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Sample records for alu repeats increase

  1. Comparative Analysis of Alu Repeats in Primate Genomes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Alu repeats are SINEs (Short intersperse repetitive elements) which enjoy a successful application in genome evolution, population biology, phylogenetics and forensics. Human Alu consensus sequences were widely used as surrogates in nonhuman primate studies with an assumption that all p...

  2. Alu repeats as markers for forensic DNA analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M.; Kass, D.H.

    1994-01-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 inch and 3 inch unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allow the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of the Alu repeat. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences probably inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem humans (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project. HS Alu family member insertions differ from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) in that polymorphisms due to Alu insertions arise as a result of a unique event which has occurred only one time in the human population and spread through the population from that point. Therefore, individuals that share HS Alu repeats inherited these elements from a common ancestor. Most VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times in parallel within a population.

  3. Alu repeat sequences are present in increased proportions compared to a unique gene in plasma/serum DNA: evidence for a preferential release from viable cells?

    PubMed

    Stroun, M; Lyautey, J; Lederrey, C; Mulcahy, H E; Anker, P

    2001-09-01

    Small amounts of DNA circulate freely in plasma or serum, but the mechanism of release is not known. To determine if DNA is actively excreted from viable cells, we utilized real-time PCR to measure the proportion of Alu repeat sequences compared to the beta-globin gene in serum and lymphocyte DNA in 27 cancer patients and 22 healthy controls. The proportion of Alu compared to beta-globin was significantly greater in serum DNA than in lymphocyte DNA both in control subjects (p = 0.003) and in cancer patients (p < 0.001). Overall, the proportion was similar in cancer and control patients (p = 0.79). Further experiments showed that the beta-globin gene was not more vulnerable to degradation by nuclease action than Alu sequences. Our results lead us to conclude that active DNA release is likely to play a significant role in the origin of circulating DNA.

  4. Alu repeats as markers for human population genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M.; Bazan, H.

    1993-09-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 97.9% nucleotide identity with each other and an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence. HS Alu family members are thought to be derived from a single source ``master`` gene, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 in. and 3 in. unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allows the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of an Alu repeat. Individual HS Alu sequences were found to be either monomorphic or dimorphic for the presence or absence of each repeat. The monomorphic HS Alu family members inserted in the human genome after the human/great ape divergence (which is thought to have occurred 4--6 million years ago), but before the radiation of modem man. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem man (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project as well. HS Alu family member insertion dimorphism differs from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) because individuals share HS Alu family member insertions based upon identity by descent from a common ancestor as a result of a single event which occurred one time within the human population. The VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times within a population and are identical by state only.

  5. Nonlinear analysis of correlations in Alu repeat sequences in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yi; Huang, Yanzhao; Li, Mingfeng; Xu, Ruizhen; Xiao, Saifeng

    2003-12-01

    We report on a nonlinear analysis of deterministic structures in Alu repeats, one of the richest repetitive DNA sequences in the human genome. Alu repeats contain the recognition sites for the restriction endonuclease AluI, which is what gives them their name. Using the nonlinear prediction method developed in chaos theory, we find that all Alu repeats have novel deterministic structures and show strong nonlinear correlations that are absent from exon and intron sequences. Furthermore, the deterministic structures of Alus of younger subfamilies show panlike shapes. As young Alus can be seen as mutation free copies from the “master genes,” it may be suggested that the deterministic structures of the older subfamilies are results of an evolution from a “panlike” structure to a more diffuse correlation pattern due to mutation.

  6. [Conformational polymorphysm of G-rich fragments of DNA ALU-repeats. I. Potential noncanonical structures].

    PubMed

    Sekridova, A V; Varizhuk, A M; Tatarinova, O N; Severov, V V; Barinov, N A; Smirnov, I P; Lazarev, V N; Klinov, D V; Pozmogova, G E

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report results of systematic studies of conformational polymorphism of G-rich DNA fragments from Alu repeats. Alu retrotransposones are primate-specific short interspersed elements. Using the Alu sequence from the prooncogen bcl2 intron and the consensus AluSx sequence as representative examples, we determined characteristic Alu sites that are capable of adopting G-quadruplex (GQ) conformations (i.e., potential quadruplex sites - PQSAlu), and demonstrated by bioinformatics methods that those sites are Alu-specific in the human genome. Genomic frequencies of PQSAlu were assessed (~1/10000 b.p.). The sites were found to be characteristic of young (active) Alu families (Alu-Y). A recombinant DNA sequence bearing the Alu element from the human bcl2 gene (304 b.p.) and its PQS-mutant (Alu-PQS) were constructed. The formation of noncanonical structures in Alubcl2 dsDNA and the absence of such structures in the case of Alu-PQS were shown using DMS-footprinting and AFM microscopy. Expression vectors bearing wild-type and mutant Alu insertions in the promoter regions were obtained, and the effects of these insertions on the expression of the reporter gene in НЕК293 and HeLa cell lines were compared. Our findings on the spatial organization of Alu repeats may provide insight into the mechanisms of genomic rearrangements which underlie many oncological and neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Whole-genome analysis of Alu repeat elements reveals complex evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Price, Alkes L; Eskin, Eleazar; Pevzner, Pavel A

    2004-11-01

    Alu repeats are the most abundant family of repeats in the human genome, with over 1 million copies comprising 10% of the genome. They have been implicated in human genetic disease and in the enrichment of gene-rich segmental duplications in the human genome, and they form a rich fossil record of primate and human history. Alu repeat elements are believed to have arisen from the replication of a small number of source elements, whose evolution over time gives rise to the 31 Alu subfamilies currently reported in Repbase Update. We apply a novel method to identify and statistically validate 213 Alu subfamilies. We build an evolutionary tree of these subfamilies and conclude that the history of Alu evolution is more complex than previous studies had indicated.

  8. Circular RNAs are abundant, conserved, and associated with ALU repeats

    PubMed Central

    Jeck, William R.; Sorrentino, Jessica A.; Wang, Kai; Slevin, Michael K.; Burd, Christin E.; Liu, Jinze; Marzluff, William F.; Sharpless, Norman E.

    2013-01-01

    Circular RNAs composed of exonic sequence have been described in a small number of genes. Thought to result from splicing errors, circular RNA species possess no known function. To delineate the universe of endogenous circular RNAs, we performed high-throughput sequencing (RNA-seq) of libraries prepared from ribosome-depleted RNA with or without digestion with the RNA exonuclease, RNase R. We identified >25,000 distinct RNA species in human fibroblasts that contained non-colinear exons (a “backsplice”) and were reproducibly enriched by exonuclease degradation of linear RNA. These RNAs were validated as circular RNA (ecircRNA), rather than linear RNA, and were more stable than associated linear mRNAs in vivo. In some cases, the abundance of circular molecules exceeded that of associated linear mRNA by >10-fold. By conservative estimate, we identified ecircRNAs from 14.4% of actively transcribed genes in human fibroblasts. Application of this method to murine testis RNA identified 69 ecircRNAs in precisely orthologous locations to human circular RNAs. Of note, paralogous kinases HIPK2 and HIPK3 produce abundant ecircRNA from their second exon in both humans and mice. Though HIPK3 circular RNAs contain an AUG translation start, it and other ecircRNAs were not bound to ribosomes. Circular RNAs could be degraded by siRNAs and, therefore, may act as competing endogenous RNAs. Bioinformatic analysis revealed shared features of circularized exons, including long bordering introns that contained complementary ALU repeats. These data show that ecircRNAs are abundant, stable, conserved and nonrandom products of RNA splicing that could be involved in control of gene expression. PMID:23249747

  9. Ruminant globin gene structures suggest an evolutionary role for Alu-type repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Schimenti, J C; Duncan, C H

    1984-01-01

    Bovine fetal and adult globin genes were cloned and subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Both of these genes contained insertions of Alu-type repetitive DNA within their introns. Comparison of cow and goat beta-type globin genes indicates that intragenic DNA insertions played a role in their evolution. These data support the theory that Alu-type repeats maintain genetic diversity by inhibiting gene conversion. PMID:6322113

  10. A second major class of Alu family repeated DNA sequences in a primate genome.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, G R; Deininger, P L

    1983-01-01

    We have analyzed repetitive DNA sequences in a prosimian, Galago crassicaudatus, and found that there are two distinct, highly repetitive families of sequences related to the human Alu family. The Type I family is closely analogous to the human Alu Family. The Type II family of repeats, which appears to be present in higher copy number, has a right half that is almost identical to the Type I family. However, the left half of the Type II sequence shows only limited homology to the galago Type I or human Alu families. A comparison of homologous sequences in the left half indicated that they are centered in regions of the Alu family which function as RNA polymerase III promoters. We have also observed at least one example of a Type II left half that was integrated into the genome independent of the Alu family right half sequence. The Type II family appears to be of much more recent evolutionary origin than the Type I and may have arisen by the independent integration of a RNA polymerase III promoter adjacent to the right half of a Type I Alu family sequence. PMID:6647032

  11. Linkage disequilibrium among RFLPs at the insulin-receptor locus despite intervening alu repeat sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Elbein, S.C. )

    1992-11-01

    Multiple mutations of the insulin receptor (INSR) gene have been identified in individuals with extreme insulin resistance. These mutations have included recombination events between Alu repeat units in the tyrosine kinase-encoding [beta]-chain region of the gene. To evaluate the influence of Alu and dinucleotide repetitive sequences on recombination events within the insulin receptor gene, the author examined the degree of linkage disequilibrium between RFLP pairs spanning the gene. The author established 228 independent haplotypes for seven RFLPs (two each for PstI, RsaI, and SstI and one for MspI and 172 independent haplotypes which included an additional RFLP with BglII) from 19 pedigrees. These RFLPs span >130 kb of this gene, and it was previously demonstrated that multiple Alu sequences separate RFLP pairs. Observed haplotype frequencies deviated significantly from those predicted. Pairwise analysis of RFLP showed high levels of linkage disequilibrium among RFLP in the [beta]-chain region of the insulin receptor, but not between [alpha]-chain RFLPs and those of the [beta]-chain. Disequilibrium was present among [beta]-chain RFLPs, despite separation by one or more Alu repeat sequences. The very strong linkage disequilibrium which was present in sizable regions of the INSR gene despite the presence of both Alu and microsatellite repeats suggested that these regions do not have a major impact on recombinations at this locus. 25 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  12. Alu repeats as transcriptional regulatory platforms in macrophage responses to M. tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Bouttier, Manuella; Laperriere, David; Memari, Babak; Mangiapane, Joseph; Fiore, Amanda; Mitchell, Eric; Verway, Mark; Behr, Marcel A.; Sladek, Robert; Barreiro, Luis B.; Mader, Sylvie; White, John H.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the epigenetic regulation of transcriptional response of macrophages during early-stage M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, we performed ChIPseq analysis of H3K4 monomethylation (H3K4me1), a marker of poised or active enhancers. De novo H3K4me1 peaks in infected cells were associated with genes implicated in host defenses and apoptosis. Our analysis revealed that 40% of de novo regions contained human/primate-specific Alu transposable elements, enriched in the AluJ and S subtypes. These contained several transcription factor binding sites, including those for members of the MEF2 and ATF families, and LXR and RAR nuclear receptors, all of which have been implicated in macrophage differentiation, survival, and responses to stress and infection. Combining bioinformatics, molecular genetics, and biochemical approaches, we linked genes adjacent to H3K4me1-associated Alu repeats to macrophage metabolic responses against Mtb infection. In particular, we show that LXRα signaling, which reduced Mtb viability 18-fold by altering cholesterol metabolism and enhancing macrophage apoptosis, can be initiated at response elements present in Alu repeats. These studies decipher the mechanism of early macrophage transcriptional responses to Mtb, highlighting the role of Alu element transposition in shaping human transcription programs during innate immunity. PMID:27604870

  13. Inhibition of activated pericentromeric SINE/Alu repeat transcription in senescent human adult stem cells reinstates self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Hostikka, Sirkka Liisa; Atallah, Michelle; Blackwell, Benjamin; Lee, Elbert; Cook, Peter J; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Shariat, Goli; Halperin, Eran; Dobke, Marek; Rosenfeld, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    Cellular aging is linked to deficiencies in efficient repair of DNA double strand breaks and authentic genome maintenance at the chromatin level. Aging poses a significant threat to adult stem cell function by triggering persistent DNA damage and ultimately cellular senescence. Senescence is often considered to be an irreversible process. Moreover, critical genomic regions engaged in persistent DNA damage accumulation are unknown. Here we report that 65% of naturally occurring repairable DNA damage in self-renewing adult stem cells occurs within transposable elements. Upregulation of Alu retrotransposon transcription upon ex vivo aging causes nuclear cytotoxicity associated with the formation of persistent DNA damage foci and loss of efficient DNA repair in pericentric chromatin. This occurs due to a failure to recruit of condensin I and cohesin complexes. Our results demonstrate that the cytotoxicity of induced Alu repeats is functionally relevant for the human adult stem cell aging. Stable suppression of Alu transcription can reverse the senescent phenotype, reinstating the cells' self-renewing properties and increasing their plasticity by altering so-called “master” pluripotency regulators. PMID:21862875

  14. Analysis of western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) specific Alu repeats.

    PubMed

    McLain, Adam T; Carman, Glenn W; Fullerton, Mitchell L; Beckstrom, Thomas O; Gensler, William; Meyer, Thomas J; Faulk, Christopher; Batzer, Mark A

    2013-11-22

    Research into great ape genomes has revealed widely divergent activity levels over time for Alu elements. However, the diversity of this mobile element family in the genome of the western lowland gorilla has previously been uncharacterized. Alu elements are primate-specific short interspersed elements that have been used as phylogenetic and population genetic markers for more than two decades. Alu elements are present at high copy number in the genomes of all primates surveyed thus far. The AluY subfamily and its derivatives have been recognized as the evolutionarily youngest Alu subfamily in the Old World primate lineage. Here we use a combination of computational and wet-bench laboratory methods to assess and catalog AluY subfamily activity level and composition in the western lowland gorilla genome (gorGor3.1). A total of 1,075 independent AluY insertions were identified and computationally divided into 10 subfamilies, with the largest number of gorilla-specific elements assigned to the canonical AluY subfamily. The retrotransposition activity level appears to be significantly lower than that seen in the human and chimpanzee lineages, while higher than that seen in orangutan genomes, indicative of differential Alu amplification in the western lowland gorilla lineage as compared to other Homininae.

  15. Analysis of western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) specific Alu repeats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Research into great ape genomes has revealed widely divergent activity levels over time for Alu elements. However, the diversity of this mobile element family in the genome of the western lowland gorilla has previously been uncharacterized. Alu elements are primate-specific short interspersed elements that have been used as phylogenetic and population genetic markers for more than two decades. Alu elements are present at high copy number in the genomes of all primates surveyed thus far. The AluY subfamily and its derivatives have been recognized as the evolutionarily youngest Alu subfamily in the Old World primate lineage. Results Here we use a combination of computational and wet-bench laboratory methods to assess and catalog AluY subfamily activity level and composition in the western lowland gorilla genome (gorGor3.1). A total of 1,075 independent AluY insertions were identified and computationally divided into 10 subfamilies, with the largest number of gorilla-specific elements assigned to the canonical AluY subfamily. Conclusions The retrotransposition activity level appears to be significantly lower than that seen in the human and chimpanzee lineages, while higher than that seen in orangutan genomes, indicative of differential Alu amplification in the western lowland gorilla lineage as compared to other Homininae. PMID:24262036

  16. Young Alu insertions within the MHC class I region in native American populations: insights into the origin of the MHC-Alu repeats.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pérez, Luis; Alfonso-Sánchez, Miguel A; Dipierri, José E; Sánchez, Dora; Espinosa, Ibone; De Pancorbo, Marian M; Peña, José A

    2013-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity of two Amerindian populations (Jujuy province, Argentina, and Waorani tribe, Ecuador) was characterized by analyzing data on polymorphic Alu insertions within the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I region (6p21.31), which are completely nonexistent in Native Americans. We further evaluated the haplotype distribution and genetic diversity among continental ancestry groups and their potential implications for the dating of the origin of MHC-Alus. Five MHC-Alu elements (AluMicB, AluTF, AluHJ, AluHG, and AluHF) were typed in samples from Jujuy (N = 108) and Waorani (N = 36). Allele and haplotype frequency data on worldwide populations were compiled to explore spatial structuring of the MHC-Alu diversity through AMOVA tests. We utilized the median-joining network approach to illustrate the continental distribution of the MHC-Alu haplotypes and their phylogenetic relationships. Allele and haplotype distributions differed significantly between Jujuy and Waorani. The Waorani featured a low average heterozygosity attributable to strong population isolation. Overall, Alu markers showed great genetic heterogeneity both within and among populations. The haplotype distribution was distinctive of each continental ancestry group. Contrary to expectations, Africans showed the lowest MHC-Alu diversity. Genetic drift mainly associated to population bottlenecks seems to be reflected in the low MHC-Alu diversity of the Amerindians, mainly in Waorani. Geographical structuring of the haplotype distribution supports the efficiency of the MHC-Alu loci as lineage (ancestry) markers. The markedly low Alu diversity of African populations relative to other continental clusters suggests that these MHC-Alus might have arisen after the anatomically modern humans expanded out of Africa. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Intronic mutations outside of Alu-repeat-rich domains of the LDL receptor gene are a cause of familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Amsellem, Sabine; Briffaut, Dorothée; Carrié, Alain; Rabès, Jean Pierre; Girardet, Jean Philippe; Fredenrich, Alexandre; Moulin, Philippe; Krempf, Michel; Reznik, Yves; Vialettes, Bernard; de Gennes, Jean Luc; Brukert, Eric; Benlian, Pascale

    2002-12-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a frequent monogenic condition complicated by premature cardiovascular disease, is characterized by high allelic heterogeneity at the low-density lipoprotein receptor ( LDLR) locus. Despite more than a decade of genetic testing, knowledge about intronic disease-causing mutations has remained limited because of lack of available genomic sequences. Based on the finding from bioinformatic analysis that Alu repeats represent 85% of LDLR intronic sequences outside exon-intron junctions, we designed a strategy to improve the exploration of genomic regions in the vicinity of exons in 110 FH subjects from an admixed population. In the first group of 42 patients of negative mutation carriers, as previously established by former screening strategies (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing with former primers overlapping splice-sites, Southern Blotting), about half ( n=22) were found to be carriers of at least one heterozygous mutation. Among a second group of 68 newly recruited patients, 27% of mutation carriers ( n=37) had a splicing regulatory mutation. Overall, out of the 54 mutations identified, 13 were intronic, and 18 were novel, out of which nearly half were intronic. Two novel intronic mutations (IVS8-10G-->A within the polypyrimidine tract and IVS7+10G-->A downstream of donor site) might create potential aberrant splice sites according to neural-network computed estimation, contrary to 31 common single nucleotide variations also identified at exon-intron junctions. This new strategy of detecting the most likely disease-causing LDLR mutations outside of Alu-rich genomic regions reveals that intronic mutations may have a greater impact than previously reported on the molecular basis of FH.

  18. Genome-wide target site triplication of Alu elements in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wooseok; Mun, Seyoung; Kang, Keunsoo; Hennighausen, Lothar; Han, Kyudong

    2015-05-01

    Alu elements are the most successful short interspersed elements in primate genomes and their retrotransposition is a major source of genomic expansion. Alu elements integrate into genomic regions through target-site primed reverse transcription, which generates target site duplications (TSDs). Unexpectedly, we have identified target site triplications (TSTs) at some loci, where two Alu elements in tandem share one direct repeat. Thus, the three copies of the repeat are present. We located 212 TST loci in the human genome and examined 25 putative human-specific TST loci using PCR validation. As a result, 12 human-specific TST loci were identified. These findings suggest that unequal homologous recombination between TSDs can lead to TST. Through this mechanism, the copy number of Alu elements could have increased in primate genomes without new Alu retrotransposition events. This study provides new insight into the augmentation of Alu elements in the primate genome.

  19. [Conformational polymorphysm of G-rich fragments of DNA Alu-repeats. II. the putative role of G-quadruplex structures in genomic rearrangements].

    PubMed

    Varizhuk, A M; Sekridova, A V; Tankevich, M V; Podgorsky, V S; Smirnov, I P; Pozmogova, G E

    2016-11-01

    Three evolutionary conserved sites of Alu repeats (PQS2, PQS3 and PQS4) were shown to form stable inter- and intramolecular G-quadruplexes (GQs) in vitro. Structures and topologies of these GQs were elucidated using spectral methods. Self-association of G-rich Alu fragments was studied. Dimeric GQ formation from two distal identical or different putative quadruplex sites - (PQS2)2, (PQS3)2 or PQS2-PQS3 - within one lengthy DNA strand was demonstrated by a FRET-based method. Oligomer PQS4 (folded into a parallel intramolecular GQ) was shown to form stacks of quadruplexes that are stabilized by stacking interactions of external G-tetrads (this was confirmed by DOSY NMR, AFM microscopy and differential CD spectroscopy). Comparative analysis of the properties of various GQs allowed us to put forward a hypothesis of two general mechanisms of intermolecular GQ-dependant genomic rearrangements: 1) formation of a dimeric GQs; 2) association of pre-folded intramolecular parallel GQs from different strands into GQ-stacks. Thus, the observed co-localization of G-rich motifs of Alu elements with double-strand break hotspots and rearrangement hotspots may be accounted for by the specific secondary structure of these motifs. At the same time, this is likely primarily due to high abundance of such G-rich Alu fragments in the genome.

  20. Construction and expression in vivo of an internally deleted mouse alpha-fetoprotein gene: presence of a transcribed Alu-like repeat within the first intervening sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Young, P R; Scott, R W; Hamer, D H; Tilghman, S M

    1982-01-01

    An alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) 'minigene' was constructed by joining the first two exons along with 0.9 kilobases of 5' flanking sequence of the mouse AFP gene to its last exon and 0.4 kilobases of 3' flanking sequence. This 'minigene' was tested for activity by inserting it into an SV40 vector and infecting African green monkey kidney cells. Correct initiation, termination, polyadenylation and splicing were observed. Furthermore a 220 nucleotide transcript was detected and mapped to a mouse Alu-like or B1 repeat on the opposite strand to that encoding the AFP gene in the first intervening sequence. Images PMID:6179043

  1. Alu pair exclusions in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The human genome contains approximately one million Alu elements which comprise more than 10% of human DNA by mass. Alu elements possess direction, and are distributed almost equally in positive and negative strand orientations throughout the genome. Previously, it has been shown that closely spaced Alu pairs in opposing orientation (inverted pairs) are found less frequently than Alu pairs having the same orientation (direct pairs). However, this imbalance has only been investigated for Alu pairs separated by 650 or fewer base pairs (bp) in a study conducted prior to the completion of the draft human genome sequence. Results We performed a comprehensive analysis of all (> 800,000) full-length Alu elements in the human genome. This large sample size permits detection of small differences in the ratio between inverted and direct Alu pairs (I:D). We have discovered a significant depression in the full-length Alu pair I:D ratio that extends to repeat pairs separated by ≤ 350,000 bp. Within this imbalance bubble (those Alu pairs separated by ≤ 350,000 bp), direct pairs outnumber inverted pairs. Using PCR, we experimentally verified several examples of inverted Alu pair exclusions that were caused by deletions. Conclusions Over 50 million full-length Alu pairs reside within the I:D imbalance bubble. Their collective impact may represent one source of Alu element-related human genomic instability that has not been previously characterized. PMID:21943335

  2. Ace Alu insertion polymorphism in Croatia and its isolates.

    PubMed

    Barbalić, Maja; Pericić, Marijana; Skarić-Jurić, Tatjana; Narancić, Nina Smolej

    2004-12-01

    Alu elements are a family of interspersed repeats in the genome propagating by retroposition into new chromosomal locations. Alu insertion in Ace gene is known to be polymorphic (presence/absence of Alu element) in worldwide populations and as such serves as marker for population structure analyses. In this study we examined the distribution of genotypes and allele frequencies of this polymorphism in general Croatian population and its two isolates (the island of Hvar and the coastal region of the Middle Dalmatia) and related them to the level of endogamy as an indicator of inbreeding in these populations. Results showed that these three population groups are different with respect to Ace Alu polymorphism. The endogamy was highest on the island of Hvar. With the increase of endogamy a decrease in heterozigosity was observed. The same trend was observed for the frequency of insertion allele. Its frequencies in the village subpopulations of two studied isolates are subject to genetic drift due to small population sizes and high levels of endogamy. This in turn causes genetic differentiation among villages that is observed to be higher on the island of Hvar than in the coastal region. In the worldwide perspective, the Ace Alu insertion allele frequency of 50.6% in the general Croatian population falls within the range of other European populations.

  3. DHX9 suppresses RNA processing defects originating from the Alu invasion of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Aktaş, Tuğçe; Avşar Ilık, İbrahim; Maticzka, Daniel; Bhardwaj, Vivek; Pessoa Rodrigues, Cecilia; Mittler, Gerhard; Manke, Thomas; Backofen, Rolf; Akhtar, Asifa

    2017-04-06

    Transposable elements are viewed as 'selfish genetic elements', yet they contribute to gene regulation and genome evolution in diverse ways. More than half of the human genome consists of transposable elements. Alu elements belong to the short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) family of repetitive elements, and with over 1 million insertions they make up more than 10% of the human genome. Despite their abundance and the potential evolutionary advantages they confer, Alu elements can be mutagenic to the host as they can act as splice acceptors, inhibit translation of mRNAs and cause genomic instability. Alu elements are the main targets of the RNA-editing enzyme ADAR and the formation of Alu exons is suppressed by the nuclear ribonucleoprotein HNRNPC, but the broad effect of massive secondary structures formed by inverted-repeat Alu elements on RNA processing in the nucleus remains unknown. Here we show that DHX9, an abundant nuclear RNA helicase, binds specifically to inverted-repeat Alu elements that are transcribed as parts of genes. Loss of DHX9 leads to an increase in the number of circular-RNA-producing genes and amount of circular RNAs, translational repression of reporters containing inverted-repeat Alu elements, and transcriptional rewiring (the creation of mostly nonsensical novel connections between exons) of susceptible loci. Biochemical purifications of DHX9 identify the interferon-inducible isoform of ADAR (p150), but not the constitutively expressed ADAR isoform (p110), as an RNA-independent interaction partner. Co-depletion of ADAR and DHX9 augments the double-stranded RNA accumulation defects, leading to increased circular RNA production, revealing a functional link between these two enzymes. Our work uncovers an evolutionarily conserved function of DHX9. We propose that it acts as a nuclear RNA resolvase that neutralizes the immediate threat posed by transposon insertions and allows these elements to evolve as tools for the post

  4. Alu monomer revisited: recent generation of Alu monomers.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kenji K

    2011-01-01

    Alu is a predominant short interspersed element (SINE) family in the human genome and consists of two monomer units connected by an A-rich linker. At present, dimeric Alu elements are active in humans, but Alu monomers are present as fossilized sequences. A comparative genome analysis of human and chimpanzee genomes revealed eight recent insertions of Alu monomers. One of them was a retroposed product of another Alu monomer with 3' transduction. Further analysis of 1,404 loci of the Alu monomer in the human genome revealed that some Alu monomers were recently generated by recombination between the internal and 3' A-rich tracts inside of dimeric Alu elements. The data show that Alu monomers were generated by 1) retroposition of other Alu monomers and 2) recombination between two A-rich tracts.

  5. Alu distribution and mutation types of cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Alu elements are the most abundant retrotransposable elements comprising ~11% of the human genome. Many studies have highlighted the role that Alu elements have in genetic instability and how their contribution to the assortment of mutagenic events can lead to cancer. As of yet, little has been done to quantitatively assess the association between Alu distribution and genes that are causally implicated in oncogenesis. Results We have investigated the effect of various Alu densities on the mutation type based classifications of cancer genes. In order to establish the direct relationship between Alus and the cancer genes of interest, genome wide Alu-related densities were measured using genes rather than the sliding windows of fixed length as the units. Several novel genomic features, such as the density of the adjacent Alu pairs and the number of Alu-Exon-Alu triplets, were developed in order to extend the investigation via the multivariate statistical analysis toward more advanced biological insight. In addition, we characterized the genome-wide intron Alu distribution with a mixture model that distinguished genes containing Alu elements from those with no Alus, and evaluated the gene-level effect of the 5'-TTAAAA motif associated with Alu insertion sites using a two-step regression analysis method. Conclusions The study resulted in several novel findings worthy of further investigation. They include: (1) Recessive cancer genes (tumor suppressor genes) are enriched with Alu elements (p < 0.01) compared to dominant cancer genes (oncogenes) and the entire set of genes in the human genome; (2) Alu-related genomic features can be used to cluster cancer genes into biological meaningful groups; (3) The retention of exon Alus has been restricted in the human genome development, and an upper limit to the chromosome-level exon Alu densities is suggested by the distribution profile; (4) For the genes with at least one intron Alu repeat in individual chromosomes

  6. Novel Role of 3'UTR-Embedded Alu Elements as Facilitators of Processed Pseudogene Genesis and Host Gene Capture by Viral Genomes.

    PubMed

    Farré, Domènec; Engel, Pablo; Angulo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the high abundance of Alu elements in the human genome, the interest for the functional significance of these retrotransposons has been increasing. Primate Alu and rodent Alu-like elements are retrotransposed by a mechanism driven by the LINE1 (L1) encoded proteins, the same machinery that generates the L1 repeats, the processed pseudogenes (PPs), and other retroelements. Apart from free Alu RNAs, Alus are also transcribed and retrotranscribed as part of cellular gene transcripts, generally embedded inside 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). Despite different proposed hypotheses, the functional implication of the presence of Alus inside 3'UTRs remains elusive. In this study we hypothesized that Alu elements in 3'UTRs could be involved in the genesis of PPs. By analyzing human genome data we discovered that the existence of 3'UTR-embedded Alu elements is overrepresented in genes source of PPs. In contrast, the presence of other retrotransposable elements in 3'UTRs does not show this PP linked overrepresentation. This research was extended to mouse and rat genomes and the results accordingly reveal overrepresentation of 3'UTR-embedded B1 (Alu-like) elements in PP parent genes. Interestingly, we also demonstrated that the overrepresentation of 3'UTR-embedded Alus is particularly significant in PP parent genes with low germline gene expression level. Finally, we provide data that support the hypothesis that the L1 machinery is also the system that herpesviruses, and possibly other large DNA viruses, use to capture host genes expressed in germline or somatic cells. Altogether our results suggest a novel role for Alu or Alu-like elements inside 3'UTRs as facilitators of the genesis of PPs, particularly in lowly expressed genes. Moreover, we propose that this L1-driven mechanism, aided by the presence of 3'UTR-embedded Alus, may also be exploited by DNA viruses to incorporate host genes to their viral genomes.

  7. The Contribution of Alu Elements to Mutagenic DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Streva, Vincent A.; DeFreece, Cecily B.; Hedges, Dale J.; Deininger, Prescott L.

    2015-01-01

    Alu elements make up the largest family of human mobile elements, numbering 1.1 million copies and comprising 11% of the human genome. As a consequence of evolution and genetic drift, Alu elements of various sequence divergence exist throughout the human genome. Alu/Alu recombination has been shown to cause approximately 0.5% of new human genetic diseases and contribute to extensive genomic structural variation. To begin understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to these rearrangements in mammalian cells, we constructed Alu/Alu recombination reporter cell lines containing Alu elements ranging in sequence divergence from 0%-30% that allow detection of both Alu/Alu recombination and large non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) deletions that range from 1.0 to 1.9 kb in size. Introduction of as little as 0.7% sequence divergence between Alu elements resulted in a significant reduction in recombination, which indicates even small degrees of sequence divergence reduce the efficiency of homology-directed DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Further reduction in recombination was observed in a sequence divergence-dependent manner for diverged Alu/Alu recombination constructs with up to 10% sequence divergence. With greater levels of sequence divergence (15%-30%), we observed a significant increase in DSB repair due to a shift from Alu/Alu recombination to variable-length NHEJ which removes sequence between the two Alu elements. This increase in NHEJ deletions depends on the presence of Alu sequence homeology (similar but not identical sequences). Analysis of recombination products revealed that Alu/Alu recombination junctions occur more frequently in the first 100 bp of the Alu element within our reporter assay, just as they do in genomic Alu/Alu recombination events. This is the first extensive study characterizing the influence of Alu element sequence divergence on DNA repair, which will inform predictions regarding the effect of Alu element sequence divergence on both

  8. Quantification of Unmethylated Alu (QUAlu): a tool to assess global hypomethylation in routine clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Buj, Raquel; Mallona, Izaskun; Díez-Villanueva, Anna; Barrera, Víctor; Mauricio, Dídac; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Reverter, Jordi L.; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Azuara, Daniel; Ramírez, Jose L.; Alonso, Sergio; Rosell, Rafael; Capellà, Gabriel; Perucho, Manuel; Robledo, Mercedes; Peinado, Miguel A.; Jordà, Mireia

    2016-01-01

    Hypomethylation of DNA is a hallmark of cancer and its analysis as tumor biomarker has been proposed, but its determination in clinical settings is hampered by lack of standardized methodologies. Here, we present QUAlu (Quantification of Unmethylated Alu), a new technique to estimate the Percentage of UnMethylated Alu (PUMA) as a surrogate for global hypomethylation. QUAlu consists in the measurement by qPCR of Alu repeats after digestion of genomic DNA with isoschizomers with differential sensitivity to DNA methylation. QUAlu performance has been evaluated for reproducibility, trueness and specificity, and validated by deep sequencing. As a proof of use, QUAlu has been applied to a broad variety of pathological examination specimens covering five cancer types. Major findings of the preliminary application of QUAlu to clinical samples include: (1) all normal tissues displayed similar PUMA; (2) tumors showed variable PUMA with the highest levels in lung and colon and the lowest in thyroid cancer; (3) stools from colon cancer patients presented higher PUMA than those from control individuals; (4) lung squamous cell carcinomas showed higher PUMA than lung adenocarcinomas, and an increasing hypomethylation trend associated with smoking habits. In conclusion, QUAlu is a simple and robust method to determine Alu hypomethylation in human biospecimens and may be easily implemented in research and clinical settings. PMID:26859682

  9. Differential alu mobilization and polymorphism among the human and chimpanzee lineages.

    PubMed

    Hedges, Dale J; Callinan, Pauline A; Cordaux, Richard; Xing, Jinchuan; Barnes, Erin; Batzer, Mark A

    2004-06-01

    Alu elements are primate-specific members of the SINE (short interspersed element) retroposon family, which comprise approximately 10% of the human genome. Here we report the first chromosomal-level comparison examining the Alu retroposition dynamics following the divergence of humans and chimpanzees. We find a twofold increase in Alu insertions in humans in comparison to the common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes). The genomic diversity (polymorphism for presence or absence of the Alu insertion) associated with these inserts indicates that, analogous to recent nucleotide diversity studies, the level of chimpanzee Alu diversity is approximately 1.7 times higher than that of humans. Evolutionarily recent Alu subfamily structure differs markedly between the human and chimpanzee lineages, with the major human subfamilies remaining largely inactive in the chimpanzee lineage. We propose a population-based model to account for the observed fluctuation in Alu retroposition rates across primate taxa.

  10. Repeated Priming Increases Memory Accessibility in Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearce, Karen Hildreth; Rovee-Collier, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    In previous research on priming (reactivation) with 3-month-olds, two primes recovered a forgotten memory faster than one, suggesting that prior priming had increased the accessibility of the forgotten memory. Exploiting the fact that the minimum duration of a prime indexes the accessibility of the forgotten memory, we currently examined whether…

  11. MIEN1 is tightly regulated by SINE Alu methylation in its promoter

    PubMed Central

    Van Treuren, Timothy; Klinkebiel, David L.; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2016-01-01

    Migration and invasion enhancer 1 (MIEN1) is a novel gene involved in prostate cancer progression by enhancing prostate cancer cell migration and invasion. DNA methylation, an important epigenetic regulation, is one of the most widely altered mechanisms in prostate cancer. This phenomenon frames the basis to study the DNA methylation patterns in the promoter region of MIEN1. Bisulfite pyrosequencing demonstrates the MIEN1 promoter contains a short interspersed nuclear Alu element (SINE Alu) repeat sequence. Validation of methylation inhibition on MIEN1 was performed using nucleoside analogs and non-nucleoside inhibitors and resulted in an increase in both MIEN1 RNA and protein in normal cells. MIEN1 mRNA and protein increases upon inhibition of individual DNA methyltransferases using RNA interference technologies. Furthermore, dual luciferase reporter assays, in silico analysis, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays identified a sequence upstream of the transcription start site that has a site for binding of the USF transcription factors. These results suggest the MIEN1 promoter has a SINE Alu region that is hypermethylated in normal cells leading to repression of the gene. In cancer, the hypomethylation of a part of this repeat, in addition to the binding of USF, results in MIEN1 expression. PMID:27589566

  12. MIEN1 is tightly regulated by SINE Alu methylation in its promoter.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, Smrithi; Gibbs, Lee D; Van Treuren, Timothy; Klinkebiel, David L; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K

    2016-10-04

    Migration and invasion enhancer 1 (MIEN1) is a novel gene involved in prostate cancer progression by enhancing prostate cancer cell migration and invasion. DNA methylation, an important epigenetic regulation, is one of the most widely altered mechanisms in prostate cancer. This phenomenon frames the basis to study the DNA methylation patterns in the promoter region of MIEN1. Bisulfite pyrosequencing demonstrates the MIEN1 promoter contains a short interspersed nuclear Alu element (SINE Alu) repeat sequence. Validation of methylation inhibition on MIEN1 was performed using nucleoside analogs and non-nucleoside inhibitors and resulted in an increase in both MIEN1 RNA and protein in normal cells. MIEN1 mRNA and protein increases upon inhibition of individual DNA methyltransferases using RNA interference technologies. Furthermore, dual luciferase reporter assays, in silico analysis, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays identified a sequence upstream of the transcription start site that has a site for binding of the USF transcription factors. These results suggest the MIEN1 promoter has a SINE Alu region that is hypermethylated in normal cells leading to repression of the gene. In cancer, the hypomethylation of a part of this repeat, in addition to the binding of USF, results in MIEN1 expression.

  13. Combined sense-antisense Alu elements activate the EGFP reporter gene when stable transfection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhihong; Kong, Xianglong; Liu, Shufeng; Yin, Shuxian; Zhao, Yuehua; Liu, Chao; Lv, Zhanjun; Wang, Xiufang

    2017-08-01

    Alu elements in the human genome are present in more than one million copies, accounting for 10% of the genome. However, the biological functions of most Alu repeats are unknown. In this present study, we detected the effects of Alu elements on EGFP gene expression using a plasmid system to find the roles of Alu elements in human genome. We inserted 5'-4TMI-Alus-CMV promoter-4TMI-Alus (or antisense Alus)-3' sequences into the pEGFP-C1 vector to construct expression vectors. We altered the copy number of Alus, the orientation of the Alus, and the presence of an enhancer (4TMI) in the inserted 5'-4TMI-Alus-CMV promoter-4TMI-Alus (or antisense Alus)-3' sequences. These expression vectors were stably transfected into HeLa cells, and EGFP reporter gene expression was determined. Our results showed that combined sense-antisense Alu elements activated the EGFP reporter gene in the presence of enhancers and stable transfection. The combined sense-antisense Alu vectors carrying four copies of Alus downstream of inserted CMV induced much stronger EGFP gene expression than two copies. Alus downstream of inserted CMV were replaced to AluJBs (having 76% homology with Alu) to construct expression vectors. We found that combined sense-antisense Alu (or antisense AluJB) vectors induced strong EGFP gene expression after stable transfection and heat shock. To further explore combined sense-antisense Alus activating EGFP gene expression, we constructed Tet-on system vectors, mini-C1-Alu-sense-sense and mini-C1-Alu-sense-antisense (EGFP gene was driven by mini-CMV). We found that combined sense-antisense Alus activated EGFP gene in the presence of reverse tetracycline repressor (rTetR) and doxycycline (Dox). Clone experiments showed that Mini-C1-Alu-sense-antisense vector had more positive cells than that of Mini-C1-Alu-sense-sense vector. The results in this paper proved that Alu repetitive sequences inhibited gene expression and combined sense-antisense Alus activated EGFP reporter

  14. The Chinese hamster Alu-equivalent sequence: a conserved highly repetitious, interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid sequence in mammals has a structure suggestive of a transposable element.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, S R; Toomey, T P; Leinwand, L; Jelinek, W R

    1981-01-01

    A consensus sequence has been determined for a major interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid repeat in the genome of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO cells). This sequence is extensively homologous to (i) the human Alu sequence (P. L. Deininger et al., J. Mol. Biol., in press), (ii) the mouse B1 interspersed repetitious sequence (Krayev et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1201-1215, 1980) (iii) an interspersed repetitious sequence from African green monkey deoxyribonucleic acid (Dhruva et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:4514-4518, 1980) and (iv) the CHO and mouse 4.5S ribonucleic acid (this report; F. Harada and N. Kato, Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1273-1285, 1980). Because the CHO consensus sequence shows significant homology to the human Alu sequence it is termed the CHO Alu-equivalent sequence. A conserved structure surrounding CHO Alu-equivalent family members can be recognized. It is similar to that surrounding the human Alu and the mouse B1 sequences, and is represented as follows: direct repeat-CHO-Alu-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. A composite interspersed repetitious sequence has been identified. Its structure is represented as follows: direct repeat-residue 47 to 107 of CHO-Alu-non-Alu repetitious sequence-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. Because the Alu flanking sequences resemble those that flank known transposable elements, we think it likely that the Alu sequence dispersed throughout the mammalian genome by transposition. Images PMID:9279371

  15. Novel Role of 3’UTR-Embedded Alu Elements as Facilitators of Processed Pseudogene Genesis and Host Gene Capture by Viral Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Pablo; Angulo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the high abundance of Alu elements in the human genome, the interest for the functional significance of these retrotransposons has been increasing. Primate Alu and rodent Alu-like elements are retrotransposed by a mechanism driven by the LINE1 (L1) encoded proteins, the same machinery that generates the L1 repeats, the processed pseudogenes (PPs), and other retroelements. Apart from free Alu RNAs, Alus are also transcribed and retrotranscribed as part of cellular gene transcripts, generally embedded inside 3’ untranslated regions (UTRs). Despite different proposed hypotheses, the functional implication of the presence of Alus inside 3’UTRs remains elusive. In this study we hypothesized that Alu elements in 3’UTRs could be involved in the genesis of PPs. By analyzing human genome data we discovered that the existence of 3’UTR-embedded Alu elements is overrepresented in genes source of PPs. In contrast, the presence of other retrotransposable elements in 3’UTRs does not show this PP linked overrepresentation. This research was extended to mouse and rat genomes and the results accordingly reveal overrepresentation of 3’UTR-embedded B1 (Alu-like) elements in PP parent genes. Interestingly, we also demonstrated that the overrepresentation of 3’UTR-embedded Alus is particularly significant in PP parent genes with low germline gene expression level. Finally, we provide data that support the hypothesis that the L1 machinery is also the system that herpesviruses, and possibly other large DNA viruses, use to capture host genes expressed in germline or somatic cells. Altogether our results suggest a novel role for Alu or Alu-like elements inside 3’UTRs as facilitators of the genesis of PPs, particularly in lowly expressed genes. Moreover, we propose that this L1-driven mechanism, aided by the presence of 3’UTR-embedded Alus, may also be exploited by DNA viruses to incorporate host genes to their viral genomes. PMID:28033411

  16. Alu elements and hominid phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Abdel-Halim; Ray, David A.; Xing, Jinchuan; Callinan, Pauline A.; Myers, Jeremy S.; Hedges, Dale J.; Garber, Randall K.; Witherspoon, David J.; Jorde, Lynn B.; Batzer, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Alu elements have inserted in primate genomes throughout the evolution of the order. One particular Alu lineage (Ye) began amplifying relatively early in hominid evolution and continued propagating at a low level as many of its members are found in a variety of hominid genomes. This study represents the first conclusive application of short interspersed elements, which are considered nearly homoplasy-free, to elucidate the phylogeny of hominids. Phylogenetic analysis of Alu Ye5 elements and elements from several other subfamilies reveals high levels of support for monophyly of Hominidae, tribe Hominini and subtribe Hominina. Here we present the strongest evidence reported to date for a sister relationship between humans and chimpanzees while clearly distinguishing the chimpanzee and human lineages. PMID:14561894

  17. Alu elements and hominid phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Salem, Abdel-Halim; Ray, David A; Xing, Jinchuan; Callinan, Pauline A; Myers, Jeremy S; Hedges, Dale J; Garber, Randall K; Witherspoon, David J; Jorde, Lynn B; Batzer, Mark A

    2003-10-28

    Alu elements have inserted in primate genomes throughout the evolution of the order. One particular Alu lineage (Ye) began amplifying relatively early in hominid evolution and continued propagating at a low level as many of its members are found in a variety of hominid genomes. This study represents the first conclusive application of short interspersed elements, which are considered nearly homoplasy-free, to elucidate the phylogeny of hominids. Phylogenetic analysis of Alu Ye5 elements and elements from several other subfamilies reveals high levels of support for monophyly of Hominidae, tribe Hominini and subtribe Hominina. Here we present the strongest evidence reported to date for a sister relationship between humans and chimpanzees while clearly distinguishing the chimpanzee and human lineages.

  18. Repeated administration of adenosine increases its cardiovascular effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, H; García-Márquez, F; Magos, G A

    1987-01-20

    Hypotensive and negative chronotropic responses to adenosine in anesthetized rats increased after previous administration of the nucleoside. Bradycardia after adenosine in the isolated perfused rat heart was also potentiated after repeated administration at short intervals. This self-potentiation could be due to extracellular accumulation of adenosine and persistent stimulation of receptors caused by saturation or inhibition of cellular uptake of adenosine.

  19. Aberrant methylation and associated transcriptional mobilization of Alu elements contributes to genomic instability in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pal, Arnab; Srivastava, Tapasya; Sharma, Manish K; Mehndiratta, Mohit; Das, Prerna; Sinha, Subrata; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad

    2010-11-01

    Hypoxia is an integral part of tumorigenesis and contributes extensively to the neoplastic phenotype including drug resistance and genomic instability. It has also been reported that hypoxia results in global demethylation. Because a majority of the cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) islands are found within the repeat elements of DNA, and are usually methylated under normoxic conditions, we suggested that retrotransposable Alu or short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) which show altered methylation and associated changes of gene expression during hypoxia, could be associated with genomic instability. U87MG glioblastoma cells were cultured in 0.1% O₂ for 6 weeks and compared with cells cultured in 21% O₂ for the same duration. Real-time PCR analysis showed a significant increase in SINE and reverse transcriptase coding long interspersed nuclear element (LINE) transcripts during hypoxia. Sequencing of bisulphite treated DNA as well as the Combined Bisulfite Restriction Analysis (COBRA) assay showed that the SINE loci studied underwent significant hypomethylation though there was patchy hypermethylation at a few sites. The inter-alu PCR profile of DNA from cells cultured under 6-week hypoxia, its 4-week revert back to normoxia and 6-week normoxia showed several changes in the band pattern indicating increased alu mediated genomic alteration. Our results show that aberrant methylation leading to increased transcription of SINE and reverse transcriptase associated LINE elements could lead to increased genomic instability in hypoxia. This might be a cause of genetic heterogeneity in tumours especially in variegated hypoxic environment and lead to a development of foci of more aggressive tumour cells. © 2009 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Hypomethylation of Alu Elements in Post-Menopausal Women with Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Jintaridth, Pornrutsami; Tungtrongchitr, Rungsunn; Preutthipan, Sangchai; Mutirangura, Apiwat

    2013-01-01

    A decrease in genomic methylation commonly occurs in aging cells; however, whether this epigenetic modification leads to age-related phenotypes has not been evaluated. Alu elements are the major interspersed repetitive DNA elements in humans that lose DNA methylation in aging individuals. Alu demethylation in blood cells starts at approximately 40 years of age, and the degree of Alu hypomethylation increases with age. Bone mass is lost with aging, particularly in menopausal women with lower body mass. Consequently, osteoporosis is commonly found in thin postmenopausal women. Here, we correlated the Alu methylation level of blood cells with bone density in 323 postmenopausal women. Alu hypomethylation was associated with advanced age and lower bone mass density, (P<0.05). The association between the Alu methylation level and bone mass was independent of age, body mass, and body fat, with an odds ratio [1]  = 0.4316 (0.2087–0.8927). Individuals of the same age with osteopenia, osteoporosis, and a high body mass index have lower Alu methylation levels (P = 0.0005, 0.003, and ≤0.0001, respectively). Finally, when comparing individuals with the same age and body mass, Alu hypomethylation was observed in individuals with lower bone mass (P<0.0001). In conclusion, there are positive correlations between Alu hypomethylation in blood cells and several age-related phenotypes in bone and body fat. Therefore, reduced global methylation may play a role in the systemic senescence process. Further evaluation of Alu hypomethylation may clarify the epigenetic regulation of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women. PMID:23990903

  1. Age-Associated ALU Element Instability in White Blood Cells Is Linked to Lower Survival in Elderly Adults: A Preliminary Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R Garrett; Venturelli, Massimo; Gross, Cole; Tarperi, Cantor; Schena, Federico; Reggiani, Carlo; Naro, Fabio; Pedrinolla, Anna; Monaco, Lucia; Richardson, Russell S; Donato, Anthony J

    2017-01-01

    ALU element instability could contribute to gene function variance in aging, and may partly explain variation in human lifespan. To assess the role of ALU element instability in human aging and the potential efficacy of ALU element content as a marker of biological aging and survival. Preliminary cohort study. We measured two high frequency ALU element subfamilies, ALU-J and ALU-Sx, by a single qPCR assay and compared ALU-J/Sx content in white blood cell (WBCs) and skeletal muscle cell (SMCs) biopsies from twenty-three elderly adults with sixteen healthy sex-balanced young adults; all-cause survival rates of elderly adults predicted by ALU-J/Sx content in both tissues; and cardiovascular disease (CVD)- and cancer-specific survival rates of elderly adults predicted by ALU-J/Sx content in both tissues, as planned subgroup analyses. We found greater ALU-J/Sx content variance in WBCs from elderly adults than young adults (P < 0.001) with no difference in SMCs (P = 0.94). Elderly adults with low WBC ALU-J/Sx content had worse four-year all-cause and CVD-associated survival than those with high ALU-J/Sx content (both P = 0.03 and hazard ratios (HR) ≥ 3.40), while WBC ALU-J/Sx content had no influence on cancer-associated survival (P = 0.42 and HR = 0.74). SMC ALU-J/Sx content had no influence on all-cause, CVD- or cancer -associated survival (all P ≥ 0.26; HR ≤ 2.07). These initial findings demonstrate that ALU element instability occurs with advanced age in WBCs, but not SMCs, and imparts greater risk of all-cause mortality that is likely driven by an increased risk for CVD and not cancer.

  2. Age-Associated ALU Element Instability in White Blood Cells Is Linked to Lower Survival in Elderly Adults: A Preliminary Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Venturelli, Massimo; Gross, Cole; Tarperi, Cantor; Schena, Federico; Reggiani, Carlo; Naro, Fabio; Pedrinolla, Anna; Monaco, Lucia; Richardson, Russell S.; Donato, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    Background ALU element instability could contribute to gene function variance in aging, and may partly explain variation in human lifespan. Objective To assess the role of ALU element instability in human aging and the potential efficacy of ALU element content as a marker of biological aging and survival. Design Preliminary cohort study. Methods We measured two high frequency ALU element subfamilies, ALU-J and ALU-Sx, by a single qPCR assay and compared ALU-J/Sx content in white blood cell (WBCs) and skeletal muscle cell (SMCs) biopsies from twenty-three elderly adults with sixteen healthy sex-balanced young adults; all-cause survival rates of elderly adults predicted by ALU-J/Sx content in both tissues; and cardiovascular disease (CVD)- and cancer-specific survival rates of elderly adults predicted by ALU-J/Sx content in both tissues, as planned subgroup analyses. Results We found greater ALU-J/Sx content variance in WBCs from elderly adults than young adults (P < 0.001) with no difference in SMCs (P = 0.94). Elderly adults with low WBC ALU-J/Sx content had worse four-year all-cause and CVD-associated survival than those with high ALU-J/Sx content (both P = 0.03 and hazard ratios (HR) ≥ 3.40), while WBC ALU-J/Sx content had no influence on cancer-associated survival (P = 0.42 and HR = 0.74). SMC ALU-J/Sx content had no influence on all-cause, CVD- or cancer -associated survival (all P ≥ 0.26; HR ≤ 2.07). Conclusions These initial findings demonstrate that ALU element instability occurs with advanced age in WBCs, but not SMCs, and imparts greater risk of all-cause mortality that is likely driven by an increased risk for CVD and not cancer. PMID:28060910

  3. Epigenetic nucleosomes: Alu sequences and CG as nucleosome positioning element.

    PubMed

    Salih, F; Salih, B; Kogan, S; Trifonov, E N

    2008-08-01

    Alu sequences carry periodical pattern with CG dinucleotides (CpG) repeating every 31-32 bases. Similar distances are observed in distribution of DNA curvature in crystallized nucleosomes, at positions +/-1.5 and +/-4.5 periods of DNA from nucleosome DNA dyad. Since CG elements are also found to impart to nucleosomes higher stability when positioned at +/-1.5 sites, it suggests that CG dinucleotides may play a role in modulation of the nucleosome strength when the CG elements are methylated. Thus, Alu sequences may harbor special epigenetic nucleosomes with methylation-dependent regulatory functions. Nucleosome DNA sequence probe is suggested to detect locations of such regulatory nucleosomes in the sequences.

  4. Identification of Alternative Variants and Insertion of the Novel Polymorphic AluYl17 in TSEN54 Gene during Primate Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hyun; Choe, Se-Hee; Cho, Hyeon-Mu; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kim, Ji-Su; Song, Bong-Seok; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Jin, Yeung Bae; Kang, Philyong

    2016-01-01

    TSEN54 encodes a subunit of the tRNA-splicing endonuclease complex, which catalyzes the identification and cleavage of introns from precursor tRNAs. Previously, we identified an AluSx-derived alternative transcript in TSEN54 of cynomolgus monkey. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification and TSEN54 sequence analysis of primate and human samples identified five novel alternative transcripts, including the AluSx exonized transcript. Additionally, we performed comparative expression analysis via RT-qPCR in various cynomolgus, rhesus monkey, and human tissues. RT-qPCR amplification revealed differential expression patterns. Furthermore, genomic PCR amplification and sequencing of primate and human DNA samples revealed that AluSx elements were integrated in human and all of the primate samples tested. Intriguingly, in langur genomic DNA, an additional AluY element was inserted into AluSx of intron eight of TSEN54. The new AluY element showed polymorphic insertion. Using standardized nomenclature for Alu repeats, the polymorphic AluY of the langur TSEN54 was designated as being of the AluYl17 subfamily. Our results suggest that integration of the AluSx element in TSEN54 contributed to diversity in transcripts and induced lineage- or species-specific evolutionary events such as alternative splicing and polymorphic insertion during primate evolution. PMID:28083540

  5. Evidence for large diversity in the human transcriptome created by Alu RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Barak, Michal; Levanon, Erez Y; Eisenberg, Eli; Paz, Nurit; Rechavi, Gideon; Church, George M; Mehr, Ramit

    2009-11-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing alters the original genomic content of the human transcriptome and is essential for maintenance of normal life in mammals. A-to-I editing in Alu repeats is abundant in the human genome, with many thousands of expressed Alu sequences undergoing editing. Little is known so far about the contribution of Alu editing to transcriptome complexity. Transcripts derived from a single edited Alu sequence can be edited in multiple sites, and thus could theoretically generate a large number of different transcripts. Here we explored whether the combinatorial potential nature of edited Alu sequences is actually fulfilled in the human transcriptome. We analyzed datasets of editing sites and performed an analysis of a detailed transcript set of one edited Alu sequence. We found that editing appears at many more sites than detected by earlier genomic screens. To a large extent, editing of different sites within the same transcript is only weakly correlated. Thus, rather than finding a few versions of each transcript, a large number of edited variants arise, resulting in immense transcript diversity that eclipses alternative splicing as mechanism of transcriptome diversity, although with less impact on the proteome.

  6. Repeated Binge Drinking Increases Perineuronal Nets in the Insular Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hu; He, Donghong; Lasek, Amy W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol exposure leads to changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the brain, which profoundly impacts neuronal plasticity. Perineuronal nets (PNs) are specialized ECM structures that enclose subpopulations of neurons in the cortex. Adolescent exposure to alcohol induces long-lasting increases in the expression of PN components in the cortex in adult mice. However, it has not been determined whether binge alcohol exposure in young adults alters PNs. Here, we examined PNs and their core components in the insula and primary motor cortex after repeated binge-like ethanol consumption in adult mice. Methods The 4 day drinking in the dark (DID) procedure was performed in mice for 1 or 6 weeks to model binge alcohol consumption. The impact of ethanol drinking on PNs was examined by fluorescent staining of brain sections using a marker for PNs, Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). In another set of experiments, cortex was dissected and Western blots and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) were performed to evaluate the expression of the PN proteins aggrecan, brevican, and phosphacan. Results Binge-like ethanol drinking for 6 weeks caused a significant increase in PNs in the insula, as measured by WFA binding. Aggrecan, brevican and phosphacan protein expression, and aggrecan mRNA expression, were also elevated in the insula after 6 weeks of ethanol drinking. In contrast, expression of PN components did not change after 1 week of DID. The increase in PNs appears to be specific to the insula, since alterations were not observed in the primary motor cortex. Conclusions Our results provide the first evidence that insular PNs increase after long-term binge drinking. The insula mediates compulsive alcohol use. Since PNs influence neuronal firing and plasticity, increased PNs in the insula after multiple binge cycles may contribute to restricted neuronal plasticity and lead to the development of compulsive alcohol use. PMID:26332441

  7. Alu-mediated diverse and complex pathogenic copy-number variants within human chromosome 17 at p13.3.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shen; Yuan, Bo; Campbell, Ian M; Beck, Christine R; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Erez, Ayelet; Patel, Ankita; Bacino, Carlos A; Shaw, Chad A; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Cheung, Sau Wai; Bi, Weimin; Lupski, James R

    2015-07-15

    Alu repetitive elements are known to be major contributors to genome instability by generating Alu-mediated copy-number variants (CNVs). Most of the reported Alu-mediated CNVs are simple deletions and duplications, and the mechanism underlying Alu-Alu-mediated rearrangement has been attributed to non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Chromosome 17 at the p13.3 genomic region lacks extensive low-copy repeat architecture; however, it is highly enriched for Alu repetitive elements, with a fraction of 30% of total sequence annotated in the human reference genome, compared with the 10% genome-wide and 18% on chromosome 17. We conducted mechanistic studies of the 17p13.3 CNVs by performing high-density oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization, specifically interrogating the 17p13.3 region with ∼150 bp per probe density; CNV breakpoint junctions were mapped to nucleotide resolution by polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Studied rearrangements include 5 interstitial deletions, 14 tandem duplications, 7 terminal deletions and 13 complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs). Within the 17p13.3 region, Alu-Alu-mediated rearrangements were identified in 80% of the interstitial deletions, 46% of the tandem duplications and 50% of the CGRs, indicating that this mechanism was a major contributor for formation of breakpoint junctions. Our studies suggest that Alu repetitive elements facilitate formation of non-recurrent CNVs, CGRs and other structural aberrations of chromosome 17 at p13.3. The common observation of Alu-mediated rearrangement in CGRs and breakpoint junction sequences analysis further demonstrates that this type of mechanism is unlikely attributed to NAHR, but rather may be due to a recombination-coupled DNA replicative repair process.

  8. Resisting sarcolemmal rupture: dystrophin repeats increase membrane-actin stiffness.

    PubMed

    Sarkis, Joe; Vié, Véronique; Winder, Steve J; Renault, Anne; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Hubert, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Dystrophin is an essential part of a membrane protein complex that provides flexible support to muscle fiber membranes. Loss of dystrophin function leads to membrane fragility and muscle-wasting disease. Given the importance of cytoskeletal interactions in strengthening the sarcolemma, we have focused on actin-binding domain 2 of human dystrophin, constituted by repeats 11 to 15 of the central domain (DYS R11-15). We previously showed that DYS R11-15 also interacts with membrane lipids. We investigated the shear elastic constant (μ) and the surface viscosity (η(s)) of Langmuir phospholipid monolayers mimicking the inner leaflet of the sarcolemma in the presence of DYS R11-15 and actin. The initial interaction of 100 nM DYS R11-15 with the monolayers slightly modifies their rheological properties. Injection of 0.125 μM filamentous actin leads to a strong increase of μ and η(s,) from 0 to 5.5 mN/m and 2.4 × 10(-4) N · s/m, respectively. These effects are specific to DYS R11-15, require filamentous actin, and depend on phospholipid nature and lateral surface pressure. These findings suggest that the central domain of dystrophin contributes significantly to the stiffness and the stability of the sarcolemma through its simultaneous interactions with the cytoskeleton and lipid membrane. This mechanical link is likely to be a major contributing factor to the shock absorber function of dystrophin and muscle sarcolemmal integrity on mechanical stress.

  9. Assembly and characterization of novel Alu inserts detected from next-generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Harun; David, Matei; Brudno, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive elements generally, and Alu inserts specifically are a large contributor to the recent evolution of the human genome. By assembling the sequences of novel Alu inserts using their respective subfamily consensus sequences as references, we found an exponential decay in the Alu subfamily call enrichment with increased number of sequence variants (Pearson correlation r=−0.68, p<0.0039). By mapping the sequences of these inserts to a human reference genome, we infer the reference Alu sources of a subset of the novel Alus, of which 85% were previously shown to be active. We also evaluate relationships between the loci of the novel inserts and their inferred sources. PMID:26442170

  10. Alu elements shape the primate transcriptome by cis-regulation of RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA editing by adenosine to inosine deamination is a widespread phenomenon, particularly frequent in the human transcriptome, largely due to the presence of inverted Alu repeats and their ability to form double-stranded structures – a requisite for ADAR editing. While several hundred thousand editing sites have been identified within these primate-specific repeats, the function of Alu-editing has yet to be elucidated. Results We show that inverted Alu repeats, expressed in the primate brain, can induce site-selective editing in cis on sites located several hundred nucleotides from the Alu elements. Furthermore, a computational analysis, based on available RNA-seq data, finds that site-selective editing occurs significantly closer to edited Alu elements than expected. These targets are poorly edited upon deletion of the editing inducers, as well as in homologous transcripts from organisms lacking Alus. Sequences surrounding sites near edited Alus in UTRs, have been subjected to a lesser extent of evolutionary selection than those far from edited Alus, indicating that their editing generally depends on cis-acting Alus. Interestingly, we find an enrichment of primate-specific editing within encoded sequence or the UTRs of zinc finger-containing transcription factors. Conclusions We propose a model whereby primate-specific editing is induced by adjacent Alu elements that function as recruitment elements for the ADAR editing enzymes. The enrichment of site-selective editing with potentially functional consequences on the expression of transcription factors indicates that editing contributes more profoundly to the transcriptomic regulation and repertoire in primates than previously thought. PMID:24485196

  11. Growth signals employ CGGBP1 to suppress transcription of Alu-SINEs

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Prasoon; Enroth, Stefan; Teichmann, Martin; Jernberg Wiklund, Helena; Smit, Arian; Westermark, Bengt; Singh, Umashankar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT CGGBP1 (CGG triplet repeat-binding protein 1) regulates cell proliferation, stress response, cytokinesis, telomeric integrity and transcription. It could affect these processes by modulating target gene expression under different conditions. Identification of CGGBP1-target genes and their regulation could reveal how a transcription regulator affects such diverse cellular processes. Here we describe the mechanisms of differential gene expression regulation by CGGBP1 in quiescent or growing cells. By studying global gene expression patterns and genome-wide DNA-binding patterns of CGGBP1, we show that a possible mechanism through which it affects the expression of RNA Pol II-transcribed genes in trans depends on Alu RNA. We also show that it regulates Alu transcription in cis by binding to Alu promoter. Our results also indicate that potential phosphorylation of CGGBP1 upon growth stimulation facilitates its nuclear retention, Alu-binding and dislodging of RNA Pol III therefrom. These findings provide insights into how Alu transcription is regulated in response to growth signals. PMID:25483050

  12. Model-based adhesive shrinkage compensation for increased bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Tobias; Schlette, Christian; Lakshmanan, Shunmuganathan; Haag, Sebastian; Zontar, Daniel; Sauer, Sebastian; Wenzel, Christian; Brecher, Christian; Roβmann, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The assembly process of optical components consists of two phases - the alignment and the bonding phase. Precision - or better process repeatability - is limited by the latter one. The limitation of the alignment precision is given by the measurement equipment and the manipulation technology applied. Today's micromanipulators in combination with beam imaging setups allow for an alignment in the range of far below 100nm. However, once precisely aligned optics need to be fixed in their position. State o f the art in optics bonding for laser systems is adhesive bonding with UV-curing adhesives. Adhesive bonding is a multi-factorial process and thus subject to statistical process deviations. As a matter of fact, UV-curing adhesives inherit shrinkage effects during their curing process, making offsets for shrinkage compensation mandatory. Enhancing the process control of the adhesive bonding process is the major goal of the activities described in this paper. To improve the precision of shrinkage compensation a dynamic shrinkage prediction is envisioned by Fraunhofer IPT. Intense research activities are being practiced to gather a deeper understanding of the parameters influencing adhesive shrinkage behavior. These effects are of different nature - obviously being the raw adhesive material itself as well as its condition, the bonding geometry, environmental parameters like surrounding temperature and of course process parameters such as curing properties. Understanding the major parameters and linking them in a model-based shrinkage-prediction environment is the basis for improved process control. Results are being deployed by Fraunhofer in prototyping, as well as volume production solutions for laser systems.

  13. Alu RNA accumulation induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by modulating miR-566 and is associated with cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Di Ruocco, F; Basso, V; Rivoire, M; Mehlen, P; Ambati, J; De Falco, S; Tarallo, V

    2017-10-09

    Alu sequences are the most abundant short interspersed repeated elements in the human genome. Here we show that in a cell culture model of colorectal cancer (CRC) progression, we observe accumulation of Alu RNA that is associated with reduced DICER1 levels. Alu RNA induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by acting as a molecular sponge of miR-566. Moreover, Alu RNA accumulates as consequence of DICER1 deficit in colorectal, ovarian, renal and breast cancer cell lines. Interestingly, Alu RNA knockdown prevents DICER1 depletion-induced EMT despite global microRNA (miRNA) downregulation. Alu RNA expression is also induced by transforming growth factor-β1, a major driver of EMT. Corroborating this data, we found that non-coding Alu RNA significantly correlates with tumor progression in human CRC patients. Together, these findings reveal an unexpected DICER1-dependent, miRNA-independent role of Alu RNA in cancer progression that could bring mobile element transcripts in the fields of cancer therapeutic and prognosis.Oncogene advance online publication, 9 October 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.369.

  14. Detailed Mapping of the Alu Volcano, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrain, Guillaume; Buso, Roxane; Carlier, Jean; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    The Alu volcano in the Danakil Depression is interpreted as a forced-fold related uplift, related to progressive intrusions of sills, or similar tabular intrusions. Alu is in a very isolated and difficult to access area, but Google Earth provides high resolution images that can be used for mapping the structure and volcanic features. We use the imagery to map in as much detail as possible all the morphological features of Alu, which we separate into primary volcanic features and secondary structural features. The mapping has been undertaken by a group undergraduates, graduates and researchers. The group has checked and validated the interpretation of each feature mapped. The data set is available as a kmz, and has been imported into QGIS. The detailed mapping reveals a complex history of multiple lava fields and fissure eruptions, some which pre-date uplift, while others have occurred during uplift, but are subsequently deformed. Similarly, there are cross-cutting structures, and we are able to set up a chronology of events. This shows that uplift grew in an area which was already covered by lavas, that some lava has been probably erupted from Alu's flanks, while most eruptions have been from around the base of Alu. Early in the deformation, thrust faults developed on the lower flanks, similar to those described near the Grosmanaux uplift (van Wyk de Vries et al 2014). These are cut by the larger faults, and by minor fissures. The mapping provides an accessible way of preparing for dedicated fieldwork in preparation of an eventual field expedition to Alu, while extracting the most from remote sensing data.

  15. Alu-mediated diverse and complex pathogenic copy-number variants within human chromosome 17 at p13.3

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shen; Yuan, Bo; Campbell, Ian M.; Beck, Christine R.; Carvalho, Claudia M.B.; Nagamani, Sandesh C.S.; Erez, Ayelet; Patel, Ankita; Bacino, Carlos A.; Shaw, Chad A.; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Cheung, Sau Wai; Bi, Weimin; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Alu repetitive elements are known to be major contributors to genome instability by generating Alu-mediated copy-number variants (CNVs). Most of the reported Alu-mediated CNVs are simple deletions and duplications, and the mechanism underlying Alu–Alu-mediated rearrangement has been attributed to non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Chromosome 17 at the p13.3 genomic region lacks extensive low-copy repeat architecture; however, it is highly enriched for Alu repetitive elements, with a fraction of 30% of total sequence annotated in the human reference genome, compared with the 10% genome-wide and 18% on chromosome 17. We conducted mechanistic studies of the 17p13.3 CNVs by performing high-density oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization, specifically interrogating the 17p13.3 region with ∼150 bp per probe density; CNV breakpoint junctions were mapped to nucleotide resolution by polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Studied rearrangements include 5 interstitial deletions, 14 tandem duplications, 7 terminal deletions and 13 complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs). Within the 17p13.3 region, Alu–Alu-mediated rearrangements were identified in 80% of the interstitial deletions, 46% of the tandem duplications and 50% of the CGRs, indicating that this mechanism was a major contributor for formation of breakpoint junctions. Our studies suggest that Alu repetitive elements facilitate formation of non-recurrent CNVs, CGRs and other structural aberrations of chromosome 17 at p13.3. The common observation of Alu-mediated rearrangement in CGRs and breakpoint junction sequences analysis further demonstrates that this type of mechanism is unlikely attributed to NAHR, but rather may be due to a recombination-coupled DNA replicative repair process. PMID:25908615

  16. Genome-wide chromatin remodeling modulates the Alu heat shock response.

    PubMed

    Kim, C; Rubin, C M; Schmid, C W

    2001-10-03

    During heat shock recovery in Hela cells, the level of Alu RNA transiently increases with kinetics that approximately parallel the transient expression of heat shock protein mRNAs. Coincidentally, there is a transient increase in the accessibility of Alu chromatin to restriction enzyme cleavage suggesting that an opening and re-closing of chromatin regulates the Alu stress response. Similar changes occur in alpha satellite and LINE1 chromatin showing that heat shock induces a genome-wide remodeling of chromatin structure which is independent of transcription. The increased accessibility of restriction sites within these repetitive sequences is inconsistent with a simple lengthening of the nucleosome linker region but instead suggests a scrambling of nucleosome positions. Chromatin structure and its dynamics account for many of the principal features of SINE transcriptional regulation potentially providing a functional rationale for the dispersion and high copy number of SINEs.

