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Sample records for alu repeats increase

  1. Comparative Analysis of Alu Repeats in Primate Genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Alu repeats are SINEs (Short intersperse repetitive elements) which enjoy a successful application in genome evolution, population biology, phylogenetics and forensics. Human Alu consensus sequences were widely used as surrogates in nonhuman primate studies with an assumption that all p...

  2. Alu repeats as markers for forensic DNA analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M.; Kass, D.H.

    1994-01-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 inch and 3 inch unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allow the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of the Alu repeat. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences probably inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem humans (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project. HS Alu family member insertions differ from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) in that polymorphisms due to Alu insertions arise as a result of a unique event which has occurred only one time in the human population and spread through the population from that point. Therefore, individuals that share HS Alu repeats inherited these elements from a common ancestor. Most VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times in parallel within a population.

  3. Alu repeats as markers for human population genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M.; Bazan, H.

    1993-09-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 97.9% nucleotide identity with each other and an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence. HS Alu family members are thought to be derived from a single source ``master`` gene, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 in. and 3 in. unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allows the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of an Alu repeat. Individual HS Alu sequences were found to be either monomorphic or dimorphic for the presence or absence of each repeat. The monomorphic HS Alu family members inserted in the human genome after the human/great ape divergence (which is thought to have occurred 4--6 million years ago), but before the radiation of modem man. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem man (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project as well. HS Alu family member insertion dimorphism differs from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) because individuals share HS Alu family member insertions based upon identity by descent from a common ancestor as a result of a single event which occurred one time within the human population. The VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times within a population and are identical by state only.

  4. Nonlinear analysis of correlations in Alu repeat sequences in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yi; Huang, Yanzhao; Li, Mingfeng; Xu, Ruizhen; Xiao, Saifeng

    2003-12-01

    We report on a nonlinear analysis of deterministic structures in Alu repeats, one of the richest repetitive DNA sequences in the human genome. Alu repeats contain the recognition sites for the restriction endonuclease AluI, which is what gives them their name. Using the nonlinear prediction method developed in chaos theory, we find that all Alu repeats have novel deterministic structures and show strong nonlinear correlations that are absent from exon and intron sequences. Furthermore, the deterministic structures of Alus of younger subfamilies show panlike shapes. As young Alus can be seen as mutation free copies from the “master genes,” it may be suggested that the deterministic structures of the older subfamilies are results of an evolution from a “panlike” structure to a more diffuse correlation pattern due to mutation.

  5. Discovery and characterization of Alu repeat sequences via precise local read assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wildschutte, Julia H.; Baron, Alayna; Diroff, Nicolette M.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Alu insertions have contributed to >11% of the human genome and ∼30–35 Alu subfamilies remain actively mobile, yet the characterization of polymorphic Alu insertions from short-read data remains a challenge. We build on existing computational methods to combine Alu detection and de novo assembly of WGS data as a means to reconstruct the full sequence of insertion events from Illumina paired end reads. Comparison with published calls obtained using PacBio long-reads indicates a false discovery rate below 5%, at the cost of reduced sensitivity due to the colocation of reference and non-reference repeats. We generate a highly accurate call set of 1614 completely assembled Alu variants from 53 samples from the Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP) panel. We utilize the reconstructed alternative insertion haplotypes to genotype 1010 fully assembled insertions, obtaining >99% agreement with genotypes obtained by PCR. In our assembled sequences, we find evidence of premature insertion mechanisms and observe 5′ truncation in 16% of AluYa5 and AluYb8 insertions. The sites of truncation coincide with stem-loop structures and SRP9/14 binding sites in the Alu RNA, implicating L1 ORF2p pausing in the generation of 5′ truncations. Additionally, we identified variable AluJ and AluS elements that likely arose due to non-retrotransposition mechanisms. PMID:26503250

  6. Linkage disequilibrium among RFLPs at the insulin-receptor locus despite intervening alu repeat sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Elbein, S.C. )

