors seek to change the traditional teaching model away from a single classroom and traditional written examinations to expand trainees' abilities. These innovative methods of training can improve both the quality of teaching and students' abilities to prevent and treat acute mountain sickness, high altitude pulmonary edema, high altitude cerebral edema, and chronic mountain sickness to increase the quality of high altitude medical care.

  19. Preparing for Hiking and Rock-Climbing At Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2002-01-01

    Exposure to altitude with or without exercise usually results in body dehydration. Psychological and physiological preparation for exercise at altitude involves consideration of maintaining body warmth in a cool to cold environment with progressively lower oxygen content (partial pressure) as altitude increases. However, this discussion will focus on altitudes below 14,000 it where supplemental breathing oxygen is not required for sojourns of healthy people. Background information and helpful advice for those who exercise in the cold can be found in selected articles in the 2001 Winter Issue of this Newsletter: M.B. Ducharme, Get ready for outdoor winter play: prepare yourself for the cold; C. O'Brien, Think layers when dressing for exercise in the cold; B.G. Rice and R. Ellis, Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow - but be aware of winter hazards; and L.B. Mayers, Exercise - induced asthma.

  20. [Altitude and the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Richalet, Jean-Paul

    2012-06-01

    A stay at high altitude exposes an individual to various environmental changes (cold, exercise, isolation) but the most stressful for the body is hypoxia. However, the cardiovascular system yields some efficient mechanisms of acclimatization to oxygen lack. Hypoxia activates the adrenergic system and induces a tachycardia that decreases during a prolonged stay at altitude. The desensitization of the adrenergic system leads to a decrease in maximal heart rate and a protection of the myocardium against an energy disequilibrium that could be potentially harmful for the heart. Hypoxia induces a peripheral vasodilation and a pulmonary vasoconstriction, leading to few changes in systemic blood pressure and an increase in pulmonary blood pressure (PHT) that can contribute to a high altitude pulmonary edema. Advice to a cardiac patient who plans to go to high altitude should take into account that all diseases aggravated by increased adrenergic activity or associated with a PHT or a hypoxemia (right-to-left shunt) will be aggravated at high altitude. As altitude increases, a patient with a coronary disease will present an ischemic threshold for a lower power output during an EKG exercise test. The only test allowing predicting the tolerance to high altitude is the hypoxia exercise test realized at 30% of maxVO(2)and at an equivalent altitude of 4,800m.

  1. Altitude measurement for model rocketry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughey, David A.

    2007-05-01

    The simple, ballistic time-of-flight equation for the maximum altitude of a vertically launched rocket neglects the effects of atmospheric drag. We show that the error introduced by using this equation to estimate the maximum altitude is typically less than 1% because of the effective cancellations of timing errors during the ascent and descent of the rocket.

  2. High Altitude Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lt Col G K

    2017-01-01

    Approximately, 140 million people worldwide live permanently at high altitudes (HAs) and approximately another 40 million people travel to HA area (HAA) every year for reasons of occupation, sports or recreation. In India, whole of Ladakh region, part of Northwest Kashmir, Northern part of Sikkim and Tenga valley of Arunachal are considered inhabited areas of HAA. The low quantity of oxygen, high exposure of ultraviolet (UV) light, very low humidity, extreme subzero temperature in winter, high wind velocity, make this region difficult for lowlanders as well as for tourists. Acute mountain sickness, HA pulmonary edema, HA cerebral edema, and thromboembolic conditions are known to occur in HA. However, enough knowledge has not been shared on dermatoses peculiar to this region. Xerosis, UV-related skin disorders (tanning, photomelanosis, acute and chronic sunburn, polymorphic light eruption, chronic actinic dermatitis, actinic cheilitis, etc.), cold injuries (frostbite, chilblains, acrocyanosis, erythrocyanosis, etc.) nail changes (koilonychias), airborne contact dermatitis, insect bite reaction, and skin carcinoma (basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and also rarely malignant melanoma) are the dermatoses seen in HAAs. Early diagnosis and knowledge of HA dermatoses may prevent serious consequences of disease and improve the quality of life for the visitors as well as for native of the place.

  3. High Altitude Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Lt. Col. G K

    2017-01-01

    Approximately, 140 million people worldwide live permanently at high altitudes (HAs) and approximately another 40 million people travel to HA area (HAA) every year for reasons of occupation, sports or recreation. In India, whole of Ladakh region, part of Northwest Kashmir, Northern part of Sikkim and Tenga valley of Arunachal are considered inhabited areas of HAA. The low quantity of oxygen, high exposure of ultraviolet (UV) light, very low humidity, extreme subzero temperature in winter, high wind velocity, make this region difficult for lowlanders as well as for tourists. Acute mountain sickness, HA pulmonary edema, HA cerebral edema, and thromboembolic conditions are known to occur in HA. However, enough knowledge has not been shared on dermatoses peculiar to this region. Xerosis, UV-related skin disorders (tanning, photomelanosis, acute and chronic sunburn, polymorphic light eruption, chronic actinic dermatitis, actinic cheilitis, etc.), cold injuries (frostbite, chilblains, acrocyanosis, erythrocyanosis, etc.) nail changes (koilonychias), airborne contact dermatitis, insect bite reaction, and skin carcinoma (basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and also rarely malignant melanoma) are the dermatoses seen in HAAs. Early diagnosis and knowledge of HA dermatoses may prevent serious consequences of disease and improve the quality of life for the visitors as well as for native of the place. PMID:28216727

  4. Acute Exposure of College Basketball Players to Moderate Altitude: Selected Physiological Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Bruce J.; Maresh, Carl M.

    1979-01-01

    In general, basketball players with moderately high aerobic power who reside at an altitude of 1,000 m do not display the hypoxic response to an altitude of 2,200 m expected of sea level residents and aerobically trained athletes. (JD)

  5. Altitude transitions in energy climbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weston, A. R.; Cliff, E. M.; Kelley, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    The aircraft energy-climb trajectory for configurations with a sharp transonic drag rise is well known to possess two branches in the altitude/Mach-number plane. Transition in altitude between the two branches occurs instantaneously, a 'corner' in the minimum-time solution obtained with the energy-state model. If the initial and final values of altitude do not lie on the energy-climb trajectory, then additional jumps (crude approximations to dives and zooms) are required at the initial and terminal points. With a singular-perturbation approach, a 'boundary-layer' correction is obtained for each altitude jump, the transonic jump being a so-called 'internal' boundary layer, different in character from the initial and terminal layers. The determination of this internal boundary layer is examined and some computational results for an example presented.

  6. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    ... and blocked ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... The eustachian tube is a connection between the middle ear (the space deep to the eardrum) and the back of the ...

  7. Monitoring altitude acclimatization--a case study of an élite woman athlete.

    PubMed Central

    Nimmo, M A

    1995-01-01

    A simple study monitoring altitude acclimatization, which is not intrusive to the athlete's training, is described. Particular attention is drawn to the change in production of lactate in response to steady state exercise, before and after altitude. The results suggest that a more thorough assessment of aerobic ability at altitude is required than that described in the British Association of Sports and Exercise Science (BASES) guidelines. It is also relevant to note that elevations in haemoglobin, promoted by altitude, can mask iron abnormalities. It is therefore recommended to assay for iron in addition to haemoglobin. Images Figure 3 PMID:7788212

  8. Aging, Tolerance to High Altitude, and Cardiorespiratory Response to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Richalet, Jean-Paul; Lhuissier, François J

    2015-06-01

    Richalet, Jean-Paul, and François J. Lhuissier. Aging, tolerance to high altitude, and cardiorespiratory response to hypoxia. High Alt Med Biol. 16:117-124, 2015.--It is generally accepted that aging is rather protective, at least at moderate altitude. Some anecdotal reports even mention successful ascent of peaks over 8000 m and even Everest by elderly people. However, very few studies have explored the influence of aging on tolerance to high altitude and prevalence of acute high altitude related diseases, taking into account all confounding factors such as speed of ascent, altitude reached, sex, training status, and chemo-responsiveness. Changes in physiological responses to hypoxia with aging were assessed through a cross-sectional 20-year study including 4675 subjects (2789 men, 1886 women; 14-85 yrs old) and a longitudinal study including 30 subjects explored at a mean 10.4-year interval. In men, ventilatory response to hypoxia increased, while desaturation was less pronounced with aging. Cardiac response to hypoxia was blunted with aging in both genders. Similar results were found in the longitudinal study, with a decrease in cardiac and an increase in ventilatory response to hypoxia with aging. These adaptive responses were less pronounced or absent in post-menopausal untrained women. In conclusion, in normal healthy and active subjects, aging has no deleterious effect on cardiac and ventilatory responses to hypoxia, at least up to the eighth decade. Aging is not a contraindication for high altitude, as far as no pathological condition interferes and physical fitness is compatible with the intensity of the expected physical demand of one's individual. Physiological evaluation through hypoxic exercise testing before going to high altitude is helpful to detect risk factors of severe high altitude-related diseases.

  9. A3 Altitude Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulreix, Lionel J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation shows drawings, diagrams and photographs of the A3 Altitude Test Facility. It includes a review of the A3 Facility requirements, and drawings of the various sections of the facility including Engine Deck and Superstructure, Test Cell and Thrust Takeout, Structure and Altitude Support Systems, Chemical Steam generators, and the subscale diffuser. There are also pictures of the construction site, and the facility under construction. A Diagram of the A3 Steam system schematic is also shown

  10. Considerations for increasing the competences and capacities of the public health workforce: assessing the training needs of public health workers in Texas

    PubMed Central

    Borders, Stephen; Blakely, Craig; Quiram, Barbara; McLeroy, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Background Over the last two decades, concern has been expressed about the readiness of the public health workforce to adequately address the scientific, technological, social, political and economic challenges facing the field. A 1988 report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) served as a catalyst for the re-examination of the public health workforce. The IOM's call to increase the relevance of public health education and training prompted a renewed effort to identify competences needed by public health personnel and the organizations that employ them. Methods A recent evaluation sought to address the role of the 10 essential public health services in job services among the Texas public health workforce. Additionally, the evaluation examined the Texas public health workforce's need for training in the 10 essential public health services. Results and conclusion Overall, the level of perceived training needs varied dramatically by job category and health department type. When comparing aggregate training needs, public health workers with greater day-to-day contact (nurses, health educators) indicated a greater need for training than their peers who did not, such as those working in administrative positions. When prioritizing and designing future training modules regarding the 10 essential public health services, trainers should consider the effects of job function, location and contact with the public. PMID:16872494

  11. Key considerations for the experimental training and evaluation of cancer odour detection dogs: lessons learnt from a double-blind, controlled trial of prostate cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer detection using sniffer dogs is a potential technology for clinical use and research. Our study sought to determine whether dogs could be trained to discriminate the odour of urine from men with prostate cancer from controls, using rigorous testing procedures and well-defined samples from a major research hospital. Methods We attempted to train ten dogs by initially rewarding them for finding and indicating individual prostate cancer urine samples (Stage 1). If dogs were successful in Stage 1, we then attempted to train them to discriminate prostate cancer samples from controls (Stage 2). The number of samples used to train each dog varied depending on their individual progress. Overall, 50 unique prostate cancer and 67 controls were collected and used during training. Dogs that passed Stage 2 were tested for their ability to discriminate 15 (Test 1) or 16 (Tests 2 and 3) unfamiliar prostate cancer samples from 45 (Test 1) or 48 (Tests 2 and 3) unfamiliar controls under double-blind conditions. Results Three dogs reached training Stage 2 and two of these learnt to discriminate potentially familiar prostate cancer samples from controls. However, during double-blind tests using new samples the two dogs did not indicate prostate cancer samples more frequently than expected by chance (Dog A sensitivity 0.13, specificity 0.71, Dog B sensitivity 0.25, specificity 0.75). The other dogs did not progress past Stage 1 as they did not have optimal temperaments for the sensitive odour discrimination training. Conclusions Although two dogs appeared to have learnt to select prostate cancer samples during training, they did not generalise on a prostate cancer odour during robust double-blind tests involving new samples. Our study illustrates that these rigorous tests are vital to avoid drawing misleading conclusions about the abilities of dogs to indicate certain odours. Dogs may memorise the individual odours of large numbers of training samples rather than

  12. High Altitude Ballooning as a Mechanism for Teaching NGSS-Related Geoscience Content and Classroom Activities for Pre- and In-Service Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, M. A.; Kroeger, T.

    2014-12-01

    Training in-service and pre-service K-12 science teachers to understand and structure appropriate instructional opportunities for addressing cross-cutting concepts and engineering design with students in their classrooms is critical given the emphases in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). One mechanism for doing so involves utilizing high altitude ballooning as a tool for providing authentic investigation opportunities in the geosciences. As individual states review and make decisions about what role the NGSS will play in their standards, it is important for college and university science teacher preparation programs to prepare current and future teachers to become more comfortable with designing research investigations, controlling variables, anticipating cross-disciplinary connections, refining and analyzing data, and communicating the findings of real and contrived scientific investigation. Many undergraduate and professional development research possibilities exist through high altitude ballooning, including: microbiological experimentation at high altitudes, microcontroller use for context-specific data collection, near-space system development and design, balloon flight-track modeling, and more. Example projects and findings will be shared. Equally important to creating appropriate learning activities to address NGSS expectations is understanding the context-specific needs and available resources existing in K-12 science classrooms. Findings from semi-structured interviews with a focus group of pre-service and practicing teachers will be presented -- from both participants and non-participants in high altitude ballooning activities -- related to how high altitude ballooning could be (or already is) being used to meet NGSS and state science standards. The two primary outcomes of the presentation are to: 1) inform science teacher preparation programs for purposes of structuring useful and appropriate science methods activities; 2) frame the K-12

  13. The sleep of elite athletes at sea level and high altitude: a comparison of sea-level natives and high-altitude natives (ISA3600)

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Gregory D; Schmidt, Walter F; Aughey, Robert J; Bourdon, Pitre C; Soria, Rudy; Claros, Jesus C Jimenez; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Buchheit, Martin; Simpson, Ben M; Hammond, Kristal; Kley, Marlen; Wachsmuth, Nadine; Gore, Christopher J; Sargent, Charli

    2013-01-01

    Background Altitude exposure causes acute sleep disruption in non-athletes, but little is known about its effects in elite athletes. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of altitude on two groups of elite athletes, that is, sea-level natives and high-altitude natives. Methods Sea-level natives were members of the Australian under-17 soccer team (n=14). High-altitude natives were members of a Bolivian under-20 club team (n=12). Teams participated in an 18-day (19 nights) training camp in Bolivia, with 6 nights at near sea level in Santa Cruz (430 m) and 13 nights at high altitude in La Paz (3600 m). Sleep was assessed on every day/night using activity monitors. Results The Australians’ sleep was shorter, and of poorer quality, on the first night at altitude compared with sea level. Sleep quality returned to normal by the end of the first week at altitude, but sleep quantity had still not stabilised at its normal level after 2 weeks. The quantity and quality of sleep obtained by the Bolivians was similar, or greater, on all nights at altitude compared with sea level. The Australians tended to obtain more sleep than the Bolivians at sea level and altitude, but the quality of the Bolivians’ sleep tended to be better than that of the Australians at altitude. Conclusions Exposure to high altitude causes acute and chronic disruption to the sleep of elite athletes who are sea-level natives, but it does not affect the sleep of elite athletes who are high-altitude natives. PMID:24282197

  14. [Pulmonary hypertension and lung edema at high altitude. Role of endothelial dysfunction and fetal programming].

    PubMed

    Schwab, Marcos; Allemann, Yves; Rexhaj, Emrush; Rimoldi, Stefano F; Sartori, Claudio; Scherrer, Urs

    2012-01-01

    High altitude constitutes an exciting natural laboratory for medical research. While initially, the aim of high-altitude research was to understand the adaptation of the organism to hypoxia and find treatments for altitude-related diseases, over the past decade or so, the scope of this research has broadened considerably. Two important observations led to the foundation for the broadening of the scientific scope of high-altitude research. First, high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) represents a unique model which allows studying fundamental mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension and lung edema in humans. Secondly, the ambient hypoxia associated with high-altitude exposure facilitates the detection of pulmonary and systemic vascular dysfunction at an early stage. Here, we review studies that, by capitalizing on these observations, have led to the description of novel mechanisms underpinning lung edema and pulmonary hypertension and to the first direct demonstration of fetal programming of vascular dysfunction in humans.

  15. Asteroid airburst altitude vs. strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Darrel; Wheeler, Lorien; Mathias, Donovan

    2016-10-01

    Small NEO asteroids (<Ø140m) may not be a threat on a national or global level but can still cause a significant amount of local damage as demonstrated by the Chelyabinsk event where there was over $33 million worth of damage (1 billion roubles) and 1500 were injured, mostly due to broken glass. The ground damage from a small asteroid depends strongly on the altitude at which they "burst" where most of the energy is deposited in the atmosphere. The ability to accurately predict ground damage is useful in determining appropriate evacuation or shelter plans and emergency management.Strong asteroids, such as a monolithic boulder, fail and create peak energy deposition close to the altitude at which ram dynamic pressure exceeds the material cohesive strength. Weaker asteroids, such as a rubble pile, structurally fail at higher altitude, but it requires the increased aerodynamic pressure at lower altitude to disrupt and disperse the rubble. Consequently the resulting airbursts have a peak energy deposition at similar altitudes.In this study hydrocode simulations of the entry and break-up of small asteroids were performed to examine the effect of strength, size, composition, entry angle, and speed on the resulting airburst. This presentation will show movies of the simulations, the results of peak burst height, and the comparison to semi-analytical models.

  16. High altitude medicine education in China: exploring a new medical education reform.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongjun; Luo, Rong; Li, Weiming; Huang, Jianjun; Zhou, Qiquan; Gao, Yuqi

    2012-03-01

    China has the largest plateau in the world, which includes the whole of Tibet, part of Qinghai, Xinjiang, Yunnan, and Sichuan. The plateau area is about 257.2×10(4) km(2), which accounts for about 26.8% of the total area of China. According to data collected in 2006, approximately twelve million people were living at high altitudes, between 2200 to 5200 m high, on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Therefore, there is a need for medical workers who are trained to treat individuals living at high altitudes. To train undergraduates in high altitude medicine, the College of High Altitude Military Medicine was set up at the Third Military Medical University (TMMU) in Chongqing in 1999. This is the only school to teach high altitude medicine in China. Students at TMMU study natural and social sciences, basic medical sciences, clinical medical sciences, and high altitude medicine. In their 5(th) year, students work as interns at the General Hospital of Tibet Military Command in Lhasa for 3 months, where they receive on-site teaching. The method of on-site teaching is an innovative approach for training in high altitude medicine for undergraduates. Three improvements were implemented during the on-site teaching component of the training program: (1) standardization of the learning progress; (2) integration of formal knowledge with clinical experience; and (3) coaching students to develop habits of inquiry and to engage in ongoing self-improvement to set the stage for lifelong learning. Since the establishment of the innovative training methods in 2001, six classes of high altitude medicine undergraduates, who received on-site teaching, have graduated and achieved encouraging results. This evidence shows that on-site teaching needs to be used more widely in high altitude medicine education.

  17. Low-Altitude Exploration of the Venus Atmosphere by Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    The planet Venus represents an exciting target for future exploration by spacecraft. One target of scientific interest is the lower atmosphere, which represents an environment of high temperature and moderate to high atmospheric pressure. This represents a considerable challenge to the technical art of ballooning, but one which may be amenable to solution. Several possible designs for low-altitude balloons are discussed. Conceptual design for three mission examples are analyzed: a conventional balloon operating below the cloud level at an altitude of 25 kilometers, a large rigid-envelope balloon operating near the surface at an altitude of 5 kilometers, and a small, technology demonstrator rigid-envelope balloon operating at 5 kilometers.

  18. High altitude, prolonged exercise, and the athlete biological passport.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Yorck O; Garvican, Laura A; Christian, Ryan; Lobigs, Louisa M; Qi, Jiliang; Fan, Rongyun; He, Yingying; Wang, Hailing; Gore, Christopher J; Ma, Fuhai

    2015-01-01

    The Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) detects blood doping in athletes through longitudinal monitoring of erythropoietic markers. Mathematical algorithms are used to define individual reference ranges for these markers for each athlete. It is unclear if altitude and exercise can affect the variables included in these calculations in a way that the changes might be mistaken for blood manipulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the simultaneous strenuous exercise and low to high altitude exposure on the calculation algorithms of the ABP. 14 sea level (SL) and 11 altitude native (ALT) highly trained athletes participated in a 14-day cycling stage race taking place at an average altitude of 2496 m above sea level (min. 1014 m, max. 4120 m), race distances ranged between 96 and 227 km per day. ABP blood measures were taken on days -1,3,6,10,14 (SL) and -1,9,15 (ALT) of the race. Four results from three samples of two different SL athletes exceeded the individual limits at the 99% specificity threshold and one value at 99.9%. In ALT, three results from three samples of three different athletes were beyond the individual limits at 99%, one at 99.9%. The variations could be explained by the expected physiological reaction to exercise and altitude. In summary, the abnormalities observed in the haematological ABP´s of well-trained athletes during extensive exercise at altitude are limited and in line with expected physiological changes.

  19. The Use of Anxiety Management Training in the Treatment of Generalized and Specific Anxieties. [and] Considerations in Setting Up A Full Service Desensitization Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicoletti, John A., Jr.

    This report discusses the success of desensitization techniques in alleviating specific anxiety but its failure in treating generalized anxiety. Anxiety management training (AMTO has been developed to overcome some of the deficiencies of desensitization approaches. Through the use of instructions and cues to arouse anxiety responses and the…

  20. Solar collector with altitude tracking

    DOEpatents

    Barak, Amitzur Z.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for turning a solar collector about an east-west horizontal axis so that the collector is tilted toward the sun as the EWV altitude of the sun varies each day. It includes one or more heat responsive elements and a shading means aligned so that within a range of EWV altitudes of the sun during daylight hours the shading means shades the element or elements while during the rest of the daylight hours the elements or elements are heated by the sun to assume heated, stable states. Mechanical linkage between the collector and the element is responsive to the states of the element or elements to tilt the collector in accordance with variations in the EWV altitude of the sun.

  1. Threshold altitude resulting in decompression sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. V.; Waligora, James M.; Calkins, Dick S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of case reports, hypobaric chamber training data, and experimental evidence indicated that the threshold for incidence of altitude decompression sickness (DCS) was influenced by various factors such as prior denitrogenation, exercise or rest, and period of exposure, in addition to individual susceptibility. Fitting these data with appropriate statistical models makes it possible to examine the influence of various factors on the threshold for DCS. This approach was illustrated by logistic regression analysis on the incidence of DCS below 9144 m. Estimations using these regressions showed that, under a noprebreathe, 6-h exposure, simulated EVA profile, the threshold for symptoms occurred at approximately 3353 m; while under a noprebreathe, 2-h exposure profile with knee-bends exercise, the threshold occurred at 7925 m.

  2. Gender not a factor for altitude decompression sickness risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Kannan, Nandini; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Early, retrospective reports of the incidence of altitude decompression sickness (DCS) during altitude chamber training exposures indicated that women were more susceptible than men. We hypothesized that a controlled, prospective study would show no significant difference. METHODS: We conducted 25 altitude chamber decompression exposure profiles. A total of 291 human subjects, 197 men and 94 women, underwent 961 exposures to simulated altitude for up to 8 h, using zero to 4 h of preoxygenation. Throughout the exposures, subjects breathed 100% oxygen, rested or performed mild or strenuous exercise, and were monitored for precordial venous gas emboli (VGE) and DCS symptoms. RESULTS: No significant differences in DCS incidence were observed between men (49.5%) and women (45.3%). However, VGE occurred at significantly higher rates among men than women under the same exposure conditions, 69.3% and 55.0% respectively. Women using hormonal contraception showed significantly greater susceptibility to DCS than those not using hormonal contraception during the latter two weeks of the menstrual cycle. Significantly higher DCS incidence was observed in the heaviest men, in women with the highest body fat, and in subjects with the highest body mass indices and lowest levels of fitness. CONCLUSION: No differences in altitude DCS incidence were observed between the sexes under our test conditions, although men developed VGE more often than women. Age and height showed no significant influence on DCS incidence, but persons of either sex with higher body mass index and lower physical fitness developed DCS more frequently.

  3. [High altitude medicine is a concern also for Swedish primary care. Knowledge needed to identify high risk patients and provide appropriate advice].

    PubMed

    Kiwanuka, Olivia

    2015-05-26

    With the increasing amount of people traveling to high altitude regions, the number of people at risk of acquiring altitude illness increases. Altitude illness entails three syndromes; acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral edema, and high-altitude pulmonary edema. These syndromes are potentially lethal acquired medical conditions that in most cases are preventable. Health care providers need to inform travelers of the risks associated with mountaineering and the prophylactic measures available as well as identify underlying conditions that require specific considerations. This article provides a summary of the pathophysiology, symptoms and treatment of altitude illness and aims to be an orientation for general practitioners.

  4. Altitude Testing of Large Liquid Propellant Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Bryon T.; Raines, Nickey G.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration entered a new age on January 14, 2004 with President Bush s announcement of the creation the Vision for Space Exploration that will take mankind back to the Moon and on beyond to Mars. In January, 2006, after two years of hard, dedicated labor, engineers within NASA and its contractor workforce decided that the J2X rocket, based on the heritage of the Apollo J2 engine, would be the new engine for the NASA Constellation Ares upper stage vehicle. This engine and vehicle combination would provide assured access to the International Space Station to replace that role played by the Space Shuttle and additionally, would serve as the Earth Departure Stage, to push the Crew Excursion Vehicle out of Earth Orbit and head it on a path for rendezvous with the Moon. Test as you fly, fly as you test was chosen to be the guiding philosophy and a pre-requisite for the engine design, development, test and evaluation program. An exhaustive survey of national test facility assets proved the required capability to test the J2X engine at high altitude for long durations did not exist so therefore, a high altitude/near space environment testing capability would have to be developed. After several agency concepts the A3 High Altitude Testing Facility proposal was selected by the J2X engine program on March 2, 2007 and later confirmed by a broad panel of NASA senior leadership in May 2007. This facility is to be built at NASA s John C. Stennis Space Center located near Gulfport, Mississippi. 30 plus years of Space Shuttle Main Engine development and flight certification testing makes Stennis uniquely suited to support the Vision For Space Exploration Return to the Moon. Propellant handling infrastructure, engine assembly facilities, a trained and dedicated workforce and a broad and varied technical support base will all ensure that the A3 facility will be built on time to support the schedule needs of the J2X engine and the ultimate flight

  5. Lidar Altitude Data Read Routine

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-19

    ... Profile products. It is written in Interactive Data Language (IDL) and uses HDF routine calls to read the altitude data which are ... Data Read routine  (1.5 KB) Interactive Data Language (IDL) is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . ...

  6. Altitude Compensating Nozzle Concepts Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soni, Bharat

    2000-01-01

    This report contains the summary of work accomplished during summer of 2000 by Mr. Chad Hammons, undergraduate senior student, Mississippi State University/ERC in support of NASA/MSFC mission pertinent to Altitude compensating nozzle concepts evaluations. In particular, the development of automatic grid generator applicable in conducting sensitivity analysis involving Aerospike engine is described.

  7. Development of Aptitude at Altitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Alexandra M.; Virues-Ortega, Javier; Botti, Ana Baya; Bucks, Romola; Holloway, John W.; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Webster, Rebecca J.; Baldeweg, Torsten; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2010-01-01

    Millions of people currently live at altitudes in excess of 2500 metres, where oxygen supply is limited, but very little is known about the development of brain and behavioural function under such hypoxic conditions. We describe the physiological, cognitive and behavioural profile of a large cohort of infants (6-12 months), children (6-10 years)…

  8. Alaska High Altitude Photography Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Earl V.; Knutson, Martin A.; Ekstrand, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    In 1978, the Alaska High Altitude Photography Program was initiated to obtain simultaneous black and white and color IR aerial photography of Alaska. Dual RC-10 and Zeiss camera systems were used for this program on NASA's U-2 and WB-57F, respectively. Data collection, handling, and distribution are discussed as well as general applications and the current status.

  9. Substrate utilization during exercise and recovery at moderate altitude.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Keisho; Goto, Kazushige; Ishida, Koji; Ogita, Futoshi

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that exercise training at moderate altitude or in moderate hypoxia improved glycemic parameters. From these data, it has been supposed that endurance exercise in moderate hypoxia affects substrate utilization and that exposure to moderate hypoxia in combination with exercise may be utilized as part of metabolic or diabetes prevention program. However, the influence of exercise at moderate hypoxia on circulating metabolites and hormones in terms of substrate utilization is unclear. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the influence of exercise in moderate hypoxia on substrate utilization. We determined cardiorespiratory, metabolic, and hormonal parameters during exercise and postexercise recovery at a simulated moderate altitude of 2000 m, and then we compared these variables with values obtained at sea level. Seven men participated in this study; subjects reported to the laboratory on 4 occasions. Two maximal exercise tests were performed to estimate peak oxygen uptake at the simulated 2000-m altitude and sea level on different days. Afterward, submaximal exercise tests were carried out at a simulated altitude of 2000 m or sea level, separated by 1 week. Subjects performed submaximal exercise at the same relative exercise intensity (50% peak oxygen uptake) at a simulated altitude of 2000 m and at sea level for 30 minutes. The tests were performed in random order, and subjects were blinded to the respective altitudes. Venous blood samples and expired gases were obtained before, during exercise (15 and 30 minutes), and during postexercise recovery periods (15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes). The respiratory exchange ratio during exercise and recovery at moderate altitude was greater than at sea level. The epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations during exercise and recovery were higher (P < .05) at moderate altitude than at sea level. Free fatty acids and glycerol concentrations during recovery were lower (P < .05) at moderate altitude

  10. Safety of high speed ground transportation systems. High speed passenger trains in freight railroad corridors: Operations and safety considerations. Final report, September 1993-April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ullman, K.B.; Bing, A.J.

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the results of a study into some operations and technical issues likely to be encountered when planning for high-speed rail passenger service on corridors that presently carry freight or commuter traffic. The study starts with a review of corridors designated under Section 1010 of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) of 1991, a potential future high-speed corridors. After a review of signal, train control and braking systems presently used in the United States and elsewhere, the study provides analyses of the safety and operations impacts of introducing high-speed rail service on the hypothetical corridor. The safety analysis established a safety performance target based on present intercity rail safety performance, and reviewed the need for and benefits from safety improvements for high speed operation. The operations analysis concentrated on the impacts on track capacity and train delays of introducing a high-speed rail service on three hypothetical existing corridors with different track layouts and signal systems.

  11. Altitude characteristics of selected air quality analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. H.; Strong, R.; Tommerdahl, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of altitude (pressure) on the operation and sensitivity of various air quality analyzers frequently flown on aircraft were analyzed. Two ozone analyzers were studied at altitudes from 600 to 7500 m and a nitrogen oxides chemiluminescence detector and a sulfur dioxide flame photometric detector were studied at altitudes from 600 to 3000 m. Calibration curves for altitude corrections to the sensitivity of the instruments are presented along with discussion of observed instrument behavior.

  12. [Children and pregnant women at high altitude].

    PubMed

    Rehakova, P; Rexhaj, E; Farron, F; Duplain, H

    2014-05-07

    Nowadays, high altitude resorts have become popular destinations for family vacations. Based on a limited number of publications and international guidelines, this article summarizes the effects of high altitude on children and pregnant women. Children also suffer from high altitude-related diseases, however their presentation and clinical significance are different from their adult counterparts. Careful planning of the itinerary with respect to altitude of the overnight stays, access to medical services and potential evacuation routes is the cornerstone of a successful vacation.

  13. High Altitude Ozone Research Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauthen, Timothy A.; Daniel, Leslie A.; Herrick, Sally C.; Rock, Stacey G.; Varias, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to create a mission model of the high altitude ozone research balloon (HAORB) several options for flight preparation, altitude control, flight termination, and payload recovery were considered. After the optimal launch date and location for two separate HAORB flights were calculated, a method for reducing the heat transfer from solar and infrared radiation was designed and analytically tested. This provided the most important advantage of the HAORB over conventional balloons, i.e., its improved flight duration. Comparisons of different parachute configurations were made, and a design best suited for the HAORB's needs was determined to provide for payload recovery after flight termination. In an effort to avoid possible payload damage, a landing system was also developed.

  14. Rocket Altitude Test Facilities Register

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    Classification of Document UNCLASSIFIED 5. Originator Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development North Atlantic Treaty Organization...Emphasis was put on facilities capable of performing research and development tests. This AGARDograph was prepared at the request of the Propulsion... RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT 7RUEANCELLE 92200 NEUILLY SUR SEINE FRANCE AGARDo^raph N0^97 , Rocket Altitude Test Facilities Register /^ri c^ris

  15. Investigation of Doppler Effects on high mobility OFDM-MIMO systems with the support of High Altitude Platforms (HAPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, H. A.; Sibley, M. J. N.; Mather, P. J.

    2012-05-01

    The merging of Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) with Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) is a promising mobile air interface solution for next generation wireless local area networks (WLANs) and 4G mobile cellular wireless systems. This paper details the design of a highly robust and efficient OFDM-MIMO system to support permanent accessibility and higher data rates to users moving at high speeds, such as users travelling on trains. It has high relevance for next generation wireless local area networks (WLANs) and 4G mobile cellular wireless systems. The paper begins with a comprehensive literature review focused on both technologies. This is followed by the modelling of the OFDM-MIMO physical layer based on Simulink/Matlab that takes into consideration high vehicular mobility. Then the entire system is simulated and analysed under different encoding and channel estimation algorithms. The use of High Altitude Platform system (HAPs) technology is considered and analysed.

  16. Enhancement of cold-induced vasodilatation following acclimatization to altitude.

    PubMed

    Felicijan, Ana; Golja, Petra; Milcinski, Metka; Cheung, Stephen S; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2008-09-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of high-altitude acclimatisation on the cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) response. A group of highly trained mountaineers (N = 9; Alpinists) were tested before and after a 3 week high-altitude Himalayan expedition (altitude ranging from 3,985 to 6,828 m). A control group (N = 7) with no mountaineering experience was tested at the same time points. During each test, subjects first immersed their hand to the styloid process in 37 degrees C water for 5 min and then in 10 degrees C water for 30 min. Upon completion of the hand immersion, the same procedure was repeated for the foot. Skin temperature of the pads of all immersed digits was measured throughout the immersion and for 10 min following the immersion. In the Alpinists, a significant increase in amplitude of CIVD and absolute maximum finger skin temperature during immersion was observed in the hand post-expedition. For the foot, peak time of CIVD was significantly shorter in the Alpinist group, and there were significant increases in minimum and maximum toe skin temperature during CIVD, mean toe skin temperature during immersion, absolute minimum and maximum toe skin temperature during immersion, and absolute amplitude during immersion. The results demonstrate a significant enhancement of the CIVD response as a consequence of a brief high altitude acclimatisation, and that these changes were especially prominent in the toes.

  17. Altitude-Related Illness: Advice to Travellers

    PubMed Central

    Crutcher, Rodney A.

    1990-01-01

    Altitude-related medical problems have received much attention in the recent medical literature. Family physicians must be knowledgeable about these problems so that they can give appropriate advice to travellers. The author, a practising family physician, discusses issues arising from both the modest cabin altitudes experienced in modern-day air travel and the greater altitudes experienced by skiers and trekkers, pilots and mountaineers, and lowland adventurers of all sorts. He reviews the process of acclimatization to altitude and the four principal forms of altitude illness. PMID:21233912

  18. Space Operations Center orbit altitude selection strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Indrikis, J.; Myers, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    The strategy for the operational altitude selection has to respond to the Space Operation Center's (SOC) maintenance requirements and the logistics demands of the missions to be supported by the SOC. Three orbit strategies are developed: two are constant altitude, and one variable altitude. In order to minimize the effect of atmospheric uncertainty the dynamic altitude method is recommended. In this approach the SOC will operate at the optimum altitude for the prevailing atmospheric conditions and logistics model, provided that mission safety constraints are not violated. Over a typical solar activity cycle this method produces significant savings in the overall logistics cost.

  19. Effects of Altitude on Turbojet Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, William A

    1951-01-01

    Component and over-all performance characteristics of several turbojet engines investigated in the altitude facilities of the NACA Lewis Laboratory during the last several years are summarized to indicate the effects of altitude on turbojet engine performance. Data presented show that failure of turbojet engine performance to generalize for all altitudes can be traced to reductions in compressor efficiency, corrected air flow, and combustion efficiency at altitude. In addition, it is shown that although engines of different design may have equal thrusts at sea level, the thrusts at altitude may vary widely because of differences in compressor performance characteristics from one engine to another.

  20. The Impact of Moderate-Altitude Staging on Pulmonary Arterial Hemodynamics after Ascent to High Altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    et al., 1956; Sime et al., 1974). The magnitude of the PAP in- crease plays an important role in the development of high altitude pulmonary edema ...implications for travelers to high altitude. High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is an important cause of high altitude morbidity and mortality, and...P., and Oelz O. (1991). Prevention of high-altitude pulmonary edema by nifedipine. N. Engl. J. Med. 325:1284–1289. Beidleman B.A., Fulco C.S., Muza

  1. The Effect of Residing Altitude on Levels of High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol: A Pilot Study From the Omani Arab Population.

    PubMed

    Al Riyami, Nafila B; Banerjee, Yajnavalka; Al-Waili, Khalid; Rizvi, Syed G; Al-Yahyaee, Said; Hassan, Mohammed O; Albarwani, Sulayma; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Bayoumi, Riad A

    2015-07-01

    Lower mortality rates from coronary heart disease and higher levels of serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) have been observed in populations residing at high altitude. However, this effect has not been investigated in Arab populations, which exhibit considerable genetic homogeneity. We assessed the relationship between residing altitude and HDL-C in 2 genetically similar Omani Arab populations residing at different altitudes. The association between the levels of HDL-C and other metabolic parameters was also investigated. The levels of HDL-C were significantly higher in the high-altitude group compared with the low-altitude group. Stepwise regression analysis showed that altitude was the most significant factor affecting HDL-C, followed by gender, serum triglycerides, and finally the 2-hour postprandial plasma glucose. This finding is consistent with previously published studies from other populations and should be taken into consideration when comparing cardiovascular risk factors in populations residing at different altitudes.