  17. Papio Baboon Species Indicative Alu Elements

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Jerilyn A.; Jordan, Vallmer E.; Steely, Cody J.; Beckstrom, Thomas O.; McDaniel, Cullen L.; St. Romain, Corey P.; Bennett, Emily C.; Robichaux, Arianna; Clement, Brooke N.; Konkel, Miriam K.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The genus of Papio (baboon) has six recognized species separated into Northern and Southern clades, each comprised of three species distributed across the African continent. Geographic origin and phenotypic variants such as coat color and body size have commonly been used to identify different species. The existence of multiple hybrid zones, both ancient and current, have complicated efforts to characterize the phylogeny of Papio baboons. More recently, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome genetic markers have been utilized for species identification with particular focus on the hybrid zones. Alu elements accumulate in a random manner and are a novel source of identical by descent variation with known ancestral states for inferring population genetic and phylogenetic relationships. As part of the Baboon Genome Analysis Consortium, we assembled an Alu insertion polymorphism database of nearly 500 Papio-lineage specific insertions representing all six species and performed population structure and phylogenetic analyses. In this study, we have selected a subset of 48 species indicative Alu insertions and demonstrate their utility as genetic systems for the identification of baboon species within Papio. Individual elements from the panel are easy to genotype and can be used in a hierarchical fashion based on the original level of uncertainty. This Alu-48 panel should serve as a valuable tool during the maintenance of pedigree records in captive populations and assist in the forensic identification of fossils and potential hybrids in the wild. PMID:28854642

  18. Structural Variation of Alu Element and Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Songmi; Cho, Chun-Sung; Han, Kyudong; Lee, Jungnam

    2016-09-01

    Transposable elements are one of major sources to cause genomic instability through various mechanisms including de novo insertion, insertion-mediated genomic deletion, and recombination-associated genomic deletion. Among them is Alu element which is the most abundant element, composing ~10% of the human genome. The element emerged in the primate genome 65 million years ago and has since propagated successfully in the human and non-human primate genomes. Alu element is a non-autonomous retrotransposon and therefore retrotransposed using L1-enzyme machinery. The 'master gene' model has been generally accepted to explain Alu element amplification in primate genomes. According to the model, different subfamilies of Alu elements are created by mutations on the master gene and most Alu elements are amplified from the hyperactive master genes. Alu element is frequently involved in genomic rearrangements in the human genome due to its abundance and sequence identity between them. The genomic rearrangements caused by Alu elements could lead to genetic disorders such as hereditary disease, blood disorder, and neurological disorder. In fact, Alu elements are associated with approximately 0.1% of human genetic disorders. The first part of this review discusses mechanisms of Alu amplification and diversity among different Alu subfamilies. The second part discusses the particular role of Alu elements in generating genomic rearrangements as well as human genetic disorders.

  19. Structural Variation of Alu Element and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Songmi; Cho, Chun-Sung; Han, Kyudong

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements are one of major sources to cause genomic instability through various mechanisms including de novo insertion, insertion-mediated genomic deletion, and recombination-associated genomic deletion. Among them is Alu element which is the most abundant element, composing ~10% of the human genome. The element emerged in the primate genome 65 million years ago and has since propagated successfully in the human and non-human primate genomes. Alu element is a non-autonomous retrotransposon and therefore retrotransposed using L1-enzyme machinery. The 'master gene' model has been generally accepted to explain Alu element amplification in primate genomes. According to the model, different subfamilies of Alu elements are created by mutations on the master gene and most Alu elements are amplified from the hyperactive master genes. Alu element is frequently involved in genomic rearrangements in the human genome due to its abundance and sequence identity between them. The genomic rearrangements caused by Alu elements could lead to genetic disorders such as hereditary disease, blood disorder, and neurological disorder. In fact, Alu elements are associated with approximately 0.1% of human genetic disorders. The first part of this review discusses mechanisms of Alu amplification and diversity among different Alu subfamilies. The second part discusses the particular role of Alu elements in generating genomic rearrangements as well as human genetic disorders. PMID:27729835

  20. Effect of alcohol consumption on peripheral blood Alu methylation in Korean men.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Sun; Kim, Young Hun; Lee, Won Kee; Na, Yeon Kyung; Hong, Hae Sook

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUD) are defined as alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence, which create a substantial public health problem worldwide. To date, no therapeutic can effectively solve these problems. They are complex diseases characterized by both genetic and environmental factors. DNA methylation can act as a downstream effector of environmental signals and account for multi-factorial nature of the disease. Global DNA methylation of peripheral blood cells has recently been proposed as a potential biomarker for disease risk. Alu elements host one-quarter of CpG dinucelotides in the genome to function as proxies for global DNA methylation. In this study, we evaluated the Alu methylation in the peripheral blood DNA of healthy volunteers and AUD patients using the pyrosequencing technology. The Alu methylation level is significantly higher in AUD compared to healthy controls (23.4 ± 1.6 versus 22.1 ± 1.0, t = 7.83, p < 0.0001). Moreover, significant correlation was found between Alu methylation and alcohol use disorders identification test score (r = 0.250, p < 0.0001), alcohol problem (r = 0.294, p < 0.0001), and life position (r = -0.205, p = 0.0005). Overall, these novel findings indicate that alcohol-related increase in Alu methylation might play a complex role in the etiology and pathogenesis of AUD. Further studies are required to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this relationship.

  1. AluHunter: a database of potentially polymorphic Alu insertions for use in primate phylogeny and population genetics.

    PubMed

    Bergey, Christina M

    2011-10-15

    AluHunter is a database of taxon-specific primate Alu elements for use in phylogeny and population genetics. The software automatically isolates potentially polymorphic Alu insertions in sequences submitted to GenBank by screening the elements against reference genomes. The resultant database of variable markers is a valuable resource for researchers interested in characterizing Alu elements in their primate taxon of interest. The AluHunter database can be accessed at http://www.aluhunter.com. cmb433@nyu.edu.

  2. Alu-mediated nonallelic homologous and nonhomologous recombination in the BMPR2 gene in heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Masaharu; Aimi, Yuki; Yanagisawa, Ryoji; Ono, Masae; Oka, Akira; Fukuda, Keiichi; Yoshino, Hideaki; Satoh, Toru; Gamou, Shinobu

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to undertake thorough genetic analysis of the bone morphogenetic protein type 2 receptor (BMPR2) gene in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. We conducted a systematic analysis for larger gene rearrangements together with conventional mutation analysis in 152 pulmonary arterial hypertension patients including 43 patients diagnosed as having idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and 10 diagnosed as having familial pulmonary arterial hypertension. Analysis of the BMPR2 gene revealed each of the four kinds of nonsense and frameshift mutations, one missense mutation, one splice-site mutation, and two types of exonic deletion. For cases in which exons 1-3 were deleted, the 5' and 3' break points were located in the AluY repeat sequences in the 5' side of the adjacent NOP58 gene and in the AluY repeat sequences in intron 3, suggesting an AluY-mediated nonallelic homologous recombination as the mechanism responsible for the deletion. For the case in which exon 10 was deleted, nonhomologous recombination took place between the AluSx site in intron 9 and a unique sequence in intron 10. Exonic deletions of BMPR2 account for at least part of BMPR2 mutations associated with heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension in Japan, as previously reported in other populations. One of our cases was mediated via Alu-mediated nonallelic homologous recombination and another was mediated via nonhomologous recombination.

  3. Repeating a Monologue under Increasing Time Pressure: Effects on Fluency, Complexity, and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thai, Chau; Boers, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that learners' task performance improves when they have the opportunity to repeat the task. Conditions for task repetition vary, however. In the 4/3/2 activity, learners repeat a monologue under increasing time pressure. The purpose is to foster fluency, but it has been suggested in the literature that it also benefits other…

  4. Repeating a Monologue under Increasing Time Pressure: Effects on Fluency, Complexity, and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thai, Chau; Boers, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that learners' task performance improves when they have the opportunity to repeat the task. Conditions for task repetition vary, however. In the 4/3/2 activity, learners repeat a monologue under increasing time pressure. The purpose is to foster fluency, but it has been suggested in the literature that it also benefits other…

  5. Maternal phthalate exposure during pregnancy is associated with DNA methylation of LINE-1 and Alu repetitive elements in Mexican-American children.

    PubMed

    Huen, Karen; Calafat, Antonia M; Bradman, Asa; Yousefi, Paul; Eskenazi, Brenda; Holland, Nina

    2016-07-01

    Phthalates are frequently used in personal care products and plasticizers and phthalate exposure is ubiquitous in the US population. Exposure to phthalates during critical periods in utero has been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes but the biological mechanisms linking these exposures with disease are not well characterized. In this study, we examined the relationship of in utero phthalate exposure with repetitive element DNA methylation, an epigenetic marker of genome instability, in children from the longitudinal birth cohort CHAMACOS. Methylation of Alu and long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINE-1) was determined using pyrosequencing of bisulfite-treated DNA isolated from whole blood samples collected from newborns and 9 year old children (n=355). Concentrations of eleven phthalate metabolites were measured in urine collected from pregnant mothers at 13 and 26 weeks gestation. We found a consistent inverse association between prenatal concentrations of monoethyl phthalate, the most frequently detected urinary metabolite, with cord blood methylation of Alu repeats (β(95%CI): -0.14 (-0.28,0.00) and -0.16 (-0.31, -0.02)) for early and late pregnancy, respectively, and a similar but weaker association with LINE-1 methylation. Additionally, increases in urinary concentrations of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate metabolites during late pregnancy were associated with lower levels of methylation of Alu repeats in 9 year old blood (significant p-values ranged from 0.003 to 0.03). Our findings suggest that prenatal exposure to some phthalates may influence differences in repetitive element methylation, highlighting epigenetics as a plausible biological mechanism through which phthalates may affect health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Maternal phthalate exposure during pregnancy is associated with DNA methylation of LINE-1 and Alu repetitive elements in Mexican-American children

    PubMed Central

    Huen, Karen; Calafat, Antonia M.; Bradman, Asa; Yousefi, Paul; Eskenazi, Brenda; Holland, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Phthalates are frequently used in personal care products and plasticizers and phthalate exposure is ubiquitous in the US population. Exposure to phthalates during critical periods in utero has been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes but the biological mechanisms linking these exposures with disease are not well characterized. In this study, we examined the relationship of in utero phthalate exposure with repetitive element DNA methylation, an epigenetic marker of genome instability, in children from the longitudinal birth cohort CHAMACOS. Methylation of Alu and long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINE-1) was determined using pyrosequencing of bisulfite-treated DNA isolated from whole blood samples collected from newborns and 9 year old children (n=355). Concentrations of eleven phthalate metabolites were measured in urine collected from pregnant mothers at 13 and 26 weeks gestation. We found a consistent inverse association between prenatal concentrations of monoethyl phthalate, the most frequently detected urinary metabolite, with cord blood methylation of Alu repeats (β(95%CI):−0.14(−0.28,0.00) and −0.16(−0.31,−0.02)) for early and late pregnancy, respectively, and a similar but weaker association with LINE-1 methylation. Additionally, increases in urinary concentrations of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate metabolites during late pregnancy were associated with lower levels of methylation of Alu repeats in 9 year old blood (significant p-values ranged from 0.003 to 0.03). Our findings suggest that prenatal exposure to some phthalates may influence differences in repetitive element methylation, highlighting epigenetics as a plausible biological mechanism through which phthalates may affect health. PMID:27019040

  7. Selective inhibition of Alu retrotransposition by APOBEC3G

    PubMed Central

    Hulme, Amy E.; Bogerd, Hal P.; Cullen, Bryan R.; Moran, John V.

    2010-01-01

    The non-LTR retrotransposon LINE-1 (L1) comprises ~17% of the human genome, and the L1-encoded proteins can function in trans to mediate the retrotransposition of non-autonomous retrotransposons (i.e., Alu and probably SVA elements) and cellular mRNAs to generate processed pseudogenes. Here, we have examined the effect of APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F, cytidine deaminases that inhibit Vif-deficient HIV-1 replication, on Alu retrotransposition and other L1-mediated retrotransposition processes. We demonstrate that APOBEC3G selectively inhibits Alu retrotransposition in an ORF1p-independent manner. An active cytidine deaminase site is not required for inhibition of Alu retrotransposition and the resultant integration events lack G to A or C to T hypermutation. These data demonstrate a differential restriction of L1 and Alu retrotransposition by APOBEC3G, and suggest that the Alu ribonucleoprotein complex may be targeted by APOBEC3G. PMID:17079095

  8. Sequence Analysis and Characterization of Active Human Alu Subfamilies Based on the 1000 Genomes Pilot Project

    PubMed Central

    Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Hotard, Ashley B.; Ranck, Megan C.; Fontenot, Catherine C.; Storer, Jessica; Stewart, Chip; Marth, Gabor T.; Batzer, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the 1000 Genomes Consortium is to characterize human genome structural variation (SV), including forms of copy number variations such as deletions, duplications, and insertions. Mobile element insertions, particularly Alu elements, are major contributors to genomic SV among humans. During the pilot phase of the project we experimentally validated 645 (611 intergenic and 34 exon targeted) polymorphic “young” Alu insertion events, absent from the human reference genome. Here, we report high resolution sequencing of 343 (322 unique) recent Alu insertion events, along with their respective target site duplications, precise genomic breakpoint coordinates, subfamily assignment, percent divergence, and estimated A-rich tail lengths. All the sequenced Alu loci were derived from the AluY lineage with no evidence of retrotransposition activity involving older Alu families (e.g., AluJ and AluS). AluYa5 is currently the most active Alu subfamily in the human lineage, followed by AluYb8, and many others including three newly identified subfamilies we have termed AluYb7a3, AluYb8b1, and AluYa4a1. This report provides the structural details of 322 unique Alu variants from individual human genomes collectively adding about 100 kb of genomic variation. Many Alu subfamilies are currently active in human populations, including a surprising level of AluY retrotransposition. Human Alu subfamilies exhibit continuous evolution with potential drivers sprouting new Alu lineages. PMID:26319576

  9. An Alu-Based Phylogeny of Gibbons (Hylobatidae)

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Thomas J.; McLain, Adam T.; Oldenburg, J. Michael; Faulk, Christopher; Bourgeois, Matthew G.; Conlin, Erin M.; Mootnick, Alan R.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Roos, Christian; Carbone, Lucia; Batzer, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Gibbons (Hylobatidae) are small, arboreal apes indigenous to Southeast Asia that diverged from other apes ∼15–18 Ma. Extant lineages radiated rapidly 6–10 Ma and are organized into four genera (Hylobates, Hoolock, Symphalangus, and Nomascus) consisting of 12–19 species. The use of short interspersed elements (SINEs) as phylogenetic markers has seen recent popularity due to several desirable characteristics: the ancestral state of a locus is known to be the absence of an element, rare potentially homoplasious events are relatively easy to resolve, and samples can be quickly and inexpensively genotyped. During radiation of primates, one particular family of SINEs, the Alu family, has proliferated in primate genomes. Nomascus leucogenys (northern white-cheeked gibbon) sequences were analyzed for repetitive content with RepeatMasker using a custom library. The sequences containing Alu elements identified as members of a gibbon-specific subfamily were then compared with orthologous positions in other primate genomes. A primate phylogenetic panel consisting of 18 primate species, including 13 gibbon species representing all four extant genera, was assayed for all loci, and a total of 125 gibbon-specific Alu insertions were identified. The resulting amplification patterns were used to generate a phylogenetic tree. We demonstrate significant support for Symphalangus as the most basal lineage within the family. Our findings also place Nomascus as a derived lineage, sister to Hoolock, with the Nomascus–Hoolock clade sister to Hylobates. Further, our analysis groups N. leucogenys and Nomascus siki as sister taxa to the exclusion of the other Nomascus species assayed. This study represents the first use of SINEs to determine the genus level phylogenetic relationships within the family Hylobatidae. These relationships have been resolved with robust support at most internal nodes, demonstrating the utility of SINE-based phylogenetic analysis. We postulate that

  10. An Alu-based phylogeny of gibbons (hylobatidae).

    PubMed

    Meyer, Thomas J; McLain, Adam T; Oldenburg, J Michael; Faulk, Christopher; Bourgeois, Matthew G; Conlin, Erin M; Mootnick, Alan R; de Jong, Pieter J; Roos, Christian; Carbone, Lucia; Batzer, Mark A

    2012-11-01

    Gibbons (Hylobatidae) are small, arboreal apes indigenous to Southeast Asia that diverged from other apes ∼15-18 Ma. Extant lineages radiated rapidly 6-10 Ma and are organized into four genera (Hylobates, Hoolock, Symphalangus, and Nomascus) consisting of 12-19 species. The use of short interspersed elements (SINEs) as phylogenetic markers has seen recent popularity due to several desirable characteristics: the ancestral state of a locus is known to be the absence of an element, rare potentially homoplasious events are relatively easy to resolve, and samples can be quickly and inexpensively genotyped. During radiation of primates, one particular family of SINEs, the Alu family, has proliferated in primate genomes. Nomascus leucogenys (northern white-cheeked gibbon) sequences were analyzed for repetitive content with RepeatMasker using a custom library. The sequences containing Alu elements identified as members of a gibbon-specific subfamily were then compared with orthologous positions in other primate genomes. A primate phylogenetic panel consisting of 18 primate species, including 13 gibbon species representing all four extant genera, was assayed for all loci, and a total of 125 gibbon-specific Alu insertions were identified. The resulting amplification patterns were used to generate a phylogenetic tree. We demonstrate significant support for Symphalangus as the most basal lineage within the family. Our findings also place Nomascus as a derived lineage, sister to Hoolock, with the Nomascus-Hoolock clade sister to Hylobates. Further, our analysis groups N. leucogenys and Nomascus siki as sister taxa to the exclusion of the other Nomascus species assayed. This study represents the first use of SINEs to determine the genus level phylogenetic relationships within the family Hylobatidae. These relationships have been resolved with robust support at most internal nodes, demonstrating the utility of SINE-based phylogenetic analysis. We postulate that hybridization

  11. Alu elements and DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    White, Travis B; Morales, Maria E; Deininger, Prescott L

    2015-01-01

    Alu elements represent one of the most common sources of homology and homeology in the human genome. Homeologous recombination between Alu elements represents a major form of genetic instability leading to deletions and duplications. Although these types of events have been studied extensively through genomic sequencing to assess the impact of Alu elements on disease mutations and genome evolution, the overall abundance of Alu elements in the genome often makes it difficult to assess the relevance of the Alu elements to specific recombination events. We recently reported a powerful new reporter gene system that allows the assessment of various cis and trans factors on the contribution of Alu elements to various forms of genetic instability. This allowed a quantitative measurement of the influence of mismatches on Alu elements and instability. It also confirmed that homeologous Alu elements are able to stimulate non-homologous end joining events in their vicinity. This appears to be dependent on portions of the mismatch repair pathway. We are now in a position to begin to unravel the complex influences of Alu density, mismatch and location with alterations of DNA repair processes in various tissues and tumors.

  12. Alu Elements as Novel Regulators of Gene Expression in Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility Genes?

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-07-13

    Despite numerous studies implicating Alu repeat elements in various diseases, there is sparse information available with respect to the potential functional and biological roles of the repeat elements in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Therefore, we performed a genome-wide sequence analysis of T1D candidate genes to identify embedded Alu elements within these genes. We observed significant enrichment of Alu elements within the T1D genes (p-value < 10e-16), which highlights their importance in T1D. Functional annotation of T1D genes harboring Alus revealed significant enrichment for immune-mediated processes (p-value < 10e-6). We also identified eight T1D genes harboring inverted Alus (IRAlus) within their 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) that are known to regulate the expression of host mRNAs by generating double stranded RNA duplexes. Our in silico analysis predicted the formation of duplex structures by IRAlus within the 3'UTRs of T1D genes. We propose that IRAlus might be involved in regulating the expression levels of the host T1D genes.

  13. Repeated restraint stress increases seizure susceptibility by activation of hippocampal endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinjian; Dong, Jingde; Xia, Zhengrong; Zhang, Aifeng; Chao, Jie; Yao, Honghong

    2017-09-05

    A growing body of evidence suggests that stress triggers a variety of pathophysiological responses. Recent studies show that stress produces enduring effects on structure and function of hippocampus, which is one of the most important structures involved in epilepsy. In the present study, we determined the effect of repeated restraint stress exposure on the susceptibility of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and the possible mechanisms involved using a rodent model. Our results show that mice subjected to repeated restraint stress exhibited shorter latency to PTZ-induced tonic-clonic seizures and higher seizure severity, suggesting chronic restraint stress increases seizure susceptibility. Following repeated restraint stress, we observed an increased level of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as well as oxidative stress in the hippocampus. Moreover, our results show that chronic restraint stress exposure causes neuron loss in the hippocampus. Inhibition of ER stress with chemical chaperone, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), however, protects against chronic restraint stress-induced neuron loss, suggesting repeated restraint stress-induced neuronal degeneration is dependent on ER stress activation. On the other hand, inhibition of ER stress with TUDCA suppresses restraint stress-induced seizure susceptibility. Taken together, these results indicate that repeated restraint stress increases seizure susceptibility by activation of hippocampal ER stress and ER stress mediated oxidative stress and neurodegeneration. Thus, attenuating ER stress may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy targeted to block stress-induced seizure activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. AluY-mediated germline deletion, duplication and somatic stem cell reversion in UBE2T defines a new subtype of Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Virts, Elizabeth L; Jankowska, Anna; Mackay, Craig; Glaas, Marcel F; Wiek, Constanze; Kelich, Stephanie L; Lottmann, Nadine; Kennedy, Felicia M; Marchal, Christophe; Lehnert, Erik; Scharf, Rüdiger E; Dufour, Carlo; Lanciotti, Marina; Farruggia, Piero; Santoro, Alessandra; Savasan, Süreyya; Scheckenbach, Kathrin; Schipper, Jörg; Wagenmann, Martin; Lewis, Todd; Leffak, Michael; Farlow, Janice L; Foroud, Tatiana M; Honisch, Ellen; Niederacher, Dieter; Chakraborty, Sujata C; Vance, Gail H; Pruss, Dmitry; Timms, Kirsten M; Lanchbury, Jerry S; Alpi, Arno F; Hanenberg, Helmut

    2015-09-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited disorder clinically characterized by congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. At the cellular level, FA is associated with hypersensitivity to DNA-crosslinking genotoxins. Eight of 17 known FA genes assemble the FA E3 ligase complex, which catalyzes monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and is essential for replicative DNA crosslink repair. Here, we identify the first FA patient with biallelic germline mutations in the ubiquitin E2 conjugase UBE2T. Both mutations were aluY-mediated: a paternal deletion and maternal duplication of exons 2-6. These loss-of-function mutations in UBE2T induced a cellular phenotype similar to biallelic defects in early FA genes with the absence of FANCD2 monoubiquitination. The maternal duplication produced a mutant mRNA that could encode a functional protein but was degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. In the patient's hematopoietic stem cells, the maternal allele with the duplication of exons 2-6 spontaneously reverted to a wild-type allele by monoallelic recombination at the duplicated aluY repeat, thereby preventing bone marrow failure. Analysis of germline DNA of 814 normal individuals and 850 breast cancer patients for deletion or duplication of UBE2T exons 2-6 identified the deletion in only two controls, suggesting aluY-mediated recombinations within the UBE2T locus are rare and not associated with an increased breast cancer risk. Finally, a loss-of-function germline mutation in UBE2T was detected in a high-risk breast cancer patient with wild-type BRCA1/2. Cumulatively, we identified UBE2T as a bona fide FA gene (FANCT) that also may be a rare cancer susceptibility gene.

  15. AluY-mediated germline deletion, duplication and somatic stem cell reversion in UBE2T defines a new subtype of Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Virts, Elizabeth L.; Jankowska, Anna; Mackay, Craig; Glaas, Marcel F.; Wiek, Constanze; Kelich, Stephanie L.; Lottmann, Nadine; Kennedy, Felicia M.; Marchal, Christophe; Lehnert, Erik; Scharf, Rüdiger E.; Dufour, Carlo; Lanciotti, Marina; Farruggia, Piero; Santoro, Alessandra; Savasan, Süreyya; Scheckenbach, Kathrin; Schipper, Jörg; Wagenmann, Martin; Lewis, Todd; Leffak, Michael; Farlow, Janice L.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Honisch, Ellen; Niederacher, Dieter; Chakraborty, Sujata C.; Vance, Gail H.; Pruss, Dmitry; Timms, Kirsten M.; Lanchbury, Jerry S.; Alpi, Arno F.; Hanenberg, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited disorder clinically characterized by congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. At the cellular level, FA is associated with hypersensitivity to DNA-crosslinking genotoxins. Eight of 17 known FA genes assemble the FA E3 ligase complex, which catalyzes monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and is essential for replicative DNA crosslink repair. Here, we identify the first FA patient with biallelic germline mutations in the ubiquitin E2 conjugase UBE2T. Both mutations were aluY-mediated: a paternal deletion and maternal duplication of exons 2–6. These loss-of-function mutations in UBE2T induced a cellular phenotype similar to biallelic defects in early FA genes with the absence of FANCD2 monoubiquitination. The maternal duplication produced a mutant mRNA that could encode a functional protein but was degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. In the patient's hematopoietic stem cells, the maternal allele with the duplication of exons 2–6 spontaneously reverted to a wild-type allele by monoallelic recombination at the duplicated aluY repeat, thereby preventing bone marrow failure. Analysis of germline DNA of 814 normal individuals and 850 breast cancer patients for deletion or duplication of UBE2T exons 2–6 identified the deletion in only two controls, suggesting aluY-mediated recombinations within the UBE2T locus are rare and not associated with an increased breast cancer risk. Finally, a loss-of-function germline mutation in UBE2T was detected in a high-risk breast cancer patient with wild-type BRCA1/2. Cumulatively, we identified UBE2T as a bona fide FA gene (FANCT) that also may be a rare cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:26085575

  16. Rescuing Alu: Recovery of New Inserts Shows LINE-1 Preserves Alu Activity through A-Tail Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, Bradley J.; Hedges, Dale J.; Derbes, Rebecca S.; Campos Sanchez, Rebeca; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Makova, Kateryna D.; Roy-Engel, Astrid M.

    2012-01-01

    Alu elements are trans-mobilized by the autonomous non-LTR retroelement, LINE-1 (L1). Alu-induced insertion mutagenesis contributes to about 0.1% human genetic disease and is responsible for the majority of the documented instances of human retroelement insertion-induced disease. Here we introduce a SINE recovery method that provides a complementary approach for comprehensive analysis of the impact and biological mechanisms of Alu retrotransposition. Using this approach, we recovered 226 de novo tagged Alu inserts in HeLa cells. Our analysis reveals that in human cells marked Alu inserts driven by either exogenously supplied full length L1 or ORF2 protein are indistinguishable. Four percent of de novo Alu inserts were associated with genomic deletions and rearrangements and lacked the hallmarks of retrotransposition. In contrast to L1 inserts, 5′ truncations of Alu inserts are rare, as most of the recovered inserts (96.5%) are full length. De novo Alus show a random pattern of insertion across chromosomes, but further characterization revealed an Alu insertion bias exists favoring insertion near other SINEs, highly conserved elements, with almost 60% landing within genes. De novo Alu inserts show no evidence of RNA editing. Priming for reverse transcription rarely occurred within the first 20 bp (most 5′) of the A-tail. The A-tails of recovered inserts show significant expansion, with many at least doubling in length. Sequence manipulation of the construct led to the demonstration that the A-tail expansion likely occurs during insertion due to slippage by the L1 ORF2 protein. We postulate that the A-tail expansion directly impacts Alu evolution by reintroducing new active source elements to counteract the natural loss of active Alus and minimizing Alu extinction. PMID:22912586

  17. Repeated exposure to noise increases tolerance in a coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Sophie L; Mills, Suzanne C; Lecchini, David; Nedelec, Brendan; Simpson, Stephen D; Radford, Andrew N

    2016-09-01

    Some anthropogenic noise is now considered pollution, with evidence building that noise from human activities such as transportation, construction and exploration can impact behaviour and physiology in a broad range of taxa. However, relatively little research has considered the effects of repeated or chronic noise; extended exposures may result in habituation or sensitisation, and thus changes in response. We conducted a field-based experiment at Moorea Island to investigate how repeated exposure to playback of motorboat noise affected a coral reef fish (Dascyllus trimaculatus). We found that juvenile D. trimaculatus increased hiding behaviour during motorboat noise after two days of repeated exposure, but no longer did so after one and two weeks of exposure. We also found that naïve individuals responded to playback of motorboat noise with elevated ventilation rates, but that this response was diminished after one and two weeks of repeated exposure. We found no strong evidence that baseline blood cortisol levels, growth or body condition were affected by three weeks of repeated motorboat-noise playback. Our study reveals the importance of considering how tolerance levels may change over time, rather than simply extrapolating from results of short-term studies, if we are to make decisions about regulation and mitigation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Repeated exposure in a natural setting: a preschool intervention to increase vegetable consumption.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Meghan L; Henderson, Kathryn E; Luedicke, Joerg; Schwartz, Marlene B

    2012-02-01

    Laboratory and home-based research suggest that repeated exposure to vegetables may increase consumption among children. Effectiveness of repeated exposure to vegetables has not been tested in a community-based preschool setting. This randomized controlled trial tested the hypotheses that children who are served unfamiliar vegetables repeatedly in the preschool lunch setting will increase consumption of them, and that consumption will be influenced by peer eating behaviors and parental feeding behaviors. Data were collected in two private preschools in a small northeastern city in 2007. Ninety-six children (aged 3 to 6 years) participated. Schools were randomly assigned to condition. During the first 6 weeks, Preschool A served three vegetables at lunch on 10 separate occasions (ie, 30 days of exposure), while Preschool B continued routine practice. In the 7th week, schools reversed conditions and Preschool B served the vegetables for the next 6 weeks. Consumption data were collected daily in the intervention school and at baseline and post-intervention meals in the control school. PRIMARY OUTCOMES/STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Analysis of variance was used to examine the effect of vegetable exposure on vegetable intake; multilevel models were used to examine the effect of peer eating behaviors and parental feeding practices on vegetable intake. Repeated exposure did not increase vegetable consumption. Greater consumption by tablemates was a significant predictor of greater vegetable consumption; across the three vegetables, 1 g of peer intake was associated with roughly a 1/5-g intake increase among the subjects. Overall, children demonstrated wide fluctuation in vegetable consumption from day to day, creating as much variability within subjects as between them. Further research should explore the conditions necessary for repeated exposure to increase vegetable consumption in preschool settings. Creating opportunities for young children to serve as peer models has promise

  19. Newly arisen DNA repeats in primate phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Ryan, S C; Dugaiczyk, A

    1989-12-01

    We discovered the presence of an Alu and an Xba repetitive DNA element within introns 4 and 7, respectively, of the human alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) gene; these elements are absent from the same gene in the gorilla. The Alu element is flanked by 12-base-pair direct repeats, AGGATGTTGTGG ... (Alu) ... AGGATGTTGTGG, which presumably arose by way of duplication of the intronic target site AGGATGTTGTGG at the time of the Alu insertion. In the gorilla, only a single copy of the unoccupied target site is present, which is identical to the terminal repeat flanking the human Alu element. There are two copies of an Xba repeat in the human AFP gene, apparently the only two in the genome. Xba1 and Xba2, located within introns 8 and 7, respectively, differ from each other at 3 of 303 positions. Xba1 is referred to as the old (ancestral) repeat because it lacks direct repeats. The new (derived) Xba2 is flanked by direct repeats, TTTCTTTTT ... (Xba) ... TTTCTTCTT, and is thought to have arisen as a result of transposition of Xba1. The ancestral Xba1 and a single copy of the Xba2 target site are present at orthologous positions in the gorilla, but the new Xba2 is absent. We conclude that the Alu and Xba DNA repeats emerged in the human genome at a time postdating the human-gorilla divergence and became established as genetic novelties in the human lineage. We submit that the chronology of divergence of primate lines of evolution can be correlated with the timing of insertion of new DNA repeats into the genomes of those primates.

  20. Deletion of internal structured repeats increases the stability of a leucine-rich repeat protein, YopM

    PubMed Central

    Barrick, Doug

    2011-01-01

    Mapping the stability distributions of proteins in their native folded states provides a critical link between structure, thermodynamics, and function. Linear repeat proteins have proven more amenable to this kind of mapping than globular proteins. C-terminal deletion studies of YopM, a large, linear leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein, show that stability is distributed quite heterogeneously, yet a high level of cooperativity is maintained [1]. Key components of this distribution are three interfaces that strongly stabilize adjacent sequences, thereby maintaining structural integrity and promoting cooperativity. To better understand the distribution of interaction energy around these critical interfaces, we studied internal (rather than terminal) deletions of three LRRs in this region, including one of these stabilizing interfaces. Contrary to our expectation that deletion of structured repeats should be destabilizing, we find that internal deletion of folded repeats can actually stabilize the native state, suggesting that these repeats are destabilizing, although paradoxically, they are folded in the native state. We identified two residues within this destabilizing segment that deviate from the consensus sequence at a position that normally forms a stacked leucine ladder in the hydrophobic core. Replacement of these nonconsensus residues with leucine is stabilizing. This stability enhancement can be reproduced in the context of nonnative interfaces, but it requires an extended hydrophobic core. Our results demonstrate that different LRRs vary widely in their contribution to stability, and that this variation is context-dependent. These two factors are likely to determine the types of rearrangements that lead to folded, functional proteins, and in turn, are likely to restrict the pathways available for the evolution of linear repeat proteins. PMID:21764506

  1. The current source of human Alu retroposons is a conserved gene shared with Old World monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, R.J.; Stout, D.B.; Davidson, E.H. )

    1989-05-01

    A significant fraction of human Alu repeated sequences are members of the precise, recently inserted class. A cloned member of this class has been used as a probe for interspecies hybridization and thermal stability determination. The probe was reassociated with human, mandrill, and spider monkey DNA under conditions such that only almost perfectly matching duplexes could form. Equally precise hybrids were formed with human and mandrill DNA (Old World monkey) but not with spider monkey DNA (New World). These measurements as well as reassociation kinetics show the presence in mandrill DNA of many precise class Alu sequences that are very similar or identical in quantity and sequence to those in human DNA. Human and mandrill are moderately distant species with a single-copy DNA divergence of about 6%. Nevertheless, their recently inserted Alu sequences arise by retroposition of transcripts of source genes with nearly identical sequences. Apparently a gene present in our common ancestor at the time of branching was inherited and highly conserved in sequence in both the lineage of Old World monkeys and the lineage of apes and man.

  2. Repeated toluene exposure increases c-Fos in catecholaminergic cells of the nucleus accumbens shell.

    PubMed

    Tomaszycki, Michelle L; Aulerich, Kelsey E; Bowen, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    Toluene is a frequently abused solvent. Previous studies have suggested that toluene acts like other drugs of abuse, specifically on the dopaminergic system in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the mesolimbic pathway. Although changes in dopamine (DA) levels and c-Fos have been observed in both acute and repeated exposure paradigms, the extent to which c-Fos is localized to catecholaminergic cells is unknown. The present study tested the effects of repeated toluene exposure (1000-4000ppm) on locomotor activity and cells containing c-Fos, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), or both in the core and shell of the NAc, as well as the anterior and posterior VTA. We focused our study on adolescents, since adolescence is a time of great neural change and a time when individuals tend to be more susceptible to drug abuse. In early tests, toluene dose-dependently increased locomotor activity. Repeated exposure to the highest concentration of toluene resulted in sensitization to toluene's effects on locomotor activity. Although the number of cells immunopositive for c-Fos or TH did not significantly differ across groups, cells immunopositive for TH+c-Fos were higher in the NAc shell of animals exposed to 4000ppm than in animals exposed to air (control) or 1000ppm. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that repeated high dose toluene exposure increases locomotor activity as well as activation of catecholaminergic cells in the shell of the NAc. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Repeating firing fields of CA1 neurons shift forward in response to increasing angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Cowen, Stephen L; Nitz, Douglas A

    2014-01-01

    Self-motion information influences spatially-specific firing patterns exhibited by hippocampal neurons. Moreover, these firing patterns can repeat across similar subsegments of an environment, provided that there is similarity of path shape and head orientations across subsegments. The influence of self-motion variables on repeating fields remains to be determined. To investigate the role of path shape and angular rotation on hippocampal activity, we recorded the activity of CA1 neurons from rats trained to run on spiral-shaped tracks. During inbound traversals of circular-spiral tracks, angular velocity increases continuously. Under this condition, most neurons (74%) exhibited repeating fields across at least three adjacent loops. Of these neurons, 86% exhibited forward shifts in the angles of field centers relative to centers on preceding loops. Shifts were absent on squared-spiral tracks, minimal and less reliable on concentric-circle tracks, and absent on outward-bound runs on circular-spiral tracks. However, outward-bound runs on the circular-spiral track in the dark were associated with backward shifts. Together, the most parsimonious interpretation of the results is that continuous increases or decreases in angular velocity are particularly effective at shifting the center of mass of repeating fields, although it is also possible that a nonlinear integration of step counts contributes to the shift. Furthermore, the unexpected absence of field shifts during outward journeys in light (but not darkness) suggests visual cues around the goal location anchored the map of space to an allocentric reference frame.

  4. Breakpoint Associated with a novel 2.3 Mb deletion in the VCFS region of 22q11 and the role of Alu (SINE) in recurring microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Raihan K; Zhang, Yang; Siu, Victoria Mok; Fan, Yao-Shan; O'Reilly, Richard L; Rao, Jay; Singh, Shiva M

    2006-01-01

    Background Chromosome 22q11.2 region is highly susceptible to rearrangement, specifically deletions that give rise to a variety of genomic disorders including velocardiofacial or DiGeorge syndrome. Individuals with this 22q11 microdeletion syndrome are at a greatly increased risk to develop schizophrenia. Methods Genotype analysis was carried out on the DNA from a patient with the 22q11 microdeletion using genetic markers and custom primer sets to define the deletion. Bioinformatic analysis was performed for molecular characterization of the deletion breakpoint sequences in this patient. Results This 22q11 deletion patient was established to have a novel 2.3 Mb deletion with a proximal breakpoint located between genetic markers RH48663 and RH48348 and a distal breakpoint between markers D22S1138 and SHGC-145314. Molecular characterization of the sequences at the breakpoints revealed a 270 bp shared sequence of the breakpoint regions (SSBR) common to both ends that share >90% sequence similarity to each other and also to short interspersed nuclear elements/Alu elements. Conclusion This Alu sequence like SSBR is commonly in the proximity of all known deletion breakpoints of 22q11 region and also in the low copy repeat regions (LCRs). This sequence may represent a preferred sequence in the breakpoint regions or LCRs for intra-chromosomal homologous recombination mechanisms resulting in common 22q11 deletion. PMID:16512914

  5. Repeated mild traumatic brain injury in female rats increases lipid peroxidation in neurons.

    PubMed

    Yates, Nathanael J; Lydiard, Stephen; Fehily, Brooke; Weir, Gillian; Chin, Aaron; Bartlett, Carole A; Alderson, Jacqueline; Fitzgerald, Melinda

    2017-07-01

    Negative outcomes of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) can be exacerbated by repeated insult. Animal models of repeated closed-head mTBI provide the opportunity to define acute pathological mechanisms as the number of mTBI increases. Furthermore, little is known about the effects of mTBI impact site, and how this may affect brain function. We use a closed head, weight drop model of mTBI that allows head movement following impact, in adult female rats to determine the role of the number and location of mTBI on brain pathology and behaviour. Biomechanical assessment of two anatomically well-defined mTBI impact sites were used, anterior (bregma) and posterior (lambda). Location of the impact had no significant effect on impact forces (450 N), and the weight impact locations were on average 5.4 mm from the desired impact site. No between location vertical linear head kinematic differences were observed immediately following impact, however, in the 300 ms post-impact, significantly higher mean vertical head displacement and velocity were observed in the mTBI lambda trials. Breaches of the blood brain barrier were observed with three mTBI over bregma, associated with immunohistochemical indicators of damage. However, an increased incidence of hairline fractures of the skull and macroscopic haemorrhaging made bregma an unsuitable impact location to model repeated mTBI. Repeated mTBI over lambda did not cause skull fractures and were examined more comprehensively, with outcomes following one, two or three mTBI or sham, delivered at 1 day intervals, assessed on days 1-4. We observe a mild behavioural phenotype, with subtle deficits in cognitive function, associated with no identifiable neuroanatomical or inflammatory changes. However, an increase in lipid peroxidation in a subset of cortical neurons following two mTBI indicates increasing oxidative damage with repeated injury in female rats, supported by increased amyloid precursor protein immunoreactivity with three m

  6. Can the Palatability of Healthy, Satiety-Promoting Foods Increase with Repeated Exposure during Weight Loss?

    PubMed Central

    Anguah, Katherene O.-B.; Lovejoy, Jennifer C.; Craig, Bruce A.; Gehrke, Malinda M.; Palmer, Philip A.; Eichelsdoerfer, Petra E.; McCrory, Megan A.

    2017-01-01

    Repeated exposure to sugary, fatty, and salty foods often enhances their appeal. However, it is unknown if exposure influences learned palatability of foods typically promoted as part of a healthy diet. We tested whether the palatability of pulse containing foods provided during a weight loss intervention which were particularly high in fiber and low in energy density would increase with repeated exposure. At weeks 0, 3, and 6, participants (n = 42; body mass index (BMI) 31.2 ± 4.3 kg/m2) were given a test battery of 28 foods, approximately half which had been provided as part of the intervention, while the remaining half were not foods provided as part of the intervention. In addition, about half of each of the foods (provided as part or not provided as part of the intervention) contained pulses. Participants rated the taste, appearance, odor, and texture pleasantness of each food, and an overall flavor pleasantness score was calculated as the mean of these four scores. Linear mixed model analyses showed an exposure type by week interaction effect for taste, texture and overall flavor pleasantness indicating statistically significant increases in ratings of provided foods in taste and texture from weeks 0 to 3 and 0 to 6, and overall flavor from weeks 0 to 6. Repeated exposure to these foods, whether they contained pulses or not, resulted in a ~4% increase in pleasantness ratings. The long-term clinical relevance of this small increase requires further study. PMID:28231094

  7. Can the Palatability of Healthy, Satiety-Promoting Foods Increase with Repeated Exposure during Weight Loss?

    PubMed

    Anguah, Katherene O-B; Lovejoy, Jennifer C; Craig, Bruce A; Gehrke, Malinda M; Palmer, Philip A; Eichelsdoerfer, Petra E; McCrory, Megan A

    2017-02-22

    Repeated exposure to sugary, fatty, and salty foods often enhances their appeal. However, it is unknown if exposure influences learned palatability of foods typically promoted as part of a healthy diet. We tested whether the palatability of pulse containing foods provided during a weight loss intervention which were particularly high in fiber and low in energy density would increase with repeated exposure. At weeks 0, 3, and 6, participants (n = 42; body mass index (BMI) 31.2 ± 4.3 kg/m²) were given a test battery of 28 foods, approximately half which had been provided as part of the intervention, while the remaining half were not foods provided as part of the intervention. In addition, about half of each of the foods (provided as part or not provided as part of the intervention) contained pulses. Participants rated the taste, appearance, odor, and texture pleasantness of each food, and an overall flavor pleasantness score was calculated as the mean of these four scores. Linear mixed model analyses showed an exposure type by week interaction effect for taste, texture and overall flavor pleasantness indicating statistically significant increases in ratings of provided foods in taste and texture from weeks 0 to 3 and 0 to 6, and overall flavor from weeks 0 to 6. Repeated exposure to these foods, whether they contained pulses or not, resulted in a ~4% increase in pleasantness ratings. The long-term clinical relevance of this small increase requires further study.

  8. Repeated stress increases catalytic TrkB mRNA in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nibuya, M; Takahashi, M; Russell, D S; Duman, R S

    1999-05-28

    Northern blot analysis was utilized to distinguish between catalytic and truncated TrkB mRNA on the basis of transcript size. Repeated (10 days), but not acute, immobilization stress significantly increased levels of catalytic TrkB mRNA, but did not influence expression of truncated TrkB transcripts in rat hippocampus. Exposure to another paradigm, a combination of different, unpredictable stressors, also increased levels of catalytic, but not truncated, TrkB mRNA. In situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that chronic stress up-regulated TrkB mRNA in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal and dentate gyrus granule cells layers of hippocampus. As previously reported, both acute and chronic immobilization stress decreased expression of BDNF mRNA, suggesting that up-regulation of catalytic TrkB mRNA may be a compensatory adaptation to repeated stress.

  9. Repeated restraint stress increases basolateral amygdala neuronal activity in an age-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Rosenkranz, J. Amiel

    2012-01-01

    Chronic stress is a precipitating factor for affective disorders such as depression and anxiety. This is associated with the effects of chronic stress on the amygdala. Adolescents may be more vulnerable to the effects of chronic stress, which may be related to its impact on amygdala function. However, the stress-induced changes in amygdala neuronal activity, and the age-dependent impact of chronic stress on amygdala neuronal activity have not been studied in depth. In this study, we investigated how repeated restraint impacts basolateral amygdala (BLA) projection neuron activity in both adolescent and adult rats. Using in vivo extracellular recordings from anesthetized rats, we found that repeated restraint increased the number of spontaneously firing neurons in the BLA of adolescent rats, but did not significantly increase the firing rate. In contrast, repeated restraint increased the firing rate of BLA neurons in adult rats, but did not change the number of spontaneously firing neurons. This is the first direct evidence of how stress differently impacts amygdala physiology in adolescent and adult rats. These findings may shed light on the mechanism by which chronic stress may age-dependently precipitate psychiatric disorders. PMID:22986163

  10. Polymorphic Alu insertions among Mayan populations.

    PubMed

    Herrera, R J; Rojas, D P; Terreros, M C

    2007-01-01

    The Mayan homeland within Mesoamerica spans five countries: Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico. There are indications that the people we call the Maya migrated from the north to the highlands of Guatemala as early as 4000 B.C. Their existence was village-based and agricultural. The culture of these Preclassic Mayans owes much to the earlier Olmec civilization, which flourished in the southern portion of North America. In this study, four different Mayan groups were examined to assess their genetic variability. Ten polymorphic Alu insertion (PAI) loci were employed to ascertain the genetic affinities among these Mayan groups. North American, African, European and Asian populations were also examined as reference populations. Our results suggest that the Mayan groups examined in this study are not genetically homogeneous.

  11. Repeated muscle damage blunts the increase in heat strain during subsequent exercise heat stress.

    PubMed

    Dolci, A; Fortes, M B; Walker, F S; Haq, A; Riddle, T; Walsh, N P

    2015-07-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) has recently been shown to increase heat strain during exercise heat stress (HS), and represents a risk factor for exertional heat illness (EHI). We hypothesised that a repeated bout of EIMD blunts the increase in rectal temperature (T re) during subsequent endurance exercise in the heat. Sixteen non-heat-acclimated males were randomly allocated to EIMD (n = 9) or control (CON, n = 7). EIMD performed a downhill running treatment at -10 % gradient for 60 min at 65 % [Formula: see text]O2max in 20 °C, 40 % RH. CON participants performed the same treatment but at +1 % gradient. Following treatment, participants rested for 30 min, then performed HS (+1 % gradient running for 40 min at 65 % [Formula: see text]O2max in 33 °C, 50 % RH) during which thermoregulatory measures were assessed. Both groups repeated the treatment and subsequent HS 14 days later. Isometric quadriceps strength was assessed at baseline, and 48 h post-treatment. The decrease in leg strength 48 h post-EIMD trial 1 (-7.5 %) was absent 48 h post-EIMD trial 2 (+2.9 %) demonstrating a repeated bout effect. Final T re during HS was lower following EIMD trial 2 (39.25 ± 0.47 °C) compared with EIMD trial 1 (39.59 ± 0.49 °C, P < 0.01), with CON showing no difference. Thermal sensation and the T re threshold for sweating onset were also lower during HS on EIMD trial 2. The repeated bout effect blunted the increase in heat strain during HS conducted after EIMD. Incorporating a muscle-damaging bout into training could be a strategy to reduce the risk of EHI and improve endurance performance in individuals undertaking heavy exercise with an eccentric component in the heat.

  12. Alu Sb2 subfamily is present in all higher primates but was most succesfully amplified in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Richer, C.; Zietkiewicz, E.; Labuda, D.

    1994-09-01

    Alu repeats can be classified into subfamilies which amplified in primate genomes at different evolutionary time periods. A young Alu subfamily, Sb2, with a characteristic 7-nucleotide duplication at position 256, has been described in seven human loci. An Sb2 insertion found near the HD gene was unique to two HD families, indicating that Sb2 was still retropositionally active. Here, we have shown that the Sb2 insertion in the CHOL locus was similarly rare, being absent in 120 individuals of Caucasian, Oriental and Black origin. In contrast, Sb2 inserts in five other loci were found fixed (non-polymorphic), based on measurements in the same population sample, but absent from orthologous positions in higher apes. This suggest that Sb2 repeats spread relatively early in the human lineage following divergence from other primates and that these elements may be human-specific. By quantitative PCR, we investigated the presence of Sb2 sequences in different primate DNA, using one PCR primer anchored at the 5{prime} Alu-end and the other complementary to the duplicated Sb2-specific segment. With an Sb2-containing plasmid as a standard, we estimated the number of Sb2 repeats at 1500-1800 copies per human haploid equivalent; corresponding numbers in chimpanzee and gorilla were almost two orders of magnitude lower, while the signal observed in orangutan and gibbon DNAs was consistent with the presence of a single copy. The analysis of 22 human, 11 chimpanzee and 10 gorilla sequences indicates that the Alu Sb2 dispersed independently in these three primate lineages; gorilla consensus differs from the human Sb2 sequence by one position, while all chimpanzee repeats have their linker expanded by up to eight A-residues. Should they be thus considered as separate subfamilies? It is possible that sequence modifications with respect to the human consensus are responsible for poor retroposition of Sb2 in apes.

  13. The use of dimorphic Alu insertions in human DNA fingerprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, G.E.; Gonzalez, T.; Garrison, J.; Novick, C.C.; Herrera, R.J.; Batzer, M.A.; Deininger, P.L.

    1992-12-04

    We have characterized certain Human Specific Alu Insertions as either dimorphic (TPA25, PV92, APO), sightly dimorphic (C2N4 and C4N4) or monomorphic (C3N1, C4N6, C4N2, C4N5, C4N8), based on studies of Caucasian, Asian, American Black and African Black populations. Our approach is based upon: (1) PCR amplification using primers directed to the sequences that flank the site of insertion of the different Alu elements studied; (2) gel electrophoresis and scoring according to the presence or absence of an Alu insertion in one or both homologous chromosomes; (3) allelic frequencies calculated and compared according to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Our DNA fingerprinting procedure using PCR amplification of dimorphic Human Specific Alu insertions, is stable enough to be used not only as a tool for genetic mapping but also to characterize populations, study migrational patterns and track the inheritance of human genetic disorders.

  14. Sequence Analysis and Characterization of Active Human Alu Subfamilies Based on the 1000 Genomes Pilot Project.

    PubMed

    Konkel, Miriam K; Walker, Jerilyn A; Hotard, Ashley B; Ranck, Megan C; Fontenot, Catherine C; Storer, Jessica; Stewart, Chip; Marth, Gabor T; Batzer, Mark A

    2015-08-29

    The goal of the 1000 Genomes Consortium is to characterize human genome structural variation (SV), including forms of copy number variations such as deletions, duplications, and insertions. Mobile element insertions, particularly Alu elements, are major contributors to genomic SV among humans. During the pilot phase of the project we experimentally validated 645 (611 intergenic and 34 exon targeted) polymorphic "young" Alu insertion events, absent from the human reference genome. Here, we report high resolution sequencing of 343 (322 unique) recent Alu insertion events, along with their respective target site duplications, precise genomic breakpoint coordinates, subfamily assignment, percent divergence, and estimated A-rich tail lengths. All the sequenced Alu loci were derived from the AluY lineage with no evidence of retrotransposition activity involving older Alu families (e.g., AluJ and AluS). AluYa5 is currently the most active Alu subfamily in the human lineage, followed by AluYb8, and many others including three newly identified subfamilies we have termed AluYb7a3, AluYb8b1, and AluYa4a1. This report provides the structural details of 322 unique Alu variants from individual human genomes collectively adding about 100 kb of genomic variation. Many Alu subfamilies are currently active in human populations, including a surprising level of AluY retrotransposition. Human Alu subfamilies exhibit continuous evolution with potential drivers sprouting new Alu lineages. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Analysis of the regions flanking the human insulin gene and sequence of an Alu family member.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, G I; Pictet, R; Rutter, W J

    1980-01-01

    The regions around the human insulin gene have been studied by heteroduplex, hybridization and sequence analysis. These studies indicated that there is a region of heterogeneous length located approximately 700 bp before the 5' end of the gene; and that the 19 kb of cloned DNA which includes the 1430 bp insulin gene as well as 5650 bp before and 11,500 bp after the gene is single copy sequence except for 500 bp located 6000 bp from the 3' end of the gene. This 500 bp segment contains a member of the Alu family of dispersed middle repetitive sequences as well as another less highly repeated homopolymeric segment. The sequence of this region was determined. This Alu repeat is bordered by 19 bp direct repeats and also contains an 83 bp sequence which is present twice. The regions flanking the human and rat I insulin genes were compared by heteroduplex analysis to localize homologous sequences in the flanking regions which could be involved in the regulation of insulin biosynthesis. The homology between the two genes is restricted to the region encoding preproinsulin and a short region of approximately 60 bp flanking the 5' side of the genes. Images PMID:6253909

  16. Repeated taste exposure increases liking for vegetables by low-income elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Lakkakula, Anantha; Geaghan, James; Zanovec, Michael; Pierce, Sarah; Tuuri, Georgianna

    2010-10-01

    Children's food preferences play a major role in their food choices and consumption. The objective of the present study was to examine if repeated tastings of selected vegetables in a school setting increased children's liking of these items. A total of 360 fourth- and fifth-grade students attending four low-income, public elementary schools in southeastern Louisiana volunteered to participate. During the spring of 2008, children were offered a taste of carrots, peas, tomatoes, and bell peppers once a week for 10 weeks. At each tasting session children recorded whether they swallowed each of the vegetables, spit it into the napkin, or did not put it in their mouth and indicated their liking for each vegetable using a Likert-type response scale. Approximately one-half of the children tasted eight of ten times during the program (46.5% for those who began disliking and 68.5% for those who began liking the vegetables). Proc Glimmix analyses indicated that for children who began the program disliking the vegetables, repeated tasting improved liking scores for carrots, peas, and tomatoes; liking for bell peppers did not change. The number of children who reported liking or liking a lot for previously disliked vegetables was greater after eight or nine taste exposures. Repeated tasting of less-liked vegetables by children in a cafeteria-based setting is a strategy to promote liking of these items and is effective in approximately half of the participants.

  17. Differential regional development of tolerance to increase in dopamine turnover upon repeated neuroleptic administration.

    PubMed

    Scatton, B

    1977-12-15

    Repeated treatment with haloperidol and sulpiride induced tolerance to the increases in homovanillic and dihydroxyphenyl acetic acids in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, tuberculum olfactorium and frontal cortex of the rat. The threshold dose inducing this effect appeared to be lower in the striatum than in the limbic regions. Similar results were found in the frontal cortex by measuring dopamine utilization. Moreover, tolerance developed earlier in the striatum than in the limbic areas. The possible reasons are discussed for the differential development of tolerance in the various DA areas investigated.

  18. Increased Impulsivity and Disrupted Attention Induced by Repeated Phencyclidine are not Attenuated by Chronic Quetiapine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Amitai, Nurith; Markou, Athina

    2009-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic medications differ in how effectively they attenuate cognitive and other deficits in schizophrenia. The present study aimed to explore whether quetiapine, an atypical antipsychotic medication, would reverse disruptions of performance in the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), a test of attention and impulsivity, induced by repeated administration of the psychotomimetic phencyclidine (PCP). In confirmation of previous findings, repeated PCP administration (2 mg/kg, s.c., 30 min before behavioral testing, for two consecutive days, followed by a 2-week PCP-free period and then five consecutive days of PCP treatment) increased premature responding (impulsivity), decreased accuracy (attention), and increased response latencies (processing speed) and timeout responding (impulsivity/cognitive inflexibility). Chronic quetiapine (5 or 10 mg/kg/day, s.c.) did not attenuate these PCP-induced disruptions in performance, while at the highest dose used, quetiapine disrupted 5-CSRTT performance in the absence of PCP treatment and tended to exacerbate the PCP-induced increase in premature responding. Considering that clozapine, another atypical antipsychotic, was shown previously to reverse PCP-induced deficits in the same task (Amitai et al. 2007), the present findings demonstrate differences between clozapine and quetiapine in their effectiveness on schizophrenia-like cognitive deficits and impulsivity that may be attributable to their different receptor affinity profiles. PMID:18809428

  19. Repeated exposure to moderate doses of ethanol augments hippocampal glutamate neurotransmission by increasing release

    PubMed Central

    Chefer, Vladimir; Meis, Jennifer; Wang, Grace; Kuzmin, Alexander; Bakalkin, Georgy; Shippenberg, Toni

    2013-01-01

    The present study used conventional and quantitative microdialysis to assess glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the hippocampal CA3 area of the rat following a moderate-dose ethanol treatment regimen. Male Wistar rats received 3.4 g/kg of ethanol or water for 6 days via gastric gavage. Microdialysis experiments commenced 2 days later. Basal and depolarization-induced glutamate overflow were significantly elevated in ethanol-treated animals. Basal and depolarization-induced gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) overflow were unaltered. Quantitative no-net-flux microdialysis was used to determine if changes in dialysate glutamate levels following ethanol administration are due to an increase in release or a decrease in uptake.To confirm the validity of this method for quantifying basal glutamate dynamics, extracellular concentrations of glutamate and the extraction fraction, which reflects changes in analyte clearance, were quantified in response to retro-dialysis of the glutamate uptake blocker trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (tPDC). tPDC significantly decreased the extraction fraction for glutamate, resulting in augmented extracellular glutamate concentrations. Repeated ethanol administration did not alter the glutamate extraction fraction. However, extracellular glutamate concentrations were significantly elevated, indicating that glutamate release is increased as a consequence of repeated ethanol administration. These data demonstrate that repeated bouts of moderate ethanol consumption alter basal glutamate dynamics in the CA3 region of the dorsal hippocampus. Basal glutamate release is augmented, whereas glutamate uptake is unchanged. Furthermore, they suggest that dysregulation of glutamate transmission in this region may contribute to the previously documented deficits in cognitive function associated with moderate dose ethanol use. PMID:21182572

  20. Long term repeated prescribed burning increases evenness in the basidiomycete laccase gene pool in forest soils.

    PubMed

    Artz, Rebekka R E; Reid, Eileen; Anderson, Ian C; Campbell, Colin D; Cairney, John W G

    2009-03-01

    Repeated prescribed burning alters the biologically labile fraction of nutrients and carbon of soil organic matter (SOM). Using a long-term (30 years) repeated burning experiment where burning has been carried out at a 2- or 4-year frequency, we analysed the effect of prescribed burning on gross potential C turnover rates and phenol oxidase activity in relation to shifts in SOM composition as observed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. In tandem, we assessed the genetic diversity of basidiomycete laccases. While the overall effect of burning was a decline in phenol oxidase activity, Shannon diversity and evenness of laccases was significantly higher in burned sites. Co-correspondence analysis of SOM composition and laccase operational taxonomic unit frequency data also suggested a strong correlation. While this correlation could indicate that the observed increase in laccase genetic diversity due to burning is due to increased resource diversity, a temporal replacement of the most abundant members of the assembly by an otherwise dormant pool of fungi cannot be excluded. As such, our results fit the intermediate disturbance hypothesis. Effects were stronger in plots burned in 2-year rotations, suggesting that the 4-year burn frequency may be a more sustainable practice to ensure the long-term stability of C cycling in such ecosystems.

  1. Repeated bonding of fixed retainer increases the risk of enamel fracture.

    PubMed

    Chinvipas, Netrporn; Hasegawa, Yuh; Terada, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influences of repeated bonding, using 2 different orthodontic adhesive systems, on the shear bond strength (SBS) and the enamel surface morphology. Sixty premolars were divided into 2 groups (n = 30), and either Transbond XT (T group) or Fuji Ortho LC (F group) adhesives were used. SBS was measured 24 h after bonding, using a universal testing machine. Then, the enamel surfaces were investigated and the mode of failure was described using adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores. After each debonding, 10 teeth from each group were examined by scanning electron microscopy to determine the penetration of adhesives, the length of resin tags, and the state of the enamel surface. The other teeth were subjected to two more bonding/debonding procedures. In T group, the second debonding sequences had significantly higher bond strengths than the other sequences. The length of resin tags was greatest in the second debonding sequence, although there was no significant difference. In F group, the SBS increased with further rebonding and the failure mode tended towards cohesive failure. In both groups, the ARI scores increased with rebonding. Enamel loss could have occurred with both adhesives, although the surfaces appeared unchanged to the naked eye. From this study, we suggest that enamel damage caused by repeated bonding is of concern. To prevent bond failure, we should pay attention to the adhesion method used for bondable retainers.

  2. Increases in cycling performance in response to caffeine ingestion are repeatable.

    PubMed

    Astorino, Todd A; Cottrell, Trisha; Lozano, Andrea Talhami; Aburto-Pratt, Kylan; Duhon, Jessica

    2012-02-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine the repeatability of caffeine's ergogenic effects on cycling performance. It was hypothesized that improvements in performance would be similar when caffeine was ingested on 2 separate days. Nine endurance-trained men and women (mean age and maximal oxygen uptake, 27.4 ± 5.9 years and 57.5 ± 3.9 mL kg⁻¹ min⁻¹) initially completed 2 familiarization trials. During 3 subsequent sessions separated by at least 48 hours, the subjects completed a 10-km cycling time trial preceded by ingestion of a drink containing caffeine (5 mg/kg) or placebo. Treatments were ingested using a randomized, single-blind, crossover design, and the subjects were deceived as to the specific content of all drinks. During exercise, heart rate, rating of perceived exertion, and time were recorded every 1.6 km. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to compare the differences in variables across distance and treatment. In both caffeine trials, caffeine increased (P = .02) cycling performance by 1.6% and 1.9% vs placebo (16.98 ± 0.96 and 16.92 ± 0.97 minutes with caffeine vs 17.25 ± 0.96 minutes in placebo), and 7 of 9 subjects revealed improved performance. The mean performance improvement in the caffeine trials was similar (P = .35; -0.27 and -0.32 minutes, respectively) across days. Heart rate during exercise was higher (P b .001) with caffeine vs placebo, although the rating of perceived exertion was similar (P = .65). Data reveal that caffeine's ergogenic effects on cycling performance are repeatable across days, yet some individuals did not exhibit improved performance with caffeine.

  3. Effects of a Randomized Controlled Trial to Increase Repeat Mammography Screening in Iranian Women

    PubMed Central

    Taymoori, Parvaneh; Molina, Yamile; Roshani, Daem

    2014-01-01

    Background Although mammography use has increased in developed countries, regular screening in developing countries including Iran remains low. Multiple frameworks, including the Health Belief Model (HBM) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), have been used to understand screening practices among Iranians. The HBM includes intrapersonal constructs such as perceptions of breast cancer and mammography. The TPB includes interpersonal and environmental constructs, such as perceived control and subjective norms. Objectives The current study had 2 objectives: (1) to examine changes in the HBM and TPB constructs and repeat mammography screening in women receiving either intervention and women in the control group and (2) to compare changes in the HBM and TPB constructs and repeat mammography screening across the 2 interventions. Methods One hundred eight-four women from 3 randomly selected health centers in Sanandaj, Iran, participated. Eligibility criteria were being 50 years or older, having received a mammogram in the past 2 to 3 years, and no intention to obtain a mammogram within the next year. Results The TPB and HBM participants exhibited greater changes in the HBM and TPB constructs and were more likely to have a mammogram relative to control participants. The TPB and HBM participants exhibited comparable changes in constructs and repeat mammography. Conclusion Findings suggest both interventions equally improved mammography screening. Additional studies are furthermore warranted to address nonadherent Iranian women’s needs in line with these conceptual models. Implications for Practice Use of the HBM and TPB constructs in clinical practice may be helpful to promote continued screening among this population. PMID:25122130

  4. Exposing Students to Repeat Photography: Increasing Cultural Understanding on a Short-Term Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemmons, Kelly K.; Brannstrom, Christian; Hurd, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, repeat photography has been used to analyze land cover change. This paper describes how repeat photography may be used as a tool to enhance the short-term study abroad experience by facilitating cultural interaction and understanding. We present evidence from two cases and suggest a five-step repeat photography method for educators…

  5. Exposing Students to Repeat Photography: Increasing Cultural Understanding on a Short-Term Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemmons, Kelly K.; Brannstrom, Christian; Hurd, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, repeat photography has been used to analyze land cover change. This paper describes how repeat photography may be used as a tool to enhance the short-term study abroad experience by facilitating cultural interaction and understanding. We present evidence from two cases and suggest a five-step repeat photography method for educators…

  6. [Utility of chromosome banding with ALU I enzyme for identifying methylated areas in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Rojas-Atencio, Alicia; Yamarte, Leonard; Urdaneta, Karelis; Soto-Alvarez, Marisol; Alvarez Nava, Francisco; Cañizalez, Jenny; Quintero, Maribel; Atencio, Raquel; González, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Cancer is a group of disorders characterized by uncontrolled cell growth which is produced by two successive events: increased cell proliferation (tumor or neoplasia) and the invasive capacity of these cells (metastasis). DNA methylation is an epigenetic process which has been involved as an important pathogenic factor of cancer. DNA methylation participates in the regulation of gene expression, directly, by preventing the union of transcription factors, and indirectly, by promoting the "closed" structure of the chromatine. The objectives of this study were to identify hypermethyled chromosomal regions through the use of restriction Alu I endonuclease, and to relate cytogenetically these regions with tumor suppressive gene loci. Sixty peripheral blood samples of females with breast cancer were analyzed. Cell cultures were performed and cytogenetic spreads, previously digested with Alu I enzyme, were stained with Giemsa. Chromosomal centromeric and not centromeric regions were stained in 37% of cases. About 96% of stained hypermethyled chromosomal regions (1q, 2q, 6q) were linked with methylated genes associated with breast cancer. In addition, centromeric regions in chromosomes 3, 4, 8, 13, 14, 15 and 17, usually unstained, were found positive to digestion with Alu I enzime and Giemsa staining. We suggest the importance of this technique for the global visualization of the genome which can find methylated genes related to breast cancer, and thus lead to a specific therapy, and therefore a better therapeutic response.

  7. Increased advanced glycation end product specific fluorescence in repeatedly heated used cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Anupriya; Bhatia, Alka; Ram, Anil Kumar; Goel, Sumit

    2017-07-01

    Repeated heating of cooking oils is known to cause their degradation and generation of toxins. Dietary Advanced glycation end products (dAGEs) are formed when the foods are cooked in dry heat at very high temperatures. dAGEs are believed to contribute significantly to total pool of AGEs in body. In this study, cooking oil samples used for frying snacks were collected from 102 shops. AGEs were extracted using Aqueous-TCA-chloroform method. Fluorescent AGE levels were determined using a fluorescence spectrophotometer and compared with AGEs in corresponding fresh oil samples collected from same shops. Palm oil was most commonly (62.5%) used for cooking. Most of the samples were subjected to several rounds of heating (1-6). AGE specific fluorescence (ASF) in used oil (range = 8.5-745.11) samples was found to be significantly higher in 88/102 as compared to the corresponding fresh oil samples. Treatment with inhibitors like lime concentrate and vitamin C decreased ASF (10/14 and 10/11 samples respectively) of the used oils. The results suggest that cooking oil subjected to repeated heating can contribute to increase in fluorescent AGEs in diet. Simple practices like liberal use of common household substances like lime concentrate may help to reduce these in fried food.