    1992-11-01

    Multiple mutations of the insulin receptor (INSR) gene have been identified in individuals with extreme insulin resistance. These mutations have included recombination events between Alu repeat units in the tyrosine kinase-encoding [beta]-chain region of the gene. To evaluate the influence of Alu and dinucleotide repetitive sequences on recombination events within the insulin receptor gene, the author examined the degree of linkage disequilibrium between RFLP pairs spanning the gene. The author established 228 independent haplotypes for seven RFLPs (two each for PstI, RsaI, and SstI and one for MspI and 172 independent haplotypes which included an additional RFLP with BglII) from 19 pedigrees. These RFLPs span >130 kb of this gene, and it was previously demonstrated that multiple Alu sequences separate RFLP pairs. Observed haplotype frequencies deviated significantly from those predicted. Pairwise analysis of RFLP showed high levels of linkage disequilibrium among RFLP in the [beta]-chain region of the insulin receptor, but not between [alpha]-chain RFLPs and those of the [beta]-chain. Disequilibrium was present among [beta]-chain RFLPs, despite separation by one or more Alu repeat sequences. The very strong linkage disequilibrium which was present in sizable regions of the INSR gene despite the presence of both Alu and microsatellite repeats suggested that these regions do not have a major impact on recombinations at this locus. 25 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  7. Effective Alu Repeat Based RT-Qpcr Normalization in Cancer Cell Perturbation Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Rihani, Ali; Van Maerken, Tom; Pattyn, Filip; Van Peer, Gert; Beckers, Anneleen; De Brouwer, Sara; Kumps, Candy; Mets, Evelien; Van der Meulen, Joni; Rondou, Pieter; Leonelli, Carina; Mestdagh, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo

    2013-01-01

    Background Measuring messenger RNA (mRNA) levels using the reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is common practice in many laboratories. A specific set of mRNAs as internal control reference genes is considered as the preferred strategy to normalize RT-qPCR data. Proper selection of reference genes is a critical issue, especially in cancer cells that are subjected to different in vitro manipulations. These manipulations may result in dramatic alterations in gene expression levels, even of assumed reference genes. In this study, we evaluated the expression levels of 11 commonly used reference genes as internal controls for normalization of 19 experiments that include neuroblastoma, T-ALL, melanoma, breast cancer, non small cell lung cancer (NSCL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, and cervical cancer cell lines subjected to various perturbations. Results The geNorm algorithm in the software package qbase+ was used to rank the candidate reference genes according to their expression stability. We observed that the stability of most of the candidate reference genes varies greatly in perturbation experiments. Expressed Alu repeats show relatively stable expression regardless of experimental condition. These Alu repeats are ranked among the best reference assays in all perturbation experiments and display acceptable average expression stability values (M<0.5). Conclusions We propose the use of Alu repeats as a reference assay when performing cancer cell perturbation experiments. PMID:23977142

  8. Inhibition of activated pericentromeric SINE/Alu repeat transcription in senescent human adult stem cells reinstates self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Hostikka, Sirkka Liisa; Atallah, Michelle; Blackwell, Benjamin; Lee, Elbert; Cook, Peter J; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Shariat, Goli; Halperin, Eran; Dobke, Marek; Rosenfeld, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    Cellular aging is linked to deficiencies in efficient repair of DNA double strand breaks and authentic genome maintenance at the chromatin level. Aging poses a significant threat to adult stem cell function by triggering persistent DNA damage and ultimately cellular senescence. Senescence is often considered to be an irreversible process. Moreover, critical genomic regions engaged in persistent DNA damage accumulation are unknown. Here we report that 65% of naturally occurring repairable DNA damage in self-renewing adult stem cells occurs within transposable elements. Upregulation of Alu retrotransposon transcription upon ex vivo aging causes nuclear cytotoxicity associated with the formation of persistent DNA damage foci and loss of efficient DNA repair in pericentric chromatin. This occurs due to a failure to recruit of condensin I and cohesin complexes. Our results demonstrate that the cytotoxicity of induced Alu repeats is functionally relevant for the human adult stem cell aging. Stable suppression of Alu transcription can reverse the senescent phenotype, reinstating the cells' self-renewing properties and increasing their plasticity by altering so-called “master” pluripotency regulators. PMID:21862875

  9. The coding region of the human c-mos pseudogene contains Alu repeat insertions.

    PubMed

    Zabarovsky, E R; Chumakov, I M; Prassolov, V S; Kisselev, L L

    1984-10-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of an 841-bp fragment derived from a segment of the human genome previously cloned by Chumakov et al. [Gene 17 (1982) 19-26] and Zabarovsky et al. [Gene 23 (1983) 379-384] and containing regions homologous to the viral mos gene probe. This sequence displays homology with part of the coding region of the human and murine c-mos genes, contains several termination codons, and is interrupted by two Alu-family elements flanked by short direct repeats. Probably, the progenitor of the human c-mos gene was duplicated approximately at the time of mammalian divergence, was converted to a pseudogene, and acquired insertions of two Alu elements.