  2. Update in the understanding of altitude-induced limitations to performance in team-sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Billaut, François; Aughey, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    The internationalism of field-based team sports (TS) such as football and rugby requires teams to compete in tournaments held at low to moderate altitude (∼1200-2500 m). In TS, acceleration, speed and aerobic endurance are physical characteristics associated with ball possession and, ultimately, scoring. While these qualities are affected by the development of neuromuscular fatigue at sea level, arterial hypoxaemia induced by exposure to altitude may further hinder the capacity to perform consecutive accelerations (CAC) or sprint endurance and thereby change the outcome of a match. The higher the altitude, the more severe the hypoxaemia, and thus, the larger the expected decline in aerobic endurance, CAC and match running performance. Therefore, it is critical for athletes and coaches to understand how arterial hypoxaemia affects aerobic endurance and CAC and the magnitude of decline they may face at altitude for optimal preparation and increased chances of success. This mini review summarises the effects of acute altitude/hypoxia exposure on aerobic endurance, CAC and activity profiles of TS athletes performing in the laboratory and during matches at natural altitude, and analyses the latest findings about the consequences of arterial hypoxaemia on the relationship between peripheral perturbations, neural adjustments and performance during repeated sprints or CAC. Finally, we briefly discuss how altitude training can potentially help athletes prepare for competition at altitude.

  3. Physiological Changes to the Cardiovascular System at High Altitude and Its Effects on Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Riley, Callum James; Gavin, Matthew

    2017-03-15

    Riley, Callum James, and Matthew Gavin. Physiological changes to the cardiovascular system at high altitude and its effects on cardiovascular disease. High Alt Med Biol. 00:000-000, 2017.-The physiological changes to the cardiovascular system in response to the high altitude environment are well understood. More recently, we have begun to understand how these changes may affect and cause detriment to cardiovascular disease. In addition to this, the increasing availability of altitude simulation has dramatically improved our understanding of the physiology of high altitude. This has allowed further study on the effect of altitude in those with cardiovascular disease in a safe and controlled environment as well as in healthy individuals. Using a thorough PubMed search, this review aims to integrate recent advances in cardiovascular physiology at altitude with previous understanding, as well as its potential implications on cardiovascular disease. Altogether, it was found that the changes at altitude to cardiovascular physiology are profound enough to have a noteworthy effect on many forms of cardiovascular disease. While often asymptomatic, there is some risk in high altitude exposure for individuals with certain cardiovascular diseases. Although controlled research in patients with cardiovascular disease was largely lacking, meaning firm conclusions cannot be drawn, these risks should be a consideration to both the individual and their physician.

  4. Barometric pressures at extreme altitudes on Mt. Everest: physiological significance.

    PubMed

    West, J B; Lahiri, S; Maret, K H; Peters, R M; Pizzo, C J

    1983-05-01

    Barometric pressures were measured on Mt. Everest from altitudes of 5,400 (base camp) to 8,848 m (summit) during the American Medical Research Expedition to Everest. Measurements at 5,400 m were made with a mercury barometer, and above this most of the pressures were obtained with an accurate crystal-sensor barometer. The mean daily pressures were 400.4 +/- 2.7 (SD) Torr (n = 35) at 5,400 m, 351.0 +/- 1.0 Torr (n = 16) at 6,300 m, 283.6 +/- 1.5 Torr (n = 6) at 8,050 m, and 253.0 Torr (n = 1) at 8,848 m. All these pressures are considerably higher than those predicted from the ICAO Standard Atmosphere. The chief reason is that pressures at altitudes between 2 and 16 km are latitude dependent, being higher near the equator because of the large mass of cold air in the stratosphere of that region. Data from weather balloons show that the pressure at the altitude of the summit of Mt. Everest varies considerably with season, being about 11.5 Torr higher in midsummer than in midwinter. Although the mountain has been climbed without supplementary O2, the very low O2 partial pressure at the summit means that it is at the limit of man's tolerance, and even day-by-day variations in barometric pressure apparently affect maximal O2 uptake.

  5. Pulmonary Adaptation to High Altitude.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    Fluorometric assays of high energy phosphates in respiratory and limb muscles plus a variety of histochemical techniques to more fully describe the...phenomenon--in the form of the critical level of CO2 required to maintain rhythmic breathing during sleep and explains the effect of acute oxygen therapy on...AD-AR140 51.4 PULMONARY ADAPTATION TO HIGH ALTITUDE(U) WISCONSIN i/i UNIV-MADISON J R DEMPSEY AUG 82 DAMD17-77-C-786 UNCLAS51FIED F/G 619 ML

  6. Platelet count on slow induction to high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Subhash C.

    1986-03-01

    Platelet counts were estimated at sea level in 50 lowlanders. They were divided at random in two groups (A and B) of 25 each. Group A went up by train/road transport to 3658 m, while group B reached the same height after 8 days of acclimatisation enroute. Platelet counts were estimated serially in both groups at high altitude. Symptoms of high altitude exposure were also recorded. No significant change in the counts was noted in either group and none became “Symptomatic”. All were brought back to sea level by air and deinduction studies carried out on days 1 and 4 of return. The importance of these findings in the light of our existing knowledge is discussed.

  7. ALT space shuttle barometric altimeter altitude analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, R.

    1978-01-01

    The accuracy was analyzed of the barometric altimeters onboard the space shuttle orbiter. Altitude estimates from the air data systems including the operational instrumentation and the developmental flight instrumentation were obtained for each of the approach and landing test flights. By comparing the barometric altitude estimates to altitudes derived from radar tracking data filtered through a Kalman filter and fully corrected for atmospheric refraction, the errors in the barometric altitudes were shown to be 4 to 5 percent of the Kalman altitudes. By comparing the altitude determined from the true atmosphere derived from weather balloon data to the altitude determined from the U.S. Standard Atmosphere of 1962, it was determined that the assumption of the Standard Atmosphere equations contributes roughly 75 percent of the total error in the baro estimates. After correcting the barometric altitude estimates using an average summer model atmosphere computed for the average latitude of the space shuttle landing sites, the residual error in the altitude estimates was reduced to less than 373 feet. This corresponds to an error of less than 1.5 percent for altitudes above 4000 feet for all flights.

  8. Altitude Stress During Participation of Medical Congress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon Bae; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Sang Jun; Cho, Su Hee; Suh, Dae Chul

    2016-09-01

    Medical congresses often held in highlands. We reviewed several medical issues associated with altitude stress especially while physicians have participated medical congress held in high altitude. Altitude stress, also known as an acute mountain sickness (AMS), is caused by acute exposure to low oxygen level at high altitude which is defined as elevations at or above 1,200 m and AMS commonly occurs above 2,500 m. Altitude stress with various symptoms including insomnia can also be experienced in airplane. AMS and drunken state share many common features in symptoms, neurologic manifestations and even show multiple microbleeds in corpus callosum and white matter on MRI. Children are more susceptible to altitude stress than adults. Gradual ascent is the best method for the prevention of altitude stress. Adequate nutrition (mainly carbohydrates) and hydration are recommended. Consumption of alcohol can exacerbate the altitude-induced impairments in judgment and the visual senses and promote psychomotor dysfunction. For prevention or treatment of altitude stress, acetazolamide, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, dexamethasone and erythropoietin are helpful. Altitude stress can be experienced relatively often during participation of medical congress. It is necessary to remind the harmful effect of AMS because it can cause serious permanent organ damage even though the symptoms are negligible in most cases.

  9. Altitude Stress During Participation of Medical Congress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon Bae; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Sang Jun; Cho, Su Hee

    2016-01-01

    Medical congresses often held in highlands. We reviewed several medical issues associated with altitude stress especially while physicians have participated medical congress held in high altitude. Altitude stress, also known as an acute mountain sickness (AMS), is caused by acute exposure to low oxygen level at high altitude which is defined as elevations at or above 1,200 m and AMS commonly occurs above 2,500 m. Altitude stress with various symptoms including insomnia can also be experienced in airplane. AMS and drunken state share many common features in symptoms, neurologic manifestations and even show multiple microbleeds in corpus callosum and white matter on MRI. Children are more susceptible to altitude stress than adults. Gradual ascent is the best method for the prevention of altitude stress. Adequate nutrition (mainly carbohydrates) and hydration are recommended. Consumption of alcohol can exacerbate the altitude-induced impairments in judgment and the visual senses and promote psychomotor dysfunction. For prevention or treatment of altitude stress, acetazolamide, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, dexamethasone and erythropoietin are helpful. Altitude stress can be experienced relatively often during participation of medical congress. It is necessary to remind the harmful effect of AMS because it can cause serious permanent organ damage even though the symptoms are negligible in most cases. PMID:27621942

  10. High-altitude reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yazdi, Renee Anna

    1991-01-01

    At the equator the ozone layer ranges from 65,000 to 130,000+ ft, which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft. This project is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer. The aircraft must be able to satisfy four mission profiles. The first is a polar mission that ranges from Chile to the South Pole and back to Chile, a total range of 6000 n.m. at 100,000 ft with a 2500-lb payload. The second mission is also a polar mission with a decreased altitude and an increased payload. For the third mission, the aircraft will take off at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft, and land in Chile. The final mission requires the aircraft to make an excursion to 120,000 ft. All four missions require that a subsonic Mach number be maintained because of constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable for meeting the requirements. The performance of each is analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the mission requirements.

  11. Rocket Engine Altitude Simulation Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Jody L.; Lansaw, John

    2010-01-01

    John C. Stennis Space Center is embarking on a very ambitious era in its rocket engine propulsion test history. The first new large rocket engine test stand to be built at Stennis Space Center in over 40 years is under construction. The new A3 Test Stand is designed to test very large (294,000 Ibf thrust) cryogenic propellant rocket engines at a simulated altitude of 100,000 feet. A3 Test Stand will have an engine testing chamber where the engine will be fired after the air in the chamber has been evacuated to a pressure at the simulated altitude of less than 0.16 PSIA. This will result in a very unique environment with extremely low pressures inside a very large chamber and ambient pressures outside this chamber. The test chamber is evacuated of air using a 2-stage diffuser / ejector system powered by 5000 lb/sec of steam produced by 27 chemical steam generators. This large amount of power and flow during an engine test will result in a significant acoustic and vibrational environment in and around A3 Test Stand.

  12. Exercise economy does not change after acclimatization to moderate to very high altitude.

    PubMed

    Lundby, C; Calbet, J A L; Sander, M; van Hall, G; Mazzeo, R S; Stray-Gundersen, J; Stager, J M; Chapman, R F; Saltin, B; Levine, B D

    2007-06-01

    For more than 60 years, muscle mechanical efficiency has been thought to remain unchanged with acclimatization to high altitude. However, recent work has suggested that muscle mechanical efficiency may in fact be improved upon return from prolonged exposure to high altitude. The purpose of the present work is to resolve this apparent conflict in the literature. In a collaboration between four research centers, we have included data from independent high-altitude studies performed at varying altitudes and including a total of 153 subjects ranging from sea-level (SL) residents to high-altitude natives, and from sedentary to world-class athletes. In study A (n=109), living for 20-22 h/day at 2500 m combined with training between 1250 and 2800 m caused no differences in running economy at fixed speeds despite low typical error measurements. In study B, SL residents (n=8) sojourning for 8 weeks at 4100 m and residents native to this altitude (n=7) performed cycle ergometer exercise in ambient air and in acute normoxia. Muscle oxygen uptake and mechanical efficiency were unchanged between SL and acclimatization and between the two groups. In study C (n=20), during 21 days of exposure to 4300 m altitude, no changes in systemic or leg VO(2) were found during cycle ergometer exercise. However, at the substantially higher altitude of 5260 m decreases in submaximal VO(2) were found in nine subjects with acute hypoxic exposure, as well as after 9 weeks of acclimatization. As VO(2) was already reduced in acute hypoxia this suggests, at least in this condition, that the reduction is not related to anatomical or physiological adaptations to high altitude but to oxygen lack because of severe hypoxia altering substrate utilization. In conclusion, results from several, independent investigations indicate that exercise economy remains unchanged after acclimatization to high altitude.

  13. Measurement of Altitude in Blind Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brombacher, W G

    1934-01-01

    In this note, instruments for measuring altitude and rate of change of altitude in blind flying and landing of aircraft and their performance are discussed. Of those indicating the altitude above ground level, the sonic altimeter is the most promising. Its present bulk, intermittent operation, and more or less unsatisfactory means of indication are serious drawbacks to its use. The sensitive type aneroid altimeter is also discussed and errors in flying at a pressure level and in landing are discussed in detail.

  14. Cardiovascular effects of chronic carbon monoxide and high-altitude exposure

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, J.J. )

    1989-07-01

    At higher altitudes, ambient carbon monoxide levels are increasing with the number of residents and tourists and their use of motor vehicles and heating devices (such as fireplaces, furnaces, and stoves). Although chronic exposure to carbon monoxide or high altitude causes pronounced cardiovascular changes in humans as well as in animals, there is little information on the effects elicited by these stressors combined. Data from acute studies and theoretical considerations suggest that carbon monoxide inhaled at altitude may be more detrimental than carbon monoxide inhaled at sea level. It is not known, however, if the cardiovascular system adapts or deteriorates with continuous, concurrent exposure to carbon monoxide and high altitude. Male laboratory rats were exposed for six weeks in steel barometric chambers to altitudes ranging from 3,300 ft (ambient) to 18,000 ft and to concentrations ranging from 0 to 500 parts per million (ppm)2. Carbon monoxide had no effect on body weight at any altitude. There was a tendency for hematocrit to increase even at the lowest concentration of carbon monoxide (9 ppm), but the increase did not become significant until 100 ppm. At 10,000 ft, there was a tendency for total heart weight to increase in rats inhaling 100 ppm carbon monoxide. Although its effects on the heart at altitude are complex, carbon monoxide, in concentrations of 500 ppm or less, had little effect on the right ventricle; it did not exacerbate any effects due to altitude. There was a tendency for the left ventricle weight to increase with exposure to 35 ppm carbon monoxide at altitude, but the increase was not significant until 100 ppm carbon monoxide. Heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac output, and peripheral resistance were unaffected by exposure to 35 ppm carbon monoxide or 10,000-ft altitude singly or in combination.

  15. Hormonal contraceptives and travel to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Linda E

    2015-03-01

    Women frequently ask about the safety and efficacy of using hormonal contraception (HC), either oral contraceptive pills (OC) or other forms, when traveling to high altitude locales. What are the risks and benefits of using HC at high altitude? Does HC affect acclimatization, exercise performance, or occurrence of acute mountain sickness? This article reviews current data regarding the risks and benefits of HC at high altitude, both demonstrated and theoretical, with the aim of helping health care providers to advise women traveling above 2500 meters. Most healthy women can safely use HC when traveling to high altitude, but should be aware of the potential risks and inconveniences.

  16. Fire Fighting from High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent; Ambrosia, Vince

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on high altitude fire fighting is shown. The topics include: 1) Yellowstone Fire - 1988; 2) 2006 Western States Fire Mission Over-View; 3) AMS-Wildfire Scanner; 4) October 24-25 Mission: Yosemite NP and NF; 5) October 24-25 Mission MODIS Overpass; 6) October 24-25 Mission Highlights; 7) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire, California; 8) Response to the Esperanza Fire in Southern California -- Timeline Oct 27-29 2006; 9) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire Altair Flight Routing; 10) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire Altair Over-Flights; 11) October 28-29 Mission Highlights; 12) Results from the Esperanza Fire Response; 13) 2007 Western States Fire Mission; and 14) Western States UAS Fire Mission 2007

  17. Training Standardization

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2003-09-01

    The article describes the benefits of and required process and recommendations for implementing the standardization of training in the nuclear power industry in the United States and abroad. Current Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) enable training standardization in the nuclear power industry. The delivery of training through the Internet, Intranet and video over IP will facilitate this standardization and bring multiple benefits to the nuclear power industry worldwide. As the amount of available qualified and experienced professionals decreases because of retirements and fewer nuclear engineering institutions, standardized training will help increase the number of available professionals in the industry. Technology will make it possible to use the experience of retired professionals who may be interested in working part-time from a remote location. Well-planned standardized training will prevent a fragmented approach among utilities, and it will save the industry considerable resources in the long run. It will also ensure cost-effective and safe nuclear power plant operation.

  18. Turbojet Performance and Operation at High Altitudes with Hydrogen and Jp-4 Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, W A; Kaufman, H R; Harp, J L , Jr; Chelko, L J

    1956-01-01

    Two current turbojet engines were operated with gaseous-hydrogen and JP-4 fuels at very high altitudes and a simulated Mach number of 0.8. With gaseous hydrogen as the fuel stable operation was obtained at altitudes up to the facility limit of about 90,000 feet and the specific fuel consumption was only 40 percent of that with JP-4 fuel. With JP-4 as the fuel combustion was unstable at altitudes above 60,000 to 65,000 feet and blowout limits were reached at 75,000 to 80,000 feet. Over-all performance, component efficiencies, and operating range were reduced considerable at very high altitudes with both fuels.

  19. Is Pulse Oximetry Useful for Screening Neonates for Critical Congenital Heart Disease at High Altitudes?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Julien I E

    2016-06-01

    Now that pulse oximetry is used widely to screen for critical congenital heart disease, it is time to consider whether this screening method is applicable to those who live at high altitudes. Consideration of basic physical principles and reports from the literature indicate that not only is the 95 % cutoff point for arterial oxygen saturation incorrect at high altitudes, but the lower saturations are accompanied by greater variability and therefore there is the possibility of a greater percentage of false-positive screening tests at high altitudes. Because of ethnic differences in response to high altitudes, normative data will have to be collected separately in different countries and perhaps for different ethnic groups.

  20. High Altitude Illnesses in Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High Altitude Headache (HAH), Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS), and High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE) are all high altitude related illnesses in order of severity from the mildly symptomatic to the potentially life-threatening. High altitude illnesses occur when travelers ascend to high altitudes too rapidly, which does not allow enough time for the body to adjust. Slow graded ascent to the desired altitude and termination of ascent if AMS symptoms present are keys to illness prevention. Early recognition and rapid intervention of AMS can halt progression to HACE. Pharmacologic prophylaxis with acetazolamide is a proven method of prevention and treatment of high altitude illness. If prevention fails then treatment modalities include supplemental oxygen, supportive therapy, hyperbaric treatment, and dexamethasone. Given the multitude of visitors to the mountains of Hawai‘i, high altitude illness will continue to persist as a prevalent local condition. This paper will emphasize the prevention and early diagnosis of AMS so that the illness does not progress to HACE. PMID:25478293

  1. 77 FR 3091 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... Altitudes and Changeover Points Amendment 498 Effective Date February 9, 2012 From To MEA Sec. 95.10 Amber... From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3223 RNAV Route T223 Is Amended To Read... FIX Amott, AK FIX 18000 45000 Total Changeover From/To distance distance Point from Track angle...

  2. 76 FR 59890 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... Altitudes and Changeover Points From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.4000 High Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.4037 RNAV Route Q37 Is Added to Read FORT STOCKTON, TX VORTAC CAVRN, TX FIX *25000 45000 *18000--GNSS MEA *DME/DME/IRU MEA CAVRN, TX FIX YORUB, NM FIX *25000 45000 *18000--GNSS MEA *DME/DME/IRU MEA YORUB, NM FIX...

  3. Density Altitude Maps of Iran and Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    standard, DA is lower than PA. DA can also be expressed as the altitude in the ICAO standard atmosphere at which a given density occurs. The maps...produced in this study show the altitude in the ICAO standard atmosphere at which surface density occurs.

  4. Internalized Heterosexism: Clinical Implications and Training Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashubeck-West, Susan; Szymanski, Dawn; Meyer, Jill

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on implications of empirical research on the construct of internalized heterosexism (IH) in lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals. First, suggestions for practice with LGB clients are provided using the framework proposed by Goodman et al. for social justice work at micro, meso, and macro levels. Second, ideas for the…

  5. Developmental functional adaptation to high altitude: review.

    PubMed

    Frisancho, A Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Various approaches have been used to understand the origins of the functional traits that characterize the Andean high-altitude native. Based on the conceptual framework of developmental functional adaptation which postulates that environmental influences during the period of growth and development have long lasting effects that may be expressed during adulthood, we initiated a series of studies addressed at determining the pattern of physical growth and the contribution of growth and development to the attainment of full functional adaptation to high-altitude of low and high altitude natives living under rural and urban conditions. Current research indicate that: (a) the pattern of growth at high altitude due to limited nutritional resources, physical growth in body size is delayed but growth in lung volumes is accelerated because of hypoxic stress); (b) low-altitude male and female urban natives can attain a full functional adaptation to high altitude by exposure to high-altitude hypoxia during the period of growth and development; (c) both experimental studies on animals and comparative human studies indicate that exposure to high altitude during the period of growth and development results in the attainment of a large residual lung volume; (d) this developmentally acquired enlarged residual lung volume and its associated increase in alveolar area when combined with the increased tissue capillarization and moderate increase in red blood cells and hemoglobin concentration contributes to the successful functional adaptation of the Andean high-altitude native to hypoxia; and (e) any specific genetic traits that are related to the successful functional adaptation of Andean high-altitude natives have yet to be identified.

  6. Diving at altitude: from definition to practice.

    PubMed

    Egi, S Murat; Pieri, Massimo; Marroni, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Diving above sea level has different motivations for recreational, military, commercial and scientific activities. Despite the apparently wide practice of inland diving, there are three major discrepancies about diving at altitude: threshold elevation that requires changes in sea level procedures; upper altitude limit of the applicability of these modifications; and independent validation of altitude adaptation methods of decompression algorithms. The first problem is solved by converting the normal fluctuation in barometric pressure to an altitude equivalent. Based on the barometric variations recorded from a meteorological center, it is possible to suggest 600 meters as a threshold for classifying a dive as an "altitude" dive. The second problem is solved by proposing the threshold altitude of aviation (2,400 meters) to classify "high" altitude dives. The DAN (Divers Alert Network) Europe diving database (DB) is analyzed to solve the third problem. The database consists of 65,050 dives collected from different dive computers. A total of 1,467 dives were found to be classified as altitude dives. However, by checking the elevation according to the logged geographical coordinates, 1,284 dives were disqualified because the altitude setting had been used as a conservative setting by the dive computer despite the fact that the dive was made at sea level. Furthermore, according to the description put forward in this manuscript, 72 dives were disqualified because the surface level elevation is lower than 600 meters. The number of field data (111 dives) is still very low to use for the validation of any particular method of altitude adaptation concerning decompression algorithms.

  7. Sleep at high altitude: guesses and facts.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Konrad E; Buenzli, Jana C; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Ulrich, Silvia

    2015-12-15

    Lowlanders commonly report a poor sleep quality during the first few nights after arriving at high altitude. Polysomnographic studies reveal that reductions in slow wave sleep are the most consistent altitude-induced changes in sleep structure identified by visual scoring. Quantitative spectral analyses of the sleep electroencephalogram have confirmed an altitude-related reduction in the low-frequency power (0.8-4.6 Hz). Although some studies suggest an increase in arousals from sleep at high altitude, this is not a consistent finding. Whether sleep instability at high altitude is triggered by periodic breathing or vice versa is still uncertain. Overnight changes in slow wave-derived encephalographic measures of neuronal synchronization in healthy subjects were less pronounced at moderately high (2,590 m) compared with low altitude (490 m), and this was associated with a decline in sleep-related memory consolidation. Correspondingly, exacerbation of breathing and sleep disturbances experienced by lowlanders with obstructive sleep apnea during a stay at 2,590 m was associated with poor performance in driving simulator tests. These findings suggest that altitude-related alterations in sleep may adversely affect daytime performance. Despite recent advances in our understanding of sleep at altitude, further research is required to better establish the role of gender and age in alterations of sleep at different altitudes, to determine the influence of acclimatization and of altitude-related illness, and to uncover the characteristics of sleep in highlanders that may serve as a study paradigm of sleep in patients exposed to chronic hypoxia due to cardiorespiratory disease.

  8. 12 days of altitude exposure at 1800m does not increase resting metabolic rate in elite rowers.

    PubMed

    Woods, Amy L; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Rice, Anthony; Thompson, Kevin Grant

    2017-03-09

    Four elite rowers completed a twelve-day altitude training camp living at 1800m, and training at 1800m and 915m, to assess changes in resting metabolic rate (RMR). RMR and body composition were assessed PRE and POST-camp. Downward trends in RMR and body composition were observed post-altitude: absolute RMR (percent change: -5.2%), relative RMR (-4.6%), body mass (-1.2%), and fat mass (-4.1%), likely related to the hypoxic stimulus and an imbalance between training load and energy intake.

  9. Short-term hematological effects upon completion of a four-week simulated altitude camp.

    PubMed

    Pottgiesser, Torben; Garvican, Laura A; Martin, David T; Featonby, Jesse M; Gore, Christopher J; Schumacher, Yorck O

    2012-03-01

    Hemoglobin mass (tHb) is considered to be a main factor for sea-level performance after "live high-train low" (LHTL) altitude training, but little research has focused on the persistence of tHb following cessation of altitude exposure. The aim of the case study was to investigate short-term effects of various hematological measures including tHb upon completion of a simulated altitude camp. Five female cyclists spent 26 nights at simulated altitude (LHTL, 16.6 ± 0.4 h/d, 3000 m in an altitude house) where tHb was measured at baseline, at cessation of the camp, and 9 d thereafter. Venous blood measures (hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, %reticulocytes, serum erythropoietin, ferritin, lactate dehydrogenase, and haptoglobin) were determined at baseline; on day 21 during LHTL; and at days 2, 5, and 9 after LHTL. Hemoglobin mass increased by 5.5% (90% confidence limits [CL] 2.5 to 8.5%, very likely) after the LHTL training camp. At day 9 after simulated LHTL, tHb decreased by 3.0% (90%CL -5.1 to -1.0%, likely). There was a substantial decrease in serum EPO (-34%, 90%CL -50 to -12%) at 2 d after return to sea level and a rise in ferritin (23%, 90%CL 3 to 46%) coupled with a decrease in %reticulocytes (-23%, 90%CL -34 to -9%) between day 5 and 9 after LHTL. Our findings show that following a hypoxic intervention with a beneficial tHb outcome, there may be a high probability of a rapid tHb decrease upon return to normoxic conditions. This highlights a rapid component in red-cell control and may have implications for the appropriate timing of altitude training in relation to competition.

  10. Morphology of the internal organs in the adaptation of animals to high-altitude conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakhimov, Y. A.; Belkin, V. S.; Usmanov, M. U.

    1975-01-01

    Disruption of metabolic processes in the walls of the blood vessels as well as changes in the functional activity of the endocrine glands play an important role in the process of an animal's accommodation to a combination of stress factors. Preliminary training of animals for stays at high-altitude markedly reduces the severity of the morphological picture.

  11. Postnatal cardiopulmonary adaptations to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Huicho, Luis

    2007-09-30

    Postnatal cardiopulmonary adaptations to high altitude constitute a key component of any set of responses developed to face high altitude hypoxia. Such responses are required ultimately to meet the energy demands necessary for adequate functioning at cell and organism level. After a brief insight on general and cardiopulmonary comparative studies in growing and adult organisms, differences and possible explanations for varying cardiopulmonary pathology, pulmonary artery hypertension, persistent right ventricular predominance and subacute high altitude pulmonary hypertension in different populations of children living at high altitude are discussed. Potential long-term implications of early chronic hypoxic exposure on later diseases are also presented. It is hoped that this review will help the practicing physician working at high altitude to make informed decisions concerning individual pediatric patients, specifically with regard to diagnosis and management of altitude-related cardiopulmonary pathology. Finally, plausibility and the knowledge-base of public health interventions to reduce the risks posed by suboptimal or inadequate postnatal cardiopulmonary responses to high altitude are discussed.

  12. [Sildenafil and exercise performance at altitude].

    PubMed

    Peidro, Roberto M

    2015-01-01

    Barometric pressure and partial oxygen pressure decrease with increasing altitude. Hypobaric hypoxia produced is responsible for altitude-related diseases and it can cause severe decrements in exercise performance. The physiological adaptations to the altitude are multiple and they contribute to alter different athletic qualities. The VO2 worsening could be associated to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and nitric oxide diffusion alteration. Performance impairments at altitude can also be accentuated by hypoxia-induced elevations in pulmonary arterial pressure. Clinical studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of sildenafil on the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. These effects have led to suggest that its indication for competitions at altitude might improve athletic performance. The investigations demonstrate different results depending on the altitude level and times and intensities of exercise. Some studies show performance improvements, although not in all participants. Individual responses vary widely between different athletes. This presentation examines the effects of altitude on exercise capacity and shows studies about the use of sildenafil to improve sport performance. This text also discusses the possible side effects and implications for the use of sildenafil in athletes, indication that is not the basic one of the drug. The physicians must know in each athlete the individual sildenafil side effects that could arise and that would influence negatively on health and performance.

  13. Carbon monoxide studies at high altitude.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J J

    1988-01-01

    In high altitude areas, ambient carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations are rising because of the increasing number of new residents and tourists, and their concomitant use of motor vehicles and heating appliances. There are, however, comparatively few studies of the acute or chronic physiological effects that may be caused by inhaling CO at high altitude. There are data supporting the concept that the effects of breathing CO at high altitude are additive, and data suggesting that the effects may be more than additive. Visual sensitivity and flicker fusion frequency are reduced in humans inhaling CO at high altitude. One provocative study suggests that the increase in coronary capillarity seen with chronic altitude exposure may be blocked by CO. We exposed male, laboratory rats for 6 weeks to 100 ppm CO, 4676 m (15,000 ft) simulated high altitude (SHA), and CO at SHA. SHA increase hematocrit ratio (Hct) and right ventricle weight, but decreased body weight. CO increased Hct and left ventricle weight. Our results indicate that 100 ppm CO does not exacerbate the effects produced by exposure to 4676 m altitude.

  14. High Altitude Launch for a Practical SSTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Denis, Vincent

    2003-01-01

    Existing engineering materials allow the construction of towers to heights of many kilometers. Orbital launch from a high altitude has significant advantages over sea-level launch due to the reduced atmospheric pressure, resulting in lower atmospheric drag on the vehicle and allowing higher rocket engine performance. high-altitude launch sites are particularly advantageous for single-stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles, where the payload is typically 2% of the initial launch mass. An earlier paper enumerated some of the advantages of high altitude launch of SSTO vehicles. In this paper, we calculate launch trajectories for a candidate SSTO vehicle, and calculate the advantage of launch at launch altitudes 5 to 25 kilometer altitudes above sea level. The performance increase can be directly translated in to increased payload capability to orbit, ranging from 5 to 20% increase in the mass to orbit. For a candidate vehicle with an initial payload fraction of 2% of gross lift-off weight, this corresponds to 31 % increase in payload (for 5-km launch altitude) to 122% additional payload (for 25-km launch altitude).

  15. High Altitude Launch for a Practical SSTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Denis, Vincent

    2003-01-01

    Existing engineering materials allow the construction of towers to heights of many kilometers. Orbital launch from a high altitude has significant advantages over sea-level launch due to the reduced atmospheric pressure, resulting in lower atmospheric drag on the vehicle and allowing higher rocket engine performance. High-altitude launch sites are particularly advantageous for single-stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles, where the payload is typically 2 percent of the initial launch mass. An earlier paper enumerated some of the advantages of high altitude launch of SSTO vehicles. In this paper, we calculate launch trajectories for a candidate SSTO vehicle, and calculate the advantage of launch at launch altitudes 5 to 25 kilometer altitudes above sea level. The performance increase can be directly translated into increased payload capability to orbit, ranging from 5 to 20 percent increase in the mass to orbit. For a candidate vehicle with an initial payload fraction of 2 percent of gross lift-off weight, this corresponds to 31 percent increase in payload (for 5-kilometer launch altitude) to 122 percent additional payload (for 25-kilometer launch altitude).

  16. High-Altitude Hydration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott E.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Bue, Grant C.; Schaefbauer, Mark E.; Urban, Kase

    2010-01-01

    Three methods are being developed for keeping water from freezing during high-altitude climbs so that mountaineers can remain hydrated. Three strategies have been developed. At the time of this reporting two needed to be tested in the field and one was conceptual. The first method is Passive Thermal Control Using Aerogels. This involves mounting the fluid reservoir of the climber s canteen to an inner layer of clothing for better heat retention. For the field test, bottles were mounted to the inner fleece layer of clothing, and then aerogel insulation was placed on the outside of the bottle, and circumferentially around the drink straw. When climbers need to drink, they can pull up the insulated straw from underneath the down suit, take a sip, and then put it back into the relative warmth of the suit. For the field test, a data logger assessed the temperatures of the water reservoir, as well as near the tip of the drink straw. The second method is Passive Thermal Control with Copper-Shielded Drink Straw and Aerogels, also mounted to inner layers of clothing for better heat retention. Braided wire emanates from the inside of the fleece jacket layer, and continues up and around the drink straw in order to use body heat to keep the system-critical drink straw warm enough to keep water in the liquid state. For the field test, a data logger will be used to compare this with the above concept. The third, and still conceptual, method is Active Thermal Control with Microcontroller. If the above methods do not work, microcontrollers and tape heaters have been identified that could keep the drink straw warm even under extremely cold conditions. Power requirements are not yet determined because the thermal environment inside the down suit relative to the external environment has not been established. A data logger will be used to track both the external and internal temperatures of the suit on a summit day.

  17. Attention to detail: injuries at altitude among U.S. Army Military static line parachutists.

    PubMed

    Craig, S C; Lee, T

    2000-04-01

    Altitude injuries, defined as injuries sustained by military static line parachutists before ground impact, have not been reviewed for 50 years. There are indications that these injuries are increasing at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Between May 1, 1994, and April 30, 1996, surveillance was conducted for parachute-related injuries and altitude injuries at Fort Bragg. The incidence of all jump-related injuries was 8.1/1,000 aircraft exits. Significant risk factors for injury included being 30 years of age or older (p < 0.001) and being female (p = 0.003). The overall incidence of altitude injuries was noted to be 0.46/1,000 aircraft exits. Risk factors for altitude injury included being 40 years of age or older (p = 0.005) and in the rank of E-1 to E-3 (p = 0.0001). Fifty-four percent of injuries occurred during exiting before complete parachute deployment, and 46% occurred during the opening shock of the parachute. Mechanisms of injury included static line entanglement (33%), riser/suspension-line entanglement (46%), aircraft strikes (21%), unsecured equipment strikes (1%), and opening shock deceleration (1%). The majority of severe altitude injuries are caused by riser/suspension-line entanglement (63%) and involve the knee joint (37%). Although the incidence of altitude injury is quite small, the potential risk for career-threatening and/or life-threatening injury is great. This risk can be reduced by appropriate training and attention to detail.

  18. Cardiovascular effects of chronic carbon monoxide and high-altitude exposure.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J J

    1989-07-01

    At higher altitudes, ambient carbon monoxide levels are increasing with the number of residents and tourists and their use of motor vehicles and heating devices (such as fireplaces, furnaces, and stoves). Although chronic exposure to carbon monoxide or high altitude causes pronounced cardiovascular changes in humans as well as in animals, there is little information on the effects elicited by these stressors combined. Data from acute studies and theoretical considerations suggest that carbon monoxide inhaled at altitude may be more detrimental than carbon monoxide inhaled at sea level. It is not known, however, if the cardiovascular system adapts or deteriorates with continuous, concurrent exposure to carbon monoxide and high altitude. Male laboratory rats were exposed for six weeks in steel barometric chambers to altitudes ranging from 3,300 ft (ambient) to 18,000 ft and to concentrations ranging from 0 to 500 parts per million (ppm)2. Carbon monoxide had no effect on body weight at any altitude. There was a tendency for hematocrit to increase even at the lowest concentration of carbon monoxide (9 ppm), but the increase did not become significant until 100 ppm. At 10,000 ft, there was a tendency for total heart weight to increase in rats inhaling 100 ppm carbon monoxide. Although its effects on the heart at altitude are complex, carbon monoxide, in concentrations of 500 ppm or less, had little effect on the right ventricle; it did not exacerbate any effects due to altitude. There was a tendency for the left ventricle weight to increase with exposure to 35 ppm carbon monoxide at altitude, but the increase was not significant until 100 ppm carbon monoxide. Heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac output, and peripheral resistance were unaffected by exposure to 35 ppm carbon monoxide or 10,000-ft altitude singly or in combination. I conclude that six weeks of exposure to 35 ppm carbon monoxide does not produce measurable effects in the healthy laboratory rat, nor does it

  19. The impact of altitude on the sleep of young elite soccer players (ISA3600)

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Charli; Schmidt, Walter F; Aughey, Robert J; Bourdon, Pitre C; Soria, Rudy; Claros, Jesus C Jimenez; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Buchheit, Martin; Simpson, Ben M; Hammond, Kristal; Kley, Marlen; Wachsmuth, Nadine; Gore, Christopher J; Roach, Gregory D

    2013-01-01

    Background Altitude training is used by elite athletes to improve sports performance, but it may also disrupt sleep. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of 2 weeks at high altitude on the sleep of young elite athletes. Methods Participants (n=10) were members of the Australian under-17 soccer team on an 18-day (19-night) training camp in Bolivia, with six nights at near sea level in Santa Cruz (430 m) and 13 nights at high altitude in La Paz (3600 m). Sleep was monitored using polysomnography during a baseline night at 430 m and three nights at 3600 m (immediately after ascent, 1 week after ascent and 2 weeks after ascent). Data were analysed using effect size statistics. Results All results are reported as comparisons with baseline. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was likely lower immediately upon ascent to altitude, possibly lower after 1 week and similar after 2 weeks. On all three nights at altitude, hypopneas and desaturations were almost certainly higher; oxygen saturation was almost certainly lower; and central apnoeas, respiratory arousals and periodic breathing were very likely higher. The effects on REM sleep were common to all but one participant, but the effects on breathing were specific to only half the participants. Conclusions The immediate effects of terrestrial altitude of 3600 m are to reduce the amount of REM sleep obtained by young elite athletes, and to cause 50% of them to have impaired breathing during sleep. REM sleep returns to normal after 2 weeks at altitude, but impaired breathing does not improve. PMID:24282215

  20. The Gravity Field of Mercury After the Messenger Low-Altitude Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazarico, Erwan; Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gary A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    The final year of the MESSENGER mission was designed to take advantage of the remaining propellant onboard to provide a series of lowaltitude observation campaigns and acquire novel scientific data about the innermost planet. The lower periapsis altitude greatly enhances the sensitivity to the short-wavelength gravity field, but only when the spacecraft is in view of Earth. After more than 3 years in orbit around Mercury, the MESSENGER spacecraft was tracked for the first time below 200-km altitude on 5 May 2014 by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). Between August and October, periapsis passages down to 25-km altitude were routinely tracked. These periods considerably improved the quality of the data coverage. Before the end of its mission, MESSENGER will fly at very low altitudes for extended periods of time. Given the orbital geometry, however the periapses will not be visible from Earth and so no new tracking data will be available for altitudes lower than 75 km. Nevertheless, the continuous tracking of MESSENGER in the northern hemisphere will help improve the uniformity of the spatial coverage at altitudes lower than 150 km, which will further improve the overall quality of the Mercury gravity field.