  8. Repeated dexamphetamine treatment alters the dopaminergic system and increases the phMRI response to methylphenidate

    PubMed Central

    Schrantee, Anouk; Tremoleda, Jordi L.; Wylezinska-Arridge, Marzena; Bouet, Valentine; Hesseling, Peter; Meerhoff, Gideon F.; de Bruin, Kora M.; Koeleman, Jan; Freret, Thomas; Boulouard, Michel; Desfosses, Emilie; Galineau, Laurent; Gozzi, Alessandro; Dauphin, François; Gsell, Willy; Booij, Jan; Lucassen, Paul J.; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2017-01-01

    Dexamphetamine (AMPH) is a psychostimulant drug that is used both recreationally and as medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that repeated exposure to AMPH can induce damage to nerve terminals of dopamine (DA) neurons. We here assessed the underlying neurobiological changes in the DA system following repeated AMPH exposure and pre-treated rats with AMPH or saline (4 times 5 mg/kg s.c., 2 hours apart), followed by a 1-week washout period. We then used pharmacological MRI (phMRI) with a methylphenidate (MPH) challenge, as a sensitive and non-invasive in-vivo measure of DAergic function. We subsequently validated the DA-ergic changes post-mortem, using a.o. high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and autoradiography. In the AMPH pre-treated group, we observed a significantly larger BOLD response to the MPH challenge, particularly in DA-ergic brain areas and their downstream projections. Subsequent autoradiography studies showed that AMPH pre-treatment significantly reduced DA transporter (DAT) density in the caudate-putamen (CPu) and nucleus accumbens, whereas HPLC analysis revealed increases in the DA metabolite homovanillic acid in the CPu. Our results suggest that AMPH pre-treatment alters DAergic responsivity, a change that can be detected with phMRI in rats. These phMRI changes likely reflect increased DA release together with reduced DAT binding. The ability to assess subtle synaptic changes using phMRI is promising for both preclinical studies of drug discovery, and for clinical studies where phMRI can be a useful tool to non-invasively investigate DA abnormalities, e.g. in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:28241065

  9. Repeated chlorpromazine administration increases a behavioural response of rats to 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Green, A R

    1977-01-01

    1 The hyperactivity syndrome produced in rats by administration of tranylcypromine (20 mg/kg i.p.) followed 30 min later by L-tryptophan (50 mg/kg i.p.) is generally considered to be due to increased 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) functional activity. It is inhibited by chlorpromazine (30 mg/kg i.p.) injected 60 min before the tranylcypromine. However, chlorpromazine injection for 4 days either at a dose of 30 mg/kg once daily or 5 mg/kg twice daily results in an enhanced hyperactivity response to tranylcypromine and L-tryptophan administration 24 h after the final dose of chlorpromazine. 2 One injection of chlorpromazine (30 mg/kg) did not produce enhancement 24 h later and the inhibition of the tranylcypromine/L-tryptophan hyperactivity observed after acute chlorpromazine injection was seen if the rats were given tranylcypromine and L-tryptophan 1 h after the fourth chlorpromazine (30 mg/kg) dose. 3 Chlorpromazine (30 mg/kg) once daily or 5 mg/kg twice daily for 4 days resulted in rats displaying enhanced behavioral responses to the suggested 5-HT agonist 5-methoxy N,N-dimethyltryptamine (2 mg/kg) on day 5. 4 Chlorpromazine (30 mg/kg) once daily for 4 days produces a slight increase in brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) concentration on day 5, but no difference in the rate of brain 5-HT synthesis or the rate of 5-HT accumulation after tranylcypromine and L-tryptophan administration. 5. There is some evidence that chlorpromazine blocks 5-HT receptors. It has also been observed that several other neuroleptic drugs do not produce enhanced 5-HT responses after repeated administration. It is suggested therefore that the enhanced behavioural response to 5-HT receptor stimulation following repeated chlorpromazine administration may be because this drug blocks 5-HT receptors. PMID:264797

  10. Increased impulsivity in rats as a result of repeated cycles of alcohol intoxication and abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Cristina; Wiskerke, Joost; Natividad, Luis A.; Polis, Ilham Y.; de Vries, Taco J.; Pattij, Tommy; Parsons, Loren H.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is a risk factor for alcoholism and long-term alcohol exposure may further impair impulse control in a manner that propels problematic alcohol use. The present study employed the rat 5-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task (5-CSRTT) to measure behavioral inhibition and attentional capacity during abstinence from repeated 5d cycles of alcohol liquid diet consumption. Task performance was not disrupted following the first cycle of alcohol exposure, however, evidence of impaired behavioral inhibition emerged following the third cycle of alcohol exposure. In comparison with controls, alcohol rats exhibited deficits in inhibitory control during cognitively challenging 5-CSRTT tests employing variable inter-trial intervals (varITI). This behavioral disruption was not present during early abstinence (3d) but was evident by 7d abstinence and persisted for at least 34d. Interestingly, renewed alcohol consumption ameliorated these disruptions in impulse control, though deficient behavioral inhibition re-emerged during subsequent abstinence. Indices of increased impulsivity were no longer present in tests conducted after 49 days of abstinence. Alcohol-related impairments in impulse control were not evident in sessions employing highly familiar task parameters regardless of abstinence period and control experiments confirmed that performance deficits during the challenge sessions were unlikely to result from alcohol-related disruption in the adaptation to repeated varITI testing. Together, the current findings demonstrate that chronic intermittent alcohol consumption results in decreased behavioral inhibition in rats that is temporally similar to clinical observations of disrupted impulsive control in abstinent alcoholics performing tasks of behavioral inhibition. PMID:24341858

  11. Increased impulsivity in rats as a result of repeated cycles of alcohol intoxication and abstinence.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Cristina; Wiskerke, Joost; Natividad, Luis A; Polis, Ilham Y; de Vries, Taco J; Pattij, Tommy; Parsons, Loren H

    2015-03-01

    Impulsivity is a risk factor for alcoholism, and long-term alcohol exposure may further impair impulse control in a manner that propels problematic alcohol use. The present study employed the rat 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) to measure behavioral inhibition and attentional capacity during abstinence from repeated 5-day cycles of alcohol liquid diet consumption. Task performance was not disrupted following the first cycle of alcohol exposure; however, evidence of impaired behavioral inhibition emerged following the third cycle of alcohol exposure. In comparison with controls, alcoholic rats exhibited deficits in inhibitory control during cognitively challenging 5-CSRTT tests employing variable intertrial interval (varITI). This behavioral disruption was not present during early abstinence (3 days) but was evident by 7 days of abstinence and persisted for at least 34 days. Interestingly, renewed alcohol consumption ameliorated these disruptions in impulse control, although deficient behavioral inhibition re-emerged during subsequent abstinence. Indices of increased impulsivity were no longer present in tests conducted after 49 days of abstinence. Alcohol-related impairments in impulse control were not evident in sessions employing highly familiar task parameters regardless of the abstinence period, and control experiments confirmed that performance deficits during the challenge sessions were unlikely to result from alcohol-related disruption in the adaptation to repeated varITI testing. Together, the current findings demonstrate that chronic intermittent alcohol consumption results in decreased behavioral inhibition in rats that is temporally similar to clinical observations of disrupted impulsive control in abstinent alcoholics performing tasks of behavioral inhibition.

  12. Repeated exposure to ozone increases alveolar macrophage recruitment into asthmatic airways.

    PubMed

    Arjomandi, Mehrdad; Witten, Allyson; Abbritti, Emilio; Reintjes, Kurt; Schmidlin, Isabelle; Zhai, Wenwu; Solomon, Colin; Balmes, John

    2005-08-15

    Repeated, short-term exposures to ozone (O3) lead to attenuation of the acute lung function and airway inflammatory responses seen after a single exposure in healthy subjects, but it is unclear whether these acute responses also attenuate in subjects with asthma. To address this question by exposing 14 subjects with asthma to 0.2 ppm O3 for either 4 hours on a single day or 4 hours on 4 consecutive days (multiday [MD]). At least 3 weeks later, subjects underwent the alternate exposure. Spirometry was performed immediately pre- and postexposure and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was obtained 18 hours after each exposure. The decrease in FEV1 was greatest across Day 2 of the MD (MD2) exposure and then gradually declined on successive days of the MD exposure (mean +/- SD decrease in FEV1 of 25.4 +/- 18.0% across MD2 compared with 4.2 +/- 6.5% across MD4). Respiratory symptoms followed a similar pattern to that of FEV1. Although the concentration of neutrophils in BAL after the MD4 exposure was not significantly different from that after the single-day exposure (1.7 +/- 1.3 x 10(4) cells/ml vs. 1.2 +/- 0.8 x 10(4) cells/ml, p = 0.20), the concentration of alveolar macrophages did significantly increase in BAL after the MD exposure (19.9 +/- 9.7 x 10(4) cells/ml after MD4 vs. 12.1 +/- 6.4 x 10(4) cells/ml after the single day). Alveolar macrophages are recruited to the airways of subjects with asthma with repeated short-term exposures to O3, suggesting a possible role for these cells in the chronic response to oxidant-induced injury.

  13. Repeated cocaine exposure increases fast-spiking interneuron excitability in the rat medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Dax A.

    2013-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex plays a key role in cocaine addiction. However, how chronic cocaine exposure affects cortical networks remains unclear. Most studies have focused on layer 5 pyramidal neurons (the circuit output), while the response of local GABAergic interneurons to cocaine remains poorly understood. Here, we recorded from fast-spiking interneurons (FS-IN) after repeated cocaine exposure and found altered membrane excitability. After cocaine withdrawal, FS-IN showed an increase in the number of spikes evoked by positive current injection, increased input resistance, and decreased hyperpolarization-activated current. We also observed a reduction in miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, whereas miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current activity was unaffected. We show that, in animals with cocaine history, dopamine receptor D2 activation is less effective in increasing FS-IN intrinsic excitability. Interestingly, these alterations are only observed 1 wk or more after the last cocaine exposure. This suggests that the dampening of D2-receptor-mediated response may be a compensatory mechanism to rein down the excitability of FS-IN. PMID:23486201

  14. Repeated cocaine exposure increases fast-spiking interneuron excitability in the rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Campanac, Emilie; Hoffman, Dax A

    2013-06-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex plays a key role in cocaine addiction. However, how chronic cocaine exposure affects cortical networks remains unclear. Most studies have focused on layer 5 pyramidal neurons (the circuit output), while the response of local GABAergic interneurons to cocaine remains poorly understood. Here, we recorded from fast-spiking interneurons (FS-IN) after repeated cocaine exposure and found altered membrane excitability. After cocaine withdrawal, FS-IN showed an increase in the number of spikes evoked by positive current injection, increased input resistance, and decreased hyperpolarization-activated current. We also observed a reduction in miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, whereas miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current activity was unaffected. We show that, in animals with cocaine history, dopamine receptor D(2) activation is less effective in increasing FS-IN intrinsic excitability. Interestingly, these alterations are only observed 1 wk or more after the last cocaine exposure. This suggests that the dampening of D(2)-receptor-mediated response may be a compensatory mechanism to rein down the excitability of FS-IN.

  15. Cellular inhibitors of long interspersed element 1 and Alu retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, Hal P.; Wiegand, Heather L.; Hulme, Amy E.; Garcia-Perez, José L.; O’Shea, K. Sue; Moran, John V.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2006-01-01

    Long interspersed element (LINE) 1 retrotransposons are major genomic parasites that represent ≈17% of the human genome. The LINE-1 ORF2 protein is also responsible for the mobility of Alu elements, which constitute a further ≈11% of genomic DNA. Representative members of each element class remain mobile, and deleterious retrotransposition events can induce spontaneous genetic diseases. Here, we demonstrate that APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B, two members of the APOBEC3 family of human innate antiretroviral resistance factors, can enter the nucleus, where LINE-1 and Alu reverse transcription occurs, and specifically inhibit both LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposition. These data suggest that the APOBEC3 protein family may have evolved, at least in part, to defend the integrity of the human genome against endogenous retrotransposons. PMID:16728505

  16. Cellular inhibitors of long interspersed element 1 and Alu retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Hal P; Wiegand, Heather L; Hulme, Amy E; Garcia-Perez, José L; O'Shea, K Sue; Moran, John V; Cullen, Bryan R

    2006-06-06

    Long interspersed element (LINE) 1 retrotransposons are major genomic parasites that represent approximately 17% of the human genome. The LINE-1 ORF2 protein is also responsible for the mobility of Alu elements, which constitute a further approximately 11% of genomic DNA. Representative members of each element class remain mobile, and deleterious retrotransposition events can induce spontaneous genetic diseases. Here, we demonstrate that APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B, two members of the APOBEC3 family of human innate antiretroviral resistance factors, can enter the nucleus, where LINE-1 and Alu reverse transcription occurs, and specifically inhibit both LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposition. These data suggest that the APOBEC3 protein family may have evolved, at least in part, to defend the integrity of the human genome against endogenous retrotransposons.

  17. Alu sequences in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells display high levels of A-to-I RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Osenberg, Sivan; Paz Yaacov, Nurit; Safran, Michal; Moshkovitz, Sharon; Shtrichman, Ronit; Sherf, Ofra; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Keshet, Gilmor; Amariglio, Ninette; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Rechavi, Gideon

    2010-06-21

    Adenosine to Inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a site-specific modification of RNA transcripts, catalyzed by members of the ADAR (Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA) protein family. RNA editing occurs in human RNA in thousands of different sites. Some of the sites are located in protein-coding regions but the majority is found in non-coding regions, such as 3'UTRs, 5'UTRs and introns - mainly in Alu elements. While editing is found in all tissues, the highest levels of editing are found in the brain. It was shown that editing levels within protein-coding regions are increased during embryogenesis and after birth and that RNA editing is crucial for organism viability as well as for normal development. In this study we characterized the A-to-I RNA editing phenomenon during neuronal and spontaneous differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We identified high editing levels of Alu repetitive elements in hESCs and demonstrated a global decrease in editing levels of non-coding Alu sites when hESCs are differentiating, particularly into the neural lineage. Using RNA interference, we showed that the elevated editing levels of Alu elements in undifferentiated hESCs are highly dependent on ADAR1. DNA microarray analysis showed that ADAR1 knockdown has a global effect on gene expression in hESCs and leads to a significant increase in RNA expression levels of genes involved in differentiation and development processes, including neurogenesis. Taken together, we speculate that A-to-I editing of Alu sequences plays a role in the regulation of hESC early differentiation decisions.

  18. The tandemly repeated domains of a β-propeller phytase act synergistically to increase catalytic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyuan; Huang, Huoqing; Yang, Peilong; Yuan, Tiezheng; Shi, Pengjun; Zhao, Junqi; Meng, Kun; Yao, Bin

    2011-09-01

    β-Propeller phytases (BPPs) with tandemly repeated domains are abundant in nature. Previous studies have shown that the intact domain is responsible for phytate hydrolysis, but the function of the other domain is relatively unknown. In this study, a new dual-domain BPP (PhyH) from Bacillus sp. HJB17 was identified to contain an incomplete N-terminal BPP domain (PhyH-DI, residues 41-318) and a typical BPP domain (PhyH-DII, residues 319-644) at the C-terminus. Purified recombinant PhyH and PhyH-DII required Ca(2+) for phytase activity, showed activity at low temperatures (0-35 °C) and pH 6.0-8.0, and remained active (at 37 °C) after incubation at 60 °C and pH 6.0-12.0. Compared with PhyH-DII, PhyH is catalytically more active against phytate (catalytic constant 27.72 versus 4.17 s(-1)), which indicates the importance of PhyH-DI in phytate degradation. PhyH-DI was found to hydrolyze phytate intermediate D-Ins(1,4,5,6) P(4), and to act synergistically (a 1.2-2.5-fold increase in phosphate release) with PhyH-DII, other BPPs (PhyP and 168PhyA) and a histidine acid phosphatase. Furthermore, fusion of PhyH-DI with PhyP or 168PhyA significantly enhanced their catalytic efficiencies. This is the first report to elucidate the substrate specificity of the incomplete domain and the functional relationship of tandemly repeated domains in BPPs. We conjecture that dual-domain BPPs have succeeded evolutionarily because they can increase the amount of available phosphate by interacting together. Additionally, fusing PhyH-DI to a single-domain phytase appears to be an efficient way to improve the activity of the latter.

  19. Exposure to repeated immobilization stress inhibits cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in the rat ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor-Zárate, Ramón; Abarca, Jorge; Araya, Katherine A; Renard, Georgina M; Andrés, María E; Gysling, Katia

    2015-11-01

    A higher vulnerability to drug abuse has been observed in human studies of individuals exposed to chronic or persistent stress, as well as in animal models of drug abuse. Here, we explored the effect of repeated immobilization stress on cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in VTA and its regulation by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and GABA systems. Cocaine (10mg/Kg i.p.) induced an increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in control rats. However, this effect was not observed in repeated stress rats. Considering the evidence relating stress with CRF, we decided to perfuse CRF and CP-154526 (selective antagonist of CRF1 receptor) in the VTA of control and repeated stress rats, respectively. We observed that perfusion of 20μM CRF inhibited the increase of VTA DA extracellular levels induced by cocaine in control rats. Interestingly, we observed that in the presence of 10μM CP-154526, cocaine induced a significant increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats. Regarding the role of VTA GABA neurotransmission, cocaine administration induced a significant increase in VTA GABA extracellular levels only in repeated stress rats. Consistently, cocaine was able to increase VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats when 100μM bicuculline, an antagonist of GABAA receptor, was perfused intra VTA. Thus, both CRF and GABA systems are involved in the lack of response to cocaine in the VTA of repeated stress rats. It is tempting to suggest that the loss of response in VTA dopaminergic neurons to cocaine, after repeated stress, is due to an interaction between CRF and GABA systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An Alu-derived intronic splicing enhancer facilitates intronic processing and modulates aberrant splicing in ATM

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Tibor; Talotti, Gabriele; Lewandowska, Marzena Anna; Pagani, Franco

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported a natural GTAA deletion within an intronic splicing processing element (ISPE) of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene that disrupts a non-canonical U1 snRNP interaction and activates the excision of the upstream portion of the intron. The resulting pre-mRNA splicing intermediate is then processed to a cryptic exon, whose aberrant inclusion in the final mRNA is responsible for ataxia telangiectasia. We show here that the last 40 bases of a downstream intronic antisense Alu repeat are required for the activation of the cryptic exon by the ISPE deletion. Evaluation of the pre-mRNA splicing intermediate by a hybrid minigene assay indicates that the identified intronic splicing enhancer represents a novel class of enhancers that facilitates processing of splicing intermediates possibly by recruiting U1 snRNP to defective donor sites. In the absence of this element, the splicing intermediate accumulates and is not further processed to generate the cryptic exon. Our results indicate that Alu-derived sequences can provide intronic splicing regulatory elements that facilitate pre-mRNA processing and potentially affect the severity of disease-causing splicing mutations. PMID:19773425

  1. Transcripts from a novel human KRAB zinc finger gene contain spliced Alu and endogenous retroviral segments

    SciTech Connect

    Baban, S.; Freeman, J.D.; Mager, D.L.

    1996-05-01

    During the course of an investigation into the potential effects of endogenous retroviruses on adjacent gene expression, we isolated two cDNA clones containing a small sequence segment belonging to the human endogenous retrovirus family, HERV-H. Characterization of the clones revealed that they represent transcripts from a novel KRAB zinc finger gene termed ZNF177. The two cDNA clones differ at their 5{prime} termini and in the presence of a 559-bp internal exon. The clone containing this internal exon has six imperfect zinc finger motifs followed by seven perfect copies of the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} type but has a frame shift between the KRAB domain and the downstream zinc finger region. The smaller clone lacks the six imperfect motifs and has an intact ORF. The 5{prime} putative untranslated regions of both cDNAs contain an 86-bp HERV-H env segment and a segment of an Alu repeat, both in the antisense orientation, that have been incorporated by splicing. RT-PCR experiments show evidence of alternative splicing but the majority of transcripts appear to contain the Alu and env segments. Genomic PCR and hybridization experiments suggest that a partial HERV-H element is integrated within the ZNF177 locus, which Southern analysis has shown to be a single-copy gene. Northern and RT-PCR analyses suggest that ZNF177 is transcribed at a low level in a variety of cell types. 41 refs., 8 figs.

  2. An Alu-derived intronic splicing enhancer facilitates intronic processing and modulates aberrant splicing in ATM.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Tibor; Talotti, Gabriele; Lewandowska, Marzena Anna; Pagani, Franco

    2009-11-01

    We have previously reported a natural GTAA deletion within an intronic splicing processing element (ISPE) of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene that disrupts a non-canonical U1 snRNP interaction and activates the excision of the upstream portion of the intron. The resulting pre-mRNA splicing intermediate is then processed to a cryptic exon, whose aberrant inclusion in the final mRNA is responsible for ataxia telangiectasia. We show here that the last 40 bases of a downstream intronic antisense Alu repeat are required for the activation of the cryptic exon by the ISPE deletion. Evaluation of the pre-mRNA splicing intermediate by a hybrid minigene assay indicates that the identified intronic splicing enhancer represents a novel class of enhancers that facilitates processing of splicing intermediates possibly by recruiting U1 snRNP to defective donor sites. In the absence of this element, the splicing intermediate accumulates and is not further processed to generate the cryptic exon. Our results indicate that Alu-derived sequences can provide intronic splicing regulatory elements that facilitate pre-mRNA processing and potentially affect the severity of disease-causing splicing mutations.

  3. Serine-Aspartate Repeat Protein D Increases Staphylococcus aureus Virulence and Survival in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Satoshi; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Ajayi, Clement; Sollid, Johanna U. E.; van Sorge, Nina M.; Nizet, Victor; van Strijp, Jos A. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus expresses a panel of cell wall-anchored adhesins, including proteins belonging to the microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM) family, exemplified by the serine-aspartate repeat protein D (SdrD), which serve key roles in colonization and infection. Deletion of sdrD from S. aureus subsp. aureus strain NCTC8325-4 attenuated bacterial survival in human whole blood ex vivo, which was associated with increased killing by human neutrophils. Remarkably, SdrD was able to inhibit innate immune-mediated bacterial killing independently of other S. aureus proteins, since addition of recombinant SdrD protein and heterologous expression of SdrD in Lactococcus lactis promoted bacterial survival in human blood. SdrD contributes to bacterial virulence in vivo, since fewer S. aureus subsp. aureus NCTC8325-4 ΔsdrD bacteria than bacteria of the parent strain were recovered from blood and several organs using a murine intravenous infection model. Collectively, our findings reveal a new property of SdrD as an important key contributor to S. aureus survival and the ability to escape the innate immune system in blood. PMID:27795358

  4. A novel PCR technique using Alu-specific primers to identify unknown flanking sequences from the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, M.; Poussin, K.; Brechot, C.; Paterlini, P.

    1995-09-20

    The rapid and reproducible identification of new cellular DNA sequences is difficult to achieve with the currently available procedures. Here we describe a novel approach based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a primer specific to the known sequence and another directed to a human Alu repeat. To avoid undesirable amplifications between Alu sequences, primers are constructed with dUTPs and destroyed by uracil DNA glycosylase treatment after 10 initial cycles of amplification. Only desirable fragments are then further amplified with specific primers to the known region and to a tag sequence introduced in the Alu-specific primer. Using this protocol, we have successfully indentified cellular sequences flanking integrated hepatitis B virus DNA from the human genome of three hepatoma tissues. The method enables a direct specific amplification without any ligation or nonspecific annealing steps as required by previous PCR-based protocols. This rapid and straightforward approach will be a powerful tool for the study of viral integration sites, but is also widely applicable to other studies of the human genome. 39 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Threshold frequency of an electrically induced cramp increases following a repeated, localized fatiguing exercise.

    PubMed

    Stone, Marcus B; Edwards, Jeffrey E; Huxel, Kellie C; Cordova, Mitchell L; Ingersoll, Christopher D; Babington, J Patrick

    2010-02-01

    Though clinical observations and laboratory data provide some support for the neuromuscular imbalance theory of the genesis of exercise-associated muscle cramps, no direct evidence has been published. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of local muscle fatigue on the threshold frequency of an electrically induced muscle cramp. To determine baseline threshold frequency, a cramp was electrically induced in the flexor hallucis brevis of 16 apparently healthy participants (7 males, 9 females; age 25.1 +/- 4.8 years). The testing order of control and fatigue conditions was counterbalanced. In the control condition, participants rested in a supine position for 30 min followed by another cramp induction to determine post-threshold frequency. In the fatigue condition, participants performed five bouts of great toe curls at 60% one-repetition maximum to failure with 1 min rest between bouts followed immediately by a post-threshold frequency measurement. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and simple main effects testing showed post-fatigue threshold frequency (32.9 +/- 11.7 Hz) was greater (P < 0.001) than pre-fatigue threshold frequency (20.0 +/- 7.7 Hz). An increase in threshold frequency seems to demonstrate a decrease in one's propensity to cramp following the fatigue exercise regimen used. These results contradict the proposed theory that suggests cramp propensity should increase following fatigue. However, differences in laboratory versus clinical fatiguing exercise and contributions from other sources, as well as the notion of a graded response to fatiguing exercise, on exercise-associated muscle cramp and electrically induced muscle cramp should be considered.

  6. Association of AluYb8 insertion/deletion polymorphism in the MUTYH gene with mtDNA maintain in the type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenwen; Zheng, Bixia; Guo, Dong; Cai, Zhenming; Wang, Yaping

    2015-07-05

    A common AluYb8-element insertion/deletion polymorphism of the MUTYH gene (AluYb8MUTYH) is a novel genetic risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In the present study, mtDNA sequencing analysis indicated that the mtDNA sequence heteroplasmy was not associated with AluYb8MUTYH polymorphism. To better understand the genetic risk for T2DM, we investigated the association of this polymorphism with mtDNA content, mtDNA breakage and mtDNA transcription in the leukocytes of T2DM patients. The mtDNA content and unbroken mtDNA were significantly increased in the mutant patients than in the wild-type patients (P <0.05, respectively). However, no association between mtDNA transcription and AluYb8MUTYH variant was observed. The results suggested that the AluYb8MUTYH variant was associated with an altered mtDNA maintain in T2DM patients. The high level of mtDNA content observed in the mutant patients may have resulted from inefficient base excision repair of mitochondrial MUTYH and a compensatory mechanism that is triggered by elevated oxidative stress.

  7. Repeated social stress increases reward salience and impairs encoding of prediction by rat locus coeruleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Chaijale, Nayla N; Snyder, Kevin; Arner, Jay; Curtis, Andre L; Valentino, Rita J

    2015-01-01

    Stress is implicated in psychopathology characterized by cognitive dysfunction. Cognitive responses to stress are regulated by the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE) system. As social stress is a prevalent human stressor, this study determined the impact of repeated social stress on the relationship between LC neuronal activity and behavior during the performance of cognitive tasks. Social stress-exposed rats performed better at intradimensional set shifting (IDS) and made fewer perseverative errors during reversal learning (REV). LC neurons of control rats were task responsive, being activated after the choice and before reward. Social stress shifted LC neuronal activity from being task responsive to being reward responsive during IDS and REV. LC neurons of stressed rats were activated by reward and tonically inhibited by reward omission with incorrect choices. In contrast, LC neurons of stress-naive rats were only tonically inhibited by reward omission. Reward-related LC activation in stressed rats was unrelated to predictability because it did not habituate as learning progressed. The findings suggest that social stress history increases reward salience and impairs processes that compute predictability for LC neurons. These effects of social stress on LC neuronal activity could facilitate learning as indicated by improved performance in stressed rats. However, the ability of social stress history to enhance responses to behavioral outcomes may have a role in the association between stress and addictive behaviors. In addition, magnified fluctuations in LC activity in response to opposing behavioral consequences may underlie volatile changes in emotional arousal that characterize post-traumatic stress disorder.

  8. Repeated Social Stress Increases Reward Salience and Impairs Encoding of Prediction by Rat Locus Coeruleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chaijale, Nayla N; Snyder, Kevin; Arner, Jay; Curtis, Andre L; Valentino, Rita J

    2015-01-01

    Stress is implicated in psychopathology characterized by cognitive dysfunction. Cognitive responses to stress are regulated by the locus coeruleus–norepinephrine (LC–NE) system. As social stress is a prevalent human stressor, this study determined the impact of repeated social stress on the relationship between LC neuronal activity and behavior during the performance of cognitive tasks. Social stress-exposed rats performed better at intradimensional set shifting (IDS) and made fewer perseverative errors during reversal learning (REV). LC neurons of control rats were task responsive, being activated after the choice and before reward. Social stress shifted LC neuronal activity from being task responsive to being reward responsive during IDS and REV. LC neurons of stressed rats were activated by reward and tonically inhibited by reward omission with incorrect choices. In contrast, LC neurons of stress-naive rats were only tonically inhibited by reward omission. Reward-related LC activation in stressed rats was unrelated to predictability because it did not habituate as learning progressed. The findings suggest that social stress history increases reward salience and impairs processes that compute predictability for LC neurons. These effects of social stress on LC neuronal activity could facilitate learning as indicated by improved performance in stressed rats. However, the ability of social stress history to enhance responses to behavioral outcomes may have a role in the association between stress and addictive behaviors. In addition, magnified fluctuations in LC activity in response to opposing behavioral consequences may underlie volatile changes in emotional arousal that characterize post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:25109891

  9. Identification of human-specific AluS elements through comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae; Kim, Yun-Ji; Mun, Seyoung; Kim, Heui-Soo; Han, Kyudong

    2015-01-25

    Mobile elements are responsible for ~45% of the human genome. Among them is the Alu element, accounting for 10% of the human genome (>1.1million copies). Several studies of Alu elements have reported that they are frequently involved in human genetic diseases and genomic rearrangements. In this study, we investigated the AluS subfamily, which is a relatively old Alu subfamily and has the highest copy number in primate genomes. Previously, a set of 263 human-specific AluS insertions was identified in the human genome. To validate these, we compared each of the human-specific AluS loci with its pre-insertion site in other primate genomes, including chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan. We obtained 24 putative human-specific AluS candidates via the in silico analysis and manual inspection, and then tried to verify them using PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. Through the PCR product sequencing, we were able to detect two instances of near-parallel Alu insertions in nearby sites that led to computational false negatives. Finally, we computationally and experimentally verified 23 human-specific AluS elements. We reported three alternative Alu insertion events, which are accompanied by filler DNA and/or Alu retrotransposition mediated-deletion. Bisulfite sequencing was carried out to examine DNA methylation levels of human-specific AluS elements. The results showed that fixed AluS elements are hypermethylated compared with polymorphic elements, indicating a possible relation between DNA methylation and Alu fixation in the human genome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Methylation status of individual CpG sites within Alu elements in the human genome and Alu hypomethylation in gastric carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Alu methylation is correlated with the overall level of DNA methylation and recombination activity of the genome. However, the maintenance and methylation status of each CpG site within Alu elements (Alu) and its methylation status have not well characterized. This information is useful for understanding natural status of Alu in the genome and helpful for developing an optimal assay to quantify Alu hypomethylation. Methods Bisulfite clone sequencing was carried out in 14 human gastric samples initially. A Cac8I COBRA-DHPLC assay was developed to detect methylated-Alu proportion in cell lines and 48 paired gastric carcinomas and 55 gastritis samples. DHPLC data were statistically interpreted using SPSS version 16.0. Results From the results of 427 Alu bisulfite clone sequences, we found that only 27.2% of CpG sites within Alu elements were preserved (4.6 of 17 analyzed CpGs, A ~ Q) and that 86.6% of remaining-CpGs were methylated. Deamination was the main reason for low preservation of methylation targets. A high correlation coefficient of methylation was observed between Alu clones and CpG site J (0.963), A (0.950), H (0.946), D (0.945). Comethylation of the sites H and J were used as an indicator of the proportion of methylated-Alu in a Cac8I COBRA-DHPLC assay. Validation studies showed that hypermethylation or hypomethylation of Alu elements in human cell lines could be detected sensitively by the assay after treatment with 5-aza-dC and M.SssI, respectively. The proportion of methylated-Alu copies in gastric carcinomas (3.01%) was significantly lower than that in the corresponding normal samples (3.19%) and gastritis biopsies (3.23%). Conclusions Most Alu CpG sites are deaminated in the genome. 27% of Alu CpG sites represented in our amplification products. 87% of the remaining CpG sites are methylated. Alu hypomethylation in primary gastric carcinomas could be detected with the Cac8I COBRA-DHPLC assay quantitatively. PMID:20163738

  11. DNA sequences of Alu elements indicate a recent replacement of the human autosomal genetic complement

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, A.; Deininger, P.L.; Batzer, M.A.

    1996-04-30

    DNA sequences of neutral nuclear autosomal loci, compared across diverse human populations, provide a previously untapped perspective into the mode and tempo of the emergence of modern humans and a critical comparison with published clonally inherited mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome measurements of human diversity. We obtained over 55 kilobases of sequence from three autosomal loci encompassing Alu repeats for representatives of diverse human populations as well as orthologous sequences for other hominoid species at one of these loci. Nucleotide diversity was exceedingly low. Most individuals and populations were identical. Only a single nucleotide difference distinguished presumed ancestral alleles from descendants. These results differ from those expected if alleles from divergent archaic populations were maintained through multiregional continuity. The observed virtual lack of sequence polymorphism is the signature of a recent single origin for modern humans, with general replacement of archaic populations. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Markedly reduced activity of mutant calcium-sensing receptor with an inserted Alu element from a kindred with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Bai, M; Janicic, N; Trivedi, S; Quinn, S J; Cole, D E; Brown, E M; Hendy, G N

    1997-01-01

    Missense mutations have been identified in the coding region of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) gene and cause human autosomal dominant hypo- and hypercalcemic disorders. The functional effects of several of these mutations have been characterized in either Xenopus laevis oocytes or in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. All of the mutations that have been examined to date, however, cause single putative amino acid substitutions. In this report, we studied a mutant CASR with an Alu-repetitive element inserted at codon 876, which was identified in affected members of families with the hypercalcemic disorders, familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) and neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT), to understand how this insertion affects CASR function. After cloning of the Alu-repetitive element into the wild-type CASR cDNA, we transiently expressed the mutant receptor in HEK293 cells. Expression of mutant and wild-type receptors was assessed by Western analysis, and the effects of the mutation on extracellular calcium (Ca2+(o)) and gadolinium (Gd3+(o)) elicited increases in the cytosolic calcium concentration (Ca2+(i)) were examined in fura-2-loaded cells using dual wavelength fluorimetry. The insertion resulted in truncated receptor species that had molecular masses some 30 kD less than that of the wild-type CASR and exhibited no Ca2+(i) responses to either Ca2+(o) or Gd3+(o). A similar result was observed with a mutated CASR truncated at residue 876. However, the Alu mutant receptor had no impact on the function of the coexpressed wild-type receptor. Interestingly, the Alu mutant receptor demonstrated decreased cell surface expression relative to the wild-type receptor, whereas the CASR (A877stop) mutant exhibited increased cell surface expression. Thus, like the missense mutations that have been characterized to date in families with FHH, the Alu insertion in this family is a loss-of-function mutation that produces hypercalcemia by

  13. An Alu-Based Phylogeny of Lemurs (Infraorder: Lemuriformes)

    PubMed Central

    McLain, Adam T.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Faulk, Christopher; Herke, Scott W.; Oldenburg, J. Michael; Bourgeois, Matthew G.; Abshire, Camille F.

    2012-01-01

    Lemurs (infraorder: Lemuriformes) are a radiation of strepsirrhine primates endemic to the island of Madagascar. As of 2012, 101 lemur species, divided among five families, have been described. Genetic and morphological evidence indicates all species are descended from a common ancestor that arrived in Madagascar ∼55–60 million years ago (mya). Phylogenetic relationships in this species-rich infraorder have been the subject of debate. Here we use Alu elements, a family of primate-specific Short INterspersed Elements (SINEs), to construct a phylogeny of infraorder Lemuriformes. Alu elements are particularly useful SINEs for the purpose of phylogeny reconstruction because they are identical by descent and confounding events between loci are easily resolved by sequencing. The genome of the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) was computationally assayed for synapomorphic Alu elements. Those that were identified as Lemuriformes-specific were analyzed against other available primate genomes for orthologous sequence in which to design primers for PCR (polymerase chain reaction) verification. A primate phylogenetic panel of 24 species, including 22 lemur species from all five families, was examined for the presence/absence of 138 Alu elements via PCR to establish relationships among species. Of these, 111 were phylogenetically informative. A phylogenetic tree was generated based on the results of this analysis. We demonstrate strong support for the monophyly of Lemuriformes to the exclusion of other primates, with Daubentoniidae, the aye-aye, as the basal lineage within the infraorder. Our results also suggest Lepilemuridae as a sister lineage to Cheirogaleidae, and Indriidae as sister to Lemuridae. Among the Cheirogaleidae, we show strong support for Microcebus and Mirza as sister genera, with Cheirogaleus the sister lineage to both. Our results also support the monophyly of the Lemuridae. Within Lemuridae we place Lemur and Hapalemur together to the exclusion of

  14. Phylogeny of the macaques (Cercopithecidae: Macaca) based on Alu elements

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Han, Kyudong; Xing, Jinchuan; Kim, Heui-Soo; Rogers, Jeffrey; Ryder, Oliver A.; Disotell, Todd; Yue, Bisong; Batzer, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Genus Macaca (Cercopithecidae: Papionini) is one of the most successful primate radiations. Despite previous studies on morphology and mitochondrial DNA analysis, a number of issues regarding the details of macaque evolution remain unsolved. Alu elements are a class of non-autonomous retroposons belonging to short interspersed elements that are specific to the primate lineage. Because retroposon insertions show very little homoplasy, and because the ancestral state (absence of the SINE) is known, Alu elements are useful genetic markers and have been utilized for analyzing primate phylogenentic relationships and human population genetic relationships. Using PCR display methodology, 298 new Alu insertions have been identified from ten species of macaques. Together with 60 loci reported previously, a total of 358 loci are used to infer the phylogenetic relationships of genus Macaca. With regard to earlier unresolved issues on the macaque evolution, the topology of our tree suggests that: 1) genus Macaca contains four monophyletic species groups; 2) within the Asian macaques, the silenus group diverged first, and members of the sinica and fascicularis groups share a common ancestor; 3) Macaca arctoides are classified in the sinica group. Our results provide a robust molecular phylogeny for genus Macaca with stronger statistical support than previous studies. The present study also illustrates that SINE-based approaches are a powerful tool in primate phylogenetic studies and can be used to successfully resolve evolutionary relationships between taxa at scales from the ordinal level to closely related species within one genus. PMID:19497354

  15. Detecting Alu insertions from high-throughput sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    David, Matei; Mustafa, Harun; Brudno, Michael

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the cataloguing of variation in personal human genomes. In this manuscript, we present alu-detect, a tool that combines read-pair and split-read information to detect novel Alus and their precise breakpoints directly from either whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing data while also identifying insertions directly in the vicinity of existing Alus. To set the parameters of our method, we use simulation of a faux reference, which allows us to compute the precision and recall of various parameter settings using real sequencing data. Applying our method to 100 bp paired Illumina data from seven individuals, including two trios, we detected on average 1519 novel Alus per sample. Based on the faux-reference simulation, we estimate that our method has 97% precision and 85% recall. We identify 808 novel Alus not previously described in other studies. We also demonstrate the use of alu-detect to study the local sequence and global location preferences for novel Alu insertions. PMID:23921633

  16. HPV-positive women with normal cytology remain at increased risk of CIN3 after a negative repeat HPV test.

    PubMed

    Polman, Nicole J; Veldhuijzen, Nienke J; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; Snijders, Peter J F; Meijer, Chris J L M; Berkhof, Johannes

    2017-09-07

    In human papillomavirus (HPV)-based screening, a repeat HPV test is often recommended for HPV-positive women with normal cytology (HPV-pos/cyt-neg), but its absolute risk of cervical precancer (CIN3+) over two screening rounds needs to be assessed. We compared the 5-year risk of HPV infection and CIN3+ in HPV-pos/cyt-neg women with a negative repeat HPV test to the risk in HPV-negative women with normal cytology (double negatives) in the POBASCAM cohort. We obtained histology data from the Dutch pathology registry (PALGA). Human papillomavirus infection risk was 20.4% (19 of 93) in HPV-pos/cyt-neg, repeat HPV-negative women and 3.2% (294 of 9186; P<0.001) in double negatives. Corresponding CIN3+ risks were 2.0% (4 of 199) and 0.2% (41 of 18 562; P<0.001). Infection risks were also increased in type-specific analyses of HPV16, 31, 33, 39, 52, 56 and 58. HPV-pos/cyt-neg women continue to have an increased CIN3+ risk, also when the repeat HPV test is negative. Therefore, intervals in primary HPV screening should be determined separately for HPV-positive and -negative women.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication 7 September 2017; doi:10.1038/bjc.2017.309 www.bjcancer.com.

  17. Insertion and deletion polymorphisms of the ancient AluS family in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Kryatova, Maria S; Steranka, Jared P; Burns, Kathleen H; Payer, Lindsay M

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphic Alu elements account for 17% of structural variants in the human genome. The majority of these belong to the youngest AluY subfamilies, and most structural variant discovery efforts have focused on identifying Alu polymorphisms from these currently retrotranspositionally active subfamilies. In this report we analyze polymorphisms from the evolutionarily older AluS subfamily, whose peak activity was tens of millions of years ago. We annotate the AluS polymorphisms, assess their likely mechanism of origin, and evaluate their contribution to structural variation in the human genome. Of 52 previously reported polymorphic AluS elements ascertained for this study, 48 were confirmed to belong to the AluS subfamily using high stringency subfamily classification criteria. Of these, the majority (77%, 37/48) appear to be deletion polymorphisms. Two polymorphic AluS elements (4%) have features of non-classical Alu insertions and one polymorphic AluS element (2%) likely inserted by a mechanism involving internal priming. Seven AluS polymorphisms (15%) appear to have arisen by the classical target-primed reverse transcription (TPRT) retrotransposition mechanism. These seven TPRT products are 3' intact with 3' poly-A tails, and are flanked by target site duplications; L1 ORF2p endonuclease cleavage sites were also observed, providing additional evidence that these are L1 ORF2p endonuclease-mediated TPRT insertions. Further sequence analysis showed strong conservation of both the RNA polymerase III promoter and SRP9/14 binding sites, important for mediating transcription and interaction with retrotransposition machinery, respectively. This conservation of functional features implies that some of these are fairly recent insertions since they have not diverged significantly from their respective retrotranspositionally competent source elements. Of the polymorphic AluS elements evaluated in this report, 15% (7/48) have features consistent with TPRT-mediated insertion

  18. Using Alu elements as polyadenylation sites: A case of retroposon exaptation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chongjian; Ara, Takeshi; Gautheret, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Of the 1.1 million Alu retroposons in the human genome, about 10,000 are inserted in the 3' untranslated regions (UTR) of protein-coding genes and 1% of these (107 events) are active as polyadenylation sites (PASs). Strikingly, although Alu's in 3' UTR are indifferently inserted in the forward or reverse direction, 99% of polyadenylation-active Alu sequences are forward oriented. Consensus Alu+ sequences contain sites that can give rise to polyadenylation signals and enhancers through a few point mutations. We found that the strand bias of polyadenylation-active Alu's reflects a radical difference in the fitness of sense and antisense Alu's toward cleavage/polyadenylation activity. In contrast to previous beliefs, Alu inserts do not necessarily represent weak or cryptic PASs; instead, they often constitute the major or the unique PAS in a gene, adding to the growing list of Alu exaptations. Finally, some Alu-borne PASs are intronic and produce truncated transcripts that may impact gene function and/or contribute to gene remodeling.

  19. Efficacy of repeated exposure and flavour-flavour learning as mechanisms to increase preschooler's vegetable intake and acceptance.

    PubMed

    de Wild, V; de Graaf, C; Jager, G

    2015-06-01

    Dutch children's diets, like the diets of many children in Europe and the US are not balanced, do not contain enough vegetables and have been associated with a high prevalence of childhood obesity. Promoting children's vegetable intake is challenging. We investigated the relative effectiveness of repeated exposure and flavour-flavour learning in increasing vegetable intake and acceptance in preschoolers. During an intervention period of 7 weeks, 39 toddlers (aged 1.5 to 4 years) consumed red beet and parsnip crisps at day-care centres in Wageningen, the Netherlands. Half of the group received red beet crisps with a dip of tomato ketchup (Conditioned [C]) and parsnip with a neutral white sauce (Unconditioned, [UC]), whereas for the other half the order was reversed (red beet [UC], parsnip [C]). Preference and ad libitum consumption of vegetable crisps were measured once before and three times after the intervention over the course of a 6-month follow-up period to assess longer-term effects. Intake increased significantly after the intervention for both vegetables (on average with 8 g; an increase of approximately 300%), and this effect was persistent even 6 months afterwards. The increase was irrespective of crisps being offered with C or UC dip sauce. These results suggest a robust and persistent effect of repeated exposure but no effect of flavour-flavour learning. Offering pure vegetable tastes repeatedly is sufficient to increase intake. © 2014 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2014 World Obesity.

  20. The Zinc-Finger Antiviral Protein ZAP Inhibits LINE and Alu Retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, John B.; Moran, John V.

    2015-01-01

    Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) is the only active autonomous retrotransposon in the human genome. To investigate the interplay between the L1 retrotransposition machinery and the host cell, we used co-immunoprecipitation in conjunction with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry to identify cellular proteins that interact with the L1 first open reading frame-encoded protein, ORF1p. We identified 39 ORF1p-interacting candidate proteins including the zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP or ZC3HAV1). Here we show that the interaction between ZAP and ORF1p requires RNA and that ZAP overexpression in HeLa cells inhibits the retrotransposition of engineered human L1 and Alu elements, an engineered mouse L1, and an engineered zebrafish LINE-2 element. Consistently, siRNA-mediated depletion of endogenous ZAP in HeLa cells led to a ~2-fold increase in human L1 retrotransposition. Fluorescence microscopy in cultured human cells demonstrated that ZAP co-localizes with L1 RNA, ORF1p, and stress granule associated proteins in cytoplasmic foci. Finally, molecular genetic and biochemical analyses indicate that ZAP reduces the accumulation of full-length L1 RNA and the L1-encoded proteins, yielding mechanistic insight about how ZAP may inhibit L1 retrotransposition. Together, these data suggest that ZAP inhibits the retrotransposition of LINE and Alu elements. PMID:25951186

  1. Genetic change in the polynesian population of Easter Island: evidence from Alu insertion polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, E; Esteban, E; Via, M; García-Moro, C; Hernández, M; Moral, P

    2006-11-01

    The origin of Pacific islanders is still an open issue in human population genetics. To address this topic we analyzed a set of 18 Alu insertion polymorphisms in a total of 176 chromosomes from native Easter Island inhabitants (Rapanui). Available genealogical records allowed us to subdivide the total island sample into two groups, representative of the native population living in the island around 1900, and another formed by individuals with some ancestors of non-Rapanui origin. Significant genetic differentiation was found between these groups, allowing us to make some biodemographic and historical inferences about the origin and evolution of this geographically isolated island population. Our data are consistent with equivalent and recent contributions from Amerindian and European migrants to the 1900s Rapanui population, with an accelerated increase in the European gene flow during the 20(th) century, especially since the 1960s. Comparative analysis of our results with other available Alu variation data on neighbouring populations supports the "Voyaging Corridor" model of Polynesian human settlement, which indicates that pre-Polynesians are mainly derived from Southeast Asian and Wallacean populations rather than from Taiwan or the Philippines. This study underlines the importance of sampling and taking into account historical information in genetic studies to unravel the recent evolution of human populations.

  2. Iron toxicity in the retina requires Alu RNA and the NLRP3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Bradley D.; Wright, Charles B.; Kim, Younghee; Yasuma, Tetsuhiro; Yasuma, Reo; Li, Shengjian; Fowler, Benjamin J.; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Kerur, Nagaraj; Uittenbogaard, Annette; Han, Youn Seon; Lou, Dingyuan; Kleinman, Mark E.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Núñez, Gabriel; Georgel, Philippe; Dunaief, Joshua L.; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Excess iron induces tissue damage and is implicated in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Iron toxicity is widely attributed to hydroxyl radical formation through Fenton's reaction. We report that excess iron, but not other Fenton catalytic metals, induces activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, a pathway also implicated in AMD. Additionally, iron-induced degeneration of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is suppressed in mice lacking inflammasome components Caspase-1/11 or Nlrp3 or by inhibition of Caspase-1. Iron overload increases abundance of RNAs transcribed from short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs): Alu RNAs and the rodent equivalent B1 and B2 RNAs, which are inflammasome agonists. Targeting Alu or B2 RNA prevents iron-induced inflammasome activation and RPE degeneration. Iron-induced SINE RNA accumulation is due to suppression of DICER1 via sequestration of the co-factor poly(C)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2). These findings reveal an unexpected mechanism of iron toxicity, with implications for AMD and neurodegenerative diseases associated with excess iron. PMID:26074074

  3. Repeated ischaemic isometric exercise increases muscle fibre conduction velocity in humans: involvement of Na+-K+-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Rongen, G A; van Dijk, J P; van Ginneken, E E; Stegeman, D F; Smits, P; Zwarts, M J

    2002-01-01

    This study was performed to test two hypotheses: (1) ischaemic preconditioning (development of tolerance to ischaemia) influences muscle fibre conduction velocity (MFCV) during repeated ischaemic isometric exercise and (2) the increase in MFCV to supranormal levels during recovery from ischaemic exercise is caused by activation of Na+−K+-ATPase. For this purpose, MFCV was measured with surface electromyography (sEMG) during repeated ischaemic isometric exercise of the brachioradial muscle (2 min at 30 % of maximal voluntary contraction). The involvement of ischaemic preconditioning was tested by changing the duration of ischaemia and by intra-arterial infusion of adenosine (brachial artery, 50 μg min−1 dl−1). The role of Na+−K+-ATPase was explored using ouabain (0.2 μg min−1 dl−1). During the exercise, MFCV decreased from 4.4 ± 0.2 m s−1 to 3.7 ± 0.2 m s−1 (P < 0.01, n = 13). Similar reductions in MFCV were observed during repeated exercise, irrespective of the reperfusion time (10 min vs. 18 min) or duration of the ischaemia (2 vs. 10 min). However, initial MFCV gradually increased for each subsequent contraction when contractions were repeated at 10 min intervals (4.4 ± 0.2 m s−1vs. 4.9 ± 0.2 m s−1 for the first and fourth contraction respectively; P < 0.01; n = 13). This increase was not observed when contractions were performed at 18 min intervals, nor when additional ischaemia was applied. Intra-arterial adenosine did not affect MFCV. Intra-arterial ouabain did not affect the reduction in MFCV during exercise but completely prevented the increase in MFCV during recovery: from 4.7 ± 0.2 m s−1 to 5.2 ± 0.2 m s−1vs. 4.5 ± 0.1 m s−1 to 4.5 ± 0.1 m s−1 in the absence and presence of ouabain respectively (P < 0.05 for ouabain effect; n = 6). In conclusion, ischaemic preconditioning is not involved in changes in MFCV during repeated ischaemic isometric exercise. The increase in MFCV during recovery from repeated ischaemic

  4. Increases in fruit intakes in older low consumers of fruit following two community-based repeated exposure interventions.

    PubMed

    Appleton, K M

    2013-03-14

    The present study investigated the value of two repeated exposure interventions for increasing intakes of fruit in older people. A total of ninety-five participants (aged 65 years and over) were randomised to receive either one (E1), five (E5) or five plus (E5+) exposures to fruit over a 5-week period. Fruit exposures occurred in community-based church and social groups, through fruit-tasting sessions involving familiar fruits and novel fruit products and dishes (E1, E5, E5+), and through fruit provision (E5+). Daily intakes of fruit and vegetables were assessed before and after all interventions. Liking for all fruits was also measured during repeated exposure (E5, E5+). In low consumers of fruit (one portion/d or less), fruit intakes increased significantly in the repeated exposure groups (E5, E5+) (t(30) = 5·79, P< 0·01), but did not change in the E1 group (t(16) = 0·29, P= 0·78). No differences were found between E5 and E5+ groups (F(3,87) = 1·22, P= 0·31). Similar effects were also found in fruit and vegetable intakes. No effects were found in other participants. Also, no changes in liking were found. These findings suggest that compared to single exposure, repeated exposure to fruit via fruit-tasting sessions once per week for 5 weeks in a community setting significantly improved fruit intakes, and fruit and vegetable intakes in older low consumers of fruit, although no benefits of additional fruit provision were found. Repeated exposure was also easy to implement, of low cost and enjoyable.

  5. Over-representation of repeats in stress response genes: a strategy to increase versatility under stressful conditions?

    PubMed

    Rocha, Eduardo P C; Matic, Ivan; Taddei, François

    2002-05-01

    The survival of individual organisms facing stress is enhanced by the induction of a set of changes. As the intensity, duration and nature of stress is highly variable, the optimal response to stress may be unpredictable. To face such an uncertain future, it may be advantageous for a clonal population to increase its phenotypic heterogeneity (bet-hedging), ensuring that at least a subset of cells would survive the current stress. With current techniques, assessing the extent of this variability experimentally remains a challenge. Here, we use a bioinformatic approach to compare stress response genes with the rest of the genome for the presence of various kinds of repeated sequences, elements known to increase variability during the transfer of genetic information (i.e. during replication, but also during gene expression). We investigated the potential for illegitimate and homologous recombination of 296 Escherichia coli genes related to repair, recombination and physiological adaptations to different stresses. Although long repeats capable of engaging in homologous recombination are almost absent in stress response genes, we observed a significant high number of short close repeats capable of inducing phenotypic variability by slipped-mispair during DNA, RNA or protein synthesis.

  6. Dietary arginine and repeated handling increase disease resistance and modulate innate immune mechanisms of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858).

    PubMed

    Costas, Benjamín; Conceição, Luís E C; Dias, Jorge; Novoa, Beatriz; Figueras, Antonio; Afonso, António

    2011-12-01

    Stress is known to impair immune function and disease resistance in fish. In the present study, repeated handling was employed as a chronic stressor in order to verify whether its attributed immunosuppressive effects could be minimized by dietary arginine supplementation. Therefore, Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) were air exposed daily for 3 min during 14 days (handling) or left undisturbed (control). In addition, both control and handled specimens were fed 3 diets with graded levels of arginine (Arg 4.4, Arg 5.7 and Arg 6.9 g 16 g(-1) N). Following the 14 days stress challenge and feeding on those diets, fish were infected with Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida (strain PC566.1; LD(50) 5 × 10(3) cfu mL(-1)) and fed the same experimental diets. Respiratory burst activity and nitric oxide production of head-kidney leucocytes increased parallel to dietary arginine supplementation. HIF-1, HAMP-1, MIP1-alpha and gLYS expression values and some humoral parameters augmented in control specimens fed the Arg 5.7 and Arg 6.9 diets. Interestingly, repeated acute stress increased both disease resistance and some innate immune mechanisms in handled fish. The role of dietary arginine and repeated handling on Senegalese sole innate immunity and disease resistance are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prospective study of DNA methylation at LINE-1 and Alu in peripheral blood and the risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Barry, Kathryn Hughes; Moore, Lee E; Liao, Linda M; Huang, Wen-Yi; Andreotti, Gabriella; Poulin, Matthew; Berndt, Sonja I

    2015-11-01

    Evidence suggests that global blood DNA methylation levels may be associated with the risk of various cancers, but no studies have evaluated this relationship for prostate cancer. We used pyrosequencing to quantify DNA methylation levels at the long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1) and Alu repetitive elements in pre-diagnostic blood samples from 694 prostate cancer cases and 703 controls from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. We evaluated prostate cancer risk associated with the mean methylation level for each element using logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. We did not observe a significant association with prostate cancer for LINE-1 [odds ratio (OR) for the highest compared to the lowest quartile = 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73-1.39, Ptrend  = 0.99] or Alu (OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.68-1.29, Ptrend  = 0.69) methylation levels overall. However, for Alu, we observed that higher DNA methylation levels were associated with a significant increased risk for those diagnosed 4 or more years after blood draw (OR = 2.26, 95% CI: 1.27-4.00, Ptrend  = 4.4 × 10(-3) ). In contrast, there was no association for those diagnosed 2 (OR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.67-1.90, Ptrend  = 0.64) or 3 years after draw (OR = 1.22, 95% CI: 0.71-2.07, Ptrend  = 0.32), and a decreased risk for those diagnosed less than 2 years after draw (OR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.25-0.65, Ptrend  = 3.8 × 10(-5) ; Pheterogeneity  = 5.3 × 10(-6) ). Although LINE-1 DNA methylation levels were not associated with prostate cancer, we observed an association for Alu that varied by time from blood draw to diagnosis. Our study suggests that elevated Alu blood DNA methylation levels several years before diagnosis may be associated with an increased prostate cancer risk. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. DNA methylation of LINE-1 and Alu repetitive elements in relation to sex hormones and pubertal timing in Mexican-American children

    PubMed Central

    Huen, Karen; Harley, Kim; Kogut, Katherine; Rauch, Stephen; Eskenazi, Brenda; Holland, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanisms linking environmental exposures to earlier pubertal development are not well characterized. Epigenetics may play an important role, but data on the relationship between epigenetic marks and puberty, particularly in humans, is limited. Methods We used pyrosequencing to measure Alu and long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINE-1) methylation in DNA isolated from whole blood samples collected from newborns and 9-year-old children (n=266). Tanner staging was completed six times between ages 9 and 12 years to determine pubertal status, and hormone levels were measured in 12-year-old boys. Results Among girls, we observed a suggestive trend of increased odds of breast and pubic hair development with higher Alu and LINE-1 methylation in 9-year-old blood, respectively. The strongest association identified was an inverse association of LINE-1 methylation in 9-year-old girls with odds of experiencing menarche by age 12 (OR(95%CI): 0.63(0.46,0.87); p=0.005). We observed a consistent inverse relationship for Alu and LINE-1 methylation at 9 years with luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone and follicle stimulating hormone levels in boys but it was only significant between LINE-1 and LH. Conclusion DNA methylation of Alu and LINE-1 may be involved in puberty initiation and development. This relationship should be confirmed in future studies. PMID:26882368

  9. DICER1 loss and Alu RNA Induce Age-Related Macular Degeneration via the NLRP3 Inflammasome and MyD88

    PubMed Central

    Tarallo, Valeria; Hirano, Yoshio; Gelfand, Bradley D.; Dridi, Sami; Kerur, Nagaraj; Kim, Younghee; Cho, Won Gil; Kaneko, Hiroki; Fowler, Benjamin J.; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Albuquerque, Romulo J.C.; Hauswirth, William W.; Chiodo, Vince A.; Kugel, Jennifer F.; Goodrich, James A.; Ponicsan, Steven L.; Chaudhuri, Gautam; Murphy, Michael P.; Dunaief, Joshua L.; Ambati, Balamurali K.; Ogura, Yuichiro; Yoo, Jae Wook; Lee, Dong-ki; Provost, Patrick; Hinton, David R.; Núñez, Gabriel; Baffi, Judit Z.; Kleinman, Mark E.; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Alu RNA accumulation due to DICER1 deficiency in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is implicated in geographic atrophy (GA), an advanced form of age-related macular degeneration that causes blindness in millions of individuals. The mechanism of Alu RNA-induced cytotoxicity is unknown. Here we show that DICER1 deficit or Alu RNA exposure activates the NLRP3 inflammasome and triggers TLR-independent MyD88 signaling via IL-18 in the RPE. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition of inflammasome components (NLRP3, Pycard, Caspase-1), MyD88, or IL-18 prevents RPE degeneration induced by DICER1 loss or Alu RNA exposure. These findings, coupled with our observation that human GA RPE contains elevated amounts of NLRP3, PYCARD and IL-18, and evidence of increased Caspase-1 and MyD88 activation, provide a rationale for targeting this pathway in GA. Our findings also reveal a function of the inflammasome outside the immune system and an immunomodulatory action of mobile elements. PMID:22541070

  10. Alu Insertions and Genetic Diversity: A Preliminary Investigation by an Undergraduate Bioinformatics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elwess, Nancy L.; Duprey, Stephen L.; Harney, Lindesay A.; Langman, Jessie E.; Marino, Tara C.; Martinez, Carolina; McKeon, Lauren L.; Moss, Chantel I. E.; Myrie, Sasha S.; Taylor, Luke Ryan

    2008-01-01

    "Alu"-insertion polymorphisms were used by an undergraduate Bioinformatics class to study how these insertion sites could be the basis for an investigation in human population genetics. Based on the students' investigation, both allele and genotype "Alu" frequencies were determined for African-American and Japanese populations as well as a…

  11. Orangutan Alu quiescence reveals possible source element: support for ancient backseat drivers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sequence analysis of the orangutan genome revealed that recent proliferative activity of Alu elements has been uncharacteristically quiescent in the Pongo (orangutan) lineage, compared with all previously studied primate genomes. With relatively few young polymorphic insertions, the genomic landscape of the orangutan seemed like the ideal place to search for a driver, or source element, of Alu retrotransposition. Results Here we report the identification of a nearly pristine insertion possessing all the known putative hallmarks of a retrotranspositionally competent Alu element. It is located in an intronic sequence of the DGKB gene on chromosome 7 and is highly conserved in Hominidae (the great apes), but absent from Hylobatidae (gibbon and siamang). We provide evidence for the evolution of a lineage-specific subfamily of this shared Alu insertion in orangutans and possibly the lineage leading to humans. In the orangutan genome, this insertion contains three orangutan-specific diagnostic mutations which are characteristic of the youngest polymorphic Alu subfamily, AluYe5b5_Pongo. In the Homininae lineage (human, chimpanzee and gorilla), this insertion has acquired three different mutations which are also found in a single human-specific Alu insertion. Conclusions This seemingly stealth-like amplification, ongoing at a very low rate over millions of years of evolution, suggests that this shared insertion may represent an ancient backseat driver of Alu element expansion. PMID:22541534

  12. Does a Repeated Guided-Instruction Approach with Multiple Assessments Increase Student Learning of Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert; Peethambaran, Bela; Pontiggia, Laura; Blumberg, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    Guided instruction is an approach that fully explains the concepts and procedures that students are required to learn. It seems intuitive that this approach should increase student learning; however, there is evidence in the literature that this may not always be the case. We wanted to assess the effectiveness of our own repeated…

  13. Does a Repeated Guided-Instruction Approach with Multiple Assessments Increase Student Learning of Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert; Peethambaran, Bela; Pontiggia, Laura; Blumberg, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    Guided instruction is an approach that fully explains the concepts and procedures that students are required to learn. It seems intuitive that this approach should increase student learning; however, there is evidence in the literature that this may not always be the case. We wanted to assess the effectiveness of our own repeated…

  14. Terrestrial Sediment and Nutrient Fluxes to the Faga'alu Reefs in American Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    Land-based sources of pollution including increased sediment and nutrient fluxes to coastal waters have been identified and linked to degraded coral health in reef ecosystems adjacent to impacted streams such as Faga'alu in American Samoa. Monthly monitoring since 2002 has shown that Faga'alu stream has the highest turbidity of monitored streams on Tutuila, where degraded water quality is linked to lower reef health and fish biomass. To guide local and federal managers in mitigating land-based sources of pollution from agricultural, mining, urban, and residential areas, fluxes of sediment and nutrients were measured upstream and downstream of disturbed areas to identify and quantify significant pollution sources and guide mitigation efforts. Sediment flux from disturbed areas, mainly an open-pit aggregate quarry, contributed over 75% of the sediment loading to the bay. Faga'alu stream is characterized by flashy response to rainfall events and the total observed sediment yield was contributed by a small number of large storm events. Event-total sediment yield was more closely correlated with event-total discharge than event-total precipitation. It is hypothesized that the intensity of rainfall controls sediment yield for small events where sheetwash erosion from the quarry is more important. For larger events where easily available sediment is washed away in the first part of the storm it is hypothesized that increased sediment yield is due to streambank erosion and gullying from both disturbed and undisturbed areas. Based on sediment yield measurements and modeled sediment loading to the bay, recommendations for mitigation of land-based sources of pollution are focused on sediment mitigation at the quarry and runoff from the large impervious areas associated with the hospital. Measurements of sediment accumulation on the coral reef itself show sedimentation is controlled by sediment loading from the watershed and sediment scouring by increased wave and wind

  15. N-Cadherin Extracellular Repeat 4 Mediates Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition and Increased Motility

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Beom; Islam, Shahidul; Kim, Young J.; Prudoff, Ryan S.; Sass, Kristin M.; Wheelock, Margaret J.; Johnson, Keith R.

    2000-01-01

    E- and N-cadherin are members of the classical cadherin family of proteins. E-cadherin plays an important role in maintaining the normal phenotype of epithelial cells. Previous studies from our laboratory and other laboratories have shown that inappropriate expression of N-cadherin by tumor cells derived from epithelial tissue results in conversion of the cell to a more fibroblast-like cell, with increased motility and invasion. Our present study was designed to determine which domains of N-cadherin make it different from E-cadherin, with respect to altering cellular behavior, such as which domains are responsible for the epithelial to mesenchymal transition and increased cell motility and invasion. To address this question, we constructed chimeric cadherins comprised of selected domains of E- and N-cadherin. The chimeras were transfected into epithelial cells to determine their effect on cell morphology and cellular behavior. We found that a 69–amino acid portion of EC-4 of N-cadherin was necessary and sufficient to promote both an epithelial to mesenchymal transition in squamous epithelial cells and increased cell motility. Here, we show that different cadherin family members promote different cellular behaviors. In addition, we identify a novel activity that can be ascribed to the extracellular domain of N-cadherin. PMID:11121435

  16. Alu-alu recombination results in a duplication of seven exons in the lysyl hydroxylase gene in a patient with the type VI variant of Ethlers-Danlos syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Pousi, B.; Hautala, T.; Heikkinen, J.; Pajunen, L.; Kivirikko, K.I.; Myllylae, R.

    1994-11-01

    The type VI variant of the Ethlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a recessively inherited connective-tissue disorder. The characteristic features of the variant are muscular hyptonia, kyphoscoliosis, ocular manifestations, joint hypermobility, skin fragility and hyperextensibility, and other signs of connective-tissue involvement. The biochemical defect in most but not all patients is a deficiency in lysyl hydroxylase activity. Lysyl hydroxylase is an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of hydroxylysine in collagens and other proteins with collagen-like amino acid sequences. We have recently reported an apparently homozygous large-duplication rearrangement in the gene for lysyl hydroxylase, leading to the type VI variant of EDS in two siblings. We now report an identical, apparently homozygous large duplication in an unrelated 49-year-old female originally analyzed by Sussman et al. Our simple-sequence-repeat-polymorphism analysis does not support uniparental isodisomy inheritance for either of the two duplications. Furthermore, we indicate in this study that the duplication in the lysyl hydroxylase gene is caused by an Alu-Alu recombination in both families. Cloning of the junction fragment of the duplication has allowed synthesis of appropriate primers for rapid screening for this rearrangement in other families with the type VI variant of EDS. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Repeat work bouts increase thermal strain for Australian firefighters working in the heat

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Anthony; Argus, Christos; Driller, Matthew; Rattray, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Background: Firefighters regularly re-enter fire scenes during long duration emergency events with limited rest between work bouts. It is unclear whether this practice is impacting on the safety of firefighters. Objectives:To evaluate the effects of multiple work bouts on firefighter physiology, strength, and cognitive performance when working in the heat. Methods: Seventy-seven urban firefighters completed two 20-minute simulated search and rescue tasks in a heat chamber (105 ± 5°C), separated by a 10-minute passive recovery. Core and skin temperature, rate of perceived exertion (RPE), thermal sensation (TS), grip strength, and cognitive changes between simulations were evaluated. Results: Significant increases in core temperature and perceptual responses along with declines in strength were observed following the second simulation. No differences for other measures were observed. Conclusions: A significant increase in thermal strain was observed when firefighters re-entered a hot working environment. We recommend that longer recovery periods or active cooling methods be employed prior to re-entry. PMID:25849044

  18. Increasing viscosity and yields of bacterial exopolysaccharides by repeatedly exposing strains to ampicillin.

    PubMed

    Li, Ou; Liu, Ao; Lu, Cui; Zheng, Dao-qiong; Qian, Chao-dong; Wang, Pin-Mei; Jiang, Xin-Hang; Wu, Xue-Chang

    2014-09-22

    A universal method to enhance productivity and viscosity of bacterial exopolysaccharides was developed. The technique was based on the principle that ampicillin can inhibit the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, which shares a common synthetic pathway with that of bacterial exopolysaccharides. Serial passages of three typical representatives of bacterial EPS-producing strains, namely Sphingomonas elodea, Xanthomonas campestris, and Paenibacillus elgii, were subjected to ampicillin, which was used as a stressor and a mutagen. These mutant strains are advantageous over other strains because of two major factors. First, all of the resulting strains were almost mutants with increase in EPS productivity and viscosity. Second, isolated serial strains showed different levels of increase in EPS production and viscosity to satisfy the different requirements of practical applications. No differences were observed in the monosaccharide composition produced by the mutant and parent strains; however, high-viscosity mutant strains exhibited higher molecular weights. The results confirmed that the developed method is a controlled universal one that can improve exopolysaccharides productivity and viscosity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Repeat work bouts increase thermal strain for Australian firefighters working in the heat.

    PubMed

    Walker, Anthony; Argus, Christos; Driller, Matthew; Rattray, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Firefighters regularly re-enter fire scenes during long duration emergency events with limited rest between work bouts. It is unclear whether this practice is impacting on the safety of firefighters. To evaluate the effects of multiple work bouts on firefighter physiology, strength, and cognitive performance when working in the heat. Seventy-seven urban firefighters completed two 20-minute simulated search and rescue tasks in a heat chamber (105 ± 5°C), separated by a 10-minute passive recovery. Core and skin temperature, rate of perceived exertion (RPE), thermal sensation (TS), grip strength, and cognitive changes between simulations were evaluated. Significant increases in core temperature and perceptual responses along with declines in strength were observed following the second simulation. No differences for other measures were observed. A significant increase in thermal strain was observed when firefighters re-entered a hot working environment. We recommend that longer recovery periods or active cooling methods be employed prior to re-entry.

  20. Are socioeconomic disparities in tobacco consumption increasing in India? A repeated cross-sectional multilevel analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, Nandita; Srivastava, Swati; Agrawal, Sutapa; Subramanyam, Malavika; Millett, Christopher; Selvaraj, Sakthivel; Subramanian, S V

    2012-01-01

    Objectives India bears a significant portion of the global tobacco burden with high prevalence of tobacco use. This study examines the socioeconomic patterning of tobacco use and identifies the changing gender and socioeconomic dynamics in light of the Cigarette Epidemic Model. Design Secondary analyses of second and third National Family Health Survey (NFHS) data. Setting and participants Data were analysed from 201 219 men and 255 028 women over two survey rounds. Outcomes and methods Outcomes included smoking (cigarettes, bidis and pipes/cigar), chewed tobacco (paan masala, gutkha and others) and dual use, examined by education, wealth, living environment and caste. Standardised prevalence and percentage change were estimated. Pooled multilevel models estimated the effect of socioeconomic covariates on the log odds of tobacco use by gender, along with fixed and random parameters. Findings Among men (2005−2006), gradients in smoking by education (illiterates: 44% vs postgraduates: 15%) and chewing (illiterates: 47% vs postgraduates: 19%) were observed. Inverse gradients were also observed by wealth, living environment and caste. Chewed tobacco use by women showed inverse socioeconomic status (SES) gradients comparing the illiterates (7.4%) versus postgraduates (0.33%), and poorest (17%) versus richest (2%) quintiles. However, proportional increases in smoking were higher among more educated (postgraduates (98%) vs high schooling only (17%)) and chewing among richer (richest quintile (49%) vs poorest quintile (35%)). Among women, higher educated showed larger declines for smoking—90% (postgraduates) versus 12% (illiterates). Younger men (15–24 years) showed increasing tobacco use (smoking: 123% and chewing: 112%). Older women (35–49 years) show higher prevalence of smoking (3.2%) compared to younger women (0.3%). Conclusions Indian tobacco use patterns show significant diversions from the Cigarette Epidemic Model—from gender and socioeconomic

  1. Increased Length of Long Terminal Repeats Inhibits Ty1 Transposition and Leads to the Formation of Tandem Multimers

    PubMed Central

    Lauermann, V.; Hermankova, M.; Boeke, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    The Ty1 retrotransposon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is bounded by long-terminal repeats (LTRs). We have constructed a variety of Ty1 elements in which the LTR length has been increased from the normal length of 334 bp to >2 kb. Although small insertions in the LTR have minimal effects on transposition frequency, larger insertions dramatically reduce it. Nevertheless, elements with long LTRs are incorporated into the genome at a low frequency. Most of these rare insertion events represent Ty1 tandem (head to tail) multimers. PMID:9093846

  2. Fentanyl, clonidine, and repeated increases in desflurane concentration, but not nitrous oxide or esmolol, block the transient mydriasis caused by rapid increases in desflurane concentration.

    PubMed

    Daniel, M; Larson, M D; Eger, E I; Noorani, M; Weiskopf, R B

    1995-08-01

    Initial, but not subsequent, inhalation of 8% desflurane produces transient sympathetic stimulation. We hypothesized that initial but not subsequent increases should produce pupil dilation, and that N2O, fentanyl, and clonidine, but not esmolol, should blunt the response. In 10 volunteers, we maintained anesthesia with 4% end-tidal desflurane in oxygen for 32 min, then increased the concentration to 8% for 10 min. In nine of the volunteers, we twice repeated the increase to 8%, separating each increase by a 32-min period at 4%. On separate days, five volunteers received 4%-8% desflurane in 60% N2O; five received fentanyl 1.5 micrograms/kg or 4.5 micrograms/kg intravenously 5 min before 4%-8% desflurane; four received clonidine 4.3 micrograms/kg, orally, 90 min before 4% to 8%; and four received esmolol 0.75 mg/kg, intravenously, 1.5 min before 4%-8%. Without other drugs present, 4%-8% desflurane transiently increased pupil diameter to 5.4 +/- 0.5 mm (mean +/- SD), with subsequent 4%-8% increases producing attenuated responses (2.9 +/- 1.5 and 3.2 +/- 1.8 mm). N2O produced a higher peak (6.2 +/- 0.7 mm). Fentanyl 1.5 micrograms/kg and 4.5 micrograms/kg decreased peak diameter (2.3 +/- 0.9 and 1.6 +/- 0.3 mm), as did clonidine (2.3 +/- 1.7 mm) but not esmolol. We conclude that, concurrent with sympathetic stimulation, an initial rapid increase in desflurane concentration transiently increases pupil diameter, whereas repeated increases produce attenuated responses. N2O augments, fentanyl and clonidine attenuate, and esmolol does not affect the response.