  10. Consistent levels of A-to-I RNA editing across individuals in coding sequences and non-conserved Alu repeats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA-editing is an essential post-transcriptional mechanism that occurs in numerous sites in the human transcriptome, mainly within Alu repeats. It has been shown to have consistent levels of editing across individuals in a few targets in the human brain and altered in several human pathologies. However, the variability across human individuals of editing levels in other tissues has not been studied so far. Results Here, we analyzed 32 skin samples, looking at A-to-I editing level in three genes within coding sequences and in the Alu repeats of six different genes. We observed highly consistent editing levels across different individuals as well as across tissues, not only in coding targets but, surprisingly, also in the non evolutionary conserved Alu repeats. Conclusions Our findings suggest that A-to-I RNA-editing of Alu elements is a tightly regulated process and, as such, might have been recruited in the course of primate evolution for post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:21029430

  11. Alu Sx repeat-induced homozygous deletion of the StAR gene causes lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Eiden-Plach, Antje; Nguyen, Huy-Hoang; Schneider, Ursula; Hartmann, Michaela F; Bernhardt, Rita; Hannemann, Frank; Wudy, Stefan A

    2012-05-01

    Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (Lipoid CAH) is the most severe form of the autosomal recessive disorder CAH. A general loss of the steroid biosynthetic activity caused by defects in the StAR gene manifests as life-threatening primary adrenal insufficiency. We report a case of Lipoid CAH caused by a so far not described homozygous deletion of the complete StAR gene and provide diagnostic results based on a GC-MS steroid metabolomics and molecular genetic analysis. The patient presented with postnatal hypoglycemia, vomiting, adynamia, increasing pigmentation and hyponatremia. The constellation of urinary steroid metabolites suggested Lipoid CAH and ruled out all other forms of CAH or defects of aldosterone biosynthesis. After treatment with sodium supplementation, hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone the child fully recovered. Molecular genetic analysis demonstrated a homozygous 12.1 kb deletion in the StAR gene locus. The breakpoints of the deletion are embedded into two typical genomic repetitive Alu Sx elements upstream and downstream of the gene leading to the loss of all exons and regulatory elements. We established deletion-specific and intact allele-specific PCR methods and determined the StAR gene status of all available family members over three generations. This analysis revealed that one of the siblings, who died a few weeks after birth, carried the same genetic defect. Since several Alu repeats at the StAR gene locus increase the probability of deletions, patients with typical symptoms of lipoid CAH lacking evidence for the presence of both StAR alleles should be analyzed carefully for this kind of disorder.

  12. The human gene (CSNK2A1) coding for the casein kinase II subunit [alpha] is located on chromosome 20 and contains tandemly arranged Alu repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Wirkner, U.; Lichter, P.; Pyerin, W. ); Voss, H.; Ansorge, W. )

    1994-01-15

    The authors have isolated and characterized an 18.9-kb genomic clone representing a central portion of the human casein kinase II (CKII) subunit [alpha] gene (CSNK2A1). Using the whole clone as a probe, the gene was localized on chromosome 20p13. The clone contains eight exons whose sequences comprise bases 102 to 824 of the coding region of the human CKII[alpha]. The exon/intron splice junctions conform to the gt/ag rule. Three of the nine introns are located at positions corresponding to those in the CKII[alpha] gene of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The introns contain eight complete and eight incomplete Alu repeats. Some of the Alu sequences are arranged in tandems of two or three, which seem to originate from insertions of younger Alu sequences into the poly(A) region of previously integrated Alu sequences, as indicated by flanking direct repeats. 50 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. CTG repeats distribution and Alu insertion polymorphism at myotonic dystrophy (DM) gene in Amhara and Oromo populations of Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gennarelli, M; Pavoni, M; Cruciani, F; De Stefano, G; Dallapiccola, B; Novelli, G