  1. Altitude-Test-Chamber Investigation of Mcdonnell Afterburner on J34 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reller, John O.; Dowman, Harry W.

    1949-01-01

    An altitude-test-chamber investigation was conducted to determine the operational and performance characteristics of a McDonnell afterburner with a fixed-area exhaust nozzle on a J34 engine. At rated engine speed, the altitude limit, as determined by combustion blow-out, occurred as a band of unstable operation of about 6000-foot altitude in width with minimum altitude limits from 31,000 feet at a simulated flight Mach number of 0.40 to about 45,500 feet at a simulated flight Mach number of 1.00. Considerable difficulty was experienced in attempting to establish or maintain balanced-cycle engine operation at altitudes above 36,000 feet. The fuel-air ratio for balanced-cycle operation and lean blowout of the afterburner, the augmented-thrust ratio, the total specific fuel consumption, and the afterburner combustion efficiency for balanced-cycle operation are summarized in a table. Satisfactory afterburner ignition was obtained over a range of flight Mach Numbers from 0.32 to 0.60 at altitudes from 10,000 to 30,000 and engine speeds from 10,000 to 12,500 rpm.

  2. The variation in engine power with altitude determined from measurements in flight with a hub dynamometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gove, W D

    1929-01-01

    The rate of change in power of aircraft engines with altitude has been the subject of considerable discussion. Only a small amount of data from direct measurements of the power delivered by airplane engines during flight, however, has been published. This report presents the results of direct measurements of the power delivered by a Liberty 12 airplane engine taken with a hub dynamometer at standard altitudes from zero to 13,000 feet. Six flights were made with the engine installed in a modified DH-4 airplane. The experimental relation of brake horsepower to altitude is compared with two theoretical relations and with the experimental results, for a second Liberty 12 engine, given in NACA Technical Report no. 252. The rate of change in power with altitude of a third Liberty engine, measured with a calibrated propeller, is also given for comparison. The data presented substantiate the theoretical relation of brake horsepower to altitude based on the correction of ground level indicated horsepower for change in atmospheric temperature and pressure with the subsequent deduction of friction horsepower corrected for altitude. (author)

  3. Paul Bikle's Record Altitude Sailplane Flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    On a cold and windy February afternoon 50 years ago, the late Paul Bikle, then director of NASA's Flight Research Center, soared into the stratosphere with one goal in mind - a world altitude recor...

  4. Aeronautic Instruments. Section II : Altitude Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mears, A H; Henrickson, H B; Brombacher, W G

    1923-01-01

    This report is Section two of a series of reports on aeronautic instruments (Technical Report nos. 125 to 132, inclusive). This section discusses briefly barometric altitude determinations, and describes in detail the principal types of altimeters and barographs used in aeronautics during the recent war. This is followed by a discussion of performance requirements for such instruments and an account of the methods of testing developed by the Bureau of Standards. The report concludes with a brief account of the results of recent investigations. For accurate measurements of altitude, reference must also be made to thermometer readings of atmospheric temperature, since the altitude is not fixed by atmospheric pressure alone. This matter is discussed in connection with barometric altitude determination.

  5. High-altitude cerebral oedema mimicking stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yanamandra, Uday; Gupta, Amul; Patyal, Sagarika; Varma, Prem Prakash

    2014-01-01

    High-altitude cerebral oedema (HACO) is the most fatal high-altitude illness seen by rural physicians practising in high-altitude areas. HACO presents clinically with cerebellar ataxia, features of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and coma. Early identification is important as delay in diagnosis can be fatal. We present two cases of HACO presenting with focal deficits mimicking stroke. The first patient presented with left-sided hemiplegia associated with the rapid deterioration in the sensorium. Neuroimaging revealed features suggestive of vasogenic oedema. The second patient presented with monoplegia of the lower limb. Neuroimaging revealed perfusion deficit in anterior cerebral artery territory. Both patients were managed with dexamethasone and they improved dramatically. Clinical picture and neuroimaging closely resembled acute ischaemic stroke in both cases. Thrombolysis in these patients would have been disastrous. Recent travel to high altitude, young age, absence of atherosclerotic risk factors and features of raised ICP concomitantly directed the diagnosis to HACO. PMID:24671373

  6. Altitude Testing of Large Liquid Propellant Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Bryon; Raines, Nickey

    2008-01-01

    Altitude Testing of the J2-X engine at 100,000 feet (start capability). Chemical Steam Generation for providing vacuum. Project Started Mar 07. Test Stand Activation around Late 2010. J-2X Testing around early 2011.

  7. Predicted optical performance of the high-altitude balloon experiment (HABE) telescope in an adverse thermal environment

    SciTech Connect

    Akau, R.L.; Givler, R.C.; Eastman, D.R.

    1994-04-01

    The High-Altitude Balloon Experiment (HABE) telescope was designed to operate at an ambient temperature of {minus}55 C and an altitude of 26 km, using a precooled primary mirror. Although at this altitude the air density is only 1.4 percent of the value at sea level, the temperature gradients within the telescope are high enough to deform the optical wavefront. This problem is considerably lessened by precooling the primary mirror to {minus}35 C. This paper describes the application of several codes to determine the range of wavefront deformation during a mission.

  8. Environmental dynamics at orbital altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The work reported involved the improvement of aerodynamic theory for free molecular and transition flow regimes. The improved theory was applied to interpretation of the dynamic response of objects traveling through the atmosphere. Satellite drag analysis includes analysis methods, atmospheric super rotation effects, and satellite lift effects on orbital dynamics. Transition flow regimes were studied with falling sphere data and errors resulting in inferred atmospheric parameters from falling sphere techniques. Improved drag coefficients reveal considerable error in previous falling sphere data. The drag coefficient has been studied for the entire spectrum of Knudsen Number and speed ratio, with particular emphasis on the theory of the very low-speed ratio regime.

  9. High altitude medicine for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    High altitude medicine deals with a continuum of diseases ranging from a mild discomfort to serious ailments affecting all organ systems, including the lungs, brain, and eyes. Decreased oxygen tension is the primary cause. The main principles of prevention are staging and graded ascent to allow acclimatization. Adventure travel to high altitude destinations is becoming increasingly popular; family physicians should be informed of the medical problems associated with such travel. Images p712-a p715-a p716-a PMID:8199523

  10. 76 FR 11675 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... Altitudes and Changeover Points From To MEA Sec. 95.1001 Direct Routes--U.S. Color Routes Sec. 95.516 Green... MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3278 RNAV Route T278 Is Amended To Read in Part... *5000 *1500--MOCA *2000--GNSS MEA Sec. 95.6020 VOR Federal Airway V20 Is Amended To Read in...

  11. Python Engine Installed in Altitude Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    An engine mechanic checks instrumentation prior to an investigation of engine operating characteristics and thrust control of a large turboprop engine with counter-rotating propellers under high-altitude flight conditions in the 20-foot-dianieter test section of the Altitude Wind Tunnel at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Cleveland, Ohio, now known as the John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.

  12. Cabin cruising altitudes for regular transport aircraft.

    PubMed

    2008-04-01

    The adverse physiological effects of flight, caused by ascent to altitude and its associated reduction in barometric pressure, have been known since the first manned balloon flights in the 19th century. It soon became apparent that the way to protect the occupant of an aircraft from the effects of ascent to altitude was to enclose either the individual, or the cabin, in a sealed or pressurized environment. Of primary concern in commercial airline transport operations is the selection of a suitable cabin pressurization schedule that assures adequate oxygen partial pressures for all intended occupants. For the past several decades, 8000 ft has been accepted as the maximum operational cabin pressure altitude in the airline industry. More recent research findings on the physiological and psycho-physiological effects of mild hypoxia have provided cause for renewed discussion of the "acceptability" of a maximum cabin cruise altitude of 8000 ft; however, we did not find sufficient scientific data to recommend a change in the cabin altitude of transport category aircraft. The Aerospace Medical Association (AsMA) should support further research to evaluate the safety, performance and comfort of occupants at altitudes between 5000 and 10,000 ft.

  13. Early history of high-altitude physiology.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2016-02-01

    High-altitude physiology can be said to have begun in 1644 when Torricelli described the first mercury barometer and wrote the immortal words "We live submerged at the bottom of an ocean of the element air." Interestingly, the notion of atmospheric pressure had eluded his teacher, the great Galileo. Blaise Pascal was responsible for describing the fall in pressure with increasing altitude, and Otto von Guericke gave a dramatic demonstration of the enormous force that could be developed by atmospheric pressure. Robert Boyle learned of Guericke's experiment and, with Robert Hooke, constructed the first air pump that allowed small animals to be exposed to a low pressure. Hooke also constructed a small low-pressure chamber and exposed himself to a simulated altitude of about 2400 meters. With the advent of ballooning, humans were rapidly exposed to very low pressures, sometimes with tragic results. For example, the French balloon, Zénith, rose to over 8000 m, and two of the three aeronauts succumbed to the hypoxia. Paul Bert was the first person to clearly state that the deleterious effects of high altitude were caused by the low partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), and later research was accelerated by high-altitude stations and expeditions to high altitude.

  14. Analysis of Experimental Sea-level Transient Data and Analog Method of Obtaining Altitude Response for Turbine-propeller Engine with Relay-type Speed Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasu, George; Pack, George J

    1951-01-01

    Correlation has been established between transient engine and control data obtained experimentally and data obtained by simulating the engine and control with an analog computer. This correlation was established at sea-level conditions for a turbine-propeller engine with a relay-type speed control. The behavior of the controlled engine at altitudes of 20,000 and 35,000 feet was determined with an analog computer using the altitude pressure and temperature generalization factors to calculate the new engine constants for these altitudes. Because the engine response varies considerably at altitude some type of compensation appears desirable and four methods of compensation are discussed.

  15. Nitric oxide in adaptation to altitude.

    PubMed

    Beall, Cynthia M; Laskowski, Daniel; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2012-04-01

    This review summarizes published information on the levels of nitric oxide gas (NO) in the lungs and NO-derived liquid-phase molecules in the acclimatization of visitors newly arrived at altitudes of 2500 m or more and adaptation of populations whose ancestors arrived thousands of years ago. Studies of acutely exposed visitors to high altitude focus on the first 24-48 h with just a few extending to days or weeks. Among healthy visitors, NO levels in the lung, plasma, and/or red blood cells fell within 2h, but then returned toward baseline or slightly higher by 48 h and increased above baseline by 5 days. Among visitors ill with high-altitude pulmonary edema at the time of the study or in the past, NO levels were lower than those of their healthy counterparts. As for highland populations, Tibetans had NO levels in the lung, plasma, and red blood cells that were at least double and in some cases orders of magnitude greater than other populations regardless of altitude. Red blood cell-associated nitrogen oxides were more than 200 times higher. Other highland populations had generally higher levels although not to the degree shown by Tibetans. Overall, responses of those acclimatized and those presumed to be adapted are in the same direction, although the Tibetans have much larger responses. Missing are long-term data on lowlanders at altitude showing how similar they become to the Tibetan phenotype. Also missing are data on Tibetans at low altitude to see the extent to which their phenotype is a response to the immediate environment or expressed constitutively. The mechanisms causing the visitors' and the Tibetans' high levels of NO and NO-derived molecules at altitude remain unknown. Limited data suggest processes including hypoxic upregulation of NO synthase gene expression, hemoglobin-NO reactions, and genetic variation. Gains in understanding will require integrating appropriate methods and measurement techniques with indicators of adaptive function under hypoxic

  16. Nitric oxide in adaptation to altitude

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Daniel; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes published information on levels of nitric oxide gas (NO) in the lungs and NO-derived liquid phase molecules in the acclimatization of visitors newly arrived at altitudes of 2500m or more and adaptation of populations whose ancestors arrived thousands of years ago. Studies of acutely exposed visitors to high altitude focus on the first 24–48 hours with just a few extending to days or weeks. Among healthy visitors, NO levels in the lung, plasma and/or red blood cells fell within three hours, but then returned toward baseline or slightly higher by 48 hours, and increased above baseline by 5 days. Among visitors ill with high-altitude pulmonary edema at the time of the study or in the past, NO levels were lower than their healthy counterparts. As for highland populations, Tibetans had NO levels in the lung, plasma and red blood cells that were at least double and in some cases orders of magnitude greater than other populations regardless of altitude. Red blood cell associated nitrogen oxides were more than two hundred times higher. Other highland populations had generally higher levels although not to the degree showed by Tibetans. Overall, responses of those acclimatized and those presumed to be adapted are in the same direction although the Tibetans have much larger responses. Missing are long-term data on lowlanders at altitude showing how similar they become to the Tibetan phenotype. Also missing are data on Tibetans at low altitude to see the extent to which their phenotype is a response to the immediate environment or expressed constitutively. The mechanisms causing the visitors’ and the Tibetans’ high levels of NO and NO-derived molecules at altitude remain unknown. Limited data suggest processes including hypoxic upregulation of NO synthase gene expression, hemoglobin-NO reactions and genetic variation. Gains in understanding will require integrating appropriate methods and measurement techniques with indicators of adaptive function

  17. Neutral Wind Observations below 200 km altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Abe, T.; Habu, H.; Kakinami, Y.; Larsen, M. F.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Yamamoto, M.

    2015-12-01

    Neutral Wind Observations below 200 km altitudesS. Watanabe1, T. Abe2, H. Habu2, Y. Kakinami3, M. Larsen4, R. Pfaff5, M. Yamamoto6, M-Y. Yamamoto31Hokkaido University/Hokkaido Information University, 2JAXA/ISAS, 3Kochi University of Technology, 4Clemson University, 5NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, 6Kyoto University, Neutral wind in the thermosphere is one of the key parameters to understand the ionosphere-thermosphere coupling process. JAXA/ISAS successfully launched sounding rockets from Uchinoura Space Center (USC) on September 2, 2007, January 12, 2012, and July 20, 2013, and NASA launched sounding rockets from Kwajalein on May 7, 2013 and from Wallops on July 4, 2013. The rockets installed Lithium and/or TMA canisters as well as instruments for plasma and electric and magnetic fields. The atomic Lithium gases were released at altitudes between 150 km and 300 km in the evening on September 2, 2007, at altitude of ~100 km in the morning on January 12, 2012, at altitude of ~120km in the midnight on July 20, 2013, at altitude between 150 km and 300 km in the evening on May 7, 2013 and at altitude of ~150 km in the noon on July 4, 2013. The Lithium atoms were scattering sunlight by resonance scattering with wavelength of 670nm. However, the Lithium atoms scattered moon light on July 20, 2013. The moon light scattering is the first time to use for thermospheric wind measurement in the midnight. The Lithium clouds/trails and TMA trails showed clearly the neutral wind shears and atmospheric waves at ~150 km altitude in the lower thermosphere for all local time.

  18. Lead - nutritional considerations

    MedlinePlus

    Lead poisoning - nutritional considerations; Toxic metal - nutritional considerations ... utensils . Old paint poses the greatest danger for lead poisoning , especially in young children. Tap water from lead ...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 23.1527 Section... Information § 23.1527 Maximum operating altitude. (a) The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed... established. (b) A maximum operating altitude limitation of not more than 25,000 feet must be established...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 23.1527 Section... Information § 23.1527 Maximum operating altitude. (a) The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed... established. (b) A maximum operating altitude limitation of not more than 25,000 feet must be established...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 23.1527 Section... Information § 23.1527 Maximum operating altitude. (a) The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed... established. (b) A maximum operating altitude limitation of not more than 25,000 feet must be established...

  2. 14 CFR 91.119 - Minimum safe altitudes: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum safe altitudes: General. 91.119... § 91.119 Minimum safe altitudes: General. Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes: (a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if a power...

  3. 14 CFR 91.119 - Minimum safe altitudes: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum safe altitudes: General. 91.119... § 91.119 Minimum safe altitudes: General. Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes: (a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if a power...

  4. 14 CFR 91.119 - Minimum safe altitudes: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum safe altitudes: General. 91.119... § 91.119 Minimum safe altitudes: General. Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes: (a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if a power...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 23.1527 Section... Information § 23.1527 Maximum operating altitude. (a) The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed... established. (b) A maximum operating altitude limitation of not more than 25,000 feet must be established...

  6. 14 CFR 91.119 - Minimum safe altitudes: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum safe altitudes: General. 91.119... § 91.119 Minimum safe altitudes: General. Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes: (a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if a power...

  7. 14 CFR 91.119 - Minimum safe altitudes: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum safe altitudes: General. 91.119... § 91.119 Minimum safe altitudes: General. Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes: (a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if a power...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 23.1527 Section... Information § 23.1527 Maximum operating altitude. (a) The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed... established. (b) A maximum operating altitude limitation of not more than 25,000 feet must be established...

  9. Benefits Assessment of Algorithmically Combining Generic High Altitude Airspace Sectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloem, Michael; Gupta, Pramod; Lai, Chok Fung; Kopardekar, Parimal

    2009-01-01

    In today's air traffic control operations, sectors that have traffic demand below capacity are combined so that fewer controller teams are required to manage air traffic. Controllers in current operations are certified to control a group of six to eight sectors, known as an area of specialization. Sector combinations are restricted to occur within areas of specialization. Since there are few sector combination possibilities in each area of specialization, human supervisors can effectively make sector combination decisions. In the future, automation and procedures will allow any appropriately trained controller to control any of a large set of generic sectors. The primary benefit of this will be increased controller staffing flexibility. Generic sectors will also allow more options for combining sectors, making sector combination decisions difficult for human supervisors. A sector-combining algorithm can assist supervisors as they make generic sector combination decisions. A heuristic algorithm for combining under-utilized air space sectors to conserve air traffic control resources has been described and analyzed. Analysis of the algorithm and comparisons with operational sector combinations indicate that this algorithm could more efficiently utilize air traffic control resources than current sector combinations. This paper investigates the benefits of using the sector-combining algorithm proposed in previous research to combine high altitude generic airspace sectors. Simulations are conducted in which all the high altitude sectors in a center are allowed to combine, as will be possible in generic high altitude airspace. Furthermore, the algorithm is adjusted to use a version of the simplified dynamic density (SDD) workload metric that has been modified to account for workload reductions due to automatic handoffs and Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B). This modified metric is referred to here as future simplified dynamic density (FSDD). Finally

  10. Atmospheric Sampling of Aerosols to Stratospheric Altitudes using High Altitude Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerde, E. A.; Thomas, E.

    2010-12-01

    Although carbon dioxide represents a long-lived atmospheric component relevant to global climate change, it is also understood that many additional contributors influence the overall climate of Earth. Among these, short-lived components are more difficult to incorporate into models due to uncertainties in the abundances of these both spatially and temporally. Possibly the most significant of these short-lived components falls under the heading of “black carbon” (BC). There are numerous overlapping definitions of BC, but it is basically carbonaceous in nature and light absorbing. Due to its potential as a climate forcer, an understanding of the BC population in the atmosphere is critical for modeling of radiative forcing. Prior measurements of atmospheric BC generally consist of airplane- and ground-based sampling, typically below 5000 m and restricted in time and space. Given that BC has a residence time on the order of days, short-term variability is easily missed. Further, since the radiative forcing is a result of BC distributed through the entire atmospheric column, aircraft sampling is by definition incomplete. We are in the process of planning a more comprehensive sampling of the atmosphere for BC using high-altitude balloons. Balloon-borne sampling is a highly reliable means to sample air through the entire troposphere and into the lower stratosphere. Our system will incorporate a balloon and a flight train of two modules. One module will house an atmospheric sampler. This sampler will be single-stage (samples all particle sizes together), and will place particles directly on an SEM sample stub for analysis. The nozzle depositing the sample will be offset from the center of the stub, placing the aerosol particles toward the edge. At various altitudes, the stub will be rotated 45 degrees, providing 6-8 sample “cuts” of particle populations through the atmospheric column. The flights will reach approximately 27 km altitude, above which the balloons

  11. Responses of the autonomic nervous system in altitude adapted and high altitude pulmonary oedema subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Lazar; Purkayastha, S. S.; Jayashankar, A.; Radhakrishnan, U.; Sen Gupta, J.; Nayar, H. S.

    1985-06-01

    Studies were carried out to ascertain the role of sympatho-parasympathetic responses in the process of adaptation to altitude. The assessment of status of autonomic balance was carried out in a group of 20 young male subjects by recording their resting heart rate, blood pressure, oral temperature, mean skin temperature, extremity temperatures, pupillary diameter, cold pressor response, oxygen consumption, cardioacceleration during orthostasis and urinary excretion of catecholamines; in a thermoneutral laboratory. The same parameters were repeated on day 3 and at weekly intervals for a period of 3 weeks, after exposing them to 3,500 m; and also after return to sea level. At altitude, similar studies were carried out in a group of 10 acclimatized lowlanders, 10 high altitude natives and 6 patients who had recently recovered from high altitude pulmonary oedema. In another phase, similar studies were done in two groups of subjects, one representing 15 subjects who had stayed at altitude (3,500 4,000 m) without any ill effects and the other comprising of 10 subjects who had either suffered from high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPO) or acute mountain sickness (AMS). The results revealed sympathetic overactivity on acute induction to altitude which showed gradual recovery on prolonged stay, the high altitude natives had preponderance to parasympathetic system. Sympathetic preponderance may not be an essential etiological factor for the causation of maladaptation syndromes.

  12. Altitude Registration of Limb-Scattered Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moy, Leslie; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jaross, Glen; Loughman, Robert; Kramarova, Natalya; Chen, Zhong; Taha, Ghassan; Chen, Grace; Xu, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    One of the largest constraints to the retrieval of accurate ozone profiles from UV backscatter limb sounding sensors is altitude registration. Two methods, the Rayleigh scattering attitude sensing (RSAS) and absolute radiance residual method (ARRM), are able to determine altitude registration to the accuracy necessary for long-term ozone monitoring. The methods compare model calculations of radiances to measured radiances and are independent of onboard tracking devices. RSAS determines absolute altitude errors, but, because the method is susceptible to aerosol interference, it is limited to latitudes and time periods with minimal aerosol contamination. ARRM, a new technique introduced in this paper, can be applied across all seasons and altitudes. However, it is only appropriate for relative altitude error estimates. The application of RSAS to Limb Profiler (LP) measurements from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) on board the Suomi NPP (SNPP) satellite indicates tangent height (TH) errors greater than 1 km with an absolute accuracy of +/-200 m. Results using ARRM indicate a approx. 300 to 400m intra-orbital TH change varying seasonally +/-100 m, likely due to either errors in the spacecraft pointing or in the geopotential height (GPH) data that we use in our analysis. ARRM shows a change of approx. 200m over 5 years with a relative accuracy (a long-term accuracy) of 100m outside the polar regions.

  13. High altitude pulmonary edema in mountain climbers.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Guzek, Aneta; Juszczak, Dariusz

    2015-04-01

    Every year thousands of ski, trekking or climbing fans travel to the mountains where they stay at the altitude of more than 2500-3000m above sea level or climb mountain peaks, often exceeding 7000-8000m. High mountain climbers are at a serious risk from the effects of adverse environmental conditions prevailing at higher elevations. They may experience health problems resulting from hypotension, hypoxia or exposure to low temperatures; the severity of those conditions is largely dependent on elevation, time of exposure as well as the rate of ascent and descent. A disease which poses a direct threat to the lives of mountain climbers is high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). It is a non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema which typically occurs in rapidly climbing unacclimatized lowlanders usually within 2-4 days of ascent above 2500-3000m. It is the most common cause of death resulting from the exposure to high altitude. The risk of HAPE rises with increased altitude and faster ascent. HAPE incidence ranges from an estimated 0.01% to 15.5%. Climbers with a previous history of HAPE, who ascent rapidly above 4500m have a 60% chance of illness recurrence. The aim of this article was to present the relevant details concerning epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical symptoms, prevention, and treatment of high altitude pulmonary edema among climbers in the mountain environment.

  14. [Effects of high altitude on bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Schultze-Werninghaus, G

    2008-03-01

    Sojourns in the high mountains have been recommended to patients with asthma for many decades. It is the aim of this contribution to summarise the published studies about the effects of a stay at > 1500 m above sea level on asthmatic patients. These data from 428 adolescent and adult patients indicate an improvement of asthma symptoms and lung function during sojourns at high altitude. In many patients a reduction of the steroid therapy was achievable. Profound changes in the immune system have been demonstrated at high altitude, with a reduction of B- and T-helper cell activation. Total and mite-specific immunoglobulin E antibodies decrease significantly during longer sojourns. These changes are associated with a reduction of airway inflammation (e. g., reduction of eosinophil activation, NO exhalation and bronchial hyper-responsiveness). The fact that also patients with non-allergic asthma demonstrate a reduction of their airway inflammation at high altitude suggests that the high altitude climate has beneficial effects on asthma beyond the effects of allergen avoidance. High UV exposure and low humidity could be important additional factors, to explain the reductions in asthma severity in the high mountain climate. Larger controlled studies should be performed to prove the positive effects of the high altitude climate on asthma.

  15. Altitude registration of limb-scattered radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Leslie; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jaross, Glen; Loughman, Robert; Kramarova, Natalya; Chen, Zhong; Taha, Ghassan; Chen, Grace; Xu, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    One of the largest constraints to the retrieval of accurate ozone profiles from UV backscatter limb sounding sensors is altitude registration. Two methods, the Rayleigh scattering attitude sensing (RSAS) and absolute radiance residual method (ARRM), are able to determine altitude registration to the accuracy necessary for long-term ozone monitoring. The methods compare model calculations of radiances to measured radiances and are independent of onboard tracking devices. RSAS determines absolute altitude errors, but, because the method is susceptible to aerosol interference, it is limited to latitudes and time periods with minimal aerosol contamination. ARRM, a new technique introduced in this paper, can be applied across all seasons and altitudes. However, it is only appropriate for relative altitude error estimates. The application of RSAS to Limb Profiler (LP) measurements from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) on board the Suomi NPP (SNPP) satellite indicates tangent height (TH) errors greater than 1 km with an absolute accuracy of ±200 m. Results using ARRM indicate a ˜ 300 to 400 m intra-orbital TH change varying seasonally ±100 m, likely due to either errors in the spacecraft pointing or in the geopotential height (GPH) data that we use in our analysis. ARRM shows a change of ˜ 200 m over ˜ 5 years with a relative accuracy (a long-term accuracy) of ±100 m outside the polar regions.

  16. Wind study for high altitude platform design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strganac, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of upper air winds was performed to define the wind environment at potential operating altitudes for high altitude powered platform concepts. Wind conditions of the continental United States, Pacific area (Alaska to Sea of Japan), and European area (Norwegian and Mediterranean Sea) were obtained using a representative network of sites selected based upon adequate high altitude sampling, geographic dispersion, and observed upper wind patterns. A data base of twenty plus years of rawinsonde gathered wind information was used in the analysis. Annual variations from surface to 10 mb pressure altitude were investigated to encompass the practical operating range for the platform concepts. Parametric analysis for the United States and foreign areas was performed to provide a basis for vehicle system design tradeoffs. This analysis of wind magnitudes indicates the feasibility of annual operation at a majority of sites and more selective seasonal operation for the extreme conditions between the pressure altitudes of 100 to 25 mb based upon the assumed design speeds.

  17. Pulmonary Embolism Masquerading as High Altitude Pulmonary Edema at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Prativa; Lohani, Benu; Murphy, Holly

    2016-12-01

    Pandey, Prativa, Benu Lohani, and Holly Murphy. Pulmonary embolism masquerading as high altitude pulmonary edema at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 17:353-358, 2016.-Pulmonary embolism (PE) at high altitude is a rare entity that can masquerade as or occur in conjunction with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and can complicate the diagnosis and management. When HAPE cases do not improve rapidly with descent, other diagnoses, including PE, ought to be considered. From 2013 to 2015, we identified eight cases of PE among 303 patients with initial diagnosis of HAPE. Upon further evaluation, five had deep vein thrombosis (DVT). One woman had a contraceptive ring and seven patients had no known thrombotic risks. PE can coexist with or mimic HAPE and should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath from high altitude regardless of thrombotic risk.

  18. Pulmonary Embolism Masquerading as High Altitude Pulmonary Edema at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Lohani, Benu; Murphy, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pandey, Prativa, Benu Lohani, and Holly Murphy. Pulmonary embolism masquerading as high altitude pulmonary edema at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 17:353–358, 2016.—Pulmonary embolism (PE) at high altitude is a rare entity that can masquerade as or occur in conjunction with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and can complicate the diagnosis and management. When HAPE cases do not improve rapidly with descent, other diagnoses, including PE, ought to be considered. From 2013 to 2015, we identified eight cases of PE among 303 patients with initial diagnosis of HAPE. Upon further evaluation, five had deep vein thrombosis (DVT). One woman had a contraceptive ring and seven patients had no known thrombotic risks. PE can coexist with or mimic HAPE and should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath from high altitude regardless of thrombotic risk. PMID:27768392

  19. Exercise-Induced Hypoxaemia Developed at Sea-Level Influences Responses to Exercise at Moderate Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Anne-Fleur; Durand, Fabienne; Roca, Emma; Doucende, Grégory; Hapkova, Ilona; Subirats, Enric

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of exercise-induced hypoxaemia (EIH) developed at sea-level on exercise responses at moderate acute altitude. Methods Twenty three subjects divided in three groups of individuals: highly trained with EIH (n = 7); highly trained without EIH (n = 8) and untrained participants (n = 8) performed two maximal incremental tests at sea-level and at 2,150 m. Haemoglobin O2 saturation (SpO2), heart rate, oxygen uptake (VO2) and several ventilatory parameters were measured continuously during the tests. Results EIH athletes had a drop in SpO2 from 99 ± 0.8% to 91 ± 1.2% from rest to maximal exercise at sea-level, while the other groups did not exhibit a similar decrease. EIH athletes had a greater decrease in VO2max at altitude compared to non-EIH and untrained groups (-22 ± 7.9%, -16 ± 5.3% and -13 ± 9.4%, respectively). At altitude, non-EIH athletes had a similar drop in SpO2 as EIH athletes (13 ± 0.8%) but greater than untrained participants (6 ± 1.0%). EIH athletes showed greater decrease in maximal heart rate than non-EIH athletes at altitude (8 ± 3.3 bpm and 5 ± 2.9 bpm, respectively). Conclusion EIH athletes demonstrated specific cardiorespiratory response to exercise at moderate altitude compared to non-EIH athletes with a higher decrease in VO2max certainly due to the lower ventilator and HRmax responses. Thus EIH phenomenon developed at sea-level negatively impact performance and cardiorespiratory responses at acute moderate altitude despite no potentiated O2 desaturation. PMID:27583364

  20. Sonic Thermometer for High-Altitude Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bognar, John

    2012-01-01

    The sonic thermometer is a specialized application of well-known sonic anemometer technology. Adaptations have been made to the circuit, including the addition of supporting sensors, which enable its use in the high-altitude environment and in non-air gas mixtures. There is a need to measure gas temperatures inside and outside of superpressure balloons that are flown at high altitudes. These measurements will allow the performance of the balloon to be modeled more accurately, leading to better flight performance. Small thermistors (solid-state temperature sensors) have been used for this general purpose, and for temperature measurements on radiosondes. A disadvantage to thermistors and other physical (as distinct from sonic) temperature sensors is that they are subject to solar heating errors when they are exposed to the Sun, and this leads to issues with their use in a very high-altitude environment

  1. Tests of artificial flight at high altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradenwitz, Arthur

    1920-01-01

    If we wish to form an accurate idea of the extraordinary progress achieved in aeronautics, a comparison must be made of the latest altitude records and the figures regarded as highest attainable limit some ten years ago. It is desirable, for two reasons, that we should be able to define the limit of the altitudes that can be reached without artificial aid. First, to know to what extent the human body can endure the inhalation of rarified air. Second, the mental capacity of the aviator must be tested at high altitudes and the limit known below which he is able to make reliable observations without being artificially supplied with oxygen. A pneumatic chamber was used for the most accurate observations.

  2. Lunar Landing Training vehicle piloted by Neil Armstrong during training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    A Lunar Landing Training Vehicle, piloted by Astronaut Neil Armstrong, goes through a checkout flight at Ellington Air Force Base on June 16, 1969. The total duration of the lunar simulation flight was five minutes and 59 seconds. Maximum altitude attained was about 300 feet.

  3. Autonomous homing control of a powered parafoil with insufficient altitude.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jin; Sun, Qing-Lin; Tan, Pan-Long; Chen, Zeng-Qiang; He, Ying-Ping

    2016-11-01

    In order to realize safe and accurate homing of a powered parafoil under the condition of insufficient initial altitude, a multiphase homing path is designed according to the flight characteristics of the vehicle. With consideration that the traditional control methods cannot ensure the quality of path following because of the nonlinear, large inertial and longtime delay existed in the system and strong disturbances in a complex environment, a homing controller, composed of the vertical and horizontal trajectory tracking controllers, is designed based on active disturbance rejection control (ADRC). Then autonomous homing simulation experiment of the powered parafoil with insufficient altitude is carried on in a windy environment. The simulation results show that the planned multiphase homing trajectory can fulfill the requirements of fixed-point homing and flare landing; the designed homing controller can overcome the influences of uncertain items of the internal and external disturbances, track the desired homing path more rapidly and steadily, and possesses better control performances than traditional PID controllers.

  4. Progress on low altitude cloud icing research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeck, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    The icing environment at altitudes below 10,000 feet were studied. The following questions are asked, are: (1) existing aircraft certification criteria applicable; (2) too stringent on icing for helos; (3) based on accurate data; (4) appropriate for low (10,000 ft) altitudes? The research plan is outlined: review historical icing data, obtain new measurements, collect modern icing data from other groups, and recommend LWC, OAT, and MVD criteria for helicopters. Estimated accuracies and known sources of error are included. It is concluded that the net effect of possible sources of error of both signs is uncertain.

  5. Butterflies of the high-altitude Atacama Desert: habitat use and conservation

    PubMed Central

    Despland, Emma

    2014-01-01

    The butterfly fauna of the high-altitude desert of Northern Chile, though depauperate, shows high endemism, is poorly known and is of considerable conservation concern. This study surveys butterflies along the Andean slope between 2400 and 5000 m asl (prepuna, puna and Andean steppe habitats) as well as in high and low-altitude wetlands and in the neoriparian vegetation of agricultural sites. We also include historical sightings from museum records. We compare abundances between altitudes, between natural and impacted sites, as well as between two sampling years with different precipitation regimes. The results confirm high altitudinal turnover and show greatest similarity between wetland and slope faunas at similar altitudes. Results also underscore vulnerability to weather fluctuations, particularly in the more arid low-altitude sites, where abundances were much lower in the low precipitation sampling season and several species were not observed at all. Finally, we show that some species have shifted to the neoriparian vegetation of the agricultural landscape, whereas others were only observed in less impacted habitats dominated by native plants. These results suggest that acclimation to novel habitats depends on larval host plant use. The traditional agricultural environment can provide habitat for many, but not all, native butterfly species, but an estimation of the value of these habitats requires better understanding of butterfly life history strategies and relationships with host plants. PMID:25309583

  6. Variability in low altitude astronomical refraction as a function of altitude.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Russell D; Lozowski, Edward P; Fathi-Nejad, Arsha

    2008-12-01

    Low altitude astronomical refraction (LAAR) of the setting Sun was measured over a sea horizon from a coastal location in Barbados, West Indies. The altitude of the upper limb of the Sun and the apparent horizon were determined using a digital video camera (Canon XL2) and a digital SLR camera (Canon EOS 5D). A total of 14 sunsets were measured between 2005 and 2007. From these measurements LAAR variability was estimated at 14 standard altitudes of the refracted Sun between 0 degrees .01 and 4 degrees .5. The relative variability decreases with increasing altitude from +/- 0.0195 of mean refraction at an altitude of 0 degrees .01 to +/- 0.0142 at 4 degrees .5. If extrapolated to an altitude of 15 degrees , a linear fit to the data produces a relative variability of +/- 0.0038 and an absolute variability of +/- 0(").45. Statistical analysis of the relative variability in LAAR appears to support the decreasing trend. However, error propagation analysis further suggests that the observed values of refraction may exceed the accuracy of the measurement system at altitudes higher than 2 degrees .