  3. Increased 5-HT Levels Following Repeated Administration of Nigella sativa L. (Black Seed) Oil Produce Antidepressant Effects in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Perveen, Tahira; Haider, Saida; Zuberi, Nudrat Anwar; Saleem, Sadia; Sadaf, Sana; Batool, Zehra

    2014-01-01

    The seeds of Nigella sativa L., commonly known as black seed or black cumin, and its extracts are used in folk medicine in the Middle East and in Asian countries for the promotion of good health and as a remedy for many ailments. These seeds have many acclaimed medicinal properties such as broncho-dilatory, immunopotentiating, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and hypotensive. In the present study, the antidepressant activity following the repeated administration of Nigella sativa L. oil has been monitored using the forced swim test. Rats treated with Nigella sativa L. oil exhibited a significant increase in struggling time after oral administration of Nigella sativa L. oil (0.1 ml/kg/day) for four weeks. Nigella sativa L. oil increased brain 5-HT levels and decreased 5-HT turnover (5-HT/5-HIAA ratio). Levels of tryptophan increased significantly in the brain and plasma following the repeated administration of Nigella sativa L. oil. Nigella sativa L. oil showed a potential antidepressant-like effect. PMID:24634848

  4. Increased 5-HT Levels Following Repeated Administration of Nigella sativa L. (Black Seed) Oil Produce Antidepressant Effects in Rats.

    PubMed

    Perveen, Tahira; Haider, Saida; Zuberi, Nudrat Anwar; Saleem, Sadia; Sadaf, Sana; Batool, Zehra

    2014-01-01

    The seeds of Nigella sativa L., commonly known as black seed or black cumin, and its extracts are used in folk medicine in the Middle East and in Asian countries for the promotion of good health and as a remedy for many ailments. These seeds have many acclaimed medicinal properties such as broncho-dilatory, immunopotentiating, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and hypotensive. In the present study, the antidepressant activity following the repeated administration of Nigella sativa L. oil has been monitored using the forced swim test. Rats treated with Nigella sativa L. oil exhibited a significant increase in struggling time after oral administration of Nigella sativa L. oil (0.1 ml/kg/day) for four weeks. Nigella sativa L. oil increased brain 5-HT levels and decreased 5-HT turnover (5-HT/5-HIAA ratio). Levels of tryptophan increased significantly in the brain and plasma following the repeated administration of Nigella sativa L. oil. Nigella sativa L. oil showed a potential antidepressant-like effect.

  5. Threshold concentration of ozone causing an increase in bronchial reactivity in humans and adaptation with repeated exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Dimeo, M.J.; Glenn, M.G.; Holtzman, M.J.; Sheller, J.R.; Nadel, J.A.; Boushey, H.A.

    1981-09-01

    To determine the lowest concentration of ozone that causes an increase in bronchial reactivity to histamine and to determine whether adaptation to this effect of ozone develops with repeated exposures, we studied 19 healthy adult subjects. Bronchial reactivity was assessed by measuring the rise in specific airway resistance (delta SRaw) produced by inhalation of 10 breaths of histamine aerosol (1.6% solution). Results indicate that the threshold concentration of ozone causing an increase in bronchial reactivity in healthy human subjects is between 0.2 and 0.4 ppm, and that adaptation to this effect of ozone develops with repeated exposures. The threshold concentration of ozone identified in other studies as causing changes in symptoms, lung volumes, or airway resistance was also between 0.2 and 0.4 ppm, and the time course of the development of tolerance to ozone in these other studies was similar to hat observed in our study. We propose that the appearance of symptoms, changes in pulmonary function, and the increase in bronchial reactivity may be caused by a change in the activity of afferent nerve endings in the airway epithelium.

  6. Characterization of Alu and recombination-associated motifs mediating a large homozygous SPG7 gene rearrangement causing hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    López, Eva; Casasnovas, Carlos; Giménez, Javier; Matilla-Dueñas, Antoni; Sánchez, Ivelisse; Volpini, Víctor

    2015-04-01

    Spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7) is one of the most common forms of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia (AR-HSP). Although over 77 different mutations have been identified in SPG7 patients, only 9 gross deletions have been reported with only a few of them being fully characterized. Here, we present a detailed description of a large homozygous intragenic SPG7 gene rearrangement involving a 5144-base pair (bp) genomic loss (c. 1450-446_1779 + 746 delinsAAAGTGCT) encompassing exons 11 to 13, identified in a Spanish AR-HSP family. Analysis of the deletion junction sequences revealed that the 5' breakpoint of this SPG7 gene deletion was located within highly homologous Alu sequences where the 3' breakpoint appears to be flanked by the core crossover hotspot instigator (chi)-like sequence (GCTGG). Furthermore, an 8-bp (AAAGTTGCT) conserved sequence at the breakpoint junction was identified, suggesting that the most likely mechanism for the occurrence of this rearrangement is by Alu microhomology and chi-like recombination-associated motif-mediated multiple exon deletion. Our results are consistent with non-allelic homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining in deletion mutagenesis for the generation of rearrangements. This study provides more evidence associating repeated elements as a genetic mechanism underlying neurodegenerative disorders, highlighting their importance in human diseases.

  7. Repeat traumatic brain injury in the juvenile rat is associated with increased axonal injury and cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Prins, M L; Hales, A; Reger, M; Giza, C C; Hovda, D A

    2010-01-01

    Among the enormous population of head-injured children and young adults are a growing subpopulation who experience repeat traumatic brain injury (RTBI). The most common cause of RTBI in this age group is sports-related concussions, and athletes who have experienced a head injury are at greater risk for subsequent TBI, with consequent long-term cognitive dysfunction. While several animal models have been proposed to study RTBI, they have been shown to either produce injuries too severe, were conducted in adults, involved craniotomy, or failed to show behavioral deficits. A closed head injury model for postnatal day 35 rats was established, and single and repeat TBI (1-day interval) were examined histologically for axonal injury and behaviorally by the novel object recognition (NOR) task. The results from the current study demonstrate that an experimental closed head injury in the rodent with low mortality rates and absence of gross pathology can produce measurable cognitive deficits in a juvenile age group. The introduction of a second injury 24 h after the first impact resulted in increased axonal injury, astrocytic reactivity and increased memory impairment in the NOR task. The histological evidence demonstrates the potential usefulness of this RTBI model for studying the impact and time course of RTBI as it relates to the pediatric and young adult population. This study marks the first critical step in experimentally addressing the consequences of concussions and the cumulative effects of RTBI in the developing brain. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Multifactorial Interplay Controls the Splicing Profile of Alu-Derived Exons▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Oren; Schwartz, Schraga; Ast, Gil

    2008-01-01

    Exonization of Alu elements creates primate-specific genomic diversity. Here we combine bioinformatic and experimental methodologies to reconstruct the molecular changes leading to exon selection. Our analyses revealed an intricate network involved in Alu exonization. A typical Alu element contains multiple sites with the potential to serve as 5′ splice sites (5′ss). First, we demonstrated the role of 5′ss strength in controlling exonization events. Second, we found that a cryptic 5′ss enhances the selection of a more upstream site and demonstrate that this is mediated by binding of U1 snRNA to the cryptic splice site, challenging the traditional role attributed to U1 snRNA of binding the 5′ss only. Third, we used a simple algorithm to identify specific sequences that determine splice site selection within specific Alu exons. Finally, by inserting identical exons within different sequences, we demonstrated the importance of flanking genomic sequences in determining whether an Alu exon will undergo exonization. Overall, our results demonstrate the complex interplay between at least four interacting layers that affect Alu exonization. These results shed light on the mechanism through which Alu elements enrich the primate transcriptome and allow a better understanding of the exonization process in general. PMID:18332115

  9. Repeated sauna therapy attenuates ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction in rats by increasing coronary vascularity of noninfarcted myocardium.

    PubMed

    Sobajima, Mitsuo; Nozawa, Takashi; Shida, Takuya; Ohori, Takashi; Suzuki, Takayuki; Matsuki, Akira; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    Repeated sauna therapy (ST) increases endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and improves cardiac function in heart failure as well as peripheral blood flow in ischemic limbs. The present study investigates whether ST can increase coronary vascularity and thus attenuate cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We induced MI by ligating the left coronary artery of Wistar rats. The rats were placed in a far-infrared dry sauna at 41°C for 15 min and then at 34°C for 20 min once daily for 4 wk. Cardiac hemodynamic, histopathological, and gene analyses were performed. Despite the similar sizes of MI between the ST and non-ST groups (51.4 ± 0.3 vs. 51.1 ± 0.2%), ST reduced left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic (9.7 ± 0.4 vs. 10.7 ± 0.5 mm, P < 0.01) and end-systolic (8.6 ± 0.5 vs. 9.6 ± 0.6 mm, P < 0.01) dimensions and attenuated MI-induced increases in LV end-diastolic pressure. Cross-sectional areas of cardiomyocytes were smaller in ST rats and associated with a significant reduction in myocardial atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA levels. Vascular density was reduced in the noninfarcted myocardium of non-ST rats, and the density of cells positive for CD31 and for α-smooth muscle actin was decreased. These decreases were attenuated in ST rats compared with non-ST rats and associated with increases in myocardial eNOS and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels. In conclusion, ST attenuates cardiac remodeling after MI, at least in part, through improving coronary vascularity in the noninfarcted myocardium. Repeated ST might serve as a novel noninvasive therapy for patients with MI.

  10. Repeated Administration of Korea Red Ginseng Extract Increases Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep via GABAAergic Systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Il; Kim, Chung-Soo; Han, Jin-Yi; Oh, Eun-Hye; Oh, Ki-Wan; Eun, Jae Soon

    2012-10-01

    The current inquiry was conducted to assess the change in sleep architecture after long periods of administration to determine whether ginseng can be used in the therapy of sleeplessness. Following post-surgical recovery, red ginseng extract (RGE, 200 mg/ kg) was orally administrated to rats for 9 d. Data were gathered on the 1st, 5th, and 9th day, and an electroencephalogram was recorded 24 h after RGE administration. Polygraphic signs of unobstructed sleep-wake activities were simultaneously recorded with sleep-wake recording electrodes from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. for 6 h. Rodents were generally tamed to freely moving polygraphic recording conditions. Although the 1st and 5th day of RGE treatment showed no effect on power densities in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, the 9th day of RGE administration showed augmented α-wave (8.0 to 13.0 Hz) power densities in NREM and REM sleep. RGE increased total sleep and NREM sleep. The total percentage of wakefulness was only decreased on the 9th day, and the number of sleep-wake cycles was reduced after the repeated administration of RGE. Thus, the repeated administration of RGE increased NREM sleep in rats. The α-wave activities in the cortical electroencephalograms were increased in sleep architecture by RGE. Moreover, the levels of both α- and β-subunits of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor were reduced in the hypothalamus of the RGE-treated groups. The level of glutamic acid decarboxylase was over-expressed in the hypothalamus. These results demonstrate that RGE increases NREM sleep via GABAAergic systems.

  11. Alu and LINE-1 Hypomethylation Is Associated with HER2 Enriched Subtype of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hae Yoen; Gwak, Jae Moon; Jung, Namhee; Cho, Nam-Yun; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The changes in DNA methylation status in cancer cells are characterized by hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands and diffuse genomic hypomethylation. Alu and long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) are non-coding genomic repetitive sequences and methylation of these elements can be used as a surrogate marker for genome-wide methylation status. This study was designed to evaluate the changes of Alu and LINE-1 hypomethylation during breast cancer progression from normal to pre-invasive lesions and invasive breast cancer (IBC), and their relationship with characteristics of IBC. We analyzed the methylation status of Alu and LINE-1 in 145 cases of breast samples including normal breast tissue, atypical ductal hyperplasia/flat epithelial atypia (ADH/FEA), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and IBC, and another set of 129 cases of IBC by pyrosequencing. Alu methylation showed no significant changes during multistep progression of breast cancer, although it tended to decrease during the transition from DCIS to IBC. In contrast, LINE-1 methylation significantly decreased from normal to ADH/FEA, while it was similar in ADH/FEA, DCIS and IBC. In IBC, Alu hypomethylation correlated with negative estrogen receptor (ER) status, and LINE-1 hypomethylation was associated with negative ER status, ERBB2 (HER2) amplification and p53 overexpression. Alu and LINE-1 methylation status was significantly different between breast cancer subtypes, and the HER2 enriched subtype had lowest methylation levels. In survival analyses, low Alu methylation status tended to be associated with poor disease-free survival of the patients. Our findings suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation is an early event and Alu hypomethylation is probably a late event during breast cancer progression, and prominent hypomethylation of Alu and LINE-1 in HER2 enriched subtype may be related to chromosomal instability of this specific subtype. PMID:24971511

  12. Alu and LINE-1 hypomethylation is associated with HER2 enriched subtype of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, So Yeon; Seo, An Na; Jung, Hae Yoen; Gwak, Jae Moon; Jung, Namhee; Cho, Nam-Yun; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The changes in DNA methylation status in cancer cells are characterized by hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands and diffuse genomic hypomethylation. Alu and long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) are non-coding genomic repetitive sequences and methylation of these elements can be used as a surrogate marker for genome-wide methylation status. This study was designed to evaluate the changes of Alu and LINE-1 hypomethylation during breast cancer progression from normal to pre-invasive lesions and invasive breast cancer (IBC), and their relationship with characteristics of IBC. We analyzed the methylation status of Alu and LINE-1 in 145 cases of breast samples including normal breast tissue, atypical ductal hyperplasia/flat epithelial atypia (ADH/FEA), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and IBC, and another set of 129 cases of IBC by pyrosequencing. Alu methylation showed no significant changes during multistep progression of breast cancer, although it tended to decrease during the transition from DCIS to IBC. In contrast, LINE-1 methylation significantly decreased from normal to ADH/FEA, while it was similar in ADH/FEA, DCIS and IBC. In IBC, Alu hypomethylation correlated with negative estrogen receptor (ER) status, and LINE-1 hypomethylation was associated with negative ER status, ERBB2 (HER2) amplification and p53 overexpression. Alu and LINE-1 methylation status was significantly different between breast cancer subtypes, and the HER2 enriched subtype had lowest methylation levels. In survival analyses, low Alu methylation status tended to be associated with poor disease-free survival of the patients. Our findings suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation is an early event and Alu hypomethylation is probably a late event during breast cancer progression, and prominent hypomethylation of Alu and LINE-1 in HER2 enriched subtype may be related to chromosomal instability of this specific subtype.

  13. Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Fatigue Failure Is Increased by Limited Internal Femoral Rotation During In Vitro Repeated Pivot Landings

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Mélanie L.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A reduced range of hip internal rotation is associated with increased peak anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) strain and risk for injury. It is unknown, however, whether limiting the available range of internal femoral rotation increases the susceptibility of the ACL to fatigue failure. Hypothesis Risk of ACL failure is significantly greater in female knee specimens with a limited range of internal femoral rotation, smaller femoral-ACL attachment angle, and smaller tibial eminence volume during repeated in vitro simulated single-leg pivot landings. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods A custom-built testing apparatus was used to simulate repeated single-leg pivot landings with a 4×-body weight impulsive load that induces knee compression, knee flexion, and internal tibial torque in 32 paired human knee specimens from 8 male and 8 female donors. These test loads were applied to each pair of specimens, in one knee with limited internal femoral rotation and in the contralateral knee with femoral rotation resisted by 2 springs to simulate the active hip rotator muscles’ resistance to stretch. The landings were repeated until ACL failure occurred or until a minimum of 100 trials were executed. The angle at which the ACL originates from the femur and the tibial eminence volume were measured on magnetic resonance images. Results The final Cox regression model (P = .024) revealed that range of internal femoral rotation and sex of donor were significant factors in determining risk of ACL fatigue failure. The specimens with limited range of internal femoral rotation had a failure risk 17.1 times higher than did the specimens with free rotation (P = .016). The female knee specimens had a risk of ACL failure 26.9 times higher than the male specimens (P = .055). Conclusion Limiting the range of internal femoral rotation during repetitive pivot landings increases the risk of an ACL fatigue failure in comparison with free rotation in a cadaveric model

  14. Tandem amino acid repeats in the green anole (Anolis carolinensis) and other squamates may have a role in increasing genetic variability.

    PubMed

    Wu, Riga; Liu, Qingfeng; Zhang, Peng; Liang, Dan

    2016-02-12

    Tandem amino acid repeats are characterised by the consecutive recurrence of a single amino acid. They exhibit high rates of length mutations in addition to point mutations and have been proposed to be involved in genetic plasticity. Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) diversify in both morphology and physiology. The underlying mechanism is yet to be understood. In a previous phylogenomic analysis of reptiles, the density of tandem repeats in an anole lizard diverged heavily from that of the other reptiles. To gain further insight into the tandem amino acid repeats in squamates, we analysed the repeat content in the green anole (Anolis carolinensis) proteome and compared the amino acid repeats in a large orthologous protein data set from six vertebrates (the Western clawed frog, the green anole, the Chinese softshell turtle, the zebra finch, mouse and human). Our results revealed that the number of amino acid repeats in the green anole exceeded those found in the other five species studied. Species-only repeats were found in high proportion in the green anole but not in the other five species, suggesting that the green anole had gained many amino acid repeats in either the Anolis or the squamate lineage. Since the amino acid repeat containing genes in the green anole were highly enriched in genes related to transcription and development, an important family of developmental genes, i.e., the Hox family, was further studied in a wide collection of squamates. Abundant amino acid repeats were also observed, implying the general high tolerance of amino acid repeats in squamates. A particular enrichment of amino acid repeats was observed in the central class Hox genes that are known to be responsible for defining cervical to lumbar regions. Our study suggests that the abundant amino acid repeats in the green anole, and possibly in other squamates, may play a role in increasing the genetic variability, and contribute to the evolutionary diversity of this clade.

  15. Alu polymorphic insertions reveal genetic structure of north Indian populations.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Manorama; Tripathi, Piyush; Chauhan, Ugam Kumari; Herrera, Rene J; Agrawal, Suraksha

    2008-10-01

    The Indian subcontinent is characterized by the ancestral and cultural diversity of its people. Genetic input from several unique source populations and from the unique social architecture provided by the caste system has shaped the current genetic landscape of India. In the present study 200 individuals each from three upper-caste and four middle-caste Hindu groups and from two Muslim populations in North India were examined for 10 polymorphic Alu insertions (PAIs). The investigated PAIs exhibit high levels of polymorphism and average heterozygosity. Limited interpopulation variance and genetic flow in the present study suggest admixture. The results of this study demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, the caste system has not provided an impermeable barrier to genetic exchange among Indian groups.

  16. Progressively increased M50 responses to repeated sounds in autism spectrum disorder with auditory hypersensitivity: a magnetoencephalographic study.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Sugata, Hisato; Hirata, Masayuki; Hanaie, Ryuzo; Nagatani, Fumiyo; Tachibana, Masaya; Tominaga, Koji; Mohri, Ikuko; Taniike, Masako

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differential time-course responses of the auditory cortex to repeated auditory stimuli in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) showing auditory hypersensitivity. Auditory-evoked field values were obtained from 21 boys with ASD (12 with and 9 without auditory hypersensitivity) and 15 age-matched typically developing controls. M50 dipole moments were significantly increased during the time-course study only in the ASD with auditory hypersensitivity compared with those for the other two groups. The boys having ASD with auditory hypersensitivity also showed more prolonged response duration than those in the other two groups. The response duration was significantly related to the severity of auditory hypersensitivity. We propose that auditory hypersensitivity is associated with decreased inhibitory processing, possibly resulting from an abnormal sensory gating system or dysfunction of inhibitory interneurons.

  17. Progressively Increased M50 Responses to Repeated Sounds in Autism Spectrum Disorder with Auditory Hypersensitivity: A Magnetoencephalographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Sugata, Hisato; Hirata, Masayuki; Hanaie, Ryuzo; Nagatani, Fumiyo; Tachibana, Masaya; Tominaga, Koji; Mohri, Ikuko; Taniike, Masako

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differential time-course responses of the auditory cortex to repeated auditory stimuli in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) showing auditory hypersensitivity. Auditory-evoked field values were obtained from 21 boys with ASD (12 with and 9 without auditory hypersensitivity) and 15 age-matched typically developing controls. M50 dipole moments were significantly increased during the time-course study only in the ASD with auditory hypersensitivity compared with those for the other two groups. The boys having ASD with auditory hypersensitivity also showed more prolonged response duration than those in the other two groups. The response duration was significantly related to the severity of auditory hypersensitivity. We propose that auditory hypersensitivity is associated with decreased inhibitory processing, possibly resulting from an abnormal sensory gating system or dysfunction of inhibitory interneurons. PMID:25054201

  18. Repeated Listening Increases the Liking for Music Regardless of Its Complexity: Implications for the Appreciation and Aesthetics of Music

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Guy; Schiölde, Gunilla

    2017-01-01

    Psychological and aesthetic theories predict that music is appreciated at optimal, peak levels of familiarity and complexity, and that appreciation of music exhibits an inverted U-shaped relationship with familiarity as well as complexity. Because increased familiarity conceivably leads to improved processing and less perceived complexity, we test whether there is an interaction between familiarity and complexity. Specifically, increased familiarity should render the music subjectively less complex, and therefore move the apex of the U curve toward greater complexity. A naturalistic listening experiment was conducted, featuring 40 music examples (ME) divided by experts into 4 levels of complexity prior to the main experiment. The MEs were presented 28 times each across a period of approximately 4 weeks, and individual ratings were assessed throughout the experiment. Ratings of liking increased monotonically with repeated listening at all levels of complexity; both the simplest and the most complex MEs were liked more as a function of listening time, without any indication of a U-shaped relation. Although the MEs were previously unknown to the participants, the strongest predictor of liking was familiarity in terms of having listened to similar music before, i.e., familiarity with musical style. We conclude that familiarity is the single most important variable for explaining differences in liking among music, regardless of the complexity of the music. PMID:28408864

  19. MORF9 increases the RNA-binding activity of PLS-type pentatricopeptide repeat protein in plastid RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junjie; Zhang, Qunxia; Guan, Zeyuan; Wang, Qiang; Li, Li; Ruan, Fengying; Lin, Rongcheng; Zou, Tingting; Yin, Ping

    2017-04-10

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process that modifies the genetic information on RNA molecules. In flowering plants, RNA editing usually alters cytidine to uridine in plastids and mitochondria. The PLS-type pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein and the multiple organellar RNA editing factor (MORF, also known as RNA editing factor interacting protein (RIP)) are two types of key trans-acting factors involved in this process. However, how they cooperate with one another remains unclear. Here, we have characterized the interactions between a designer PLS-type PPR protein (PLS)3PPR and MORF9, and found that RNA-binding activity of (PLS)3PPR is drastically increased on MORF9 binding. We also determined the crystal structures of (PLS)3PPR, MORF9 and the (PLS)3PPR-MORF9 complex. MORF9 binding induces significant compressed conformational changes of (PLS)3PPR, revealing the molecular mechanisms by which MORF9-bound (PLS)3PPR has increased RNA-binding activity. Similarly, increased RNA-binding activity is observed for the natural PLS-type PPR protein, LPA66, in the presence of MORF9. These findings significantly expand our understanding of MORF function in plant organellar RNA editing.

  20. Repeated Listening Increases the Liking for Music Regardless of Its Complexity: Implications for the Appreciation and Aesthetics of Music.

    PubMed

    Madison, Guy; Schiölde, Gunilla

    2017-01-01

    Psychological and aesthetic theories predict that music is appreciated at optimal, peak levels of familiarity and complexity, and that appreciation of music exhibits an inverted U-shaped relationship with familiarity as well as complexity. Because increased familiarity conceivably leads to improved processing and less perceived complexity, we test whether there is an interaction between familiarity and complexity. Specifically, increased familiarity should render the music subjectively less complex, and therefore move the apex of the U curve toward greater complexity. A naturalistic listening experiment was conducted, featuring 40 music examples (ME) divided by experts into 4 levels of complexity prior to the main experiment. The MEs were presented 28 times each across a period of approximately 4 weeks, and individual ratings were assessed throughout the experiment. Ratings of liking increased monotonically with repeated listening at all levels of complexity; both the simplest and the most complex MEs were liked more as a function of listening time, without any indication of a U-shaped relation. Although the MEs were previously unknown to the participants, the strongest predictor of liking was familiarity in terms of having listened to similar music before, i.e., familiarity with musical style. We conclude that familiarity is the single most important variable for explaining differences in liking among music, regardless of the complexity of the music.

  1. Repeated bouts of exhaustive exercise increase circulating cell free nuclear and mitochondrial DNA without development of tolerance in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Stawski, Robert; Walczak, Konrad; Kosielski, Piotr; Meissner, Pawel; Budlewski, Tomasz; Padula, Gianluca; Nowak, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Acute single strenuous exercise increases circulating cell free DNA (cf DNA). We tested whether three repeated bouts of exhaustive exercise induced the cf DNA response without development of tolerance in healthy men. Eleven average-trained men (age 34.0±5.2 years, body mass index 26.2±3.1 kg/m2, maximal oxygen consumption-VO2max 49.6±4.5 ml/kg*min) performed three treadmill exercise tests to exhaustion at speed corresponding to 70% VO2max separated by 72 hours of resting. Blood was collected before and after each bout of exercise for determination of cell free nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (cf n-DNA, cf mt-DNA) by real-time PCR, selected markers of muscle damage, and blood cell count. Each bout induced the increase (p<0.05) in plasma cf n-DNA: from 3.4±1.4 to 38.5±27.5, from 4.1±3.3 to 48.5±26.2, and 3.1±1.6 to 53.8±39.9 ng/mL after the first, second, and third exercise, respectively. In a congruent way, cf mt-DNA rose significantly after the second (from 229±216 to 450±228*103 GE/mL) and third bout of exercise (from 173±120 to 462±314*103 GE/mL). Pre-exercise cf mt-DNA decreased (p<0.05) by 2-times (from 355±219 before the first bout to 173±120*103 GE/mL before the third bout) over the study period and were accompanied by significant increase in white blood cells, platelets, creatine kinase, creatinine and lactate after each bout. However, the exercise induced percentage increment of cf n-DNA was always many times higher than corresponding increments of the afore-mentioned markers at any occasion. Repeated bouts of exhaustive exercise induced remarkable increase in circulating cf n-DNA without signs of tolerance development. Baseline cf mt-DNA decreased in response to series of strenuous exercise. Since percentage increments of cf n-DNA in response to exercise were many times higher than those observed for other markers, measurement of circulating cf n-DNA could be a sensitive tool for monitoring acute exercise effects in human body.

  2. Design of CNTFET-based 2-bit ternary ALU for nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lata Murotiya, Sneh; Gupta, Anu

    2014-09-01

    This article presents a hardware-efficient design of 2-bit ternary arithmetic logic unit (ALU) using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) for nanoelectronics. The proposed structure introduces a ternary adder-subtractor functional module to optimise ALU architecture. The full adder-subtractor (FAS) cell uses nearly 72% less transistors than conventional architecture, which contains separate ternary cells for addition as well as subtraction. The presented ALU also minimises ternary function expressions with utilisation of binary gates for optimisation at the circuit level, thus attaining a simple design. Hspice simulations results demonstrate that the ALU ternary circuits achieve great improvement in terms of power delay product with respect to their CMOS counterpart at 32 nm.

  3. Identification of RNA polymerase III-transcribed Alu loci by computational screening of RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Conti, Anastasia; Carnevali, Davide; Bollati, Valentina; Fustinoni, Silvia; Pellegrini, Matteo; Dieci, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Of the ∼ 1.3 million Alu elements in the human genome, only a tiny number are estimated to be active in transcription by RNA polymerase (Pol) III. Tracing the individual loci from which Alu transcripts originate is complicated by their highly repetitive nature. By exploiting RNA-Seq data sets and unique Alu DNA sequences, we devised a bioinformatic pipeline allowing us to identify Pol III-dependent transcripts of individual Alu elements. When applied to ENCODE transcriptomes of seven human cell lines, this search strategy identified ∼ 1300 Alu loci corresponding to detectable transcripts, with ∼ 120 of them expressed in at least three cell lines. In vitro transcription of selected Alus did not reflect their in vivo expression properties, and required the native 5'-flanking region in addition to internal promoter. We also identified a cluster of expressed AluYa5-derived transcription units, juxtaposed to snaR genes on chromosome 19, formed by a promoter-containing left monomer fused to an Alu-unrelated downstream moiety. Autonomous Pol III transcription was also revealed for Alus nested within Pol II-transcribed genes. The ability to investigate Alu transcriptomes at single-locus resolution will facilitate both the identification of novel biologically relevant Alu RNAs and the assessment of Alu expression alteration under pathological conditions.

  4. Identification of RNA polymerase III-transcribed Alu loci by computational screening of RNA-Seq data

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Anastasia; Carnevali, Davide; Bollati, Valentina; Fustinoni, Silvia; Pellegrini, Matteo; Dieci, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Of the ∼1.3 million Alu elements in the human genome, only a tiny number are estimated to be active in transcription by RNA polymerase (Pol) III. Tracing the individual loci from which Alu transcripts originate is complicated by their highly repetitive nature. By exploiting RNA-Seq data sets and unique Alu DNA sequences, we devised a bioinformatic pipeline allowing us to identify Pol III-dependent transcripts of individual Alu elements. When applied to ENCODE transcriptomes of seven human cell lines, this search strategy identified ∼1300 Alu loci corresponding to detectable transcripts, with ∼120 of them expressed in at least three cell lines. In vitro transcription of selected Alus did not reflect their in vivo expression properties, and required the native 5′-flanking region in addition to internal promoter. We also identified a cluster of expressed AluYa5-derived transcription units, juxtaposed to snaR genes on chromosome 19, formed by a promoter-containing left monomer fused to an Alu-unrelated downstream moiety. Autonomous Pol III transcription was also revealed for Alus nested within Pol II-transcribed genes. The ability to investigate Alu transcriptomes at single-locus resolution will facilitate both the identification of novel biologically relevant Alu RNAs and the assessment of Alu expression alteration under pathological conditions. PMID:25550429

  5. Higher Alu Methylation Levels in Catch-Up Growth in Twenty-Year-Old Offsprings

    PubMed Central

    Rerkasem, Kittipan; Rattanatanyong, Prakasit; Rerkasem, Amaraporn; Wongthanee, Antika; Rungruengthanakit, Kittipong; Mangklabruks, Ampica; Mutirangura, Apiwat

    2015-01-01

    Alu elements and long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) are two major human intersperse repetitive sequences. Lower Alu methylation, but not LINE-1, has been observed in blood cells of people in old age, and in menopausal women having lower bone mass and osteoporosis. Nevertheless, Alu methylation levels also vary among young individuals. Here, we explored phenotypes at birth that are associated with Alu methylation levels in young people. In 2010, 249 twenty-years-old volunteers whose mothers had participated in a study association between birth weight (BW) and nutrition during pregnancy in 1990, were invited to take part in our present study. In this study, the LINE-1 and Alu methylation levels and patterns were measured in peripheral mononuclear cells and correlated with various nutritional parameters during intrauterine and postnatal period of offspring. This included the amount of maternal intake during pregnancy, the mother’s weight gain during pregnancy, birth weight, birth length, and the rate of weight gain in the first year of life. Catch-up growth (CUG) was defined when weight during the first year was >0.67 of the standard score, according to WHO data. No association with LINE-1 methylation was identified. The mean level of Alu methylation in the CUG group was significantly higher than those non-CUG (39.61% and 33.66 % respectively, P < 0.0001). The positive correlation between the history of CUG in the first year and higher Alu methylation indicates the role of Alu methylation, not only in aging cells, but also in the human growth process. Moreover, here is the first study that demonstrated the association between a phenotype during the newborn period and intersperse repetitive sequences methylation during young adulthood. PMID:25807557

  6. Alu-Derived Alternative Splicing Events Specific to Macaca Lineages in CTSF Gene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ja-Rang; Park, Sang-Je; Kim, Young-Hyun; Choe, Se-Hee; Cho, Hyeon-Mu; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Ji-Su; Sim, Bo-Woong; Song, Bong-Seok; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Lee, Youngjeon; Jin, Yeung Bae; Kang, Philyong; Huh, Jae-Won; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Cathepsin F, which is encoded by CTSF, is a cysteine proteinase ubiquitously expressed in several tissues. In a previous study, novel transcripts of the CTSF gene were identified in the crab-eating monkey deriving from the integration of an Alu element–AluYRa1. The occurrence of AluYRa1-derived alternative transcripts and the mechanism of exonization events in the CTSF gene of human, rhesus monkey, and crab-eating monkey were investigated using PCR and reverse transcription PCR on the genomic DNA and cDNA isolated from several tissues. Results demonstrated that AluYRa1 was only integrated into the genome of Macaca species and this lineage-specific integration led to exonization events by producing a conserved 3′ splice site. Six transcript variants (V1–V6) were generated by alternative splicing (AS) events, including intron retention and alternative 5′ splice sites in the 5′ and 3′ flanking regions of CTSF_AluYRa1. Among them, V3–V5 transcripts were ubiquitously expressed in all tissues of rhesus monkey and crab-eating monkey, whereas AluYRa1-exonized V1 was dominantly expressed in the testis of the crab-eating monkey, and V2 was only expressed in the testis of the two monkeys. These five transcript variants also had different amino acid sequences in the C-terminal region of CTSF, as compared to reference sequences. Thus, species-specific Alu-derived exonization by lineage-specific integration of Alu elements and AS events seems to have played an important role during primate evolution by producing transcript variants and gene diversification. PMID:28196413

  7. Alu SINE analyses of 3,000-year-old human skeletal remains: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kothe, Maximilian; Seidenberg, Verena; Hummel, Susanne; Piskurek, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    As Short Interspersed Elements (SINEs), human-specific Alu elements can be used for population genetic studies. Very recent inserts are polymorphic within and between human populations. In a sample of 30 elements originating from three different Alu subfamilies, we investigated whether they are preserved in prehistorical skeletal human remains from the Bronze Age Lichtenstein cave in Lower Saxony, Germany. In the present study, we examined a prehistoric triad of father, mother and daughter. For 26 of the 30 Alu loci investigated, definite results were obtained. We were able to demonstrate that presence/absence analyses of Alu elements can be conducted on individuals who lived 3,000 years ago. The preservation of the ancient DNA (aDNA) is good enough in two out of three ancient individuals to routinely allow the amplification of 500 bp fragments. The third individual revealed less well-preserved DNA, which results in allelic dropout or complete amplification failures. We here present an alternative molecular approach to deal with these degradation phenomena by using internal Alu subfamily specific primers producing short fragments of approximately 150 bp. Our data clearly show the possibility of presence/absence analyses of Alu elements in individuals from the Lichtenstein cave. Thus, we demonstrate that our method is reliably applicable for aDNA samples with good or moderate DNA preservation. This method will be very useful for further investigations with more Alu loci and larger datasets. Human population genetic studies and other large-scale investigations would provide insight into Alu SINE-based microevolutionary processes in humans during the last few thousand years and help us comprehend the evolutionary dynamics of our genome.

  8. Increased levels of FFA during passive heat loading after a 2-week repeated heat load in Koreans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Beom; Kim, Tae Wook

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether repeated heat load is closely related to circulating levels of free fatty acids (FFA) during repeated passive heat loading (PHL), defined as immersion of the lower body up to an umbilical level in hot water, 42 ± 0.5 °C (three times/week, 30 min/day) for 2 weeks. There were significant correlations between mean body temperature and FFA before and after repeated heat load ( p < 0.001, respectively), and the level of FFA was significantly higher after repeated heat load during PHL ( p < 0.01). The threshold of mean body temperature for lipolysis was lowered by repeated heat load and enhanced lipolysis during PHL. However, caution is needed for diabetic individuals.

  9. Altering a gene involved in nuclear distribution increases the repeat-induced point mutation process in the fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed Central

    Bouhouche, Khaled; Zickler, Denise; Debuchy, Robert; Arnaise, Sylvie

    2004-01-01

    Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is a homology-dependent gene-silencing mechanism that introduces C:G-to-T:A transitions in duplicated DNA segments. Cis-duplicated sequences can also be affected by another mechanism called premeiotic recombination (PR). Both are active over the sexual cycle of some filamentous fungi, e.g., Neurospora crassa and Podospora anserina. During the sexual cycle, several developmental steps require precise nuclear movement and positioning, but connections between RIP, PR, and nuclear distributions have not yet been established. Previous work has led to the isolation of ami1, the P. anserina ortholog of the Aspergillus nidulans apsA gene, which is required for nuclear positioning. We show here that ami1 is involved in nuclear distribution during the sexual cycle and that alteration of ami1 delays the fruiting-body development. We also demonstrate that ami1 alteration affects loss of transgene functions during the sexual cycle. Genetically linked multiple copies of transgenes are affected by RIP and PR much more frequently in an ami1 mutant cross than in a wild-type cross. Our results suggest that the developmental slowdown of the ami1 mutant during the period of RIP and PR increases time exposure to the duplication detection system and thus increases the frequency of RIP and PR. PMID:15166143

  10. Adeno-associated virus inverted terminal repeats stimulate gene editing.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, M L

    2015-02-01

    Advancements in genome editing have relied on technologies to specifically damage DNA which, in turn, stimulates DNA repair including homologous recombination (HR). As off-target concerns complicate the therapeutic translation of site-specific DNA endonucleases, an alternative strategy to stimulate gene editing based on fragile DNA was investigated. To do this, an episomal gene-editing reporter was generated by a disruptive insertion of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) inverted terminal repeat (ITR) into the egfp gene. Compared with a non-structured DNA control sequence, the ITR induced DNA damage as evidenced by increased gamma-H2AX and Mre11 foci formation. As local DNA damage stimulates HR, ITR-mediated gene editing was investigated using DNA oligonucleotides as repair substrates. The AAV ITR stimulated gene editing >1000-fold in a replication-independent manner and was not biased by the polarity of the repair oligonucleotide. Analysis of additional human DNA sequences demonstrated stimulation of gene editing to varying degrees. In particular, inverted yet not direct, Alu repeats induced gene editing, suggesting a role for DNA structure in the repair event. Collectively, the results demonstrate that inverted DNA repeats stimulate gene editing via double-strand break repair in an episomal context and allude to efficient gene editing of the human chromosome using fragile DNA sequences.

  11. Splicing repression allows the gradual emergence of new Alu-exons in primate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Attig, Jan; Ruiz de los Mozos, Igor; Haberman, Nejc; Wang, Zhen; Emmett, Warren; Zarnack, Kathi; König, Julian; Ule, Jernej

    2016-01-01

    Alu elements are retrotransposons that frequently form new exons during primate evolution. Here, we assess the interplay of splicing repression by hnRNPC and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) in the quality control and evolution of new Alu-exons. We identify 3100 new Alu-exons and show that NMD more efficiently recognises transcripts with Alu-exons compared to other exons with premature termination codons. However, some Alu-exons escape NMD, especially when an adjacent intron is retained, highlighting the importance of concerted repression by splicing and NMD. We show that evolutionary progression of 3' splice sites is coupled with longer repressive uridine tracts. Once the 3' splice site at ancient Alu-exons reaches a stable phase, splicing repression by hnRNPC decreases, but the exons generally remain sensitive to NMD. We conclude that repressive motifs are strongest next to cryptic exons and that gradual weakening of these motifs contributes to the evolutionary emergence of new alternative exons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19545.001 PMID:27861119

  12. Repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol exposure increases basal glutamate in the nucleus accumbens of mice without affecting glutamate transport.

    PubMed

    Griffin, William C; Ramachandra, Vorani S; Knackstedt, Lori A; Becker, Howard C

    2015-01-01

    Repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure increase voluntary consumption of ethanol in mice. Previous work has shown that extracellular glutamate in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is significantly elevated in ethanol-dependent mice and that pharmacologically manipulating glutamate concentrations in the NAc will alter ethanol drinking, indicating that glutamate homeostasis plays a crucial role in ethanol drinking in this model. The present studies were designed to measure extracellular glutamate at a time point in which mice would ordinarily be allowed voluntary access to ethanol in the CIE model and, additionally, to measure glutamate transport capacity in the NAc at the same time point. Extracellular glutamate was measured using quantitative microdialysis procedures. Glutamate transport capacity was measured under Na(+)-dependent and Na(+)-independent conditions to determine whether the function of excitatory amino acid transporters (also known as system XAG) or of system Xc (-) (glial cysteine-glutamate exchanger) was influenced by CIE exposure. The results of the quantitative microdialysis experiment confirm increased extracellular glutamate (approximately twofold) in the NAc of CIE exposed mice (i.e., ethanol-dependent) compared to non-dependent mice in the NAc, consistent with earlier work. However, the increase in extracellular glutamate was not due to altered transporter function in the NAc of ethanol-dependent mice, because neither Na(+)-dependent nor Na(+)-independent glutamate transport was significantly altered by CIE exposure. These findings point to the possibility that hyperexcitability of cortical-striatal pathways underlies the increases in extracellular glutamate found in the ethanol-dependent mice.

  13. Increasing the repeating units of ethylene glycol-based dimethacrylates directed toward reduced oxidative stress and co-stimulatory factors expression in human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Atsushi; Fukumoto, Izumi; Yui, Nobuhiko; Matsumura, Mitsuaki; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    The ethylene glycol-based dimethacrylates are commonly used in biomaterials and dental restorative materials as a cross-linking agent. In this study, toxic effect of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylates (PEG-DMAs) with various ethylene glycol repeating units was investigated in terms of cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and the expression of co-stimulatory factors in human leukemia cell line (THP-1 cells) to verify the effect of ethylene glycol repeating units. Note that the 1-octanol/water partition coefficient of PEG-based dimethacrylates decreased with increasing the ethylene glycol repeating units, indicating that the hydrophilicity of PEG-DMAs increased with ethylene glycol repeating units. The toxic effect of PEG-DMAs such as cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and the expression of CD86 in treated THP-1 cells are reduced with increasing the ethylene glycol repeating units in PEG-DMAs. However, the expression of CD54 in treated THP-1 cells was not influenced with the ethylene glycol repeating units and the maximal expression level of CD54 was observed at the concentration range of 2-4 mM for all samples. Accordingly, hydrophilic character of PEG-DMAs with long ethylene glycol chains definitely alleviates the some toxic aspect of PEG-based DMAs. This finding would provide important insight into the design of new biomaterials and dental materials with superior biocompatibility. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Estimating Regional and National-Scale Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Agriculture, Forestry, and Other Land Use (AFOLU) Sector using the `Agricultural and Land Use (ALU) Tool'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, S.; Ogle, S. M.; Wirth, T. C.; Sivakami, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) provides methods and guidance for estimating anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions for reporting to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. The methods are comprehensive and require extensive data compilation, management, aggregation, documentation and calculations of source and sink categories to achieve robust emissions estimates. IPCC Guidelines describe three estimation tiers that require increasing levels of country-specific data and method complexity. Use of higher tiers should improve overall accuracy and reduce uncertainty in estimates. The AFOLU sector represents a complex set of methods for estimating greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sinks. Major AFOLU emissions and sinks include carbon dioxide (CO2) from carbon stock change in biomass, dead organic matter and soils, urea or lime application to soils, and oxidation of carbon in drained organic soils; nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) emissions from livestock management and biomass burning; N2O from organic amendments and fertilizer application to soils, and CH4 emissions from rice cultivation. To assist inventory compilers with calculating AFOLU-sector estimates, the Agriculture and Land Use Greenhouse Gas Inventory Tool (ALU) was designed to implement Tier 1 and 2 methods using IPCC Good Practice Guidance. It guides the compiler through activity data entry, emission factor assignment, and emissions calculations while carefully maintaining data integrity. ALU also provides IPCC defaults and can estimate uncertainty. ALU was designed to simplify the AFOLU inventory compilation process at regional or national scales, disaggregating the process into a series of steps reduces the potential for errors in the compilation process. An example application has been developed using ALU to estimate methane emissions from rice production in the United States.

  15. High Altitude Increases Alteration in Maximal Torque but Not in Rapid Torque Development in Knee Extensors after Repeated Treadmill Sprinting

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Olivier; Brocherie, Franck; Millet, Grégoire P.

    2016-01-01

    . Additionally, the EMG rise for VL muscle was similar (P > 0.05), whereas it increased (P < 0.05) for RF muscle during all epochs post-exercise, independently of the conditions. In summary, alteration in repeated-sprint ability and post-exercise MVC decrease were greater at high altitude than in normoxia or at low altitude. However, the post-exercise alterations in RTD were similar between normoxia and low-to-high hypoxia. PMID:27014095

  16. Small Deletion Variants Have Stable Breakpoints Commonly Associated with Alu Elements

    PubMed Central

    Coin, Lachlan J. M.; Steinfeld, Israel; Yakhini, Zohar; Sladek, Rob; Froguel, Philippe; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.

    2008-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) contribute significantly to human genomic variation, with over 5000 loci reported, covering more than 18% of the euchromatic human genome. Little is known, however, about the origin and stability of variants of different size and complexity. We investigated the breakpoints of 20 small, common deletions, representing a subset of those originally identified by array CGH, using Agilent microarrays, in 50 healthy French Caucasian subjects. By sequencing PCR products amplified using primers designed to span the deleted regions, we determined the exact size and genomic position of the deletions in all affected samples. For each deletion studied, all individuals carrying the deletion share identical upstream and downstream breakpoints at the sequence level, suggesting that the deletion event occurred just once and later became common in the population. This is supported by linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis, which has revealed that most of the deletions studied are in moderate to strong LD with surrounding SNPs, and have conserved long-range haplotypes. Analysis of the sequences flanking the deletion breakpoints revealed an enrichment of microhomology at the breakpoint junctions. More significantly, we found an enrichment of Alu repeat elements, the overwhelming majority of which intersected deletion breakpoints at their poly-A tails. We found no enrichment of LINE elements or segmental duplications, in contrast to other reports. Sequence analysis revealed enrichment of a conserved motif in the sequences surrounding the deletion breakpoints, although whether this motif has any mechanistic role in the formation of some deletions has yet to be determined. Considered together with existing information on more complex inherited variant regions, and reports of de novo variants associated with autism, these data support the presence of different subgroups of CNV in the genome which may have originated through different mechanisms. PMID:18769679

  17. Alu-derived old world monkeys exonization event and experimental validation of the LEPR gene.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jae-Won; Kim, Young-Hyun; Kim, Dae-Soo; Park, Sang-Je; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Ekyune; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Myeong-Su; Kim, Heui-Soo; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2010-09-01

    The leptin receptor (LEPR) is a crucial regulatory protein that interacts with Leptin. In our analysis of LEPR, novel AluJb-derived alternative transcripts were identified in the genome of the rhesus monkey. In order to investigate the occurrence of AluJb-derived alternative transcripts and the mechanism underlying exonization events, we conducted analyses using a number of primate genomic DNAs and adipose RNAs of tissue and primary cells derived from the crab-eating monkey. Our results demonstrate that the AluJb element has been integrated into our common ancestor genome prior to the divergence of simians and prosimians. The lineage-specific exonization event of the LEPR gene in chimpanzees, orangutans, and Old World monkeys appear to have been accomplished via transition mutations of the 5' splicing site (second position of C to T). However, in New World monkeys and prosimians, the AluJb-related LEPR transcript should be silenced by the additional transversion mutation (fourth position of T to G). The AluJb-related transcript of human LEPR should also be silenced by a mutation of the 5' splicing site (first position of G to A) and the insertion of one nucleotide sequence (minus fourth position of A). Our data suggests that lineage-specific exonization events should be determined by the combination event of the formation of splicing sites and protection against site-specific mutation pressures. These evolutionary mechanisms could be major sources for primate diversification.

  18. Methylation Status of Alu and LINE-1 Interspersed Repetitive Sequences in Behcet's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Şahru; Kucukazman, Selma Ozbek; Karataş, Gülten Sungur; Ozturk, Mehmet Akif; Prombhul, Sasiprapa; Hirankarn, Nattiya

    2016-01-01

    Behcet's Disease (BD) is a multisystem chronic inflammatory disease. The pathology is believed to involve both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Hypomethylation leading to activation of interspersed repetitive sequences (IRSs) such as LINE-1 and Alu contributes to the pathologies of autoimmune diseases and cancer. Herein, the epigenetic changes of IRSs in BD were evaluated using combined bisulfite restriction analysis-interspersed repetitive sequences (COBRA-IRS). DNA from neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of BD patients with ocular involvement that were in active or inactive states and healthy controls were used to analyze LINE-1 and Alu methylation levels. For Alu sequences, significant differences were observed in the frequency of uCuC alleles between PBMCs of patients and controls (p = 0.03), and between inactive patients and controls (p = 0.03). For neutrophils, the frequency of uCuC was significantly higher between patients and controls (p = 0.006) and between inactive patients and controls (p = 0.002). The partial methylation (uCmC + mCuC) frequencies of Alu between inactive patients and control samples also differed (p = 0.02). No statistically significant differences for LINE-1 were detected. Thus, changes in the methylation level of IRS elements might contribute to the pathogenesis of BD. The role of Alu transcripts in BD should be investigated further. PMID:27123441

  19. Alu retrotransposons promote differentiation of human carcinoma cells through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Morales-Hernández, Antonio; González-Rico, Francisco J; Román, Angel C; Rico-Leo, Eva; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Sánchez, Laura; Macia, Ángela; Heras, Sara R; García-Pérez, José L; Merino, Jaime M; Fernández-Salguero, Pedro M

    2016-06-02

    Cell differentiation is a central process in development and in cancer growth and dissemination. OCT4 (POU5F1) and NANOG are essential for cell stemness and pluripotency; yet, the mechanisms that regulate their expression remain largely unknown. Repetitive elements account for almost half of the Human Genome; still, their role in gene regulation is poorly understood. Here, we show that the dioxin receptor (AHR) leads to differentiation of human carcinoma cells through the transcriptional upregulation of Alu retrotransposons, whose RNA transcripts can repress pluripotency genes. Despite the genome-wide presence of Alu elements, we provide evidences that those located at the NANOG and OCT4 promoters bind AHR, are transcribed by RNA polymerase-III and repress NANOG and OCT4 in differentiated cells. OCT4 and NANOG repression likely involves processing of Alu-derived transcripts through the miRNA machinery involving the Microprocessor and RISC. Consistently, stable AHR knockdown led to basal undifferentiation, impaired Alus transcription and blockade of OCT4 and NANOG repression. We suggest that transcripts produced from AHR-regulated Alu retrotransposons may control the expression of stemness genes OCT4 and NANOG during differentiation of carcinoma cells. The control of discrete Alu elements by specific transcription factors may have a dynamic role in genome regulation under physiological and diseased conditions. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Alu retrotransposons promote differentiation of human carcinoma cells through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Hernández, Antonio; González-Rico, Francisco J.; Román, Angel C.; Rico-Leo, Eva; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Sánchez, Laura; Macia, Ángela; Heras, Sara R.; García-Pérez, José L.; Merino, Jaime M.; Fernández-Salguero, Pedro M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cell differentiation is a central process in development and in cancer growth and dissemination. OCT4 (POU5F1) and NANOG are essential for cell stemness and pluripotency; yet, the mechanisms that regulate their expression remain largely unknown. Repetitive elements account for almost half of the Human Genome; still, their role in gene regulation is poorly understood. Here, we show that the dioxin receptor (AHR) leads to differentiation of human carcinoma cells through the transcriptional upregulation of Alu retrotransposons, whose RNA transcripts can repress pluripotency genes. Despite the genome-wide presence of Alu elements, we provide evidences that those located at the NANOG and OCT4 promoters bind AHR, are transcribed by RNA polymerase-III and repress NANOG and OCT4 in differentiated cells. OCT4 and NANOG repression likely involves processing of Alu-derived transcripts through the miRNA machinery involving the Microprocessor and RISC. Consistently, stable AHR knockdown led to basal undifferentiation, impaired Alus transcription and blockade of OCT4 and NANOG repression. We suggest that transcripts produced from AHR-regulated Alu retrotransposons may control the expression of stemness genes OCT4 and NANOG during differentiation of carcinoma cells. The control of discrete Alu elements by specific transcription factors may have a dynamic role in genome regulation under physiological and diseased conditions. PMID:26883630

  1. A SINE in the genome of the cephalochordate amphioxus is an Alu element

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Linda Z.

    2006-01-01

    Transposable elements of about 300 bp, termed “short interspersed nucleotide elements or SINEs are common in eukaryotes. However, Alu elements, SINEs containing restriction sites for the AluI enzyme, have been known only from primates. Here I report the first SINE found in the genome of the cephalochordate, amphioxus. It is an Alu element of 375 bp that does not share substantial identity with any genomic sequences in vertebrates. It was identified because it was located in the FoxD regulatory region in a cosmid derived from one individual, but absent from the two FoxD alleles of BACs from a second individual. However, searches of sequences of BACs and genomic traces from this second individual gave an estimate of 50-100 copies in the amphioxus genome. The finding of an Alu element in amphioxus raises the question of whether Alu elements in amphioxus and primates arose by convergent evolution or by inheritance from a common ancestor. Genome-wide analyses of transposable elements in amphioxus and other chordates such as tunicates, agnathans and cartilaginous fishes could well provide the answer. PMID:16733535

  2. Methylation Status of Alu and LINE-1 Interspersed Repetitive Sequences in Behcet's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Şahru; Kucukazman, Selma Ozbek; Karataş, Gülten Sungur; Ozturk, Mehmet Akif; Prombhul, Sasiprapa; Hirankarn, Nattiya

    2016-01-01

    Behcet's Disease (BD) is a multisystem chronic inflammatory disease. The pathology is believed to involve both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Hypomethylation leading to activation of interspersed repetitive sequences (IRSs) such as LINE-1 and Alu contributes to the pathologies of autoimmune diseases and cancer. Herein, the epigenetic changes of IRSs in BD were evaluated using combined bisulfite restriction analysis-interspersed repetitive sequences (COBRA-IRS). DNA from neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of BD patients with ocular involvement that were in active or inactive states and healthy controls were used to analyze LINE-1 and Alu methylation levels. For Alu sequences, significant differences were observed in the frequency of (u)C(u)C alleles between PBMCs of patients and controls (p = 0.03), and between inactive patients and controls (p = 0.03). For neutrophils, the frequency of (u)C(u)C was significantly higher between patients and controls (p = 0.006) and between inactive patients and controls (p = 0.002). The partial methylation ((u)C(m)C + (m)C(u)C) frequencies of Alu between inactive patients and control samples also differed (p = 0.02). No statistically significant differences for LINE-1 were detected. Thus, changes in the methylation level of IRS elements might contribute to the pathogenesis of BD. The role of Alu transcripts in BD should be investigated further.

  3. Amphiphysin I but not dynamin I nor synaptojanin mRNA expression increased after repeated methamphetamine administration in the rat cerebrum and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Mitsuko; Okouchi, Jiro; Ozawa, Hidetoshi; Kimuro, Yoshihiko; Iwaki, Akiko; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki

    2013-07-01

    Dopamine increases/decreases synaptic vesicle recycling and in schizophrenia the proteins/mRNA is decreased. We isolated cDNA clone, similar to amphiphysin 1 (vesicle protein) mRNA from the neocortex of rats injected repeatedly with methamphetamine using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) differential display. This clone is highly homologous to the 3' region of the human amphiphysin gene. PCR extension study using a primer specific for the rat amphiphysin 1 gene and a primer located within the clone revealed that it is the 3' UTR region of the rat amphiphysin 1 gene. Furthermore, in situ hybridization revealed that amphiphysin 1 mRNA is expressed in the cerebrum, medial thalamus, hippocampus and cerebellum. In the cerebellum, amphiphysin mRNA expression was confined to upper granule cell layer. Repeated methamphetamine administration increased amphiphysin I mRNA expression in both anterior part of the cerebrum, and the cerebellum. However, the repeated administration did not alter mRNA expression of the other vesicle proteins, synaptotagmin I, synapsin I, synaptojanin and dynamin I, we conclude that the repeated administration selectively increased amphiphysin 1 mRNA expression. Thus, amphiphysin 1 does not work as synaptic recycling, but it is suggested, as a part of pathogenesis of brain tissue injury (under Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺ devoid environment) in repeated methamphetamine-injected states, the gene regulate actin-asssembly, learning, cell stress signaling and cell polarity.

  4. Polymorphic Alu insertions in six Brazilian African-derived populations.

    PubMed

    Cotrim, Nelson Henderson; Auricchio, Maria Teresa B M; Vicente, João Pedro; Otto, Paulo A; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia

    2004-01-01

    At least 25 African-derived populations (quilombo remnants) are believed to exist in the Ribeira River Valley, located in the southern part of São Paulo State, Brazil. We studied four Alu polymorphic loci (APO, ACE, TPA25, and FXIIIB) in individuals belonging to six quilombo remnants in addition to individuals sampled from the city of São Paulo. The allelic frequencies observed in the quilombo remnants were similar to those previously observed in African-derived populations from Central and North America. Genetic variability indexes (Fst and Gst values) in our quilombos were higher than the reported values for the majority of other populations analyzed for the same kind of markers, but lower than the variability usually observed in Amerindian groups. The observed high degree of genetic differentiation may be due to genetic drift, especially the founder effect. Our results suggest that these populations behave genetically as semi-isolates. The degree of genetic variability within populations was larger than among them, a finding described in other studies. In the neighbor-joining tree, some of the Brazilian quilombos clustered with the African and African-derived populations (São Pedro and Galvão), others with the Europeans (Pilões, Maria Rosa, and Abobral). Pedro Cubas was placed in an isolated branch. Principal component analysis was also performed and confirmed the trends observed in the neighbor-joining tree. Overall, the quilombos showed a higher degree of gene flow than average when compared to other worldwide populations, but similar to other African-derived populations.

  5. A novel composite retrotransposon derived from or generated independently of the SVA (SINE/VNTR/Alu) transposon has undergone proliferation in gibbon genomes.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toru; Hirai, Yuriko; Baicharoen, Sudarath; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hirai, Hirohisa; Koga, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    The superfamily Hominoidea (hominoids) comprises two families: Hominidae (hominids) and Hylobatidae (gibbons, also called small apes). The SVA transposon is a composite retrotransposon that occurs widely in hominoids and is considered to have been generated by stepwise fusions of three genetic elements: SINE-R, a variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) sequence, and Alu. We identified a novel transposon whose basic structure is the same as that of SVA, with one prominent difference being the presence of part of prostaglandin reductase 2 (PTGR2) in place of SINE-R. We designate this composite transposon as PVA and propose two possible mechanisms regarding its generation. One is the derivation of PVA from SVA: the SINE-R region of SVA was replaced with a PTGR2 fragment by template switching. The other is the formation of PVA independently of SVA: a PTGR2 fragment was fused to an evolutionary intermediate comprising the VNTR and Alu regions. The nucleotide sequence of the junction between the VNTR and PTGR2 regions supports the second hypothesis. We identified PVA in the white-cheeked gibbon Nomascus leucogenys by analysis of genome sequence databases, and subsequent experimental analysis revealed its presence in all four gibbon genera. The white-cheeked gibbon harbors at least 93 PVA copies in its haploid genome. Another SVA-like composite transposon carrying parts of the LINE1 and Alu transposons in place of SINE-R, designated as LAVA, has recently been reported. The significance of the discovery of PVA is that its substituted fragment originates not from a transposon but from a single-copy gene. PVA should provide additional insights into the transposition mechanism of this type of composite transposon; the transposition activity is conferred even if the substituted fragment is not related to a transposon.

  6. Genetic variation of MHC Class I polymorphic Alu insertions (POALINs) in three sub-populations of the East Midlands, UK.

    PubMed

    Mastana, Sarabjit S; Bhatti, Jasvinder S; Singh, Puneetpal; Wiles, Adam; Holland, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    Alu elements are highly researched due to their useful nature as markers in the study of human population genetics. Recently discovered Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) polymorphic Alu insertions (POALINs) have not been examined extensively for genetic variation and their HLA associations. The aim of this study is to assess the genetic variation between three populations using five recently discovered POALINs. The study examined 190 healthy, unrelated subjects from three different populations in the East Midlands (UK) for the presence or absence of five Alu elements (AluHG, AluMICB, AluHJ, AluTF and AluHF) via the polymerase chain reaction followed by gel electrophoresis. Data were analysed for genetic variation and phylogenetic analyses. All Alus were polymorphic in study populations. Appreciable allele frequency variation was observed at a number of loci. The British population was significantly different from both the Punjabi Jat Sikh and Gujarati Patel populations, although showing a closer genetic relationship to the Punjabi Jat Sikh population than the Gujarati Patel population (Nei's DA = 0.0031 and 0.0064, respectively). MHC POALINs are useful markers in the investigation of genetic variation and the assessment of population relationships, and may have some bearing on disease associations due to their linkage disequilibrium with HLA loci; this warrants further studies.

  7. The 2-repeat allele of the MAOA gene confers an increased risk for shooting and stabbing behaviors.

    PubMed

    Beaver, Kevin M; Barnes, J C; Boutwell, Brian B

    2014-09-01

    There has been a great deal of research examining the link between a polymorphism in the promoter region of the MAOA gene and antisocial phenotypes. The results of these studies have consistently revealed that low activity MAOA alleles are related to antisocial behaviors for males who were maltreated as children. Recently, though, some evidence has emerged indicating that a rare allele of the MAOA gene-that is, the 2-repeat allele-may have effects on violence that are independent of the environment. The current study builds on this research and examines the association between the 2-repeat allele and shooting and stabbing behaviors in a sample of males drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Analyses revealed that African-American males who carry the 2-repeat allele are significantly more likely than all other genotypes to engage in shooting and stabbing behaviors and to report having multiple shooting and stabbing victims. The limitations of the study are discussed and suggestions for future research are offered.

  8. APOBEC3G Oligomerization Is Associated with the Inhibition of Both Alu and LINE-1 Retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Iwabu, Yukie; Yokoyama, Masaru; Fujita, Hideaki; Sato, Hironori; Tokunaga, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    Alu and LINE-1 (L1), which constitute ~11% and ~17% of the human genome, respectively, are transposable non-LTR retroelements. They transpose not only in germ cells but also in somatic cells, occasionally causing cancer. We have previously demonstrated that antiretroviral restriction factors, human APOBEC3 (hA3) proteins (A–H), differentially inhibit L1 retrotransposition. In this present study, we found that hA3 members also restrict Alu retrotransposition at differential levels that correlate with those observed previously for L1 inhibition. Through deletion analyses based on the best-characterized hA3 member human APOBEC3G (hA3G), its N-terminal 30 amino acids were required for its inhibitory activity against Alu retrotransposition. The inhibitory effect of hA3G on Alu retrotransposition was associated with its oligomerization that was affected by the deletion of its N-terminal 30 amino acids. Through structural modeling, the amino acids 24 to 28 of hA3G were predicted to be located at the interface of the dimer. The mutation of these residues resulted in abrogated hA3G oligomerization, and consistently abolished the inhibitory activity of hA3G against Alu retrotransposition. Importantly, the anti-L1 activity of hA3G was also associated with hA3G oligomerization. These results suggest that the inhibitory activities of hA3G against Alu and L1 retrotransposition might involve a common mechanism. PMID:24367644

  9. Alu insertions in the Iberian Peninsula and north west Africa--genetic boundaries or melting pot?

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Emili; Via, Marc; Esteban, Esther; López-Alomar, Antoni; Mazieres, Stéphane; Harich, Nourdin; Kandil, Mostafa; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Moral, Pedro

    2003-12-01

    The Western Mediterranean Basin joins a set of ethnically different populations as Iberians and Basques in the North shore and Berbers and Arab-speakers in the South one. In spite of this differentiation, they have maintained historical contacts since ancient times. The existence of a possible common genetic background (specially for Berbers and Iberians) together with the genetic impact of the Islamic occupation of the Iberian Peninsula during 7 centuries are some of the intriguing anthropological questions that have been studied in this area using several classical and DNA markers. The aim of this work is to present the results on a survey of polymorphic Alu elements in 10 human populations of the Western Mediterranean. Recent Alu subfamilies include a significant number of polymorphic Alu insertions in humans. The polymorphic Alu elements are neutral genetic markers of identical descent with known ancestral states. This fact turns Alu insertions into useful markers for the study of human population genetics. A total number of 14 Alu insertions were analyzed in 5 Iberian populations, 3 Berber groups from North-Western Africa, an Arab-speaker population from Morocco and a sub-Saharan ethnic group from Ivory Coast. The results of this study allow the genetic characterization of Berber populations, which show a certain degree of differentiation from Arab-speaking groups of the same geographic area. Furthermore, a closer genetic distance between South Spain and Moroccan Berbers as compared with other Spanish samples supports a major genetic influx consistent with some (but not all) previous genetic studies on populations from the two shores of the Gibraltar Straits.

  10. Molecular archeology of an SP100 splice variant revisited: dating the retrotranscription and Alu insertion events

    PubMed Central

    Devor, Eric J

    2001-01-01

    Background SP100 is a nuclear protein that displays a number of alternative splice variants. In Old World monkeys, apes and humans one of these variants is extended by a retroprocessed pseudogene, HMG1L3, whose antecedent gene is a member of the family of high-mobility-group proteins, HMG1. This is one of only a few documented cases of a retropseudogene being incorporated into another gene as a functional exon. In addition to the HMG1L3 insertion, Old World monkey genomes also contain an Alu sequence within the last SP100-HMG intron. PCR amplification of the 3' end of the SP100 gene using genomic DNAs from human and New World and Old World monkey species, followed by direct sequencing of the amplicons has made dating the HMG1L3 and Alu insertion events possible. Results PCR amplifications confirm that the HMG1L3 retrotransposition into the SP100 locus occurred after divergence of New World and Old World monkey lineages, some 35-40 million years ago. PCR amplification also shows that an upstream Alu sequence was inserted in the last SP100-HMG intron after divergence of the Old World monkey and ape lineages. Direct sequencing of the Alu in five Old World monkey species places the latter event at around 19 million years ago. Finally, ten single base mutations and one deletion in the Alu differentiate African from Asian Old World monkey species. Conclusions PCR and DNA sequence analysis of 'genetic fossils' such as retropseudogenes and Alu elements in primates give details as to the timing of such events and can reveal sequence features useful for other molecular phylogenetic applications. PMID:11574059

  11. Increasing the reliability of the shutdown of 500 - 750-kV overhead lines equipped with shunt reactors in an unsuccessful three-phase automatic repeated closure cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Kuz'micheva, K. I.; Merzlyakov, A. S.; Fokin, G. G.

    2013-05-15

    The reasons for circuit-breaker failures during repeated disconnection of 500 - 750 kV overhead lines with shunt reactors in a cycle of unsuccessful three-phase automatic reconnection (TARC) are analyzed. Recommendations are made for increasing the operating reliability of power transmission lines with shunt reactors when there is unsuccessful reconnection.

  12. The reinforcing value of vegetables does not increase with repeated exposure during a randomized controlled provided vegetable intervention among overweight and obese adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: The primary aim of this randomized controlled trial is to determine whether the relative reinforcing value (RRV) of vegetables compared to a snack food can be increased through repeated exposure (incentive sensitization) to amounts of vegetables recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for A...

  13. Social Stories: Mechanisms of Effectiveness in Increasing Game Play Skills in Children Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder Using a Pretest Posttest Repeated Measures Randomized Control Group Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quirmbach, Linda M.; Lincoln, Alan J.; Feinberg-Gizzo, Monica J.; Ingersoll, Brooke R.; Andrews, Siri M.

    2009-01-01

    An increasing body of literature has indicated that social stories are an effective way to teach individuals diagnosed with autism appropriate social behavior. This study compared two formats of a social story targeting the improvement of social skills during game play using a pretest posttest repeated measures randomized control group design. A…

  14. Social Stories: Mechanisms of Effectiveness in Increasing Game Play Skills in Children Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder Using a Pretest Posttest Repeated Measures Randomized Control Group Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quirmbach, Linda M.; Lincoln, Alan J.; Feinberg-Gizzo, Monica J.; Ingersoll, Brooke R.; Andrews, Siri M.