    1999-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a dominantly inherited neuromuscular disease, highly variable and multisystemic, which is caused by the expansion of a CTG repeat located in the 3' untranslated region of the DMPK gene. Normal alleles show a copy number of 5-37 repeats on normal chromosomes, amplified to 50-3000 copies on DM chromosomes. The trinucleotide repeat shows a trimodal allele distribution in the majority of the examined population. The first class includes alleles carrying (CTG)5, the second class, alleles in the range 7-18 repeats, and the third class, alleles (CTG) > or =19. The frequency of this third class is directly related to the prevalence of DM in different populations, suggesting that normal large-sized alleles predispose toward DM. We studied CTG repeat allele distribution and Alu insertion and/or deletion polymorphism at the myotonic dystrophy locus in two major Ethiopian populations, the Amhara and Oromo. CTG allele distribution and haplotype analysis on a total of 224 normal chromosomes showed significant differences between the two ethnic groups. These differences have a bearing on the out-of-Africa hypothesis for the origin of the DM mutation. In addition, (CTG) > or =19 were exclusively detected in the Amhara population, confirming the predisposing role of these alleles compared with the DM expansion-mutation.

  14. Three RFLPs defining a haplotype associated with the common mutation in a human medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency occur in Alu repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Zhifang Zhang; Yeqing Zhou; Kelly, D.P.; Strauss, A.W. St. Louis Children's Hospital, MO ); Kolvraa, S.; Gregersen, N. )

    1993-06-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is a common inborn error of fatty-acid oxidation and may cause sudden infant death. Previous studies revealed that (i) homozygosity for an A-to-G mutation at nucleotide 985 of the mRNA coding region (A985G) is an extremely common cause of MCAD deficiency and (ii) MCAD deficiency is strongly associated with a particular haplotype for RFLPs for BanII, PstI, and TaqI. TaqI allele 2 is always associated with the A985G mutation in human MCAD deficiency. In this study, the authors have delineated the molecular basis of the RFLPs for PstI, BamHI, and TaqI in the human MCAD gene. Their results prove that the three RFLPs are caused by point mutations in the 8 kb of DNA encompassing exons 8--10 of the human MCAD gene. The TaqI polymorphism is caused by a C-to-A substitution 392 bp upstream of the exon 8, and the PstI and BamHI polymorphisms are due to T-to-C and G-to-A substitutions, respectively, which are 727 and 931 bp downstream of exon 10, respectively. All three RFLPs lie within Alu repetitive sequences. Comparison of intronic sequences immediately following exon 10 from two normal individuals with different haplotypes showed that this region contains densely packed Alu repeats and is highly polymorphic. The results are consistent both with a founder effect as the cause of the high prevalence of a single (A985G) mutation in MCAD deficiency and with its association with a particular haplotype for these intragenic RFLPs. 27 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. ALU repeats in promoters are position-dependent co-response elements (coRE) that enhance or repress transcription by dimeric and monomeric progesterone receptors.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Britta M; Jambal, Purevsuren; Schittone, Stephanie A; Horwitz, Kathryn B

    2009-07-01

    We have conducted an in silico analysis of progesterone response elements (PRE) in progesterone receptor (PR) up-regulated promoters. Imperfect inverted repeats, direct repeats, and half-site PRE are widespread, not only in PR-regulated, but also in non-PR-regulated and random promoters. Few resemble the commonly used palindromic PRE with three nucleotide (nt) spacers. We speculated that PRE may be necessary but insufficient to control endogenous PR-dependent transcription. A search for PRE partners identified a highly conserved 234-nt sequence invariably located within 1-2 kb of transcription start sites. It resembles ALU repeats and contains binding sites for 11 transcription factors. The 234-nt sequence of the PR-regulated 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase promoter was cloned in the forward or reverse orientation in front of zero, one, or two inverted repeat PRE, and one or tandem PRE half-sites, driving luciferase. Under these conditions the 234-nt sequence functions as a co-response element (coRE). From the PRE or tandem half-sites, the reverse coRE is a strong activator of PR and glucocorticoid receptor-dependent transcription. The forward coRE is a powerful repressor. The prevalence of PRE half-sites in natural promoters suggested that PR monomers regulate transcription. Indeed, dimerization-domain mutant PR monomers were stronger transactivators than wild-type PR on PRE or tandem half-sites. This was repressed by the forward coRE. We propose that in natural promoters the coRE functions as a composite response element with imperfect PRE and half-sites to present variable, orientation-dependent transcription factors for interaction with nearby PR. PMID:19372234