  7. High-altitude physiology: lessons from Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Peter D.; Simonson, Tatum S.; Wei, Guan; Wagner, Harrieth; Wuren, Tanna; Yan, Ma; Qin, Ga; Ge, Rili

    2013-05-01

    Polycythemia is a universal lowlander response to altitude; healthy Andean high-altitude natives also have elevated [Hb]. While this may enhance O2 transport to tissues, studies have shown that acute isovolumic changes in [Hb] do not affect exercise capacity. Many high-altitude Tibetans have evolved sea-level values of [Hb], providing a natural opportunity to study this issue. In 21 young healthy male Tibetans with [Hb] between 15 and 23 g/dl, we measured VO2MAX and O2 transport capacity at 4200m. VO2MAX was higher when [Hb] was lower (P<0.05), enabled by both higher cardiac output and muscle O2 diffusional conductance, but neither ventilation nor the alveolar-arterial PO2 difference (AaPO2) varied with [Hb]. In contrast, Andean high altitude natives remain polycythemic with larger lungs and higher lung diffusing capacity, a smaller exercising AaPO2, and lower ventilation. The challenges now are (1) to understand the different adaptive pathways used by Andeans and Tibetans, and (2) to determine in Tibetans whether, during evolution, reduced [Hb] appeared first, causing compensatory cardiac and muscle adaptations, or if enhanced cardiac function and muscle O2 transport capacity appeared first, permitting secondary reduction in [Hb]. For (2), further research is necessary to determine the basis of enhanced cardiac function and muscle O2 transport, and identify molecular targets of evolution in heart and muscle. Putative mutations can then be timed and compared to appearance of those affecting [Hb].

  8. Altitude Preexposure Recommendations for Inducing Acclimatization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    acetazolamide ( Kronenberg and Cain, 1968). Acute exposure to high altitude increases heart rate and cardiac output to maintain systemic oxygen delivery...emphasizing the regulation of breathing. Physiologist. 11:37–57. Kronenberg R.S., and Cain S.M. (1968). Hastening respiratory acclimatization to

  9. Breathing and sleep at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Philip N; Lucas, Samuel J E; Burgess, Keith R

    2013-09-15

    We provide an updated review on the current understanding of breathing and sleep at high altitude in humans. We conclude that: (1) progressive changes in pH initiated by the respiratory alkalosis do not underlie early (<48 h) ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH) because this still proceeds in the absence of such alkalosis; (2) for VAH of longer duration (>48 h), complex cellular and neurochemical re-organization occurs both in the peripheral chemoreceptors as well as within the central nervous system. The latter is likely influenced by central acid-base changes secondary to the extent of the initial respiratory responses to initial exposure to high altitude; (3) sleep at high altitude is disturbed by various factors, but principally by periodic breathing; (4) the extent of periodic breathing during sleep at altitude intensifies with duration and severity of exposure; (5) complex interactions between hypoxic-induced enhancement in peripheral and central chemoreflexes and cerebral blood flow--leading to higher loop gain and breathing instability--underpin this development of periodic breathing during sleep; (6) because periodic breathing may elevate rather than reduce mean SaO2 during sleep, this may represent an adaptive rather than maladaptive response; (7) although oral acetazolamide is an effective means to reduce periodic breathing by 50-80%, recent studies using positive airway pressure devices to increase dead space, hyponotics and theophylline are emerging but appear less practical and effective compared to acetazolamide. Finally, we suggest avenues for future research, and discuss implications for understanding sleep pathology.

  10. High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Dynamics Explorer mission are to investigate the coupling of energy, mass, and momentum among the earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere. At launch, on August 3, 1981, DE-1 was placed into an elliptical polar orbit having an apogee of 23,130 km to allow global auroral imaging and crossings of auroral field lines at altitudes of several thousand kilometers. At the same time DE-2 was placed into a polar orbit, coplanar with that of DE-1 but with a perigee altitude low enough (309 km) for neutral measurements and an apogee altitude of 1012 km. The DE-1 High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) provided data on low and medium energy electrons and ions from August 13, 1981 until December 1, 1981, when a high-voltage failure occured. Analysis of HAPI data for the time period of this contract has produced new results on the source mechanisms for electron conical distributions, particle acceleration phenomena in auroral acceleration regions, Birkeland currents throughout the nightside auroral regions, the source region for auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), and plasma injection phenomena in the polar cusp.

  11. The Power of Aircraft Engines at Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragazzi, Paolo

    1939-01-01

    The subject of the present paper is confined to the investigations and methods employed by the Fiat company in their studies on the altitude performance of an air-cooled engine of the production type. The experimental set-up as well as test engine data are provided.

  12. SRB Altitude Switch Assembly Wire Harness Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanche, Jim

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of two wire harness failures that had occurred in Solid Rocket Booster Altitude Switch Assemblies S/N 200001 and S/N 20002. A list of modifications to EDU #4 and modification of qualification units 2000001 and 2000002 are also presented.

  13. The morbid anatomy of high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Donald

    1979-01-01

    The morbid anatomical changes which take place in man and animals exposed to the chronic hypoxia of residence at high altitude are briefly reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 4Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:493205

  14. Sickle Cell Trait, Exercise, and Altitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Sickle cell trait is generally benign and does not shorten life, but it may confer some small risk with extremes of exercise or altitude. Research concerning these risks is presented, and it is concluded sickle cell trait is no barrier to outstanding athletic performance. (Author/MT)

  15. Sextant measures spacecraft altitude without gravitational reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Horizon-sensing sextant measures the altitude of an orbiting spacecraft without gravitational reference by optically measuring the dip angle to the horizon along a line of sight in each of two planes. The sextant scans over a relatively limited field of view.

  16. Altitude Adaptation: A Glimpse Through Various Lenses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Simonson, Tatum S. Altitude adaptation: A glimpse through various lenses. High Alt Med Biol 16:125–137, 2015.—Recent availability of genome-wide data from highland populations has enabled the identification of adaptive genomic signals. Some of the genomic signals reported thus far among Tibetan, Andean, and Ethiopian are the same, while others appear unique to each population. These genomic findings parallel observations conveyed by decades of physiological research: different continental populations, resident at high altitude for hundreds of generations, exhibit a distinct composite of traits at altitude. The most commonly reported signatures of selection emanate from genomic segments containing hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway genes. Corroborative evidence for adaptive significance stems from associations between putatively adaptive gene copies and sea-level ranges of hemoglobin concentration in Tibetan and Amhara Ethiopians, birth weights and metabolic factors in Andeans and Tibetans, maternal uterine artery diameter in Andeans, and protection from chronic mountain sickness in Andean males at altitude. While limited reports provide mechanistic insights thus far, efforts to identify and link precise genetic variants to molecular, physiological, and developmental functions are underway, and progress on the genomics front continues to provide unprecedented movement towards these goals. This combination of multiple perspectives is necessary to maximize our understanding of orchestrated biological and evolutionary processes in native highland populations, which will advance our understanding of both adaptive and non-adaptive responses to hypoxia. PMID:26070057

  17. [High altitude anemia: validity of definition criteria].

    PubMed

    Yepez, R; Estevez, E; Galan, P; Chauliac, M; Davila, M; Calle, A; Estrella, R; Masse-Raimbault, A M; Hercberg, S

    1994-01-01

    The effect of iron and folate supplementation on the hemoglobin response and iron status was studied in male and female equatorian medical students: 66 in Quito (2,800 m altitude) and 40 in Guayaquil (sea level). At the end of the supplementation, there was a nearly complete disappearance of biochemical evidence of iron deficiency in the two groups of students. In Quito, 30% of the men and 26% of the women increased their hemoglobin concentration by more than 1 g/dl after one month of supplementation and could be considered as true anemics, compared to 31% of the men and 29% of the women in Guayaquil. This study shows that at sea level, cut-off points defined by WHO for hemoglobin, taking as reference the impact of a supplementation trial, have a specificity of 100% but poor sensitivity (58%). For people living at high altitudes, cut-off limits adjusted for altitude seem unsuitable: the specificity is 98% but the sensitivity is 0%. Studies taking into account all the factors impacting on the hemoglobin level could be useful for defining cut-off points for high-altitude anemia better than those currently recommended.

  18. Performance of portable ventilators at altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-20

    BirdVSO2 and theLTV- 1000 at ranges of altitudes from sea level to 9,800 ft using lung models of adult respiratory distress syndrome and severe asthma ...Trauma. 2010;69(6):1574Y1577. 11. Tourtier JP, Forsans E, Leclerc T, Libert N, Ramsang S, Tazarourte K, Man M, Borne M. Acute severe asthma : performance

  19. Altitude Adaptation: A Glimpse Through Various Lenses.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Tatum S

    2015-06-01

    Simonson, Tatum S. Altitude adaptation: A glimpse through various lenses. High Alt Med Biol 16:125-137, 2015.--Recent availability of genome-wide data from highland populations has enabled the identification of adaptive genomic signals. Some of the genomic signals reported thus far among Tibetan, Andean, and Ethiopian are the same, while others appear unique to each population. These genomic findings parallel observations conveyed by decades of physiological research: different continental populations, resident at high altitude for hundreds of generations, exhibit a distinct composite of traits at altitude. The most commonly reported signatures of selection emanate from genomic segments containing hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway genes. Corroborative evidence for adaptive significance stems from associations between putatively adaptive gene copies and sea-level ranges of hemoglobin concentration in Tibetan and Amhara Ethiopians, birth weights and metabolic factors in Andeans and Tibetans, maternal uterine artery diameter in Andeans, and protection from chronic mountain sickness in Andean males at altitude. While limited reports provide mechanistic insights thus far, efforts to identify and link precise genetic variants to molecular, physiological, and developmental functions are underway, and progress on the genomics front continues to provide unprecedented movement towards these goals. This combination of multiple perspectives is necessary to maximize our understanding of orchestrated biological and evolutionary processes in native highland populations, which will advance our understanding of both adaptive and non-adaptive responses to hypoxia.

  20. Safely Enabling Low-Altitude Airspace Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal

    2015-01-01

    Near-term Goal: Enable initial low-altitude airspace and UAS operations with demonstrated safety as early as possible, within 5 years. Long-term Goal: Accommodate increased UAS operations with highest safety, efficiency, and capacity as much autonomously as possible (10-15 years).

  1. Mini review of high altitude health problems in Ladakh.

    PubMed

    Norboo, T; Saiyed, H N; Angchuk, P T; Tsering, P; Angchuk, S T; Phuntsog, S T; Yahya, M; Wood, Steve; Bruce, N G; Ball, K P

    2004-05-01

    Ladakh is a sparsely populated area of Indian Himalaya lying at 3-4500 m altitude mainly consisting of arid desert. This paper will discuss high altitude health problems in Ladakh under the following headings. 1. Acute altitude illness: acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). 2. Effects of prolonged and permanent exposure to high altitude: (subacute and chronic mountain sickness). 3. Environmental dust and domestic fire pollution resulting in non-occupational pneumoconiosis and high prevalence of respiratory morbidity.

  2. Is high altitude pulmonary edema relevant to Hawai'i?

    PubMed

    Cornell, Seth Lewis

    2014-11-01

    High altitude clinical syndromes have been described in the medical literature but may be under recognized in the state of Hawai'i. As tourism increases, high altitude injuries may follow given the easy access to high altitude attractions. Visitors and clinicians should be aware of the dangers associated with the rapid ascent to high altitudes in the perceived comfort of a vehicle. This paper will review the basic pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of the most serious of the high altitude clinical syndromes, high altitude pulmonary edema.

  3. Is High Altitude Pulmonary Edema Relevant to Hawai‘i?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High altitude clinical syndromes have been described in the medical literature but may be under recognized in the state of Hawai‘i. As tourism increases, high altitude injuries may follow given the easy access to high altitude attractions. Visitors and clinicians should be aware of the dangers associated with the rapid ascent to high altitudes in the perceived comfort of a vehicle. This paper will review the basic pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of the most serious of the high altitude clinical syndromes, high altitude pulmonary edema. PMID:25478294

  4. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  5. The impact of moderate-altitude staging on pulmonary arterial hemodynamics after ascent to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Baggish, Aaron L; Fulco, Charles S; Muza, Stephen; Rock, Paul B; Beidleman, Beth; Cymerman, Allen; Yared, Kibar; Fagenholz, Peter; Systrom, David; Wood, Malissa J; Weyman, Arthur E; Picard, Michael H; Harris, N Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Staged ascent (SA), temporary residence at moderate altitude en route to high altitude, reduces the incidence and severity of noncardiopulmonary altitude illness such as acute mountain sickness. To date, the impact of SA on pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that SA would attenuate the PAP increase that occurs during rapid, direct ascent (DA). Transthoracic echocardiography was used to estimate mean PAP in 10 healthy males at sea level (SL, P(B) approximately 760 torr), after DA to simulated high altitude (hypobaric chamber, P(B) approximately 460 torr), and at 2 times points (90 min and 4 days) during exposure to terrestrial high altitude (P(B) approximately 460 torr) after SA (7 days, moderate altitude, P(B) approximately 548 torr). Alveolar oxygen pressure (Pao(2)) and arterial oxygenation saturation (Sao(2)) were measured at each time point. Compared to mean PAP at SL (mean +/- SD, 14 +/- 3 mmHg), mean PAP increased after DA to 37 +/- 8 mmHg (Delta = 24 +/- 10 mmHg, p < 0.001) and was negatively correlated with both Pao(2) (r(2) = 0.57, p = 0.011) and Sao(2) (r(2) = 0.64, p = 0.005). In comparison, estimated mean PAP after SA increased to only 25 +/- 4 mmHg (Delta = 11 +/- 6 mmHg, p < 0.001), remained unchanged after 4 days of high altitude residence (24 +/- 5 mmHg, p = not significant, or NS), and did not correlate with either parameter of oxygenation. SA significantly attenuated the PAP increase associated with continuous direct ascent to high altitude and appeared to uncouple PAP from both alveolar hypoxia and arterial hypoxemia.

  6. Simulated Altitude Performance of Combustor of Westinghouse 19XB-1 Jet-Propulsion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, J. Howard; McCafferty, Richard J.

    1948-01-01

    A 19XB-1 combustor was operated under conditions simulating zero-ram operation of the 19XB-1 turbojet engine at various altitudes and engine speeds. The combustion efficiencies and the altitude operational limits were determined; data were also obtained on the character of the combustion, the pressure drop through the combustor, and the combustor-outlet temperature and velocity profiles. At altitudes about 10,000 feet below the operational limits, the flames were yellow and steady and the temperature rise through the combustor increased with fuel-air ratio throughout the range of fuel-air ratios investigated. At altitudes near the operational limits, the flames were blue and flickering and the combustor was sluggish in its response to changes in fuel flow. At these high altitudes, the temperature rise through the combustor increased very slowly as the fuel flow was increased and attained a maximum at a fuel-air ratio much leaner than the over-all stoichiometric; further increases in fuel flow resulted in decreased values of combustor temperature rise and increased resonance until a rich-limit blow-out occurred. The approximate operational ceiling of the engine as determined by the combustor, using AN-F-28, Amendment-3, fuel, was 30,400 feet at a simulated engine speed of 7500 rpm and increased as the engine speed was increased. At an engine speed of 16,000 rpm, the operational ceiling was approximately 48,000 feet. Throughout the range of simulated altitudes and engine speeds investigated, the combustion efficiency increased with increasing engine speed and with decreasing altitude. The combustion efficiency varied from over 99 percent at operating conditions simulating high engine speed and low altitude operation to less than 50 percent at conditions simulating operation at altitudes near the operational limits. The isothermal total pressure drop through the combustor was 1.82 times as great as the inlet dynamic pressure. As expected from theoretical

  7. Why Are High-Altitude Natives So Strong at Altitude? Maximal Oxygen Transport to the Muscle Cell in Altitude Natives.

    PubMed

    Lundby, Carsten; Calbet, Jose A L

    2016-01-01

    In hypoxia aerobic exercise performance of high-altitude natives is suggested to be superior to that of lowlanders; i.e., for a given altitude natives are reported to have higher maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). The likely basis for this is a higher pulmonary diffusion capacity, which in turn ensures higher arterial O2 saturation (SaO2) and therefore also potentially a higher delivery of O2 to the exercising muscles. This review focuses on O2 transport in high-altitude Aymara. We have quantified femoral artery O2 delivery, arterial O2 extraction and calculated leg VO2 in Aymara, and compared their values with that of acclimatizing Danish lowlanders. All subjects were studied at 4100 m. At maximal exercise SaO2 dropped tremendously in the lowlanders, but did not change in the Aymara. Therefore arterial O2 content was also higher in the Aymara. At maximal exercise however, fractional O2 extraction was lower in the Aymara, and the a-vO2 difference was similar in both populations. The lower extraction levels in the Aymara were associated with lower muscle O2 conductance (a measure of muscle diffusion capacity). At any given submaximal exercise intensity, leg VO2 was always of similar magnitude in both groups, but at maximal exercise the lowlanders had higher leg blood flow, and hence also higher maximum leg VO2. With the induction of acute normoxia fractional arterial O2 extraction fell in the highlanders, but remained unchanged in the lowlanders. Hence high-altitude natives seem to be more diffusion limited at the muscle level as compared to lowlanders. In conclusion Aymara preserve very high SaO2 during hypoxic exercise (likely due to a higher lung diffusion capacity), but the effect on VO2max is reduced by a lower ability to extract O2 at the muscle level.

  8. Acute high-altitude illness: a clinically orientated review

    PubMed Central

    Smedley, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Acute high-altitude illness is an encompassing term for the range of pathology that the unacclimatised individual can develop at increased altitude. This includes acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. These conditions represent an increasing clinical problem as more individuals are exposed to the hypobaric hypoxic environment of high altitude for both work and leisure. In this review of acute high-altitude illness, the epidemiology, risk factors and pathophysiology are explored, before their prevention and treatment are discussed. Appropriate ascent rate remains the most effective acute high-altitude illness prevention, with pharmacological prophylaxis indicated in selected individuals. Descent is the definitive treatment for acute high-altitude illness, with the adjuncts of oxygen and specific drug therapies. PMID:26516505

  9. Design and Development of a High Altitude Protective Assembly.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CWU-3/P ANTIGRAVITY SUITS, CWU-12/P ANTIEXPOSURE SUITS, HAPA(HIGH ALTITUDE PROTECTIVE ASSEMBLIES), *HIGH ALTITUDE PROTECTIVE ASSEMBLIES, LPU-3/P LIFE PRESERVERS, MA-3 VENTILATION GARMENTS, PARACHUTE HARNESSES, PARTIAL PRESSURE SUITS.

  10. DETAIL OF VACUUM PIPE OPENING WITHIN ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF VACUUM PIPE OPENING WITHIN ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING SOUTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  11. INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L FROM TOP LEVEL OF ACCESS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L FROM TOP LEVEL OF ACCESS PLATFORMS, FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  12. EXTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING SOUTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  13. UPPER HALF OF THE INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    UPPER HALF OF THE INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING UP FROM BOTTOM LEVEL, FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  14. INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, LOOKING UP FROM BOTTOM LEVEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, LOOKING UP FROM BOTTOM LEVEL OF INTERNAL PLATFORMS, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  15. EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBERS R (TO LEFT) AND L (TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBERS R (TO LEFT) AND L (TO RIGHT), FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  16. VIEW OF THE CONTROL ROOM FOR THE ALTITUDE CHAMBERS, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE CONTROL ROOM FOR THE ALTITUDE CHAMBERS, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  17. BOTTOM LEVEL OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST Cape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOTTOM LEVEL OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  18. DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  19. VIEW OF PUMP ROOM FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBERS, FACING SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PUMP ROOM FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBERS, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  20. EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING SOUTH - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  1. DETAIL OF REPRESSURIZATION AIR PIPE, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF RE-PRESSURIZATION AIR PIPE, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  2. DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  3. DETAIL OF WALLMOUNTED STAIRS ON INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF WALL-MOUNTED STAIRS ON INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  4. INTERIOR OF AIRLOCK FROM INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF AIRLOCK FROM INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  5. LOWER HALF OF THE INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOWER HALF OF THE INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING UP FROM BOTTOM LEVEL, FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  6. DETAIL OF PLATFORM SUPPORT BRACKET, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF PLATFORM SUPPORT BRACKET, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  7. INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING DOWN FROM AIRLOCK, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING DOWN FROM AIRLOCK, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  8. EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBERS R (TO LEFT) AND L (TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBERS R (TO LEFT) AND L (TO RIGHT), FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  9. DETAIL OF THE EXTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE EXTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  10. DETAIL OF THE INTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE INTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  11. The effect of ''living high-training low'' on physical performance in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, S.; Sakai, A.

    In this research, we hypothesized that, in rats, adaptation to high altitude (2500 m) plus training at low altitude (610 m), ''living high-training low'', improves physical performance at low altitude more than living and training at low altitude (610 m). Rats were divided into four groups: (1) living at low altitude (LL, n=12), (2) living and training at low altitude (LLTL, n=13), (3) living at high altitude (LH, n=12), (4) living at high altitude and training at low altitude (LHTL, n=13). The program for living at high altitude involved raising rats under hypobaric hypoxia (equivalent to 2500 m), and the training program consisted of running on a tread-mill at low altitude. All groups were raised at each altitude and trained to run at 35 m/min for 40 min/day, 6 days/week for 6 weeks. During this program, we measured heart rates both at rest and during exercise, and performed running-time trials. The mean heart rate during exercise was lower in groups with training than in groups without training, and the groups receiving training could run longer than the untrained groups. The LHTL group especially showed the lowest mean heart rate during exercise and the longest running time among all groups. After 6 weeks of the training program, all rats had a catheter implanted into the carotid artery, and the mean systemic arterial pressure was continuously measured during treadmill running. The rate of increase of this pressure as the running intensity increased was lower in groups with training than in groups without training, especially in the LHTL group. Finally, we anesthetized all the rats and extracted both the right and left ventricles, and the triceps surae and liver. Training increased the weight of the left ventricle, triceps surae, and liver. The increase in weight of the left ventricle and triceps surae was higher in the LHTL group than in the LLTL group in particular. It appeared that living high- training low may be an effective strategy to improve performance

  12. Time at or near VO2max during continuous and intermittent running. A review with special reference to considerations for the optimisation of training protocols to elicit the longest time at or near VO2max.

    PubMed

    Midgley, A W; Mc Naughton, L R

    2006-03-01

    Several authors have suggested that training at or near VO2max (i.e. > or = 95% VO2max) is the most effective training intensity to enhance VO2max and that for highly trained endurance athletes, training at or near VO2max may be necessary to increase it further. Consequently, there is an interest in characterising training protocols that allow the longest time at or near VO2max (T@VO2max). Intermittent running protocols have been found to be more effective than continuous protocols for increasing T@VO2max. Intermittent protocols can be manipulated by altering the warm-up intensity and timing, work and relief interval velocity and duration, amplitude, interval number per set, and the number of sets performed. To increase T@VO2max it is recommended that work interval intensity should generally range between 90% and 105% vVO2max and relief interval intensity between 50% vVO2max and the lactate threshold velocity. Work and relief interval durations should be between 15 and 30 seconds. The warm-up period prior to the intermittent protocol should be about 10 to 15 minutes in duration at 1 or 2 km x h(-1) below the lactate threshold velocity, with no gap between the warm-up and the intermittent protocol. When designing intermittent training protocols for the enhancement of VO2max, the simultaneous enhancement of other physiological performance determinants should also be considered. Further experimental research is required to identify the specific physiological responses and adaptations to various intermittent running protocols that are designed to elicit the longest time at or near VO2max, before recommendations can be given to competitive endurance runners.

  13. Changes in labial capillary density on ascent to and descent from high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-Kawai, Edward; Coppel, Jonny; Phillip, Hennis; Grocott, Michael; Ince, Can; Martin, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Present knowledge of how the microcirculation is altered by prolonged exposure to hypoxia at high altitude is incomplete and modification of existing analytical techniques may improve our knowledge considerably. We set out to use a novel simplified method of measuring in vivo capillary density during an expedition to high altitude using a CytoCam incident dark field imaging video-microscope. The simplified method of data capture involved recording one-second images of the mucosal surface of the inner lip to reveal data about microvasculature density in ten individuals. This was done on ascent to, and descent from, high altitude. Analysis was conducted offline by two independent investigators blinded to the participant identity, testing conditions and the imaging site.  Additionally we monitored haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit data to see if we could support or refute mechanisms of altered density relating to vessel recruitment. Repeated sets of paired values were compared using Kruskall Wallis Analysis of Variance tests, whilst comparisons of values between sites was by related samples Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. Correlation between different variables was performed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, and concordance between analysing investigators using intra-class correlation coefficient. There was a significant increase in capillary density from London on ascent to high altitude; median capillaries per field of view area increased from 22.8 to 25.3 (p=0.021). There was a further increase in vessel density during the six weeks spent at altitude (25.3 to 32.5, p=0.017). Moreover, vessel density remained high on descent to Kathmandu (31.0 capillaries per field of view area), despite a significant decrease in haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit. Using a simplified technique, we have demonstrated an increase in capillary density on early and sustained exposure to hypobaric hypoxia at thigh altitude, and that this remains elevated on descent

  14. Changes in labial capillary density on ascent to and descent from high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert-Kawai, Edward; Coppel, Jonny; Phillip, Hennis; Grocott, Michael; Ince, Can; Martin, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Present knowledge of how the microcirculation is altered by prolonged exposure to hypoxia at high altitude is incomplete and modification of existing analytical techniques may improve our knowledge considerably. We set out to use a novel simplified method of measuring in vivo capillary density during an expedition to high altitude using a CytoCam incident dark field imaging video-microscope. The simplified method of data capture involved recording one-second images of the mucosal surface of the inner lip to reveal data about microvasculature density in ten individuals. This was done on ascent to, and descent from, high altitude. Analysis was conducted offline by two independent investigators blinded to the participant identity, testing conditions and the imaging site.  Additionally we monitored haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit data to see if we could support or refute mechanisms of altered density relating to vessel recruitment. Repeated sets of paired values were compared using Kruskall Wallis Analysis of Variance tests, whilst comparisons of values between sites was by related samples Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. Correlation between different variables was performed using Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient, and concordance between analysing investigators using intra-class correlation coefficient. There was a significant increase in capillary density from London on ascent to high altitude; median capillaries per field of view area increased from 22.8 to 25.3 (p=0.021). There was a further increase in vessel density during the six weeks spent at altitude (25.3 to 32.5, p=0.017). Moreover, vessel density remained high on descent to Kathmandu (31.0 capillaries per field of view area), despite a significant decrease in haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit. Using a simplified technique, we have demonstrated an increase in capillary density on early and sustained exposure to hypobaric hypoxia at thigh altitude, and that this remains elevated on

  15. Effect of geosynchronous altitude radiation on performance of Ni/H 2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, C. K.

    Nickel/hydrogen cells are under consideration as eclipse season power sources for long-life communications satellites in geosynchronous orbit (GEO). There is concern that damage to polymers in key components of these cells may arise from irradiation with high energy protons and electrons at the fluxes present at GEO altitudes. Nickel/hydrogen cells have been subjected to fluences of electrons and protons which simulate exposure to the GEO environment for more than 10 years. The cells show promise for considerable radiation tolerance in this new application.

  16. High altitude plumes at Mars morning terminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Garcia Muñoz, A.; Garcia Melendo, E.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Gomez Forrellad, J. M.; Pellier, C.; Delcroix, M.; Lopez Valverde, M. A.; González Galindo, F.; Jaeschke, W.; Parker, D.; Phillips, J.; Peach, D.

    2015-10-01

    In March and April 2012 two extremely high altitude plumes were observed at the Martian terminator reaching 200 -250 km or more above the surface[1]. They were located at about 195o West longitude and 45o South latitude (at Terra Cimmeria) and extended ˜500 -1,000 km in both North-South and East- West, and lasted for about 10 days. Both plumes exhibited day-to-day variability, and were seen at the morning terminator but not at the evening limb. Another large plume was captured on Hubble Space Telescope images in May 1997 at 99º West longitude and 3º South latitude, but its altitude cannot be pr ecisely determined.Broad-band photometry was performed of both events in the spectral range 255 nm -1052 nm. Based on the observed properties, we discuss different possible scenarios for the mechanism responsible for the formation of these plumes.

  17. The High Altitude Gamma Ray Observatory, HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M. M.

    2011-10-01

    The Volcano Sierra Negra in Puebla, Mexico was selected to host HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov), a unique obervatory of wide field of view (2π sr) capable of observing the sky continously at energies from 0.5 TeV to 100 TeV. HAWC is an array of 300 large water tanks (7.3 m diameter × 5 m depth) at an altitude of 4100 m. a. s. l. Each tank is instrumented with three upward-looking photomultipliers tubes. The full array will be capable of observing the most energetic gamma rays from the most violent events in the universe. HAWC will be 15 times more sensitive than its predecesor, Milagro. We present HAWC, the scientific case and capabilities.

  18. [Effect of altitude on iron absorption].

    PubMed

    Pizarro, F; Zavaleta, N; Hertrampf, E; Berlanga, R; Camborda, L; Olivares, M

    1998-03-01

    Iron bioavailability was evaluated in people living in high altitudes. Absorption was estimated from a reference dose of ferrous ascorbate and from a standard diet of wheat flour, using extrinsic tag radioisotope technique of 55Fe and 59Fe. Twenty four volunteers, healthy women, with ages ranging from 28 to 45 years, participated. Of those, eleven lived at 3450 meters above sea level (m.a.s.l.) in Huancayo city-Peru (study group), and 13 lived in Santiago de Chile at 630 m.a.s.l. (control group). Iron absorption from reference dose of ferrous ascorbate was 32.0% and 31.1% in the study and control groups respectively. The geometric mean of iron absorption from the standard diet, corrected to 40% of absorption of reference dose, was 9.0% and 6.9% in the study and control groups respectively (NS). The results suggest that altitude does not produce a high iron absorption in highlander residents.

  19. Dust observations at orbital altitudes surrounding Mars.

    PubMed

    Andersson, L; Weber, T D; Malaspina, D; Crary, F; Ergun, R E; Delory, G T; Fowler, C M; Morooka, M W; McEnulty, T; Eriksson, A I; Andrews, D J; Horanyi, M; Collette, A; Yelle, R; Jakosky, B M

    2015-11-06

    Dust is common close to the martian surface, but no known process can lift appreciable concentrations of particles to altitudes above ~150 kilometers. We present observations of dust at altitudes ranging from 150 to above 1000 kilometers by the Langmuir Probe and Wave instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft. Based on its distribution, we interpret this dust to be interplanetary in origin. A comparison with laboratory measurements indicates that the dust grain size ranges from 1 to 12 micrometers, assuming a typical grain velocity of ~18 kilometers per second. These direct observations of dust entering the martian atmosphere improve our understanding of the sources, sinks, and transport of interplanetary dust throughout the inner solar system and the associated impacts on Mars's atmosphere.

  20. HAWC - The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepe, Andreas; HAWC Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    The high altitude water Cherenkov observatory (HAWC) is an instrument for the detection of high energy cosmic gamma-rays. Its predecessor Milagro has successfully proven that the water Cherenkov technology for gamma-ray astronomy is a useful technique. HAWC is currently under construction at Sierra Negra in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m and will include several improvements compared to Milagro. Two complementary DAQ systems of the HAWC detector allow for the observation of a large fraction of the sky with a very high duty cycle and independent of environmental conditions. HAWC will observe the gamma-ray sky from about 100 GeV up to 100 TeV. Also the cosmic ray flux anisotropy on different angular length scales is object of HAWC science. Because of HAWC's large effective area and field of view, we describe its prospects to observe gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as an example for transient sources.

  1. Development of a high altitude Spin Parachute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silbert, M. N.

    1981-01-01

    A specially configured 16.6 foot (5.1 meter) Disc Gap Band (DGB) Spin Parachute has been designed, developed, integrated with a sounding rocket, and qualified by flight testing. Design requirements include (1) stable parachute should successfully deploy in the altitude region of 260,000 feet (80 kilometers) from a Super Arcas launch vehicle; (2) after deployment, parachute and payload spin rate should be greater than three rpm; (3) four electric field sensors should be mounted on parachute shroud lines and have provisions to be electrically connected to the suspended payload; and (4) time above 100,000 feet (30 kilometers) should exceed five minutes. The successful meeting of these requirements provided the first known high-altitude deployment of a Spin Parachute.

  2. Guidance and Control Design Considerations for Low-Altitude and Terminal-Area Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    the area of computer driv«n, multifunctional virtual controlt. Figur« 2. Vorlaut typ« of trjch-MnilMv« screen Input Control Device! ( TICO ) a...they meet an obstruction such at a finger and are then reflected back to the origin. This returned wave It received by the trans- ducer/ prism

  3. 14 CFR 121.661 - Initial approach altitude: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Initial approach altitude: Flag operations... § 121.661 Initial approach altitude: Flag operations. When making an initial approach to a radio navigation facility under IFR, no person may descend below the pertinent minimum altitude for...

  4. 10 CFR 862.6 - Voluntary minimum altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Voluntary minimum altitude. 862.6 Section 862.6 Energy... § 862.6 Voluntary minimum altitude. In addition to complying with all applicable FAA prohibitions or restrictions, aircraft are requested to maintain a minimum altitude of 2,000 feet above the terrain of...

  5. 14 CFR 29.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 29.1527 Section 29.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 29.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed,...

  6. 14 CFR 121.661 - Initial approach altitude: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Initial approach altitude: Flag operations... § 121.661 Initial approach altitude: Flag operations. When making an initial approach to a radio navigation facility under IFR, no person may descend below the pertinent minimum altitude for...

  7. 10 CFR 862.6 - Voluntary minimum altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Voluntary minimum altitude. 862.6 Section 862.6 Energy... § 862.6 Voluntary minimum altitude. In addition to complying with all applicable FAA prohibitions or restrictions, aircraft are requested to maintain a minimum altitude of 2,000 feet above the terrain of...

  8. 14 CFR 27.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 27.1527 Section 27.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... § 27.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed, as...

  9. 14 CFR 121.661 - Initial approach altitude: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Initial approach altitude: Flag operations... § 121.661 Initial approach altitude: Flag operations. When making an initial approach to a radio navigation facility under IFR, no person may descend below the pertinent minimum altitude for...

  10. 14 CFR 27.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 27.1527 Section 27.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... § 27.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed, as...

  11. VIEW OF THE TOPS OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R (TO LEFT) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE TOPS OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R (TO LEFT) AND ALTITUDE CHAMBER L (TO RIGHT) FROM THE 42’-0” LEVEL OF ACCESS PLATFORMS, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  12. 14 CFR 121.661 - Initial approach altitude: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Initial approach altitude: Flag operations... § 121.661 Initial approach altitude: Flag operations. When making an initial approach to a radio navigation facility under IFR, no person may descend below the pertinent minimum altitude for...

  13. 14 CFR 91.515 - Flight altitude rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight altitude rules. 91.515 Section 91... Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.515 Flight altitude rules. (a..., hill, or other obstruction to flight, for day operations; and (2) The altitudes prescribed in §...

  14. 14 CFR 91.515 - Flight altitude rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight altitude rules. 91.515 Section 91... Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.515 Flight altitude rules. (a..., hill, or other obstruction to flight, for day operations; and (2) The altitudes prescribed in §...

  15. 14 CFR 91.515 - Flight altitude rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight altitude rules. 91.515 Section 91... Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.515 Flight altitude rules. (a..., hill, or other obstruction to flight, for day operations; and (2) The altitudes prescribed in §...

  16. 14 CFR 27.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 27.1527 Section 27.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... § 27.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed, as...

  17. 14 CFR 29.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 29.1527 Section 29.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 29.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed,...

  18. 14 CFR 29.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 29.1527 Section 29.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 29.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed,...

  19. 10 CFR 862.6 - Voluntary minimum altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Voluntary minimum altitude. 862.6 Section 862.6 Energy... § 862.6 Voluntary minimum altitude. In addition to complying with all applicable FAA prohibitions or restrictions, aircraft are requested to maintain a minimum altitude of 2,000 feet above the terrain of...

  20. 10 CFR 862.6 - Voluntary minimum altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Voluntary minimum altitude. 862.6 Section 862.6 Energy... § 862.6 Voluntary minimum altitude. In addition to complying with all applicable FAA prohibitions or restrictions, aircraft are requested to maintain a minimum altitude of 2,000 feet above the terrain of...

  1. 14 CFR 27.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 27.1527 Section 27.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... § 27.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed, as...

  2. 14 CFR 29.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 29.1527 Section 29.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 29.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed,...

  3. 14 CFR 91.515 - Flight altitude rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight altitude rules. 91.515 Section 91... Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.515 Flight altitude rules. (a..., hill, or other obstruction to flight, for day operations; and (2) The altitudes prescribed in §...

  4. 14 CFR 27.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 27.1527 Section 27.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... § 27.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed, as...

  5. 14 CFR 121.661 - Initial approach altitude: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Initial approach altitude: Flag operations... § 121.661 Initial approach altitude: Flag operations. When making an initial approach to a radio navigation facility under IFR, no person may descend below the pertinent minimum altitude for...

  6. 14 CFR 29.1527 - Maximum operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum operating altitude. 29.1527 Section 29.1527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 29.1527 Maximum operating altitude. The maximum altitude up to which operation is allowed,...

  7. Human Behaviour and Development under High-Altitude Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virues-Ortega, Javier; Garrido, Eduardo; Javierre, Casimiro; Kloezeman, Karen C.

    2006-01-01

    Although we are far from a universally accepted pattern of impaired function at altitude, there is evidence indicating motor, perceptual, memory and behavioural deficits in adults. Even relatively low altitudes (2500 m) may delay reaction time, and impair motor function. Extreme altitude exposure (greater than 5000 m) may result in more pronounced…

  8. Hazards of Altitude Testing at AEDC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    12 kbar. Initiation can also take place by XDT (Unknown-to- Detonation - Transition) under conditions less severe than for SDT. This might occur... XDT of approximately 3 kbar. DETONATION REQUIREMENTS AND DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION Ullianl reported the "TNT EquivalentI1 of a series of aborted flights...HAZARDS OF ALTITUDE TESTING AT AEDC Paul K. Salzman TRW San Bernardino, CA ABSTRACT The detonability (explosion) hazards associated with testing

  9. 75 FR 40720 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-14

    ... From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 LOW ALTITUDE RNAV ROUTES Sec. 95.3227 RNAV ROUTE T227 IS AMENDED TO READ... 17500 *1300--MOCA From To MEA Sec. 95.6001 VICTOR ROUTES-U.S. Sec. 95.6001 VOR FEDERAL AIRWAY V1 IS... *2500--MOCA *3000--GNSS MEA Sec. 95.6003 VOR FEDERAL AIRWAY V3 IS AMENDED TO READ IN PART MODENA,...