    2009-01-01

    An increasing body of literature has indicated that social stories are an effective way to teach individuals diagnosed with autism appropriate social behavior. This study compared two formats of a social story targeting the improvement of social skills during game play using a pretest posttest repeated measures randomized control group design. A…

  15. Interaction of hnRNPA1/A2 and DAZAP1 with an Alu-Derived Intronic Splicing Enhancer Regulates ATM Aberrant Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Tibor; Pagani, Franco

    2011-01-01

    We have previously identified an Alu-derived Intronic Splicing enhancer (ISE) in the Ataxia Teleangectasia Mutated gene (ATM) that facilitates intron pre-mRNA processing and leads to the inclusion of a cryptic exon in the final mRNA transcript. By using an RNA pull-down assay, we show here that hnRNPA1/A2, HuR and DAZAP1 splicing factors and DHX36 RNA helicase bind to the ISE. By functional studies (overexpression and siRNA experiments), we demonstrate that hnRNPA1 and DAZAP1 are indeed involved in ISE-dependent ATM cryptic exon activation, with hnRNPA1 acting negatively and DAZAP1 positively on splicing selection. On the contrary, HuR and DHX36 have no effect on ATM splicing pattern. These data suggest that splicing factors with both negative and positive effect can assemble on the intronic Alu repeats and regulate pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:21858080

  16. The SRP9/14 subunit of the signal recognition particle (SRP) is present in more than 20-fold excess over SRP in primate cells and exists primarily free but also in complex with small cytoplasmic Alu RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Bovia, F; Fornallaz, M; Leffers, H; Strub, K

    1995-01-01

    The heterodimeric protein SRP9/14 bound to the Alu sequences of SRP RNA is essential for the translational control function of the signal recognition particle (SRP). The Alu RNAs of primate cells are believed to be derived from SRP RNA and have been shown to bind to an SRP14-related protein in vitro. We have used antibodies to characterize SRP9/14 and examine its association with small RNAs in vivo. Although SRP9 proteins are the same size in both rodent and primate cells, SRP14 subunits are generally larger in primate cells. An additional alanine-rich domain at the C-terminus accounts for the larger size of one human isoform. Although the other four SRP proteins are largely assembled into SRP in both rodent and primate cells, we found that the heterodimer SRP9/14 is present in 20-fold excess over SRP in primate cells. An increased synthesis rate of both proteins may contribute to their accumulation. The majority of the excess SRP9/14 is cytoplasmic and does not appear to be bound to any small RNAs; however, a significant fraction of a small cytoplasmic Alu RNA is complexed with SRP9/14 in a 8.5 S particle. Our findings that there is a large excess of SRP9/14 in primate cells and that Alu RNAs are bound to SRP9/14 in vivo suggest that this heterodimeric protein may play additional roles in the translational control of gene expression and/or Alu transcript metabolism. Images PMID:7542942

  17. Repeat low-level blast exposure increases transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression in the trigeminal ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Teresa A.; Doyle Brackley, Allison; Jeske, Nathaniel A.; Cleland, Jeffery M.; Lund, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Blast-associated sensory and cognitive trauma sustained by military service members is an area of extensively studied research. Recent studies in our laboratory have revealed that low-level blast exposure increased expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), proteins well characterized for their role in mediating pain transmission, in the cornea. Determining the functional consequences of these alterations in protein expression is critical to understanding blast-related sensory trauma. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine TRPV1 and ET-1 expression in ocular associated sensory tissues following primary and tertiary blast. A rodent model of blast injury was used in which anesthetized animals, unrestrained or restrained, received a single or repeat blast (73.8 ± 5.5 kPa) from a compressed air shock tube once or daily for five consecutive days, respectively. Behavioral and functional analyses were conducted to assess blast effects on nocifensive behavior and TRPV1 activity. Immunohistochemistry and Western Blot were also performed with trigeminal ganglia (TG) to determine TRPV1, ET-1 and glial fibrillary associated protein (GFAP) expression following blast. Increased TRPV1, ET-1 and GFAP were detected in the TG of animals exposed to repeat blast. Increased nocifensive responses were also observed in animals exposed to repeat, tertiary blast as compared to single blast and control. Moreover, decreased TRPV1 desensitization was observed in TG neurons exposed to repeat blast. Repeat, tertiary blast resulted in increased TRPV1, ET-1 and GFAP expression in the TG, enhanced nociception and decreased TRPV1 desensitization. PMID:28797041

  18. Repeat low-level blast exposure increases transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression in the trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Por, Elaine D; Sandoval, Melody L; Thomas-Benson, Chiquita; Burke, Teresa A; Doyle Brackley, Allison; Jeske, Nathaniel A; Cleland, Jeffery M; Lund, Brian J

    2017-01-01

    Blast-associated sensory and cognitive trauma sustained by military service members is an area of extensively studied research. Recent studies in our laboratory have revealed that low-level blast exposure increased expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), proteins well characterized for their role in mediating pain transmission, in the cornea. Determining the functional consequences of these alterations in protein expression is critical to understanding blast-related sensory trauma. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine TRPV1 and ET-1 expression in ocular associated sensory tissues following primary and tertiary blast. A rodent model of blast injury was used in which anesthetized animals, unrestrained or restrained, received a single or repeat blast (73.8 ± 5.5 kPa) from a compressed air shock tube once or daily for five consecutive days, respectively. Behavioral and functional analyses were conducted to assess blast effects on nocifensive behavior and TRPV1 activity. Immunohistochemistry and Western Blot were also performed with trigeminal ganglia (TG) to determine TRPV1, ET-1 and glial fibrillary associated protein (GFAP) expression following blast. Increased TRPV1, ET-1 and GFAP were detected in the TG of animals exposed to repeat blast. Increased nocifensive responses were also observed in animals exposed to repeat, tertiary blast as compared to single blast and control. Moreover, decreased TRPV1 desensitization was observed in TG neurons exposed to repeat blast. Repeat, tertiary blast resulted in increased TRPV1, ET-1 and GFAP expression in the TG, enhanced nociception and decreased TRPV1 desensitization.

  19. Arcuate keratotomy on post-keratoplasty astigmatism is unpredictable and frequently needs repeat procedures to increase its success rate.

    PubMed

    Bayramlar, Huseyin; Karadag, Remzi; Cakici, Ozgur; Ozsoy, Isilay

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and predictability of arcuate keratotomy (AK) for post-keratoplasty astigmatism and to present the complications and rate of repeat procedures. Sixteen eyes from 14 patients were included. Paired 70-80° arc length AKs centred on the steep axis were carried out 0.5 mm within the graft-host junction. The depth of the AKs was set at approximately 80-90% of the depth of the cornea, based on a topographic pachymeter at the incision location. The outcome measures included preoperative and postoperative topographic astigmatism, uncorrected and corrected visual acuity, surgical complications and repeat procedures. In 12 of the 16 eyes (75%), at least one additional surgical procedure was required to obtain the desired result: suturing for overcorrection or wound gape in six eyes (38%), lengthening of the incisions for undercorrection in four eyes (25%) and additional AKs for marked astigmatic axis displacement in three eyes (19%). The mean preoperative astigmatism was 10.45±3.82 dioptres (D); the postoperative astigmatism at the last visit was 2.99±1.14 D (in a mean follow-up of 17.6±5.55 months). The efficacy index was 0.83 and the safety index was 1.68. In treatment of post-keratoplasty astigmatism, AK does not have a good predictability. Additional procedures such as lengthening of the AK incisions for undercorrection or using compression sutures for overcorrection with significantly gaping wounds are frequently required to improve the final outcome. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Repeated immobilization stress increases the binding of c-Fos-like proteins to a rat dopamine beta-hydroxylase promoter enhancer sequence.

    PubMed

    Nankova, B; Devlin, D; Kvetnanský, R; Kopin, I J; Sabban, E L

    1993-08-01

    Repeated immobilization stress elicits a large elevation in adrenal dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) mRNA levels. This study attempts to analyze the molecular mechanism of increased DBH gene expression in stress. Adrenomedullary nuclear proteins were prepared from controls and rats exposed to various intervals of immobilization stress. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that repeated stress led to increased binding of adrenomedullary nuclear factors to a cis-acting regulatory element in the rat DBH promoter (DBH-1). One of the partners in the DNA-protein complex is c-Fos or a Fos-related protein. There was a correlation between promoter binding activity and elevated steady-state levels of DBH mRNA. Our data indicate that this cis regulatory element in the rat DBH promoter is functional in vivo, and increased binding of AP1-like transcription factors to this motif is induced by immobilization stress.

  1. Genetic variation among world populations: inferences from 100 Alu insertion polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Watkins, W Scott; Rogers, Alan R; Ostler, Christopher T; Wooding, Steve; Bamshad, Michael J; Brassington, Anna-Marie E; Carroll, Marion L; Nguyen, Son V; Walker, Jerilyn A; Prasad, B V Ravi; Reddy, P Govinda; Das, Pradipta K; Batzer, Mark A; Jorde, Lynn B

    2003-07-01

    We examine the distribution and structure of human genetic diversity for 710 individuals representing 31 populations from Africa, East Asia, Europe, and India using 100 Alu insertion polymorphisms from all 22 autosomes. Alu diversity is highest in Africans (0.349) and lowest in Europeans (0.297). Alu insertion frequency is lowest in Africans (0.463) and higher in Indians (0.544), E. Asians (0.557), and Europeans (0.559). Large genetic distances are observed among African populations and between African and non-African populations. The root of a neighbor-joining network is located closest to the African populations. These findings are consistent with an African origin of modern humans and with a bottleneck effect in the human populations that left Africa to colonize the rest of the world. Genetic distances among all pairs of populations show a significant product-moment correlation with geographic distances (r = 0.69, P < 0.00001). F(ST), the proportion of genetic diversity attributable to population subdivision is 0.141 for Africans/E. Asians/Europeans, 0.047 for E. Asians/Indians/Europeans, and 0.090 for all 31 populations. Resampling analyses show that approximately 50 Alu polymorphisms are sufficient to obtain accurate and reliable genetic distance estimates. These analyses also demonstrate that markers with higher F(ST) values have greater resolving power and produce more consistent genetic distance estimates.

  2. Enrichment analysis of Alu elements with different spatial chromatin proximity in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhuoya; Jin, Ke; Crabbe, M James C; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Xiaolin; Huang, Yanyan; Hua, Mengyi; Nan, Peng; Zhang, Zhaolei; Zhong, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) have no longer been totally considered as "junk DNA" for quite a time since the continual discoveries of their multifunctional roles in eukaryote genomes. As one of the most important and abundant TEs that still active in human genome, Alu, a SINE family, has demonstrated its indispensable regulatory functions at sequence level, but its spatial roles are still unclear. Technologies based on 3C (chromosome conformation capture) have revealed the mysterious three-dimensional structure of chromatin, and make it possible to study the distal chromatin interaction in the genome. To find the role TE playing in distal regulation in human genome, we compiled the new released Hi-C data, TE annotation, histone marker annotations, and the genome-wide methylation data to operate correlation analysis, and found that the density of Alu elements showed a strong positive correlation with the level of chromatin interactions (hESC: r = 0.9, P < 2.2 × 10(16); IMR90 fibroblasts: r = 0.94, P < 2.2 × 10(16)) and also have a significant positive correlation with some remote functional DNA elements like enhancers and promoters (Enhancer: hESC: r = 0.997, P = 2.3 × 10(-4); IMR90: r = 0.934, P = 2 × 10(-2); Promoter: hESC: r = 0.995, P = 3.8 × 10(-4); IMR90: r = 0.996, P = 3.2 × 10(-4)). Further investigation involving GC content and methylation status showed the GC content of Alu covered sequences shared a similar pattern with that of the overall sequence, suggesting that Alu elements also function as the GC nucleotide and CpG site provider. In all, our results suggest that the Alu elements may act as an alternative parameter to evaluate the Hi-C data, which is confirmed by the correlation analysis of Alu elements and histone markers. Moreover, the GC-rich Alu sequence can bring high GC content and methylation flexibility to the regions with more distal chromatin contact, regulating the transcription of tissue-specific genes.

  3. Alu elements in primates are preferentially lost from areas of high GC content

    PubMed Central

    Brookfield, John FY

    2013-01-01

    The currently-accepted dogma when analysing human Alu transposable elements is that ‘young’ Alu elements are found in low GC regions and ‘old’ Alus in high GC regions. The correlation between high GC regions and high gene frequency regions make this observation particularly difficult to explain. Although a number of studies have tackled the problem, no analysis has definitively explained the reason for this trend. These observations have been made by relying on the subfamily as a proxy for age of an element. In this study, we suggest that this is a misleading assumption and instead analyse the relationship between the taxonomic distribution of an individual element and its surrounding GC environment. An analysis of 103906 Alu elements across 6 human chromosomes was carried out, using the presence of orthologous Alu elements in other primate species as a proxy for age. We show that the previously-reported effect of GC content correlating with subfamily age is not reflected by the ages of the individual elements. Instead, elements are preferentially lost from areas of high GC content over time. The correlation between GC content and subfamily may be due to a change in insertion bias in the young subfamilies. The link between Alu subfamily age and GC region was made due to an over-simplification of the data and is incorrect. We suggest that use of subfamilies as a proxy for age is inappropriate and that the analysis of ortholog presence in other primate species provides a deeper insight into the data. PMID:23717800

  4. Saccharomyces SRP RNA secondary structures: a conserved S-domain and extended Alu-domain.

    PubMed

    Van Nues, Rob W; Brown, Jeremy D

    2004-01-01

    The contribution made by the RNA component of signal recognition particle (SRP) to its function in protein targeting is poorly understood. We have generated a complete secondary structure for Saccharomyces cerevisiae SRP RNA, scR1. The structure conforms to that of other eukaryotic SRP RNAs. It is rod-shaped with, at opposite ends, binding sites for proteins required for the SRP functions of signal sequence recognition (S-domain) and translational elongation arrest (Alu-domain). Micrococcal nuclease digestion of purified S. cerevisiae SRP separated the S-domain of the RNA from the Alu-domain as a discrete fragment. The Alu-domain resolved into several stable fragments indicating a compact structure. Comparison of scR1 with SRP RNAs of five yeast species related to S. cerevisiae revealed the S-domain to be the most conserved region of the RNA. Extending data from nuclease digestion with phylogenetic comparison, we built the secondary structure model for scR1. The Alu-domain contains large extensions, including a sequence with hallmarks of an expansion segment. Evolutionarily conserved bases are placed in the Alu- and S-domains as in other SRP RNAs, the exception being an unusual GU(4)A loop closing the helix onto which the signal sequence binding Srp54p assembles (domain IV). Surprisingly, several mutations within the predicted Srp54p binding site failed to disrupt SRP function in vivo. However, the strength of the Srp54p-scR1 and, to a lesser extent, Sec65p-scR1 interaction was decreased in these mutant particles. The availability of a secondary structure for scR1 will facilitate interpretation of data from genetic analysis of the RNA.

  5. High-molecular-mass APOBEC3G complexes restrict Alu retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Ya-Lin; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Hall, Steven C.; Santiago, Mario; Soros, Vanessa B.; Esnault, Cécile; Heidmann, Thierry; Greene, Warner C.

    2006-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) and related deoxycytidine deaminases are potent intrinsic antiretroviral factors. A3G is expressed either as an enzymatically active low-molecular-mass (LMM) form or as an enzymatically inactive high-molecular-mass (HMM) ribonucleoprotein complex. Resting CD4 T cells exclusively express LMM A3G, where it functions as a powerful postentry restriction factor for HIV-1. Activation of CD4 T cells promotes the recruitment of LMM A3G into 5- to 15-MDa HMM complexes whose function is unknown. Using tandem affinity purification techniques coupled with MS, we identified Staufen-containing RNA-transporting granules and Ro ribonucleoprotein complexes as specific components of HMM A3G complexes. Analysis of RNAs in these complexes revealed Alu and small Y RNAs, two of the most prominent nonautonomous mobile genetic elements in human cells. These retroelement RNAs are recruited into Staufen-containing RNA-transporting granules in the presence of A3G. Retrotransposition of Alu and hY RNAs depends on the reverse transcriptase machinery provided by long interspersed nucleotide elements 1 (L1). We now show that A3G greatly inhibits L1-dependent retrotransposition of marked Alu retroelements not by inhibiting L1 function but by sequestering Alu RNAs in cytoplasmic HMM A3G complexes away from the nuclear L1 enzymatic machinery. These findings identify nonautonomous Alu and hY retroelements as natural cellular targets of A3G and highlight how different forms of A3G uniquely protect cells from the threats posed by exogenous retroviruses (LMM A3G) and endogenous retroelements (HMM A3G). PMID:17030807

  6. Transfer of genetic therapy across human populations: molecular targets for increasing patient coverage in repeat expansion diseases.

    PubMed

    Varela, Miguel A; Curtis, Helen J; Douglas, Andrew G L; Hammond, Suzan M; O'Loughlin, Aisling J; Sobrido, Maria J; Scholefield, Janine; Wood, Matthew J A

    2016-02-01

    Allele-specific gene therapy aims to silence expression of mutant alleles through targeting of disease-linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, SNP linkage to disease varies between populations, making such molecular therapies applicable only to a subset of patients. Moreover, not all SNPs have the molecular features necessary for potent gene silencing. Here we provide knowledge to allow the maximisation of patient coverage by building a comprehensive understanding of SNPs ranked according to their predicted suitability toward allele-specific silencing in 14 repeat expansion diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, myotonic dystrophy 1, myotonic dystrophy 2, Huntington's disease and several spinocerebellar ataxias. Our systematic analysis of DNA sequence variation shows that most annotated SNPs are not suitable for potent allele-specific silencing across populations because of suboptimal sequence features and low variability (>97% in HD). We suggest maximising patient coverage by selecting SNPs with high heterozygosity across populations, and preferentially targeting SNPs that lead to purine:purine mismatches in wild-type alleles to obtain potent allele-specific silencing. We therefore provide fundamental knowledge on strategies for optimising patient coverage of therapeutics for microsatellite expansion disorders by linking analysis of population genetic variation to the selection of molecular targets.

  7. Transfer of genetic therapy across human populations: molecular targets for increasing patient coverage in repeat expansion diseases

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Miguel A; Curtis, Helen J; Douglas, Andrew GL; Hammond, Suzan M; O'Loughlin, Aisling J; Sobrido, Maria J; Scholefield, Janine; Wood, Matthew JA

    2016-01-01

    Allele-specific gene therapy aims to silence expression of mutant alleles through targeting of disease-linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, SNP linkage to disease varies between populations, making such molecular therapies applicable only to a subset of patients. Moreover, not all SNPs have the molecular features necessary for potent gene silencing. Here we provide knowledge to allow the maximisation of patient coverage by building a comprehensive understanding of SNPs ranked according to their predicted suitability toward allele-specific silencing in 14 repeat expansion diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, myotonic dystrophy 1, myotonic dystrophy 2, Huntington's disease and several spinocerebellar ataxias. Our systematic analysis of DNA sequence variation shows that most annotated SNPs are not suitable for potent allele-specific silencing across populations because of suboptimal sequence features and low variability (>97% in HD). We suggest maximising patient coverage by selecting SNPs with high heterozygosity across populations, and preferentially targeting SNPs that lead to purine:purine mismatches in wild-type alleles to obtain potent allele-specific silencing. We therefore provide fundamental knowledge on strategies for optimising patient coverage of therapeutics for microsatellite expansion disorders by linking analysis of population genetic variation to the selection of molecular targets. PMID:25990798

  8. Loss of the mu opioid receptor on different genetic backgrounds leads to increased bromodeoxyuridine labeling in the dentate gyrus only after repeated injection.

    PubMed

    Cominski, T P; Turchin, C E; Hsu, M S; Ansonoff, M A; Pintar, J E

    2012-03-29

    The endogenous opioid system is involved in various physiological processes, including neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. In the current study, we investigated the role of the mu opioid receptor (MOR-1) on DG neurogenesis and measured glucocorticoid levels following several injection paradigms to supplement the neurogenesis experiments. MOR-1 knockout (KO) mice on C57BL/6 and 129S6 backgrounds were injected with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) using either a single injection or two different repeated injection protocols and then sacrificed at different time points. The total number of BrdU and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive cells in the DG is significantly increased in MOR-1 KO mice compared with wild type (WT) on both strains after repeated injection, but not after a single injection. Plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels increased similarly in MOR-1 KO and WT mice following both single and repeated injection, indicating that the stress response is activated following any injection protocol, but that the mechanism responsible for the increase in BrdU labeling in MOR-1 KO mice is CORT-level independent. Finally, WT 129S6 mice, independent of genotype, showed higher levels of plasma CORT compared with WT C57BL/6 mice in both noninjected controls and following injection at two separate time points; these levels were inversely correlated with low numbers of BrdU cells in the DG in 129S6 mice compared with C57BL/6 mice. In summary, these data demonstrate that loss of MOR-1 increases BrdU labeling in the DG independent of CORT levels, but only following a repeated injection, illustrating the capability of injection paradigms to influence cell-proliferative responses in a genotype-dependent manner.

  9. Repeated administration of aripiprazole produces a sensitization effect in the suppression of avoidance responding and phencyclidine-induced hyperlocomotion and increases D2 receptor-mediated behavioral function

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Qin, Rongyin; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated how repeated administration of aripiprazole (a novel antipsychotic drug) alters its behavioral effects in two behavioral tests of antipsychotic activity and whether this alteration is correlated with an increase in dopamine D2 receptor function. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were first repeatedly tested with aripiprazole (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg, subcutaneously (sc)) or vehicle in a conditioned avoidance response (CAR) test or a phencyclidine (PCP) (3.20 mg/kg, sc)-induced hyperlocomotion test daily for five consecutive days. After 2–3 days of drug-free retraining or resting, all rats were then challenged with aripiprazole (1.5 or 3.0 mg/kg, sc). Repeated administration of aripiprazole progressively increased its inhibition of avoidance responding and PCP-induced hyperlocomotion. More importantly, rats previously treated with aripiprazole showed significantly lower avoidance response and lower PCP-induced hyperlocomotion than those previously treated with vehicle in the challenge tests. An increased sensitivity to quinpirole (a selective D2/3 agonist) in prior aripiprazole-treated rats was also found in the quinpirole-induced hyperlocomotion test, suggesting an enhanced D2/3-mediated function. These findings suggest that aripiprazole, despite its distinct receptor mechanisms of action, induces a sensitization effect similar to those induced by other antipsychotic drugs and this effect may be partially mediated by brain plasticity involving D2/3 receptor systems. PMID:25586399

  10. Repeated administration of aripiprazole produces a sensitization effect in the suppression of avoidance responding and phencyclidine-induced hyperlocomotion and increases D2 receptor-mediated behavioral function.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Qin, Rongyin; Li, Ming

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated how repeated administration of aripiprazole (a novel antipsychotic drug) alters its behavioral effects in two behavioral tests of antipsychotic activity and whether this alteration is correlated with an increase in dopamine D2 receptor function. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were first repeatedly tested with aripiprazole (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg, subcutaneously (sc)) or vehicle in a conditioned avoidance response (CAR) test or a phencyclidine (PCP) (3.20 mg/kg, sc)-induced hyperlocomotion test daily for five consecutive days. After 2-3 days of drug-free retraining or resting, all rats were then challenged with aripiprazole (1.5 or 3.0 mg/kg, sc). Repeated administration of aripiprazole progressively increased its inhibition of avoidance responding and PCP-induced hyperlocomotion. More importantly, rats previously treated with aripiprazole showed significantly lower avoidance response and lower PCP-induced hyperlocomotion than those previously treated with vehicle in the challenge tests. An increased sensitivity to quinpirole (a selective D2/3 agonist) in prior aripiprazole-treated rats was also found in the quinpirole-induced hyperlocomotion test, suggesting an enhanced D2/3-mediated function. These findings suggest that aripiprazole, despite its distinct receptor mechanisms of action, induces a sensitization effect similar to those induced by other antipsychotic drugs and this effect may be partially mediated by brain plasticity involving D2/3 receptor systems.

  11. Repeated exposure of the posterior ventral tegmental area to nicotine increases the sensitivity of local dopamine neurons to the stimulating effects of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zheng-Ming; Katner, Simon N; Rodd, Zachary A; Truitt, William; Hauser, Sheketha R; Deehan, Gerald A; Engleman, Eric A; McBride, William J

    2012-05-01

    Clinical evidence indicates a frequent co-morbidity of nicotine and alcohol abuse and dependence. The posterior ventral tegmental area (pVTA) appears to support the reinforcing and dopamine-stimulating effects of both drugs. The current study tested the hypothesis that repeated exposure of the pVTA to one drug would increase the sensitivity of local dopamine neurons to the stimulating effects of the other drug. Female Wistar rats received repeated daily microinjections of either 100 μM nicotine or vehicle directly into the pVTA for 7 days. On the 8th day, rats received microinjections of either vehicle or ethanol (100 or 200 mg%) into the pVTA while extracellular dopamine samples were collected from the ipsilateral nucleus accumbens shell (NACsh) with microdialysis. Another experiment tested the effects of challenge microinjections of 200 μM nicotine in the pVTA on extracellular dopamine levels in the NACsh following 7 daily pretreatments with 200 mg% ethanol in the pVTA. Nicotine pretreatments increased the dopamine-stimulating effects of ethanol in the pVTA (100 mg% ethanol: 115% vs 160% of baseline in the vehicle and nicotine groups, respectively, p < 0.05; 200 mg% ethanol: 145% vs 190% of baseline in the vehicle and nicotine groups, respectively, p < 0.05). In contrast, ethanol pretreatments did not alter the stimulating effects of nicotine in the pVTA. The results suggest that repeated exposure of the pVTA to nicotine increased the response of local dopamine neurons to the stimulating effects of ethanol, whereas repeated exposure of the pVTA to ethanol did not alter the responses of pVTA dopamine neurons to nicotine.

  12. Rewarding effects of electrical stimulation of the insular cortex: decayed effectiveness after repeated tests and subsequent increase in vertical behavioral activity and conditioned place aversion after naloxone administration.

    PubMed

    García, Raquel; Zafra, Maria A; Puerto, Amadeo

    2015-02-01

    The insular cortex has been associated with various aversive and rewarding sensory, regulatory, and learning processes. The objective of this study was to examine the characteristics of the reinforcement induced by electrical stimulation of this brain area in rats. Results obtained confirm that electrical stimulation of the insular cortex may induce conditioned place and flavor preferences but the learning acquired is not transferred in a reversal test. Unexpectedly, they also demonstrate that this rewarding effect diminishes after repeated tests. In follow-up experiments, locomotor activity tests revealed an increased number of rearings (a sensitization index) in stimulated animals. Furthermore, in these same animals, administration of low doses of naloxone, an opiate antagonist, developed place aversion toward the maze compartment for which the animals had previously shown preference. These results are interpreted in relation to the effects induced by the repeated administration of natural and artificial rewarding stimuli.

  13. Direct mapping of symbolic DNA sequence into frequency domain in global repeat map algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Glunčić, Matko; Paar, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The main feature of global repeat map (GRM) algorithm (www.hazu.hr/grm/software/win/grm2012.exe) is its ability to identify a broad variety of repeats of unbounded length that can be arbitrarily distant in sequences as large as human chromosomes. The efficacy is due to the use of complete set of a K-string ensemble which enables a new method of direct mapping of symbolic DNA sequence into frequency domain, with straightforward identification of repeats as peaks in GRM diagram. In this way, we obtain very fast, efficient and highly automatized repeat finding tool. The method is robust to substitutions and insertions/deletions, as well as to various complexities of the sequence pattern. We present several case studies of GRM use, in order to illustrate its capabilities: identification of α-satellite tandem repeats and higher order repeats (HORs), identification of Alu dispersed repeats and of Alu tandems, identification of Period 3 pattern in exons, implementation of ‘magnifying glass’ effect, identification of complex HOR pattern, identification of inter-tandem transitional dispersed repeat sequences and identification of long segmental duplications. GRM algorithm is convenient for use, in particular, in cases of large repeat units, of highly mutated and/or complex repeats, and of global repeat maps for large genomic sequences (chromosomes and genomes). PMID:22977183

  14. Development and validation of InnoQuant™, a sensitive human DNA quantitation and degradation assessment method for forensic samples using high copy number mobile elements Alu and SVA.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Gina M; Montgomery, Anne H; Thompson, Robyn; Indest, Brooke; Carroll, Marion; Sinha, Sudhir K

    2014-11-01

    There is a constant need in forensic casework laboratories for an improved way to increase the first-pass success rate of forensic samples. The recent advances in mini STR analysis, SNP, and Alu marker systems have now made it possible to analyze highly compromised samples, yet few tools are available that can simultaneously provide an assessment of quantity, inhibition, and degradation in a sample prior to genotyping. Currently there are several different approaches used for fluorescence-based quantification assays which provide a measure of quantity and inhibition. However, a system which can also assess the extent of degradation in a forensic sample will be a useful tool for DNA analysts. Possessing this information prior to genotyping will allow an analyst to more informatively make downstream decisions for the successful typing of a forensic sample without unnecessarily consuming DNA extract. Real-time PCR provides a reliable method for determining the amount and quality of amplifiable DNA in a biological sample. Alu are Short Interspersed Elements (SINE), approximately 300bp insertions which are distributed throughout the human genome in large copy number. The use of an internal primer to amplify a segment of an Alu element allows for human specificity as well as high sensitivity when compared to a single copy target. The advantage of an Alu system is the presence of a large number (>1000) of fixed insertions in every human genome, which minimizes the individual specific variation possible when using a multi-copy target quantification system. This study utilizes two independent retrotransposon genomic targets to obtain quantification of an 80bp "short" DNA fragment and a 207bp "long" DNA fragment in a degraded DNA sample in the multiplex system InnoQuant™. The ratio of the two quantitation values provides a "Degradation Index", or a qualitative measure of a sample's extent of degradation. The Degradation Index was found to be predictive of the observed loss

  15. β-Adrenergic receptor mediated increases in activation and function of natural killer cells following repeated social disruption.

    PubMed

    Tarr, Andrew J; Powell, Nicole D; Reader, Brenda F; Bhave, Neela S; Roloson, Amanda L; Carson, William E; Sheridan, John F

    2012-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are specialized innate lymphocytes important in the early defense against tumor and virus bearing cells. Many factors influence the immune system's effectiveness against pathogens, including stress. Social disruption (SDR) "primes" macrophages/monocytes and dendritic cells thereby enhancing their anti-microbial function. What remains unclear is whether similar responses are evident in NK cells. Current studies investigated the cellular distribution and activation/inhibitory phenotypes of NK cells in the spleen, lung, and blood of C57BL/6 male mice following SDR. Furthermore, cytolytic activity and anti-viral cytokine production of splenic NK cells were determined. Lastly, β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) signaling was investigated to determine possible mechanisms behind the SDR-induced NK cell alterations. Results indicated NK cells from SDR mice have increased expression of CD16 and CD69 and reduced NKG2a and Ly49a expression on splenic CD3-/DX5+ NK cells indicative of an activated phenotype, both immediately and 14h post-SDR. Administration of propranolol (10mg/kg; non-selective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist) was shown to block these "priming" effects at the 14h time-point. In the lung, SDR had similar effects on activation and inhibitory receptors 14h post-SDR, however no alterations were evident in the blood besides increased NK cells directly after SDR. Additionally, splenic NK cells from SDR mice had increased CD107a surface expression, cytolytic activity, and IFN-γ production was increased upon costimulation with IgG and IL-2 ex vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that social stress "primes" NK cells in the spleen and lung to be more proficient in their cytolytic and anti-viral/tumor effecter functions through β-adrenergic receptor dependent signaling.

  16. β-ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR MEDIATED INCREASES IN ACTIVATION AND FUNCTION OF NATURAL KILLER CELLS FOLLOWING REPEATED SOCIAL DISRUPTION

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Andrew J.; Powell, Nicole D.; Reader, Brenda F.; Bhave, Neela S.; Roloson, A.L.; Carson, William E.; Sheridan, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are specialized innate lymphocytes important in the early defense against tumor and virus bearing cells. Many factors influence the immune system’s effectiveness against pathogens, including stress. Social disruption (SDR) “primes” macrophages/monocytes and dendritic cells thereby enhancing their antimicrobial function. What remains unclear is whether similar responses are evident in NK cells. Current studies investigated the cellular distribution and activation/inhibitory phenotypes of NK cells in the spleen, lung, and blood of C57BL/6 male mice following SDR. Furthermore, cytolytic activity and anti-viral cytokine production of splenic NK cells were determined. Lastly, β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) signaling was investigated to determine possible mechanisms behind the SDR-induced NK cell alterations. Results indicated NK cells from SDR mice have increased expression of CD16 and CD69 and reduced NKG2a and Ly49a expression on splenic CD3-/DX5+ NK cells indicative of an activated phenotype, both immediately and 14hrs post-SDR. Administration of propranolol (10mg/kg; non-selective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist) was shown to block these “priming” effects at the 14hr time-point. In the lung, SDR had similar effects on activation and inhibitory receptors 14hr post-SDR, however no alterations were evident in the blood besides increased NK cells directly after SDR. Additionally, splenic NK cells from SDR mice had increased CD107a surface expression, cytolytic activity, and IFN-γ production was increased upon costimulation with IgG and IL-2 ex vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that social stress “primes” NK cells in the spleen and lung to be more proficient in their cytolytic and antiviral/tumor effecter functions through β-adrenergic receptor dependent signaling. PMID:22796551

  17. Supplementing regular training with short-duration sprint-agility training leads to a substantial increase in repeated sprint-agility performance with national level badminton players.

    PubMed

    Walklate, Benjamin M; O'Brien, Brendan J; Paton, Carl D; Young, Warren

    2009-08-01

    Repeated-agility sprint ability is an important performance characteristic of badminton players. However, it is unclear whether regular badminton training is sufficient to improve repeated-agility sprint ability or whether supplementary training is required. Therefore, our aim was to investigate whether supplementing regular group training with short sessions of badminton-specific agility-sprint training conferred any greater changes in performance than regular training alone. Twelve national level badminton players completed a set of performance tests in the week before and after a 4-week training period. Performance tests consisted of 10- and 20-meter sprints, a multistage fitness test, a 300-meter shuttle run, and a novel badminton sprint protocol. After pretesting, pair-matched participants were randomly assigned into regular or supplementary training groups. Both groups undertook regular national squad training consisting of 4 2-hour sessions per week. In addition, the supplementary group completed a high-intensity sprint-training regime consisting of 7 to 15 repeats of badminton-specific sprints twice per week. Relative to control, the supplementary training group reported improvements (mean +/- 90% confidence limits) in the 300-meter shuttle run (2.4% +/- 2.7%) and badminton sprint protocol (3.6% +/- 2.6%). However, there were no substantial difference in either the 10-meter (-0.3% +/- 2.1%) or 20-meter (-0.6% +/- 1.8%) sprint or the multistage fitness test (0.0% +/- 2.7%). Supplementing regular training with sessions of short-duration sprint training appears to lead to worthwhile increases in repeated-agility sprint performance with national level badminton players.

  18. Rationale and design of REACT: a randomised controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of home-collection to increase chlamydia retesting and detect repeat positive tests

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Repeat infection with Chlamydia trachomatis is common and increases the risk of sequelae in women and HIV seroconversion in men who have sex with men (MSM). Despite guidelines recommending chlamydia retesting three months after treatment, retesting rates are low. We are conducting the first randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of home collection combined with short message service (SMS) reminders on chlamydia retesting and reinfection rates in three risk groups. Methods/Design The REACT (retest after Chlamydia trachomatis) trial involves 600 patients diagnosed with chlamydia: 200 MSM, 200 women and 200 heterosexual men recruited from two Australian sexual health clinics where SMS reminders for retesting are routine practice. Participants will be randomised to the home group (3-month SMS reminder and home-collection) or the clinic group (3-month SMS reminder to return to the clinic). Participants in the home group will be given the choice of attending the clinic if they prefer. The mailed home-collection kit includes a self-collected vaginal swab (women), UriSWAB (Copan) for urine collection (heterosexual men), and UriSWAB plus rectal swab (MSM). The primary outcome is the retest rate at 1-4 months after a chlamydia diagnosis, and the secondary outcomes are: the repeat positive test rate; the reinfection rate; the acceptability of home testing with SMS reminders; and the cost effectiveness of home testing. Sexual behaviour data collected via an online survey at 4-5 months, and genotyping of repeat infections, will be used to discriminate reinfections from treatment failures. The trial will be conducted over two years. An intention to treat analysis will be conducted. Discussion This study will provide evidence about the effectiveness of home-collection combined with SMS reminders on chlamydia retesting, repeat infection and reinfection rates in three risk groups. The trial will determine client acceptability and cost effectiveness of

  19. Repeated social defeat increases reactive emotional coping behavior and alters functional responses in serotonergic neurons in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Evan D.; Hale, Matthew W.; Lukkes, Jodi L.; Valentine, McKenzie J.; Sarchet, Derek M.; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic stress is a vulnerability factor for a number of psychiatric disorders, including anxiety and affective disorders. Social defeat in rats has proven to be a useful paradigm to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying physiologic and behavioral adaptation to acute and chronic stress. Previous studies suggest that serotonergic systems may contribute to the physiologic and behavioral adaptation to chronic stress, including social defeat in rodent models. In order to test the hypothesis that repeated social defeat alters the emotional behavior and the excitability of brainstem serotonergic systems implicated in control of emotional behavior, we exposed adult male rats either to home cage control conditions, acute social defeat, or social defeat followed 24 h later by a second social defeat encounter. We then assessed behavioral responses during social defeat as well as the excitability of serotonergic neurons within the dorsal raphe nucleus using immunohistochemical staining of tryptophan hydroxylase, a marker of serotonergic neurons, and the protein product of the immediate-early gene, c-fos. Repeated social defeat resulted in a shift away from proactive emotional coping behaviors, such as rearing (explorative escape behavior), and toward reactive emotional coping behaviors such as freezing. Both acute and repeated defeat led to widespread increases in c-Fos expression in serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus. Changes in behavior following a second exposure to social defeat, relative to acute defeat, were associated with decreased c-Fos expression in serotonergic neurons within the dorsal and ventral parts of the mid-rostrocaudal dorsal raphe nucleus, regions that have been implicated in 1) serotonergic modulation of fear- and anxiety-related behavior and 2) defensive behavior in conspecific aggressive encounters, respectively. These data support the hypothesis that serotonergic systems play a role in physiologic and behavioral responses to both

  20. Repeated social defeat increases reactive emotional coping behavior and alters functional responses in serotonergic neurons in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Paul, Evan D; Hale, Matthew W; Lukkes, Jodi L; Valentine, McKenzie J; Sarchet, Derek M; Lowry, Christopher A

    2011-08-03

    Chronic stress is a vulnerability factor for a number of psychiatric disorders, including anxiety and affective disorders. Social defeat in rats has proven to be a useful paradigm to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying physiologic and behavioral adaptation to acute and chronic stress. Previous studies suggest that serotonergic systems may contribute to the physiologic and behavioral adaptation to chronic stress, including social defeat in rodent models. In order to test the hypothesis that repeated social defeat alters the emotional behavior and the excitability of brainstem serotonergic systems implicated in control of emotional behavior, we exposed adult male rats either to home cage control conditions, acute social defeat, or social defeat followed 24h later by a second social defeat encounter. We then assessed behavioral responses during social defeat as well as the excitability of serotonergic neurons within the dorsal raphe nucleus using immunohistochemical staining of tryptophan hydroxylase, a marker of serotonergic neurons, and the protein product of the immediate-early gene, c-fos. Repeated social defeat resulted in a shift away from proactive emotional coping behaviors, such as rearing (explorative escape behavior), and toward reactive emotional coping behaviors such as freezing. Both acute and repeated defeat led to widespread increases in c-Fos expression in serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus. Changes in behavior following a second exposure to social defeat, relative to acute defeat, were associated with decreased c-Fos expression in serotonergic neurons within the dorsal and ventral parts of the mid-rostrocaudal dorsal raphe nucleus, regions that have been implicated in 1) serotonergic modulation of fear- and anxiety-related behavior and 2) defensive behavior in conspecific aggressive encounters, respectively. These data support the hypothesis that serotonergic systems play a role in physiologic and behavioral responses to both

  1. Development of two highly sensitive forensic sex determination assays based on human DYZ1 and Alu repetitive DNA elements.

    PubMed

    Fazi, Amanda; Gobeski, Brianne; Foran, David

    2014-11-01

    Sex determination is a critical component of forensic identification, the standard genetic method for which is detection of the single copy amelogenin gene that has differing homologues on the X and Y chromosomes. However, this assay may not be sensitive enough when DNA samples are minute or highly compromised, thus other strategies for sex determination are needed. In the current research, two ultrasensitive sexing assays, based on real-time PCR and pyrosequencing, were developed targeting the highly repetitive elements DYZ1 on the Y chromosome and Alu on the autosomes. The DYZ1/Alu strategy was compared to amelogenin for overall sensitivity based on high molecular weight and degraded DNA, followed by assaying the sex of 34 touch DNA samples and DNA from 30 hair shafts. The real-time DYZ1/Alu assay proved to be approximately 1500 times more sensitive than its amelogenin counterpart based on high molecular weight DNA, and even more sensitive when sexing degraded DNA. The pyrosequencing DYZ1/Alu assay correctly sexed 26 of the touch DNAs, compared to six using amelogenin. Hair shaft DNAs showed equally improved sexing results using the DYZ1/Alu assays. Overall, both DYZ1/Alu assays were far more sensitive and accurate than was the amelogenin assay, and thus show great utility for sexing poor quality and low quantity DNA evidence.

  2. Lithium chloride administration prevents spatial learning and memory impairment in repeated cerebral ischemia-reperfusion mice by depressing apoptosis and increasing BDNF expression in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mingyue; Jin, Wei; Zhao, Haifeng; Xiao, Yining; Jia, Yanqiu; Yin, Yu; Jiang, Xin; Xu, Jing; Meng, Nan; Lv, Peiyuan

    2015-09-15

    Lithium has been reported to have neuroprotective effects, but the preventive and treated role on cognition impairment and the underlying mechanisms have not been determined. In the present study, C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to repeated bilateral common carotid artery occlusion to induce the learning and memory deficits. 2 mmol/kg or 5 mmol/kg of lithium chloride (LiCl) was injected intraperitoneally per day before (for 7 days) or post (for 28 days) the operation. This repeated cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (IR) induced dynamic overexpression of ratio of Bcl-2/Bax and BDNF in hippocampus of mice. LiCl pretreatment and treatment significantly decreased the escape latency and increased the percentage of time that the mice spent in the target quadrant in Morris water maze. 2 mmol/kg LiCl evidently reversed the morphologic changes, up-regulated the survival neuron count and increased the BDNF gene and protein expression. 5 mmol/kg pre-LiCl significantly increased IR-stimulated reduce of Bcl-2/Bax and p-CREB/CREB. These results described suggest that pre-Li and Li treatment may induce a pronounced prevention on cognitive impairment. These effects may relay on the inhibition of apoptosis and increasing BDNF and p-CREB expression.

  3. Close genetic relationships in vast territories: autosomal and X chromosome Alu diversity in Yakuts from Siberia.

    PubMed

    Rocañín-Arjó, Ares; Rodríguez-Botigué, Laura; Esteban, Esther; Theves, Catherine; Evdokimova, Larissa E; Fedorova, Sardana A; Gibert, Morgane; Crubezy, Eric; Moral, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Twelve autosomal and 8 X chromosome Alu markers were genotyped for the first time in 161 Central and West Yakuts to test their ability to reconstruct the genetic history of these populations, the northernmost Turkic-speaker ethnic group living in Siberia. Autosomal data revealed that both groups showed extremely close genetic distances to other populations of Siberian origins that occupied areas from Lake Baikal, the ancestral place of origin of Yakuts, to North Siberia, their current territories. Autosomal and X chromosome data revealed some discrepancies on the genetic differentiation and the effective sizes of Central and West Yakuts. Such discrepancies could be related to the patrilineal and occasionally polygamous structure of these populations. Autosomal and X Alu markers are informative markers to reconstruct population past demography and history, but their utility is limited by the available data. This study represents a contribution for further investigations on these populations.

  4. Alu-mediated large deletion of the CDSN gene as a cause of peeling skin disease.

    PubMed

    Wada, T; Matsuda, Y; Muraoka, M; Toma, T; Takehara, K; Fujimoto, M; Yachie, A

    2014-10-01

    Peeling skin disease (PSD) is an autosomal recessive skin disorder caused by mutations in CDSN and is characterized by superficial peeling of the upper epidermis. Corneodesmosin (CDSN) is a major component of corneodesmosomes that plays an important role in maintaining epidermis integrity. Herein, we report a patient with PSD caused by a novel homozygous large deletion in the 6p21.3 region encompassing the CDSN gene, which abrogates CDSN expression. Several genes including C6orf15, PSORS1C1, PSORS1C2, CCHCR1, and TCF19 were also deleted, however, the patient showed only clinical features typical of PSD. The deletion size was 59.1 kb. Analysis of the sequence surrounding the breakpoint showed that both telomeric and centromeric breakpoints existed within Alu-S sequences that were oriented in opposite directions. These results suggest an Alu-mediated recombination event as the mechanism underlying the deletion in our patient.

  5. Polymorphic Alu Insertion/Deletion in Different Caste and Tribal Populations from South India

    PubMed Central

    Chinniah, Rathika; Vijayan, Murali; Thirunavukkarasu, Manikandan; Mani, Dhivakar; Raju, Kamaraj; Ravi, Padma Malini; Sivanadham, Ramgopal; C, Kandeepan; N, Mahalakshmi; Karuppiah, Balakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Seven human-specific Alu markers were studied in 574 unrelated individuals from 10 endogamous groups and 2 hill tribes of Tamil Nadu and Kerala states. DNA was isolated, amplified by PCR-SSP, and subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis, and genotypes were assigned for various Alu loci. Average heterozygosity among caste populations was in the range of 0.292–0.468. Among tribes, the average heterozygosity was higher for Paliyan (0.3759) than for Kani (0.2915). Frequency differences were prominent in all loci studied except Alu CD4. For Alu CD4, the frequency was 0.0363 in Yadavas, a traditional pastoral and herd maintaining population, and 0.2439 in Narikuravars, a nomadic gypsy population. The overall genetic difference (Gst) of 12 populations (castes and tribes) studied was 3.6%, which corresponds to the Gst values of 3.6% recorded earlier for Western Asian populations. Thus, our study confirms the genetic similarities between West Asian populations and South Indian castes and tribes and supported the large scale coastal migrations from Africa into India through West Asia. However, the average genetic difference (Gst) of Kani and Paliyan tribes with other South Indian tribes studied earlier was 8.3%. The average Gst of combined South and North Indian Tribes (CSNIT) was 9.5%. Neighbor joining tree constructed showed close proximity of Kani and Paliyan tribal groups to the other two South Indian tribes, Toda and Irula of Nilgiri hills studied earlier. Further, the analysis revealed the affinities among populations and confirmed the presence of North and South India specific lineages. Our findings have documented the highly diverse (micro differentiated) nature of South Indian tribes, predominantly due to isolation, than the endogamous population groups of South India. Thus, our study firmly established the genetic relationship of South Indian castes and tribes and supported the proposed large scale ancestral migrations from Africa, particularly into South India

  6. TRIzol and Alu qPCR-based quantification of metastatic seeding within the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Preston Campbell, J; Mulcrone, P; Masood, S K; Karolak, M; Merkel, A; Hebron, K; Zijlstra, A; Sterling, J; Elefteriou, F

    2015-08-14

    Current methods for detecting disseminated tumor cells in the skeleton are limited by expense and technical complexity. We describe a simple and inexpensive method to quantify, with single cell sensitivity, human metastatic cancer in the mouse skeleton, concurrently with host gene expression, using TRIzol-based DNA/RNA extraction and Alu sequence qPCR amplification. This approach enables precise quantification of tumor cells and corresponding host gene expression during metastatic colonization in xenograft models.

  7. Repeated exposure to corticosterone increases depression-like behavior in two different versions of the forced swim test without altering nonspecific locomotor activity or muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Marks, Wendie; Fournier, Neil M; Kalynchuk, Lisa E

    2009-08-04

    We have recently shown that repeated high dose injections of corticosterone (CORT) reliably increase depression-like behavior on a modified one-day version of the forced swim test. The main purpose of this experiment was to compare the effect of these CORT injections on our one-day version of the forced swim test and the more traditional two-day version of the test. A second purpose was to determine whether altered behavior in the forced swim test could be due to nonspecific changes in locomotor activity or muscle strength. Separate groups of rats received a high dose CORT injection (40 mg/kg) or a vehicle injection once per day for 21 consecutive days. Then, half the rats from each group were exposed to the traditional two-day forced swim test and the other half were exposed to our one-day forced swim test. After the forced swim testing, all the rats were tested in an open field and in a wire suspension grip strength test. The CORT injections significantly increased the time spent immobile and decreased the time spent swimming in both versions of the forced swim test. However, they had no significant effect on activity in the open field or grip strength in the wire suspension test. These results show that repeated CORT injections increase depression-like behavior regardless of the specific parameters of forced swim testing, and that these effects are independent of changes in locomotor activity or muscle strength.

  8. Agar-agar entrapment increases the stability of endo-β-1,4-xylanase for repeated biodegradation of xylan.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Zainab; Shahid, Faiza; Ul Qader, Shah Ali; Aman, Afsheen

    2015-04-01

    Microbial xylanases, specially endo-β-1,4-xylanase catalyzes the hydrolysis of xylan, is considered one of the most significant hydrolases. It has numerous applications but most extensively is utilized in paper and pulp industry as a bio-bleaching agent. Immobilization technique is comprehensively studied with the expectation of modifying and improving enzyme stability and characteristics for commercial purposes. Currently, matrix entrapment technique is applied to immobilize endo-β-1,4-xylanase within agar-agar gel beads produced by Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29. Maximal enzyme immobilization yield was achieved at 2.5% of agar-agar concentration. Optimized conditions demonstrated an increase in the optimal reaction time from 05 min to 30 min and incubation temperature from 50 °C to 60 °C with reference to free enzyme whereas; no effect was observed for optimum pH. Entrapment technique uniquely changed the kinetic parameters of immobilized endo-β-1,4-xylanase (Km: 0.5074 mg min(-1) to 0.5230 mg min(-1) and Vmax: 4773 U min(-1) to 968 U min(-1)) as compared to free enzyme. However, immobilized enzyme displayed broad thermal stability and retained 79.0% of its initial activity at 80 °C up to 30 min whereas; free enzyme completely lost its activity at this temperature. With respect to economic feasibility, the immobilized enzyme showed impressive recycling efficiency up to six reaction cycles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Design and implementation of low power clock gated 64-bit ALU on ultra scale FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ashutosh; Murgai, Shruti; Gulati, Anmol; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-03-01

    64-bit energy efficient Arithmetic and Logic Unit using negative latch based clock gating technique is designed in this paper. The 64-bit ALU is designed using multiplexer based full adder cell. We have designed a 64-bit ALU with a gated clock. We have used negative latch based circuit for generating gated clock. This gated clock is used to control the multiplexer based 64-bit ALU. The circuit has been synthesized on kintex FPGA through Xilinx ISE Design Suite 14.7 using 28 nm technology in Verilog HDL. The circuit has been simulated on Modelsim 10.3c. The design is verified using System Verilog on QuestaSim in UVM environment. We have achieved 74.07%, 92. 93% and 95.53% reduction in total clock power, 89.73%, 91.35% and 92.85% reduction in I/Os power, 67.14%, 62.84% and 74.34% reduction in dynamic power and 25.47%, 29.05% and 46.13% reduction in total supply power at 20 MHz, 200 MHz and 2 GHz frequency respectively. The power has been calculated using XPower Analyzer tool of Xilinx ISE Design Suite 14.3.

  10. SINE Retrotransposition: Evaluation of Alu Activity and Recovery of De Novo Inserts.

    PubMed

    Ade, Catherine; Roy-Engel, Astrid M

    2016-01-01

    Mobile element activity is of great interest due to its impact on genomes. However, the types of mobile elements that inhabit any given genome are remarkably varied. Among the different varieties of mobile elements, the Short Interspersed Elements (SINEs) populate many genomes, including many mammalian species. Although SINEs are parasites of Long Interspersed Elements (LINEs), SINEs have been highly successful in both the primate and rodent genomes. When comparing copy numbers in mammals, SINEs have been vastly more successful than other nonautonomous elements, such as the retropseudogenes and SVA. Interestingly, in the human genome the copy number of Alu (a primate SINE) outnumbers LINE-1 (L1) copies 2 to 1. Estimates suggest that the retrotransposition rate for Alu is tenfold higher than LINE-1 with about 1 insert in every twenty births. Furthermore, Alu-induced mutagenesis is responsible for the majority of the documented instances of human retroelement insertion-induced disease. However, little is known on what contributes to these observed differences between SINEs and LINEs. The development of an assay to monitor SINE retrotransposition in culture has become an important tool for the elucidation of some of these differences. In this chapter, we present details of the SINE retrotransposition assay and the recovery of de novo inserts. We also focus on the nuances that are unique to the SINE assay.

  11. Heritability and heteromorphic distributions of AluI chromosome banding variants in twins

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, B.; Meyer, J.M.; Jackson-Cook, C.K.

    1995-07-03

    The heritability and heteromorphic appearance of chromosomal banding patterns induced through in situ digestion with the restriction enzyme AluI were studied by analyzing the chromosomes of 25 monozygotic and 25 dizygotic twin pairs selected at random from a juvenile twin registry. A total of 19 AluI banding variants were found to be heteromorphic, with the pericentromeric region of chromosome 3 and the satellites of chromosome 22 being most and least heteromorphic, respectively. As expected, the correlations of the semi-quantitative scores for each of the chromosomal variants were significantly higher between MZ twin pairs (ranging from 0.48 to 0.95) than DZ twin pairs (ranging from -0.02 to 0.69), suggesting that genetic factors play an important role in their appearance. This finding was confirmed in a model fitting analysis in which the heritabilities of the AluI-induced chromosome variants were found to range from 70 to 96% for 12/13 heteromorphisms studied. These consistent findings are significant in that these variants may be useful for family studies in clinical genetics. 23 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Repeated Sodium Salicylate Administration to Laying Hens: Evidence for Time Dependent Increase in Drug Elimination from Plasma and Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Poźniak, Błażej; Grabowski, Tomasz; Motykiewicz-Pers, Karolina; Bobrek, Kamila; Rak, Lech; Bobusia, Katarzyna; Gaweł, Andrzej; Świtała, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Salicylates were the first non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to be used in any species and are still widely used in humans and livestock. However, the data on their pharmacokinetics in animals is limited, especially after repeated administration. Evidence exist that in chickens (Gallus gallus) salicylate (SA) may induce its own elimination. The aim of this study was to investigate salicylate pharmacokinetics and egg residues during repeated administration of sodium salicylate (SS) to laying hens. Pharmacokinetics of SA was assessed during 14 d oral administration of SS at daily doses of 50 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg body weight to laying hens. On the 1st, 7th and 14th d a 24 h-long pharmacokinetic study was carried out, whereas eggs were collected daily. Salicylate concentrations in plasma and eggs were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and pharmacokinetic variables were calculated using a non-compartmental model. Mean residence time (MRT), minimal plasma concentration (Cmin, C16h) and elimination half-life (T1/2el) of SA showed gradual decrease in layers administered with a lower dose. Total body clearance (ClB) increased. Layers administered with the higher dose showed a decrease only in the T1/2el. In the low dose group, SA was found only in the egg white and was low throughout the experiment. Egg whites from the higher dose group showed initially high SA levels which significantly decreased during the experiment. Yolk SA levels were lower and showed longer periods of accumulation and elimination. Repeated administration of SS induces SA elimination, although this effect may differ depending on the dose and production type of a chicken. Decreased plasma drug concentration may have clinical implications during prolonged SS treatment. PMID:25893240

  13. Sensitization of depressive-like behavior during repeated maternal separation is associated with more-rapid increase in core body temperature and reduced plasma cortisol levels.

    PubMed

    Yusko, Brittany; Hawk, Kiel; Schiml, Patricia A; Deak, Terrence; Hennessy, Michael B

    2012-02-01

    Infant guinea pigs exhibit a 2-stage response to maternal separation: an initial active stage, characterized by vocalizing, and a second passive stage marked by depressive-like behavior (hunched posture, prolonged eye-closure, extensive piloerection) that appears to be mediated by proinflammatory activity. Recently we found that pups showed an enhanced (i.e., sensitized) depressive-like behavioral response during repeated separation. Further, core body temperature was higher during the beginning of a second separation compared to the first, suggesting a more-rapid stress-induced febrile response to separation the second day, though the possibility that temperature was already elevated prior to the second separation could not be ruled out. Therefore, the present study examined temperature prior to, and during, 2 daily separations. We also examined the temperature response to a third separation conducted 3 days after the second, and assessed the effect of repeated separation on plasma cortisol levels. Core temperature did not differ just prior to the separations, but showed a more-rapid increase and then decline during both a second and third separation than during a first. Temperature responses were not associated with changes in motor activity. Depressive-like behavior was greater during the second and third separations. Pups separated a first time showed a larger plasma cortisol response at the conclusion of separation than did animals of the same age separated a third time. In all, the results indicate that the sensitization of depressive-like behavior during repeated separations over several days is accompanied by a more-rapid febrile response that may be related to a reduction of glucocorticoid suppression.

  14. Branched DNA-based Alu quantitative assay for cell-free plasma DNA levels in patients with sepsis or systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yan-Qiang; Liang, Dong-Yu; Lou, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Zhen-huan; Zhang, Lu-rong

    2016-02-01

    Cell-free circulating DNA (cf-DNA) can be detected by various of laboratory techniques. We described a branched DNA-based Alu assay for measuring cf-DNA in septic patients. Compared to healthy controls and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) patients, serum cf-DNA levels were significantly higher in septic patients (1426.54 ± 863.79 vs 692.02 ± 703.06 and 69.66 ± 24.66 ng/mL). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of cf-DNA for normal vs sepsis and SIRS vs sepsis were 0.955 (0.884-1.025), and 0.856 (0.749-0.929), respectively. There was a positive correlation between cf-DNA and interleukin 6 or procalcitonin or Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II. The cf-DNA concentration was higher in intensive care unit nonsurviving patients compared to surviving patients (2183.33 ± 615.26 vs 972.46 ± 648.36 ng/mL; P < .05). Branched DNA-based Alu assays are feasible and useful to quantify serum cf-DNA levels. Increased cf-DNA levels in septic patients might complement C-reactive protein and procalcitonin in a multiple marker format. Cell-free circulating DNA might be a new marker in discrimination of sepsis and SIRS. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Human intron-encoded AluACA RNAs and telomerase RNA share a common element promoting RNA accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Ketele, Amandine; Kiss, Tamás; Jády, Beáta E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian cells express hundreds of intron-encoded box H/ACA RNAs which fold into a common hairpin-hinge-hairpin-tail structure, interact with 4 evolutionarily conserved proteins, dyskerin, Nop10, Nhp2 and Gar1, and function mainly in RNA pseudouridylation. The human telomerase H/ACA RNA (hTR) directs telomeric DNA synthesis and it carries a 5′-terminal domain encompassing the telomeric template sequence. The primary hTR transcript is synthesized from an independent gene by RNA polymerase II and undergoes 3′ end processing controlled by the 3′-terminal H/ACA domain. The apical stem-loop of the 3′ hairpin of hTR carries a unique biogenesis-promoting element, the BIO motif that promotes hTR processing and RNP assembly. AluACA RNAs represent a distinct class of human H/ACA RNAs; they are processed from intronic Alu repetitive sequences. As compared to canonical H/ACA RNAs, the AluACA RNAs carry unusually short or long 5′ hairpins and generally, they accumulate at low levels. Here, we demonstrate that the suboptimal 5′ hairpins are responsible for the weak expression of AluACA RNAs. We also show that AluACA RNAs frequently carry a processing/stabilization element that is structurally and functionally indistinguishable from the hTR BIO motif. Both hTR and AluACA biogenesis-promoting elements are located in the terminal stem-loop of the 3′-terminal H/ACA hairpin, they show perfect structural conservation and are functionally interchangeable in in vivo RNA processing reactions. Our results demonstrate that the BIO motif, instead of being confined to hTR, is a more general H/ACA RNP biogenesis-facilitating element that can also promote processing/assembly of intron-encoded AluACA RNPs. PMID:27726486

  16. Alu-miRNA interactions modulate transcript isoform diversity in stress response and reveal signatures of positive selection

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Rajesh; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Bhardwaj, Vivek; Jha, Vineet; Mandal, Amit K.; Mukerji, Mitali

    2016-01-01

    Primate-specific Alus harbor different regulatory features, including miRNA targets. In this study, we provide evidence for miRNA-mediated modulation of transcript isoform levels during heat-shock response through exaptation of Alu-miRNA sites in mature mRNA. We performed genome-wide expression profiling coupled with functional validation of miRNA target sites within exonized Alus, and analyzed conservation of these targets across primates. We observed that two miRNAs (miR-15a-3p and miR-302d-3p) elevated in stress response, target RAD1, GTSE1, NR2C1, FKBP9 and UBE2I exclusively within Alu. These genes map onto the p53 regulatory network. Ectopic overexpression of miR-15a-3p downregulates GTSE1 and RAD1 at the protein level and enhances cell survival. This Alu-mediated fine-tuning seems to be unique to humans as evident from the absence of orthologous sites in other primate lineages. We further analyzed signatures of selection on Alu-miRNA targets in the genome, using 1000 Genomes Phase-I data. We found that 198 out of 3177 Alu-exonized genes exhibit signatures of selection within Alu-miRNA sites, with 60 of them containing SNPs supported by multiple evidences (global-FST > 0.3, pair-wise-FST > 0.5, Fay-Wu’s H < −20, iHS > 2.0, high ΔDAF) and implicated in p53 network. We propose that by affecting multiple genes, Alu-miRNA interactions have the potential to facilitate population-level adaptations in response to environmental challenges. PMID:27586304

  17. Alu-miRNA interactions modulate transcript isoform diversity in stress response and reveal signatures of positive selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Rajesh; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Bhardwaj, Vivek; Jha, Vineet; Mandal, Amit K.; Mukerji, Mitali

    2016-09-01

    Primate-specific Alus harbor different regulatory features, including miRNA targets. In this study, we provide evidence for miRNA-mediated modulation of transcript isoform levels during heat-shock response through exaptation of Alu-miRNA sites in mature mRNA. We performed genome-wide expression profiling coupled with functional validation of miRNA target sites within exonized Alus, and analyzed conservation of these targets across primates. We observed that two miRNAs (miR-15a-3p and miR-302d-3p) elevated in stress response, target RAD1, GTSE1, NR2C1, FKBP9 and UBE2I exclusively within Alu. These genes map onto the p53 regulatory network. Ectopic overexpression of miR-15a-3p downregulates GTSE1 and RAD1 at the protein level and enhances cell survival. This Alu-mediated fine-tuning seems to be unique to humans as evident from the absence of orthologous sites in other primate lineages. We further analyzed signatures of selection on Alu-miRNA targets in the genome, using 1000 Genomes Phase-I data. We found that 198 out of 3177 Alu-exonized genes exhibit signatures of selection within Alu-miRNA sites, with 60 of them containing SNPs supported by multiple evidences (global-FST > 0.3, pair-wise-FST > 0.5, Fay-Wu’s H < -20, iHS > 2.0, high ΔDAF) and implicated in p53 network. We propose that by affecting multiple genes, Alu-miRNA interactions have the potential to facilitate population-level adaptations in response to environmental challenges.

  18. Repeated nightmares

    MedlinePlus

    ... different from night terrors . Alternative Names Nightmares - repeated; Dream anxiety disorder References American Academy of Family Physicians. Information from your family doctor. Nightmares and night terrors in children. ...

  19. Chronic myelogenous leukemia stem and progenitor cells demonstrate chromosomal instability related to repeated breakage-fusion-bridge cycles mediated by increased nonhomologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sujata; Stark, Jeremy M; Sun, Can-Lan; Modi, Hardik; Chen, WenYong; O'Connor, Timothy R; Forman, Stephen J; Bhatia, Smita; Bhatia, Ravi

    2012-06-28

    Chromosomal aberrations are an important consequence of genotoxic exposure and contribute to pathogenesis and progression of several malignancies. We investigated the susceptibility to chromosomal aberrations in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) progenitors after exposure to ionizing radiation. In normal progenitors, ionizing radiation induced both stable and unstable chromosomal lesions, but only stable aberrations persisted after multiple divisions. In contrast, radiation of chronic phase CML progenitors resulted in enhanced generation of unstable lesions that persisted after multiple divisions. CML progenitors demonstrated active cell cycle checkpoints and increased nonhomologous end joining DNA repair, suggesting that persistence of unstable aberrations was the result of continued generation of these lesions. CML progenitors demonstrated enhanced susceptibility to repeated cycles of chromosome damage, repair, and damage through a breakage-fusion-bridge mechanism. Perpetuation of breakage-fusion-bridge cycles in CML progenitors was mediated by classic nonhomologous end joining repair. These studies reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism of chromosomal instability in leukemia progenitors because of continued generation of unstable chromosomal lesions through repeated cycles of breakage and repair of such lesions.

  20. Expansion of GA Dinucleotide Repeats Increases the Density of CLAMP Binding Sites on the X-Chromosome to Promote Drosophila Dosage Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Jessica; Siggers, Trevor; Boor, Sonia; Bliss, Jacob; Liu, Wei; Jogl, Gerwald; Rohs, Remo; Singh, Nadia D.; Bulyk, Martha L.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Larschan, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Dosage compensation is an essential process that equalizes transcript levels of X-linked genes between sexes by forming a domain of coordinated gene expression. Throughout the evolution of Diptera, many different X-chromosomes acquired the ability to be dosage compensated. Once each newly evolved X-chromosome is targeted for dosage compensation in XY males, its active genes are upregulated two-fold to equalize gene expression with XX females. In Drosophila melanogaster, the CLAMP zinc finger protein links the dosage compensation complex to the X-chromosome. However, the mechanism for X-chromosome identification has remained unknown. Here, we combine biochemical, genomic and evolutionary approaches to reveal that expansion of GA-dinucleotide repeats likely accumulated on the X-chromosome over evolutionary time to increase the density of CLAMP binding sites, thereby driving the evolution of dosage compensation. Overall, we present new insight into how subtle changes in genomic architecture, such as expansions of a simple sequence repeat, promote the evolution of coordinated gene expression. PMID:27414415

  1. Repeated oral administration of a cathepsin K inhibitor significantly suppresses bone resorption in exercising horses with evidence of increased bone formation and maintained bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Hussein, H; Dulin, J; Smanik, L; Drost, W T; Russell, D; Wellman, M; Bertone, A

    2017-08-01

    Our investigations evaluated the effect of VEL-0230, a highly specific irreversible inhibitor of cathepsin K (CatK). The objectives of our study were to determine whether repeated dosing of a CatK inhibitor (CatKI) produced a desired inhibition of the bone resorption biomarker (CTX-1), and document the effect of repeated dosing on bone homeostasis, structure, and dynamics of bone resorption and formation in horses. Twelve young exercising horses were randomized in a prospective, controlled clinical trial and received 4 weekly doses of a CatKI or vehicle. Baseline and poststudy nuclear scintigraphy, blood sampling and analysis of plasma bone biomarkers (CTX-1 and osteocalcin), poststudy bone fluorescent labeling, and bone biopsy were performed. Bone specimens were further processed for microcomputed tomography and bone histomorphometry. Each dose of this CatKI transiently inhibited plasma CTX-1 (reflecting inhibition of bone collagen resorption) and increased bone plasma osteocalcin concentrations, with no detectable adverse effect on normal bone turnover in the face of exercise. Bone morphology, density, and formation rate were not different between control and treated group. Further investigation of CatK inhibition in abnormal bone turnover is required in animals with bone diseases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Social stories: mechanisms of effectiveness in increasing game play skills in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder using a pretest posttest repeated measures randomized control group design.

    PubMed

    Quirmbach, Linda M; Lincoln, Alan J; Feinberg-Gizzo, Monica J; Ingersoll, Brooke R; Andrews, Siri M

    2009-02-01

    An increasing body of literature has indicated that social stories are an effective way to teach individuals diagnosed with autism appropriate social behavior. This study compared two formats of a social story targeting the improvement of social skills during game play using a pretest posttest repeated measures randomized control group design. A total of 45 children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) ages 7-14 were randomly assigned to standard, directive, or control story conditions. Results demonstrated that the standard and directive story formats were equally as effective in eliciting, generalizing and maintaining the targeted social skills in participants who had prior game play experience and Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI) scores from the WISC-IV intelligence test in the borderline range or above.

  3. Replacement of histone H1 by H5 in vivo does not change the nucleosome repeat length of chromatin but increases its stability.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J M; Ali, Z; Lurz, R; Ruiz-Carrillo, A

    1990-01-01

    In vivo competition between histones H1 and H5 for chromatin has been studied in rat sarcoma XC10 cells transfected with a glucocorticoid responsive MMTV-H5 gene. Activation of H5 expression results in accumulation of H5 in the nuclei where it partially replaces H1. H5 displaces H1 from its primary binding sites presumably during chromatin replication and also binds with high affinity to secondary chromatin sites normally not occupied by H1. Replacement of H1 by H5 to levels similar to those of mature chicken erythrocytes does not alter the nucleosome repeat length of chromatin. This indicates that H5 is not solely responsible for the increase in nucleosome spacing of maturing erythroid cells. Exchange of H1 by H5 in vivo or in vitro results in a higher compaction/stability of chromatin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2328730

  4. Impact of repeated increases in shear stress via reactive hyperemia and handgrip exercise: no evidence of systematic changes in brachial artery FMD.

    PubMed

    Pyke, K E; Jazuli, F

    2011-03-01

    Reactive hyperemia (RH) creates an uncontrolled, transient increase in brachial artery (BA) shear stress (SS) for flow-mediated dilation (FMD) assessment. In contrast, handgrip exercise (HGEX) can create similar, sustained SS increases over repeated trials. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of repeated SS elevation via RH or HGEX and the relationship between RH and HGEX %FMD. BA diameter and blood velocity were assessed with echo and Doppler ultrasound in 20 healthy subjects. Visit A consisted of four 6-min HGEX trials (HGEX trials 1-4) at the intensity required to achieve a shear rate (SR = mean blood velocity/BA diameter; an estimate of SS) of 65 s(-1). Visit B consisted of four RH trials (RH trials 1-4). The RH SR area under the curve (AUC) was higher in trial 1 versus trial 3 and trial 4 (P = 0.019 and 0.047). The HGEX mean SR was similar across trials (mean SR = 66.1 ± 5.8 s(-1), P = 0.152). There were no differences in %FMD across trials or tests (RH trial 1: 6.9 ± 3.5%, trial 2: 6.9 ± 2.3%, trial 3: 7.1 ± 3.5%, and trial 4: 7.0 ± 2.8%; HGEX trial 1: 7.3 ± 3.6%, trial 2: 7.0 ± 3.6%, trial 3: 6.5 ± 3.5%, and trial 4: 6.8 ± 2.9%, P = 0.913). No relationship between subject's RH %FMD and HGEX %FMD was detected (r(2) = 0.12, P = 0.137). However, with response normalization, a relationship emerged (RH %FMD/SR AUC vs. HGEX %FMD/mean SR, r(2) = 0.44, P = 0.002). In conclusion, with repeat trials, there were no systematic changes in RH or HGEX %FMD. The relationship between normalized RH and HGEX %FMD suggests that endothelial responses to different SS profiles provide related information regarding endothelial function.

  5. Repeated stressor exposure enhances contextual fear memory in a beta-adrenergic receptor-dependent process and increases impulsivity in a non-beta receptor-dependent fashion

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Robert M.; Johnson, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Memory formation is promoted by stress via the release of norepinephrine and stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs). Previous data demonstrate that repeated stressor exposure increases norepinephrine turnover and β-AR signaling within the amygdala, which led to the hypothesis that some stress-induced behavioral changes are likely due to facilitated associative learning. To test this, Fischer rats were exposed to chronic mild stress for four days. On day 5, subjects (including non-stressed controls) were injected with the beta-blocker propranolol or vehicle prior to conditioning in an operant box (animals receive two mild foot shocks) or passive avoidance apparatus (animals received a foot shock upon entry into the dark chamber). Twenty-four hours later, subjects were returned to the operant box for measurement of freezing or returned to the passive avoidance apparatus for measurement of latency to enter the dark chamber. Subjects were also tested in an open field to assess context-independent anxiety-like behavior. Animals exposed to chronic stress showed significantly more freezing behavior in the operant box than did controls, and this exaggerated freezing was blocked by propranolol during the conditioning trial. There was no effect of stress on behavior in the open field. Unexpectedly, retention latency was significantly reduced in subjects exposed to chronic stress. These results indicate that chronic exposure to stress results in complex behavioral changes. While repeated stress appears to enhance the formation of fearful memories, it also results in behavioral responses that resemble impulsive behaviors that result in poor decision-making. PMID:25747320

  6. Repeated stressor exposure enhances contextual fear memory in a beta-adrenergic receptor-dependent process and increases impulsivity in a non-beta receptor-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Camp, Robert M; Johnson, John D

    2015-10-15

    Memory formation is promoted by stress via the release of norepinephrine and stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs). Previous data demonstrate that repeated stressor exposure increases norepinephrine turnover and β-AR signaling within the amygdala, which led to the hypothesis that some stress-induced behavioral changes are likely due to facilitated associative learning. To test this, Fischer rats were exposed to chronic mild stress for four days. On day 5, subjects (including non-stressed controls) were injected with the beta-blocker propranolol or vehicle prior to conditioning in an operant box (animals receive two mild foot shocks) or passive avoidance apparatus (animals received a foot shock upon entry into the dark chamber). Twenty-four hours later, subjects were returned to the operant box for measurement of freezing or returned to the passive avoidance apparatus for measurement of latency to enter the dark chamber. Subjects were also tested in an open field to assess context-independent anxiety-like behavior. Animals exposed to chronic stress showed significantly more freezing behavior in the operant box than did controls, and this exaggerated freezing was blocked by propranolol during the conditioning trial. There was no effect of stress on behavior in the open field. Unexpectedly, retention latency was significantly reduced in subjects exposed to chronic stress. These results indicate that chronic exposure to stress results in complex behavioral changes. While repeated stress appears to enhance the formation of fearful memories, it also results in behavioral responses that resemble impulsive behaviors that result in poor decision-making. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Repeated social defeat causes increased anxiety-like behavior and alters splenocyte function in C57BL/6 and CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Steven G; Bailey, Michael T; Sheridan, John F; Padgett, David A; Avitsur, Ronit

    2007-05-01

    The experimental model, social disruption (SDR), is a model of social stress in which mice are repeatedly attacked and defeated in their home cage by an aggressive conspecific. In terms of the impact of this stressor on the immune response, SDR has been reported to cause hyperinflammation and glucocorticoid insensitivity. To this point however, the behavioral consequences of SDR have not been thoroughly characterized. Because social defeat has been reported to cause anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, the current study was designed to assess whether SDR also causes anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. Using the light/dark preference test and the open field test as tools to measure behaviors characteristic of anxiety, the data showed that C57BL/6 and CD-1 male mice subjected to SDR displayed increased anxiety-like behavior. The increase in anxiety-like behaviors persisted for at least 1 week after the cessation of the stressor. In contrast, depressive-like behaviors were not elicited by SDR as assessed by the forced swim test or the tail suspension test. These data indicate that social disruption stress causes an increase in anxiety-like behaviors, but not depressive-like behaviors.