  16. Patterns of Ancestral Human Diversity: An Analysis of Alu-Insertion and Restriction-Site Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, W. S.; Ricker, C. E.; Bamshad, M. J.; Carroll, M. L.; Nguyen, S. V.; Batzer, M. A.; Harpending, H. C.; Rogers, A. R.; Jorde, L. B.

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed 35 widely distributed, polymorphic Alu loci in 715 individuals from 31 world populations. The average frequency of Alu insertions (the derived state) is lowest in Africa (.42) but is higher and similar in India (.55), Europe (.56), and Asia (.57). A comparison with 30 restriction-site polymorphisms (RSPs) for which the ancestral state has been determined shows that the frequency of derived RSP alleles is also lower in Africa (.35) than it is in Asia (.45) and in Europe (.46). Neighbor-joining networks based on Alu insertions or RSPs are rooted in Africa and show African populations as separate from other populations, with high statistical support. Correlations between genetic distances based on Alu and nuclear RSPs, short tandem-repeat polymorphisms, and mtDNA, in the same individuals, are high and significant. For the 35 loci, Alu gene diversity and the diversity attributable to population subdivision is highest in Africa but is lower and similar in Europe and Asia. The distribution of ancestral alleles is consistent with an origin of early modern human populations in sub-Saharan Africa, the isolation and preservation of ancestral alleles within Africa, and an expansion out of Africa into Eurasia. This expansion is characterized by increasing frequencies of Alu inserts and by derived RSP alleles with reduced genetic diversity in non-African populations. PMID:11179020

  17. Alu element-containing RNAs maintain nucleolar structure and function.

    PubMed

    Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Pankert, Teresa; Seiler, Jeanette; Németh, Attila; Voit, Renate; Grummt, Ingrid; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-11-12

    Non-coding RNAs play a key role in organizing the nucleus into functional subcompartments. By combining fluorescence microscopy and RNA deep-sequencing-based analysis, we found that RNA polymerase II transcripts originating from intronic Alu elements (aluRNAs) were enriched in the nucleolus. Antisense-oligo-mediated depletion of aluRNAs or drug-induced inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity disrupted nucleolar structure and impaired RNA polymerase I-dependent transcription of rRNA genes. In contrast, overexpression of a prototypic aluRNA sequence increased both nucleolus size and levels of pre-rRNA, suggesting a functional link between aluRNA, nucleolus integrity and pre-rRNA synthesis. Furthermore, we show that aluRNAs interact with nucleolin and target ectopic genomic loci to the nucleolus. Our study suggests an aluRNA-based mechanism that links RNA polymerase I and II activities and modulates nucleolar structure and rRNA production.

  18. Origin and diversification of minisatellites derived from human Alu sequences.

    PubMed

    Jurka, Jerzy; Gentles, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    We analyze minisatellites derived from Alu fragments corresponding approximately to the first 44 bases of human Alu consensus sequences from different subfamilies. The origin of Alu-derived minisatellites appears to have been mediated by short flanking repeats, as first proposed by Haber and Louis [Haber, J.E., Louis, E.J., 1998. Minisatellite origins in yeast and humans. Genomics 48, 132-135.]. We also present evidence for base substitutions and deletions introduced to minisatellites by gene conversion with partially similar but unrelated flanking regions. Segments flanked by short direct repeats are relatively common in different regions of Alu and other repetitive sequences. Our analysis shows that they can be effectively used in comparative studies of the overall sequence context which may contribute to instability of DNA segments flanked by short direct repeats.

  19. The Contribution of Alu Elements to Mutagenic DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Streva, Vincent A.; DeFreece, Cecily B.; Hedges, Dale J.; Deininger, Prescott L.