  10. 77 FR 38477 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... & Changeover Points From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3306 RNAV Route T306 is Added... MEA * DME/DME/IRU MEA ROCCY, UT FIX RATTLESNAKE, NM * 22000 45000 VORTAC. * 18000--GNSS MEA * DME/DME/IRU MEA Sec. 95.4148 RNAV Route Q148 is Amended to Read in Part STEVS, WA FIX ZAXUL, WA FIX.. *...

  11. 77 FR 65256 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... & Changeover Points From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.4000 HIGH ALTITUDE RNAV ROUTES Sec. 95.4062 RNAV ROUTE Q62 Is... MEA Sec. 95.6001 VICTOR ROUTES--U.S. Sec. 95.6001 VOR FEDERAL AIRWAY V1 Is Amended to Read in Part...--MOCA *2700--GNSS MEA DES MOINES R-105 UNUSABLE, USE OTTUMWA R-287 BUSSY, IA FIX OTTUMWA, IA...

  12. 77 FR 50909 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3310 RNAV Route T310 Is Amended To Read... From To MEA Sec. 95.6001 Victor Routes-U.S. Sec. 95.6001 VOR Federal Airway V1 Is Amended To Read in... V10 Is Amended To Read in Part Emporia, KS VORTAC Wetzl, KS FIX *5000 *2600--MOCA *3000--GNSS...

  13. 76 FR 21622 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... Changeover Points From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3231 RNAV Route T231 Is... *18000--GNSS MEA DME/DME/IRU MEA ZORUN, NV FIX GALLI, NV FIX *2 45000 4000 *18000--GNSS MEA DME/DME/IRU MEA GALLI, NV FIX BIG PINEY, WY VOR/DME *2 45000 3000 *18000--GNSS MEA DME/DME/IRU MEA BIG PINEY,...

  14. 78 FR 57472 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... & Changeover Point From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3212 RNAV Route T212 Is... Is Amended To Read in Part FAREV, KY WP JEDER, KY WP *18000 45000 *18000--GNSS MEA *DME/DME/IRU MEA Sec. 95.4436 RNAV Route Q436 Is Added To Read EMMMA, MI FIX DIXSN, MI WP *18000 45000 *18000--GNSS...

  15. 78 FR 44874 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ... Point From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3291 RNAV Route T291 Is Added To...--GNSS MEA *DME/DME/IRU MEA KOATA, OR WP KIMBERLY, OR VORTAC *29000 45000 *18000--GNSS MEA *DME/DME/IRU MEA Sec. 95.4068 RNAV Route Q68 Is Added To Read CHARLESTON, WV VORTAC TOMCA, WV WP *18000...

  16. 78 FR 9583 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... Changeover Points FROM TO MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3254 RNAV Route T254 is... 3000 15000 FROM TO MEA MAA --------- Sec. 95.6001 Victor Routes-U.S. Sec. 95.6010 VOR Federal Airway V10 is Amended to Read in Part REVLOC, PA VOR/DME JUNEY, PA FIX........ *5000 *5000--GNSS MEA...

  17. 78 FR 32979 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... & Changeover Points Amendment 507 Effective Date June 27, 2013 From To MEA Sec. 95.1001 DIRECT ROUTES--U.S... River, AK NDB..... *7000 *6000-MOCA ] From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3266... *6000-MOCA From To MEA Sec. 95.6001 VICTOR ROUTES--U.S. Sec. 95.6003 VOR Federal Airway V3 Is Amended...

  18. 75 FR 24790 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... From To MEA Sec. 95.1001 Direct Routes-U.S. Color Routes Sec. 95.510 GREEN Federal Airway G10 is... Requred Below 8000 From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3254 RNAV Route T254 is... Crepo, TX FIX Lake Charles, LA VORTAC 2200 15000 ] From To MEA Sec. 95.6001 Victor Routes-U.S. Sec....

  19. 75 FR 82228 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3227 RNAV Route T227 Is Amended To Read... Route Q8 Is Amended To Read in Part Galena, AK VOR/DME Anchorage, AK VOR/DME 18000 45000 From To MEA Sec..., OH VOR/DME Morow, OH FIX 3100 Morow, OH FIX Hires, OH FIX *5000 *2700--MOCA *3000--GNSS MEA Hires,...

  20. 75 FR 52437 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... amended to read as follows: Revisions to IFR Altitudes & Changeover Points From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000... Read in Part WALNUT RIDGE, AR VORTAC DEVAC, AL FIX *20000 33000 *18000--GNSS MEA *DME/DME/IRU MEA From To MEA Sec. 95.6001 Victor Routes-U.S. Sec. 95.6003 VOR Federal Airway V3 Is Amended To Read in...

  1. 76 FR 46202 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... Amendment 495 Effective Date August 25, 2011 From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95... 2000 17500 Borke, NJ FIX Banka, NJ FIX 2000 17500 From To MEA Sec. 95.6001 Victor Routes--U.S. Sec. 95... Airway V36 Is Amended To Read in Part Elmira, NY VOR/DME..... Hawly, PA FIX * 4500 * GNSS MEA. Elmira...

  2. 77 FR 14269 - IFR Altitudes; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... Points From To MEA MAA Sec. 95.3000 Low Altitude RNAV Routes Sec. 95.3223 RNAV Route T223 Is Amended to... 18000 45000 GNSS REQUIRED From To MEA Sec. 95.6001 Victor Routes--U.S. Sec. 95.6002 VOR Federal Airway... Amended to Read in Part SERTS, OK FIX LIONS, OK FIX *4500 *3100--MOCA *3700--GNSS MEA LIONS, OK FIX...

  3. High Altitude Cooking and Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Administrative Forms Standard Forms Skip Navigation Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H1 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... / Topics / ... High Altitude Cooking and Food Safety Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H3 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Z7_ ...

  4. Altitude Compensating Nozzle Cold Flow Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, J. H.; McDaniels, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    A suite of four altitude compensating nozzle (ACN) concepts were evaluated by NASA MSFC in the Nozzle Test Facility. The ACN concepts were a dual bell, a dual expander, an annular plug nozzle and an expansion deflection nozzle. Two reference bell nozzles were also tested. Axial thrust and nozzle wall static pressures were measured for each nozzle over a wide range of nozzle pressure ratios. The nozzle hardware and test program are described. Sample test results are presented.

  5. Limiting factors for exercise at extreme altitudes.

    PubMed

    West, J B

    1990-05-01

    Man can only survive and do work in the severe oxygen deprivation of great altitudes by an enormous increase in ventilation which has the advantage of defending the alveolar PO2 against the reduced inspired PO2. Nevertheless the arterial PO2 on the summit of Mt Everest at rest is less than 30 Torr, and it decreases with exercise because of diffusion limitation within the lung. One of the consequences of the hyperventilation is that the marked respiratory alkalosis increases the oxygen affinity of the haemoglobin and assists in loading of oxygen by the pulmonary capillary. Although ventilation is greatly increased, it is a paradox that cardiac output for a given work level is the same in acclimatized subjects at high altitude as at sea level. Stroke volume is reduced but not because of impaired myocardial contractility because this is preserved up to extreme altitudes. Indeed the normal myocardium is one of the few tissues whose function is unimpaired by the very severe hypoxia. There is evidence that oxygen delivery to exercising muscle is diffusion limited along the pathway between the peripheral capillary and the mitochondria. At the altitude of Mt Everest, maximal oxygen uptake is reduced to 20-25% of its sea level value, and it is exquisitely sensitive to barometric pressure. Seasonal variations of barometric pressure affect the ability of man to reach the summit without supplementary oxygen. In spite of the greatly reduced aerobic capacity, anaerobiosis is greatly curtailed, and it is predicted that above 7500 m, there is no rise in blood lactate on exercise. The paradoxically low lactate is possibly related to plasma bicarbonate depletion.

  6. Geodetic altitude to a triaxial ellipsoidal planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Charles C. H.

    1988-01-01

    An efficient theoretical model for determining geodetic altitudes with better than millimeter accuracy is proposed, with application to the TOPEX/Poseidon project. The triaxial ellipsoidal subsurface point of a satellite is used as the initial trial solution to achieve an efficient and simple iterative solution. It is found that the second-iteration solution is exact to an accuracy of at least 10 to the -9th km.

  7. Geodetic altitude to a triaxial ellipsoidal planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Charles C. H.

    1988-09-01

    An efficient theoretical model for determining geodetic altitudes with better than millimeter accuracy is proposed, with application to the TOPEX/Poseidon project. The triaxial ellipsoidal subsurface point of a satellite is used as the initial trial solution to achieve an efficient and simple iterative solution. It is found that the second-iteration solution is exact to an accuracy of at least 10 to the -9th km.

  8. 20 CFR 332.2 - General considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... MILEAGE OR WORK RESTRICTIONS AND STAND-BY OR LAY-OVER RULES § 332.2 General considerations. (a) Classes of... to an employee solely because of the application to him of a mileage or work restriction exist in train-and-engine service, yard service, dining-car service, sleeping-car service, and other...

  9. 20 CFR 332.2 - General considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... MILEAGE OR WORK RESTRICTIONS AND STAND-BY OR LAY-OVER RULES § 332.2 General considerations. (a) Classes of... to an employee solely because of the application to him of a mileage or work restriction exist in train-and-engine service, yard service, dining-car service, sleeping-car service, and other...

  10. 20 CFR 332.2 - General considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... MILEAGE OR WORK RESTRICTIONS AND STAND-BY OR LAY-OVER RULES § 332.2 General considerations. (a) Classes of... to an employee solely because of the application to him of a mileage or work restriction exist in train-and-engine service, yard service, dining-car service, sleeping-car service, and other...

  11. The effect of altitude on welding

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1996-12-31

    Welding at high altitude has typically been reported as more difficult, particularly in the aspect of porosity control. As a consequence, welding of a similar assembly in cities of high elevation such as Denver, Colorado (USA) and Mexico City (Mexico) may require different parameters from those selected for welding in Houston, Texas (USA), Kobe (Japan), and Hamburg (Germany). The atmospheric pressures in these locations are different and the solubilities of bases such as hydrogen in the weld metal are also expected to be different. In this work, the formation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide porosity in low carbon steel weld metals was investigated. The thermodynamic conditions of the chemical reactions that occur in the weld poor were examined. The effects of ambient pressure on the H-O and C-O reactions were estimated for a range of pressures that varied from sea level to approximately 10,000 feet elevation. It was determined that the amounts of carbon monoxide and water in the pores varied measurably with altitude. Since the water vapor molecules that are entrapped in a pore react favorably with the iron atoms on the surface of the pore to form hydrogen and iron oxide, the amount of retained carbon monoxide and hydrogen would also vary with altitude. Finally, welds performed at lower ambient pressure (in locations of higher elevation) are expected to exhibit a larger amount of porosity because of reaction thermodynamics and nucleation kinetics.

  12. Use of ultrasound in altitude decompression modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Robert M.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    A model that predicts the probability of developing decompression sickness (DCS) with various denitrogenation schedules is being developed by the Armstrong Laboratory, using human data from previous exposures. It was noted that refinements are needed to improve the accuracy and scope of the model. A commercially developed ultrasonic echo imaging system is being used in this model development. Using this technique, bubbles images from a subject at altitude can be seen in the gall bladder, hepatic veins, vena cava, and chambers of the heart. As judged by their motion and appearance in the vena cava, venous bubbles near the heart range in size from 30 to 300 M. The larger bubbles skim along the top, whereas the smaller ones appear as faint images near the bottom of the vessel. Images from growing bubbles in a model altitude chamber indicate that they grow rapidly, going from 20 to 100 M in 3 sec near 30,000 ft altitude. Information such as this is valuable in verifying those aspects of the DCS model dealing with bubble size, their growth rate, and their site of origin.

  13. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Miguel; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a continuously operated, wide field of view experiment comprised of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs) to study transient and steady emission of TeV gamma and cosmic rays. Each 200000 l WCD is instrumented with 4 PMTs providing charge and timing information. The array covers ~22000 m2 at an altitude of 4100 m a.s.l. inside the Pico de Orizaba national park in Mexico. The high altitude, large active area, and optical isolation of the PMTs allows us to reliably estimate the energy and determine the arrival direction of gamma and cosmic rays with significant sensitivity over energies from several hundred GeV to a hundred TeV. Continuously observing 2 / 3 of the sky every 24 h, HAWC plays a significant role as a survey instrument for multi-wavelength studies. The performance of HAWC makes possible the detection of both transient and steady emissions, the study of diffuse emission and the measurement of the spectra of gamma-ray sources at TeV energies. HAWC is also sensitive to the emission from GRBs above 100 GeV. I will highlight the results from the first year of operation of the full HAWC array, and describe the ongoing site work to expand the array by a factor of 4 to explore the high energy range.

  14. Altitude and arteriolar hyalinosis after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cippà, Pietro E; Grebe, Scott O; Fehr, Thomas; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Mueller, Thomas F

    2016-09-01

    The kidney is very susceptible to hypoxic injury. Calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) induce vasoconstriction and might reduce renal tissue oxygenation. We aimed to investigate if the synergistic deleterious effects of CNI-treatment and hypoxia of high altitude living might accelerate the development of arteriolar hyalinosis in kidney allografts. We stratified all patients who received a kidney graft from 2000 to 2010 in our centre (n = 477) in three groups according to the residential elevation (below 400, between 400 to 600 and above 600 m above sea level) and we retrospectively re-evaluated all transplant biopsies performed during follow-up, specifically looking at the degree of arteriolar hyalinosis, the hallmark of chronic CNI nephrotoxicity. Living at high altitude was markedly associated with a higher degree of arteriolar hyalinosis (P < 0.001). Haemoglobin levels confirmed the functional relevance of different arterial oxygenation among the groups (P = 0.01). Thus, patients living at high altitude seem to be more susceptible to the development of arteriolar hyalinosis after kidney transplantation.

  15. Strength Training and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the potential health benefits of strength training for children, discussing the role of strength training in preventing sports-related injuries and highlighting design considerations for such programs. The focus is on musculoskeletal adaptations to strength training that are observable in healthy children. Guidelines for…

  16. Fluid-electrolyte shifts and maximal oxygen uptake in man at simulated altitude /2,287 m/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Adams, W. C.; Juhos, L.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on six trained distance runners (21-23 yr) subjected to an eight-day dietary control at sea level, followed by an eight-day stay in an altitude chamber (2287-m altitude) and a four-day recovery at sea level. Fluid and electrolyte shifts during exercise at altitude were evaluated to gain insight into the mechanism of reduction in working capacity. The results are discussed in terms of resting fluid volumes and blood constituents, maximal exercise variables, and maximal exercise fluid-electrolyte shifts. Since there are no significant changes in fluid balance or resting plasma volume (PV) at altitude, it is concluded that neither these nor the excessive PV shifts with exercise contribute to the reduction in maximal oxygen uptake at altitude. During altitude exposure the percent loss in PV is found to follow the percent reduction in maximal oxygen uptake; however, on the first day of recovery the percent change in PV remains depressed while maximal oxygen uptake returns to control levels.

  17. Growth of Han migrants at high altitude in central Asia.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Charles A; Garruto, Ralph M

    2004-01-01

    Han Chinese of low-altitude descent have been living in Qinghai Province of Western China for at least two millennia. For most of this time they have lived at elevations under 2,500 m. However, during the last four decades an increasing number of Han have moved into high-altitude towns at elevations over 3,000 m, and some above 4,000 m. There are now sufficient numbers of Han descendants who have been born and raised at high altitude to allow a comparison of their morphological and physiological growth patterns with low-altitude Han to detect the effect of hypoxia. The field study reported here was conducted by collaborating Chinese and American researchers over a 6-year period, and included 1,227 Han living at high altitude in Qinghai and at low altitude near Beijing. This study demonstrates that Han born and raised at high altitude are smaller and lighter than those at low altitude-particularly as children and adolescents. Slower growth at high altitude may be a consequence of hypoxia, but it also corresponds to poorer economic conditions in rural Qinghai Province, and thus may reflect nutritional inadequacies. Differences in altitude and/or nutrition do not seem to affect thorax dimensions, since, relative to stature, chest dimensions are similar at both high and low altitudes. Nevertheless, lung volumes are higher among Han at high altitude, possibly reflecting the influence of hypoxia on alveolar growth. The hematological values of Han growing up at 3,200 m are not different from those at low altitude-an unusual finding relative to other low-altitude groups that may reflect population differences in response to hypoxia. At 3,800 m and 4,300 m, however, Han show elevated hemoglobin relative to Han at low altitude.

  18. Global Trends in Glacial Cirque Floor Altitudes and Their Relationships with Climate, Equilibrium Line Altitudes, and Mountain Range Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, S. G.; Humphries, E.

    2013-12-01

    Glacial erosion at the base of cirque headwalls and the creation of threshold slopes above cirque floors may contribute to the 'glacial buzzsaw' effect in limiting the altitude of some mountain ranges. Since glacial extent and therefore glacial erosion rate depends on the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) of a region, the altitude of cirque formation should be a function of the ELA. Several regional studies have shown that cirque floors form at an altitude approximating average Quaternary ELAs in some mountain ranges, but a global correlation has not yet been demonstrated. We examined the correlation between cirque altitudes and global ELA trends by compiling existing and new cirque altitude and morphometry data from > 30 mountain ranges at a wide range of latitudes. Where available, we calculate or present the average cirque altitude, relief, and latitude. We compared these altitudes to both the global East Pacific ELA and local ELAs where available. For the locations analyzed, the majority of average cirque altitudes fall between the Eastern Pacific modern and LGM ELAs, and mountain range height is typically limited to < 600 m above that altitude. This evidence supports the hypothesis that cirque formation is dependent upon the ELA, and that cirques likely form as a result of average, rather than extreme, glacial conditions. Furthermore, the correlation between cirque altitude and ELA, along with the restricted window of relief, implies that cirque formation is a factor in limiting peak altitude in ranges that rise above the ELA.

  19. New horizons for the national high-altitude photography program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bermel, Peter F.

    1983-01-01

    The National High-Altitude Photography Program (NHAP) is a multi-Federal agency activity to acquire uniform imagery for the establishment of a national high-altitude photographic data base. Federal agencies participating in NHAP have pooled their resources and consolidated photographic requirements in a systematic 6-year effort that will minimize duplication of photographic programs, reduce overall Federal expenditures for aerial photography, and provide imagery for a wide range of public and private users, The U.S. Geological Survey has the lead coordination role and shares, with the other participating agencies, the responsibility for funding the acquisition of photography. Since the inception of NHAP in 1980, black-and-white and color infrared stereoscopic imagery has been acquired for about 50% of the 3,000,000 square miles in the conterminous United States. An additional 40% of the 48-State area is under contract to provide aerial survey firms, and the sixth and final contract to achieve complete once-over coverage will be awarded early in 1985. Extensive use has been made of the newly established data base for mapping, landform studies, land use planning, natural resource inventory, evaluation and management, engineering, and education. In anticipation of the completion of once-over coverage, the participating agencies have begun studies to define the requirements for a maintenance program which would provide cyclic coverage of the conterminous United States and imagery for specific agency needs. Although continued funding at the same level is not assured, under consideration are requirements for new cameras, films, and other remote sensors, photographic parameters, and extension of program coverage to Alaska, Hawaii, and outlying areas. In addition, new applications of the data base to prepare cartographic map and data products are being investigated. It is becoming increasingly clear that some major decision needs to be made soon if a NHAP II is to begin in

  20. The effect of sudden depressurization on pilots at cruising altitude.

    PubMed

    Muehlemann, Thomas; Holper, Lisa; Wenzel, Juergen; Wittkowski, Martin; Wolf, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The standard flight level for commercial airliners is ∼12 km (40 kft; air pressure: ∼ 200 hPa), the maximum certification altitude of modern airliners may be as high as 43-45 kft. Loss of structural integrity of an airplane may result in sudden depressurization of the cabin potentially leading to hypoxia with loss of consciousness of the pilots. Specialized breathing masks supply the pilots with oxygen. The aim of this study was to experimentally simulate such sudden depressurization to maximum design altitude in a pressure chamber while measuring the arterial and brain oxygenation saturation (SaO(2) and StO(2)) of the pilots. Ten healthy subjects with a median age of 50 (range 29-70) years were placed in a pressure chamber, breathing air from a cockpit mask. Pressure was reduced from 753 to 148 hPa within 20 s, and the test mask was switched to pure O(2) within 2 s after initiation of depressurization. During the whole procedure SaO(2) and StO(2) were measured by pulse oximetry, respectively near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS; in-house built prototype) of the left frontal cortex. During the depressurization the SaO(2) dropped from median 93% (range 91-98%) to 78% (62-92%) by 16% (6-30%), while StO(2) decreased from 62% (47-67%) to 57% (43-62%) by 5% (3-14%). Considerable drops in oxygenation were observed during sudden depressurization. The inter-subject variability was high, for SaO(2) depending on the subjects' ability to preoxygenate before the depressurization. The drop in StO(2) was lower than the one in SaO(2) maybe due to compensation in blood flow.

  1. Sensitivity of Mass Balance and Equilibrium Line Altitude to Climate Change in the French Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six, D.

    2014-12-01

    Assessment of the sensitivity of surface mass balance and equilibrium line altitude to climate change is crucial for the simulation of the future evolution of glaciers. Such an assessment has been carried out using a very extensive data set comprising numerous measurements of snow accumulation and snow and ice ablation made on four French glaciers over the last 16 years. Winter mass balances show a complicated pattern with respect to altitude, showing no clear linear relationship. Although the ratios of winter mass balance to valley precipitation differ considerably from one site to another, they remain relatively constant over time. Relationships between snow/ice ablation and temperature are stable, showing no link with altitude. The mean snow and ice PDD factors found are 0.003 and 0.0061 m w.e. °C-1 d-1. This analysis shows that, at a given site, ablation depends mainly on the amount of snow precipitation and on cumulative positive degree days. The sensitivity of annual ablation to temperature change increases almost linearly from 0.25 m w.e. °C-1 at 3500 m to 1.55 m w.e. °C-1 at 1650 m. Equilibrium line altitude sensitivity to temperature change was found to ranges from 50 m °C-1 to 85 m °C-1, generally lower than previous studies.

  2. [Occurrence of biting midges (Culicoides spp.) at three different altitudes in an alpine region of Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Tschuor, A C; Kaufmann, C; Schaffner, F; Mathis, A

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this field study was to investigate the occurrence of biting midges (Culicoides spp.), the potential vectors of the bluetongue virus (BTV), in an alpine region of Switzerland (Vals/GR) at altitudes between 1300 and 2000 meters above sea level (m a.s.l.). For this purpose, insects were caught with UV-light traps once weekly from the end of June to the end of October 2008. Midges were found on all altitudes investigated, but distinct differences in the abundance at different stations were noticed. Most midges were caught at the intermediate station (about 1500 m a.s.l.) whereas the catches on the two alps (approximately 2000 m a.s.l.) varied considerably. The predominance of midges belonging to the Pulicaris complex, whose vector competence regarding bluetongue virus (BTV) is largely unknown, rose with increasing altitude. To identify potential breeding habitats, 17 soil samples of three farms were incubated in the laboratory. Different insects emerged but none of them was a Culicoides spp. and, therefore, the habitats of juvenile stages remain unknown. From our results we can conclude that most likely there are no midges-free zones in all of the agriculturally utilized areas (including the alpine summer pastures) of Switzerland. This strongly indicates that cattle, sheep, goats and camelids which are permanently or temporarily kept in regions of higher altitude in Switzerland should be vaccinated against bluetongue.

  3. High-altitude illnesses: physiology, risk factors, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew T

    2011-01-01

    High-altitude illnesses encompass the pulmonary and cerebral syndromes that occur in non-acclimatized individuals after rapid ascent to high altitude. The most common syndrome is acute mountain sickness (AMS) which usually begins within a few hours of ascent and typically consists of headache variably accompanied by loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, disturbed sleep, fatigue, and dizziness. With millions of travelers journeying to high altitudes every year and sleeping above 2,500 m, acute mountain sickness is a wide-spread clinical condition. Risk factors include home elevation, maximum altitude, sleeping altitude, rate of ascent, latitude, age, gender, physical condition, intensity of exercise, pre-acclimatization, genetic make-up, and pre-existing diseases. At higher altitudes, sleep disturbances may become more profound, mental performance is impaired, and weight loss may occur. If ascent is rapid, acetazolamide can reduce the risk of developing AMS, although a number of high-altitude travelers taking acetazolamide will still develop symptoms. Ibuprofen can be effective for headache. Symptoms can be rapidly relieved by descent, and descent is mandatory, if at all possible, for the management of the potentially fatal syndromes of high-altitude pulmonary and cerebral edema. The purpose of this review is to combine a discussion of specific risk factors, prevention, and treatment options with a summary of the basic physiologic responses to the hypoxia of altitude to provide a context for managing high-altitude illnesses and advising the non-acclimatized high-altitude traveler.

  4. Application of Multilayer Feedforward Neural Networks to Precipitation Cell-Top Altitude Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spina, Michelle S.; Schwartz, Michael J.; Staelin, David H.; Gasiewski, Albin J.

    1998-01-01

    The use of passive 118-GHz O2 observations of rain cells for precipitation cell-top altitude estimation is demonstrated by using a multilayer feed forward neural network retrieval system. Rain cell observations at 118 GHz were compared with estimates of the cell-top altitude obtained by optical stereoscopy. The observations were made with 2 4 km horizontal spatial resolution by using the Millimeter-wave Temperature Sounder (MTS) scanning spectrometer aboard the NASA ER-2 research aircraft during the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE) and the COoperative Huntsville Meteorological EXperiment (COHMEX) in 1986. The neural network estimator applied to MTS spectral differences between clouds, and nearby clear air yielded an rms discrepancy of 1.76 km for a combined cumulus, mature, and dissipating cell set and 1.44 km for the cumulus-only set. An improvement in rms discrepancy to 1.36 km was achieved by including additional MTS information on the absolute atmospheric temperature profile. An incremental method for training neural networks was developed that yielded robust results, despite the use of as few as 56 training spectra. Comparison of these results with a nonlinear statistical estimator shows that superior results can be obtained with a neural network retrieval system. Imagery of estimated cell-top altitudes was created from 118-GHz spectral imagery gathered from CAMEX, September through October 1993, and from cyclone Oliver, February 7, 1993.

  5. Polar Plumes Observed at Extreme Coronal Altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, C. E.; Plunkett, S. P.

    1999-09-01

    Polar plumes, unipolar high density structures in the polar coronal holes, are key to our understanding of solar wind acceleration and coronal heating. Because unipolar magnetic flux concentrations in the coronal hole account for approximately 50 leaves the coronal hole (DeForest et al., 1996), plumes (which arise from some such concentrations) are tracers of a type of magnetic structure that fills nearly half of the solar system at solar minimum. Plumes have been observed up to altitudes of about 10 solar radii with the LASCO instrument (DeForest et al., 1996), above which they fade into the coronal background. There is some contention (Habbal and Woo, 1997; Paetzold and Bird, 1998) over whether plumes extend into the interplanetary medium or become mixed with the interplume solar wind at altitudes between 10 and 100 solar radii. Several mechanisms, including the Kelvin-Helmholtz two-stream instability and cross-mode resonant wave scattering near the alfvenic point in the wind's acceleration, have been proposed that could break up the structure of the observed plumes. Using the LASCO C-3 instrument aboard SOHO (Brueckner et al, 1995) to accumulate multiple images that we then recombine, we have generated coronal images with effective exposure times in the thousands of seconds and actual durations of less than four hours. These images clearly show polar plumes extending to altitudes of 25 solar radii or more, very close to the outer edge of the C-3 field of view and above the likely alfvenic point of the wind flow.

  6. High altitude balloon experiments at IIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Akshata; Sreejith, A. G.; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    Recent advances in balloon experiments as well as in electronics have made it possible to fly scientific payloads at costs accessible to university departments. We have begun a program of high altitude ballooning at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengaluru. The primary purpose of this activity is to test low-cost ultraviolet (UV) payloads for eventual space flight, but we will also try scientific exploration of the phenomena occurring in the upper atmosphere, including sprites and meteorite impacts. We present the results of the initial experiments carried out at the CREST campus of IIA, Hosakote, and describe our plans for the future.

  7. Determining the Altitude of Iridium Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, James; Owe, Manfred

    1999-01-01

    Iridium flares have nothing to do with the element iridium. Iridium is also the name of a telecommunications company that has been launching satellites into low orbits around the Earth. These satellites are being used for a new type of wireless phone and paging service. Flares have been observed coming from these satellites. These flares have the potential, especially when the full fleet of satellites is in orbit, to disrupt astronomical observations. The paper reviews using simple trigonometry how to calculate the altitude of one of these satellites.

  8. Regression of altitude-produced cardiac hypertrophy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sizemore, D. A.; Mcintyre, T. W.; Van Liere, E. J.; Wilson , M. F.

    1973-01-01

    The rate of regression of cardiac hypertrophy with time has been determined in adult male albino rats. The hypertrophy was induced by intermittent exposure to simulated high altitude. The percentage hypertrophy was much greater (46%) in the right ventricle than in the left (16%). The regression could be adequately fitted to a single exponential function with a half-time of 6.73 plus or minus 0.71 days (90% CI). There was no significant difference in the rates of regression for the two ventricles.

  9. Low Altitude Lightning Attachment to an Aircraft.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    densities measured exceeded 22 Amperes/meter2 (A/m2 ) and 3950 Teslas /sec (T/s), respectively. b) The three lightning attachments that occurred at altitudes...aircraft voltage wire, and a signal channel from the autopilot navigation unit. Figure 12 shows one of the clip-on current probes connected to the...phases of the 400 Hz power signal, and one of the data signals carrying information between the INS and the autopilot unit. A review of the data after

  10. Measurement of low-altitude infrared propagation.

    PubMed

    Zeisse, C R; Nener, B D; Dewees, R V

    2000-02-20

    Infrared propagation at low altitudes is determined by extinction that is due to molecules and aerosol particles and ray bending by refraction, three effects that control the mean value of the signal. Interference causes the signal to fluctuate, or scintillate, about the mean value. We discuss the design, calibration, and limitations of a field instrument for measuring optical propagation inside the midwave and long-wave infrared atmospheric windows. The instrument, which is accurate to ?10%, has been used to investigate aerosol, refractive, and scintillation phenomena in the marine boundary layer.

  11. [Effect of hypoxia on muscular performance capacity: "living low--training high"].

    PubMed

    Vogt, M; Billeter, R; Hoppeler, H

    2003-07-01

    Altitude training is very popular among endurance athletes. But athletes respond very different on acute altitude exposure and altitude training. There are individual differences in the decrement of maximal oxygen consumption making general advices on the effect of altitude training very difficult. During the last few years different altitude training regimes have been developed. Beside "living high--training low," the concept of "living low--training high" becomes more and more popular. By this regime, athletes train under simulated or natural hypoxic conditions, while recovery time is spent at sea-level. Several studies show that with "living low--training high" maximal oxygen consumption as well as aerobic and anaerobic endurance performance can be improved. Molecular analysis reveal that a transcription factor called Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) acts as a master gene in the regulation of hypoxia-dependent gene expression. In human skeletal muscle "living low-training high" induces the expression of glycolytic enzymes, the angiogenic factor VEGF, myoglobin as well as the increase of capillarity and mitochondrial content in parallel to the induction of the HIF-1 system. In trained human skeletal muscle, these adaptations cause a shift of substrate selection to an increased oxidation of carbohydrates as well as to an improvement of the conditions for transport and utilization of oxygen. Depending on the kind of sports, "living low--training high" can be used to train these muscular adaptations and to increase exercise performance.

  12. Factors affecting running economy in trained distance runners.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Philo U; Pyne, David B; Telford, Richard D; Hawley, John A

    2004-01-01

    Running economy (RE) is typically defined as the energy demand for a given velocity of submaximal running, and is determined by measuring the steady-state consumption of oxygen (VO2) and the respiratory exchange ratio. Taking body mass (BM) into consideration, runners with good RE use less energy and therefore less oxygen than runners with poor RE at the same velocity. There is a strong association between RE and distance running performance, with RE being a better predictor of performance than maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in elite runners who have a similar VO2max). RE is traditionally measured by running on a treadmill in standard laboratory conditions, and, although this is not the same as overground running, it gives a good indication of how economical a runner is and how RE changes over time. In order to determine whether changes in RE are real or not, careful standardisation of footwear, time of test and nutritional status are required to limit typical error of measurement. Under controlled conditions, RE is a stable test capable of detecting relatively small changes elicited by training or other interventions. When tracking RE between or within groups it is important to account for BM. As VO2 during submaximal exercise does not, in general, increase linearly with BM, reporting RE with respect to the 0.75 power of BM has been recommended. A number of physiological and biomechanical factors appear to influence RE in highly trained or elite runners. These include metabolic adaptations within the muscle such as increased mitochondria and oxidative enzymes, the ability of the muscles to store and release elastic energy by increasing the stiffness of the muscles, and more efficient mechanics leading to less energy wasted on braking forces and excessive vertical oscillation. Interventions to improve RE are constantly sought after by athletes, coaches and sport scientists. Two interventions that have received recent widespread attention are strength training and

  13. Multi-unit operations considerations.

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Walter E.; Bennett, Thomas C.; Brannon, Nathan Gregory

    2005-09-01

    Several nuclear weapons programs have or are pursuing the implementation of multi-unit operations for tasks such as disassembly and inspection, and rebuild. A multi-unit operation is interpreted to mean the execution of nuclear explosive operating procedures in a single facility by two separate teams of technicians. The institution of a multi-unit operations program requires careful consideration of the tools, resources, and environment provided to the technicians carrying out the work. Therefore, a systematic approach is necessary to produce safe, secure, and reliable processes. In order to facilitate development of a more comprehensive multi-unit operations program, the current work details categorized issues that should be addressed prior to the implementation of multi-unit operations in a given weapons program. The issues have been organized into the following categories: local organizational conditions, work process flow/material handling/workplace configuration, ambient environmental conditions, documented safety analysis, and training.

  14. Dressing for Altitude: U.S. Aviation Pressure Suits--Wiley Post to Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    Since its earliest days, flight has been about pushing the limits of technology and, in many cases, pushing the limits of human endurance. The human body can be the limiting factor in the design of aircraft and spacecraft. Humans cannot survive unaided at high altitudes. There have been a number of books written on the subject of spacesuits, but the literature on the high-altitude pressure suits is lacking. This volume provides a high-level summary of the technological development and operational use of partial- and full-pressure suits, from the earliest models to the current high altitude, full-pressure suits used for modern aviation, as well as those that were used for launch and entry on the Space Shuttle. The goal of this work is to provide a resource on the technology for suits designed to keep humans alive at the edge of space. Hopefully, future generations will learn from the hard-fought lessons of the past. NASA is committed to the future of aerospace, and a key component of that future is the workforce. Without these men and women, technological advancements would not be possible. Dressing for Altitude is designed to provide the history of the technology and to explore the lessons learned through years of research in creating, testing, and utilizing today s high-altitude suits. It is our hope that this information will prove helpful in the development of future suits. Even with the closeout of the Space Shuttle and the planned ending of the U-2 program, pressure suits will be needed for protection as long as humans seek to explore high frontiers. The NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate is committed to the training of the current and future aerospace workforce. This book and the other books published by the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate are in support of this commitment. Hopefully, you will find this book a valuable resource for many years to come.

  15. The effect of repeated altitude exposures on the incidence of decompression sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilmanis, Andrew A.; Webb, James T.; Kannan, Nandini; Balldin, Ulf

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Repeated altitude exposures in a single day occur during special operations parachute training, hypobaric chamber training, unpressurized flight, and extravehicular space activity. Inconsistent and contradictory information exists regarding the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) during such hypobaric exposures. HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesized that four short exposures to altitude with and without ground intervals would result in a lower incidence of DCS than a single exposure of equal duration. METHODS: The 32 subjects were exposed to 3 different hypobaric exposures--condition A: 2 h continuous exposure (control); condition B: four 30-min exposures with descent/ascent but no ground interval between the exposures; condition C: four 30-min exposures with descent/ascent and 60 min of ground interval breathing air between exposures. All exposures were to 25,000 ft with 100% oxygen breathing. Subjects were observed for symptoms of DCS, and precordial monitoring of venous gas emboli (VGE) was accomplished with a SONOS 1000 echo-imaging system. RESULTS: DCS occurred in 19 subjects during A (mean onset 70+/-29 min), 7 subjects in B (60+/-34 min), and 2 subjects in C (40+/-18 min). There was a significant difference in DCS incidence between B and A (p = 0.0015) and C and A (p = 0.0002), but no significant difference between B and C. There were 28 cases of VGE in A (mean onset 30+/-23 min), 21 in B (41+/-35 min), and 21 in C (41+/-32 min) with a significant onset curve difference between B and A and between C and A, but not between B and C. Exposure A resulted in four cases of serious respiratory/neurological symptoms, while B had one and C had none. All symptoms resolved during recompression to ground level. CONCLUSION: Data indicate that repeated simulated altitude exposures to 25,000 ft significantly reduce DCS and VGE incidence compared with a single continuous altitude exposure.

  16. Current Status of a NASA High-Altitude Balloon-Based Observatory for Planetary Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varga, Denise M.; Dischner, Zach

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that progress can be made on over 20% of the key questions called out in the current Planetary Science Decadal Survey by a high-altitude balloon-borne observatory. Therefore, NASA has been assessing concepts for a gondola-based observatory that would achieve the greatest possible science return in a low-risk and cost-effective manner. This paper addresses results from the 2014 Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science (BOPPS) mission, namely successes in the design and performance of the Fine Pointing System. The paper also addresses technical challenges facing the new Gondola for High Altitude Planetary Science (GHAPS) reusable platform, including thermal control for the Optical Telescope Assembly, power generation and management, and weight-saving considerations that the team will be assessing in 2015 and beyond.

  17. Experimental Characterization of Gas Turbine Emissions at Simulated Flight Altitude Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R. P.; Wormhoudt, J. C.; Whitefield, P. D.