  8. Repeated anabolic-androgenic steroid treatment during adolescence increases vasopressin V(1A) receptor binding in Syrian hamsters: correlation with offensive aggression.

    PubMed

    DeLeon, Katrina R; Grimes, Jill M; Melloni, Richard H

    2002-09-01

    Repeated anabolic-androgenic steroid treatment during adolescence increases hypothalamic vasopressin and facilitates offensive aggression in male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). The current study investigated whether anabolic-androgenic steroid exposure during this developmental period influenced vasopressin V(1A) receptor binding activity in the hypothalamus and several other brain areas implicated in aggressive behavior in hamsters. To test this, adolescent male hamsters were administered anabolic steroids or sesame oil throughout adolescence, tested for offensive aggression, and examined for differences in vasopressin V(1A) receptor binding using in situ autoradiography. When compared with control animals, aggressive, adolescent anabolic steroid-treated hamsters showed significant increases (20-200%) in the intensity of vasopressin V(1A) receptor labeling in several aggression areas, including the ventrolateral hypothalamus, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and lateral septum. However, no significant differences in vasopressin V(1A) receptor labeling were found in other brain regions implicated in aggressive responding, most notably the lateral zone from the medial preoptic area to anterior hypothalamus and the corticomedial amygdala. These data suggest that adolescent anabolic steroid exposure may facilitate offensive aggression by increasing vasopressin V(1A) receptor binding in several key areas of the hamster brain.

  9. Repeated Social Defeat Causes Increased Anxiety-Like Behavior and Alters Splenocyte Function in C57BL/6 and CD-1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, Steven G.; Bailey, Michael T.; Sheridan, John F.; Padgett, David A.; Avitsur, Ronit

    2007-01-01

    The experimental model, social disruption (SDR), is a model of social stress in which mice are repeatedly attacked and defeated in their home cage by an aggressive conspecific. In terms of the impact of this stressor on the immune response, SDR has been reported to cause hyperinflammation and glucocorticoid insensitivity. To this point however, the behavioral consequences of SDR have not been thoroughly characterized. Because social defeat has been reported to cause anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, the current study was designed to assess whether SDR also causes anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. Using the light/dark preference test and the open field test as tools to measure behaviors characteristic of anxiety, the data showed that C57BL/6 and CD-1 male mice subjected to SDR displayed increased anxiety-like behavior. The increase in anxiety-like behaviors persisted for at least one week after the cessation of the stressor. In contrast, depressive-like behaviors were not elicited by SDR as assessed by the forced swim test or the tail suspension test. These data indicate that social disruption stress causes an increase in anxiety-like behaviors, but not depressive-like behaviors. PMID:17178210

  10. Development of an Alu-based, QSY 7-labeled primer PCR method for quantitation of human DNA in forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, Janice A; Buel, Eric

    2003-03-01

    Determining the amount of human DNA extracted from a crime scene sample is an important step in DNA profiling. The forensic community relies almost entirely upon a technique (slot blot) to quantitate human DNA that is imprecise, time consuming, and labor intensive. This paper describes the development of a new technique based on PCR amplification of a repetitive Alu sequence. Specific primers were used to amplify a 124-bp fragment of Alu sequence; amplification was detected by SYBR Green I staining in a fluorescent plate reader. To reduce background in the plate reader assay, QSY-7 labeled primers were utilized. The assay was tested on animal DNAs, human blood spots, mock crime samples, and degraded DNA in comparison with the slot blot technique. The QSY Alu assay has a dynamic range of 10 ng to 10 pg, and is sensitive, specific, fast, quantitative, and comparable in cost to the slot blot assay.

  11. Atomic interaction of the MEAM type for the study of intermetallics in the Al-U alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascuet, M. I.; Fernández, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Interaction for both pure Al and Al-U alloys of the MEAM type are developed. The obtained Al interatomic potential assures its compatibility with the details of the framework presently adopted. The Al-U interaction fits various properties of the Al2U, Al3U and Al4U intermetallics. The potential verifies the stability of the intermetallic structures in a temperature range compatible with that observed in the phase diagram, and also takes into account the greater stability of these structures relative to others that are competitive in energy. The intermetallics are characterized by calculating elastic and thermal properties and point defect parameters. Molecular dynamics simulations show a growth of the Al3U intermetallic in the Al/U interface in agreement with experimental evidence.

  12. Flash x-ray test of the CMOS/SOS SCP-STAR ALU

    SciTech Connect

    Brucker, G.J.; Kertesz, C.; Miller, M.; Oey, K.K.

    1984-12-01

    This paper reports on the measurement of the x-ray upset dose rate for a subsystem which was designed to represent the ALU part of the SCP-STAR spacecraft computer. This computer was fabricated totally with radhard, CMOS/SOS devices. The test was conducted at the OWL flash x-ray facility of Physics International. The results showed that the upset dose rate for the subsystem was 9.8 x 10/sup 10/ and 1.7 x 10/sup 11/ rads(Si)/s during dynamic and static modes of operation, respectively. Subsystem interactions did not compromise the upset levels of the discrete components.

  13. A molecular phylogeny of the tamarins (genus Saguinus) based on five nuclear sequence data from regions containing Alu insertions.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Divino Bruno; Monteiro, Eliene; Vallinoto, Marcelo; Sampaio, Iracilda; Ferrari, Stephen F; Schneider, Horacio

    2011-11-01

    This study presents a molecular phylogeny of the Saguinus genus, based on the analysis of the DNA sequences of five nuclear loci with Alu insertions in 10 species. The concatenated alignment produced a polytomic arrangement with four main groups, although only two clades-the Amazonian (S. midas, S. niger, and S. bicolor) and the Colombian (S. leucopus and S. oedipus) tamarins-were statistically significant. The emergence of the midas-bicolor clade was estimated at about 5 million years ago (mya), and that of the Colombian clade, at 4.6 mya. The phylogenetic relationships among the mustached tamarins (S. mystax, S. imperator, and S. labiatus) remained unresolved, as did the internal arrangement of the midas group. The lack of a clear consensus on the phylogeny of this group may be related to rapid bursts of evolutionary change within the context of a highly dynamic environment, which may be difficult to resolve using the available quantitative approaches. On the other hand, the discrepancies between mtDNA and nDNA in resolving phylogenies strongly indicate the role of reticulated evolution in the evolutionary history of this group. We hope that the advance of whole genome sequencing technology and increasing information on nuclear markers and SNPs, coupled with a better understanding of the geological phenomena that took place in western Amazonia over the past 20 million years, will shed further light on the phylogenetic history of these New World primates. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Alu and LINE1 distributions in the human chromosomes: evidence of global genomic organization expressed in the form of power laws.

    PubMed

    Sellis, Diamantis; Provata, Astero; Almirantis, Yannis

    2007-11-01

    Spatial distribution and clustering of repetitive elements are extensively studied during the last years, as well as their colocalization with other genomic components. Here we investigate the large-scale features of Alu and LINE1 spatial arrangement in the human genome by studying the size distribution of interrepeat distances. In most cases, we have found power-law size distributions extending in several orders of magnitude. We have also studied the correlations of the extent of the power law (linear region in double-logarithmic scale) and of the corresponding exponent (slope) with other genomic properties. A model has been formulated to explain the formation of the observed power laws. According to the model, 2 kinds of events occur repetitively in evolutionary time: random insertion of several types of intruding sequences and occasional loss of repeats belonging to the initial population due to "elimination" events. This simple mechanism is shown to reproduce the observed power-law size distributions and is compatible with our present knowledge on the dynamics of repeat proliferation in the genome.

  15. Statistical analysis of simple repeats in the human genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, F.; Liò, P.

    2005-03-01

    The human genome contains repetitive DNA at different level of sequence length, number and dispersion. Highly repetitive DNA is particularly rich in homo- and di-nucleotide repeats, while middle repetitive DNA is rich of families of interspersed, mobile elements hundreds of base pairs (bp) long, among which belong the Alu families. A link between homo- and di-polymeric tracts and mobile elements has been recently highlighted. In particular, the mobility of Alu repeats, which form 10% of the human genome, has been correlated with the length of poly(A) tracts located at one end of the Alu. These tracts have a rigid and non-bendable structure and have an inhibitory effect on nucleosomes, which normally compact the DNA. We performed a statistical analysis of the genome-wide distribution of lengths and inter-tract separations of poly(X) and poly(XY) tracts in the human genome. Our study shows that in humans the length distributions of these sequences reflect the dynamics of their expansion and DNA replication. By means of general tools from linguistics, we show that the latter play the role of highly-significant content-bearing terms in the DNA text. Furthermore, we find that such tracts are positioned in a non-random fashion, with an apparent periodicity of 150 bases. This allows us to extend the link between repetitive, highly mobile elements such as Alus and low-complexity words in human DNA. More precisely, we show that Alus are sources of poly(X) tracts, which in turn affect in a subtle way the combination and diversification of gene expression and the fixation of multigene families.

  16. Intravesical TRPV4 blockade reduces repeated variate stress-induced bladder dysfunction by increasing bladder capacity and decreasing voiding frequency in male rats.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Liana; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2014-08-15

    Individuals with functional lower urinary tract disorders including interstitial cystitis (IC)/bladder pain syndrome (BPS) and overactive bladder (OAB) often report symptom (e.g., urinary frequency) worsening due to stress. One member of the transient receptor potential ion channel vanilloid family, TRPV4, has recently been implicated in urinary bladder dysfunction disorders including OAB and IC/BPS. These studies address the role of TRPV4 in stress-induced bladder dysfunction using an animal model of stress in male rats. To induce stress, rats were exposed to 7 days of repeated variate stress (RVS). Quantitative PCR data demonstrated significant (P ≤ 0.01) increases in TRPV4 transcript levels in urothelium but not detrusor smooth muscle. Western blot analyses of split urinary bladders (i.e., urothelium and detrusor) showed significant (P ≤ 0.01) increases in TRPV4 protein expression levels in urothelial tissues but not detrusor smooth muscle. We previously showed that RVS produces bladder dysfunction characterized by decreased bladder capacity and increased voiding frequency. The functional role of TRPV4 in RVS-induced bladder dysfunction was evaluated using continuous, open outlet intravesical infusion of saline in conjunction with administration of a TRPV4 agonist, GSK1016790A (3 μM), a TRPV4 antagonist, HC067047 (1 μM), or vehicle (0.1% DMSO in saline) in control and RVS-treated rats. Bladder capacity, void volume, and intercontraction interval significantly decreased following intravesical instillation of GSK1016790A in control rats and significantly (P ≤ 0.01) increased following administration of HC067047 in RVS-treated rats. These results demonstrate increased TRPV4 expression in the urothelium following RVS and that TRPV4 blockade ameliorates RVS-induced bladder dysfunction consistent with the role of TRPV4 as a promising target for bladder function disorders. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Induction of direct repeat recombination by psoralen-DNA adducts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: defects in DNA repair increase gene copy number variation.

    PubMed

    Saffran, Wilma A; Ahmed, Anam; Binyaminov, Olga; Gonzalez, Cynthia; Gupta, Amita; Fajardo, Manuel A; Kishun, Devindra; Nandram, Ashana; Reyes, Kenneth; Scalercio, Karina; Senior, Charles W

    2014-09-01

    Psoralen photoreaction produces covalent monoadducts and interstrand crosslinks in DNA. The interstrand DNA crosslinks are complex double strand lesions that require the involvement of multiple pathways for repair. Homologous recombination, which can carry out error-free repair, is a major pathway for crosslink repair; however, some recombination pathways can also produce DNA rearrangements. Psoralen photoreaction-induced recombination in yeast was measured using direct repeat substrates that can detect gene conversions, a form of conservative recombination, as well as deletions and triplications, which generate gene copy number changes. In repair-proficient cells the major products of recombination were gene conversions, along with substantial fractions of deletions. Deficiencies in DNA repair pathways increased non-conservative recombination products. Homologous recombination-deficient rad51, rad54, and rad57 strains had low levels of crosslink-induced recombination, and most products were deletions produced by single strand annealing. Nucleotide excision repair-deficient rad1 and rad2 yeast had increased levels of triplications, and rad1 cells had lower crosslink-induced recombination. Deficiencies in post-replication repair increased crosslink-induced recombination and gene copy number changes. Loss of REV3 function, in the error-prone branch, and of RAD5 and UBC13, in the error-free branch, produced moderate increases in deletions and triplications; rad18 cells, deficient in both post-replication repair sub-pathways, exhibited hyperrecombination, with primarily non-conservative products. Proper functioning of all the DNA repair pathways tested was required to maintain genomic stability and avoid gene copy number variation in response to interstrand crosslinks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Repeated exposure of infants at complementary feeding to a vegetable puree increases acceptance as effectively as flavor-flavor learning and more effectively than flavor-nutrient learning.

    PubMed

    Remy, Eloïse; Issanchou, Sylvie; Chabanet, Claire; Nicklaus, Sophie

    2013-07-01

    Children's vegetable consumption is below the public health recommendations. This study aimed to compare learning mechanisms to increase vegetable acceptance in infants at complementary feeding, namely repeated exposure (RE), flavor-flavor learning (FFL), and flavor-nutrient learning (FNL); measure the stability of the learning effect; and examine the impact of infants' feeding history on vegetable acceptance. The study was composed of a preexposure test, an exposure period, a postexposure test, and tests at 2-wk, 3-mo, and 6-mo follow-ups. At pre- and postexposure, a basic artichoke purée and carrot purée were presented to 95 French infants (6.4 ± 0.8 mo). During the exposure period, infants were randomly split into 3 groups and were exposed 10 times to the basic (RE group; 2 kJ/g; n = 32), a sweet (FFL group; 2 kJ/g; n = 32), or an energy-dense (FNL group; 6 kJ/g; n = 31) artichoke purée 2 or 3 times/wk. To evaluate acceptance, intake (g) and liking were recorded at home by parents. Between pre- and postexposure, intake of the basic artichoke purée significantly increased in the RE (+63%) and FFL (+39%) groups but not in the FNL group; liking increased only in the RE group (+21%). After exposure, artichoke was as much consumed and as much liked as carrot only in the RE group. Learning of artichoke acceptance was stable up to 3 mo postexposure. Initial artichoke intake was significantly related to the number of vegetables offered before the study started. RE is as effective as and simpler to implement than FFL and more effective than FNL for increasing vegetable acceptance at complementary feeding.

  19. Reprogramming triggers endogenous L1 and Alu retrotransposition in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Klawitter, Sabine; Fuchs, Nina V; Upton, Kyle R; Muñoz-Lopez, Martin; Shukla, Ruchi; Wang, Jichang; Garcia-Cañadas, Marta; Lopez-Ruiz, Cesar; Gerhardt, Daniel J; Sebe, Attila; Grabundzija, Ivana; Merkert, Sylvia; Gerdes, Patricia; Pulgarin, J Andres; Bock, Anja; Held, Ulrike; Witthuhn, Anett; Haase, Alexandra; Sarkadi, Balázs; Löwer, Johannes; Wolvetang, Ernst J; Martin, Ulrich; Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Garcia-Perez, Jose L; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Schumann, Gerald G

    2016-01-08

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are capable of unlimited proliferation and can differentiate in vitro to generate derivatives of the three primary germ layers. Genetic and epigenetic abnormalities have been reported by Wissing and colleagues to occur during hiPSC derivation, including mobilization of engineered LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. However, incidence and functional impact of endogenous retrotransposition in hiPSCs are yet to be established. Here we apply retrotransposon capture sequencing to eight hiPSC lines and three human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines, revealing endogenous L1, Alu and SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA) mobilization during reprogramming and pluripotent stem cell cultivation. Surprisingly, 4/7 de novo L1 insertions are full length and 6/11 retrotransposition events occurred in protein-coding genes expressed in pluripotent stem cells. We further demonstrate that an intronic L1 insertion in the CADPS2 gene is acquired during hiPSC cultivation and disrupts CADPS2 expression. These experiments elucidate endogenous retrotransposition, and its potential consequences, in hiPSCs and hESCs.

  20. Reprogramming triggers endogenous L1 and Alu retrotransposition in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Klawitter, Sabine; Fuchs, Nina V.; Upton, Kyle R.; Muñoz-Lopez, Martin; Shukla, Ruchi; Wang, Jichang; Garcia-Cañadas, Marta; Lopez-Ruiz, Cesar; Gerhardt, Daniel J.; Sebe, Attila; Grabundzija, Ivana; Merkert, Sylvia; Gerdes, Patricia; Pulgarin, J. Andres; Bock, Anja; Held, Ulrike; Witthuhn, Anett; Haase, Alexandra; Sarkadi, Balázs; Löwer, Johannes; Wolvetang, Ernst J.; Martin, Ulrich; Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Garcia-Perez, Jose L.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Schumann, Gerald G.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are capable of unlimited proliferation and can differentiate in vitro to generate derivatives of the three primary germ layers. Genetic and epigenetic abnormalities have been reported by Wissing and colleagues to occur during hiPSC derivation, including mobilization of engineered LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. However, incidence and functional impact of endogenous retrotransposition in hiPSCs are yet to be established. Here we apply retrotransposon capture sequencing to eight hiPSC lines and three human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines, revealing endogenous L1, Alu and SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA) mobilization during reprogramming and pluripotent stem cell cultivation. Surprisingly, 4/7 de novo L1 insertions are full length and 6/11 retrotransposition events occurred in protein-coding genes expressed in pluripotent stem cells. We further demonstrate that an intronic L1 insertion in the CADPS2 gene is acquired during hiPSC cultivation and disrupts CADPS2 expression. These experiments elucidate endogenous retrotransposition, and its potential consequences, in hiPSCs and hESCs. PMID:26743714

  1. Identification of homogeneously staining regions by G-banding and chromosome microdissection, and FISH marker selection using human Alu sequence primers in a scleractinian coral Coelastrea aspera Verrill, 1866 (Cnidaria).

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Takahiro; Kubota, Satoshi; Mezaki, Takuma; Tagami, Erika; Sekida, Satoko; Nakachi, Shu; Okuda, Kazuo; Tominaga, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Karyotype analysis was performed on the scleractinian coral Coelastrea aspera Verrill, 1866, commonly found along temperate coasts in Japan (30-35°N) and in coastal waters in the Indian and Pacific oceans. G-banding of Coelastrea aspera was successfully performed, although the banding pattern was not as clear as that in mammals. The karyogram clearly revealed that this coral had a homogeneously staining region (hsr) in chromosome 11. This hsr consisted of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) related genes, which was demonstrated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with probes generated using 28S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) primers and those generated through chromosome microdissection. In addition, we conducted silver-stained nucleolus organizer region (Ag-NOR) analysis and found Ag depositions in the interphase nuclei but not on rRNA gene loci and hsr(s) in the mitotic stage. The hsr of this coral was observed in approximately 50% of the metaphase spreads analyzed. This may explain the diversity of coral rDNA based on the molecular study of sequence analysis. Furthermore, it was discovered that human telomere and Alu repeated sequences were present in this Coelastrea aspera. Probes derived from human Alu sequences are expected to play an important role in the classification of corals. Overall, our data can be of great value in discriminating among scleractinian coral species and understanding their genetics, including chromosomal evolution.

  2. Repeated adolescent MDMA ("Ecstasy") exposure in rats increases behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to a 5-HT2A/2C agonist.

    PubMed

    Biezonski, Dominik K; Courtemanche, Andrea B; Hong, Sang B; Piper, Brian J; Meyer, Jerrold S

    2009-02-03

    MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) is a popular recreational drug among adolescents. The present study aimed to determine the effects of repeated intermittent administration of 10 mg/kg MDMA during adolescence on behavioral (Experiment 1) and neuroendocrine (Experiment 2) responses of rats to the 5-HT(2A/2C) agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) and on [(3)H]ketanserin binding to 5-HT(2A) receptors. In the first experiment, MDMA pretreatment increased the frequency of head twitches and back muscle contractions, but not wet-dog shakes, to a high-dose DOI challenge. In the second experiment, both the prolactin and corticosterone responses to DOI were potentiated in MDMA-pretreated animals. No changes were found in 5-HT(2A) receptor binding in the hypothalamus or other forebrain areas that were examined. These results indicate that intermittent adolescent MDMA exposure enhances sensitivity of 5-HT(2A/2C) receptors in the CNS, possibly through changes in downstream signaling mechanisms.

  3. Repeated 6-Hz Corneal Stimulation Progressively Increases FosB/ΔFosB Levels in the Lateral Amygdala and Induces Seizure Generalization to the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Carmela; Vinet, Jonathan; Curia, Giulia; Biagini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to repetitive seizures is known to promote convulsions which depend on specific patterns of network activity. We aimed at evaluating the changes in seizure phenotype and neuronal network activation caused by a modified 6-Hz corneal stimulation model of psychomotor seizures. Mice received up to 4 sessions of 6-Hz corneal stimulation with fixed current amplitude of 32 mA and inter-stimulation interval of 72 h. Video-electroencephalography showed that evoked seizures were characterized by a motor component and a non-motor component. Seizures always appeared in frontal cortex, but only at the fourth stimulation they involved the hippocampus, suggesting the establishment of an epileptogenic process. Duration of seizure non-motor component progressively decreased after the second session, whereas convulsive seizures remained unchanged. In addition, a more severe seizure phenotype, consisting of tonic-clonic generalized convulsions, was predominant after the second session. Immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence experiments revealed a significant increase in neuronal activity occurring in the lateral amygdala after the fourth session, most likely due to activity of principal cells. These findings indicate a predominant role of amygdala in promoting progressively more severe convulsions as well as the late recruitment of the hippocampus in the seizure spread. We propose that the repeated 6-Hz corneal stimulation model may be used to investigate some mechanisms of epileptogenesis and to test putative antiepileptogenic drugs. PMID:26555229

  4. Repeated 6-Hz Corneal Stimulation Progressively Increases FosB/ΔFosB Levels in the Lateral Amygdala and Induces Seizure Generalization to the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Carmela; Vinet, Jonathan; Curia, Giulia; Biagini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to repetitive seizures is known to promote convulsions which depend on specific patterns of network activity. We aimed at evaluating the changes in seizure phenotype and neuronal network activation caused by a modified 6-Hz corneal stimulation model of psychomotor seizures. Mice received up to 4 sessions of 6-Hz corneal stimulation with fixed current amplitude of 32 mA and inter-stimulation interval of 72 h. Video-electroencephalography showed that evoked seizures were characterized by a motor component and a non-motor component. Seizures always appeared in frontal cortex, but only at the fourth stimulation they involved the hippocampus, suggesting the establishment of an epileptogenic process. Duration of seizure non-motor component progressively decreased after the second session, whereas convulsive seizures remained unchanged. In addition, a more severe seizure phenotype, consisting of tonic-clonic generalized convulsions, was predominant after the second session. Immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence experiments revealed a significant increase in neuronal activity occurring in the lateral amygdala after the fourth session, most likely due to activity of principal cells. These findings indicate a predominant role of amygdala in promoting progressively more severe convulsions as well as the late recruitment of the hippocampus in the seizure spread. We propose that the repeated 6-Hz corneal stimulation model may be used to investigate some mechanisms of epileptogenesis and to test putative antiepileptogenic drugs.

  5. Hoffmann reflex is increased after 14 days of daily repeated Achilles tendon vibration for the soleus but not for the gastrocnemii muscles.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Pérot, Chantal

    2012-02-01

    In a previous study, Achilles tendon vibrations were enough to improve the triceps surae (TS) activation capacities and also to slightly increase TS Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) obtained by summing up soleus (Sol) and gastrocnemii (GM and GL) EMGs. The purpose of the present study was to analyze separately Sol and GM or GL reflexes to account for different effects of the vibrations on the reflex excitability of the slow soleus and of the gastrocnemii muscles. A control group (n = 13) and a vibration group (n = 16) were tested in pre-test and post-test conditions. The Achilles tendon vibration program consisted of 1 h of daily vibration (frequency: 50 Hz) applied during 14 days. Maximal Sol, GM and GL H-reflexes, and M-waves were recorded, and their H(max)/M(max) ratios gave the index of reflex excitability. After the vibration protocol, only Sol H(max)/M(max) was enhanced (p < 0.001). The enhanced Sol reflex excitability after vibration is in favor of a decrease in the pre-synaptic inhibition due to the repeated vibrations and the high solicitation of the reflex pathway. Those results of a short period of vibration applied at rest may be limited to the soleus because of its high density in muscle spindles and slow motor units, both structures being very sensitive to vibrations.

  6. cDNA cloning of the human peroxisomal enoyl-CoA hydratase: 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme and localization to chromosome 3q26. 3-3q28: A free left Alu arm is inserted in the 3[prime] noncoding region

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefler, G.; Forstner, M.; Hulla, W.; Hiden, M.; Krisper, P.; Kenner, L.; Zechner, R. ); McGuinness, M.C. ); Ried, T.; Lengauer, C. )

    1994-01-01

    Enoyl-CoA hydratase:3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme is one of the four enzymes of the peroxisomal, [beta]-oxidation pathway. Here, the authors report the full-length human cDNA sequence and the localization of the corresponding gene on chromosome 3q26.3-3q28. The cDNA sequence spans 3779 nucleotides with an open reading frame of 2169 nucleotides. The tripeptide SKL at the carboxy terminus, known to serve as a peroxisomal targeting signal, is present. DNA sequence comparison of the coding region showed an 80% homology between human and rat bifunctional enzyme cDNA. The 3[prime] noncoding sequence contains 117 nucleotides homologous to an Alu repeat. Based on sequence comparison, they propose that these nucleotides are a free left Alu arm with 86% homology to the Alu-J family. RNA analysis shows one band with highest intensity in liver and kidney. This cDNA will allow in-depth studies of molecular defects in patients with defective peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme. Moreover, it will also provide a means for studying the regulation of peroxisomal [beta]-oxidation in humans. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  7. The organization of classical satellite DNAs in human chromosomes: an approach using AluI and TaqI restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Nieddu, M; Pichiri, G; Diaz, G; Mezzanotte, R

    2003-01-01

    Human classical satellite DNAs were used as probes to investigate the molecular mechanism(s) of AluI/TaqI attack in situ on specific centromeric areas. The biochemical results obtained show that the majority of such highly repetitive DNAs are not solubilized from chromosomes, in spite of a cleavage pattern identical to that shown in naked genomic DNA digested with the same enzymes. Moreover, when digestion in situ with restriction enzymes precedes in situ hybridization, it is possible to observe an increased signal in the centromeres of some chromosomes as compared to that shown in standard undigested chromosomes and, on the other hand, hybridization labelling in centromeres which are difficult to detect by in situ hybridization using standard undigested chromosomes. Lastly, our results show that centromeric heterochromatin is not a homogeneous class in regard to organizational structure.

  8. Distribution of a marker of germline methylation differs between major families of transposon-derived repeats in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Martin I.; Smith, Albert V.; Bjornsson, Hans T.; Jonsson, Jon J.

    2012-01-01

    A potential relationship between transposon-derived repeats (TDR) and human germline methylation is of biological importance since many genes are flanked by TDR and methylation could affect the expression of nearby genes. Furthermore, DNA methylation has been suggested as a global defense mechanism against genome instability threatened by TDR. We studied the correlation between the density of HapMap methyl-associated SNPs (mSNPs), a marker of germline methylation, and proportion of TDR. After correcting for confounding variables, we found a negative correlation between proportion of Alu repeats and mSNP density for 125–1000 kb windows. Similar results were found for the most active subgroup of repeats. In contrast, a negative correlation between proportion of L1 repeats and mSNP density was found only in the larger 1000 kb windows. Using methylation data on germ cells (sperm) from the Human Epigenome Project, we found a lower proportion of Alu repeats adjacent (3–15 kb) to hypermethylated amplicons. On the contrary, there was a higher proportion of L1 repeats in the 3–5 kb of sequence flanking hypermethylated amplicons but not in the 10–15 kb flanks. Our data indicate a differential response to the major repeat families and that DNA methylation is unlikely to be a uniform global defense system against all TDR. It appears to play a role for the L1 subgroup, with sequences adjacent to L1 repeats methylated in response to their proximity. In contrast, sequences adjacent to Alu repeats appear to be hypomethylated, arguing against a role of methylation in germline defense against those elements. PMID:22093876

  9. Pediatric Brain: Repeated Exposure to Linear Gadolinium-based Contrast Material Is Associated with Increased Signal Intensity at Unenhanced T1-weighted MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Flood, Thomas F; Stence, Nicholas V; Maloney, John A; Mirsky, David M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether repeated exposure of the pediatric brain to a linear gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) is associated with an increase in signal intensity (SI) relative to that in GBCA-naive control subjects at unenhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods This single-center, retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board and compliant with HIPAA. The authors evaluated 46 pediatric patients who had undergone at least three GBCA-enhanced MR examinations (30 patients for two-group analysis and 16 for pre- and post-GBCA exposure comparisons) and 57 age-matched GBCA-naive control subjects. The SI in the globus pallidus, thalamus, dentate nucleus, and pons was measured at unenhanced T1-weighted MR imaging. Globus pallidus-thalamus and dentate nucleus-pons SI ratios were calculated and compared between groups and relative to total cumulative gadolinium dose, age, sex, and number of and mean time between GBCA-enhanced examinations. Analysis included the Wilcoxon signed rank test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and Spearman correlation coefficient. Results Patients who underwent multiple GBCA-enhanced examinations had increased SI ratios within the dentate nucleus (mean SI ratio ± standard error of the mean for two-group comparison: 1.007 ± 0.0058 for GBCA-naive group and 1.046 ± 0.0060 for GBCA-exposed group [P < .001]; mean SI ratio for pre- and post-GBCA comparison: 0.995 ± 0.0062 for pre-GBCA group and 1.035 ± 0.0063 for post-GBCA group [P < .001]) but not the globus pallidus (mean SI ratio for two-group comparison: 1.131 ± 0.0070 for GBCA-naive group and 1.014 ± 0.0091 for GBCA-exposed group [P = .21]; mean SI ratio for pre- and post-GBCA comparison: 1.068 ± 0.0094 for pre-GBCA group and 1.093 ± 0.0134 for post-GBCA group [P = .12]). There was a significant correlation between dentate nucleus SI and total cumulative gadolinium dose (r = 0.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.03, 0.67; P = .03), but

  10. An Alu-mediated large deletion of the FUT2 gene in individuals with the ABO-Bombay phenotype.

    PubMed

    Koda, Y; Soejima, M; Johnson, P H; Smart, E; Kimura, H

    2000-01-01

    Recently, we have found an allelic deletion of the secretor alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase (FUT2) gene in individuals with the classical Bombay phenotype of the ABO system. The FUT2 gene consists of two exons separated by an intron that spans approximately 7 kb. The first exon is noncoding, whereas exon 2 contains the complete coding sequence. Since the 5' breakpoint of the deletion has previously been mapped to the single intron of FUT2, we have cloned the junction region of the deletion in a Bombay individual by cassette-mediated polymerase chain reaction. In addition, the region from the 3' untranslated region of FUT2 to the 3' breakpoint sequence has been amplified from a control individual. DNA sequence analysis of this region indicates that the 5' breakpoint is within a free left Alu monomer (FLAM-C) sequence that lies 1.3 kb downstream of exon 1, and that the 3' breakpoint is within a complete Alu element (AluSx) that is positioned 1.5 kb downstream of exon 2. The size of the deletion is estimated to be about 10 kb. There is a 25-bp sequence identity between the reference DNA sequences surrounding the 5' and 3' breakpoints. This demonstrates that an Alu-mediated large gene deletion generated by unequal crossover is responsible for secretor alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase deficiency in Indian Bombay individuals.

  11. Gain of a New Exon by a Lineage-Specific Alu Element-Integration Event in the BCS1L Gene during Primate Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Je; Kim, Young-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Rae; Choe, Se-Hee; Kim, Myung-Jin; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Ji-Su; Sim, Bo-Woong; Song, Bong-Seok; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Jin, Yeung-Bae; Lee, Youngjeon; Park, Young-Ho; Park, Young Il; Huh, Jae-Won; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2015-01-01

    BCS1L gene encodes mitochondrial protein and is a member of conserved AAA protein family. This gene is involved in the incorporation of Rieske FeS and Qcr10p into complex III of respiratory chain. In our previous study, AluYRa2-derived alternative transcript in rhesus monkey genome was identified. However, this transcript has not been reported in human genome. In present study, we conducted evolutionary analysis of AluYRa2-exonized transcript with various primate genomic DNAs and cDNAs from humans, rhesus monkeys, and crab-eating monkeys. Remarkably, our results show that AluYRa2 element has only been integrated into genomes of Macaca species. This Macaca lineage-specific integration of AluYRa2 element led to exonization event in the first intron region of BCS1L gene by producing a conserved 3′ splice site. Intriguingly, in rhesus and crab-eating monkeys, more diverse transcript variants by alternative splicing (AS) events, including exon skipping and different 5′ splice sites from humans, were identified. Alignment of amino acid sequences revealed that AluYRa2-exonized transcript has short N-terminal peptides. Therefore, AS events play a major role in the generation of various transcripts and proteins during primate evolution. In particular, lineage-specific integration of Alu elements and species-specific Alu-derived exonization events could be important sources of gene diversification in primates. PMID:26537194

  12. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat-Dependent, Biofilm-Specific Death of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Mediated by Increased Expression of Phage-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Heussler, Gary E.; Cady, Kyle C.; Koeppen, Katja; Bhuju, Sabin; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas) system is an adaptive immune system present in many archaea and bacteria. CRISPR/Cas systems are incredibly diverse, and there is increasing evidence of CRISPR/Cas systems playing a role in cellular functions distinct from phage immunity. Previously, our laboratory reported one such alternate function in which the type 1-F CRISPR/Cas system of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain UCBPP-PA14 (abbreviated as P. aeruginosa PA14) inhibits both biofilm formation and swarming motility when the bacterium is lysogenized by the bacteriophage DMS3. In this study, we demonstrated that the presence of just the DMS3 protospacer and the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) on the P. aeruginosa genome is necessary and sufficient for this CRISPR-dependent loss of these group behaviors, with no requirement of additional DMS3 sequences. We also demonstrated that the interaction of the CRISPR system with the DMS3 protospacer induces expression of SOS-regulated phage-related genes, including the well-characterized pyocin operon, through the activity of the nuclease Cas3 and subsequent RecA activation. Furthermore, our data suggest that expression of the phage-related genes results in bacterial cell death on a surface due to the inability of the CRISPR-engaged strain to downregulate phage-related gene expression, while these phage-related genes have minimal impact on growth and viability under planktonic conditions. Deletion of the phage-related genes restores biofilm formation and swarming motility while still maintaining a functional CRISPR/Cas system, demonstrating that the loss of these group behaviors is an indirect effect of CRISPR self-targeting. PMID:25968642

  13. Gene flow and genetic structure in the Galician population (NW Spain) according to Alu insertions

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Tito A; Fariña, José; Diéguez, Lois Pérez; Lodeiro, Rosa

    2008-01-01

    Background The most recent Alu insertions reveal different degrees of polymorphism in human populations, and a series of characteristics that make them particularly suitable genetic markers for Human Biology studies. This has led these polymorphisms to be used to analyse the origin and phylogenetic relationships between contemporary human groups. This study analyses twelve Alu sequences in a sample of 216 individuals from the autochthonous population of Galicia (NW Spain), with the aim of studying their genetic structure and phylogenetic position with respect to the populations of Western and Central Europe and North Africa, research that is of special interest in revealing European population dynamics, given the peculiarities of the Galician population due to its geographical situation in western Europe, and its historical vicissitudes. Results The insertion frequencies of eleven of the Alu elements analysed were within the variability range of European populations, while Yb8NBC125 proved to be the lowest so far recorded to date in Europe. Taking the twelve polymorphisms into account, the GD value for the Galician population was 0.268. The comparative analyses carried out using the MDS, NJ and AMOVA methods reveal the existence of spatial heterogeneity, and identify three population groups that correspond to the geographic areas of Western-Central Europe, Eastern Mediterranean Europe and North Africa. Galicia is shown to be included in the Western-Central European cluster, together with other Spanish populations. When only considering populations from Mediterranean Europe, the Galician population revealed a degree of genetic flow similar to that of the majority of the populations from this geographic area. Conclusion The results of this study reveal that the Galician population, despite its geographic situation in the western edge of the European continent, occupies an intermediate position in relation to other European populations in general, and Iberian

  14. Gene flow and genetic structure in the Galician population (NW Spain) according to Alu insertions.

    PubMed

    Varela, Tito A; Fariña, José; Diéguez, Lois Pérez; Lodeiro, Rosa

    2008-12-02

    The most recent Alu insertions reveal different degrees of polymorphism in human populations, and a series of characteristics that make them particularly suitable genetic markers for Human Biology studies. This has led these polymorphisms to be used to analyse the origin and phylogenetic relationships between contemporary human groups. This study analyses twelve Alu sequences in a sample of 216 individuals from the autochthonous population of Galicia (NW Spain), with the aim of studying their genetic structure and phylogenetic position with respect to the populations of Western and Central Europe and North Africa, research that is of special interest in revealing European population dynamics, given the peculiarities of the Galician population due to its geographical situation in western Europe, and its historical vicissitudes. The insertion frequencies of eleven of the Alu elements analysed were within the variability range of European populations, while Yb8NBC125 proved to be the lowest so far recorded to date in Europe. Taking the twelve polymorphisms into account, the GD value for the Galician population was 0.268. The comparative analyses carried out using the MDS, NJ and AMOVA methods reveal the existence of spatial heterogeneity, and identify three population groups that correspond to the geographic areas of Western-Central Europe, Eastern Mediterranean Europe and North Africa. Galicia is shown to be included in the Western-Central European cluster, together with other Spanish populations. When only considering populations from Mediterranean Europe, the Galician population revealed a degree of genetic flow similar to that of the majority of the populations from this geographic area. The results of this study reveal that the Galician population, despite its geographic situation in the western edge of the European continent, occupies an intermediate position in relation to other European populations in general, and Iberian populations in particular. This

  15. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat-Dependent, Biofilm-Specific Death of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Mediated by Increased Expression of Phage-Related Genes.

    PubMed

    Heussler, Gary E; Cady, Kyle C; Koeppen, Katja; Bhuju, Sabin; Stanton, Bruce A; O'Toole, George A

    2015-05-12

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas) system is an adaptive immune system present in many archaea and bacteria. CRISPR/Cas systems are incredibly diverse, and there is increasing evidence of CRISPR/Cas systems playing a role in cellular functions distinct from phage immunity. Previously, our laboratory reported one such alternate function in which the type 1-F CRISPR/Cas system of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain UCBPP-PA14 (abbreviated as P. aeruginosa PA14) inhibits both biofilm formation and swarming motility when the bacterium is lysogenized by the bacteriophage DMS3. In this study, we demonstrated that the presence of just the DMS3 protospacer and the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) on the P. aeruginosa genome is necessary and sufficient for this CRISPR-dependent loss of these group behaviors, with no requirement of additional DMS3 sequences. We also demonstrated that the interaction of the CRISPR system with the DMS3 protospacer induces expression of SOS-regulated phage-related genes, including the well-characterized pyocin operon, through the activity of the nuclease Cas3 and subsequent RecA activation. Furthermore, our data suggest that expression of the phage-related genes results in bacterial cell death on a surface due to the inability of the CRISPR-engaged strain to downregulate phage-related gene expression, while these phage-related genes have minimal impact on growth and viability under planktonic conditions. Deletion of the phage-related genes restores biofilm formation and swarming motility while still maintaining a functional CRISPR/Cas system, demonstrating that the loss of these group behaviors is an indirect effect of CRISPR self-targeting. The various CRISPR/Cas systems found in both archaea and bacteria are incredibly diverse, and advances in understanding the complex mechanisms of these varied systems has not only increased our knowledge of host

  16. Association of the Alu insertion polymorphism in the progesterone receptor gene with breast cancer in a Mexican population

    PubMed Central

    Figuera, Luis E.; Flores-Ramos, Liliana Gómez; Puebla-Pérez, Ana María; Zúñiga-González, Guillermo Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The progesterone receptor (PR) gene plays an important role in reproduction-related events. Data on polymorphisms in the PR gene have revealed associations with cancer, particularly for the Alu insertion polymorphism, which has been suggested to affect progesterone receptor function and contribute to tumor promotion in the mammary gland. Material and methods We examined the role of the Alu insertion polymorphism in the PR gene by comparing the genotypes of 209 healthy Mexican women with those of 481 Mexican women with breast cancer (BC). Results The genotype frequencies observed in the controls and BC patients were 0% and 4% for T2/T2 (Alu insertion), 16% and 21% for T1/T2, and 84% and 75% for T1/T1 (Alu deletion), respectively. The obtained odds ratio (OR) was 1.7, with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 1.1–2.6, p = 0.009, for the T1/T2–T2/T2 genotypes. The association was also evident when the distributions of the T1/T2–T2/T2 genotypes in patients in the following categories were compared: obesity grade II (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.03–3.18, p = 0.039) and the chemotherapy response (OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.27–3.067, p = 0.002). Conclusions The T1/T2–T2/T2 genotypes of the Alu insertion polymorphism in the PR gene are associated with BC susceptibility in the analyzed Mexican population. PMID:26170848

  17. microRNAs and Alu elements in the p53-Mdm2-Mdm4 regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Yonit; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Oren, Moshe

    2014-06-01

    p53 is a transcription factor that governs numerous stress response pathways within the cell. Maintaining the right levels of p53 is crucial for cell survival and proper cellular homeostasis. The tight regulation of p53 involves many cellular components, most notably its major negative regulators Mdm2 and Mdm4, which maintain p53 protein amount and activity in tight check. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that target specific mRNAs to translational arrest and degradation. miRNAs are also key components of the normal p53 pathway, joining forces with Mdm2 and Mdm4 to maintain proper p53 activity. Here we review the current knowledge of miRNAs targeting Mdm2 and Mdm4, and their importance in different tissues and in pathological states such as cancer. In addition, we address the role of Alu sequences-highly abundant retroelements spread throughout the human genome, and their impact on gene regulation via the miRNA machinery. Alus occupy a significant portion of genes' 3'UTR, and as such they have the potential to impact mRNA regulation. Since Alus are primate-specific, they introduce a new regulatory layer into primate genomes. Alus can influence and alter gene regulation, creating primate-specific cancer-preventive regulatory mechanisms to sustain the transition to longer life span in primates. We review the possible influence of Alu sequences on miRNA functionality in general and specifically within the p53 network.

  18. Alu sequence involvement in transcriptional insulation of the keratin 18 gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Thorey, I S; Ceceña, G; Reynolds, W; Oshima, R G

    1993-01-01

    The human keratin 18 (K18) gene is expressed in a variety of adult simple epithelial tissues, including liver, intestine, lung, and kidney, but is not normally found in skin, muscle, heart, spleen, or most of the brain. Transgenic animals derived from the cloned K18 gene express the transgene in appropriate tissues at levels directly proportional to the copy number and independently of the sites of integration. We have investigated in transgenic mice the dependence of K18 gene expression on the distal 5' and 3' flanking sequences and upon the RNA polymerase III promoter of an Alu repetitive DNA transcription unit immediately upstream of the K18 promoter. Integration site-independent expression of tandemly duplicated K18 transgenes requires the presence of either an 825-bp fragment of the 5' flanking sequence or the 3.5-kb 3' flanking sequence. Mutation of the RNA polymerase III promoter of the Alu element within the 825-bp fragment abolishes copy number-dependent expression in kidney but does not abolish integration site-independent expression when assayed in the absence of the 3' flanking sequence of the K18 gene. The characteristics of integration site-independent expression and copy number-dependent expression are separable. In addition, the formation of the chromatin state of the K18 gene, which likely restricts the tissue-specific expression of this gene, is not dependent upon the distal flanking sequences of the 10-kb K18 gene but rather may depend on internal regulatory regions of the gene. Images PMID:7692231

  19. Signal Increase on Unenhanced T1-Weighted Images in the Rat Brain After Repeated, Extended Doses of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin Andrew; Lohrke, Jessica; Frenzel, Thomas; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In this prospective preclinical study, we evaluated T1-weighted signal intensity in the deep cerebellar nuclei (CN) and globus pallidus (GP) up to 24 days after repeated administration of linear and macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) using homologous imaging and evaluation methods as in the recently published retrospective clinical studies. In a second part of the study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces were evaluated for contrast enhancement by fluid-attenuated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods Sixty adult male Wistar-Han rats were randomly divided into a control and 5 GBCA groups (n = 10 per group). The administered GBCAs were gadodiamide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadobenate dimeglumine (linear GBCAs) as well as gadobutrol and gadoterate meglumine (macrocyclic GBCAs) and saline (control). Over a period of 2 weeks, the animals received 10 intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight, each on 5 consecutive days per week. Before GBCA administration, as well as 3 and 24 days after the last injection, a whole-brain MRI was performed using a standard T1-weighted 3-dimensional turbo spin echo sequence on a clinical 1.5 T scanner. The ratios of signal intensities in deep CN to pons (CN/Po) and GP to thalamus (GP/Th) were determined. For the evaluation of the CSF spaces, 18 additional rats were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 3 per group) that received the same GBCAs as in the first part of the study. After MR cisternography for anatomical reference, a fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence was performed before and 1 minute after intravenous injection of a dose of 1 mmol Gd/kg body weight GBCA or saline. Results A significantly increased signal intensity ratio of CN/Po was observed 3 and 24 days after the last injection of gadodiamide and gadobenate dimeglumine. No significant changes were observed between the 2 time points. Gadopentetate dimeglumine injection led to a moderately elevated

  20. Increased prevalence of the seven-repeat variant of the dopamine D4 receptor gene in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder with tics.

    PubMed

    Cruz, C; Camarena, B; King, N; Páez, F; Sidenberg, D; de la Fuente, J R; Nicolini, H

    1997-08-01

    The polymorphism characterized by a varying number of 48 bp repeats (VNTR) in the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene was examined in 61 obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) probands with and without tics. Most of the OCD patients with tics showed at least one copy of the 7-fold variant compared to those affected subjects without tics (91 vs. 48%, respectively, Yates corrected chi2 = 5.54, P = 0.018). Similarly, a higher number of copies of this common variant were detected in the group of probands displaying tics compared to those OCD's without tics (Yates corrected chi2 = 4.66, P = 0.03). Our study suggests that the seven-repeat allele of the DRD4 gene could be a factor in the phenotypic variance of tics among OCD individuals.

  1. A spontaneously arising mutation in connexin32 with repeated passage of FRTL-5 cells coincides with increased growth rate and reduced thyroxine release.

    PubMed

    Green, L M; Murray, D K; Tran, D T; Nelson, G A; Shah, M M; Luben, R A

    2001-10-01

    regions of the Cx32 molecule contain the sequences and epitopes to which probes and antibodies are directed, and as such alterations of these regions with repeated passage explains reports by others that FRTL-5 cells do not express Cx32, and implies that cultures used for these assessments were passed more than 15 times. To determine if genetic or epigenetic abnormalities existed in FRTL-5 cells we performed chromosome spreads from various passage cultures. FRTL-5 cells have been reported to be diploid and more recently non-diploid; however, we found them to be fully tetraploid. This tetraploidy appears to be unstable in that later passes are tetraploid plus two or three extra chromosomes. There were no obvious translocations, breaks or large-scale interstitial deletions of any chromosomes in the FRTL-5 cultures tested. As FRTL-5 cells were repeatedly passed their morphology changed. Monolayer areas spread from beneath the follicles, and the follicles became flattened in appearance. These physical changes were coincident with dramatically increased growth rates. Early cultures (passed 3-12 times) divided on average every 49+/-1 h, whereas later passes (passes 20-25) divided every 28+/-3 h. To correlate these changes with a measure of thyroid function we assayed T(4) output. Early passage follicular cultures incubated for 6 h with sodium iodide, released on average 5.27+/- 0.33 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. Later passes, or early passes treated with heptanol to down-regulate Cx32, released an average of 3.84+/-0.50 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. There was a 27% difference in T(4) release between early follicular cultures, that were coupled by Cx32, and late or down-regulated early follicular cultures, that were uncoupled (P<0.0001). Collectively, the physical changes documented in this study were coincident with the loss of functional Cx32. This implies a relationship between the loss of intercellular communication and changes in morphogenic appearance, growth rate and

  2. A spontaneously arising mutation in connexin32 with repeated passage of FRTL-5 cells coincides with increased growth rate and reduced thyroxine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, L. M.; Murray, D. K.; Tran, D. T.; Nelson, G. A.; Shah, M. M.; Luben, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    regions of the Cx32 molecule contain the sequences and epitopes to which probes and antibodies are directed, and as such alterations of these regions with repeated passage explains reports by others that FRTL-5 cells do not express Cx32, and implies that cultures used for these assessments were passed more than 15 times. To determine if genetic or epigenetic abnormalities existed in FRTL-5 cells we performed chromosome spreads from various passage cultures. FRTL-5 cells have been reported to be diploid and more recently non-diploid; however, we found them to be fully tetraploid. This tetraploidy appears to be unstable in that later passes are tetraploid plus two or three extra chromosomes. There were no obvious translocations, breaks or large-scale interstitial deletions of any chromosomes in the FRTL-5 cultures tested. As FRTL-5 cells were repeatedly passed their morphology changed. Monolayer areas spread from beneath the follicles, and the follicles became flattened in appearance. These physical changes were coincident with dramatically increased growth rates. Early cultures (passed 3-12 times) divided on average every 49+/-1 h, whereas later passes (passes 20-25) divided every 28+/-3 h. To correlate these changes with a measure of thyroid function we assayed T(4) output. Early passage follicular cultures incubated for 6 h with sodium iodide, released on average 5.27+/- 0.33 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. Later passes, or early passes treated with heptanol to down-regulate Cx32, released an average of 3.84+/-0.50 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. There was a 27% difference in T(4) release between early follicular cultures, that were coupled by Cx32, and late or down-regulated early follicular cultures, that were uncoupled (P<0.0001). Collectively, the physical changes documented in this study were coincident with the loss of functional Cx32. This implies a relationship between the loss of intercellular communication and changes in morphogenic appearance, growth rate and

  3. A spontaneously arising mutation in connexin32 with repeated passage of FRTL-5 cells coincides with increased growth rate and reduced thyroxine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, L. M.; Murray, D. K.; Tran, D. T.; Nelson, G. A.; Shah, M. M.; Luben, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    regions of the Cx32 molecule contain the sequences and epitopes to which probes and antibodies are directed, and as such alterations of these regions with repeated passage explains reports by others that FRTL-5 cells do not express Cx32, and implies that cultures used for these assessments were passed more than 15 times. To determine if genetic or epigenetic abnormalities existed in FRTL-5 cells we performed chromosome spreads from various passage cultures. FRTL-5 cells have been reported to be diploid and more recently non-diploid; however, we found them to be fully tetraploid. This tetraploidy appears to be unstable in that later passes are tetraploid plus two or three extra chromosomes. There were no obvious translocations, breaks or large-scale interstitial deletions of any chromosomes in the FRTL-5 cultures tested. As FRTL-5 cells were repeatedly passed their morphology changed. Monolayer areas spread from beneath the follicles, and the follicles became flattened in appearance. These physical changes were coincident with dramatically increased growth rates. Early cultures (passed 3-12 times) divided on average every 49+/-1 h, whereas later passes (passes 20-25) divided every 28+/-3 h. To correlate these changes with a measure of thyroid function we assayed T(4) output. Early passage follicular cultures incubated for 6 h with sodium iodide, released on average 5.27+/- 0.33 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. Later passes, or early passes treated with heptanol to down-regulate Cx32, released an average of 3.84+/-0.50 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. There was a 27% difference in T(4) release between early follicular cultures, that were coupled by Cx32, and late or down-regulated early follicular cultures, that were uncoupled (P<0.0001). Collectively, the physical changes documented in this study were coincident with the loss of functional Cx32. This implies a relationship between the loss of intercellular communication and changes in morphogenic appearance, growth rate and

  4. A spontaneously arising mutation in connexin32 with repeated passage of FRTL-5 cells coincides with increased growth rate and reduced thyroxine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, L. M.; Murray, D. K.; Tran, D. T.; Nelson, G. A.; Shah, M. M.; Luben, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    regions of the Cx32 molecule contain the sequences and epitopes to which probes and antibodies are directed, and as such alterations of these regions with repeated passage explains reports by others that FRTL-5 cells do not express Cx32, and implies that cultures used for these assessments were passed more than 15 times. To determine if genetic or epigenetic abnormalities existed in FRTL-5 cells we performed chromosome spreads from various passage cultures. FRTL-5 cells have been reported to be diploid and more recently non-diploid; however, we found them to be fully tetraploid. This tetraploidy appears to be unstable in that later passes are tetraploid plus two or three extra chromosomes. There were no obvious translocations, breaks or large-scale interstitial deletions of any chromosomes in the FRTL-5 cultures tested. As FRTL-5 cells were repeatedly passed their morphology changed. Monolayer areas spread from beneath the follicles, and the follicles became flattened in appearance. These physical changes were coincident with dramatically increased growth rates. Early cultures (passed 3-12 times) divided on average every 49+/-1 h, whereas later passes (passes 20-25) divided every 28+/-3 h. To correlate these changes with a measure of thyroid function we assayed T(4) output. Early passage follicular cultures incubated for 6 h with sodium iodide, released on average 5.27+/- 0.33 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. Later passes, or early passes treated with heptanol to down-regulate Cx32, released an average of 3.84+/-0.50 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. There was a 27% difference in T(4) release between early follicular cultures, that were coupled by Cx32, and late or down-regulated early follicular cultures, that were uncoupled (P<0.0001). Collectively, the physical changes documented in this study were coincident with the loss of functional Cx32. This implies a relationship between the loss of intercellular communication and changes in morphogenic appearance, growth rate and

  5. An Alu-based, MGB Eclipse real-time PCR method for quantitation of human DNA in forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, Janice A; Buel, Eric

    2005-09-01

    The forensic community needs quick, reliable methods to quantitate human DNA in crime scene samples to replace the laborious and imprecise slot blot method. A real-time PCR based method has the possibility of allowing development of a faster and more quantitative assay. Alu sequences are primate-specific and are found in many copies in the human genome, making these sequences an excellent target or marker for human DNA. This paper describes the development of a real-time Alu sequence-based assay using MGB Eclipse primers and probes. The advantages of this assay are simplicity, speed, less hands-on-time and automated quantitation, as well as a large dynamic range (128 ng/microL to 0.5 pg/microL).

  6. Repeated sensory contact with aggressive mice rapidly leads to an anticipatory increase in core body temperature and physical activity that precedes the onset of aversive responding.

    PubMed

    Pardon, Marie-Christine; Kendall, David A; Pérez-Diaz, Fernando; Duxon, Mark S; Marsden, Charles A

    2004-08-01

    The present study investigated whether the 'psychological threat' induced by sensory contact with an aggressive conspecific would be a sufficient factor in inducing behavioural and physiological disturbances. Repeated sensory contact with an aggressive mouse (social threat) in a partitioned cage was compared with repeated exposure to a novel partitioned cage in male NMRI mice. We first examined parameters of stress responsiveness (body weight, plasma corticosterone levels, frequency of self-grooming and defecation). The temperature and physical activity responses to stress were also recorded during and after the 4 weeks of stress using radiotelemetry. Finally, cognitivo-emotional performance was assessed after acute stress and 2 and 4 weeks of stress by measuring decision making, sequential alternation performance and behaviour in the elevated T-maze. Social threat had a greater impact than novel cage exposure on most parameters of stress responsiveness, although mice did not habituate to either stressor. Social threat rapidly led to an anticipatory rise in core body temperature and physical activity before the scheduled stress sessions. Such anticipation developed within the first week and persisted for 9 days after ending the stress procedure. Some memory impairment in the sequential alternation test was found in stressed mice, independent of the stressor. After 4 weeks of stress, inhibitory avoidance in the elevated T-maze was enhanced in socially stressed mice and reduced in novel cage mice. The sustained anticipation of stress in the social threat group preceded aversive responding. It remains to be established whether anticipation contributes to the development of aversive responses.

  7. Inhibition of LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposition by exosomes encapsidating APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F

    PubMed Central

    Khatua, Atanu K.; Taylor, Harry E.; Hildreth, James E. K.; Popik, Waldemar

    2010-01-01

    Human cytidine deaminases, including APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F, are part of a cellular defense system against retroviruses and retroelements including non-LTR retrotransposons LINE-1 (L1) and Alu. Expression of cellular A3 proteins is sufficient for inhibition of L1 and Alu retrotransposition, but the effect of A3 proteins transferred in exosomes on retroelement mobilization is unknown. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that exosomes secreted by CD4+ H9 T cells and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells encapsidate A3G and A3F and inhibit L1 and Alu retrotransposition. A3G is the major contributor to the inhibitory activity of exosomes, however, the contribution of A3F in H9 exosomes cannot be excluded. Additionally, we show that exosomes encapsidate mRNAs coding for A3 proteins. A3G mRNA, and less so A3F, was enriched in exosomes secreted by H9 cells. Exosomal A3G mRNA was functional in vitro. Whether exosomes inhibit retrotransposons in vivo requires further investigation. PMID:20153011

  8. Inhibition of LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposition by exosomes encapsidating APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F.

    PubMed

    Khatua, Atanu K; Taylor, Harry E; Hildreth, James E K; Popik, Waldemar

    2010-04-25

    Human cytidine deaminases, including APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F, are part of a cellular defense system against retroviruses and retroelements including non-LTR retrotransposons LINE-1 (L1) and Alu. Expression of cellular A3 proteins is sufficient for inhibition of L1 and Alu retrotransposition, but the effect of A3 proteins transferred in exosomes on retroelement mobilization is unknown. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that exosomes secreted by CD4(+)H9 T cells and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells encapsidate A3G and A3F and inhibit L1 and Alu retrotransposition. A3G is the major contributor to the inhibitory activity of exosomes, however, the contribution of A3F in H9 exosomes cannot be excluded. Additionally, we show that exosomes encapsidate mRNAs coding for A3 proteins. A3G mRNA, and less so A3F, was enriched in exosomes secreted by H9 cells. Exosomal A3G mRNA was functional in vitro. Whether exosomes inhibit retrotransposons in vivo requires further investigation.

  9. The Y Alu polymorphism in southern African populations and its relationship to other Y-specific polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Spurdle, A.B.; Jenkins, T. ); Hammer, M.F. )

    1994-02-01

    Y-linked polymorphisms were studied in a number of African populations. The frequency of the alleles of a Y-specific Alu insertion polymorphism, termed the [open quotes]Y Alu polymorphism,[close quotes] was determined in 889 individuals from 23 different African population groups. A trend in frequency was observed, with the insert largely absent in Caucasoid populations, at intermediate frequency in the Khoisan, and at high frequency in Negroids. The insert predates diversification of Homo sapiens, since it occurs in all groups. The Alu insertion is believed to result from a unique mutation event, and comparisons between this and several other Y-linked polymorphisms were carried out in an attempt to validate their usefulness in population and evolutionary studies. The p21A1/Taql and pDP31/EcoRI polymorphisms and 49a/TaqI alleles were all shown to have arisen on more than one occasion, and evidence exists for a preraciation crossover event between the Y-linked pseudoautosomal XY275 locus and the Y chromosome pseudoautosomal boundary. 33 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. The Y Alu polymorphism in southern African populations and its relationship to other Y-specific polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Spurdle, A. B.; Hammer, M. F.; Jenkins, T.

    1994-01-01

    Y-linked polymorphisms were studied in a number of African populations. The frequency of the alleles of a Y-specific Alu insertion polymorphism, termed the "Y Alu polymorphism," was determined in 889 individuals from 23 different African population groups. A trend in frequency was observed, with the insert largely absent in Caucasoid populations, at intermediate frequency in the Khoisan, and at high frequency in Negroids. The insert predates diversification of Homo sapiens, since it occurs in all groups. The Alu insertion is believed to result from a unique mutation event, and comparisons between this and several other Y-linked polymorphisms were carried out in an attempt to validate their usefulness in population and evolutionary studies. The p21A1/TaqI and pDP31/EcoRI polymorphisms and 49a/TaqI alleles were all shown to have arisen on more than one occasion, and evidence exists for a preraciation crossover event between the Y-linked pseudoautosomal XY275 locus and the Y chromosome pseudoautosomal boundary. PMID:8304348

  11. Blood leukocyte Alu and LINE-1 methylation and gastric cancer risk in the Shanghai Women's Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Y; Baccarelli, A; Shu, X O; Ji, B-T; Yu, K; Tarantini, L; Yang, G; Li, H-L; Hou, L; Rothman, N; Zheng, W; Gao, Y-T; Chow, W-H

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recent data suggest a link between blood leukocyte DNA methylation, and cancer risk. However, reports on DNA methylation from a prospective study are unavailable for gastric cancer. Methods: We explored the association between methylation in pre-diagnostic blood leukocyte DNA and gastric cancer risk in a case–control study nested in the prospective Shanghai Women's Health Study cohort. Incident gastric cancer cases (n=192) and matched controls (n=384) were included in the study. Methylation of Alu and long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINE)-1 were evaluated using bisulphite pyrosequencing. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated from logistic regression adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Alu methylation was inversely associated with gastric cancer risk, mainly among cases diagnosed one or more years after blood collection. After excluding cases diagnosed during the first year of follow-up, the ORs for the third, second, and first quartiles of Alu methylation compared with the highest quartile were 2.43 (1.43–4.13), 1.47(0.85–2.57), and 2.22 (1.28–3.84), respectively. This association appeared to be modified by dietary intake, particularly isoflavone. In contrast, LINE-1 methylation levels were not associated with gastric cancer risk. Conclusion: Evidence from this prospective study is consistent with the hypothesis that DNA hypomethylation in blood leukocytes may be related to cancer risk, including risk of gastric cancer. PMID:22173668

  12. Effects of Short-term Exposure to Inhalable Particulate Matter on DNA Methylation of Tandem Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liqiong; Byun, Hyang-Min; Zhong, Jia; Motta, Valeria; Barupal, Jitendra; Zheng, Yinan; Dou, Chang; Zhang, Feiruo; McCracken, John P.; Diaz, Anaité; Marco, Sanchez-Guerra; Colicino, Silvia; Schwartz, Joel; Wang, Sheng; Hou, Lifang; Baccarelli, Andrea A.

    2015-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that particulate matter (PM) increases lung cancer risk by triggering systemic inflammation, and leukocyte DNA hypomethylation. However, previous investigations focused on repeated element sequences from LINE-1 and Alu families. Tandem repeats, which display a greater propensity to mutate, and are often hypomethylated in cancer patients, have never been investigated in individuals exposed to PM. We measured methylation of three tandem repeats (SATα, NBL2, D4Z4) by polymerase chain reaction–pyrosequencing on blood samples from truck drivers and office workers (60 per group) in Beijing, China. We used lightweight monitors to measure personal PM2.5 (PM with aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm) and elemental carbon (EC, a tracer of PM from vehicular traffic). Ambient PM10 data were obtained from air quality measuring stations. Overall, an interquartile increase in personal PM2.5 and ambient PM10 levels was associated with a significant covariate-adjusted decrease in SATα methylation (−1.35% 5-methyl cytosine [5mC], P = 0.01; and −1.33%5mC; P = 0.01, respectively). Effects from personal PM2.5 and ambient PM10 on SATα methylation were stronger in truck drivers (−2.34%5mC, P = 0.02; −1.44%5mC, P = 0.06) than office workers (−0.95%5mC, P = 0.26; −1.25%5mC, P = 0.12, respectively). Ambient PM10 was negatively correlated with NBL2 methylation in truck drivers (−1.38%5mC, P = 0.03) but not in office workers (1.04%5mC, P = 0.13). Our result suggests that PM exposure is associated with hypomethylation of selected tandem repeats. Measuring tandem-repeat hypomethylation in easy-to-obtain blood specimens might identify individuals with biological effects and potential cancer risk from PM exposure. PMID:24436168

  13. Population data of six Alu insertions in indigenous groups from Sabah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kee, B P; Chua, K H; Lee, P C; Lian, L H

    2012-01-01

    The present study is the first to report the genetic relatedness of indigenous populations of Sabah, Malaysia, using a set of Indel markers (HS4.32, TPA25, APO, PV92, B65 and HS3.23). The primary aim was to assess the genetic relationships among these populations and with populations from other parts of the world by examining the distribution of these markers. A total of 504 volunteers from the three largest indigenous groups, i.e. Kadazan-Dusun, Bajau and Rungus, were recruited for the study. Six Alu insertions were typed by PCR with specific primer sets. All insertions were found to present at different frequencies, ranging from 0.170-0.970. The heterozygosity of most of the markers was high (>0.4), with the exception of HS3.23 and APO. A genetic differentiation study revealed that these populations are closely related to each other (G(ST) = 0.006). A principle component plot showed that these populations have higher affinity to Mainland South East Asia/East Asia populations, rather than Island Southeast Asia (ISEA) populations. In summary, these indigenous groups were closely associated in terms of their genetic composition. This finding also supports the colonization model of ISEA, which suggests that the inhabitants of this region were mostly descendants from Southern China.

  14. Human diversity in Jordan: polymorphic Alu insertions in general Jordanian and Bedouin groups.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Daniela; Sadiq, May; Carreras-Torres, Robert; Khabour, Omar; Alkaraki, Almuthanna; Esteban, Esther; Via, Marc; Moral, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Jordan, located in the Levant region, is an area crucial for the investigation of human migration between Africa and Eurasia. However, the genetic history of Jordanians has yet to be clarified, including the origin of the Bedouins today resident in Jordan. Here, we provide new genetic data on autosomal independent markers in two Jordanian population samples (Bedouins and the general population) to begin to examine the genetic diversity inside this country and to provide new information about the genetic position of these populations in the context of the Mediterranean and Middle East area. The markers analyzed were 18 Alu polymorphic insertions characterized by their identity by descent, known ancestral state (lack of insertion), and apparent selective neutrality. The results indicate significant genetic diffferences between Bedouins and general Jordanians (p = 0.038). Whereas Bedouins show a close genetic proximity to North Africans, general Jordanians appear genetically more similar to other Middle East populations. In general, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that Bedouins had an important role in the peopling of Jordan and constitute the original substrate of the current population. However, migration into Jordan in recent years likely has contributed to the diversity among current Jordanian population groups. Copyright © 2014 Wayne State University Press, Detroit, Michigan 48201-1309.

  15. Genetic differentiation and origin of the Jordanian population: an analysis of Alu insertion polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Bahri, Raoudha; El Moncer, Wifak; Al-Batayneh, Khalid; Sadiq, May; Esteban, Esther; Moral, Pedro; Chaabani, Hassen

    2012-05-01

    Although much of Jordan is covered by desert, its north-western region forms part of the Fertile Crescent region that had given a rich past to Jordanians. This past, scarcely described by historians, is not yet clarified by sufficient genetic data. Thus in this paper we aim to determine the genetic differentiation of the Jordanian population and to discuss its origin. A total of 150 unrelated healthy Jordanians were investigated for ten Alu insertion polymorphisms. Genetic relationships among populations were estimated by a principal component (PC) plot based on the analyses of the R-matrix software. Statistical analysis showed that the Jordanian population is not significantly different from the United Arab Emirates population or the North Africans. This observation, well represented in PC plot, suggests a common origin of these populations belonging respectively to ancient Mesopotamia, Arabia, and North Africa. Our results are compatible with ancient peoples' movements from Arabia to ancient Mesopotamia and North Africa as proposed by historians and supported by previous genetic results. The original genetic profile of the Jordanian population, very likely Arabian Semitic, has not been subject to significant change despite the succession of several civilizations.

  16. Alu insertion polymorphisms in the Balkans and the origins of the Aromuns.

    PubMed

    Comas, D; Schmid, H; Braeuer, S; Flaiz, C; Busquets, A; Calafell, F; Bertranpetit, J; Scheil, H-G; Huckenbeck, W; Efremovska, L; Schmidt, H

    2004-03-01

    We have analysed 11 human-specific Alu insertion polymorphisms in the Balkans to elucidate the origins of the Aromuns, a linguistic isolate inhabiting scattered areas in the Balkan Peninsula. Four Aromun samples (two from the Republic of Macedonia, one from Albania, and one from Romania) and five neighbouring populations (Macedonians, Albanians, Romanians, Greeks, and Turks) were analysed by means of genetic distances, principal components and analyses of the molecular variance (AMOVA). Three hypotheses were tested: Aromuns are Romanophonic Greeks; the result of a Romanian southward migration; or local descendants of the Thracians. The analyses show that the Aromuns do not constitute a homogeneous group separated from the rest of the Balkan populations. Grouping by language or geography does not explain the genetic differences observed in the region, suggesting a lack of genetic structure in the area. Aromuns do not seem to be particularly related to Greeks, Romanians, or to other Romance speakers. The Aromuns might have their origin to the south of the Danube river, with extensive gene flow with the neighbouring populations. The present results suggest a common ancestry of all Balkan populations, including Aromuns, with a lack of correlation between genetic differentiation and language or ethnicity, stressing that no major migration barriers have existed in the making of the complex Balkan human puzzle.