    2015-01-01

    Alu elements make up the largest family of human mobile elements, numbering 1.1 million copies and comprising 11% of the human genome. As a consequence of evolution and genetic drift, Alu elements of various sequence divergence exist throughout the human genome. Alu/Alu recombination has been shown to cause approximately 0.5% of new human genetic diseases and contribute to extensive genomic structural variation. To begin understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to these rearrangements in mammalian cells, we constructed Alu/Alu recombination reporter cell lines containing Alu elements ranging in sequence divergence from 0%-30% that allow detection of both Alu/Alu recombination and large non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) deletions that range from 1.0 to 1.9 kb in size. Introduction of as little as 0.7% sequence divergence between Alu elements resulted in a significant reduction in recombination, which indicates even small degrees of sequence divergence reduce the efficiency of homology-directed DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Further reduction in recombination was observed in a sequence divergence-dependent manner for diverged Alu/Alu recombination constructs with up to 10% sequence divergence. With greater levels of sequence divergence (15%-30%), we observed a significant increase in DSB repair due to a shift from Alu/Alu recombination to variable-length NHEJ which removes sequence between the two Alu elements. This increase in NHEJ deletions depends on the presence of Alu sequence homeology (similar but not identical sequences). Analysis of recombination products revealed that Alu/Alu recombination junctions occur more frequently in the first 100 bp of the Alu element within our reporter assay, just as they do in genomic Alu/Alu recombination events. This is the first extensive study characterizing the influence of Alu element sequence divergence on DNA repair, which will inform predictions regarding the effect of Alu element sequence divergence on both

  20. PopAlu: population-scale detection of Alu polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yu; Kehr, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Alu elements are sequences of approximately 300 basepairs that together comprise more than 10% of the human genome. Due to their recent origin in primate evolution some Alu elements are polymorphic in humans, present in some individuals while absent in others. We present PopAlu, a tool to detect polymorphic Alu elements on a population scale from paired-end sequencing data. PopAlu uses read pair distance and orientation as well as split reads to identify the location and precise breakpoints of polymorphic Alus. Genotype calling enables us to differentiate between homozygous and heterozygous carriers, making the output of PopAlu suitable for use in downstream analyses such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We show on a simulated dataset that PopAlu calls Alu elements inserted and deleted with respect to a reference genome with high accuracy and high precision. Our analysis of real data of a human trio from the 1000 Genomes Project confirms that PopAlu is able to produce highly accurate genotype calls. To our knowledge, PopAlu is the first tool that identifies polymorphic Alu elements from multiple individuals simultaneously, pinpoints the precise breakpoints and calls genotypes with high accuracy. PMID:26417547

  1. Quantification of Unmethylated Alu (QUAlu): a tool to assess global hypomethylation in routine clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Buj, Raquel; Mallona, Izaskun; Díez-Villanueva, Anna; Barrera, Víctor; Mauricio, Dídac; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Reverter, Jordi L.; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Azuara, Daniel; Ramírez, Jose L.; Alonso, Sergio; Rosell, Rafael; Capellà, Gabriel; Perucho, Manuel; Robledo, Mercedes; Peinado, Miguel A.; Jordà, Mireia

    2016-01-01

    Hypomethylation of DNA is a hallmark of cancer and its analysis as tumor biomarker has been proposed, but its determination in clinical settings is hampered by lack of standardized methodologies. Here, we present QUAlu (Quantification of Unmethylated Alu), a new technique to estimate the Percentage of UnMethylated Alu (PUMA) as a surrogate for global hypomethylation. QUAlu consists in the measurement by qPCR of Alu repeats after digestion of genomic DNA with isoschizomers with differential sensitivity to DNA methylation. QUAlu performance has been evaluated for reproducibility, trueness and specificity, and validated by deep sequencing. As a proof of use, QUAlu has been applied to a broad variety of pathological examination specimens covering five cancer types. Major findings of the preliminary application of QUAlu to clinical samples include: (1) all normal tissues displayed similar PUMA; (2) tumors showed variable PUMA with the highest levels in lung and colon and the lowest in thyroid cancer; (3) stools from colon cancer patients presented higher PUMA than those from control individuals; (4) lung squamous cell carcinomas showed higher PUMA than lung adenocarcinomas, and an increasing hypomethylation trend associated with smoking habits. In conclusion, QUAlu is a simple and robust method to determine Alu hypomethylation in human biospecimens and may be easily implemented in research and clinical settings. PMID:26859682