    1996-01-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) is developing a scientific basis for assessment of the atmospheric impact of subsonic and supersonic aviation. A primary goal is to assist assessments of United Nations scientific organizations and hence, consideration of emissions standards by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Engine tests have been conducted at AEDC to fulfill the need of AEAP. The purpose of these tests is to obtain a comprehensive database to be used for supplying critical information to the atmospheric research community. It includes: (1) simulated sea-level-static test data as well as simulated altitude data; and (2) intrusive (extractive probe) data as well as non-intrusive (optical techniques) data. A commercial-type bypass engine with aviation fuel was used in this test series. The test matrix was set by parametrically selecting the temperature, pressure, and flow rate at sea-level-static and different altitudes to obtain a parametric set of data.

  18. Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Traffic Management (UTM): Enabling Low-Altitude Airspace and UAS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal H.

    2014-01-01

    Many civilian applications of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) have been imagined ranging from remote to congested urban areas, including goods delivery, infrastructure surveillance, agricultural support, and medical services delivery. Further, these UAS will have different equipage and capabilities based on considerations such as affordability, and mission needs applications. Such heterogeneous UAS mix, along with operations such as general aviation, helicopters, gliders must be safely accommodated at lower altitudes. However, key infrastructure to enable and safely manage widespread use of low-altitude airspace and UAS operations therein does not exist. Therefore, NASA is exploring functional design, concept and technology development, and a prototype UAS Traffic Management (UTM) system. UTM will support safe and efficient UAS operations for the delivery of goods and services

  19. Constraints on the Longwave Cloud Altitude Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelinka, M. D.; Klein, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud feedback represents the source of largest spread among global climate model projections of future climate change. Though most studies to date have focused on the large spread in cloud feedback that arises from disparate responses of subtropical low clouds, we show using a new technique for quantifying the contribution to cloud feedback from individual cloud types that a significant spread exists in the response of high clouds, with implications for both longwave and shortwave feedbacks. In this talk, we focus on the inter-model spread in longwave altitude feedback, defined as the impact on top of atmosphere longwave fluxes due solely to changes in the vertical distribution of clouds, holding both the total amount and the optical depth distribution fixed. Among the ten models analyzed, this feedback varies from 0.06 to 0.80 W m-2 K-1. We show that the magnitude of this feedback is dependent on two key variables: the effective high cloud amount in the control climate and the change in mean cloud top pressure under doubling of CO2. The latter component is governed by the degree to which the troposphere deepens under doubling of CO2, suggesting an inverse relationship with the lapse rate feedback. To the extent that realistic bounds can be placed on effective high cloud amount using observations, the range of plausible longwave cloud altitude feedback magnitudes can be further reduced.

  20. High-altitude adaptations in vertebrate hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Weber, Roy E

    2007-09-30

    Vertebrates at high altitude are subjected to hypoxic conditions that challenge aerobic metabolism. O(2) transport from the respiratory surfaces to tissues requires matching between the O(2) loading and unloading tensions and the O(2)-affinity of blood, which is an integrated function of hemoglobin's intrinsic O(2)-affinity and its allosteric interaction with cellular effectors (organic phosphates, protons and chloride). Whereas short-term altitudinal adaptations predominantly involve adjustments in allosteric interactions, long-term, genetically-coded adaptations typically involve changes in the structure of the haemoglobin molecules. The latter commonly comprise substitutions of amino acid residues at the effector binding sites, the heme-protein contacts, or at intersubunit contacts that stabilize either the low-affinity ('Tense') or the high-affinity ('Relaxed') structures of the molecules. Molecular heterogeneity (multiple isoHbs with differentiated oxygenation properties) can further broaden the range of physico-chemical conditions where Hb functions under altitudinal hypoxia. This treatise reviews the molecular and cellular mechanisms that adapt haemoglobin-oxygen affinities in mammals, birds and ectothermic vertebrates at high altitude.

  1. Green Power Procurement Considerations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Green power products are available from a variety of different vendors, including utilities, renewable energy certificate (REC) marketers, on-site system integrators, and non-profit organizations. This page lists considerations to evaluate during selection

  2. Resistance Training Using Different Hypoxic Training Strategies: a Basis for Hypertrophy and Muscle Power Development.

    PubMed

    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Morales-Artacho, Antonio J; Padial, Paulino

    2017-12-01

    The possible muscular strength, hypertrophy, and muscle power benefits of resistance training under environmental conditions of hypoxia are currently being investigated.Nowadays, resistance training in hypoxia constitutes a promising new training strategy for strength and muscle gains. The main mechanisms responsible for these effects seem to be related to increased metabolite accumulation due to hypoxia. However, no data are reported in the literature to describe and compare the efficacy of the different hypertrophic resistance training strategies in hypoxia.Moreover, improvements in sprinting, jumping, or throwing performance have also been described at terrestrial altitude, encouraging research into the speed of explosive movements at altitude. It has been suggested that the reduction in the aerodynamic resistance and/or the increase in the anaerobic metabolism at higher altitudes can influence the metabolic cost, increase the take-off velocities, or improve the motor unit recruitment patterns, which may explain these improvements. Despite these findings, the applicability of altitude conditions in improving muscle power by resistance training remains to be clarified.This review examines current knowledge regarding resistance training in different types of hypoxia, focusing on strategies designed to improve muscle hypertrophy as well as power for explosive movements.

  3. DOE handbook: Design considerations

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    The Design Considerations Handbook includes information and suggestions for the design of systems typical to nuclear facilities, information specific to various types of special facilities, and information useful to various design disciplines. The handbook is presented in two parts. Part 1, which addresses design considerations, includes two sections. The first addresses the design of systems typically used in nuclear facilities to control radiation or radioactive materials. Specifically, this part addresses the design of confinement systems and radiation protection and effluent monitoring systems. The second section of Part 1 addresses the design of special facilities (i.e., specific types of nonreactor nuclear facilities). The specific design considerations provided in this section were developed from review of DOE 6430.1A and are supplemented with specific suggestions and considerations from designers with experience designing and operating such facilities. Part 2 of the Design Considerations Handbook describes good practices and design principles that should be considered in specific design disciplines, such as mechanical systems and electrical systems. These good practices are based on specific experiences in the design of nuclear facilities by design engineers with related experience. This part of the Design Considerations Handbook contains five sections, each of which applies to a particular engineering discipline.

  4. High-altitude illness induced by tooth root infection

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, J

    1999-01-01

    High-altitude illness may occur after recent pulmonary infection, but high-altitude illness after root canal therapy has not been described previously. A 44-year-old man is presented who skied to a 3333 m high peak in the Eastern Alps one day after he had undergone root canal therapy because of a tooth root infection. After 4 hours above 3000 m severe symptoms of high-altitude illness, including pulmonary oedema, developed. His condition improved after immediate descent. The next day he presented with local and general signs of infection which were successfully treated with gingival incisions and antibiotics. In conclusion, acute tooth root infection and root canal therapy may induce high-altitude illness at an altitude just above 3000 m.


Keywords: high-altitude illness; pulmonary oedema; root canal therapy; tooth root infection PMID:10715764

  5. Sources of plasma in the high altitude cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Trattner, K. J.

    2012-10-01

    Ambiguities introduced by the inconsistent definitions of the low and high altitude cusp lead to the inconsistency that at low altitudes the region commonly known as the cusp does not include boundary layer plasmas, but at high altitudes it does. Here we examine plasma data from two high altitude cusp intervals where ∼100 keV ionospheric ions were observed. We show that the data are an average over an interval that includes plasma from both boundary layer and newly injected solar wind plasmas. We find that the ∼100 keV ionospheric ions reported in the high altitude cusp are energized by well-known magnetospheric processes bringing energetic ions to the dayside boundary layers. We conclude that there is no need to postulate new processes associated with waves in diamagnetic cavities commonly found in the high altitude cusp to explain the observation of ∼100 keV ionospheric ions found there.

  6. Cardiovascular and renal effects of chronic exposure to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Abdias; Escudero, Elizabeth; Pando, Jackeline; Sharma, Shailendra; Johnson, Richard J

    2012-12-01

    Over 140 million people live at high altitude, defined as living at an altitude of 2400 m or more above sea level. Subjects living under these conditions are continuously living under hypoxic conditions and, depending on the population, various adaptations have developed. Interestingly, subjects living chronically at high altitude appear to have a decreased frequency of obesity, diabetes and coronary artery disease. However, these benefits on health are balanced by the frequent development of systemic and pulmonary hypertension. Recently, it has been recognized that subjects living at high altitude are at risk for developing high-altitude renal syndrome (HARS), which is a syndrome consisting of polycythemia, hyperuricemia, systemic hypertension and microalbuminuria, but with preserved glomerular filtration rate. More studies should be performed to characterize the mechanisms and etiology of HARS; as such studies may be of benefit not only to the high-altitude population, but also to better understanding of the renal consequences of acute and chronic hypoxia.

  7. Propulsion System for Very High Altitude Subsonic Unmanned Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.; Mockler, Ted; Maldonado, Jaime; Harp, James L., Jr.; King, Joseph F.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper explains why a spark ignited gasoline engine, intake pressurized with three cascaded stages of turbocharging, was selected to power NASA's contemplated next generation of high altitude atmospheric science aircraft. Beginning with the most urgent science needs (the atmospheric sampling mission) and tracing through the mission requirements which dictate the unique flight regime in which this aircraft has to operate (subsonic flight at greater then 80 kft) we briefly explore the physical problems and constraints, the available technology options and the cost drivers associated with developing a viable propulsion system for this highly specialized aircraft. The paper presents the two available options (the turbojet and the turbocharged spark ignited engine) which are discussed and compared in the context of the flight regime. We then show how the unique nature of the sampling mission, coupled with the economic considerations pursuant to aero engine development, point to the spark ignited engine as the only cost effective solution available. Surprisingly, this solution compares favorably with the turbojet in the flight regime of interest. Finally, some remarks are made about NASA's present state of development, and future plans to flight demonstrate the three stage turbocharged powerplant.

  8. Oxygen atom reaction with shuttle materials at orbital altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    Surfaces of materials used in the space shuttle orbiter payload bay and exposed during STS-1 through STS-3 were examined after flight. Paints and polymers, in particular Kapton used on the television camera thermal blanket, showed significant change. Generally, the change was a loss of surface gloss on the polymer with apparent aging on the paint surfaces. The Kapton surfaces showed the greatest change, and postflight analyses showed mass loss of 4.8 percent on STS-2 and 35 percent on STS-3 for most heavily affected surfaces. Strong shadow patterns were evident. The greatest mass loss was measured on surfaces which were exposed to solar radiation in conjunction with exposure in the vehicle velocity vector. A mechanism which involves the interaction of atomic oxygen with organic polymer surfaces is proposed. Atomic oxygen is the major ambient species at low orbital altitudes and presents a flux of 8 x 10 to the 14th power atoms/cu cm sec for reaction. Correlation of the expected mass loss based on ground-based oxygen atom/polymer reaction rates shows lower mass loss of the Kapton than measured. Consideration of solar heating effects on reaction rates as well as the high oxygen atom energy due to the orbiter's orbital velocity brings the predicted and measured mass loss in surprisingly good agreement. Flight sample surface morphology comparison with ground based Kapton/oxygen atom exposures provides additional support for the oxygen interaction mechanism.

  9. A study of altitude-constrained supersonic cruise transport concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tice, David C.; Martin, Glenn L.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of restricting maximum cruise altitude on the mission performance of two supersonic transport concepts across a selection of cruise Mach numbers is studied. Results indicate that a trapezoidal wing concept can be competitive with an arrow wing depending on the altitude and Mach number constraints imposed. The higher wing loading of trapezoidal wing configurations gives them an appreciably lower average cruise altitude than the lower wing loading of the arrow wing configurations, and this advantage increases as the maximum allowable cruise altitude is reduced.

  10. The pulmonary circulation of some domestic animals at high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, I.; Heath, D.; Williams, D.; Deen, M.; Ferrari, R.; Bergel, D.; Harris, P.

    1988-03-01

    Pulmonary haemodynamics and the histology of the pulmonary vasculature have been studied at high altitude in the yak, in interbreeds between yaks and cattle, and in domestic goats and sheep indigenous to high altitudes together with crosses between them and low-altitude strains. Cattle at high altitude had a higher pulmonary arterial pressure than cattle at low altitude. The yak and two interbreeds with cattle (dzos and stols) had a low pulmonary arterial pressure compared with cattle, while the medial thickness of the small pulmonary arteries was less than would be expected in cattle, suggesting that the yak has a low capacity for hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and that this characteristic is transmitted genetically. Goats and sheep showed haemodynamic evidence of a limited response of the pulmonary circulation to high altitude, but no evidence that the high altitude breeds had lost this response. There were no measurable differences in the thickness of the media of the small pulmonary arteries between high- and low-altitude breeds of goats and sheep. All these species showed prominent intimal protrusions of muscle into the pulmonary veins but no specific effect of high altitude in this respect.

  11. Synthetic Vision Systems - Operational Considerations Simulation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Williams, Steven P.; Bailey, Randall E.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic vision is a computer-generated image of the external scene topography that is generated from aircraft attitude, high-precision navigation information, and data of the terrain, obstacles, cultural features, and other required flight information. A synthetic vision system (SVS) enhances this basic functionality with real-time integrity to ensure the validity of the databases, perform obstacle detection and independent navigation accuracy verification, and provide traffic surveillance. Over the last five years, NASA and its industry partners have developed and deployed SVS technologies for commercial, business, and general aviation aircraft which have been shown to provide significant improvements in terrain awareness and reductions in the potential for Controlled-Flight-Into-Terrain incidents/accidents compared to current generation cockpit technologies. It has been hypothesized that SVS displays can greatly improve the safety and operational flexibility of flight in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) to a level comparable to clear-day Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC), regardless of actual weather conditions or time of day. An experiment was conducted to evaluate SVS and SVS-related technologies as well as the influence of where the information is provided to the pilot (e.g., on a Head-Up or Head-Down Display) for consideration in defining landing minima based upon aircraft and airport equipage. The "operational considerations" evaluated under this effort included reduced visibility, decision altitudes, and airport equipage requirements, such as approach lighting systems, for SVS-equipped aircraft. Subjective results from the present study suggest that synthetic vision imagery on both head-up and head-down displays may offer benefits in situation awareness; workload; and approach and landing performance in the visibility levels, approach lighting systems, and decision altitudes tested.

  12. Daytime Aspect Camera for Balloon Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Kurt L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Alexander, Cheryl D.; Apple, Jeff A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swift, Wesley R.

    2002-01-01

    We have designed, built, and flight-tested a new star camera for daytime guiding of pointed balloon-borne experiments at altitudes around 40 km. The camera and lens are commercially available, off-the-shelf components, but require a custom-built baffle to reduce stray light, especially near the sunlit limb of the balloon. This new camera, which operates in the 600- to 1000-nm region of the spectrum, successfully provides daytime aspect information of approx. 10 arcsec resolution for two distinct star fields near the galactic plane. The detected scattered-light backgrounds show good agreement with the Air Force MODTRAN models used to design the camera, but the daytime stellar magnitude limit was lower than expected due to longitudinal chromatic aberration in the lens. Replacing the commercial lens with a custom-built lens should allow the system to track stars in any arbitrary area of the sky during the daytime.

  13. A Daytime Aspect Camera for Balloon Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Kurt L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Alexander, Cheryl D.; Apple, Jeff A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swift, Wesley R.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have designed, built, and flight-tested a new star camera for daytime guiding of pointed balloon-borne experiments at altitudes around 40km. The camera and lens are commercially available, off-the-shelf components, but require a custom-built baffle to reduce stray light, especially near the sunlit limb of the balloon. This new camera, which operates in the 600-1000 nm region of the spectrum, successfully provided daytime aspect information of approximately 10 arcsecond resolution for two distinct star fields near the galactic plane. The detected scattered-light backgrounds show good agreement with the Air Force MODTRAN models, but the daytime stellar magnitude limit was lower than expected due to dispersion of red light by the lens. Replacing the commercial lens with a custom-built lens should allow the system to track stars in any arbitrary area of the sky during the daytime.

  14. Aviation fuel property effects on altitude relight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataramani, K.

    1987-01-01

    The major objective of this experimental program was to investigate the effects of fuel property variation on altitude relight characteristics. Four fuels with widely varying volatility properties (JP-4, Jet A, a blend of Jet A and 2040 Solvent, and Diesel 2) were tested in a five-swirl-cup-sector combustor at inlet temperatures and flows representative of windmilling conditions of turbofan engines. The effects of fuel physical properties on atomization were eliminated by using four sets of pressure-atomizing nozzles designed to give the same spray Sauter mean diameter (50 + or - 10 micron) for each fuel at the same design fuel flow. A second series of tests was run with a set of air-blast nozzles. With comparable atomization levels, fuel volatility assumes only a secondary role for first-swirl-cup lightoff and complete blowout. Full propagation first-cup blowout were independent of fuel volatility and depended only on the combustor operating conditions.

  15. Power Budget Analysis for High Altitude Airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Elliott, James R.; King, Glen C.

    2006-01-01

    The High Altitude Airship (HAA) has various potential applications and mission scenarios that require onboard energy harvesting and power distribution systems. The energy source considered for the HAA s power budget is solar photon energy that allows the use of either photovoltaic (PV) cells or advanced thermoelectric (ATE) converters. Both PV cells and an ATE system utilizing high performance thermoelectric materials were briefly compared to identify the advantages of ATE for HAA applications in this study. The ATE can generate a higher quantity of harvested energy than PV cells by utilizing the cascaded efficiency of a three-staged ATE in a tandem mode configuration. Assuming that each stage of ATE material has the figure of merit of 5, the cascaded efficiency of a three-staged ATE system approaches the overall conversion efficiency greater than 60%. Based on this estimated efficiency, the configuration of a HAA and the power utility modules are defined.

  16. HAWC: The high altitude water Cherenkov observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Jordan A.

    2013-02-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is currently being deployed at 4100m above sea level on the Vulcan Sierra Negra near Puebla, Mexico. The HAWC observatory will consist of 250-300 Water Cherenkov Detectors totaling approximately 22,000 m2 of instrumented area. The water Cherenkov technique allows HAWC to have a nearly 100% duty cycle and large field of view, making the HAWC observatory an ideal instrument for the study of transient phenomena. With its large effective area, excellent angular and energy resolutions, and efficient gamma-hadron separation, HAWC will survey the TeV gamma-ray sky, measure spectra of galactic sources from 1 TeV to beyond 100 TeV, and map galactic diffuse gamma ray emission. The science goals, instrument performance and status of the HAWC observatory will be presented.

  17. The Low Altitude Plasma Instrument /LAPI/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winningham, J. D.; Burch, J. L.; Eaker, N.; Blevins, V. A.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1981-12-01

    The Low Altitude Plasma Instrument on the Dynamics Explorer-B spacecraft provides high resolution velocity space measurements of positive ions and electrons from 5 eV to 32 keV and a monitor of electrons with energies above 35 keV. It consists of an array of 15 parabolic electrostatic analyzers spanning 180 deg in angle and two Geiger-Mueller counters mounted on a one-degree of freedom scan platform. The platform is controlled by a magnetometer that allows placement of the array to selected angles with respect to the magnetic field. Each parabolic analyzer simultaneously measures electrons and positive ions. The temporal resolution and energy range of the measurements and the detector complement to be sampled are programmable by ground command

  18. Population Trends of Central European Montane Birds Provide Evidence for Adverse Impacts of Climate Change on High-Altitude Species.

    PubMed

    Flousek, Jiří; Telenský, Tomáš; Hanzelka, Jan; Reif, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is among the most important global threats to biodiversity and mountain areas are supposed to be under especially high pressure. Although recent modelling studies suggest considerable future range contractions of montane species accompanied with increased extinction risk, data allowing to test actual population consequences of the observed climate changes and identifying traits associated to their adverse impacts are very scarce. To fill this knowledge gap, we estimated long-term population trends of montane birds from 1984 to 2011 in a central European mountain range, the Giant Mountains (Krkonoše), where significant warming occurred over this period. We then related the population trends to several species' traits related to the climate change effects. We found that the species breeding in various habitats at higher altitudes had more negative trends than species breeding at lower altitudes. We also found that the species moved upwards as a response to warming climate, and these altitudinal range shifts were associated with more positive population trends at lower altitudes than at higher altitudes. Moreover, long-distance migrants declined more than residents or species migrating for shorter distances. Taken together, these results indicate that the climate change, besides other possible environmental changes, already influences populations of montane birds with particularly adverse impacts on high-altitude species such as water pipit (Anthus spinoletta). It is evident that the alpine species, predicted to undergo serious climatically induced range contractions due to warming climate in the future, already started moving along this trajectory.

  19. Population Trends of Central European Montane Birds Provide Evidence for Adverse Impacts of Climate Change on High-Altitude Species

    PubMed Central

    Flousek, Jiří; Telenský, Tomáš; Hanzelka, Jan; Reif, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is among the most important global threats to biodiversity and mountain areas are supposed to be under especially high pressure. Although recent modelling studies suggest considerable future range contractions of montane species accompanied with increased extinction risk, data allowing to test actual population consequences of the observed climate changes and identifying traits associated to their adverse impacts are very scarce. To fill this knowledge gap, we estimated long-term population trends of montane birds from 1984 to 2011 in a central European mountain range, the Giant Mountains (Krkonoše), where significant warming occurred over this period. We then related the population trends to several species' traits related to the climate change effects. We found that the species breeding in various habitats at higher altitudes had more negative trends than species breeding at lower altitudes. We also found that the species moved upwards as a response to warming climate, and these altitudinal range shifts were associated with more positive population trends at lower altitudes than at higher altitudes. Moreover, long-distance migrants declined more than residents or species migrating for shorter distances. Taken together, these results indicate that the climate change, besides other possible environmental changes, already influences populations of montane birds with particularly adverse impacts on high-altitude species such as water pipit (Anthus spinoletta). It is evident that the alpine species, predicted to undergo serious climatically induced range contractions due to warming climate in the future, already started moving along this trajectory. PMID:26426901

  20. Uav Borne Low Altitude Photogrammetry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Z.; Su, G.; Xie, F.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper,the aforementioned three major aspects related to the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) system for low altitude aerial photogrammetry, i.e., flying platform, imaging sensor system and data processing software, are discussed. First of all, according to the technical requirements about the least cruising speed, the shortest taxiing distance, the level of the flight control and the performance of turbulence flying, the performance and suitability of the available UAV platforms (e.g., fixed wing UAVs, the unmanned helicopters and the unmanned airships) are compared and analyzed. Secondly, considering the restrictions on the load weight of a platform and the resolution pertaining to a sensor, together with the exposure equation and the theory of optical information, the principles of designing self-calibration and self-stabilizing combined wide-angle digital cameras (e.g., double-combined camera and four-combined camera) are placed more emphasis on. Finally, a software named MAP-AT, considering the specialty of UAV platforms and sensors, is developed and introduced. Apart from the common functions of aerial image processing, MAP-AT puts more effort on automatic extraction, automatic checking and artificial aided adding of the tie points for images with big tilt angles. Based on the recommended process for low altitude photogrammetry with UAVs in this paper, more than ten aerial photogrammetry missions have been accomplished, the accuracies of Aerial Triangulation, Digital orthophotos(DOM)and Digital Line Graphs(DLG) of which meet the standard requirement of 1:2000, 1:1000 and 1:500 mapping.

  1. High Altitude Supersonic Decelerator Test Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Brant T.; Blando, Guillermo; Kennett, Andrew; Von Der Heydt, Max; Wolff, John Luke; Yerdon, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project is tasked by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) to advance the state of the art in Mars entry and descent technology in order to allow for larger payloads to be delivered to Mars at higher altitudes with better accuracy. The project will develop a 33.5 m Do Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute, 6m attached torus, robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R), and an 8 m attached isotensoid, exploration class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-E). The SSRS and SIAD-R should be brought to TRL-6, while the SIAD-E should be brought to TRL-5. As part of the qualification and development program, LDSD must perform a Mach-scaled Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) in order to demonstrate successful free flight dynamic deployments at Mars equivalent altitude, of all three technologies. In order to perform these tests, LDSD must design and build a test vehicle to deliver all technologies to approximately 180,000 ft and Mach 4, deploy a SIAD, free fly to approximately Mach 2, deploy the SSRS, record high-speed and high-resolution imagery of both deployments, as well as record data from an instrumentation suite capable of characterizing the technology induced vehicle dynamics. The vehicle must also be recoverable after splashdown into the ocean under a nominal flight, while guaranteeing forensic data protection in an off nominal catastrophic failure of a test article that could result in a terminal velocity, tumbling water impact.

  2. Cloud altitude determination from infrared spectral radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William L.; Frey, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The CO2 slicing method is generally recognized as the most accurate means of inferring cloud altitude from passive infrared radiance observations. The method is applicable to semi-transparent and broken clouds. During the cirrus FIRE and COHMEX field experiments, CO2 channel radiance data suitable for cloud altitude specification were achieved from moderate spectral resolution satellite sounders (NOAA-TOVS and GOES-VAS) and from a High spectral resolution Interferometer Spectrometer (HIS) flown on the NASA U2/ER2 aircraft. Also aboard the ER2 was a down-looking active lidar unit capable of providing cloud top pressure verifications with high accuracy. A third instrument, the Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS) provided 50 meter resolution infrared window data which is used wtih radiosonde data to verify the heights of middle and low level clouds. Comparisons of lidar and MAMS/radiosonde ground truth cloud heights are made with those determined from: high resolution (0.5/cm) HIS spectra, HIS spectra degraded to the moderate resolution (15/cm) of the VAS/TOVS instruments, and spectrally averaged HIS radiances for individual pairs of VAS spectral channels. The results show that the best results are achieved from high resolution spectra; the RMS difference with the ground truth is 23 mb. The RMS differences between the infrared radiance determination and ground truth increase by 35 percent when the spectral resolution is degraded to the moderate spectral resolution of the VAS/TOVS instruments and by 52 to 183 percent, depending upon channel combinations, when only two spectral channels at VAS/TOVS spectral resolution are used.

  3. Ventilation during simulated altitude, normobaric hypoxia and normoxic hypobaria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Icenogle, M.; Scotto, P.; Robergs, R.; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.; Roach, R. C.; Leoppky, J. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the possible effect of hypobaria on ventilation (VE) at high altitude, we exposed nine men to three conditions for 10 h in a chamber on separate occasions at least 1 week apart. These three conditions were: altitude (PB = 432, FIO2 = 0.207), normobaric hypoxia (PB = 614, FIO2 = 0.142) and normoxic hypobaria (PB = 434, FIO2 = 0.296). In addition, post-test measurements were made 2 h after returning to ambient conditions at normobaric normoxia (PB = 636, FIO2 = 0.204). In the first hour of exposure VE was increased similarly by altitude and normobaric hypoxia. The was 38% above post-test values and end-tidal CO2 (PET(CO2) was lower by 4 mmHg. After 3, 6 and 9 h, the average VE in normobaric hypoxia was 26% higher than at altitude (p < 0.01), resulting primarily from a decline in VE at altitude. The difference between altitude and normobaric hypoxia was greatest at 3 h (+ 39%). In spite of the higher VE during normobaric hypoxia, the PET(CO2) was higher than at altitude. Changes in VE and PET(CO2) in normoxic hypobaria were minimal relative to normobaric normoxia post-test measurements. One possible explanation for the lower VE at altitude is that CO2 elimination is relatively less at altitude because of a reduction in inspired gas density compared to normobaric hypoxia; this may reduce the work of breathing or alveolar deadspace. The greater VE during the first hour at altitude, relative to subsequent measurements, may be related to the appearance of microbubbles in the pulmonary circulation acting to transiently worsen matching. Results indicate that hypobaria per se effects ventilation under altitude conditions.

  4. [Altitude, the ratio of PaO2 to fraction of inspired oxygen, and shunt: impact on the assessment of acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Padilla, J R

    2004-10-01

    The ratio of PaO2 to the fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FIO2) is commonly used to determine the severity of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The research presented here used computational models of the lung to analyze the effect of altitude on the PaO2/FIO2 ratio and pulmonary shunt. At a given shunt, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio is lower at higher altitudes. Therefore, when evaluating for ARDS based on a PaO2/FIO2 ratio of <200 mm Hg, patients residing at high altitudes will have less shunt and, presumably, less severe lung injury than patients at sea level. This should be taken into consideration when comparing patients from different altitudes. Shunt should more often be measured directly or be estimated assuming a constant arteriovenous oxygen content difference.

  5. Educational Considerations, Spring 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hortin, John A., Ed.; Teague, Fred A., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Crucial, technologically oriented issues currently facing educators are addressed in the following 11 articles: (1) "The Definition of Educational Technology: An Emerging Stability," by Donald P. Ely; (2) "Media Applications to Instruction: Current Theoretical Considerations," by Gerald M. Torkelson; (3) "The Dilemma of…

  6. Nutritional Considerations for Performance in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, JohnEric W.; Holmes, Megan E.; McAllister, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition is an integral component to any athletes training and performance program. In adults the balance between energy intake and energy demands is crucial in training, recovery, and performance. In young athletes the demands for training and performance remain but should be a secondary focus behind the demands associated with maintaining the proper growth and maturation. Research interventions imposing significant physiological loads and diet manipulation are limited in youth due to the ethical considerations related to potential negative impacts on the growth and maturation processes associated with younger individuals. This necessary limitation results in practitioners providing nutritional guidance to young athletes to rely on exercise nutrition recommendations intended for adults. While many of the recommendations can appropriately be repurposed for the younger athlete attention needs to be taken towards the differences in metabolic needs and physiological differences. PMID:26464898

  7. Quadrant to Measure the Sun's Altitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windsor, A Morgan, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The changing altitude of the Sun (either over the course of a day or longer periods) is a phenomenon that students do not normally appreciate. However, the altitude of the Sun affects many topics in disciplines as diverse as astronomy, meteorology, navigation, or horology, such as the basis for seasons, determination of latitude and longitude, or…

  8. Comparative aspects of high-altitude adaptation in human populations.

    PubMed

    Moore, L G; Armaza, F; Villena, M; Vargas, E

    2000-01-01

    The conditions and duration of high-altitude residence differ among high-altitude populations. The Tibetan Plateau is larger, more geographically remote, and appears to have been occupied for a longer period of time than the Andean Altiplano and, certainly, the Rocky Mountain region as judged by archaeological, linguistic, genetic and historical data. In addition, the Tibetan gene pool is less likely to have been constricted by small numbers of initial migrants and/or severe population decline, and to have been less subject to genetic admixture with lowland groups. Comparing Tibetans to other high-altitude residents demonstrates that Tibetans have less intrauterine growth retardation better neonatal oxygenation higher ventilation and hypoxic ventilatory response lower pulmonary arterial pressure and resistance lower hemoglobin concentrations and less susceptibility to CMS These findings are consistent with the conclusion that "adaptation" to high altitude increases with time, considering time in generations of high-altitude exposure. Future research is needed to compare the extent of IUGR and neonatal oxygenation in South American high-altitude residents of Andean vs. European ancestry, controlling for gestational age and other characteristics. Another fruitful line of inquiry is likely to be determining whether persons with CMS or other altitude-associated problems experienced exaggerated hypoxia during prenatal or neonatal life. Finally, the comparison of high-altitude populations with respect to the frequencies of genes involved in oxygen sensing and physiologic response to hypoxia will be useful, once candidate genes have been identified.

  9. [Hemoglobin and testosterone: importance on high altitude acclimatization and adaptation].

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2011-03-01

    The different types of response mechanisms that the organism uses when exposed to hypoxia include accommodation, acclimatization and adaptation. Accommodation is the initial response to acute exposure to high altitude hypoxia and is characterized by an increase in ventilation and heart rate. Acclimatization is observed in individuals temporarily exposed to high altitude, and to some extent, it enables them to tolerate the high altitudes. In this phase, erythropoiesis is increased, resulting in higher hemoglobin and hematocrit levels to improve oxygen delivery capacity. Adaptation is the process of natural acclimatization where genetical variations and acclimatization play a role in allowing subjects to live without any difficulties at high altitudes. Testosterone is a hormone that regulates erythropoiesis and ventilation and could be associated to the processes of acclimatization and adaptation to high altitude. Excessive erythrocytosis, which leads to chronic mountain sickness, is caused by low arterial oxygen saturation, ventilatory inefficiency and reduced ventilatory response to hypoxia. Testosterone increases during acute exposure to high altitude and also in natives at high altitude with excessive erythrocytosis. Results of current research allow us to conclude that increase in serum testosterone and hemoglobin is adequate for acclimatization, as they improve oxygen transport, but not for high altitude adaptation, since high serum testosterone levels are associated to excessive erythrocytosis.

  10. Altitude acclimatization. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography of citations to the international literature covers aspects of altitude acclimatization. Included are articles concerning high altitude environments, hypoxia, heart function and hemodynamic responses, physical exercise, human tolerances and reactions, physiological responses, and oxygen consumption. This updated bibliography contains 164 citations, 35 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  11. 14 CFR 91.515 - Flight altitude rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight altitude rules. 91.515 Section 91...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Large and Turbine-Powered Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.515 Flight altitude rules....

  12. MISR Level 3 Cloud Fraction by Altitude Versioning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-11-04

    MISR Level 3 Cloud Fraction by Altitude Versioning Cloud Fraction by Altitude Product (CFbA) - Daily, Monthly, Quarterly, Yearly ... consult the product versioning statements for the  TOA/Cloud Classifiers  and  Radiometric Camera-by-camera Cloud Mask  products ...

  13. Visual-Motion Cueing in Altitude and Yaw Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Schroeder, Jeffery; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Research conducted using the Vertical Motion Simulator at the NASA Ames Research Center examined the contributions of platform motion and visual level-of-detail (LOD) cueing to tasks that required altitude and/or yaw control in a simulated AH-64 Apache helicopter. Within the altitude control tasks the LOD manipulation caused optical density to change across altitudes by a small, moderate, or large amount; while platform motion was either present or absent. The results from these tasks showed that both constant optical density and platform motion improved altitude awareness in an altitude repositioning task, while the presence of platform motion also led to improved performance in a vertical rate control task. The yaw control tasks had pilots'sit 4.5 ft in front of the center of rotation, thus subjecting them to both rotational and lateral motions during a yaw. The pilots were required to regulate their yaw, while the platform motion was manipulated in order to present all combinations of the resulting rotational and lateral motion components. Ratings of simulation fidelity and sensed platform motion showed that the pilots were relatively insensitive to the rotational component, but highly aware of the lateral component. Together these findings show that: 1) platform motion cues are important when speed regulation is required during altitude change; 2) platform motion contributes to the perception of movement amplitude; 3) lateral, but not rotational, motion cues are essential to the perception of vehicle yaw; and 4) LOD management yielding constant optical density across altitudes improves altitude awareness.

  14. 14 CFR 135.203 - VFR: Minimum altitudes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false VFR: Minimum altitudes. 135.203 Section 135... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.203 VFR: Minimum altitudes. Except when necessary for... above the surface or less than 500 feet horizontally from any obstacle; or (2) At night, at an...

  15. Photocopy of drawing, RIGHT ALTITUDE CHAMBER REACTIVATION. NASA, John F. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing, RIGHT ALTITUDE CHAMBER REACTIVATION. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Drawing 82K06032, Boeing, December, 1997. ACCESS PLATFORM INSTALLATION. Sheet S2 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  16. 14 CFR 135.203 - VFR: Minimum altitudes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false VFR: Minimum altitudes. 135.203 Section 135... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.203 VFR: Minimum altitudes. Except when necessary for... above the surface or less than 500 feet horizontally from any obstacle; or (2) At night, at an...

  17. Photocopy of drawing. RIGHT ALTITUDE CHAMBER REACTIVATION. NASA, John F. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. RIGHT ALTITUDE CHAMBER REACTIVATION. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Drawing 82K06032, Boeing, December, 1997. 15 FT LEVEL EQUIPMENT LAYOUT. Sheet E13 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  18. 14 CFR 135.203 - VFR: Minimum altitudes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false VFR: Minimum altitudes. 135.203 Section 135... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.203 VFR: Minimum altitudes. Except when necessary for... above the surface or less than 500 feet horizontally from any obstacle; or (2) At night, at an...

  19. DETAIL OF THE EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R FROM THE 15’-0” LEVEL OF ACCESS PLATFORMS, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  20. 14 CFR 135.203 - VFR: Minimum altitudes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false VFR: Minimum altitudes. 135.203 Section 135... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.203 VFR: Minimum altitudes. Except when necessary for... above the surface or less than 500 feet horizontally from any obstacle; or (2) At night, at an...

  1. Photocopy of drawing. RIGHT ALTITUDE CHAMBER REACTIVATION. NASA, John F. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. RIGHT ALTITUDE CHAMBER REACTIVATION. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Drawing 82K06032, Boeing, December, 1997. ACCESS PLATFORM DEMOLITION. Sheet S1 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  2. 10 CFR 862.6 - Voluntary minimum altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary minimum altitude. 862.6 Section 862.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RESTRICTIONS ON AIRCRAFT LANDING AND AIR DELIVERY AT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SITES § 862.6 Voluntary minimum altitude. In addition to complying with all applicable FAA prohibitions...