  17. Phylogenetic information in polymorphic L1 and Alu insertions from East Asians and Native American populations.

    PubMed

    Mateus Pereira, L H; Socorro, A; Fernandez, I; Masleh, M; Vidal, D; Bianchi, N O; Bonatto, S L; Salzano, F M; Herrera, R J

    2005-09-01

    This study attempts to ascertain genetic affinities between Native American and East Asian populations by analyzing four polymorphic Alu insertions (PAIs) and three L1 polymorphic loci. These two genetic systems demonstrated strong congruence when levels of diversity and genetic distances were considered. Overall, genetic relatedness within Native American groups does not correlate with geographical and linguistic structure, although strong grouping for Native Americans with East Asians was demonstrated, with clear discrimination from African and European groups. Most of the variation was assigned to differences occurring within groups, but the interpopulation variation found for South Amerindians was recognizably higher in comparison to the other sampled groups of populations. Our data suggest that bottleneck events followed by strong influence of genetic drift in the process of the peopling of the Americas may have been determinant factors in delineating the genetic background of present-day South Amerindians. Since no clear subgroups were detected within Native Americans and East Asians, there is no indication of multiple waves in the early colonization of the New World.

  18. Questioning the "melting pot": analysis of Alu inserts in three population samples from Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Pedro C; Mut, Patricia; Ackermann, Elizabeth; Figueiro, Gonzalo; Sans, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The way that immigrants integrate into recipient societies has been discussed for decades, mainly from the perspective of the social sciences. Uruguay, as other American countries, received diffferent waves of European immigrants, although the details of the process of assimilation, when it did occur, are unclear. In this study we used genetic markers to understand the process experienced by the Basques, one of the major migration waves that populated Uruguay, and their relation to other immigrants, as well as to Native American and African descendants. For this purpose, we analyzed the allele frequencies of 10 ALU loci (A25, ACE, APOA1, B65, D1, F13B, PV92, TPA25, HS2.43, and HS4.65) in three samples from Uruguay (two of Basque descendants, one of non-Basque descendants) from two locations: Montevideo and Trinidad. No departure from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed, with the exceptions of the APOA1 and D1 loci in the non-Basque descendants' samples. Our data show that the major genetic contribution in the three samples comes from Europe (78-88%), with minor African (10-15%) and Native American (0-10%) contributions. Genetic distances reveal that Basque descendants from Trinidad cluster with Europeans, whereas both Montevideo samples cluster together and are separate from other populations, showing two diffferent types of integration, related to the general characteristics of each regional population. Copyright © 2014 Wayne State University Press, Detroit, Michigan 48201-1309.

  19. Repeated 3-minute stair climbing-descending exercise after a meal over 2 weeks increases serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol levels in people with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Hiroto; Igaki, Makoto; Hatanaka, Yuki; Komatsu, Motoaki; Tanaka, Shin-Ichiro; Miki, Tetsuo; Matsuki, Yumika; Takaishi, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the hypoglycemic effect of a postprandial exercise program using brief stair climbing-descending exercise in people with type 2 diabetes. [Subjects and Methods] Seven males with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes (age 68.0 ± 3.7 years) performed two sets of stair climbing-descending exercise 60 and 120 min after each meal for the first 2 weeks but not for the following 2 weeks. Each set of exercise comprised 3-min of continuous repetition of climbing briskly to the second floor followed by slow waking down to the first floor in their home. A rest period of 1–2 min was allowed between each set. [Results] Serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol level was significantly higher by 11.5% at the end of the 2-week exercise period than at the baseline. By contrast, the 1,5-anhydroglucitol level at the end of the following 2-week period did not differ from the baseline value. Fasting blood glucose level and insulin resistance index at the end of the exercise period did not differ from the baseline value. [Conclusion] Repeated 3-min bouts of stair climbing-descending exercise after a meal may be a promising method for improving postprandial glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes. PMID:28210043

  20. Over-expression in the nucleotide-binding site-leucine rich repeat gene DEPG1 increases susceptibility to bacterial leaf streak disease in transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lijia; Li, Min; Wang, Wujing; Wang, Lijuan; Hao, Guojing; Guo, Chiming; Chen, Liang

    2012-04-01

    Bacterial leaf streak of rice (BLS) caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) is a widely-spread disease in the main rice-producing areas of the world. Investigating the genes that play roles in rice-Xoc interactions helps us to understand the defense signaling pathway in rice. Here we report a differentially expressed protein gene (DEPG1), which regulates susceptibility to BLS. DEPG1 is a nucleotide-binding site (NBS)-leucine rich repeat (LRR) gene, and the deduced protein sequence of DEPG1 has approximately 64% identity with that of the disease resistance gene Pi37. Phylogenetic analysis of DEPG1 and the 18 characterized NBS-LRR genes revealed that DEPG1 is more closely related to Pi37. DEPG1 protein is located to the cytoplasm, which was confirmed by transient expression of DEPG1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion construct in onion epidermal cells. Semi-quantitative PCR assays showed that DEPG1 is widely expressed in rice, and is preferentially expressed in internodes, leaf blades, leaf sheaths and flag leaves. Observation of cross sections of leaves from the transgenic plants with a DEPG1-promoter::glucuronidase (GUS) fusion gene revealed that DEPG1 is also highly expressed in mesophyll tissues where Xoc mainly colonizes. Additionally, Xoc negatively regulates expression of DEPG1 at the early stage of the pathogen infection, and so do the three defense-signal compounds including salicylic acid (SA), methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic-acid (ACC). Transgenic rice plants overexpressing DEPG1 exhibit enhanced susceptibility to Xoc compared to the wild-type controls. Moreover, enhanced susceptibility to Xoc may be mediated by inhibition of the expression of some SA biosynthesis-related genes and pathogenesis-related genes that may contribute to the disease resistance. Taken together, DEPG1 plays roles in the interactions between rice and BLS pathogen Xoc.

  1. The Infertility of Repeat-Breeder Cows During Summer Is Associated with Decreased Mitochondrial DNA and Increased Expression of Mitochondrial and Apoptotic Genes in Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Roberta Machado; Chiaratti, Marcos Roberto; Macabelli, Carolina Habermann; Rodrigues, Carlos Alberto; Ferraz, Márcio Leão; Watanabe, Yeda Fumie; Smith, Lawrence Charles; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira; Baruselli, Pietro Sampaio

    2016-03-01

    Oocyte quality is known to be a major cause of infertility in repeat-breeder (RB) and heat-stressed dairy cows. However, the mechanisms by which RB oocytes become less capable of supporting embryo development remain largely unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the decreased oocyte competence of RB cows (RBs) during summer is associated with an altered gene expression profile and a decrease in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number. Therefore, oocytes collected from heifers, non-RBs in peak lactation (PLs), and RBs were used to evaluate mtDNA amounts as well as the expression levels of genes associated with the mitochondria (MT-CO1, NRF1, POLG, POLG2, PPARGC1A, and TFAM), apoptosis (BAX, BCL2, and ITM2B), and oocyte maturation (BMP15, FGF8, FGF10, FGF16, FGF17, and GDF9). The oocytes retrieved from RBs during winter contained over eight times more mtDNA than those retrieved from RBs during summer. They also contained significantly less mtDNA than oocytes retrieved from heifers and PLs during summer. Moreover, the expression of mitochondria- (NRF1, POLG, POLG2, PPARGC1A, and TFAM) and apoptosis-related (BAX and ITM2B) genes, as well as of GDF9, in RB oocytes collected during summer was significantly greater than that in oocytes collected from heifers and PLs during the same season. In oocytes from heifers and PLs, the expression levels of these genes were lower in those collected during summer compared with winter, but this difference was not observed in oocytes collected from RBs. Altogether, these data provide evidence of altered gene expression and reduced mtDNA copy number in the oocytes collected from RBs during summer. This indicates a loss of fertility in RBs during summer, which might be caused by a possible mitochondrial dysfunction associated with a greater chance of oocytes to undergo apoptosis.

  2. Opposing Control by Transcription Factors MYB61 and MYB3 Increases Freezing Tolerance by Relieving C-Repeat Binding Factor Suppression1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunqin; Miao, Zhenyan; Xie, Can; Meng, Xiangzhao; Deng, Jie; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Frugier, Florian; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Cold acclimation is an important process by which plants respond to low temperature and enhance their winter hardiness. C-REPEAT BINDING FACTOR1 (CBF1), CBF2, and CBF3 genes were shown previously to participate in cold acclimation in Medicago truncatula. In addition, MtCBF4 is transcriptionally induced by salt, drought, and cold stresses. We show here that MtCBF4, shown previously to enhance drought and salt tolerance, also positively regulates cold acclimation and freezing tolerance. To identify molecular factors acting upstream and downstream of the MtCBF4 transcription factor (TF) in cold responses, we first identified genes that are differentially regulated upon MtCBF4 overexpression using RNAseq Digital Gene Expression Profiling. Among these, we showed that MtCBF4 directly activates the transcription of the COLD ACCLIMATION SPECIFIC15 (MtCAS15) gene. To gain insights into how MtCBF4 is transcriptionally regulated in response to cold, an R2R3-MYB TF, MtMYB3, was identified based on a yeast one-hybrid screen as binding directly to MYB cis-elements in the MtCBF4 promoter, leading to the inhibition of MtCBF4 expression. In addition, another MYB TF, MtMYB61, identified as an interactor of MtMYB3, can relieve the inhibitory effect of MtMYB3 on MtCBF4 transcription. This study, therefore, supports a model describing how MtCBF4 is regulated by antagonistic MtMYB3/MtMYB61 TFs, leading to the up-regulation of downstream targets such as MtCAS15 acting in cold acclimation in M. truncatula. PMID:27578551

  3. Effect of repeated benzimidazole treatments with increasing dosages on the phenotype of resistance and the beta-tubulin codon 200 genotype distribution in a benzimidazole-resistant cyathostomin population.

    PubMed

    Drogemuller, Michaela; Failing, Klaus; Schnieder, Thomas; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg

    2004-09-02

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of repeated treatments with increasingly high fenbendazole (FBZ) dosages on the phenotype and genotype of a benzimidazole (BZ)-resistant cyathostomin population. An experimentally infected horse was treated repeatedly with FBZ dose rates between 7.5 and 30.0 mg/kg body weight (bw) over approximately 2 years. Faecal egg counts (FECs) and larval cultures were performed weekly. A total of 45 faecal egg count reduction tests (FECRTs) were analysed, revealing a high variability during the course of experiment with a mean value in faecal egg count reduction (FECR) of -17% (S.D. +/- 78). The FECR was always < 90%, providing the evidence of BZ resistance. Nine egg hatch tests were performed during the course of the experiment and revealed LD(50) values between 0.20 and 0.31 microg/ml thiabendazole (TBZ) and LD(96) values of > 0.36 microg/ml TBZ, confirming the phenotype of resistance. The LD(99) varied between 0.40 and 0.63 microg/ml TBZ. Despite consecutive treatments, no noticeable increase of the LD(50), LD(96) and LD(99) values was detected for the duration of the experiment. The molecular analysis of the codon 200 of 106 third stage larvae (L3) was carried out following repeated treatments with 30 mg FBZ/kg bw. Out of these larvae 32% were homozygous TTC/TTC, 60% showed the heterozygous TTC/TAC genotype, and 8% were homozygous TAC/TAC. The resulting allele frequencies were 62% for TTC and 38% for TAC. These findings suggest that repeated BZ treatments with increasing dosages do not alter significantly the FECRT and EHT characteristics of a BZ-resistant cyathostomin population. Furthermore, it may also be concluded that, in contrast to sheep trichostrongyles, such a selection regime does not result in beta-tubulin codon 200 TAC allele autocracy.

  4. Canonical TTAGG-repeat telomeres and telomerase in the honey bee, Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Hugh M; Gordon, Karl H J

    2006-11-01

    The draft assembly of the honey bee Apis mellifera genome sequence reveals that the 17 centromeric-distal telomeres are of a simple, shared, and canonical structure, with 3-4 kb of a unique subtelomeric sequence, followed by several kilobases of TTAGG or variant telomeric repeats. This simple subtelomeric structure differs from the centromeric-proximal telomeres on the short arms of the 15 acrocentric chromosomes, which are apparently composed primarily of the 176-bp AluI tandem repeat. This dichotomy between the distal and proximal telomeres may involve differential participation of the telomeres of the 15 acrocentric chromosomes in the Rabl configuration after mitosis and the chromosome bouquet in meiotic prophase I. As expected from the presence of canonical TTAGG telomeric repeats, we identified a candidate telomerase gene in the bee, as well as the silkmoth Bombyx mori and the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum.

  5. Canonical TTAGG-repeat telomeres and telomerase in the honey bee, Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Hugh M.; Gordon, Karl H.J.

    2006-01-01

    The draft assembly of the honey bee Apis mellifera genome sequence reveals that the 17 centromeric-distal telomeres are of a simple, shared, and canonical structure, with 3–4 kb of a unique subtelomeric sequence, followed by several kilobases of TTAGG or variant telomeric repeats. This simple subtelomeric structure differs from the centromeric-proximal telomeres on the short arms of the 15 acrocentric chromosomes, which are apparently composed primarily of the 176-bp AluI tandem repeat. This dichotomy between the distal and proximal telomeres may involve differential participation of the telomeres of the 15 acrocentric chromosomes in the Rabl configuration after mitosis and the chromosome bouquet in meiotic prophase I. As expected from the presence of canonical TTAGG telomeric repeats, we identified a candidate telomerase gene in the bee, as well as the silkmoth Bombyx mori and the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. PMID:17065609

  6. A low-volume polyethylene glycol solution was associated with an increased suboptimal bowel preparation rate but had similar recommendations for an early repeat colonoscopy, procedure times, and adenoma detection rates.

    PubMed

    Hankins, Sam C; Brimhall, Bryan B; Kankanala, Vineel; Austin, Gregory L

    2017-01-01

    Low-volume polyethylene glycol (PEG) bowel preparations are better tolerated by patients than high-volume preparations and may achieve similar preparation quality. However, there is little data comparing their effects on a recommendation for an early repeat colonoscopy (because of a suboptimal preparation), procedure times, adenoma detection rate (ADR), and advanced adenoma detection rate (AADR). This is a retrospective cohort study of outpatient colonoscopies performed during a one-year period at a single academic medical center in which low-volume MoviPrep® (n = 1841) or high-volume Colyte® (n = 1337) was used. All preparations were split-dosed. Appropriate covariates were included in regression models assessing suboptimal preparation quality (fair, poor, or inadequate), procedure times, recommendation for an early repeat colonoscopy, ADR, and AADR. MoviPrep® was associated with an increase in having a suboptimal bowel preparation (OR 1.36; 95% CI: 1.06-1.76), but it was not associated with differences in insertion (p = 0.43), withdrawal (p = 0.22), or total procedure times (p = 0.10). The adjusted percentage with a suboptimal preparation was 11.7% for patients using MoviPrep® and 8.8% for patients using Colyte®. MoviPrep® was not associated with a significant difference in overall ADR (OR 0.93; 95% CI: 0.78-1.11), AADR (OR 1.18; 95% CI: 0.87-1.62), or recommendation for early repeat colonoscopy (OR 1.16; 95% CI: 0.72-1.88). MoviPrep® was associated with a small absolute increase in having a suboptimal preparation, but did not affect recommendations for an early repeat colonoscopy, procedure times, or adenoma detection rates. Mechanisms to reduce financial barriers limiting low-volume preparations should be considered because of their favorable tolerability profile.

  7. Alu and L1 sequence distributions in Xq24-q28 and their comparative utility in YAC contig assembly and verification

    SciTech Connect

    Porta, G.; Zucchi, I.; Schlessinger, D.; Hillier, L.; Green, P.; Nowotny, V.; D`Urso, M.

    1993-05-01

    The contents of Alu- and L1-containing TaqI restriction fragments were assessed by Southern blot analyses across YAC contigs already assembled by other means and localized within Xq24-q28. Fingerprinting patterns of YACs in contigs were concordant. Using software based on that of M. V. Olson et al. to analyze digitized data on fragment sizes, fingerprinting itself could establish matches among about 40% of a test group of 435 YACs. At 100-kb resolution, both repetitive elements were found throughout the region, with no apparent enrichment of Alu or L1 in DNA of G compared to that found in R bands. However, consistent with a random overall distribution, delimited regions of up to 100 kb contained clusters of repetitive elements. The local concentrations may help to account for the reported differential hybridization of Alu and L1 probes to segments of metaphase chromosomes. 40 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Conserved 3' UTR stem-loop structure in L1 and Alu transposons in human genome: possible role in retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Grechishnikova, Daria; Poptsova, Maria

    2016-12-03

    In the process of retrotransposition LINEs use their own machinery for copying and inserting themselves into new genomic locations, while SINEs are parasitic and require the machinery of LINEs. The exact mechanism of how a LINE-encoded reverse transcriptase (RT) recognizes its own and SINE RNA remains unclear. However it was shown for the stringent-type LINEs that recognition of a stem-loop at the 3'UTR by RT is essential for retrotransposition. For the relaxed-type LINEs it is believed that the poly-A tail is a common recognition element between LINE and SINE RNA. However polyadenylation is a property of any messenger RNA, and how the LINE RT recognizes transposon and non-transposon RNAs remains an open question. It is likely that RNA secondary structures play an important role in RNA recognition by LINE encoded proteins. Here we selected a set of L1 and Alu elements from the human genome and investigated their sequences for the presence of position-specific stem-loop structures. We found highly conserved stem-loop positions at the 3'UTR. Comparative structural analyses of a human L1 3'UTR stem-loop showed a similarity to 3'UTR stem-loops of the stringent-type LINEs, which were experimentally shown to be recognized by LINE RT. The consensus stem-loop structure consists of 5-7 bp loop, 8-10 bp stem with a bulge at a distance of 4-6 bp from the loop. The results show that a stem loop with a bulge exists at the 3'-end of Alu. We also found conserved stem-loop positions at 5'UTR and at the end of ORF2 and discuss their possible role. Here we presented an evidence for the presence of a highly conserved 3'UTR stem-loop structure in L1 and Alu retrotransposons in the human genome. Both stem-loops show structural similarity to the stem-loops of the stringent-type LINEs experimentally confirmed as essential for retrotransposition. Here we hypothesize that both L1 and Alu RNA are recognized by L1 RT via the 3'-end RNA stem-loop structure. Other conserved stem

  9. Emulsifying and Foaming Properties of Different Protein Fractions Obtained from a Novel Lupin Variety AluProt-CGNA(®) (Lupinus luteus).

    PubMed

    Burgos-Díaz, César; Piornos, José A; Wandersleben, Traudy; Ogura, Takahiro; Hernández, Xaviera; Rubilar, Mónica

    2016-07-01

    The use of vegetable proteins as food ingredient is becoming increasingly important due to their high versatility and environmental acceptability. This work describes a chemical characterization and techno-functional properties (emulsifying and foaming properties) of 3 protein fractions obtained from a protein-rich novel lupin variety, AluProt-CGNA(®) . This nongenetically modified variety have a great protein content in dehulled seeds (60.6 g protein/100 g, dry matter), which is higher than soybean and other lupin varieties. A simple procedure was utilized to obtain 3 different fractions by using alkali solubilization and isoelectric precipitation. Fractions 1 and 3 were mainly composed of protein and polysaccharides (NNE), whereas fraction 2 was mainly composed by protein (97%, w/w). Fraction 3 presented interesting and potential foaming properties in comparison to the other fractions evaluated in the study. Besides, its solubility, foaming and emulsifying capacity were practically not affected by pH variations. The 3 fractions also presented good emulsion stability, reaching values above a 95%. SDS-PAGE showed that fractions 1 and 2 contained mainly conglutin α, β, and δ, but in different ratios, whereas fraction 3 contained mainly conglutin γ and albumins. The results of this work will provide better understanding for the utilization of each protein fractions as potential ingredients in food industry.

  10. Are the surgeon's movements repeatable? An analysis of the feasibility and expediency of implementing support procedures guiding the surgical tools and increasing motion accuracy during the performance of stereotypical movements by the surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Podsędkowski, Leszek Robert; Moll, Jacek; Moll, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The developments in surgical robotics suggest that it will be possible to entrust surgical robots with a wider range of tasks. So far, it has not been possible to automate the surgery procedures related to soft tissue. Thus, the objective of the conducted studies was to confirm the hypothesis that the surgery telemanipulator can be equipped with certain routines supporting the surgeon in leading the surgical tools and increasing motion accuracy during stereotypical movements. As the first step in facilitating the surgery, an algorithm will be developed which will concurrently provide automation and allow the surgeon to maintain full control over the slave robot. The algorithm will assist the surgeon in performing typical movement sequences. This kind of support must, however, be preceded by determining the reference points for accurately defining the position of the stitched tissue. It is in relation to these points that the tool's trajectory will be created, along which the master manipulator will guide the surgeon's hand. The paper presents the first stage, concerning the selection of movements for which the support algorithm will be used. The work also contains an analysis of surgical movement repeatability. The suturing movement was investigated in detail by experimental research in order to determine motion repeatability and verify the position of the stitched tissue. Tool trajectory was determined by a motion capture stereovision system. The study has demonstrated that the suturing movement could be considered as repeatable; however, the trajectories performed by different surgeons exhibit some individual characteristics. PMID:26336404

  11. Are the surgeon's movements repeatable? An analysis of the feasibility and expediency of implementing support procedures guiding the surgical tools and increasing motion accuracy during the performance of stereotypical movements by the surgeon.

    PubMed

    Podsędkowski, Leszek Robert; Moll, Jacek; Moll, Maciej; Frącczak, Łukasz

    2014-03-01

    The developments in surgical robotics suggest that it will be possible to entrust surgical robots with a wider range of tasks. So far, it has not been possible to automate the surgery procedures related to soft tissue. Thus, the objective of the conducted studies was to confirm the hypothesis that the surgery telemanipulator can be equipped with certain routines supporting the surgeon in leading the surgical tools and increasing motion accuracy during stereotypical movements. As the first step in facilitating the surgery, an algorithm will be developed which will concurrently provide automation and allow the surgeon to maintain full control over the slave robot. The algorithm will assist the surgeon in performing typical movement sequences. This kind of support must, however, be preceded by determining the reference points for accurately defining the position of the stitched tissue. It is in relation to these points that the tool's trajectory will be created, along which the master manipulator will guide the surgeon's hand. The paper presents the first stage, concerning the selection of movements for which the support algorithm will be used. The work also contains an analysis of surgical movement repeatability. The suturing movement was investigated in detail by experimental research in order to determine motion repeatability and verify the position of the stitched tissue. Tool trajectory was determined by a motion capture stereovision system. The study has demonstrated that the suturing movement could be considered as repeatable; however, the trajectories performed by different surgeons exhibit some individual characteristics.

  12. Repeatedly Heading a Soccer Ball Does Not Increase Serum Levels of S-100B, a Biochemical Marker of Brain Tissue Damage: an Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie; Sojka, Peter

    2008-02-29

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to analyse whether the controlled heading of soccer balls elicits increased serum concentrations of a biochemical marker of brain tissue damage S-100B. METHODS: Nineteen male soccer players were randomly divided into two groups, A and B. Group A headed a soccer ball falling from 18 m five times, while group B served as controls (no heading). Blood samples were taken before and 0.5 h, 2 h and 4 h after the heading for analysis of S-100B. RESULTS: No statistically significant (p > 0.05) increases in serum concentrations of S-100B were encountered in group A at 0.5 h (0.109 +/-0.024 mug/L), 2 h (0.098 +/- 0.026 mug/L), and 4 h (0.113 +/- 0.035 mug/L) when the blood samples obtained before and after the heading were compared (0.157 +/- 0.134 mug/L). No statistically significant difference was found when the serum concentrations of S-100B were compared between groups A and B either before or after heading. CONCLUSIONS: Heading a soccer ball dropped from a height of 18 m five times was not found to cause an increase in serum concentrations of S-100B, indicating that the impact was not sufficient to cause biochemically discernible damage of brain tissue.

  13. Repeatedly Heading a Soccer Ball Does Not Increase Serum Levels of S-100B, a Biochemical Marker of Brain Tissue Damage: an Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie; Sojka, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to analyse whether the controlled heading of soccer balls elicits increased serum concentrations of a biochemical marker of brain tissue damage S-100B. Methods Nineteen male soccer players were randomly divided into two groups, A and B. Group A headed a soccer ball falling from 18 m five times, while group B served as controls (no heading). Blood samples were taken before and 0.5 h, 2 h and 4 h after the heading for analysis of S-100B. Results No statistically significant (p > 0.05) increases in serum concentrations of S-100B were encountered in group A at 0.5 h (0.109 ±0.024 μg/L), 2 h (0.098 ± 0.026 μg/L), and 4 h (0.113 ± 0.035 μg/L) when the blood samples obtained before and after the heading were compared (0.157 ± 0.134 μg/L). No statistically significant difference was found when the serum concentrations of S-100B were compared between groups A and B either before or after heading. Conclusions Heading a soccer ball dropped from a height of 18 m five times was not found to cause an increase in serum concentrations of S-100B, indicating that the impact was not sufficient to cause biochemically discernible damage of brain tissue. PMID:19578497

  14. Increasing Belief in the Effectiveness of HIV Treatment as Prevention: Results of Repeated, National Surveys of Australian Gay and Bisexual Men, 2013-15.

    PubMed

    Holt, Martin; Lea, Toby; Schmidt, Heather-Marie; Murphy, Dean; Rosengarten, Marsha; Crawford, David; Ellard, Jeanne; Kolstee, Johann; de Wit, John

    2016-07-01

    We surveyed Australian gay and bisexual men, assessing belief in HIV treatment as prevention (TasP) and support for early treatment. We identified the characteristics of participants who believed in TasP and supported early treatment using multivariate logistic regression. In 2013, 1316 men participated; 1251 participated in 2015. Belief in TasP increased from 2.6 % in 2013 to 13.1 % in 2015 (p < 0.001). The increase was most noticeable among HIV-positive men (from 9.7 % to 46.2 %). Support for early treatment increased from 71.8 % to 75.3 % (p = 0.02). Belief in TasP was associated with being HIV-positive, having a tertiary education, having recent condomless anal intercourse with casual male partners, and ever having taken post-exposure prophylaxis. Support for early HIV treatment was associated with being younger, living in New South Wales and being in paid employment. We recommend continued monitoring of the growing gap in belief about TasP between HIV-positive men and HIV-negative/untested men.

  15. Progressive Seizure Aggravation in the Repeated 6-Hz Corneal Stimulation Model Is Accompanied by Marked Increase in Hippocampal p-ERK1/2 Immunoreactivity in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Carmela; Costa, Anna M.; Lucchi, Chiara; Leo, Giuseppina; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; Torsello, Antonio; Biagini, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The 6-Hz corneal stimulation test is used to screen novel antiepileptic molecules to overcome the problem of drug refractoriness. Although recognized as a standard test, it has been evaluated only recently in the attempt to characterize the putative neuronal networks involved in seizures caused by corneal stimulation. In particular, by recording from the CA1 region we previously established that the hippocampus participates to propagation of seizure activity. However, these findings were not corroborated by using markers of neuronal activation such as FosB/ΔFosB antigens. In view of this discrepancy, we performed new experiments to characterize the changes in levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases1/2 (p-ERK1/2), which are also used as markers of neuronal activation. To this aim, mice underwent corneal stimulation up to three different times, in three sessions separated by an interval of 3 days. To characterize a group in which seizures could be prevented by pharmacological treatment, we also considered pretreatment with the ghrelin receptor antagonist EP-80317 (330 μg/kg). Control mice were sham-treated. Video electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings were obtained from mice belonging to each group of treatment. Animals were finally used to characterize the immunoreactivity for FosB/ΔFosB and p-ERK1/2 in the hippocampus. As previously shown, FosB/ΔFosB levels were highly increased throughout the hippocampus by the first induced seizure but, in spite of the progressively increased seizure severity, they were restored to control levels after the third stimulation. At variance, corneal stimulation caused a progressive increase in p-ERK1/2 immunoreactivity all over the hippocampus, especially in CA1, peaking in the third session. Predictably, EP-80317 administration reduced both duration and severity of seizures, prevented the increase in FosB/ΔFosB levels in the first session, and partially counteracted the increase in p-ERK1/2 levels in

  16. The reinforcement enhancing effects of nicotine depend on the incentive value of non-drug reinforcers and increase with repeated drug injections.

    PubMed

    Palmatier, Matthew I; Matteson, Gina L; Black, Jessica J; Liu, Xiu; Caggiula, Anthony R; Craven, Laure; Donny, Eric C; Sved, Alan F

    2007-06-15

    We have hypothesized that nicotine has two effects on reinforcement; it increases the probability of responses resulting in nicotine delivery (primary reinforcement) and enhances the apparent reward value of non-nicotine reinforcers (reinforcement enhancing effect). The present studies investigated two predictions generated by this hypothesis: (1) that the reinforcement enhancing effect will depend on apparent stimulus reward value and (2) that the temporal profile of this effect would depend on the pharmacological profile of nicotine. In Experiment 1, rats were trained to lever press for one of two audio-visual stimuli that differed in their intrinsic reinforcing value and then the effect of pre-session nicotine (0.4 mg/kg base) or saline injections was tested. The stimulus that supported very low rates of operant responding displayed smaller increases in responding after pre-session injections of nicotine. In Experiment 2 the effect of nicotine injected 5 min before the session was compared to the effect of nicotine injected 1h after the session using the more reinforcing stimulus condition from the first experiment. A control group received only vehicle injections. In contrast to nicotine injected just prior to the session, post-session injections of nicotine had no detectable effect on responding for the more reinforcing stimulus. These results indicate that the reinforcement enhancing action of nicotine depends on the intensity of the primary reinforcer and that enhanced reinforcement by nicotine depends on coincident access to a stimulus with reinforcing properties.

  17. The reinforcement enhancing effects of nicotine depend on the incentive value of non-drug reinforcers and increase with repeated drug injections

    PubMed Central

    Palmatier, Matthew I.; Matteson, Gina L.; Black, Jessica J.; Liu, Xiu; Caggiula, Anthony R.; Craven, Laure; Donny, Eric C.; Sved, Alan F.

    2007-01-01

    We have hypothesized that nicotine has two effects on reinforcement; it increases the probability of responses resulting in nicotine delivery (primary reinforcement) and enhances the apparent reward value of non-nicotine reinforcers (reinforcement enhancing effect). The present studies investigated two predictions generated by this hypothesis: 1) that the reinforcement enhancing effect will depend on apparent stimulus reward value, and 2) that the temporal profile of this effect would depend on the pharmacological profile of nicotine. In Experiment 1, rats were trained to lever press for one of two audio-visual stimuli that differed in their intrinsic reinforcing value and then the effect of pre-session nicotine (0.4 mg/kg base) or saline injections was tested. The stimulus that supported very low rates of operant responding displayed smaller increases in responding after pre-session injections of nicotine. In Experiment 2 the effect of nicotine injected 5 min before the session was compared to the effect of nicotine injected 1 h after the session using the more reinforcing stimulus condition from the first experiment. A control group received only vehicle injections. In contrast to nicotine injected just prior to the session, post-session injections of nicotine had no detectable effect on responding for the more reinforcing stimulus. These results indicate that the reinforcement enhancing action of nicotine depends on the intensity of the primary reinforcer and that enhanced reinforcement by nicotine depends on coincident access to a stimulus with reinforcing properties. PMID:17240084

  18. A Repeated Measures Experiment of School Playing Environment to Increase Physical Activity and Enhance Self-Esteem in UK School Children

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Carly; Gladwell, Valerie; Barton, Jo

    2014-01-01

    School playtime provides daily opportunities for children to be active outdoors, but only makes small contributions to physical activity (PA) requirements. Natural environments facilitate unstructured PA and children report a preference for play in nature. Thus, play on the school field might encourage children to be more active during playtime. The primary aim of this study was to examine the impact of the school playing environment on children's PA. Descriptive data and fitness were assessed in 25 children aged 8–9 years from a single primary school. Over two consecutive weeks participants were allocated to either play on the school field or playground during playtime. The order of play in the two areas was randomised and counterbalanced. Moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) was assessed during playtime on the last two days of each week using accelerometers. There was a significant interaction of environment and sex on MVPA during morning play (F(1,22) = 6.27; P<0.05; np2 = 0.222), but not during lunch (P>0.05; np2 = 0.060) or all of playtime combined (P>0.05; np2 = 0.140). During morning play boys were significantly more active than girls on the playground (t(23) = 1.32; P<0.01; n2 = 0.291), but not on the field (P>0.05; n2 = 0.071). For lunch (F(1,22) = 24,11; P<0.001; np2 = 0.523) and all of playtime combined (F(1,22) = 33.67; P<0.001; np2 = 0.616) there was a significant effect of environment. There was also a significant main effect of sex during lunch (F(1,22) = 11.56; P<0.01; np2 = 0.344) and all of playtime combined (F(1,22) = 12.37; P<0.01; np2 = 0.371). MVPA was higher on the field and boys were more active than girls. Play on the field leads to increases in MVPA, particularly in girls. The promising trend for the effect of the natural environment on MVPA indicates that interventions aimed at increasing MVPA should use the natural environment and that schools should encourage greater use of their

  19. Development of an Alu-based, real-time PCR method for quantitation of human DNA in forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, Janice A; Buel, Eric

    2003-09-01

    Determining the amount of human DNA extracted from a crime scene sample is an important step in DNA profiling. The forensic community relies almost entirely upon a technique (slot blot) to quantitate human DNA that is imprecise, time consuming, and labor intensive. We have previously described a method for quantitation of human DNA based on PCR amplification of a repetitive Alu sequence that uses a fluorescence plate reader. This manuscript describes and validates a variation of this assay using real-time PCR and SYBR Green I for quantitation. The advantages of the real-time assay over the plate reader assay are: reduced hands-on time, lower assay cost, and a greater dynamic range. The main disadvantage is the cost of the real-time instrument. However, for those forensic laboratories with access to a real-time instrument, this Alu-based assay has a dynamic range of 16 ng to 1 pg, is sensitive, specific, fast, quantitative, and uses only 2 microL of sample.

  20. LINE1 and Alu repetitive element DNA methylation in tumors and white blood cells from epithelial ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Stacey N.; Moysich, Kirsten; Zhang, Wa; Lai, Golda Collamat; Miller, Austin; Lele, Shashikant; Odunsi, Kunle; Karpf, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We determined whether DNA methylation of repetitive elements (RE) is altered in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patient tumors and white blood cells (WBC), compared to normal tissue controls. Methods Two different quantitative measures of RE methylation (LINE1 and Alu bisulfite pyrosequencing) were used in normal and tumor tissues from EOC cases and controls. Tissues analyzed included: i) EOC, ii) normal ovarian surface epithelia (OSE), iii) normal fallopian tube surface epithelia (FTE), iv) WBC from EOC patients, obtained before and after treatment, and v) WBC from demographically-matched controls. Results REs were significantly hypomethylated in EOC compared to OSE and FTE, and LINE1 and Alu methylation showed a significant direct association in these tissues. In contrast, WBC RE methylation was significantly higher in EOC cases compared to controls. RE methylation in patient-matched EOC tumors and pre-treatment WBC did not correlate. Conclusions EOC shows robust RE hypomethylation compared to normal tissues from which the disease arises. In contrast, RE are generally hypermethylated in EOC patient WBC compared to controls. EOC tumor and WBC methylation did not correlate in matched patients, suggesting that RE methylation is independently controlled in tumor and normal tissues. Despite the significant differences observed over the population, the range of RE methylation in patient and control WBC overlapped, limiting their specific utility as an EOC biomarker. However, our data demonstrate that DNA methylation is deranged in normal tissues from EOC patients, supporting further investigation of WBC DNA methylation biomarkers suitable for EOC risk assessment. PMID:24374023

  1. School-based intervention with children. Peer-modeling, reward and repeated exposure reduce food neophobia and increase liking of fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Laureati, Monica; Bergamaschi, Valentina; Pagliarini, Ella

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of the 'Food Dudes' school-based intervention consisting of rewards, peer-modeling and food exposure on food neophobia and the liking of fruits and vegetables (FV) in a large cohort of children. Five-hundred sixty children recruited from three schools were assigned to the experimental or control group. For 16 days, children in the experimental group watched motivational videos, were read letters to encourage them to eat FV and received a small reward for eating one portion of both a fruit and a vegetable. The control group was only provided with FV for the same time period. Food neophobia and liking were measured in both groups of children before and after the intervention, and a follow-up measurement was carried out 6 months later. The intervention was effective in reducing food neophobia and, most importantly, a persistent effect was observed 6 months after the intervention as children of the experimental group showed significantly lower neophobia scores than the control group. Additionally, the program was effective in increasing liking for both FV; however, this effect was maintained only for fruit after 6 months.

  2. Repeating LP events and increases in high-frequency seismic energy preceding the December 1999 eruption of the quiescently active Telica Volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, M.; Roman, D. C.; Geirsson, H.; Lafemina, P.; Muñoz, A.; Guzman, C.; Tenorio, V.

    2010-12-01

    Telica volcano, Nicaragua, is a ‘quiescently active’ basaltic andesite stratovolcano located in the Central American volcanic front. A high rate of long-period (LP) seismicity has been recorded at Telica since the installation of a single vertical-component 1 Hz seismic sensor (TELN) near its summit in 1993 by the Instituto Nicaragüense de Estudios Territoriales (INETER). Due to the continuously high rate of LPs at Telica, traditional methods of forecasting volcanic activity may not be applicable; therefore an understanding of the nature of precursory changes in Telica’s seismicity is necessary to accurately forecast future volcanic activity. A VEI 2 eruption of Telica occurred on the 29th December 1999, preceded by a series of small explosions between the 3rd-15th October 1999. Here we analyse an eight-month period of seismicity bracketing this activity, in an attempt to identify precursory changes with respect to background seismicity. Between August 1999 and March 2000 over 18,000 seismic events were recorded on TELN. We first calculated the dominant frequencies (i.e. frequency with dominant spectral energy) for all events recorded during this period. A time series of the dominant event frequencies between August 1999 and March 2000 shows a significant increase in the number of high frequency (> 5 Hz) events and, in LP events, a shift in the two dominant spectral energy peaks from 2 Hz and 4 Hz to 2 Hz and 3 Hz in the month before the October 1999 explosions. Next, we selected six representative eight-day periods, three from before the explosions and three from after, for multiplet analysis using waveform cross-correlation. Multiplet analysis of the six selected time periods reveal significant changes in behaviour. In period 1 (more than one month before the explosions) events are poorly correlated. In periods 2 and 3 (less than one month before the explosions) we identified several unique families of LP events, each having high cross-correlation values

  3. N-Terminal Ile-Orn- and Trp-Orn-Motif Repeats Enhance Membrane Interaction and Increase the Antimicrobial Activity of Apidaecins against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bluhm, Martina E. C.; Schneider, Viktoria A. F.; Schäfer, Ingo; Piantavigna, Stefania; Goldbach, Tina; Knappe, Daniel; Seibel, Peter; Martin, Lisandra L.; Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a life-threatening nosocomial pathogen due to its generally low susceptibility toward antibiotics. Furthermore, many strains have acquired resistance mechanisms requiring new antimicrobials with novel mechanisms to enhance treatment options. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides, such as the apidaecin analog Api137, are highly efficient against various Enterobacteriaceae infections in mice, but less active against P. aeruginosa in vitro. Here, we extended our recent work by optimizing lead peptides Api755 (gu-OIORPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH; gu = N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylguanidino, O = L-ornithine) and Api760 (gu-OWORPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) by incorporation of Ile-Orn- and Trp-Orn-motifs, respectively. Api795 (gu-O(IO)2RPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) and Api794 (gu-O(WO)3RPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) were highly active against P. aeruginosa with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 8–16 and 8–32 μg/mL against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Assessed using a quartz crystal microbalance, these peptides inserted into a membrane layer and the surface activity increased gradually from Api137, over Api795, to Api794. This mode of action was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy indicating some membrane damage only at the high peptide concentrations. Api794 and Api795 were highly stable against serum proteases (half-life times >5 h) and non-hemolytic to human erythrocytes at peptide concentrations of 0.6 g/L. At this concentration, Api795 reduced the cell viability of HeLa cells only slightly, whereas the IC50 of Api794 was 0.23 ± 0.09 g/L. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed no colocalization of 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein-labeled Api794 or Api795 with the mitochondria, excluding interactions with the mitochondrial membrane. Interestingly, Api795 was localized in endosomes, whereas Api794 was present in endosomes and the cytosol. This was verified using flow cytometry showing a 50% higher uptake of Api794 in HeLa cells compared

  4. Direct Competition between hnRNP C and U2AF65 Protects the Transcriptome from the Exonization of Alu Elements

    PubMed Central

    Zarnack, Kathi; König, Julian; Tajnik, Mojca; Martincorena, Iñigo; Eustermann, Sebastian; Stévant, Isabelle; Reyes, Alejandro; Anders, Simon; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Ule, Jernej

    2013-01-01

    Summary There are ∼650,000 Alu elements in transcribed regions of the human genome. These elements contain cryptic splice sites, so they are in constant danger of aberrant incorporation into mature transcripts. Despite posing a major threat to transcriptome integrity, little is known about the molecular mechanisms preventing their inclusion. Here, we present a mechanism for protecting the human transcriptome from the aberrant exonization of transposable elements. Quantitative iCLIP data show that the RNA-binding protein hnRNP C competes with the splicing factor U2AF65 at many genuine and cryptic splice sites. Loss of hnRNP C leads to formation of previously suppressed Alu exons, which severely disrupt transcript function. Minigene experiments explain disease-associated mutations in Alu elements that hamper hnRNP C binding. Thus, by preventing U2AF65 binding to Alu elements, hnRNP C plays a critical role as a genome-wide sentinel protecting the transcriptome. The findings have important implications for human evolution and disease. PMID:23374342

  5. A Repeat Look at Repeating Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markworth, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    A "repeating pattern" is a cyclical repetition of an identifiable core. Children in the primary grades usually begin pattern work with fairly simple patterns, such as AB, ABC, or ABB patterns. The unique letters represent unique elements, whereas the sequence of letters represents the core that is repeated. Based on color, shape,…

  6. Repeated Reading. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Repeated reading" is an academic practice that aims to increase oral reading fluency. "Repeated reading" can be used with students who have developed initial word reading skills but demonstrate inadequate reading fluency for their grade level. During "repeated reading," a student sits in a quiet location with a…

  7. The Role of the Y-Chromosome in the Establishment of Murine Hybrid Dysgenesis and in the Analysis of the Nucleotide Sequence Organization, Genetic Transmission and Evolution of Repeated Sequences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallaseth, Ferez Soli

    The Y-chromosome presents a unique cytogenetic framework for the evolution of nucleotide sequences. Alignment of nine Y-chromosomal fragments in their increasing Y-specific/non Y-specific (male/female) sequence divergence ratios was directly and inversely related to their interspersion on these two respective genomic fractions. Sequence analysis confirmed a direct relationship between divergence ratios and the Alu, LINE-1, Satellite and their derivative oligonucleotide contents. Thus their relocation on the Y-chromosome is followed by sequence divergence rather than the well documented concerted evolution of these non-coding progenitor repeated sequences. Five of the nine Y-chromosomal fragments are non-pseudoautosomal and transcribed into heterogeneous PolyA^+ RNA and thus can be retrotransposed. Evolutionary and computer analysis identified homologous oligonucleotide tracts in several human loci suggesting common and random mechanistic origins. Dysgenic genomes represent the accelerated evolution driving sequence divergence (McClintock, 1984). Sex reversal and sterility characterizing dysgenesis occurs in C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos} derivative strains. High frequency, random, multi-locus deletion products of the feral Y^{ rm Pos}-chromosome are generated in the germlines of F1(C57BL/6J X 129/SvY^{ rm Pos})(male) and C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos}(male) but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos}(male). Equal, 10^{-1}, 10^ {-2}, and 0 copies (relative to males) of Y^{rm Pos}-specific deletion products respectively characterize C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} (HC), (LC), (T) and (F) females. The testes determining loci of inactive Y^{rm Pos}-chromosomes in C57BL/6JY^{rm Pos} HC females are the preferentially deleted/rearranged Y ^{rm Pos}-sequences. Disruption of regulation of plasma testosterone and hepatic MUP-A mRNA levels, TRD of a 4.7 Kbp EcoR1 fragment suggest disruption of autosomal/X-chromosomal sequences. These data and the highly repeated progenitor (Alu, GATA, LINE-1

  8. Rat dams exposed repeatedly to a daily brief separation from the pups exhibit increased maternal behavior, decreased anxiety and altered levels of receptors for estrogens (ERα, ERβ), oxytocin and serotonin (5-HT1A) in their brain.

    PubMed

    Stamatakis, Antonios; Kalpachidou, Theodora; Raftogianni, Androniki; Zografou, Efstratia; Tzanou, Athanasia; Pondiki, Stavroula; Stylianopoulou, Fotini

    2015-02-01

    In the present study we investigated the neurobiological mechanisms underlying expression of maternal behavior. Increased maternal behavior was experimentally induced by a brief 15-min separation between the mother and the pups during postnatal days 1 to 22. On postnatal days (PND) 12 and 22, we determined in experimental and control dams levels of anxiety in the elevated plus maze (EPM) as well as the levels of receptors for estrogens (ERα, ERβ), oxytocin (OTR) and serotonin (5-HT1AR) in areas of the limbic system (prefrontal cortex-PFC, hippocampus, lateral septum-SL, medial preoptic area-MPOA, shell of nucleus accumbens-nAc-Sh, central-CeA and basolateral-BLA amygdala), involved in the regulation of maternal behavior. Experimental dams, which showed increased maternal behavior towards their offspring, displayed reduced anxiety in the EPM on both PND12 and PND22. These behavioral differences could be attributed to neurochemical alterations in their brain: On both PND12 and PND22, experimental mothers had higher levels of ERα and OTRs in the PFC, hippocampus, CeA, SL, MPOA and nAc-Sh. The experimental manipulation-induced increase in ERβ levels was less widespread, being localized in PFC, the hippocampal CA2 area, MPOA and nAc-Sh. In addition, 5-HT1ARs were reduced in the PFC, hippocampus, CeA, MPOA and nAc-Sh of the experimental mothers. Our results show that the experience of the daily repeated brief separation from the pups results in increased brain ERs and OTRs, as well as decreased 5-HT1ARs in the dam's brain; these neurochemical changes could underlie the observed increase in maternal behavior and the reduction of anxiety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The emergence of new DNA repeats and the divergence of primates.

    PubMed

    Minghetti, P P; Dugaiczyk, A

    1993-03-01

    We have identified four genetic novelties that are fixed in specific primate lineages and hence can serve as phylogenetic time markers. One Alu DNA repeat is present in the human lineage but is absent from the great apes. Another Alu DNA repeat is present in the gorilla lineage but is absent from the human, chimpanzee, and orangutan. A progenitor Xba1 element is present in the human, chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan, but only in the human lineage did it give rise to a transposed progeny, Xba2. The saltatory appearance of Xba2 is an example of a one-time event in the evolutionary history of a species. The enolase pseudogene, known to be present as a single copy in the human, was found to be present in four other primates, including the baboon, an Old World monkey. Using the accepted value of 5 x 10(-9) nucleotide substitutions per site per year as the evolutionary rate for pseudogenes, we calculated that the enolase pseudogene arose approximately 14 million years ago. The calculated age for this pseudogene and its presence in the baboon are incongruent with each other, since Old World monkeys are considered to have diverged from the hominid lineage some 30 million years ago. Thus the rate of evolution in the enolase pseudogene is only about 2.5 x 10(-9) substitutions per site per year, or half the rate in other pseudogenes. It is concluded that rates of substitution vary between species, even for similar DNA elements such as pseudogenes. We submit that new DNA repeats arise in the genomes of species in irreversible and punctuated events and hence can be used as molecular time markers to decipher phylogenies.

  10. Allergen sensitization is associated with increased DNA methylation in older men

    PubMed Central

    Sordillo, Joanne E.; Lange, Nancy E.; Tarantini, Letizia; Bollati, Valentina; Zanobetti, Antonella; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel; Baccarelli, Andrea; DeMeo, Dawn; Litonjua, Augusto A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Variation in epigenetic modifications, arising from either environmental exposures or internal physiological changes, can influence gene expression, and may ultimately contribute to complex diseases such as asthma and allergies. We examined the association of asthma and allergic phenotypes with DNA methylation levels of retrotransposon-derived elements. Methods We used data from 704 men (mean age 73) in the longitudinal Normative Aging Study to assess the relationship between asthma, allergic phenotypes and DNA methylation levels of the retrotransposon derived elements Alu and LINE-1. Retrotransposons represent a large fraction of the genome (> 30%), and are heavily methylated to prevent expression. Percent methylation of Alu and LINE-1 elements in peripheral white blood cells was quantified using PCR pyrosequencing. Data on sensitization to common allergens by skin prick testing, asthma, and methacholine responsiveness was gathered approximately 8 years prior to DNA methylation analysis. Results Prior allergen sensitization was associated with increased methylation of Alu (β=0.32 [sensitized vs. non-sensitized], p value 0.003), in models adjusted for pack-years, BMI, smoking, air pollutants, percent eosinophils, white blood cell count and age. Of the men interviewed, 5 % of subjects reported diagnosis of asthma. Neither Alu, nor LINE-1 methylation was associated with asthma. Conclusions These data suggest that increased DNA methylation of repetitive elements may be associated with allergen sensitization, but does not appear to be associated with asthma. Future work is needed to identify potential underlying mechanisms for these relationships. PMID:23257623

  11. Benthic habitat map of U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Faga‘alu Bay priority study area, Tutuila, American Samoa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochran, Susan A.; Gibbs, Ann E.; D'Antonio, Nicole L.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2016-05-18

    The coral reef in Faga‘alu Bay, Tutuila, American Samoa, has suffered numerous natural and anthropogenic stresses. Areas once dominated by live coral are now mostly rubble surfaces covered with turf or macroalgae. In an effort to improve the health and resilience of the coral reef system, the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force selected Faga‘alu Bay as a priority study area. To support these efforts, the U.S. Geological Survey mapped nearly 1 km2 of seafloor to depths of about 60 m. Unconsolidated sediment (predominantly sand) constitutes slightly greater than 50 percent of the seafloor in the mapped area; reef and other hardbottom potentially available for coral recruitment constitute nearly 50 percent of the mapped area. Of this potentially available hardbottom, only slightly greater than 37 percent is covered with at least 10 percent coral, which is fairly evenly distributed between the reef flat, fore reef, and offshore bank/shelf. 

  12. An AluI fragment isolated from lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), maps to the intergenic spacer region of the rDNA cistron.

    PubMed

    Reed, K M; Oakley, T H; Phillips, R B

    1997-02-20

    The relationship between a 217-bp AluI fragment (SnAluI-33c) from lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) which hybridizes to the nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) and the ribosomal RNA genes was examined by Southern analysis and comparative hybridization. Restriction enzymes with recognition sites mapped in the lake trout rDNA cistron were used to digest genomic DNA into fragments of predetermined size. Comparison of the hybridization pattern of SnAluI-33c with those of two rDNA-specific probes placed this fragment within the intergenic spacer region of the rDNA cistron, approximately 3 kb upstream (5') of the 18S gene. This finding is consistent with in situ hybridization experiments showing hybridization of this fragment to sites of rDNA [Reed, K.M. and Phillips, R.B., Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 70 (1995) 104-107]. Based on cross hybridization and sequence comparisons, homologous sequences are present in other salmonid species.

  13. Identification of region-specific yeast artificial chromosomes using pools of Alu element-mediated polymerase chain reaction probes labeled via linear amplification.

    PubMed

    Cole, C G; Patel, K; Shipley, J; Sheer, D; Bobrow, M; Bentley, D R; Dunham, I

    1992-12-01

    The ability to identify large numbers of yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) specific to any given genomic region rapidly and efficiently enhances both the construction of clone maps and the isolation of region-specific landmarks (e.g., polymorphic markers). We describe a method of preparing region-specific single-stranded hybridization probes from Alu element-mediated polymerase chain reaction (Alu-PCR) products of somatic cell hybrids for YAC library screening. Pools of up to 50 cloned Alu-PCR products from an irradiation-reduced hybrid containing 22q11.2-q13.1 were labeled to high specific activity by linear amplification using a single vector primer. The resulting single-stranded probes were extensively competed to remove repetitive sequences, while retaining the full complexity of the probe. Extensive coverage of the region by YACs using multiple probe pools was demonstrated as many YACs were detected more than once. In situ analysis using chosen YACs confirmed that the clones were specific for the region. Thus, this pooled probe approach constitutes a rapid method to identify large numbers of YACs relevant to a large chromosomal region.

  14. Sill emplacement and corresponding ground deformation processes at the Alu-Dalafilla volcanic centre in the Danakil Depression, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Craig; Bastow, Ian; Hetherington, Rachel; van Wyk de Vries, Ben; Jackson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    A consensus has emerged from a variety of disciplines over the past 15 years that Quaternary magmatism in Ethiopia is almost entirely dominated by dike intrusion. Focused dike intrusion within 60 km long, 20 km wide, rift zones is considered to mark the present day locus of extension in Ethiopia, and represent the proto-ridge axis location of an incipient ocean spreading centre. However, it has been suggested on the strength of Moho depths and Quaternary eruptive volumes in northernmost Ethiopia, that the final transition from continental rifting to incipient oceanic spreading may instead be characterised by an abrupt, rheologically driven, late-phase of crustal thinning. Development of a sedimentary basin and mantle decompression melting occurring in the Danakil Depression, driven by this late-phase crustal thinning, should result in a markedly different style of magmatism in the upper crust: i.e. field observations, high-resolution seismic reflection studies, and experimental modelling suggest that interconnected networks of sill intrusions dominate in sedimentary basins. Here, we present the first evidence from the Danakil Depression that links surficial structures, observed at the Alu-Dalafilla volcanic centre, to the ongoing emplacement of an underlying sill. In particular, we use satellite imagery to examine a dome-shaped fold, associated fracture patterns, and surrounding lava flows, which we suggest likely formed in response to roof uplift above and extrusion from a saucer-shaped sill; i.e. a sub-horizontal inner sill encircled by an inward-dipping, transgressive inclined rim. InSAR observations by Pagli et al. (2012) of ground uplift and deflation occurring during the eruption of basaltic lava at Alu-Dalafilla in 2008 capture what we believe to be the first real-time evidence for intrusion-induced forced folding dynamics above a saucer-shaped sill. InSAR data further suggest that intrusion occurred at a depth of ~1 km, likely placing the sill within an

  15. Noninvasive pulsed focused ultrasound allows spatiotemporal control of targeted homing for multiple stem cell types in murine skeletal muscle and the magnitude of cell homing can be increased through repeated applications

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Scott R.; Ziadloo, Ali; Kim, Saejeong J.; Nguyen, Ben A.; Frank, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are promising therapeutics for cardiovascular diseases and intravenous injection is the most desirable route of administration clinically. Subsequent homing of exogenous stem cells to pathological loci is frequently required for therapeutic efficacy and is mediated by chemo attractants (cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, and growth factors). Homing processes are inefficient and depend on short-lived pathological inflammation that limits the window of opportunity for cell injections. Noninvasive pulsed focused ultrasound (plus), which emphasizes mechanical ultrasound-tissue interactions, can be precisely targeted in the body and is a promising approach to target and maximize stem cell delivery by stimulating chemo attractant expression in plus-treated tissue prior to cell infusions. We demonstrate that plus is nondestructive to marine skeletal muscle tissue (no necrosis, hemorrhage, or muscle stem cell activation) and initiates a largely M2-type macrophage response. We also demonstrate local up regulation of chemo attractants in plus-treated skeletal muscle leads to enhance homing, permeability, and retention of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and human endothelial precursor cells (EPC). Furthermore, the magnitude of MSC or EPC homing was increased when plus treatments and cell infusions were repeated daily. This study demonstrates that plus defines transient “molecular zip codes” of elevated chemo attractants in targeted muscle tissue, which effectively provides spatiotemporal control and tenability of the homing process for multiple stem cell types. plus is a clinically-translatable modality that may ultimately improve homing efficiency and flexibility of cell therapies for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23922277

  16. Unfolding a linker between helical repeats.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Vanessa; Nielsen, Steven O; Klein, Michael L; Discher, Dennis E

    2005-06-10

    In many multi-repeat proteins, linkers between repeats have little secondary structure and place few constraints on folding or unfolding. However, the large family of spectrin-like proteins, including alpha-actinin, spectrin, and dystrophin, share three-helix bundle, spectrin repeats that appear in crystal structures to be linked by long helices. All of these proteins are regularly subjected to mechanical stress. Recent single molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrate not only forced unfolding but also simultaneous unfolding of tandem repeats at finite frequency, which suggests that the contiguous helix between spectrin repeats can propagate a cooperative helix-to-coil transition. Here, we address what happens atomistically to the linker under stress by steered molecular dynamics simulations of tandem spectrin repeats in explicit water. The results for alpha-actinin repeats reveal rate-dependent pathways, with one pathway showing that the linker between repeats unfolds, which may explain the single-repeat unfolding pathway observed in AFM experiments. A second pathway preserves the structural integrity of the linker, which explains the tandem-repeat unfolding event. Unfolding of the linker begins with a splay distortion of proximal loops away from hydrophobic contacts with the linker. This is followed by linker destabilization and unwinding with increased hydration of the backbone. The end result is an unfolded helix that mechanically decouples tandem repeats. Molecularly detailed insights obtained here aid in understanding the mechanical coupling of domain stability in spectrin family proteins.

  17. High Degree of Plasmodium vivax Diversity in the Peruvian Amazon Demonstrated by Tandem Repeat Polymorphism Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kosek, Margaret; Yori, Pablo P.; Gilman, Robert H.; Calderon, Maritza; Zimic, Mirko; Chuquiyauri, Raul; Jeri, Cesar; Pinedo-Cancino, Viviana; Matthias, Michael A.; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular tools to distinguish strains of Plasmodium vivax are important for studying the epidemiology of malaria transmission. Two sets of markers—tandem repeat (TR) polymorphisms and MSP3α—were used to study Plasmodium vivax in patients in the Peruvian Amazon region of Iquitos. Of 110 patients, 90 distinct haplotypes were distinguished using 9 TR markers. An MSP3α polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using HhaI and AluI revealed 8 and 9 profiles, respectively, and 36 profiles when analyzed in combination. Combining TR and PCR-RFLP markers, 101 distinct molecular profiles were distinguished among these 110 patients. Nine TR markers arrayed along a 100 kB stretch of a P. vivax chromosome containing the gene for circumsporozoite protein showed non-linear linkage disequilibrium (ISA = 0.03, P = 0.001). These findings demonstrate the potential use of TR markers for molecular epidemiology studies. PMID:22492139

  18. Association between birth weight and DNA methylation of IGF2, glucocorticoid receptor and repetitive elements LINE-1 and Alu.

    PubMed

    Burris, Heather H; Braun, Joe M; Byun, Hyang-Min; Tarantini, Letizia; Mercado, Adriana; Wright, Rosalind J; Schnaas, Lourdes; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Wright, Robert O; Tellez-Rojo, Martha M

    2013-06-01

    We examined the association between birth weight and methylation in the imprinted IGF/H19 loci, the nonimprinted gene NR3C1 and repetitive element DNA (LINE-1 and Alu). We collected umbilical cord venous blood from 219 infants born in Mexico City (Mexico) as part of a prospective birth cohort study and analyzed DNA methylation using pyrosequencing. Birth weight was not associated with DNA methylation of the regions studied. One of the CpG dinucleotides in the IGF2 imprinting control region (ICR)1 includes a potential C-T SNP. Among individuals with an absence of methylation at this site, probably due to a paternally inherited T allele, birth weight was associated with mean methylation status of both IGF2 ICR1 and ICR2. However, this association would not have survived adjustment for multiple testing. While we did not detect an association between DNA methylation and birth weight, our study suggests a potential gene-epigene interaction between a T allele in the IGF2 ICR1 and methylation of ICRs of IGF2, and fetal growth.

  19. Noninvasive pulsed focused ultrasound allows spatiotemporal control of targeted homing for multiple stem cell types in murine skeletal muscle and the magnitude of cell homing can be increased through repeated applications.

    PubMed

    Burks, Scott R; Ziadloo, Ali; Kim, Saejeong J; Nguyen, Ben A; Frank, Joseph A

    2013-11-01

    Stem cells are promising therapeutics for cardiovascular diseases, and i.v. injection is the most desirable route of administration clinically. Subsequent homing of exogenous stem cells to pathological loci is frequently required for therapeutic efficacy and is mediated by chemoattractants (cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, and growth factors). Homing processes are inefficient and depend on short-lived pathological inflammation that limits the window of opportunity for cell injections. Noninvasive pulsed focused ultrasound (pFUS), which emphasizes mechanical ultrasound-tissue interactions, can be precisely targeted in the body and is a promising approach to target and maximize stem cell delivery by stimulating chemoattractant expression in pFUS-treated tissue prior to cell infusions. We demonstrate that pFUS is nondestructive to murine skeletal muscle tissue (no necrosis, hemorrhage, or muscle stem cell activation) and initiates a largely M2-type macrophage response. We also demonstrate that local upregulation of chemoattractants in pFUS-treated skeletal muscle leads to enhance homing, permeability, and retention of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and human endothelial precursor cells (EPC). Furthermore, the magnitude of MSC or EPC homing was increased when pFUS treatments and cell infusions were repeated daily. This study demonstrates that pFUS defines transient "molecular zip codes" of elevated chemoattractants in targeted muscle tissue, which effectively provides spatiotemporal control and tunability of the homing process for multiple stem cell types. pFUS is a clinically translatable modality that may ultimately improve homing efficiency and flexibility of cell therapies for cardiovascular diseases. © AlphaMed Press.

  20. Prenatal Air Pollution Exposures, DNA Methyl Transferase Genotypes, and Associations with Newborn LINE1 and Alu Methylation and Childhood Blood Pressure and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in the Children’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Carrie V.; Yao, Jin; Millstein, Josh; Gao, Lu; Siegmund, Kimberly D.; Mack, Wendy; Whitfield-Maxwell, Lora; Lurmann, Fred; Hodis, Howard; Avol, Ed; Gilliland, Frank D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although exposure to ambient air pollutants increases cardiovascular disease risk in adults little is known about the effects of prenatal exposure. Genetic variation and epigenetic alterations are two mechanisms that may influence the effects of early-life exposures on cardiovascular phenotypes. Objectives: We investigated whether genetic and epigenetic variation modify associations between prenatal air pollution on markers of cardiovascular risk in childhood. Methods: We used linear regression analysis to investigate the associations between prenatal pollutants (PM2.5, PM10, NO2, O3), long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE1) and AluYb8 DNA methylation levels measured in newborn blood spot tests, and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and blood pressure (BP) in 459 participants as part of the Children’s Health Study. Interaction terms were also included to test for effect modification of these associations by genetic variation in methylation reprogramming genes. Results: Prenatal exposure to NO2 in the third trimester of pregnancy was associated with higher systolic BP in 11-year-old children. Prenatal exposure to multiple air pollutants in the first trimester was associated with lower DNA methylation in LINE1, whereas later exposure to O3 was associated with higher LINE1 methylation levels in newborn blood spots. The magnitude of associations with prenatal air pollution varied according to genotype for 11 SNPs within DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), DNA methyltransferase 3 Beta (DNMT3B), Tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 2 (TET2), and Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) genes. Although first-trimester O3 exposure was not associated with CIMT and systolic BP overall, associations within strata of DNMT1 or DNMT3B were observed, and the magnitude and the direction of these associations depended on DNMT1 genotypes. Conclusions: Genetic and epigenetic variation in DNA methylation reprogramming genes and in LINE1 retrotransposons may play important roles in

  1. Prenatal Air Pollution Exposures, DNA Methyl Transferase Genotypes, and Associations with Newborn LINE1 and Alu Methylation and Childhood Blood Pressure and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in the Children's Health Study.

    PubMed

    Breton, Carrie V; Yao, Jin; Millstein, Josh; Gao, Lu; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Mack, Wendy; Whitfield-Maxwell, Lora; Lurmann, Fred; Hodis, Howard; Avol, Ed; Gilliland, Frank D

    2016-12-01

    Although exposure to ambient air pollutants increases cardiovascular disease risk in adults little is known about the effects of prenatal exposure. Genetic variation and epigenetic alterations are two mechanisms that may influence the effects of early-life exposures on cardiovascular phenotypes. We investigated whether genetic and epigenetic variation modify associations between prenatal air pollution on markers of cardiovascular risk in childhood. We used linear regression analysis to investigate the associations between prenatal pollutants (PM2.5, PM10, NO2, O3), long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE1) and AluYb8 DNA methylation levels measured in newborn blood spot tests, and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and blood pressure (BP) in 459 participants as part of the Children's Health Study. Interaction terms were also included to test for effect modification of these associations by genetic variation in methylation reprogramming genes. Prenatal exposure to NO2 in the third trimester of pregnancy was associated with higher systolic BP in 11-year-old children. Prenatal exposure to multiple air pollutants in the first trimester was associated with lower DNA methylation in LINE1, whereas later exposure to O3 was associated with higher LINE1 methylation levels in newborn blood spots. The magnitude of associations with prenatal air pollution varied according to genotype for 11 SNPs within DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), DNA methyltransferase 3 Beta (DNMT3B), Tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 2 (TET2), and Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) genes. Although first-trimester O3 exposure was not associated with CIMT and systolic BP overall, associations within strata of DNMT1 or DNMT3B were observed, and the magnitude and the direction of these associations depended on DNMT1 genotypes. Genetic and epigenetic variation in DNA methylation reprogramming genes and in LINE1 retrotransposons may play important roles in downstream cardiovascular consequences of prenatal air

  2. Alu insertion polymorphisms and an assessment of the genetic contribution of Central Asia to Anatolia with respect to the Balkans.

    PubMed

    Berkman, Ceren Caner; Dinc, Havva; Sekeryapan, Ceran; Togan, Inci

    2008-05-01

    In the evolutionary history of modern humans, Anatolia acted as a bridge between the Caucasus, the Near East, and Europe. Because of its geographical location, Anatolia was subject to migrations from multiple different regions throughout time. The last, well-known migration was the movement of Turkic speaking, nomadic groups from Central Asia. They invaded Anatolia and then the language of the region was gradually replaced by the Turkic language. In the present study, insertion frequencies of 10 Alu loci (A25 = 0.07, APO = 0.96, TPA25 = 0.44, ACE = 0.37, B65 = 0.57, PV92 = 0.18, FXIIIB = 0.52, D1 = 0.40, HS4.32 = 0.66, and HS4.69 = 0.30) have been determined in the Anatolian population. Together with the data compiled from other databases, the similarity of the Anatolian population to that of the Balkans and Central Asia has been visualized by multidimensional scaling method. Analysis suggested that, genetically, Anatolia is more closely related with the Balkan populations than to the Central Asian populations. Central Asian contribution to Anatolia with respect to the Balkans was quantified with an admixture analysis. Furthermore, the association between the Central Asian contribution and the language replacement episode was examined by comparative analysis of the Central Asian contribution to Anatolia, Azerbaijan (another Turkic speaking country) and their neighbors. In the present study, the Central Asian contribution to Anatolia was estimated as 13%. This was the lowest value among the populations analyzed. This observation may be explained by Anatolia having the lowest migrant/resident ratio at the time of migrations.

  3. Repeating the Past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the celebration of the Journal 's 75th year, we are scanning each Journal issue from 25, 50, and 74 years ago. Many of the ideas and practices described are so similar to present-day "innovations" that George Santayana's adage (1) "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" comes to mind. But perhaps "condemned" is too strong - sometimes it may be valuable to repeat something that was done long ago. One example comes from the earliest days of the Division of Chemical Education and of the Journal.

  4. Wilson's disease caused by alternative splicing and Alu exonization due to a homozygous 3039-bp deletion spanning from intron 1 to exon 2 of the ATP7B gene.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Eva; Lepori, Maria Barbara; Chiappe, Francesca; Ranucci, Giusy; Di Dato, Fabiola; Iorio, Raffaele; Loudianos, Georgios

    2015-09-15

    We describe a case of Wilson's disease (WD) diagnosed at 5 years after routine biochemical test showed increased aminotransferases. Mutation analysis of the ATP7B gene revealed a 3039-bp deletion in the homozygous state spanning from the terminal part of intron 1 to nt position 368 of exon 2. This deletion results in the activation of 3 cryptic splice sites: an AG acceptor splice site in nt positions 578-579 producing a different breakpoint and removing the first 577 nts of exon 2, an acceptor and a donor splice site in nt positions 20363-4 and 20456-7, respectively, in intron 1, resulting in the activation of a 94-bp cryptic Alu exon being incorporated into the mature transcript. The resulting alternative transcript contains a TAG stop codon in the first amino acid position of the cryptic exon, likely producing a truncated, non-functional protein. This study shows that intron exonization can also occur in humans through naturally occurring gross deletions. The results suggest that the combination of DNA and RNA analyses can be used for molecular characterization of gross ATP7B deletions, thus improving genetic counseling and diagnosis of WD. Moreover these studies help to better establish new molecular mechanisms producing Wilson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Slit Wheel Repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiFelice, Audrey

    2013-10-01

    Test the repeatibility of the slit wheel by taking a sequence of comparison lamp spectra with grating G230MB {2697} and the three smallest long slits {52X0.2, 52X0.1, and 52X0.05}. This is a clone of Cycle 20 Program 13140.

  6. Slit Wheel Repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chris

    2011-10-01

    Test the repeatibility of the slit wheel by taking a sequence of comparison lamp spectra with grating G230MB {2697} and the three smallest long slits {52X0.2, 52X0.1, and 52X0.05}. This is a clone of Cycle 18 Program 12410.

  7. Slit Wheel Repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiFelice, Audrey

    2012-10-01

    Test the repeatibility of the slit wheel by taking a sequence of comparison lamp spectra with grating G230MB {2697} and the three smallest long slits {52X0.2, 52X0.1, and 52X0.05}. This is a clone of Cycle 19 Program 12771.

  8. Repeated Causal Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagmayer, York; Meder, Bjorn

    2013-01-01

    Many of our decisions refer to actions that have a causal impact on the external environment. Such actions may not only allow for the mere learning of expected values or utilities but also for acquiring knowledge about the causal structure of our world. We used a repeated decision-making paradigm to examine what kind of knowledge people acquire in…

  9. Do DNA double-strand breaks induced by Alu I lead to development of novel aberrations in the second and third post-treatment mitoses?

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, A.; Bonk, K.; Mueller, M.U.; Streffer, C.; Obe, G.