  2. African origin of human-specific polymorphic Alu insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M. ); Stoneking, M. ); Bazan, H.; Kass, D.H.; Shaikh, T.H.; Scheer, W.D. ); Novick, G.E.; Herrera, R.J. ); Ioannou, P.A. )

    1994-12-06

    Alu elements are a family of interspersed repeats that have mobilized throughout primate genomes by retroposition from a few [open quotes]master[close quotes] genes. Among the 500,000 Alu elements in the human genome are members of the human-specific subfamily that are not fixed in the human species. Four such polymorphic human-specific Alu insertions were analyzed by a rapid, PCR-based assay. These four polymorphic Alu insertions were shown to be absent from the genomes of a number of nonhuman primates, consistent with their arising as human genetic polymorphisms sometime after the human/African ape divergence. Analysis of 664 unrelated individuals from 16 population groups from around the world revealed substantial levels of variation within population groups and significant genetic differentiation among groups. No significant associations were found among the four loci, consistent with their location on different chromosomes. A maximum-likelihood tree of population relationships showed four major groupings consisting of Africa, Europe, Asia/Americas, and Australia/New Guinea, which is concordant with similar trees based on other loci. A particularly useful feature of the polymorphic Alu insertions is that the ancestral state is known to be the absence of the Alu element, and the presence of the Alu element at a particular chromosomal site reflects a single, unique event in human evolution. A hypothetical ancestral group can then be included in the tree analysis, with the frequency of each insertion set to zero. The ancestral group connected to the maximum-likelihood tree within the African branch, which suggests an African origin of these polymorphic Alu insertions. These data are concordant with other diverse data sets, which lends further support to the recent African origin hypothesis for modern humans. Polymorphic Alu insertions represent a source of genetic variation for studying human population structure and evolution. 45 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. A knowledgebase of the human Alu repetitive elements.

    PubMed

    Mallona, Izaskun; Jordà, Mireia; Peinado, Miguel A

    2016-04-01

    Alu elements are the most abundant retrotransposons in the human genome with more than one million copies. Alu repeats have been reported to participate in multiple processes related with genome regulation and compartmentalization. Moreover, they have been involved in the facilitation of pathological mutations in many diseases, including cancer. The contribution of Alus and other repeats in genomic regulation is often overlooked because their study poses technical and analytical challenges hardly attainable with conventional strategies. Here we propose the integration of ontology-based semantic methods to query a knowledgebase for the human Alus. The knowledgebase for the human Alus leverages Sequence (SO) and Gene Ontologies (GO) and is devoted to address functional and genetic information in the genomic context of the Alus. For each Alu element, the closest gene and transcript are stored, as well their functional annotation according to GO, the state of the chromatin and the transcription factors binding sites inside the Alu. The model uses Web Ontology Language (OWL) and Semantic Web Rule Language (SWRL). As a case of use and to illustrate the utility of the tool, we have evaluated the epigenetic states of Alu repeats associated with gene promoters according to their transcriptional activity. The ontology is easily extendable, offering a scaffold for the inclusion of new experimental data. The RDF/XML formalization is freely available at http://aluontology.sourceforge.net/.

  4. A knowledgebase of the human Alu repetitive elements.

    PubMed

    Mallona, Izaskun; Jordà, Mireia; Peinado, Miguel A

    2016-04-01

    Alu elements are the most abundant retrotransposons in the human genome with more than one million copies. Alu repeats have been reported to participate in multiple processes related with genome regulation and compartmentalization. Moreover, they have been involved in the facilitation of pathological mutations in many diseases, including cancer. The contribution of Alus and other repeats in genomic regulation is often overlooked because their study poses technical and analytical challenges hardly attainable with conventional strategies. Here we propose the integration of ontology-based semantic methods to query a knowledgebase for the human Alus. The knowledgebase for the human Alus leverages Sequence (SO) and Gene Ontologies (GO) and is devoted to address functional and genetic information in the genomic context of the Alus. For each Alu element, the closest gene and transcript are stored, as well their functional annotation according to GO, the state of the chromatin and the transcription factors binding sites inside the Alu. The model uses Web Ontology Language (OWL) and Semantic Web Rule Language (SWRL). As a case of use and to illustrate the utility of the tool, we have evaluated the epigenetic states of Alu repeats associated with gene promoters according to their transcriptional activity. The ontology is easily extendable, offering a scaffold for the inclusion of new experimental data. The RDF/XML formalization is freely available at http://aluontology.sourceforge.net/. PMID:26827622