  3. Cardiopulmonary Effects of Acute Stressful Exercise at Altitude (2300m) of Individuals with Sickle Cell Trait (SCT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    Central and peripheral circulatory changes after training of arms or legs. J. Appl. Physiol. 225:675-682, 1973. 56 6WM. 7. Clausen,J.P. Muscle blood...altitude of 2,300m. During Phase III the following studies were carried out: 1. PHYSIOLOGIC RESPONSE TO ACUTE STRENUOUS EXERCISE DURING INSPIRATORY ...and cause a deterioration in gas exchange and overall 02 delivery. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of inspiratory hypoxia

  4. Understanding controls on cirque floor altitudes: Insights from Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Iestyn D.; Spagnolo, Matteo

    2015-11-01

    Glacial cirques reflect former regions of glacier initiation, and are therefore used as indicators of past climate. One specific way in which palaeoclimatic information is obtained from cirques is by analysing their elevations, on the assumption that cirque floor altitudes are a proxy for climatically controlled equilibrium-line altitudes (ELAs) during former periods of small scale (cirque-type) glaciation. However, specific controls on cirque altitudes are rarely assessed, and the validity of using cirque floor altitudes as a source of palaeoclimatic information remains open to question. In order to address this, here we analyse the distribution of 3520 ice-free cirques on the Kamchatka Peninsula (eastern Russia), and assess various controls on their floor altitudes. In addition, we analyse controls on the mid-altitudes of 503 modern glaciers, currently identifiable on the peninsula, and make comparisons with the cirque altitude data. The main study findings are that cirque floor altitudes increase steeply inland from the Pacific, suggesting that moisture availability (i.e., proximity to the coastline) played a key role in regulating the altitudes at which former (cirque-forming) glaciers were able to initiate. Other factors, such as latitude, aspect, topography, geology, and neo-tectonics seem to have played a limited (but not insignificant) role in regulating cirque floor altitudes, though south-facing cirques are typically higher than their north-facing equivalents, potentially reflecting the impact of prevailing wind directions (from the SSE) and/or variations in solar radiation on the altitudes at which former glaciers were able to initiate. Trends in glacier and cirque altitudes across the peninsula are typically comparable (i.e., values typically rise from both the north and south, inland from the Pacific coastline, and where glaciers/cirques are south-facing), yet the relationship with latitude is stronger for modern glaciers, and the relationship with

  5. The effect of high altitude on olfactory functions.

    PubMed

    Altundağ, Aytuğ; Salihoglu, Murat; Çayönü, Melih; Cingi, Cemal; Tekeli, Hakan; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    It is known that high-altitude trips cause nasal congestion, impaired nasal mucociliary transport rate, and increased nasal resistance, due to decreased partial oxygen pressure and dry air. It is also known that olfactory perception is affected by barometric pressure and humidity. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether olfactory function changes in relation to high altitude in a natural setting. The present study included 41 volunteers with no history of chronic rhinosinusitis or nasal polyposis. The study group consisted of 31 men (76 %) and 10 women (24 %); the mean age of the study population was 38 ± 10 years. Olfactory testing was conducted using "Sniffin' Sticks" at a high altitude (2,200 ms) and at sea level. Odor test scores for threshold and identification were significantly better at sea level than at high altitude (p < 0.001). The major finding of this investigation was that olfactory functions are decreased at high altitudes.

  6. Optimal birthweights in Peruvian populations at high and low altitudes.

    PubMed

    Beall, C M

    1981-11-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that optimum birthweight for survival is lower among hospital-born infants in Puno, Peru (altitude 3860 m) than that among their counterparts at low altitude in Tacna, Peru (altitude 600 m). The data are derived from hospital birth records for 1971 and 1972 and municipal death records for 1971 through 1973. Linking these records permits analysis of the patterns of mortality in relation to birthweight. Stabilizing selection upon birthweight is operating in both populations. The high altitude population has a lower mean birthweight and a lower optimal birthweight. The Puno population is closer to its optimal birthweight distribution and, as a result of mortality during infancy, is approaching its optimum birthweight distribution for survival more rapidly than the Tacna population. It appears that the high altitude Puno population may well be adapted to its environment in the sense that there is less selective mortality on birthweight phenotypes.

  7. Bipedality and hair loss in human evolution revisited: The impact of altitude and activity scheduling.

    PubMed

    Dávid-Barrett, Tamás; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2016-05-01

    Bipedality evolved early in hominin evolution, and at some point was associated with hair loss over most of the body. One classic explanation (Wheeler 1984: J. Hum. Evol. 13, 91-98) was that these traits evolved to reduce heat overload when australopiths were foraging in more open tropical habitats where they were exposed to the direct effects of sunlight at midday. A recent critique of this model (Ruxton & Wilkinson 2011a: Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 20965-20969) argued that it ignored the endogenous costs of heat generated by locomotion, and concluded that only hair loss provided a significant reduction in heat load. We add two crucial corrections to this model (the altitude at which australopiths actually lived and activity scheduling) and show that when these are included there are substantial reductions in heat load for bipedal locomotion even for furred animals. In addition, we add one further consideration to the model: we extend the analysis across the full 24 h day, and show that fur loss could not have evolved until much later because of the thermoregulatory costs this would have incurred at the altitudes where australopiths actually lived. Fur loss is most likely associated with the exploitation of open habitats at much lower altitudes at a much later date by the genus Homo.

  8. Theoretical atmospheric transmission in the mid-and far-infrared at four altitudes.

    PubMed

    Traub, W A; Stier, M T

    1976-02-01

    The ir transmission of the terrestrial atmosphere is calculated at four altitudes of interest: Mauna Kea at 4.2 km (2-1000 microm), aircraft at 14 km (5-1000 microm), and balloon at 28 km and 41 km (10-1000 microm). We show both high resolution spectra (0.05 cm(-1)) and broadband averages. The results are intended to serve both as a detailed guide to the interference that is expected from the atmosphere for astronomical spectroscopy and also as an indicator of the relative change in absorption and emission that can be expected at various observing altitudes. One salient result for the spectral region around 100 microm is that the absorption (and emissivity) of the atmosphere drops by a factor of 10 for each increase in altitude of 15 km throughout the aircraft and balloon range; thus balloon-borne astronomical photometry and spectroscopy should both enjoy a considerable advantage over aircraft observations in the 30-300-microm region.

  9. Helios High Altitude Long Endurance Mission Mishap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henwood, Barton E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the failure of the Helios solar aircraft failure. Included are pictures of the aircraft, inflight, and after the mishap, analysis of the root causes of the mishap, contributing factors, recommendations and lessons learned in respect to crew training, and assessing the level of risk.

  10. Impact of Altitude on Power Output during Cycling Stage Racing

    PubMed Central

    Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Clark, Bradley; Martin, David T.; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf; McDonald, Warren; Stephens, Brian; Ma, Fuhai; Thompson, Kevin G.; Gore, Christopher J.; Menaspà, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of moderate-high altitude on power output, cadence, speed and heart rate during a multi-day cycling tour. Methods Power output, heart rate, speed and cadence were collected from elite male road cyclists during maximal efforts of 5, 15, 30, 60, 240 and 600 s. The efforts were completed in a laboratory power-profile assessment, and spontaneously during a cycling race simulation near sea-level and an international cycling race at moderate-high altitude. Matched data from the laboratory power-profile and the highest maximal mean power output (MMP) and corresponding speed and heart rate recorded during the cycling race simulation and cycling race at moderate-high altitude were compared using paired t-tests. Additionally, all MMP and corresponding speeds and heart rates were binned per 1000m (<1000m, 1000–2000, 2000–3000 and >3000m) according to the average altitude of each ride. Mixed linear modelling was used to compare cycling performance data from each altitude bin. Results Power output was similar between the laboratory power-profile and the race simulation, however MMPs for 5–600 s and 15, 60, 240 and 600 s were lower (p ≤ 0.005) during the race at altitude compared with the laboratory power-profile and race simulation, respectively. Furthermore, peak power output and all MMPs were lower (≥ 11.7%, p ≤ 0.001) while racing >3000 m compared with rides completed near sea-level. However, speed associated with MMP 60 and 240 s was greater (p < 0.001) during racing at moderate-high altitude compared with the race simulation near sea-level. Conclusion A reduction in oxygen availability as altitude increases leads to attenuation of cycling power output during competition. Decrement in cycling power output at altitude does not seem to affect speed which tended to be greater at higher altitudes. PMID:26629912

  11. Free and total thyroid hormones in humans at extreme altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Minakshi; Pal, K.; Malhotra, A. S.; Prasad, R.; Sawhney, R. C.

    1995-03-01

    Alterations in circulatory levels of total T4 (TT4), total T3 (TT3), free T4 (FT4), free T3 (FT3), thyrotropin (TSH) and T3 uptake (T3U) were studied in male and female sea-level residents (SLR) at sea level, in Armed forces personnel staying at high altitude (3750 m) for prolonged duration (acclimatized lowlanders, ALL) and in high-altitude natives (HAN). Identical studies were also performed on male ALL who trekked to an extreme altitude of 5080 m and stayed at an altitude of more than 6300 m for about 6 months. The total as well as free thyroid hormones were found to be significantly higher in ALL and HAN as compared to SLR values. Both male as well as female HAN had higher levels of thyroid hormones. The rise in hormone levels in different ALL ethnic groups drawn from amongst the southern and northern parts of the country was more or less identical. In both HAN and ALL a decline in FT3 and FT4 occurred when these subjects trekked at subzero temperatures to extreme altitude of 5080 m but the levels were found to be higher in ALL who stayed at 6300 m for a prolonged duration. Plasma TSH did not show any appreciable change at lower altitudes but was found to be decreased at extreme altitude. The increase in thyroid hormones at high altitude was not due to an increase in hormone binding proteins, since T3U was found to be higher at high altitudes. A decline in TSH and hormone binding proteins and an increase in the free moiety of the hormones is indicative of a subtle degree of tissue hyperthyroidism which may be playing an important role in combating the extreme cold and hypoxic environment of high altitudes.

  12. Accuracy of Handheld Blood Glucose Meters at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Suzanna T.; Fokkert, Marion J.; Dikkeschei, Bert D.; Rienks, Rienk; Bilo, Karin M.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Due to increasing numbers of people with diabetes taking part in extreme sports (e.g., high-altitude trekking), reliable handheld blood glucose meters (BGMs) are necessary. Accurate blood glucose measurement under extreme conditions is paramount for safe recreation at altitude. Prior studies reported bias in blood glucose measurements using different BGMs at high altitude. We hypothesized that glucose-oxidase based BGMs are more influenced by the lower atmospheric oxygen pressure at altitude than glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs. Methodology/Principal Findings Glucose measurements at simulated altitude of nine BGMs (six glucose dehydrogenase and three glucose oxidase BGMs) were compared to glucose measurement on a similar BGM at sea level and to a laboratory glucose reference method. Venous blood samples of four different glucose levels were used. Moreover, two glucose oxidase and two glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs were evaluated at different altitudes on Mount Kilimanjaro. Accuracy criteria were set at a bias <15% from reference glucose (when >6.5 mmol/L) and <1 mmol/L from reference glucose (when <6.5 mmol/L). No significant difference was observed between measurements at simulated altitude and sea level for either glucose oxidase based BGMs or glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs as a group phenomenon. Two GDH based BGMs did not meet set performance criteria. Most BGMs are generally overestimating true glucose concentration at high altitude. Conclusion At simulated high altitude all tested BGMs, including glucose oxidase based BGMs, did not show influence of low atmospheric oxygen pressure. All BGMs, except for two GDH based BGMs, performed within predefined criteria. At true high altitude one GDH based BGM had best precision and accuracy. PMID:21103399

  13. Microgravity combustion experiment using high altitude balloon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Yuji

    In JAXA, microgravity experiment system using a high altitude balloon was developed , for good microgravity environment and short turn-around time. In this publication, I give an account of themicrogravity experiment system and a combustion experiment to utilize the system. The balloon operated vehicle (BOV) as a microgravity experiment system was developed from 2004 to 2009. Features of the BOV are (1) BOV has double capsule structure. Outside-capsule and inside-capsule are kept the non-contact state by 3-axis drag-free control. (2) The payload is spherical shape and itsdiameter is about 300 mm. (3) Keep 10-4 G level microgravity environment for about 30 seconds However, BOV’s payload was small, and could not mount large experiment module. In this study, inherits the results of past, we established a new experimental system called “iBOV” in order toaccommodate larger payload. Features of the iBOV are (1) Drag-free control use for only vertical direction. (2) The payload is a cylindrical shape and its size is about 300 mm in diameter and 700 mm in height. (3) Keep 10-3-10-4 G level microgravity environment for about 30 seconds We have "Observation experiment of flame propagation behavior of the droplets column" as experiment using iBOV. This experiment is a theme that was selected first for technical demonstration of iBOV. We are conducting the flame propagation mechanism elucidation study of fuel droplets array was placed at regular intervals. We conducted a microgravity experiments using TEXUS rocket ESA and drop tower. For this microgravity combustion experiment using high altitude balloon, we use the Engineering Model (EM) for TEXUS rocket experiment. The EM (This payload) consists of combustion vessel, droplets supporter, droplets generator, fuel syringe, igniter, digital camera, high-speed camera. And, This payload was improved from the EM as follows. (1) Add a control unit. (2) Add inside batteries for control unit and heater of combustion

  14. Human factors workplace considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    Computer workstations assume many different forms and play different functions today. In order for them to assume the effective interface role which they should play they must be properly designed to take into account the ubiguitous human factor. In addition, the entire workplace in which they are used should be properly configured so as to enhance the operational features of the individual workstation where possible. A number of general human factors workplace considerations are presented. This ongoing series of notes covers such topics as achieving comfort and good screen visibility, hardware issues (e.g., mouse maintenance), screen symbology features (e.g., labels, cursors, prompts), and various miscellaneous subjects. These notes are presented here in order to: (1) illustrate how one's workstation can be used to support telescience activities of many other people working within an organization, and (2) provide a single complete set of considerations for future reference.

  15. Implant treatment planning considerations.

    PubMed

    Kao, Richard T

    2008-04-01

    As dental implants become a more accepted treatment modality, there is a need for all parties involved with implant dentistry to be familiar with various treatment planning issues. Though the success can be highly rewarding, failure to forecast treatment planning issues can result in an increase of surgical needs, surgical cost, and even case failure. In this issue, the focus is on implant treatment planning considerations.

  16. Collaborative Robotics Design Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-06

    I~D~·L Paper Number Collaborative Robotics Design Considerations ABSTRACT As research advances individual robot capabilities, a logical...progression is the use of multiple robots to complete a task more effectively. Mission performance can be improved by the ability to allocate robots with...diverse capabilities to perform different parts of a complex task. To paraphrase [[10], there are many advantages to enabling robotic collaborative

  17. NASA/USRA high altitude reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Michael; Gudino, Juan; Chen, Kenny; Luong, Tai; Wilkerson, Dave; Keyvani, Anoosh

    1990-01-01

    At the equator, the ozone layer ranges from approximately 80,000 to 130,000+ feet which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. This project is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to cruise at 130,000 lbs. of payload. In addition, the aircraft must have a minimum of a 6,000 mile range. The low Mach number, payload, and long cruising time are all constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. A pilot must be able to take control in the event of unforseen difficulties. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable for meeting the above requirements, a joined-wing, a bi-plane, and a twin-boom conventional airplane. The techniques used have been deemed reasonable within the limits of 1990 technology. The performance of each configuration is analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the project requirements. In the event that a requirement can not be obtained within the given constraints, recommendations for proposal modifications are given.

  18. SHARP: Subsonic High Altitude Research Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beals, Todd; Burton, Craig; Cabatan, Aileen; Hermano, Christine; Jones, Tom; Lee, Susan; Radloff, Brian

    1991-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association is sponsoring an undergraduate program which is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to satisfy four mission profiles. Mission one is a polar mission that ranges from Chile to the South Pole and back to Chile, a total range of 6000 n.mi. at 100,000 ft with a 2500 lb payload. The second mission is also a polar mission, with an altitude of 70,000 ft and an increased payload of 4000 lbs. For the third mission, the aircraft will takeoff at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft carrying a 2500 lb payload, and land at Puerto Montt, Chile. The final mission requires the aircraft to take off at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft with a 1000 lb payload, make an excursion to 120,000 ft, and land at Howard AFB, Panama. Three missions require that a subsonic Mach number be maintained due to constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. The aircraft need not be manned for all four missions. Three aircraft configurations have been determined to be the most suitable for meeting the above requirements. In the event that a requirement cannot be obtained within the given constraints, recommendations for proposal modifications are given.

  19. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafá, Miguel A.

    2014-10-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a large field of view, continuously operated, TeV γ-ray experiment under construction at 4,100 m a.s.l. in Mexico. The HAWC observatory will have an order of magnitude better sensitivity, angular resolution, and background rejection than its predecessor, the Milagro experiment. The improved performance will allow us to detect both the transient and steady emissions, to study the Galactic diffuse emission at TeV energies, and to measure or constrain the TeV spectra of GeV γ-ray sources. In addition, HAWC will be the only ground-based instrument capable of detecting prompt emission from γ-ray bursts above 50 GeV. The HAWC observatory will consist of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), each with four photomultiplier tubes. This array is currently under construction on the flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano near the city of Puebla, Mexico. The first 30 WCDs (forming an array approximately the size of Milagro) were deployed in Summer 2012, and 100 WCDs will be taking data by May, 2013. We present in this paper the motivation for constructing the HAWC observatory, the status of the deployment, and the first results from the constantly growing array.

  20. High Altitude Observatory YBJ and ARGO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y.; ARGO Collaboration

    A 5800 m2 RPC (Resistive Plate Chamber) full coverage air shower array is under construction in the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Observatory, Tibet of China, by the ChinaItaly ARGO Collaboration. YBJ is a large flat grassland with an area 10 × 70 km2 at 4300m altitude, about 90 north west from Lhasa. Its nearby power station, asphalt road to Lhasa, passing railway (will be constructed during the coming 5 years), optical fiber link to the INTERNET, rare snow and other favourable weather conditions are well suitable for setting an Astrophysical Observatory here. The installation of a large area carpet-like detector in this peculiar site will allow one to perform an all-sky and high duty cycle study of high energy gamma rays from 100GeV to 50 TeV as well as accurate measurements on UHE cosmic rays. To insure the stable and uniform working condition of RPCs, a 104 M2 carpet hall was constructed, the RPC installation have be started in it since last November. The natural distribution and daily variation of temperature in the hall, the data concerning the performances of the installed RPCs, have been measured, the results are presented. ce

  1. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, Wayne

    2014-06-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a continuously operated, wide field of view detector based upon a water Cherenkov technology developed by the Milagro experiment. HAWC observes, at an elevation of 4100 m on Sierra Negra Mountain in Mexico, extensive air showers initiated by gamma and cosmic rays. The completed detector will consist of 300 closely spaced water tanks each instrumented with four photomultiplier tubes that provide timing and charge information used to reconstruct energy and arrival direction. HAWC has been optimized to observe transient and steady emission from point as well as diffuse sources of gamma rays in the energy range from several hundred GeV to several hundred TeV. Studies in solar physics as well as the properties of cosmic rays will also be performed. HAWC has been making observations at various stages of deployment since completion of 10% of the array in summer 2012. A discussion of the detector design, science capabilities, current construction/commissioning status, and first results will be presented...

  2. High-altitude aerostats as astronomical platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bely, Pierre Y.; Ashford, Robert; Cox, Charles D.

    1995-06-01

    The tropopause, typically at 16 to 18 km altitude at the lower latitudes, dips to 8 km in the polar regions. This makes the cold, dry, and nonturbulent lower stratosphere accessible to tethered aerostats. Tethered aerostats can fly as high as 12 km and are extremely reliable, lasting for many years. In contrast to free-flying balloons, they can stay on station for weeks at a time, and payloads can be safely recovered for maintenance and adjustment and relaunched in a matter of hours. We propose to use such a platform, located first in the Arctic (near Fairbanks, Alaska), and then later in the Antarctic, to operate a new technology 4-meter telescope with diffraction-limited performance in the near-IR. Thanks to the low ambient temperature (200 degrees K), thermal emission from the optics is of the same order as that of the zodiacal light in the 2 to 3 micron band. Since this wavelength interval is the darkest part of the zodiacal light spectrum from optical wavelengths to 100 microns, the combination of high resolution images and a very dark sky make it the spectral region of choice for observing the redshifted light from galaxies and clusters of galaxies at moderate to high redshifts.

  3. Methods of the international study on soccer at altitude 3600 m (ISA3600)

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Christopher J; Aughey, Robert J; Bourdon, Pitre C; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Soria, Rudy; Claros, Jesus C Jimenez; Sargent, Charli; Roach, Gregory D; Buchheit, Martin; Simpson, Ben M; Hammond, Kristal; Kley, Marlen; Wachsmuth, Nadine; Pepper, Mark; Edwards, Alistair; Cuenca, Douglas; Vidmar, Tony; Spielvogel, Hilde; Schmidt, Walter F

    2013-01-01

    Background We describe here the 3-year process underpinning a multinational collaboration to investigate soccer played at high altitude—La Paz, Bolivia (3600 m). There were two main aims: first, to quantify the extent to which running performance would be altered at 3600 m compared with near sea level; and second, to characterise the time course of acclimatisation of running performance and underlying physiology to training and playing at 3600 m. In addition, this project was able to measure the physiological changes and the effect on running performance of altitude-adapted soccer players from 3600 m playing at low altitude. Methods A U20 Bolivian team (‘The Strongest’ from La Paz, n=19) played a series of five games against a U17 team from sea level in Australia (The Joeys, n=20). 2 games were played near sea level (Santa Cruz 430 m) over 5 days and then three games were played in La Paz over the next 12 days. Measures were (1) game and training running performance—including global positioning system (GPS) data on distance travelled and velocity of movement; (2) blood—including haemoglobin mass, blood volume, blood gases and acid–base status; (3) acclimatisation—including resting heart rate variability, perceived altitude sickness, as well as heart rate and perceived exertion responses to a submaximal running test; and (4) sleep patterns. Conclusions Pivotal to the success of the project were the strong professional networks of the collaborators, with most exceeding 10 years, the links of several of the researchers to soccer federations, as well as the interest and support of the two head coaches. PMID:24282214

  4. Characteristics of trapped proton anisotropy at Space Station Freedom altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.; Watts, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    The ionizing radiation dose for spacecraft in low-Earth orbit (LEO) is produced mainly by protons trapped in the Earth's magnetic field. Current data bases describing this trapped radiation environment assume the protons to have an isotropic angular distribution, although the fluxes are actually highly anisotropic in LEO. The general nature of this directionality is understood theoretically and has been observed by several satellites. The anisotropy of the trapped proton exposure has not been an important practical consideration for most previous LEO missions because the random spacecraft orientation during passage through the radiation belt 'averages out' the anisotropy. Thus, in spite of the actual exposure anisotropy, cumulative radiation effects over many orbits can be predicted as if the environment were isotropic when the spacecraft orientation is variable during exposure. However, Space Station Freedom will be gravity gradient stabilized to reduce drag, and, due to this fixed orientation, the cumulative incident proton flux will remain anisotropic. The anisotropy could potentially influence several aspects of Space Station design and operation, such as the appropriate location for radiation sensitive components and experiments, location of workstations and sleeping quarters, and the design and placement of radiation monitors. Also, on-board mass could possible be utilized to counteract the anisotropy effects and reduce the dose exposure. Until recently only omnidirectional data bases for the trapped proton environment were available. However, a method to predict orbit-average, angular dependent ('vector') trapped proton flux spectra has been developed from the standard omnidirectional trapped proton data bases. This method was used to characterize the trapped proton anisotropy for the Space Station orbit (28.5 degree inclination, circular) in terms of its dependence on altitude, solar cycle modulation (solar minimum vs. solar maximum), shielding thickness

  5. Characteristics of trapped proton anisotropy at Space Station Freedom altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.; Watts, J. W.

    1990-10-01

    The ionizing radiation dose for spacecraft in low-Earth orbit (LEO) is produced mainly by protons trapped in the Earth's magnetic field. Current data bases describing this trapped radiation environment assume the protons to have an isotropic angular distribution, although the fluxes are actually highly anisotropic in LEO. The general nature of this directionality is understood theoretically and has been observed by several satellites. The anisotropy of the trapped proton exposure has not been an important practical consideration for most previous LEO missions because the random spacecraft orientation during passage through the radiation belt 'averages out' the anisotropy. Thus, in spite of the actual exposure anisotropy, cumulative radiation effects over many orbits can be predicted as if the environment were isotropic when the spacecraft orientation is variable during exposure. However, Space Station Freedom will be gravity gradient stabilized to reduce drag, and, due to this fixed orientation, the cumulative incident proton flux will remain anisotropic. The anisotropy could potentially influence several aspects of Space Station design and operation, such as the appropriate location for radiation sensitive components and experiments, location of workstations and sleeping quarters, and the design and placement of radiation monitors. Also, on-board mass could possible be utilized to counteract the anisotropy effects and reduce the dose exposure. Until recently only omnidirectional data bases for the trapped proton environment were available. However, a method to predict orbit-average, angular dependent ('vector') trapped proton flux spectra has been developed from the standard omnidirectional trapped proton data bases. This method was used to characterize the trapped proton anisotropy for the Space Station orbit (28.5 degree inclination, circular) in terms of its dependence on altitude, solar cycle modulation (solar minimum vs. solar maximum), shielding thickness

  6. Height and altitude distribution of large volcanoes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keddie, S. T.; Head, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    Magellan data reveal 156 large volcanoes on Venus (greater than 100 km in diameter) which range in height from 300 m to 5.55 km, with an average height of 1.42 km. On the basis of theory it has been predicted that the development of neutral buoyancy zones (NBZ) on Venus and thus the resulting volcanic deposits are strongly influenced by the altitude-controlled variations in surface pressure. The distribution and height of these large volcanoes as a function of altitude was examined to begin to test these predications. Although large volcanoes are relatively uniformly distributed in altitude, there may be a slight paucity of volcanoes at the lowest elevations and a slight surplus at mid-altitudes. In addition, it is observed that the volcanoes at the highest altitudes tend to be the tallest. The observed distributions at low-mid altitudes is consistent with the prediction of NBZ theory. The high altitude distribution and heights, however, emphasize the necessity of considering other factors, such as tectonic setting, edifice age, magma supply, and thermal gradient, in describing the location and development of large volcanoes on Venus.

  7. Travel to high altitude with pre-existing lung disease.

    PubMed

    Luks, A M; Swenson, E R

    2007-04-01

    The pathophysiology of high-altitude illnesses has been well studied in normal individuals, but little is known about the risks of high-altitude travel in patients with pre-existing lung disease. Although it would seem self-evident that any patient with lung disease might not do well at high altitude, the type and severity of disease will determine the likelihood of difficulty in a high-altitude environment. The present review examines whether these individuals are at risk of developing one of the main forms of acute or chronic high-altitude illness and whether the underlying lung disease itself will get worse at high elevations. Several groups of pulmonary disorders are considered, including obstructive, restrictive, vascular, control of ventilation, pleural and neuromuscular diseases. Attempts will be made to classify the risks faced by each of these groups at high altitude and to provide recommendations regarding evaluation prior to high-altitude travel, advice for or against taking such excursions, and effective prophylactic measures.

  8. Travel to High Altitude Following Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M

    2016-09-01

    Luks, Andrew M. Clinician's corner: travel to high altitude following solid organ transplantation. High Alt Med Biol. 17:147-156, 2016.-As they regain active lifestyles following successful organ transplantation, transplant recipients may travel to high altitude for a variety of activities, including skiing, climbing, and trekking. This review is intended to provide information for medical providers who may encounter transplant patients seeking advice before planned high altitude travel or care for medical issues that develop during the actual sojourn. There is currently limited information in the literature about outcomes during high-altitude travel following solid organ transplantation, but the available evidence suggests that the physiologic responses to hypobaric hypoxia are comparable to those seen in nontransplanted individuals and well-selected transplant recipients with no evidence of organ rejection can tolerate ascents as high as 6200 m. All transplant recipients planning high-altitude travel should undergo pretravel assessment and counseling with an emphasis on the recognition, prevention, and treatment of altitude illness, as well as the importance of preventing infection and limiting sun exposure. Transplant recipients can use the standard medications for altitude illness prophylaxis and treatment, but the choice and dose of medication should take into account the patient's preexisting medication regimen and current renal function. With careful attention to these and other details, the healthy transplant recipient can safely experience the rewards of traveling in the mountains.

  9. Mechanical properties of the lungs during acclimatization to altitude.

    PubMed

    Gautier, H; Peslin, R; Grassino, A; Milic-Emili, J; Hannhart, B; Powell, E; Miserocchi, G; Bonora, M; Fischer, J T

    1982-06-01

    Mechanical properties of the lung were studied in nine healthy lowlanders during a 6-day sojourn at an altitude of 3,457 m. In comparison to sea-level values, it was found at altitude that 1) lung volumes measured by plethysmography including total lung capacity, vital capacity, and functional residual capacity (FRC) presented small changes not exceeding 300 ml; 2) static and dynamic lung compliances were not modified but static pressure-volume curves of lungs were shifted progressively to the left (the decrease in lung elastic recoil averaged about 2 cmH2O on days 4-6); and 3) maximal midexpiratory flow, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and maximal expiratory and inspiratory flows were increased and, conversely, airways and pulmonary flow resistances were decreased on most days at altitude. The unchanged FRC in the face of a decreased lung recoil may be explained by an increase in thoracic blood volume at altitude, but other possible mechanisms are discussed. The decrease in resistances and increase in maximal flows may be partly explained by the decreased air density at altitude, but another contributing factor such as a bronchodilatation is also suggested. It is proposed that changes in lung mechanics at altitude may account for some of the changes in the pattern of breathing and mouth occlusion pressure (P0.1) observed during acclimatization of lowlanders to altitude.

  10. Aging, High Altitude, and Blood Pressure: A Complex Relationship.

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Ochoa, Juan Eugenio; Torlasco, Camilla; Salvi, Paolo; Lombardi, Carolina; Bilo, Grzegorz

    2015-06-01

    Parati, Gianfranco, Juan Eugenio Ochoa, Camilla Torlasco, Paolo Salvi, Carolina Lombardi, and Grzegorz Bilo. Aging, high altitude, and blood pressure: A complex relationship. High Alt Biol Med 16:97-109, 2015.--Both aging and high altitude exposure may induce important changes in BP regulation, leading to significant increases in BP levels. By inducing atherosclerotic changes, stiffening of large arteries, renal dysfunction, and arterial baroreflex impairment, advancing age may induce progressive increases in systolic BP levels, promoting development and progression of arterial hypertension. It is also known, although mainly from studies in young or middle-aged subjects, that exposure to high altitude may influence different mechanisms involved in BP regulation (i.e., neural central and reflex control of sympathetic activity), leading to important increases in BP levels. The evidence is less clear, however, on whether and to what extent advancing age may influence the BP response to acute or chronic high altitude exposure. This is a question not only of scientific interest but also of practical relevance given the consistent number of elderly individuals who are exposed for short time periods (either for leisure or work) or live permanently at high altitude, in whom arterial hypertension is frequently observed. This article will review the evidence available on the relationship between aging and blood pressure levels at high altitude, the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this complex association, as well as some questions of practical interest regarding antihypertensive treatment in elderly subjects, and the effects of antihypertensive drugs on blood pressure response during high altitude exposure.

  11. DLR HABLEG- High Altitude Balloon Launched Experimental Glider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlach, S.; Schwarzbauch, M.; Laiacker, M.

    2015-09-01

    The group Flying Robots at the DLR Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics in Oberpfaffenhofen conducts research on solar powered high altitude aircrafts. Due to the high altitude and the almost infinite mission duration, these platforms are also denoted as High Altitude Pseudo-Satellites (HAPS). This paper highlights some aspects of the design, building, integration and testing of a flying experimental platform for high altitudes. This unmanned aircraft, with a wingspan of 3 m and a mass of less than 10 kg, is meant to be launched as a glider from a high altitude balloon in 20 km altitude and shall investigate technologies for future large HAPS platforms. The aerodynamic requirements for high altitude flight included the development of a launch method allowing for a safe transition to horizontal flight from free-fall with low control authority. Due to the harsh environmental conditions in the stratosphere, the integration of electronic components in the airframe is a major effort. For regulatory reasons a reliable and situation dependent flight termination system had to be implemented. In May 2015 a flight campaign was conducted. The mission was a full success demonstrating that stratospheric research flights are feasible with rather small aircrafts.

  12. Sleep quality among elderly high-altitude dwellers in Ladakh.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Okumiya, Kiyohito; Norboo, Tsering; Tsering, Norboo; Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Nose, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Shinya; Tsukihara, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Motonao; Nakajima, Shun; Wada, Taizo; Fujisawa, Michiko; Imai, Hissei; Ishimoto, Yasuko; Kimura, Yumi; Fukutomi, Eriko; Chen, Wenling; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2017-03-01

    It has been already known that people who temporarily stay at high altitude may develop insomnia as a symptom of acute mountain sickness. However, much less is known about people living at high altitude. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of high altitude environment on sleep quality for the elderly who have been living at high altitude for their whole lives. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Domkhar valley at altitudes of 2800-4200m, Ladakh. Sleep quality was assessed using Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Measurement items include body mass index, blood pressure, blood sugar, hemoglobin, timed Up and Go test, oxygen saturation during wakefulness, respiratory function test, Oxford Knee Score (OKS), and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and so on. The participants were Ladakhi older adults aged 60 years or over (n=112) in Domkhar valley. The participation rate was 65.1% (male: female=47:65, mean age: 71.3 years and 67.9 years, respectively). The prevalence of the high score of ISI (8 or more) was 15.2% (17 out of 112). Altitude of residence was significantly correlated with ISI. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that OKS and altitude of residence were significantly related with ISI.

  13. Skylab medical experiments altitude test crew observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobko, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    The paper deals with the crew's observations during training and the SMEAT 56-day test. Topics covered include the crew's adaptation to the SMEAT environment and medical experiments protocol. Personal observations are made of daily activities surrounding the medical experiments hardware, Skylab clothing, supplementary activities, recreational equipment, food, and waste management. An assessment of these items and their contributions to the Skylab flight program is made.

  14. Comparison of sprite initiation altitudes between observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamerota, W. R.; Cummer, S. A.; Li, J.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Haaland, R. K.; McHarg, M. G.

    2011-02-01

    Simultaneous analyses of measured sprite initiation altitudes with predicted initiation altitudes from simulations enable an examination of our understanding of the sprite initiation mechanism and the modeling techniques to simulate this mesospheric electrical phenomenon. In this work, we selected a subset of sprites optically observed from Langmuir Laboratory, NM; locations near Las Vegas, NM, in 2007 and near Portales, NM, in 2008; and a Duke University field station. The sprites were observed by high-speed imaging with time resolutions of at least 1 ms and by low light level imagers. Sprite initiation altitudes were determined by triangulation between Langmuir Laboratory and either Portales or Las Vegas, while star field analysis determined the approximate measured initiation altitudes for Duke observations. These video observations were coordinated with electromagnetic field measurements from Yucca Ridge Field Station and Duke University, respectively. With a 2-D finite difference time domain model, we simulated the lightning-driven electric fields and predict the likely altitude of sprite initiation and compare these findings with the measured initiation altitude of each sprite analyzed. Of 20 discrete sprite events analyzed, both the measured and the simulation-predicted initiation altitudes indicate that long-delayed sprites tend to initiate at lower altitude. The average discrepancy between the measurements and the simulation results is 0.35 km with a standard deviation of 3.6 km. This consistency not only confirms previous results about the relationship between sprite initiation altitude and time delay but also helps to develop confidence in the models to reveal the sprite physics.

  15. The effect of high altitude on nasal nitric oxide levels.

    PubMed

    Altundag, Aytug; Salihoglu, Murat; Cayonu, Melih; Cingi, Cemal; Tekeli, Hakan; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether nasal nitric oxide (nNO) levels change in relation to high altitude in a natural setting where the weather conditions were favorable. The present study included 41 healthy volunteers without a history of acute rhinosinusitis within 3 weeks and nasal polyposis. The study group consisted of 31 males (76 %) and 10 females (24 %) and the mean age of the study population was 38 ± 10 years. The volunteers encamped for 2 days in a mountain village at an altitude of 1,500 m above sea level (masl) and proceeded to highlands at an altitude of 2,200 masl throughout the day. The measurements of nNO were done randomly, either first at the mountain village or at sea level. Each participant had nNO values both at sea level and at high altitude at the end of the study. The nNO values of sea level and high altitude were compared to investigate the effect of high altitude on nNO levels. The mean of average nNO measurements at the high altitude was 74.2 ± 41 parts-per-billion (ppb) and the mean of the measurements at sea level was 93.4 ± 45 ppb. The change in nNO depending on the altitude level was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The current investigation showed that nNO levels were decreased at high altitude even if the weather conditions were favorable, such as temperature, humidity, and wind.

  16. Long-Term Exposure to High Altitude Affects Conflict Control in the Conflict-Resolving Stage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hailin; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jianhui; Wang, Baoxi; Guo, Shichun; Luo, Ping; Han, Buxin

    2015-01-01

    The neurocognitive basis of the effect of long-term high altitude exposure on conflict control is unclear. Event related potentials (ERPs) were recorded in a flanker task to investigate the influence of high altitude on conflict control in the high-altitude group (who had lived at high altitude for three years but were born at low altitude) and the low-altitude group (living in low altitude only). Although altitude effect was not significant at the behavioral level, ERPs showed cognitive conflict modulation. The interaction between group and trial type was significant: P3 amplitude was greater in the low-altitude group than in the high-altitude group in the incongruent trial. This result suggests that long-term exposure to high altitude affects conflict control in the conflict-resolving stage, and that attentional resources are decreased to resist the conflict control in the high-altitude group.

  17. 14 CFR 91.217 - Data correspondence between automatically reported pressure altitude data and the pilot's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... maintain flight altitude, with that altimeter referenced to 29.92 inches of mercury for altitudes from sea level to the maximum operating altitude of the aircraft; or (c) Unless the altimeters and digitizers...

  18. The transformation of wind energy by a high altitude power plant /HAPP/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegler, G.; Riedler, W.; Horvath, E.

    1981-12-01

    Design considerations for a high altitude power plant (HAPP) are discussed. A HAPP has a generator platform supported by a balloon, a tethering and conduction cable, and a ground station for control and energy distribution. Each streamlined balloon would carry six symmetrically arranged wind turbines and could be raised or lowered by a ground winch in response to 4 hr meteorological forecasts. A double bladed, variable pitch, horizontal axis rotor was chosen for HAPP application in the jet stream at 8,000-10,000 m height. Humidity and icing are calculated to be within tolerable limits; higher winter and lower summer heights are indicated. Optimization studies for 2, 5, and 7 MW turbines are presented, and rotor diameters are found to be limited to 40 m for weight considerations. Pilot plant, production, and operating costs are estimated to result in a cost of energy of

  19. Tracheostomy: pediatric considerations.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Ellen S

    2010-08-01

    Pediatric patients for whom tracheotomy is a consideration have different anatomy, medical conditions, and prognoses than adults; even the tracheotomy tubes are different. Indications for pediatric tracheotomy generally include bypassing airway obstruction, providing access for prolonged mechanical ventilation, and facilitating tracheobronchial toilet. Subglottic stenosis is an important indication for tracheotomy in children; its etiology, prevention, and alternative options for management are presented. Discussion includes the benefits, risks, impact on families, techniques for tracheotomy tube changes, and alternatives to tracheotomy, with illustrative photographs and diagrams.