    1996-02-01

    Several authors have reported that ionizing radiation can give rise to novel aberrations several mitotic divisions after the exposure. At our institute this phenomenon has been observed in mouse preimplantation embryos. This cell system is uniquely well suited for such investigations because the first three cell divisions show a high degree of synchrony. Thus the expression of chromosomal aberrations at the first, second and third mitosis after irradiation can be scored unambiguously. To investigate whether DNA double-strand breaks may be the lesions responsible for the delayed expression of chromosomal aberrations, we have studied the frequencies of aberrations in the first, second and third mitosis after treatment of one-cell mouse embryos with the restriction enzyme Alu I. Embryos were permeabilized with Streptolysin-O. The results indicate that the induction of double-strand breaks does not lead to novel aberrations in the third post-treatment mitosis. Several embryos scored at the second mitosis showed very high numbers of aberrations, indicating that Alu I may remain active in the cells for a period of one cell cycle. After treatment with Streptolysin-O alone, enhanced aberration frequencies were observed in the third post-treatment mitosis, suggesting that membrane damage has a delayed effect on the cellular integrity. 44 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Identification of human chromosome region 3p14. 2-21. 3-specific YAC clones using Alu-PCR products from a radiation hybrid

    SciTech Connect

    Siden, T.S.; Drumheller, T.; Smith, S.E.; Smith, D.I. ); Kumlien, J.; Lehrach, H. ); Roehme, D. )

    1994-03-01

    Deletion of DNA sequences from at least three different regions on the short arm of human chromosome 3 (3p13-14, 3p21 and 3p25) are frequently observed during the development of many solid tumors, including lung cancers and renal cell carcinomas. In order to physically characterize the 3p21 region, the authors previously identified a radiation fusion hybrid that contained about 20 megabases of DNA from chromosome region 3p14.2p21.3. In this study total Alu-PCR products from this hybrid were used as a probe to isolate 86 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones from a 620-kb average insert YAC library (ICRF). Sixty-nine Alu-PCR markers, generated from the YACs, and seven PCR primers were used to screen for overlaps between individual clones. Seven contigs were identified encompassing 32 YAC clones. Based on previous information about localization of the PCR primers, the three largest contigs could be assigned to smaller subregions between 3p14.2 and 3p21.3. By this work a large proportion of the 3p14.21.3 region is covered with large-insert YAC clones.

  11. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  12. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  13. Erroneous Memories Arising from Repeated Attempts to Remember

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkel, Linda A.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of repeated and prolonged attempts at remembering on false memory rates was assessed in three experiments. Participants saw and imagined pictures and then made repeated recall attempts before taking a source memory test. Although the number of items recalled increased with repeated tests, the net gains were associated with more source…

  14. Erroneous Memories Arising from Repeated Attempts to Remember

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkel, Linda A.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of repeated and prolonged attempts at remembering on false memory rates was assessed in three experiments. Participants saw and imagined pictures and then made repeated recall attempts before taking a source memory test. Although the number of items recalled increased with repeated tests, the net gains were associated with more source…

  15. Widespread occurrence of power-law distributions in inter-repeat distances shaped by genome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Klimopoulos, Alexandros; Sellis, Diamantis; Almirantis, Yannis

    2012-05-10

    Repetitive DNA sequences derived from transposable elements (TE) are distributed in a non-random way, co-clustering with other classes of repeat elements, genes and other genomic components. In a previous work we reported power-law-like size distributions (linearity in log-log scale) in the spatial arrangement of Alu and LINE1 elements in the human genome. Here we investigate the large-scale features of the spatial arrangement of all principal classes of TEs in 14 genomes from phylogenetically distant organisms by studying the size distribution of inter-repeat distances. Power-law-like size distributions are found to be widespread, extending up to several orders of magnitude. In order to understand the emergence of this distributional pattern, we introduce an evolutionary scenario, which includes (i) Insertions of DNA segments (e.g., more recent repeats) into the considered sequence and (ii) Eliminations of members of the studied TE family. In the proposed model we also incorporate the potential for transposition events (characteristic of the DNA transposons' life-cycle) and segmental duplications. Simulations reproduce the main features of the observed size distributions. Furthermore, we investigate the effects of various genomic features on the presence and extent of power-law size distributions including TE class and age, mode of parental TE transmission, GC content, deletion and recombination rates in the studied genomic region, etc. Our observations corroborate the hypothesis that insertions of genomic material and eliminations of repeats are at the basis of power-laws in inter-repeat distances. The existence of these power-laws could facilitate the formation of the recently proposed "fractal globule" for the confined chromatin organization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Effects of Repeated Writing and Repeated Revision Strategies on Composing Fluency of Learning Disabled Adolescents. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harriman, Nancy E.; Gajar, Anna H.

    The study investigated the use of repeated writings as a means of increasing written language fluency with 48 learning disabled students in senior high school resource room English classes. Subjects received one of four treatments for 4 days: repeated writing with structural cues, repeated revision with structural cues, writing on a new topic with…

  17. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between multiple identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five GRC provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4 whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0. A second group of 10 coupons have been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, through the first 4 tests, the repeatability has been shown to be +/- 16. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  18. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  19. Digital repeat analysis; setup and operation.

    PubMed

    Nol, J; Isouard, G; Mirecki, J

    2006-06-01

    Since the emergence of digital imaging, there have been questions about the necessity of continuing reject analysis programs in imaging departments to evaluate performance and quality. As a marketing strategy, most suppliers of digital technology focus on the supremacy of the technology and its ability to reduce the number of repeats, resulting in less radiation doses given to patients and increased productivity in the department. On the other hand, quality assurance radiographers and radiologists believe that repeats are mainly related to positioning skills, and repeat analysis is the main tool to plan training needs to up-skill radiographers. A comparative study between conventional and digital imaging was undertaken to compare outcomes and evaluate the need for reject analysis. However, digital technology still being at its early development stages, setting a credible reject analysis program became the major task of the study. It took the department, with the help of the suppliers of the computed radiography reader and the picture archiving and communication system, over 2 years of software enhancement to build a reliable digital repeat analysis system. The results were supportive of both philosophies; the number of repeats as a result of exposure factors was reduced dramatically; however, the percentage of repeats as a result of positioning skills was slightly on the increase for the simple reason that some rejects in the conventional system qualifying for both exposure and positioning errors were classified as exposure error. The ability of digitally adjusting dark or light images reclassified some of those images as positioning errors.

  20. 78 FR 65594 - Vehicular Repeaters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... changes, and on whether current mobile repeater filter technologies can support reduced frequency... feasibility of adapting SAW filters, or other filter technology, for mobile repeater use. We particularly... mobile repeaters by public safety licensees on certain frequencies in the VHF band. DATES:...

  1. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  2. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  3. Alu-primed polymerase chain reaction for regional assignment of 110 yeast artificial chromosome clones from the human X chromosome: Identification of clones associated with a disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.L.; Ballabio, A.; Victoria, M.F.; Pieretti, M.; Bies, R.D.; Gibbs, R.A.; Maley, J.A.; Chinault, A.C.; Webster, T.D.; Caskey, C.T. )

    1991-07-15

    Over 400 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones were isolated from the human X chromosome, and 110 of these were assigned to regions defined by chromosome translocation and deletion breakpoints. Polymerase chain reaction using Alu primers was applied to YAC clones in order to generate probes, to identify overlapping clones, and to derive fingerprints and sequence data directly from total yeast DNA. Several clones were identified in regions of medical interest. One set of three overlapping clones was found to cross a chromsomal translocation implicated in Lowe syndrome. The regional assignment of groups of YAC clones provides initiation points for further attempts to develop large cloned contiguous sequences, as well as material for investigation of regions involved in genetic diseases.

  4. RepeatsDB: a database of tandem repeat protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Tomás; Potenza, Emilio; Walsh, Ian; Gonzalo Parra, R.; Giollo, Manuel; Minervini, Giovanni; Piovesan, Damiano; Ihsan, Awais; Ferrari, Carlo; Kajava, Andrey V.; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2014-01-01

    RepeatsDB (http://repeatsdb.bio.unipd.it/) is a database of annotated tandem repeat protein structures. Tandem repeats pose a difficult problem for the analysis of protein structures, as the underlying sequence can be highly degenerate. Several repeat types haven been studied over the years, but their annotation was done in a case-by-case basis, thus making large-scale analysis difficult. We developed RepeatsDB to fill this gap. Using state-of-the-art repeat detection methods and manual curation, we systematically annotated the Protein Data Bank, predicting 10 745 repeat structures. In all, 2797 structures were classified according to a recently proposed classification schema, which was expanded to accommodate new findings. In addition, detailed annotations were performed in a subset of 321 proteins. These annotations feature information on start and end positions for the repeat regions and units. RepeatsDB is an ongoing effort to systematically classify and annotate structural protein repeats in a consistent way. It provides users with the possibility to access and download high-quality datasets either interactively or programmatically through web services. PMID:24311564

  5. Remarkable selective constraints on exonic dinucleotide repeats.

    PubMed

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2014-09-01

    Long dinucleotide repeats found in exons present a substantial mutational hazard: mutations at these loci occur often and generate frameshifts. Here, we provide clear and compelling evidence that exonic dinucleotides experience strong selective constraint. In humans, only 18 exonic dinucleotides have repeat lengths greater than six, which contrasts sharply with the genome-wide distribution of dinucleotides. We genotyped each of these dinucleotides in 200 humans from eight 1000 Genomes Project populations and found a near-absence of polymorphism. More remarkably, divergence data demonstrate that repeat lengths have been conserved across the primate phylogeny in spite of what is likely considerable mutational pressure. Coalescent simulations show that even a very low mutation rate at these loci fails to explain the anomalous patterns of polymorphism and divergence. Our data support two related selective constraints on the evolution of exonic dinucleotides: a short-term intolerance for any change to repeat length and a long-term prevention of increases to repeat length. In general, our results implicate purifying selection as the force that eliminates new, deleterious mutants at exonic dinucleotides. We briefly discuss the evolution of the longest exonic dinucleotide in the human genome--a 10 x CA repeat in fibroblast growth factor receptor-like 1 (FGFRL1)--that should possess a considerably greater mutation rate than any other exonic dinucleotide and therefore generate a large number of deleterious variants. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. Increasing health inequalities between women in and out of work - the impact of recession or policy change? A repeated cross-sectional study in Stockholm county, 2006 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The social insurance system in Sweden underwent extensive change between 2006 and 2010, with the overall aim of making people enter the labour market. At the same time, economic recession hit Sweden. Previous studies suggest that the economic recession particularly affected women. In light of these changes, the aim of this study is to investigate whether health inequalities between employed women and groups outside the labour market changed between 2006 and 2010. A second aim is to examine the explanatory weight of socio-demographic factors vs social and economic conditions. Methods Data consists of the Stockholm Public Health Surveys (SPHS) for 2006 and 2010. Women aged 18–64 were studied. Through logistic regression, levels of mental distress and limiting longstanding illness (LLI), were compared between four labour market groups; employed and unemployed, sickness absentees and disability pension recipients, at the two time points. Results Mental distress increased among women in all four labour market groups between 2006 and 2010. Differences in mental distress between those employed and groups outside the labour market also increased. These were explained primarily by social and economic conditions. Levels of LLI were unchanged except among the unemployed. The difference in LLI between the unemployed and the employed was mostly explained by social and economic conditions. In the other groups socio-demographic factors were more salient. For both health outcomes, the weight of social and economic conditions had increased in 2010 compared to 2006. Conclusions Results indicate that levels of mental distress increased in all groups, but more so among groups outside the labour market, possibly due to stricter eligibility criteria and lower benefit levels, which particularly affected their social and economic conditions. PMID:25063363

  7. Increasing health inequalities between women in and out of work--the impact of recession or policy change? A repeated cross-sectional study in Stockholm county, 2006 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Blomqvist, Sandra; Burström, Bo; Backhans, Mona C

    2014-07-25

    The social insurance system in Sweden underwent extensive change between 2006 and 2010, with the overall aim of making people enter the labour market. At the same time, economic recession hit Sweden. Previous studies suggest that the economic recession particularly affected women. In light of these changes, the aim of this study is to investigate whether health inequalities between employed women and groups outside the labour market changed between 2006 and 2010. A second aim is to examine the explanatory weight of socio-demographic factors vs social and economic conditions. Data consists of the Stockholm Public Health Surveys (SPHS) for 2006 and 2010. Women aged 18-64 were studied. Through logistic regression, levels of mental distress and limiting longstanding illness (LLI), were compared between four labour market groups; employed and unemployed, sickness absentees and disability pension recipients, at the two time points. Mental distress increased among women in all four labour market groups between 2006 and 2010. Differences in mental distress between those employed and groups outside the labour market also increased. These were explained primarily by social and economic conditions. Levels of LLI were unchanged except among the unemployed. The difference in LLI between the unemployed and the employed was mostly explained by social and economic conditions. In the other groups socio-demographic factors were more salient. For both health outcomes, the weight of social and economic conditions had increased in 2010 compared to 2006. Results indicate that levels of mental distress increased in all groups, but more so among groups outside the labour market, possibly due to stricter eligibility criteria and lower benefit levels, which particularly affected their social and economic conditions.

  8. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  9. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  10. Learning in repeated visual search

    PubMed Central

    Hout, Michael C.; Goldinger, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Visual search (e.g., finding a specific object in an array of other objects) is performed most effectively when people are able to ignore distracting nontargets. In repeated search, however, incidental learning of object identities may facilitate performance. In three experiments, with over 1,100 participants, we examined the extent to which search could be facilitated by object memory and by memory for spatial layouts. Participants searched for new targets (real-world, nameable objects) embedded among repeated distractors. To make the task more challenging, some participants performed search for multiple targets, increasing demands on visual working memory (WM). Following search, memory for search distractors was assessed using a surprise two-alternative forced choice recognition memory test with semantically matched foils. Search performance was facilitated by distractor object learning and by spatial memory; it was most robust when object identity was consistently tied to spatial locations and weakest (or absent) when object identities were inconsistent across trials. Incidental memory for distractors was better among participants who searched under high WM load, relative to low WM load. These results were observed when visual search included exhaustive-search trials (Experiment 1) or when all trials were self-terminating (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, stimulus exposure was equated across WM load groups by presenting objects in a single-object stream; recognition accuracy was similar to that in Experiments 1 and 2. Together, the results suggest that people incidentally generate memory for nontarget objects encountered during search and that such memory can facilitate search performance. PMID:20601709

  11. Tandem-repeat internal mapping (TRIM) of the involucrin gene: Repeat number and repeat-pattern polymorphism within a coding region in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Urquhart, A.; Gill, P. )

    1993-07-01

    The authors have analyzed the human involucrin gene in 41 British African-Caribbeans and 37 British white Caucasians by tandem-repeat internal mapping and DNA sequencing. A point mutation (i.e., B[sub c]) in the last B repeat unit was found in 98.6% of British white Caucasians and in 52.4% of British African-Caribbeans. The distribution of repeat patterns was also different between the two populations. Nine previously unreported repeat pattern alleles, 4 with and 5 without the B[sub c] repeat, have been found, increasing the range of variation in humans to 15 reported repeat patterns, 6 with and 9 without the Caucasian mutation. Three further sequence variations, each occurring in a single individual, were found. The evolutionary significance of variation in the human involucrin gene is discussed. 30 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Genesis, effects and fates of repeats in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Treangen, Todd J; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Touchon, Marie; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2009-05-01

    DNA repeats are causes and consequences of genome plasticity. Repeats are created by intrachromosomal recombination or horizontal transfer. They are targeted by recombination processes leading to amplifications, deletions and rearrangements of genetic material. The identification and analysis of repeats in nearly 700 genomes of bacteria and archaea is facilitated by the existence of sequence data and adequate bioinformatic tools. These have revealed the immense diversity of repeats in genomes, from those created by selfish elements to the ones used for protection against selfish elements, from those arising from transient gene amplifications to the ones leading to stable duplications. Experimental works have shown that some repeats do not carry any adaptive value, while others allow functional diversification and increased expression. All repeats carry some potential to disorganize and destabilize genomes. Because recombination and selection for repeats vary between genomes, the number and types of repeats are also quite diverse and in line with ecological variables, such as host-dependent associations or population sizes, and with genetic variables, such as the recombination machinery. From an evolutionary point of view, repeats represent both opportunities and problems. We describe how repeats are created and how they can be found in genomes. We then focus on the functional and genomic consequences of repeats that dictate their fate.

  13. Role of memory errors in quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, L.; Kraus, B.; Briegel, H.-J.; Dür, W.

    2007-03-01

    We investigate the influence of memory errors in the quantum repeater scheme for long-range quantum communication. We show that the communication distance is limited in standard operation mode due to memory errors resulting from unavoidable waiting times for classical signals. We show how to overcome these limitations by (i) improving local memory and (ii) introducing two operational modes of the quantum repeater. In both operational modes, the repeater is run blindly, i.e., without waiting for classical signals to arrive. In the first scheme, entanglement purification protocols based on one-way classical communication are used allowing to communicate over arbitrary distances. However, the error thresholds for noise in local control operations are very stringent. The second scheme makes use of entanglement purification protocols with two-way classical communication and inherits the favorable error thresholds of the repeater run in standard mode. One can increase the possible communication distance by an order of magnitude with reasonable overhead in physical resources. We outline the architecture of a quantum repeater that can possibly ensure intercontinental quantum communication.

  14. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  15. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  16. Repeated Prescribed Burning in Aspen

    Treesearch

    Donald A. Perala

    1974-01-01

    Infrequent burning weather, low flammability of the aspen-hardwood association, and prolific sprouting and seeding of shrubs and hardwoods made repeated dormant season burning a poor tool to convert good site aspen to conifers. Repeat fall burns for wildlife habitat maintenance is workable if species composition changes are not important.

  17. ATXN2 trinucleotide repeat length correlates with risk of ALS.

    PubMed

    Sproviero, William; Shatunov, Aleksey; Stahl, Daniel; Shoai, Maryam; van Rheenen, Wouter; Jones, Ashley R; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Andersen, Peter M; Bonini, Nancy M; Conforti, Francesca L; Van Damme, Philip; Daoud, Hussein; Del Mar Amador, Maria; Fogh, Isabella; Forzan, Monica; Gaastra, Ben; Gellera, Cinzia; Gitler, Aaron D; Hardy, John; Fratta, Pietro; La Bella, Vincenzo; Le Ber, Isabelle; Van Langenhove, Tim; Lattante, Serena; Lee, Yi-Chung; Malaspina, Andrea; Meininger, Vincent; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Orrell, Richard; Rademakers, Rosa; Robberecht, Wim; Rouleau, Guy; Ross, Owen A; Salachas, Francois; Sidle, Katie; Smith, Bradley N; Soong, Bing-Wen; Sorarù, Gianni; Stevanin, Giovanni; Kabashi, Edor; Troakes, Claire; van Broeckhoven, Christine; Veldink, Jan H; van den Berg, Leonard H; Shaw, Christopher E; Powell, John F; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2017-03-01

    We investigated a CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the ATXN2 gene in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Two new case-control studies, a British dataset of 1474 ALS cases and 567 controls, and a Dutch dataset of 1328 ALS cases and 691 controls were analyzed. In addition, to increase power, we systematically searched PubMed for case-control studies published after 1 August 2010 that investigated the association between ATXN2 intermediate repeats and ALS. We conducted a meta-analysis of the new and existing studies for the relative risks of ATXN2 intermediate repeat alleles of between 24 and 34 CAG trinucleotide repeats and ALS. There was an overall increased risk of ALS for those carrying intermediate sized trinucleotide repeat alleles (odds ratio 3.06 [95% confidence interval 2.37-3.94]; p = 6 × 10(-18)), with an exponential relationship between repeat length and ALS risk for alleles of 29-32 repeats (R(2) = 0.91, p = 0.0002). No relationship was seen for repeat length and age of onset or survival. In contrast to trinucleotide repeat diseases, intermediate ATXN2 trinucleotide repeat expansion in ALS does not predict age of onset but does predict disease risk.

  18. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-04-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories.

  19. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  20. All-photonic quantum repeaters.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-04-15

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories.

  1. Fusion of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1-derived glycine-alanine repeat to trans-dominant HIV-1 Gag increases inhibitory activities and survival of transduced cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Diana; Wild, Jens; Ludwig, Christine; Asbach, Benedikt; Notka, Frank; Wagner, Ralf

    2008-06-01

    Trans-dominant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag derivatives have been shown to efficiently inhibit late steps of HIV-1 replication in vitro by interfering with Gag precursor assembly, thus ranking among the interesting candidates for gene therapy approaches. However, efficient antiviral activities of corresponding transgenes are likely to be counteracted in particular by cell-mediated host immune responses toward the transgene-expressing cells. To decrease this potential immunogenicity, a 24-amino acid Gly-Ala (GA) stretch derived from Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) and known to overcome proteasomal degradation was fused to a trans-dominant Gag variant (sgD1). To determine the capacity of this fusion polypeptide to repress viral replication, PM-1 cells were transduced with sgD1 and GAsgD1 transgenes, using retroviral gene transfer. Challenge of stably transfected permissive cell lines with various viral strains indicated that N-terminal GA fusion even enhanced the inhibitory properties of sgD1. Further studies revealed that the GA stretch increased protein stability by blocking proteasomal degradation of Gag proteins. Immunization of BALB/c mice with a DNA vaccine vector expressing sgD1 induced substantial Gag-specific immune responses that were, however, clearly diminished in the presence of GA. Furthermore, recognition of cells expressing the GA-fused transgene by CD8(+) T cells was drastically reduced, both in vitro and in vivo, resulting in prolonged survival of the transduced cells in recipient mice.

  2. A Semiparametric Bayesian Model for Repeatedly Repeated Binary Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Fernando A.; Müller, Peter; Rosner, Gary L.; Relling, Mary V.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We discuss the analysis of data from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays comparing tumor and normal tissues. The data consist of sequences of indicators for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and involve three nested levels of repetition: chromosomes for a given patient, regions within chromosomes, and SNPs nested within regions. We propose to analyze these data using a semiparametric model for multi-level repeated binary data. At the top level of the hierarchy we assume a sampling model for the observed binary LOH sequences that arises from a partial exchangeability argument. This implies a mixture of Markov chains model. The mixture is defined with respect to the Markov transition probabilities. We assume a nonparametric prior for the random mixing measure. The resulting model takes the form of a semiparametric random effects model with the matrix of transition probabilities being the random effects. The model includes appropriate dependence assumptions for the two remaining levels of the hierarchy, i.e., for regions within chromosomes and for chromosomes within patient. We use the model to identify regions of increased LOH in a dataset coming from a study of treatment-related leukemia in children with an initial cancer diagnostic. The model successfully identifies the desired regions and performs well compared to other available alternatives. PMID:19746193

  3. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Aubuchon, Adam C.; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Balamucki, Christopher J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  4. Repeatability of peripheral aberrations in young emmetropes.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Karthikeyan; Theagarayan, Baskar; Carius, Staffan; Gustafsson, Jörgen

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the intrasession repeatability of ocular aberration measurements in the peripheral visual field with a commercially available Shack-Hartmann aberrometer (complete ophthalmic analysis system-high definition-vision research). The higher-order off-axis aberrations data in young healthy emmetropic eyes are also reported. The aberrations of the right eye of 18 emmetropes were measured using an aberrometer with an open field of view that allows peripheral measurements. Five repeated measures of ocular aberrations were obtained and assessed in steps of 10° out to ±40° in the horizontal visual field (nasal + and temporal -) and -20° in the inferior visual field. The coefficient of repeatability, coefficient of variation, and the intraclass correlation coefficient were calculated as a measure of intrasession repeatability. In all eccentric angles, the repeatability of the third- and fourth-order aberrations was better than the fifth and sixth order aberrations. The coefficient of variation was <30% and the intraclass correlation coefficient was >0.90 for the third and fourth order but reduced gradually for higher orders. There was no statistical significant difference in variance of total higher-order root mean square between on- and off-axis measurements (p > 0.05). The aberration data in this group of young emmetropes showed that the horizontal coma (C(3)(1)) was most positive at 40° in the temporal field, decreasing linearly toward negative values with increasing off-axis angle into the nasal field, whereas all other higher-order aberrations showed little or no change. The complete ophthalmic analysis system-high definition-vision research provides fast, repeatable, and valid peripheral aberration measurements and can be used efficiently to measure off-axis aberrations in the peripheral visual field.

  5. A theoretical model for the mechanical unfolding of repeat proteins.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Dmitrii E

    2009-03-18

    We consider the mechanical stretching of a polypeptide chain formed by multiple interacting repeats. The folding thermodynamics and the interactions among the repeats are described by the Ising model. Unfolded repeats act as soft entropic springs, whereas folded repeats respond to a force as stiffer springs. We show that the resulting force-extension curve may exhibit a pronounced force maximum corresponding to the unfolding of the first repeat. This event is followed by the unfolding of the remaining repeats, which takes place at a lower force. As the protein extension is increased, the force-extension curve of a sufficiently long repeat protein displays a plateau, where the force remains nearly constant and the protein unfolds sequentially so that the number of unfolded repeats is proportional to the extension. Such a sequential mechanical unfolding mechanism is displayed even by the repeat proteins whose thermal denaturation is highly cooperative, provided that they are long enough. By contrast, the unfolding of short repeat progressions can be cooperative.

  6. A Theoretical Model for the Mechanical Unfolding of Repeat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2009-01-01

    We consider the mechanical stretching of a polypeptide chain formed by multiple interacting repeats. The folding thermodynamics and the interactions among the repeats are described by the Ising model. Unfolded repeats act as soft entropic springs, whereas folded repeats respond to a force as stiffer springs. We show that the resulting force-extension curve may exhibit a pronounced force maximum corresponding to the unfolding of the first repeat. This event is followed by the unfolding of the remaining repeats, which takes place at a lower force. As the protein extension is increased, the force-extension curve of a sufficiently long repeat protein displays a plateau, where the force remains nearly constant and the protein unfolds sequentially so that the number of unfolded repeats is proportional to the extension. Such a sequential mechanical unfolding mechanism is displayed even by the repeat proteins whose thermal denaturation is highly cooperative, provided that they are long enough. By contrast, the unfolding of short repeat progressions can be cooperative. PMID:19289042

  7. Survey of simple sequence repeats in woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca).

    PubMed

    Guan, L; Huang, J F; Feng, G Q; Wang, X W; Wang, Y; Chen, B Y; Qiao, Y S

    2013-07-30

    The use of simple sequence repeats (SSRs), or microsatellites, as genetic markers has become popular due to their abundance and variation in length among individuals. In this study, we investigated linkage groups (LGs) in the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) and demonstrated variation in the abundances, densities, and relative densities of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats. Mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were more common than longer repeats in all LGs examined. Perfect SSRs were the predominant SSR type found and their abundance was extremely stable among LGs and chloroplasts. Abundances of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were positively correlated with LG size, whereas those of tetranucleotide and hexanucleotide SSRs were not. Generally, in each LG, the abundance, relative abundance, relative density, and the proportion of each unique SSR all declined rapidly as the repeated unit increased. Furthermore, the lengths and frequencies of SSRs varied among different LGs.

  8. An Expanded CAG Repeat in Huntingtin Causes +1 Frameshifting.

    PubMed

    Saffert, Paul; Adamla, Frauke; Schieweck, Rico; Atkins, John F; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-08-26

    Maintenance of triplet decoding is crucial for the expression of functional protein because deviations either into the -1 or +1 reading frames are often non-functional. We report here that expression of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 with expanded CAG repeats, implicated in Huntington pathology, undergoes a sporadic +1 frameshift to generate from the CAG repeat a trans-frame AGC repeat-encoded product. This +1 recoding is exclusively detected in pathological Htt variants, i.e. those with expanded repeats with more than 35 consecutive CAG codons. An atypical +1 shift site, UUC C at the 5' end of CAG repeats, which has some resemblance to the influenza A virus shift site, triggers the +1 frameshifting and is enhanced by the increased propensity of the expanded CAG repeats to form a stem-loop structure. The +1 trans-frame-encoded product can directly influence the aggregation of the parental Htt exon 1.

  9. Multicolor FISH mapping with Alu-PCR-amplified YAC clone DNA determines the order of markers in the BRCA1 region on chromosome 17q12-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Flejter, W.J.; Glover, T.W.; Barcroft, C.L.; Guo, Sun Wei; Boehnke, M.; Chandrasekharappa, S.; Collins, F.S. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ann Arbor, MI ); Lynch, E.D. ); Hayes, S. ); Weber, B.L. )

    1993-09-01

    A gene designated BRCA1, implicated in the susceptibility to early-onset familial breast cancer, has recently been localized to chromosome 17q12-q21. To date, the order of DNA markers mapped within this region has been based on genetic linkage analysis. The authors report the use of multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization to establish a physically based map of five polymorphic DNA markers and 10 cloned genes spanning this region. Three cosmid clones and Alu-PCR-Generated products derived from 12 yeast artificial chromosome clones representing each of these markers were used in two-color mapping experiments to determine an initial proximity of markers relative to each other on metaphase chromosomes. Interphase mapping was then employed to determine the order and orientation of closely spaced loci by direct visualization of fluorescent signals following hybridization of three probes, each detected in a different color. Statistical analysis of the combined data suggests that the order of markers in the BRCA1 regions is cen-THRA1-TOP2-GAS-OF2-17HSD-248yg9-RNU2-OF3-PPY/p131-EPB3-Mfd188-WNT3-HOX2-GP3A-tel. This map is consistent with that determined by radiation-reduced hybrid mapping and will facilitate positional cloning strategies in efforts to isolate and characterize the BRCA1 gene. 27 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Validation of a quantitative polymerase chain reaction method for human Alu gene detection in microchimeric pigs used as donors for xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Abellaneda, J M; Martínez-Alarcón, L; Quereda, J J; Herrero-Medrano, J M; Mendonça, L; Mrowiec, A; García-Nicolás, O; Pallarés, F J; Ríos, A; Muñoz, A; Ramírez, P; Ramis, G

    2015-01-01

    This work was undertaken to evaluate whether a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is as an adequate method for detection and quantification of human-specific DNA elements (Alu gene) in tissues and blood samples of pigs in which human stem cells were engrafted. Real-time qPCR quantification was performed with the use of previously described primers. The human DNA was mixed with different quantities of porcine DNA. The primer concentration and specificity, the qPCR efficiency, the quantification variations due to different porcine DNA concentrations, and the dissociation curve produced by the assay were evaluated. The qPCR proved to be specific, robust, with a reproducible and specific bimodal melting curve. High porcine DNA concentration produced subquantification, especially with low human DNA quantity. However, the assay proved to be useful for the detection of chimeric piglets produced by human cells injected in utero, because the effect caused by the porcine DNA interference was corrected in quantification of human DNA from piglets.

  11. Quantum repeaters: fundamental and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Hua, Sha; Liu, Yu; Ye, Jun; Zhou, Quan

    2007-04-01

    An overview of the Quantum Repeater techniques based on Entanglement Distillation and Swapping is provided. Beginning with a brief history and the basic concepts of the quantum repeaters, the article primarily focuses on the communication model based on the quantum repeater techniques, which mainly consists of two fundamental modules --- the Entanglement Distillation module and the Swapping module. The realizations of Entanglement Distillation are discussed, including the Bernstein's Procrustean method, the Entanglement Concentration and the CNOT-purification method, etc. The schemes of implementing Swapping, which include the Swapping based on Bell-state measurement and the Swapping in Cavity QED, are also introduced. Then a comparison between these realizations and evaluations on them are presented. At last, the article discusses the experimental schemes of quantum repeaters at present, documents some remaining problems and emerging trends in this field.

  12. Repeatability in redundant manipulator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Ranjan

    1994-02-01

    Terrestrial manipulators with more DOF than the dimension of the workspace and space manipulators with as many manipulator DOF as the dimension of the workspace are both redundant systems. An interesting problem of such redundant systems has been the repeatability problem due to the presence of nonholonomic constraints. We show, contrary to the existing belief, that integrability of the nonholonomic constraints is not a necessary condition for the repeatability of the configuration variables. There exist certain trajectories in the independent configuration variable space that are like 'holonomic loops' along which the redundant manipulators exhibit repeatable motion. We present a simple method based on optimization techniques for designing repeatable trajectories for free-flying space manipulators and terrestrial manipulators under pseudoinverse control.

  13. Protein Repeats from First Principles.

    PubMed

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U

    2016-04-05

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family.

  14. Protein Repeats from First Principles

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2016-01-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family. PMID:27044676

  15. Repeated-sprint and effort ability in rugby league players.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Rich D; Gabbett, Tim J

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to (a) investigate the influence of tackling on repeated-sprint performance; (b) determine whether repeated-sprint ability (RSA) and repeated-effort ability (REA) are 2 distinct qualities; and (c) assess the test-retest reliability of repeated-sprint and repeated-effort tests in rugby league. Twelve rugby league players performed a repeated-sprint (12 × 20-m sprints performed on a 20-second cycle) and a repeated-effort (12 × 20-m sprints with intermittent tackling, performed on a 20-second cycle) test 7 days apart. The test-retest reliability of these tests was also established. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were recorded throughout the tests. There was a significantly greater (p ≤ 0.05) and large effect size (ES) differences for total sprint time (ES = 1.19), average heart rate (ES = 1.64), peak heart rate (ES = 1.35), and perceived exertion (ES = 3.39) for the repeated-effort test compared with the repeated-sprint test. A large difference (ES = 1.02, p = 0.06) was detected for percentage decrement between the 2 tests. No significant relationship was found between the repeated-sprint and repeated-effort tests for any of the dependent variables. Both tests proved reliable, with total sprint time being the most reliable method of assessing performance. This study demonstrates that the addition of tackling significantly increases the physiological response to repeated-sprint exercise and reduces repeated-sprint performance in rugby league players. Furthermore, RSA and REA appear to be 2 distinct qualities that can be reliably assessed with total time being the most reliable measure of performance.

  16. Nanospring behaviour of ankyrin repeats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gwangrog; Abdi, Khadar; Jiang, Yong; Michaely, Peter; Bennett, Vann; Marszalek, Piotr E

    2006-03-09

    Ankyrin repeats are an amino-acid motif believed to function in protein recognition; they are present in tandem copies in diverse proteins in nearly all phyla. Ankyrin repeats contain antiparallel alpha-helices that can stack to form a superhelical spiral. Visual inspection of the extrapolated structure of 24 ankyrin-R repeats indicates the possibility of spring-like behaviour of the putative superhelix. Moreover, stacks of 17-29 ankyrin repeats in the cytoplasmic domains of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been identified as candidates for a spring that gates mechanoreceptors in hair cells as well as in Drosophila bristles. Here we report that tandem ankyrin repeats exhibit tertiary-structure-based elasticity and behave as a linear and fully reversible spring in single-molecule measurements by atomic force microscopy. We also observe an unexpected ability of unfolded repeats to generate force during refolding, and report the first direct measurement of the refolding force of a protein domain. Thus, we show that one of the most common amino-acid motifs has spring properties that could be important in mechanotransduction and in the design of nanodevices.

  17. Repeated suicide attempts.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, S

    2000-12-01

    Attempted suicide is an act associated with childhood sexual abuse, depression, bipolar illness, substance abuse, and other diagnoses, as documented in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 1994). Three women, who attended a group to decrease their depression and increase their self-esteem and who had histories of multiple suicide attempts, agreed to participate in interviews designed to determine the common factors associated with their suicide attempts and to examine the assertion that their suicide attempts were an addiction, similar to their addictions to alcohol and drugs. The common factors found were depression, substance use disorders with early abuse and risky behaviors, history of sexual abuse, faulty relationships, alteration of mood with a suicide plan, and distorted and illogical thinking and motivation. The similarities to addiction also were described. Based on the complexity of factors that emerged and the addictive nature of the suicide attempts, treatment for similar patients needs to be multidimensional and ongoing to allow sufficient time to monitor progress and address the numerous factors involved.

  18. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in women with repeated miscarriages.

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, I; Daniel, V; Link, S; Monga, B; Runnebaum, B

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate a possible etiological role of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the pathogenesis of repeated miscarriages. The blood levels of chlorinated hydrocarbons [CHCs: pentachlorophenol, hexachlorocyclohexane, hexachlorobenzene, the dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) group, polychlorinated biphenyls] were determined in 89 women with repeated miscarriages, who were referred to the University Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Heidelberg for investigations between 1989 and 1993, and compared to a previously investigated reference population. In more than 20% of the women, at least one of the CHC levels exceeded the reference range. CHC levels did not differ significantly between women with primary or secondary and early or late miscarriages; neither did they differ between women with hormonal or immunological disorders as causes of repeated miscarriages or women with idiopathic repeated miscarriages. No significant associations were detected between CHC levels and further conceptions or the outcome of further pregnancies. As significant associations were found between increasing CHC blood concentrations and immunological and hormonal changes, CHCs may have an impact on the pregnancy course in certain cases. PMID:9755145

  19. Variable Glutamine-Rich Repeats Modulate Transcription Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gemayel, Rita; Chavali, Sreenivas; Pougach, Ksenia; Legendre, Matthieu; Zhu, Bo; Boeynaems, Steven; van der Zande, Elisa; Gevaert, Kris; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Babu, M. Madan; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Excessive expansions of glutamine (Q)-rich repeats in various human proteins are known to result in severe neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington’s disease and several ataxias. However, the physiological role of these repeats and the consequences of more moderate repeat variation remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Q-rich domains are highly enriched in eukaryotic transcription factors where they act as functional modulators. Incremental changes in the number of repeats in the yeast transcriptional regulator Ssn6 (Cyc8) result in systematic, repeat-length-dependent variation in expression of target genes that result in direct phenotypic changes. The function of Ssn6 increases with its repeat number until a certain threshold where further expansion leads to aggregation. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals that the Ssn6 repeats affect its solubility and interactions with Tup1 and other regulators. Thus, Q-rich repeats are dynamic functional domains that modulate a regulator’s innate function, with the inherent risk of pathogenic repeat expansions. PMID:26257283

  20. Repeated sprint training in normobaric hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, Harvey M; Cooke, Karl; Sumners, David P; Mileva, Katya N; Bowtell, Joanna L

    2013-01-01

    Repeated sprint ability (RSA) is a critical success factor for intermittent sport performance. Repeated sprint training has been shown to improve RSA, we hypothesised that hypoxia would augment these training adaptations. Thirty male well-trained academy rugby union and rugby league players (18.4±1.5 years, 1.83±0.07 m, 88.1±8.9 kg) participated in this single-blind repeated sprint training study. Participants completed 12 sessions of repeated sprint training (10×6 s, 30 s recovery) over 4 weeks in either hypoxia (13% FiO2) or normoxia (21% FiO2). Pretraining and post-training, participants completed sports specific endurance and sprint field tests and a 10×6 s RSA test on a non-motorised treadmill while measuring speed, heart rate, capillary blood lactate, muscle and cerebral deoxygenation and respiratory measures. Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 test performance improved after RS training in both groups, but gains were significantly greater in the hypoxic (33±12%) than the normoxic group (14±10%, p<0.05). During the 10×6 s RS test there was a tendency for greater increases in oxygen consumption in the hypoxic group (hypoxic 6.9±9%, normoxic (−0.3±8.8%, p=0.06) and reductions in cerebral deoxygenation (% changes for both groups, p=0.09) after hypoxic than normoxic training. Twelve RS training sessions in hypoxia resulted in twofold greater improvements in capacity to perform repeated aerobic high intensity workout than an equivalent normoxic training. Performance gains are evident in the short term (4 weeks), a period similar to a preseason training block. PMID:24282212

  1. Repeated sprint training in normobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Galvin, Harvey M; Cooke, Karl; Sumners, David P; Mileva, Katya N; Bowtell, Joanna L

    2013-12-01

    Repeated sprint ability (RSA) is a critical success factor for intermittent sport performance. Repeated sprint training has been shown to improve RSA, we hypothesised that hypoxia would augment these training adaptations. Thirty male well-trained academy rugby union and rugby league players (18.4 ± 1.5 years, 1.83 ± 0.07 m, 88.1 ± 8.9 kg) participated in this single-blind repeated sprint training study. Participants completed 12 sessions of repeated sprint training (10 × 6 s, 30 s recovery) over 4 weeks in either hypoxia (13% FiO₂) or normoxia (21% FiO₂). Pretraining and post-training, participants completed sports specific endurance and sprint field tests and a 10 × 6 s RSA test on a non-motorised treadmill while measuring speed, heart rate, capillary blood lactate, muscle and cerebral deoxygenation and respiratory measures. Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 test performance improved after RS training in both groups, but gains were significantly greater in the hypoxic (33 ± 12%) than the normoxic group (14 ± 10%, p<0.05). During the 10 × 6 s RS test there was a tendency for greater increases in oxygen consumption in the hypoxic group (hypoxic 6.9 ± 9%, normoxic (-0.3 ± 8.8%, p=0.06) and reductions in cerebral deoxygenation (% changes for both groups, p=0.09) after hypoxic than normoxic training. Twelve RS training sessions in hypoxia resulted in twofold greater improvements in capacity to perform repeated aerobic high intensity workout than an equivalent normoxic training. Performance gains are evident in the short term (4 weeks), a period similar to a preseason training block.

  2. Limitations on quantum key repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  3. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    PubMed

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-23

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  4. Repeated DNA in Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, S L; Hong, S T; Giuntoli, D; Stringer, J R

    1991-01-01

    A 16-kb DNA fragment designated Rp3-1 and cloned from the genome of rat-derived Pneumocystis carinii was found to contain sequences that were repeated approximately 70 times per genome. The repeated sequences in Rp3-1 spanned at least 10.4 kb. Sequences in Rp3-1 were present on each of the 16 P. carinii chromosomes resolved by field inversion gel electrophoresis. Most of the P. carinii genomic sequences homologous to those in the Rp3-1 clone appeared to be as long as those in the Rp3-1 clone but were highly polymorphic with respect to restriction enzyme cleavage sites. The Rp3-1 DNA fragment appears to be a member of a family of large, degenerate, dispersed repeats. Images PMID:1677941

  5. Magnetars as soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Meara, Karen

    1999-05-01

    The source of non-periodic, repeating, gamma-ray bursts located within our galaxy and near supernova remnants has been a mystery. A new theory by Christopher Thompson and Robert Duncan, postulating the existence of young neutron stars with intense magnetic fields (1E14 Gauss or more) offers an explanation. The intense magnetic fields of these "magnetars" suffice to create the phenomena detected from soft gamma-ray repeaters. The poles of a magnetar are hot enough to emit steady, low level x-ray emissions. Stresses on the star's crust due to the drifting of the magnetic field through the superfluid core create seismic activity and "starquakes," which release enormous bursts of energy. Data collected from recent soft gamma-ray repeater bursts appear to be strong evidence in support of this exciting new theory.

  6. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provenzano, Virgil; Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H.; ElBidweihy, Hatem

    2014-02-01

    The Gd5Ge2Si2 alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni50Mn35In15 Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd5Ge2Si2 and Ni50Mn35In15 alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  7. Repeat Lumbar Punctures in Infants with Meningitis in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Rachel G.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Clark, Reese H.; Cotten, C. Michael; Laughon, Matthew; Smith, P. Brian

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to examine the results of repeat lumbar puncture in infants with initial positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures in order to determine the clinical characteristics and outcomes of infants with repeat positive cultures. Study Design Cohort study of infants with an initial positive CSF culture undergoing repeat lumbar puncture between 1997 and 2004 at 150 neonatal intensive care units managed by the Pediatrix Medical group. We compared the clinical outcomes of infants with repeat positive cultures and infants with repeat negative cultures. Result We identified 118 infants with repeat CSF cultures. Of these, 26 infants had repeat positive cultures. A higher proportion with repeat positive cultures died compared to those with repeat negative cultures, 6/23 (26%) vs. 6/81 (7%), respectively (p=0.02). Conclusion Among infants with a positive CSF culture, a repeat positive CSF culture is common. The presence of a second positive culture is associated with increased mortality. PMID:21164430

  8. Stability of dental waxes following repeated heatings.

    PubMed

    Kotsiomiti, E; McCabe, J F

    1995-02-01

    The flow and strength properties of dental waxes were examined following excessive and repeated heatings of the materials. For one product, the flow at 40 +/- 0.5 degrees C was reduced by 25.3% following heating above 200 degrees C. A decrease of the elastic modulus at 20 +/- 1 degree C by approximately 66% was observed in some cases after the heating temperature had been increased to 300 degrees C. Property variations were related to compositional changes, which were investigated by infrared spectoscopy and thermal analysis. Exposure of dental waxes to temperatures higher than 200 degrees C, particularly if it is repeated, may affect the composition and properties, resulting in inferior materials.

  9. Genomic diversity and affinities in population groups of North West India: an analysis of Alu insertion and a single nucleotide polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Saini, J S; Kumar, A; Matharoo, K; Sokhi, J; Badaruddoza; Bhanwer, A J S

    2012-12-15

    The North West region of India is extremely important to understand the peopling of India, as it acted as a corridor to the foreign invaders from Eurasia and Central Asia. A series of these invasions along with multiple migrations led to intermixture of variable populations, strongly contributing to genetic variations. The present investigation was designed to explore the genetic diversities and affinities among the five major ethnic groups from North West India; Brahmin, Jat Sikh, Bania, Rajput and Gujjar. A total of 327 individuals of the abovementioned ethnic groups were analyzed for 4 Alu insertion marker loci (ACE, PV92, APO and D1) and a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) rs2234693 in the intronic region of the ESR1 gene. Statistical analysis was performed to interpret the genetic structure and diversity of the population groups. Genotypes for ACE, APO, ESR1 and PV92 loci were found to be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all the ethnic groups, while significant departures were observed at the D1 locus in every investigated population after Bonferroni's correction. The average heterozygosity for all the loci in these ethnic groups was fairly substantial ranging from 0.3927 ± 0.1877 to 0.4333 ± 0.1416. Inbreeding coefficient indicated an overall 10% decrease in heterozygosity in these North West Indian populations. The gene differentiation among the populations was observed to be of the order of 0.013. Genetic distance estimates revealed that Gujjars were close to Banias and Jat Sikhs were close to Rajputs. Overall the study favored the recent division of the populations of North West India into largely endogamous groups. It was observed that the populations of North West India represent a more or less homogenous genetic entity, owing to their common ancestral history as well as geographical proximity.

  10. Do Twelfths Terminate or Repeat?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Rebecca; Burnison, Erica

    2015-01-01

    When finding the decimal equivalent of a fraction with 12 in the denominator, will it terminate or repeat? This question came from a seventh grader in author Erica Burnison's class as the student was pondering a poster generated by one of her classmates. Not only was the question intriguing, but it also affirmed the belief in the power of…

  11. Mechanical Anisotropy of Ankyrin Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Whasil; Zeng, Xiancheng; Rotolo, Kristina; Yang, Ming; Schofield, Christopher J.; Bennett, Vann; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells are frequently deformed and their cytoskeletal proteins such as spectrin and ankyrin-R are repeatedly subjected to mechanical forces. While the mechanics of spectrin was thoroughly investigated in vitro and in vivo, little is known about the mechanical behavior of ankyrin-R. In this study, we combine coarse-grained steered molecular dynamics simulations and atomic force spectroscopy to examine the mechanical response of ankyrin repeats (ARs) in a model synthetic AR protein NI6C, and in the D34 fragment of native ankyrin-R when these proteins are subjected to various stretching geometry conditions. Our steered molecular dynamics results, supported by AFM measurements, reveal an unusual mechanical anisotropy of ARs: their mechanical stability is greater when their unfolding is forced to propagate from the N-terminus toward the C-terminus (repeats unfold at ∼60 pN), as compared to the unfolding in the opposite direction (unfolding force ∼ 30 pN). This anisotropy is also reflected in the complex refolding behavior of ARs. The origin of this unfolding and refolding anisotropy is in the various numbers of native contacts that are broken and formed at the interfaces between neighboring repeats depending on the unfolding/refolding propagation directions. Finally, we discuss how these complex mechanical properties of ARs in D34 may affect its behavior in vivo. PMID:22404934

  12. Do Twelfths Terminate or Repeat?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Rebecca; Burnison, Erica

    2015-01-01

    When finding the decimal equivalent of a fraction with 12 in the denominator, will it terminate or repeat? This question came from a seventh grader in author Erica Burnison's class as the student was pondering a poster generated by one of her classmates. Not only was the question intriguing, but it also affirmed the belief in the power of…

  13. Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins and Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.

    2009-10-16

    Cyanobacteria are unique in many ways and one unusual feature is the presence of a suite of proteins that contain at least one domain with a minimum of eight tandem repeated five-residues (Rfr) of the general consensus sequence A[N/D]LXX. The function of such pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs) are still unknown, however, their prevalence in cyanobacteria suggests that they may play some role in the unique biological activities of cyanobacteria. As part of an inter-disciplinary Membrane Biology Grand Challenge at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) and Washington University in St. Louis, the genome of Cyanothece 51142 was sequenced and its molecular biology studied with relation to circadian rhythms. The genome of Cyanothece encodes for 35 proteins that contain at least one PRP domain. These proteins range in size from 105 (Cce_3102) to 930 (Cce_2929) kDa with the PRP domains ranging in predicted size from 12 (Cce_1545) to 62 (cce_3979) tandem pentapeptide repeats. Transcriptomic studies with 29 out of the 35 genes showed that at least three of the PRPs in Cyanothece 51142 (cce_0029, cce_3083, and cce_3272) oscillated with repeated periods of light and dark, further supporting a biological function for PRPs. Using X-ray diffraction crystallography, the structure for two pentapeptide repeat proteins from Cyanothece 51142 were determined, cce_1272 (aka Rfr32) and cce_4529 (aka Rfr23). Analysis of their molecular structures suggests that all PRP may share the same structural motif, a novel type of right-handed quadrilateral β-helix, or Rfr-fold, reminiscent of a square tower with four distinct faces. Each pentapeptide repeat occupies one face of the Rfr-fold with four consecutive pentapeptide repeats completing a coil that, in turn, stack upon each other to form “protein skyscrapers”. Details of the structural features of the Rfr-fold are reviewed here together with a discussion for the possible role of end

  14. Polymorphic GGC repeat differentially regulates human reelin gene expression levels.

    PubMed

    Persico, A M; Levitt, P; Pimenta, A F

    2006-10-01

    The human gene encoding Reelin (RELN), a pivotal protein in neurodevelopment, includes a polymorphic GGC repeat in its 5' untranslated region (UTR). CHO cells transfected with constructs encompassing the RELN 5'UTR with 4-to-13 GGC repeats upstream of the luciferase reporter gene show declining luciferase activity with increasing GGC repeat number (P < 0.005), as predicted by computer-based simulations. Conversely, RELN 5'UTR sequences boost reporter gene expression above control levels in neuronal SN56 and N2A cell lines, but 12- and 13-repeat alleles still yield 50-60% less luciferase activity compared to the more common 8- and 10-repeat alleles (P < 0.0001). RELN "long" GGC alleles significantly blunt gene expression and may, through this effect, confer vulnerability to human disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism.

  15. Generation of Repeater F Waves in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Chroni, Elisabeth; Veltsista, Dimitra; Papapaulou, Chris; Trachani, Eftychia

    2017-05-01

    F waves identical in latency, size, and shape, known as repeater F waves, have been observed occasionally in normal motor conduction recordings. The purpose of this study was to examine the occurrence and characteristics of repeater F waves in healthy subjects under different testing conditions, aiming to selectively excite lower and higher threshold motor fibers. Sessions of 40 traces were recorded from the ulnar nerve in 12 volunteers, applying/using supramaximal, submaximal stimuli (intensity able to elicit 30% and 60% of the maximum compound muscle action potential amplitude), and a collision technique. Repeater F waves were identified and their numbers and relative frequency were estimated. For this purpose, a custom-designed software program was developed, to avoid misjudgments of simple visual inspection. Repeater occurrence was significantly higher using 30% submaximal intensity compared with the standard supramaximal stimulation. There was an inverse significant association between repeater index and overall F wave quantity. Repeaters' latency, amplitude, and duration measurements were within the ranges of the nonrepeaters. We herein showed that in healthy subjects the presence of repeater F waves might increase, when stimulation conditions other than standard single, supramaximal impulses were used. The frequency of repeaters was dependent on the overall F wave persistence, but there was no evidence to support a relationship with the type of motoneurons that was preferentially stimulated.

  16. Agreement and repeatability of an infrared thermometer.

    PubMed

    Kelechi, Teresa J; Good, Angela; Mueller, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Recently, manufacturers have devised thermometers for home use by patients, such as the TempTouch Infrared Thermometer (TTIR; Diabetica Solutions, San Antonio, TX), which is designed with a long handle that can be used for self-monitoring localized skin temperature of the feet and legs. This study assessed the level of agreement and repeatability of the TTIR compared to a thermistor-type thermometer (TT; PeriFlux, 5020 Temperature Unit, Perimed, Stockholm, Sweden), the reference standard. In 17 healthy subjects, localized skin temperature was measured 8 cm above the right medial malleolus at baseline (Time 1), after a 10-minute rest period (Time 2), and after 10 minutes of cold provocation (Time 3) with a cryotherapy gel wrap placed around the lower legs using the TTIR and TT for temperature measurement. Scatter plots and correlation coefficients showed strong positive relationships between the two measurement methods at all three time points (Time 1: r = 0.95; Time 2: r = 0.97; and, Time 3: r = 0.87). Results showed a reasonable level of agreement between the two methods at Times 1 and 2 but not after cold provocation. Agreement between the methods appears to be better than repeatability within each method. Results for repeatability from both the TT and TTIR were very similar suggesting that there was a systematic bias with increasing temperatures between Time 1 and Time 2.

  17. StaRProtein, A Web Server for Prediction of the Stability of Repeat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongtao; Zhou, Xu; Huang, Meilan

    2015-01-01

    Repeat proteins have become increasingly important due to their capability to bind to almost any proteins and the potential as alternative therapy to monoclonal antibodies. In the past decade repeat proteins have been designed to mediate specific protein-protein interactions. The tetratricopeptide and ankyrin repeat proteins are two classes of helical repeat proteins that form different binding pockets to accommodate various partners. It is important to understand the factors that define folding and stability of repeat proteins in order to prioritize the most stable designed repeat proteins to further explore their potential binding affinities. Here we developed distance-dependant statistical potentials using two classes of alpha-helical repeat proteins, tetratricopeptide and ankyrin repeat proteins respectively, and evaluated their efficiency in predicting the stability of repeat proteins. We demonstrated that the repeat-specific statistical potentials based on these two classes of repeat proteins showed paramount accuracy compared with non-specific statistical potentials in: 1) discriminate correct vs. incorrect models 2) rank the stability of designed repeat proteins. In particular, the statistical scores correlate closely with the equilibrium unfolding free energies of repeat proteins and therefore would serve as a novel tool in quickly prioritizing the designed repeat proteins with high stability. StaRProtein web server was developed for predicting the stability of repeat proteins. PMID:25807112

  18. Evolution of Repeated Sequence Arrays in the D-Loop Region of Bat Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, G. S.; Mayer, F.; Kerth, G.; Petri, B.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from 41 species of bats representing 11 families revealed that repeated sequence arrays near the tRNA-Pro gene are present in all vespertilionine bats. Across 18 species tandem repeats varied in size from 78 to 85 bp and contained two to nine repeats. Heteroplasmy ranged from 15% to 63%. Fewer repeats among heteroplasmic than homoplasmic individuals in a species with up to nine repeats indicates selection may act against long arrays. A lower limit of two repeats and more repeats among heteroplasmic than homoplasmic individuals in two species with few repeats suggests length mutations are biased. Significant regressions of heteroplasmy, θ and π, on repeat number further suggest that repeat duplication rate increases with repeat number. Comparison of vespertilionine bat consensus repeats to mammal control region sequences revealed that tandem repeats of similar size, sequence and number also occur in shrews, cats and bighorn sheep. The presence of two conserved protein-binding sequences in all repeat units indicates that convergent evolution has occurred by duplication of functional units. We speculate that D-loop region tandem repeats may provide signal redundancy and a primitive repair mechanism in the event of somatic mutations to these binding sites. PMID:9215906

  19. Tracking the processing of damaged DNA double-strand break ends by ligation-mediated PCR: increased persistence of 3'-phosphoglycolate termini in SCAN1 cells.

    PubMed

    Akopiants, Konstantin; Mohapatra, Susovan; Menon, Vijay; Zhou, Tong; Valerie, Kristoffer; Povirk, Lawrence F

    2014-03-01

    To track the processing of damaged DNA double-strand break (DSB) ends in vivo, a method was devised for quantitative measurement of 3'-phosphoglycolate (PG) termini on DSBs induced by the non-protein chromophore of neocarzinostatin (NCS-C) in the human Alu repeat. Following exposure of cells to NCS-C, DNA was isolated, and labile lesions were chemically stabilized. All 3'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl ends were enzymatically capped with dideoxy termini, whereas 3'-PG ends were rendered ligatable, linked to an anchor, and quantified by real-time Taqman polymerase chain reaction. Using this assay and variations thereof, 3'-PG and 3'-phosphate termini on 1-base 3' overhangs of NCS-C-induced DSBs were readily detected in DNA from the treated lymphoblastoid cells, and both were largely eliminated from cellular DNA within 1 h. However, the 3'-PG termini were processed more slowly than 3'-phosphate termini, and were more persistent in tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1-mutant SCAN1 than in normal cells, suggesting a significant role for tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 in removing 3'-PG blocking groups for DSB repair. DSBs with 3'-hydroxyl termini, which are not directly induced by NCS-C, were formed rapidly in cells, and largely eliminated by further processing within 1 h, both in Alu repeats and in heterochromatic α-satellite DNA. Moreover, absence of DNA-PK in M059J cells appeared to accelerate resolution of 3'-PG ends.

  20. Dominant short repeated sequences in bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Avershina, Ekaterina; Rudi, Knut

    2015-03-01

    We use a novel multidimensional searching approach to present the first exhaustive search for all possible repeated sequences in 166 genomes selected to cover the bacterial domain. We found an overrepresentation of repeated sequences in all but one of the genomes. The most prevalent repeats by far were related to interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)—conferring bacterial adaptive immunity. We identified a deep branching clade of thermophilic Firmicutes containing the highest number of CRISPR repeats. We also identified a high prevalence of tandem repeated heptamers. In addition, we identified GC-rich repeats that could potentially be involved in recombination events. Finally, we identified repeats in a 16322 amino acid mega protein (involved in biofilm formation) and inverted repeats flanking miniature transposable elements (MITEs). In conclusion, the exhaustive search for repeated sequences identified new elements and distribution of these, which has implications for understanding both the ecology and evolution of bacteria.

  1. Environmental stress induces trinucleotide repeat mutagenesis in human cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Santillan, Beatriz A; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H

    2015-03-24

    The dynamic mutability of microsatellite repeats is implicated in the modification of gene function and disease phenotype. Studies of the enhanced instability of long trinucleotide repeats (TNRs)-the cause of multiple human diseases-have revealed a remarkable complexity of mutagenic mechanisms. Here, we show that cold, heat, hypoxic, and oxidative stresses induce mutagenesis of a long CAG repeat tract in human cells. We show that stress-response factors mediate the stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM) of CAG repeats. We show further that SIM of CAG repeats does not involve mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, or transcription, processes that are known to promote TNR mutagenesis in other pathways of instability. Instead, we find that these stresses stimulate DNA rereplication, increasing the proportion of cells with >4 C-value (C) DNA content. Knockdown of the replication origin-licensing factor CDT1 eliminates both stress-induced rereplication and CAG repeat mutagenesis. In addition, direct induction of rereplication in the absence of stress also increases the proportion of cells with >4C DNA content and promotes repeat mutagenesis. Thus, environmental stress triggers a unique pathway for TNR mutagenesis that likely is mediated by DNA rereplication. This pathway may impact normal cells as they encounter stresses in their environment or during development or abnormal cells as they evolve metastatic potential.

  2. Environmental stress induces trinucleotide repeat mutagenesis in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Santillan, Beatriz A.; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mutability of microsatellite repeats is implicated in the modification of gene function and disease phenotype. Studies of the enhanced instability of long trinucleotide repeats (TNRs)—the cause of multiple human diseases—have revealed a remarkable complexity of mutagenic mechanisms. Here, we show that cold, heat, hypoxic, and oxidative stresses induce mutagenesis of a long CAG repeat tract in human cells. We show that stress-response factors mediate the stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM) of CAG repeats. We show further that SIM of CAG repeats does not involve mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, or transcription, processes that are known to promote TNR mutagenesis in other pathways of instability. Instead, we find that these stresses stimulate DNA rereplication, increasing the proportion of cells with >4 C-value (C) DNA content. Knockdown of the replication origin-licensing factor CDT1 eliminates both stress-induced rereplication and CAG repeat mutagenesis. In addition, direct induction of rereplication in the absence of stress also increases the proportion of cells with >4C DNA content and promotes repeat mutagenesis. Thus, environmental stress triggers a unique pathway for TNR mutagenesis that likely is mediated by DNA rereplication. This pathway may impact normal cells as they encounter stresses in their environment or during development or abnormal cells as they evolve metastatic potential. PMID:25775519

  3. Observations of Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2004-01-01

    Magnetars (Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars) are a subclass of neutron stars characterized by their recurrent X-ray bursts. While in an active (bursting) state (lasting anywhere between days and years), they are emit&ng hundreds of predominantly soft (kT=30 kev), short (0.1-100 ms long) events. Their quiescent source x-ray light ewes exhibit puhlions rotational period rate changes (spin-down) indicate that their magnetic fields are extremely high, of the order of 10^14- 10^l5 G. Such high B-field objects, dubbed "magnetars", had been predicted to exist in 1992, but the first concrete observational evidence were obtained in 1998 for two of these sources. I will discuss here the history of Soft Gamma Repeaters, and their spectral, timing and flux characteristics both in the persistent and their burst emission.

  4. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  5. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  6. Disease-associated repeat instability and mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Monika H M; Pearson, Christopher E

    2016-02-01

    Expanded tandem repeat sequences in DNA are associated with at least 40 human genetic neurological, neurodegenerative, and neuromuscular diseases. Repeat expansion can occur during parent-to-offspring transmission, and arise at variable rates in specific tissues throughout the life of an affected individual. Since the ongoing somatic repeat expansions can affect disease age-of-onset, severity, and progression, targeting somatic expansion holds potential as a therapeutic target. Thus, understanding the factors that regulate this mutation is crucial. DNA repair, in particular mismatch repair (MMR), is the major driving force of disease-associated repeat expansions. In contrast to its anti-mutagenic roles, mammalian MMR curiously drives the expansion mutations of disease-associated (CAG)·(CTG) repeats. Recent advances have broadened our knowledge of both the MMR proteins involved in disease repeat expansions, including: MSH2, MSH3, MSH6, MLH1, PMS2, and MLH3, as well as the types of repeats affected by MMR, now including: (CAG)·(CTG), (CGG)·(CCG), and (GAA)·(TTC) repeats. Mutagenic slipped-DNA structures have been detected in patient tissues, and the size of the slip-out and their junction conformation can determine the involvement of MMR. Furthermore, the formation of other unusual DNA and R-loop structures is proposed to play a key role in MMR-mediated instability. A complex correlation is emerging between tissues showing varying amounts of repeat instability and MMR expression levels. Notably, naturally occurring polymorphic variants of DNA repair genes can have dramatic effects upon the levels of repeat instability, which may explain the variation in disease age-of-onset, progression and severity. An increasing grasp of these factors holds prognostic and therapeutic potential.

  7. Oxygen uptake during repeated-sprint exercise.

    PubMed

    McGawley, Kerry; Bishop, David J

    2015-03-01

    Repeated-sprint ability appears to be influenced by oxidative metabolism, with reductions in fatigue and improved sprint times related to markers of aerobic fitness. The aim of the current study was to measure the oxygen uptake (VO₂) during the first and last sprints during two, 5 × 6-s repeated-sprint bouts. Cross-sectional study. Eight female soccer players performed two, consecutive, 5 × 6-s maximal sprint bouts (B1 and B2) on five separate occasions, in order to identify the minimum time (trec) required to recover total work done (Wtot) in B1. On a sixth occasion, expired air was collected during the first and last sprint of B1 and B2, which were separated by trec. The trec was 10.9 ± 1.1 min. The VO₂ during the first sprint was significantly less than the last sprint in each bout (p<0.001), and the estimated aerobic contribution to the final sprint (measured in kJ) was significantly related to VO₂max in both B1 (r=0.81, p=0.015) and B2 (r=0.93, p=0.001). In addition, the VO₂ attained in the final sprint was not significantly different from VO₂max in B1 (p=0.284) or B2 (p=0.448). The current study shows that the VO₂ increases from the first to the last of 5 × 6-s sprints and that VO₂max may be a limiting factor to performance in latter sprints. Increasing V˙O₂max in team-sport athletes may enable increased aerobic energy delivery, and consequently work done, during a bout of repeated sprints. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Monocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and type 2 diabetes mellitus display an increased production of interleukin (IL)-1β via the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing family pyrin 3(NLRP3)-inflammasome activation: a possible implication for therapeutic decision in these patients.

    PubMed

    Ruscitti, P; Cipriani, P; Di Benedetto, P; Liakouli, V; Berardicurti, O; Carubbi, F; Ciccia, F; Alvaro, S; Triolo, G; Giacomelli, R

    2015-10-01

    A better understanding about the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) showed that inflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-1β play a pivotal role, mirroring data largely reported in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). IL-1β is produced mainly by monocytes (MO), and hyperglycaemia may be able to modulate, in the cytoplasm of these cells, the assembly of a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing family pyrin (NLRP3)-inflammosome, a cytosolic multi-protein platform where the inactive pro-IL-1β is cleaved into active form, via caspase-1 activity. In this paper, we evaluated the production of IL-1 β and TNF, in peripheral blood MO of patients affected by RA or T2D or both diseases, in order to understand if an alteration of the glucose metabolism may influence their proinflammatory status. Our data showed, after 24 h of incubation with different glucose concentrations, a significantly increased production of IL-1β and TNF in all evaluated groups when compared with healthy controls. However, a significant increase of IL-1β secretion by T2D/RA was observed when compared with other groups. The analysis of relative mRNA expression confirmed these data. After 24 h of incubation with different concentrations of glucose, our results showed a significant increase in NLRP3 expression. In this work, an increased production of IL-1β by MO obtained from patients affected by both RA and T2D via NLRP3-inflammasome activation may suggest a potential IL-1β targeted therapy in these patients.

  9. Structure and expression of the human Lysyl hydroxylase gene (PLOD): Introns 9 and 16 contain Alu sequences at the sites of recombination in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI patients

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.; Hautala, T.; Kivirikko, K.I.

    1994-12-01

    Lysyl hydroxylase (EC 1.14.11.4) catalyzes the formation of hydroxylysine in collagens by the hydroxylation of lysine residues in peptide linkages. This enzyme activity is known to be reduced in patients with the type VI variant of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and the first mutations in the lysyl hydroxylase gene (PLOD) have recently been identified. We have now isolated genomic clones for human lysyl hydroxylase and determined the complete structure of the gene, which contains 19 exons and a 5{prime} flanking region with characteristics shared by housekeeping genes. The constitutive expression of the gene in different tissues further suggests that lysyl hydroxylase has an essential function. We have sequenced the introns of the gene in the region where many mutations and rearrangements analyzed to date are concentrated. Intron 9 and intron 16 show extensive homology resulting from the many Alu sequences found in these introns. Intron 9 contains five and intron 16 eight Alu sequences. The high homology and many short identical or complementary sequences in these introns generate many potential recombination sites with the gene. The delineation of the structure of the lysyl hydroxylase gene contributes significantly to our understanding of the rearrangements in the genome of Ehlers-Danlos type VI patients. 21 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Repeatability of agronomic traits in Panicum maximum (Jacq.) hybrids.

    PubMed

    Braz, T G S; Fonseca, D M; Jank, L; Cruz, C D; Martuscello, J A

    2015-12-29

    When evaluating plants, in particular perennial species, it is common to obtain repeated measures of a given trait from the same individual to evaluate the traits' repeatability in successive harvests. The degree of correlation among these measures defines the coefficient of repeatability, which has been widely utilized in the study of forage traits of interest for breeding. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the repeatability of agronomic traits in Panicum maximum hybrids. Hybrids from three progenies totaling 320 hybrids were evaluated in an incomplete-block design, with consideration of production and morpho-agronomic traits. Of the production traits, total dry matter and leaf dry matter showed the highest repeatability and varied from 0.540 to 0.769, whereas stem dry matter had lower coefficients (0.265-0.632). Among the morpho-agronomic traits, plant height and incidence of Bipolaris maydis had higher coefficients (0.118-0.460). The repeatability values of the agronomic traits were low-to-moderate, and six evaluations were sufficient to provide accuracy in the selection of hybrids regarding total dry matter, leaf dry matter, plant height, and incidence of B. maydis, whereas the other traits require more repeated measures to increase reliability in the prediction of their response.

  11. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  12. Crowding by a repeating pattern

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Sarah; Pelli, Denis G.

    2015-01-01

    Theinability to recognize a peripheral target among flankers is called crowding. For a foveal target, crowding can be distinguished from overlap masking by its sparing of detection, linear scaling with eccentricity, and invariance with target size.Crowding depends on the proximity and similarity of the flankers to the target. Flankers that are far from or dissimilar to the target do not crowd it. On a gray page, text whose neighboring letters have different colors, alternately black and white, has enough dissimilarity that it might escape crowding. Since reading speed is normally limited by crowding, escape from crowding should allow faster reading. Yet reading speed is unchanged (Chung & Mansfield, 2009). Why? A recent vernier study found that using alternating-color flankers produces strong crowding (Manassi, Sayim, & Herzog, 2012). Might that effect occur with letters and reading? Critical spacing is the minimum center-to-center target–flanker spacing needed to correctly identify the target. We measure it for a target letter surrounded by several equidistant flanker letters of the same polarity, opposite polarity, or mixed polarity: alternately white and black. We find strong crowding in the alternating condition, even though each flanker letter is beyond its own critical spacing (as measured in a separate condition). Thus a periodic repeating pattern can produce crowding even when the individual elements do not. Further, in all conditions we find that, once a periodic pattern repeats (two cycles), further repetition does not affect critical spacing of the innermost flanker. PMID:26024457

  13. Crowding by a repeating pattern.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Sarah; Pelli, Denis G

    2015-01-01

    Theinability to recognize a peripheral target among flankers is called crowding. For a foveal target, crowding can be distinguished from overlap masking by its sparing of detection, linear scaling with eccentricity, and invariance with target size.Crowding depends on the proximity and similarity of the flankers to the target. Flankers that are far from or dissimilar to the target do not crowd it. On a gray page, text whose neighboring letters have different colors, alternately black and white, has enough dissimilarity that it might escape crowding. Since reading speed is normally limited by crowding, escape from crowding should allow faster reading. Yet reading speed is unchanged (Chung & Mansfield, 2009). Why? A recent vernier study found that using alternating-color flankers produces strong crowding (Manassi, Sayim, & Herzog, 2012). Might that effect occur with letters and reading? Critical spacing is the minimum center-to-center target-flanker spacing needed to correctly identify the target. We measure it for a target letter surrounded by several equidistant flanker letters of the same polarity, opposite polarity, or mixed polarity: alternately white and black. We find strong crowding in the alternating condition, even though each flanker letter is beyond its own critical spacing (as measured in a separate condition). Thus a periodic repeating pattern can produce crowding even when the individual elements do not. Further, in all conditions we find that, once a periodic pattern repeats (two cycles), further repetition does not affect critical spacing of the innermost flanker.

  14. Electromyographic analysis of repeated bouts of eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    McHugh, M P; Connolly, D A; Eston, R G; Gartman, E J; Gleim, G W

    2001-03-01

    The repeated bout effect refers to the protective effect provided by a single bout of eccentric exercise again