  20. Whole-genome sequencing of six dog breeds from continuous altitudes reveals adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Xiao; Wang, Zhen; Li, Ning; Qiu, Feng; Xu, Ze; Yan, Dawei; Yang, Shuli; Jia, Jia; Kong, Xiaoyan; Wei, Zehui; Lu, Shaoxiong; Lian, Linsheng; Wu, Changxin; Wang, Xueyan; Li, Guozhi; Ma, Teng; Jiang, Qiang; Zhao, Xue; Yang, Jiaqiang; Liu, Baohong; Wei, Dongkai; Li, Hong; Yang, Jianfa; Yan, Yulin; Zhao, Guiying; Dong, Xinxing; Li, Mingli; Deng, Weidong; Leng, Jing; Wei, Chaochun; Wang, Chuan; Mao, Huaming; Zhang, Hao; Ding, Guohui; Li, Yixue

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxic environment imposes severe selective pressure on species living at high altitude. To understand the genetic bases of adaptation to high altitude in dogs, we performed whole-genome sequencing of 60 dogs including five breeds living at continuous altitudes along the Tibetan Plateau from 800 to 5100 m as well as one European breed. More than 150× sequencing coverage for each breed provides us with a comprehensive assessment of the genetic polymorphisms of the dogs, including Tibetan Mastiffs. Comparison of the breeds from different altitudes reveals strong signals of population differentiation at the locus of hypoxia-related genes including endothelial Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain protein 1 (EPAS1) and beta hemoglobin cluster. Notably, four novel nonsynonymous mutations specific to high-altitude dogs are identified at EPAS1, one of which occurred at a quite conserved site in the PAS domain. The association testing between EPAS1 genotypes and blood-related phenotypes on additional high-altitude dogs reveals that the homozygous mutation is associated with decreased blood flow resistance, which may help to improve hemorheologic fitness. Interestingly, EPAS1 was also identified as a selective target in Tibetan highlanders, though no amino acid changes were found. Thus, our results not only indicate parallel evolution of humans and dogs in adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia, but also provide a new opportunity to study the role of EPAS1 in the adaptive processes. PMID:24721644

  1. Theodor Benzinger, German pioneer in high altitude physiology research and altitude protection.

    PubMed

    Harsch, Viktor

    2007-09-01

    Theodore Benzinger was a pilot-physician who performed pioneering research-often involving self-experimentation-in areas related to flight at high altitude during World War II. Of greatest historical interest to those of us in aerospace medicine is his work on the effects of rapid decompression and related oxygen equipment. Benzinger was born in Stuttgart, Germany, on 28th August 1905. He studied medicine and natural sciences at the universities of Tuebingen, Munich, and Berlin. From 1934 to 1944, Benzinger headed the aeromedical laboratory "EMed" in Rechlin, where he was instrumental in conducting studies related to stratospheric flight, including self-experimentation with rapid decompression up to 19,000 m (62,320 ft). His Rechlin experiments made an important contribution to understanding the physiology and life-support requirements for high-altitude aviation and later work under space-equivalent conditions. Following World War II, Benzinger joined the staff of the U.S. Army Air Force Aeromedical Center in Heidelberg. In 1947 he was recruited by "Operation Paperclip" to work at the U.S. Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) in Bethesda, MD, where he worked on various aspects of human physiology. He died as a U.S. citizen in Bethesda, MD, on 26th October 1999.

  2. UAV Requirements and Design Consideration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    Integration. [les Avancees en concepts systemes pour vehicules et en integration] To order the complete compilation report, use: ADA381871 The component part...obtained with the system and the outside world (6,7). desired mode of operation (through data link or autonomous recording). Higher altitudes are

  3. Low Intensity Exercise Training Improves Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Potential

    PubMed Central

    Pietrangelo, Tiziana; Di Filippo, Ester S.; Mancinelli, Rosa; Doria, Christian; Rotini, Alessio; Fanò-Illic, Giorgio; Fulle, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether 12 days of low-to-moderate exercise training at low altitude (598 m a.s.l.) improves skeletal muscle regeneration in sedentary adult women. Methods: Satellite cells were obtained from the vastus lateralis skeletal muscle of seven women before and after this exercise training at low altitude. They were investigated for differentiation aspects, superoxide anion production, antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial potential variation after a depolarizing insult, intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, and micro (mi)RNA expression (miR-1, miR-133, miR-206). Results: In these myogenic populations of adult stem cells, those obtained after exercise training, showed increased Fusion Index and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. This exercise training also generally reduced superoxide anion production in cells (by 12–67%), although not in two women, where there was an increase of ~15% along with a reduced superoxide dismutase activity. miRNA expression showed an exercise-induced epigenetic transcription profile that was specific according to the reduced or increased superoxide anion production of the cells. Conclusions: The present study shows that low-to-moderate exercise training at low altitude improves the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle in adult women. The differentiation of cells was favored by increased intracellular calcium concentration and increased the fusion index. This low-to-moderate training at low altitude also depicted the epigenetic signature of cells. PMID:26733888

  4. Going High with Heart Disease: The Effect of High Altitude Exposure in Older Individuals and Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Levine, Benjamin D

    2015-06-01

    Levine, Benjamin D. Going high with heart disease: The effect of high altitude exposure in older individuals and patients with coronary artery disease. High Alt Med Biol 16:89-96, 2015.--Ischemic heart disease is the largest cause of death in older men and women in the western world (Lozano et al., 2012 ; Roth et al., 2015). Atherosclerosis progresses with age, and thus age is the dominant risk factor for coronary heart disease in any algorithm used to assess risk for cardiovascular events. Subclinical atherosclerosis also increases with age, providing the substrate for precipitation of acute coronary syndromes. Thus the risk of high altitude exposure in older individuals is linked closely with both subclinical and manifest coronary heart disease (CHD). There are several considerations associated with taking patients with CHD to high altitude: a) The reduced oxygen availability may cause or exacerbate symptoms; b) The hypoxia and other associated environmental conditions (exercise, dehydration, change in diet, thermal stress, emotional stress from personal danger or conflict) may precipitate acute coronary events; c) If an event occurs and the patient is far from advanced medical care, then the outcome of an acute coronary event may be poor; and d) Sudden death may occur. Physicians caring for older patients who want to sojourn to high altitude should keep in mind the following four key points: 1). Altitude may exacerbate ischemic heart disease because of both reduced O2 delivery and paradoxical vasoconstriction; 2). Adverse events, including acute coronary syndromes and sudden cardiac death, are most common in older unfit men, within the first few days of altitude exposure; 3). Ensuring optimal fitness, allowing for sufficient acclimatization (at least 5 days), and optimizing medical therapy (especially statins and aspirin) are prudent recommendations that may reduce the risk of adverse events; 4). A graded exercise test at sea level is probably sufficient for

  5. Travelling to new heights: practical high altitude medicine.

    PubMed

    Plant, Tracie; Aref-Adib, Golnar

    2008-06-01

    Over 40 million people travel to high altitude for both work and pleasure each year, and all of them are at risk of the acute effects of hypoxia. This article reviews the prevention, diagnostic features and treatments of these illnesses.

  6. The radiation protection problems of high altitude and space flight

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper considers the radiation environment in aircraft at high altitudes and spacecraft in low earth orbit and in deep space and the factors that influence the dose equivalents. Altitude, latitude and solar cycle are the major influences for flights below the radiation belts. In deep space, solar cycle and the occurrence of solar particle events are the factors of influence. The major radiation effects of concern are cancer and infertility in males. In high altitude aircraft the radiation consists mainly of protons and neutrons, with neutrons contributing about half the equivalent dose. The average dose rate at altitudes of transcontinental flights that approach the polar regions are greater by a factor of about 2.5 than on routes at low latitudes. Current estimates of does to air crews suggest they are well within the ICRP (1990) recommended dose limits for radiation workers.

  7. The radiation protection problems of high altitude and space flight

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1993-04-01

    This paper considers the radiation environment in aircraft at high altitudes and spacecraft in low earth orbit and in deep space and the factors that influence the dose equivalents. Altitude, latitude and solar cycle are the major influences for flights below the radiation belts. In deep space, solar cycle and the occurrence of solar particle events are the factors of influence. The major radiation effects of concern are cancer and infertility in males. In high altitude aircraft the radiation consists mainly of protons and neutrons, with neutrons contributing about half the equivalent dose. The average dose rate at altitudes of transcontinental flights that approach the polar regions are greater by a factor of about 2.5 than on routes at low latitudes. Current estimates of does to air crews suggest they are well within the ICRP (1990) recommended dose limits for radiation workers.

  8. Complication Rates in Altitude Restricted Patients Following Aeromedical Evacuation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    rates and bears further investigation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cabin altitude restriction, postflight complications, aeromedical evacuation 16...suggests that aggressive prescribing of CARs may have a salutary effect on postflight complication rates and bears further investigation. KEYWORDS: cabin

  9. The yak genome and adaptation to life at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Qiang; Zhang, Guojie; Ma, Tao; Qian, Wubin; Wang, Junyi; Ye, Zhiqiang; Cao, Changchang; Hu, Quanjun; Kim, Jaebum; Larkin, Denis M; Auvil, Loretta; Capitanu, Boris; Ma, Jian; Lewin, Harris A; Qian, Xiaoju; Lang, Yongshan; Zhou, Ran; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Kun; Xia, Jinquan; Liao, Shengguang; Pan, Shengkai; Lu, Xu; Hou, Haolong; Wang, Yan; Zang, Xuetao; Yin, Ye; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Zhaofeng; Zhang, Yingmei; Zhang, Dawei; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Masami; Zhong, Yang; Liu, Wenbin; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Shengxiang; Long, Ruijun; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Lenstra, Johannes A; Cooper, David N; Wu, Yi; Wang, Jun; Shi, Peng; Wang, Jian; Liu, Jianquan

    2012-07-01

    Domestic yaks (Bos grunniens) provide meat and other necessities for Tibetans living at high altitude on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and in adjacent regions. Comparison between yak and the closely related low-altitude cattle (Bos taurus) is informative in studying animal adaptation to high altitude. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of a female domestic yak generated using Illumina-based technology at 65-fold coverage. Genomic comparisons between yak and cattle identify an expansion in yak of gene families related to sensory perception and energy metabolism, as well as an enrichment of protein domains involved in sensing the extracellular environment and hypoxic stress. Positively selected and rapidly evolving genes in the yak lineage are also found to be significantly enriched in functional categories and pathways related to hypoxia and nutrition metabolism. These findings may have important implications for understanding adaptation to high altitude in other animal species and for hypoxia-related diseases in humans.

  10. Pulmonary vascular disease in a rabbit a high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Donald; Williams, David; Rios-Datenz, Jaime; Gosney, John

    1990-03-01

    A male weanling rabbit of the New Zealand White strain, born and living at an altitude of 3800 m in La Paz, Bolivia, developed right ventricular hypertrophy. This was found to be associated with growth of vascular smooth muscle cells in the intima of pulmonary arterioles, and contrasted with muscularization of the walls of pulmonary arterioles, without extension into the intima, found in a healthy, high-altitude control rabbit of the same strain. A low-altitude control showed no such muscularization. It is concluded that alveolar hypoxia, acting directly or through an intermediate agent, is a growth factor for vascular smooth muscle cells in pulmonary arterioles. This is the first report of pulmonary vascular disease due to high altitude in rabbits.

  11. Altitude and latitude dependence of the equatorial electrojet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Cole, K. D.

    1988-07-01

    A self-consistent and high-resolution dynamo model is used to investigate the effects of day-to-day or seasonal variation of altitude and latitude profiles of the E-plasma density in the equatorial ionosphere on equatorial electrojet (EEJ) structure. Variations in the E-layer peak altitude and amplitude are shown to significantly affect EEJ structure. The results indicate that, for any shape, the EEJ peak appears at or below the E-layer peak altitude. Distinct double peaks occur in the EEJ structure if the E-layer peak is above 105 km or if the gradient is large. The effect of the latitudinal variation of the integrated conductivities of ionospheric field lines upon the amplitude and altitude of the EEJ peak is discussed.

  12. 33. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL SETTING. October 1982 - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 15, Upper Mississipi River (Arsenal Island), Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  13. 13. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL SETTING. October 1982 - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 17, Upper Mississippi River, New Boston, Mercer County, IL

  14. 11. WORK CAMP ALONG PIPELINE AT 490' ALTITUDE, FOR CONSTRUCTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. WORK CAMP ALONG PIPELINE AT 490' ALTITUDE, FOR CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  15. Effects of High Terrestrial Altitude on Military Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-18

    Title Effects of High Terrestrial Altitude on Military Performance Author( s ) Louis E. Banderet and Richard L. Burse Intended for publication in Handbook...34’- <-𔃾 DA UJ 2496 PRIVOUS EDITIONS WILL II USED C . S fnt Effects of High Terrestrial Altitude on Military Performance 1 2 Louis E. Banderet...inadequate oxygen which can ad- versely affect military performance ( Disease threat, 1979; U.S. Army, 1975). Much information of military importance about

  16. Using the NPSS Environment to Model an Altitude Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Thomas M.; Owen, Albert K.; Huffman, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    An altitude test facility was modeled using Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). This altitude test facility model represents the most detailed facility model developed in the NPSS architecture. The current paper demonstrates the use of the NPSS system to define the required operating range of a component for the facility. A significant number of additional component models were easily developed to complete the model. Discussed in this paper are the additional components developed and what was done in the development of these components.

  17. Tolerance of Beta Blocked Hypertensives during Orthostatic and Altitude Stresses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Words 18. Distribution Statement Hypertension, Beta - blockers , Document is available to the public through Orthostatic Tolerance, Hypoxia, the National...Extrapolating to other dosages of atenolol and to tion-specific stress environment permits quantitative other beta - blockers can only be effected...Correspondingly, at ment, while 12 were observed with placebo tratment. altitude 40 runs were done on beta - blockers and 40 on The effect of altitude was

  18. Description of SHARC: The Strategic High-Altitude Radiance Code.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-16

    for Paths from 60 to 300 km altitude in he 2-40 _.m spectral region. It models r-adiation due to NLTE (Non-Local Thermodynamic quilibrium) molecular...2 HIGH-ALTITUDE INFRARED RADIATION CONCEPTS ... ....... 4 2.1 Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium .... ........ 4 2.2 Vibrational Temperature...Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium) populations of higher vibrational states are included in the calculation. The equivalent-width, line-by-line LBL

  19. Energy metabolism and the high-altitude environment.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    At high altitude the barometric pressure falls, challenging oxygen delivery to the tissues. Thus, whilst hypoxia is not the only physiological stress encountered at high altitude, low arterial P(O2) is a sustained feature, even after allowing adequate time for acclimatization. Cardiac and skeletal muscle energy metabolism is altered in subjects at, or returning from, high altitude. In the heart, energetic reserve falls, as indicated by lower phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratios. The underlying mechanism is unknown, but in the hypoxic rat heart fatty acid oxidation and respiratory capacity are decreased, whilst pyruvate oxidation is also lower after sustained hypoxic exposure. In skeletal muscle, there is not a consensus. With prolonged exposure to extreme high altitude (>5500 m) a loss of muscle mitochondrial density is seen, but this was not observed in a simulated ascent of Everest in hypobaric chambers. At more moderate high altitude, decreased respiratory capacity may occur without changes in mitochondrial volume density, and fat oxidation may be downregulated, although this is not seen in all studies. The underlying mechanisms, including the possible role of hypoxia-signalling pathways, remain to be resolved, particularly in light of confounding factors in the high-altitude environment. In high-altitude-adapted Tibetan natives, however, there is evidence of natural selection centred around the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway, and metabolic features in this population (e.g. low cardiac phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratios, increased cardiac glucose uptake and lower muscle mitochondrial densities) share similarities with those in acclimatized lowlanders, supporting a possible role for the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway in the metabolic response of cardiac and skeletal muscle energy metabolism to high altitude.

  20. Altitude Chamber Testing of the Passenger Oxygen System (POS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    altitude chamber flight if you have a cold, sore throat , or congestion. You should inform the medical observer during the pre-flight check of any...the V-22 like cargo, has removable ballistic protection, and requires no aircraft modifications. One or two POS units can be installed in the CV-22...roll-on/roll-off” system to support passengers or paratroopers during high altitude operations and patients during medevac. POS includes a device

  1. Performance of the Volumetric Diffusive Respirator at Altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-18

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2014-0020 Performance of the Volumetric Diffusive Respirator at Altitude Dario Rodriquez, MSc1; Tyler Britton, RRT2...the Volumetric Diffusive Respirator at Altitude 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-12-2-6B012 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...volumetric diffusive respirator is a pneumatic ventilator used by the U.S. Army Burn Team and the U.S. Air Force Lung Team for patients with hypoxemic

  2. Low-Altitude Wind Shear Detection With Doppler Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    feasibility of using the next generation weather radar ( NEXRAD ) sys- tem to detect low-altitude horizontal wind shear near airports is investi- gated. We...requires that NEXRAD radar coverage havd’> lowest scan of 60 m above the surface in the airport area (within 20 km of the,,airport); the strongest...Availability Codes * Avail ~id/or Di’.t Special LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. FAA requirements of altitude limits of NEXRAD coverage and resolu- tion in

  3. Electroretinographic assessment of retinal function at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Andreas; Willmann, Gabriel; Fischer, M Dominik; Schommer, Kai; Messias, André; Zrenner, Eberhart; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl-Ulrich; Gekeler, Florian

    2013-08-01

    Although hypoxia plays a key role in the pathophysiology of many common and well studied retinal diseases, little is known about the effects of high-altitude hypoxia on retinal function. The aim of the present study was to assess retinal function during exposure to high-altitude hypoxia using electroretinography (ERG). This work is related to the Tübingen High Altitude Ophthalmology (THAO) study. Electroretinography was performed in 14 subjects in Tübingen, Germany (341 m) and at high altitude at La Capanna Regina Margherita, Italy (4,559 m) using an extended protocol to assess functional integrity of various retinal layers. To place findings in the context of acute mountain sickness, correlations between ERG measurements and oxygen saturation, heart rate, and scores of acute mountain sickness (AMS) were calculated. At high altitude, the maximum response of the scotopic sensitivity function, the implicit times of the a- and b-wave of the combined rod-cone responses, and the implicit times of the photopic negative responses (PhNR) were significantly altered. A-wave slopes and i-waves were significantly decreased at high altitude. The strongest correlation was found for PhNR and O2 saturation (r = 0.68; P < 0.05). Of all tested correlations, only the photopic b-wave implicit time (10 cd·s/m(2)) was significantly correlated with severity of AMS (r = 0.57; P < 0.05). ERG data show that retinal function of inner, outer, and ganglion cell layer is altered at high-altitude hypoxia. Interestingly, the most affected ERG parameters are related to combined rod-cone responses, which indicate that phototransduction and visual processing, especially under conditions of rod-cone interaction, are primarily affected at high altitude.

  4. Zoom-climb altitude maximization of the F-4C and F-15 aircraft for stratospheric sampling missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, D. S.; Merz, A. W.; Page, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Some predictions indicate that byproducts of aerosol containers may lead to a modification of the ultraviolet-radiation shielding properties of the upper atmosphere. NASA currently monitors atmospheric properties to 70,000 feet using U-2 aircraft. Testing is needed at about 100,000 feet for adequate monitoring of possible aerosol contaminants during the next decade. To study this problem the F-4C and F-15 aircraft were analyzed to determine their maximum altitude ability in zoom-climb maneuvers. These trajectories must satisfy realistic dynamic pressure and Mach number constraints. Maximum altitudes obtained for the F4-C are above 90,000 feet, and for the F-15 above 100,000 feet. Sensitivities of the zoom-climb altitudes were found with respect to several variables including vehicle thrust, initial weight, stratospheric winds and the constraints. A final decision on aircraft selection must be based on mission modification costs and operational considerations balanced against their respective zoom altitude performance capabilities.

  5. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-01-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials. PMID:25855821

  6. Prion diseases: New considerations.

    PubMed

    Annus, Ádám; Csáti, Anett; Vécsei, László

    2016-11-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, which include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, are fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by the pathological accumulation of abnormal prion protein. The diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is complex. The electroencephalogram, magnetic resonance imaging, lumbar puncture and genetic testing findings can help in the differential diagnosis of rapidly progressive dementia. There has recently been considerable debate as to whether proteins involved in the development of neurodegenerative diseases should be regarded as prions or only share prion-like mechanisms. Two recent reports described the detection of abnormal prion protein in the nasal mucosa and urine of patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. These findings raise major health concerns regarding the transmissibility of human prion diseases. We set out to address this neurological hot topic and to draw conclusions on the basis of what is known in the literature thus far.

  7. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-03-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials.

  8. Effects of altitude on the climbing performance of Monarch butterflies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Chang-Kwon; Sridhar, Madhu; Landrum, David; Aono, Hikaru

    2016-11-01

    Millions of Monarchs annually travel up to 4,000km, the longest migration distance among insects. They fly and overwinter at high altitudes. However, the aerodynamic mechanism enabling the long-range flight of Monarch butterflies is unknown. To study the effects of altitude on the aerodynamic performance of Monarch butterflies, a unique combination of a motion tracking system and a variable pressure chamber that allows controlling the density is used. The condition inside the chamber is systematically varied to simulate high altitude conditions up to 3,000 m. An optical tracking technique is used to characterize the climbing trajectories of freely flying Monarch butterflies. Customized reflective markers are designed to minimize the effects of marker addition. Flapping amplitude and frequency as well as climbing trajectories are measured. Lift acting on the butterfly is also determined by considering the force balance. Results show that the average flight speed and the Reynolds number, in general, decreased with the altitude, whereas, interestingly, the lift coefficient increased with the altitude. More detailed measurements and analyses will be performed in the future to explain the lift enhancement by flying at higher altitudes. This work is partly supported by NSF Grant CBET-1335572 and in part by CK's startup fund provided by UAH.

  9. Predator foraging altitudes reveal the structure of aerial insect communities.

    PubMed

    Helms, Jackson A; Godfrey, Aaron P; Ames, Tayna; Bridge, Eli S

    2016-06-29

    The atmosphere is populated by a diverse array of dispersing insects and their predators. We studied aerial insect communities by tracking the foraging altitudes of an avian insectivore, the Purple Martin (Progne subis). By attaching altitude loggers to nesting Purple Martins and collecting prey delivered to their nestlings, we determined the flight altitudes of ants and other insects. We then tested hypotheses relating ant body size and reproductive ecology to flight altitude. Purple Martins flew up to 1,889 meters above ground, and nestling provisioning trips ranged up to 922 meters. Insect communities were structured by body size such that species of all sizes flew near the ground but only light insects flew to the highest altitudes. Ant maximum flight altitudes decreased by 60% from the lightest to the heaviest species. Winged sexuals of social insects (ants, honey bees, and termites) dominated the Purple Martin diet, making up 88% of prey individuals and 45% of prey biomass. By transferring energy from terrestrial to aerial food webs, mating swarms of social insects play a substantial role in aerial ecosystems. Although we focus on Purple Martins and ants, our combined logger and diet method could be applied to a range of aerial organisms.

  10. Predator foraging altitudes reveal the structure of aerial insect communities

    PubMed Central

    Helms, Jackson A.; Godfrey, Aaron P.; Ames, Tayna; Bridge, Eli S.

    2016-01-01

    The atmosphere is populated by a diverse array of dispersing insects and their predators. We studied aerial insect communities by tracking the foraging altitudes of an avian insectivore, the Purple Martin (Progne subis). By attaching altitude loggers to nesting Purple Martins and collecting prey delivered to their nestlings, we determined the flight altitudes of ants and other insects. We then tested hypotheses relating ant body size and reproductive ecology to flight altitude. Purple Martins flew up to 1,889 meters above ground, and nestling provisioning trips ranged up to 922 meters. Insect communities were structured by body size such that species of all sizes flew near the ground but only light insects flew to the highest altitudes. Ant maximum flight altitudes decreased by 60% from the lightest to the heaviest species. Winged sexuals of social insects (ants, honey bees, and termites) dominated the Purple Martin diet, making up 88% of prey individuals and 45% of prey biomass. By transferring energy from terrestrial to aerial food webs, mating swarms of social insects play a substantial role in aerial ecosystems. Although we focus on Purple Martins and ants, our combined logger and diet method could be applied to a range of aerial organisms. PMID:27352817

  11. Shilajit: A panacea for high-altitude problems.

    PubMed

    Meena, Harsahay; Pandey, H K; Arya, M C; Ahmed, Zakwan

    2010-01-01

    High altitude problems like hypoxia, acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, pulmonary edema, insomnia, tiredness, lethargy, lack of appetite, body pain, dementia, and depression may occur when a person or a soldier residing in a lower altitude ascends to high-altitude areas. These problems arise due to low atmospheric pressure, severe cold, high intensity of solar radiation, high wind velocity, and very high fluctuation of day and night temperatures in these regions. These problems may escalate rapidly and may sometimes become life-threatening. Shilajit is a herbomineral drug which is pale-brown to blackish-brown, is composed of a gummy exudate that oozes from the rocks of the Himalayas in the summer months. It contains humus, organic plant materials, and fulvic acid as the main carrier molecules. It actively takes part in the transportation of nutrients into deep tissues and helps to overcome tiredness, lethargy, and chronic fatigue. Shilajit improves the ability to handle high altitudinal stresses and stimulates the immune system. Thus, Shilajit can be given as a supplement to people ascending to high-altitude areas so that it can act as a "health rejuvenator" and help to overcome high-altitude related problems.

  12. Global assessment of high-altitude wind power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, C. L.; Caldeira, K.

    2008-12-01

    Wind speed generally increases with altitude to the tropopause; hence, the power available in high-altitude winds is enormous, especially near the jet streams. We assess for the first time the available wind power resource worldwide at altitudes between 500 and 12,000 m. The highest wind power densities are found near 10,000 m over Japan and eastern China, the eastern coast of the United States, southern Australia, and north-eastern Africa. Below 1000 m, the best locations are the southern tip of South America, the coasts along the northern Pacific and Atlantic oceans, the central-eastern coast of Africa, and the north-eastern coast of South America. Because jet streams vary locally and seasonally, however, the high-altitude wind power resource is less steady than needed for baseload power. However, dynamically reaching the height with the highest winds, increasing the area covered with high-altitude devices, and using batteries for storage can effectively reduce intermittency. When high-altitude wind power devices are distributed uniformly throughout the entire atmosphere, numerical simulations show negligible effects on the global climate for low densities, but surface cooling, decreased precipitation, and greater sea ice cover for high densities.

  13. Effect of high altitude on protein metabolism in Bolivian children.

    PubMed

    San Miguel, Jose L; Spielvogel, Hilde; Berger, Jacques; Araoz, Mauricio; Lujan, Carmen; Tellez, Wilma; Caceres, Esperanza; Gachon, Pierre; Coudert, Jean; Beaufrere, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    In Bolivia, malnutrition in children is a major health problem that may be caused by inadequate protein, energy, and micronutrient intake; exposure to bacterial and parasitic infections; and life in a multistress environment (high altitude, cold, cosmic radiation, low ambient humidity). However, no data on protein absorption and utilization at high altitude were available. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of altitude on protein metabolism in Bolivian children. We measured protein utilization using leucine labeled with a stable isotope ((13)C) in two groups of healthy prepubertal children matched for age. Group 1 (n = 10) was examined at high altitude (HA) in La Paz (3600 m), and group 2 (n = 10) at low altitude (LA) in Santa Cruz (420 m). The nutritional status did not differ between groups but, as was to be expected, the HA group had higher hemoglobin concentration than the LA group. The children consumed casein that was intrinsically labeled with L-(1-(13)C) leucine and expired (13)CO(2) was analyzed. Samples of expired air were measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometer in Clermont-Ferrand. It was found that cumulative leucine oxidation ((13)CO(2)) at 300 min after ingestion was 19.7 +/- 4.9% at HA and 25.2 +/- 3.2% at LA. These results showed that protein absorption and/or utilization is significantly affected by altitude.

  14. Prior altitude experience of climbers attempting to summit Aconcagua.

    PubMed

    Borm, Nicholas; Van Roo, Jon D; Pesce, Carlos; Courtney, D Mark; Malik, Sanjeev; Lazio, Matthew P

    2011-01-01

    Aconcagua (6962 m) is one of the seven summits and the highest mountain outside of Asia. Climbers of varying experience are drawn to its nontechnical route. Our objective was to detail the prior altitude experience of climbers attempting to summit Aconcagua. We asked all climbers on the normal route of Aconcagua to complete questionnaires with demographics and prior high altitude experience while acclimatizing at Plaza de Mulas base camp during 9 nonconsecutive days in January 2009. 127 volunteers from 22 countries were enrolled. Mean age was 39.8 years and 88.2% were male. Median altitude at place of residence was 200 m (IQR: 30, 700). Median previous maximum altitude reached was 5895 m (IQR: 5365, 6150). 7.1% of climbers had never been above 4000 m. Median previous maximum sleeping altitude was 4800 m (IQR: 4300, 5486). 12.6% of climbers had never slept above 4000 m. Climbers who performed acclimatization treks spent a mean of 3.6 (2.5, 4.7) days at>3000 m in the previous 2 months. However, 50.4% of climbers performed no acclimatization treks. Although the majority of mountaineers who attempt Aconcagua have prior high altitude experience, a substantial minority has never been above 4000 m.

  15. Wilderness medicine at high altitude: recent developments in the field

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neeraj M; Hussain, Sidra; Cooke, Mark; O’Hara, John P; Mellor, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Travel to high altitude is increasingly popular. With this comes an increased incidence of high-altitude illness and therefore an increased need to improve our strategies to prevent and accurately diagnose these. In this review, we provide a summary of recent advances of relevance to practitioners who may be advising travelers to altitude. Although the Lake Louise Score is now widely used as a diagnostic tool for acute mountain sickness (AMS), increasing evidence questions the validity of doing so, and of considering AMS as a single condition. Biomarkers, such as brain natriuretic peptide, are likely correlating with pulmonary artery systolic pressure, thus potential markers of the development of altitude illness. Established drug treatments include acetazolamide, nifedipine, and dexamethasone. Drugs with a potential to reduce the risk of developing AMS include nitrate supplements, propagators of nitric oxide, and supplemental iron. The role of exercise in the development of altitude illness remains hotly debated, and it appears that the intensity of exercise is more important than the exercise itself. Finally, despite copious studies demonstrating the value of preacclimatization in reducing the risk of altitude illness and improving performance, an optimal protocol to preacclimatize an individual remains elusive. PMID:26445563

  16. Wilderness Preparticipation Evaluation and Considerations for Special Populations.

    PubMed

    Joy, Elizabeth; Van Baak, Karin; Dec, Katherine L; Semakula, Barbara; Cardin, Ashlea D; Lemery, Jay; Wortley, George C; Yaron, Michael; Madden, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    Children, older adults, disabled and special needs athletes, and female athletes who participate in outdoor and wilderness sports and activities each face unique risks. For children and adolescents traveling to high altitude, the preparticipation physical evaluation should focus on risk assessment, prevention strategies, early recognition of altitude-related symptoms, management plans, and appropriate follow-up. As the risk and prevalence of chronic disease increases with age, both older patients and providers need to be aware of disease and medication-specific risks relative to wilderness sport and activity participation. Disabled and special needs athletes benefit from careful pre-event planning for the potential medical issues and equipment modifications that may affect their health in wilderness environments. Issues that demand special consideration for female adventurers include pregnancy, contraceptive use, menses, and ferritin levels at altitude. A careful preparticipation evaluation that factors in unique, population- specific risks will help special populations stay healthy and safe on wilderness adventures. The PubMed and SportDiscus databases were searched in 2014 using both MeSH terms and text words and include peer-reviewed English language articles from 1977 to 2014. Additional information was accessed from Web-based sources to produce this narrative review on preparticipation evaluation for special populations undertaking wilderness adventures. Key words include children, adolescent, pediatric, seniors, elderly, disabled, special needs, female, athlete, preparticipiation examination, wilderness medicine, and sports.

  17. Wilderness Preparticipation Evaluation and Considerations for Special Populations.

    PubMed

    Joy, Elizabeth; Van Baak, Karin; Dec, Katherine L; Semakula, Barbara; Cardin, Ashlea D; Lemery, Jay; Wortley, George C; Yaron, Michael; Madden, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Children, older adults, disabled and special needs athletes, and female athletes who participate in outdoor and wilderness sports and activities each face unique risks. For children and adolescents traveling to high altitude, the preparticipation physical evaluation should focus on risk assessment, prevention strategies, early recognition of altitude-related symptoms, management plans, and appropriate follow-up. As the risk and prevalence of chronic disease increases with age, both older patients and providers need to be aware of disease and medication-specific risks relative to wilderness sport and activity participation. Disabled and special needs athletes benefit from careful pre-event planning for the potential medical issues and equipment modifications that may affect their health in wilderness environments. Issues that demand special consideration for female adventurers include pregnancy, contraceptive use, menses, and ferritin levels at altitude. A careful preparticipation evaluation that factors in unique, population-specific risks will help special populations stay healthy and safe on wilderness adventures. The PubMed and SportDiscus databases were searched in 2014 using both MeSH terms and text words and include peer-reviewed English language articles from 1977 to 2014. Additional information was accessed from Web-based sources to produce this narrative review on preparticipation evaluation for special populations undertaking wilderness adventures. Key words include children, adolescent, pediatric, seniors, elderly, disabled, special needs, female, athlete, preparticipiation examination, wilderness medicine, and sports.

  18. Use of low-altitude aerial photography to identify submersed aquatic macrophytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, Donald W.; Manny, Bruce A.; Brown, Charles L.; Jaworski, Eugene

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using low-altitude aerial photography to identify beds of submersed macrophytes is demonstrated. True color aerial photos and collateral ground survey information for submersed aquatic macrophyte beds at 10 sites in the St.Clair-Detroit River system were obtained in September 1978. Using the photos and collateral ground survey information, a dichotomous key was developed for the identification of six classes - beds of five genera of macrophytes and one substrate type. A test was prepared to determine how accurately photo interpreters could identify the six classes. The test required an interpreter to examine an unlabeled, outlined area on photographs and identify it using the key. Six interpreters were tested. One pair of interpreters was trained in the interpretation of a variety of aerial photos, a second pair had field experience in the collection and identification of submersed macrophytes in the river system, and a third pair had neither training in the interpretation of aerial photos nor field experience. The criteria that we developed were applied equally well by the interpretors, regardless of their training or experience. Overall accuracy (i.e., omission errors) of all six classes combined was 68% correct, whereas, overall accuracy of individual classes ranged from 50 to 100% correct. Mapping accuracy (i.e. omission and commission errors) of individual classes ranged from 36 to 75%. Although the key developed for this study has only limited application outside the context of the data and sites examined in this study, it is concluded that low-altitude aerial photography, together with limited amounts of collateral ground survey information, can be used to economically identify beds of submersed macrophytes in the St. Clair-Detroit River system and other similar water bodies.

  19. Analysis of high-altitude de-acclimatization syndrome after exposure to high altitudes: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    He, Binfeng; Wang, Jianchun; Qian, Guisheng; Hu, Mingdong; Qu, Xinming; Wei, Zhenghua; Li, Jin; Chen, Yan; Chen, Huaping; Zhou, Qiquan; Wang, Guansong

    2013-01-01

    The syndrome of high-altitude de-acclimatization commonly takes place after long-term exposure to high altitudes upon return to low altitudes. The syndrome severely affects the returnee's quality of life. However, little attention has been paid to careful characterization of the syndrome and their underlying mechanisms. Male subjects from Chongqing (n = 67, 180 m) and Kunming (n = 70, 1800 m) visited a high-altitude area (3650 m) about 6 months and then returned to low-altitude. After they came back, all subjects were evaluated for high-altitude de-acclimatization syndrome on the 3(rd), 50(th), and 100(th). Symptom scores, routine blood and blood gas tests, and myocardial zymograms assay were used for observation their syndrome. The results showed that the incidence and severity of symptoms had decreased markedly on the 50(th) and 100(th) days, compared with the 3(rd) day. The symptom scores and incidence of different symptoms were lower among subjects returning to Kunming than among those returning to Chongqing. On the 3(rd) day, RBC, Hb, Hct, CK, CK-MB, and LDH values were significantly lower than values recorded at high altitudes, but they were higher than baseline values. On the 50(th) day, these values were not different from baseline values, but LDH levels did not return to baseline until the 100(th) day. These data show that, subjects who suffered high-altitude de-acclimatization syndrome, the recovery fully processes takes a long time (≥ 100(th) days). The appearance of the syndrome is found to be related to the changes in RBC, Hb, Hct, CK, CK-MB, and LDH levels, which should be caused by reoxygenation after hypoxia.

  20. Human factors considerations for unattended ground sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert A.

    2009-05-01

    Even with traditional system design and development programs military systems are developed that end up being difficult for the target audience to use. Over the years the military has learned to incorporate human factors considerations and requirements in system requirements documents in order to minimize this problem. However in today's environment of procuring GOTS/COTS equipment to quickly field a needed capability, the human factors aspects are not always considered or they may have to be traded for other considerations. This occurs for a variety of reasons with the driving reason being the willingness of commanders and agencies to trade capabilities for speed of fielding. This paper addresses human factors considerations that should be observed in the design of unattended ground sensors (UGS) at the component, equipment and system levels. This is not an abstract paper on human factors engineering but an examination of current trends and applications. Lessons learned from recent fieldings and example designs from the Harris Falcon Watch system are provided. What Harris has found is that design considerations, development schedules, understanding of the target audience and the mission scenarios, and training are all key factors in determining whether a system will be found to have utility by a broad spectrum of users.