  5. LINE-1 ORF1 protein enhances Alu SINE retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Nicholas; Wagstaff, Bradley J; Deininger, Prescott L; Roy-Engel, Astrid M

    2008-08-01

    Retroelements have contributed over one third of the human genome mass. The currently active LINE-1 (L1) codes for two proteins (ORF1p and ORF2p), both strictly required for retrotransposition. In contrast, the non-coding parasitic SINE (Alu) only appears to need the L1 ORF2p for its own amplification. This requirement was previously determined using a tissue culture assay system in human cells (HeLa). Because HeLa are likely to express functional L1 proteins, it is possible that low levels of endogenous ORF1p are necessary for the observed tagged Alu mobilization. By individually expressing ORF1 and ORF2 proteins from both human (L1RP and LRE3) and rodent (L1A102 and L1spa) L1 sources, we demonstrate that increasing amounts of ORF1 expressing vector enhances tagged Alu mobilization in HeLa cells. In addition, using chicken fibroblast cells as an alternate cell culture source, we confirmed that ORF1p is not strictly required for Alu mobilization in our assay. Supporting our observations in HeLa cells, we find that tagged Alu retrotransposition is improved by supplementation of ORF1p in the cultured chicken cells. We postulate that L1 ORF1p plays either a direct or indirect role in enhancing the interaction between the Alu RNA and the required factors needed for its retrotransposition.

  6. LINE-1 and Alu hypomethylation in mucoepidermoid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) can be classified into low-, intermediate-, and high-grade tumors based on its histological features. MEC is mainly composed of three cell types (squamous or epidermoid, mucous and intermediate cells), which correlates with the histological grade and reflects its clinical behavior. Most cancers exhibit reduced methylation of repetitive sequences such as Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1) and Alu elements. However, to date very little information is available on the LINE-1 and Alu methylation status in MEC. The aim of this study was to investigate LINE-1 and Alu element methylation in MEC and compare if key differences in the methylation status exist between the three different cell types, and adjacent normal salivary gland cells, to see if this may reflect the histological grade. Methods LINE-1 and Alu element methylation of 24 MEC, and 14 normal salivary gland tissues were compared using Combine Bisulfite Restriction Analysis (COBRA). Furthermore, the three different cell types from MEC samples were isolated for enrichment by laser capture microdissection (LCM), essentially to see if COBRA was likely to increase the predictive value of LINE-1 and Alu element methylation. Results LINE-1 and Alu element methylation levels were significantly different (p<0.001) between the cell types, and showed a stepwise decrease from the adjacent normal salivary gland to the intermediate, mucous and squamous cells. The reduced methylation levels of LINE-1 were correlated with a poorer histological grade. In addition, MEC tissue showed a significantly lower level of LINE-1 and Alu element methylation overall compared to normal salivary gland tissue (p<0.001). Conclusions Our findings suggest that LINE-1 methylation differed among histological grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Hence, this epigenetic event may hold value for MEC diagnosis and prognostic prediction. PMID:23510117

  7. Can nursing students' confidence levels increase with repeated simulation activities?

    PubMed

    Cummings, Cynthia L; Connelly, Linda K

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, nursing faculty conducted a study with undergraduate nursing students on their satisfaction, confidence, and educational practice levels, as it related to simulation activities throughout the curriculum. The study was a voluntary survey conducted on junior and senior year nursing students. It consisted of 30 items based on the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning and the Educational Practices Questionnaire (Jeffries, 2012). Mean averages were obtained for each of the 30 items from both groups and were compared using T scores for unpaired means. The results showed that 8 of the items had a 95% confidence level and when combined the items were significant for p <.001. The items identified were those related to self-confidence and active learning. Based on these findings, it can be assumed that repeated simulation experiences can lead to an increase in student confidence and active learning. PMID:26599594

  8. Can nursing students' confidence levels increase with repeated simulation activities?

    PubMed

    Cummings, Cynthia L; Connelly, Linda K

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, nursing faculty conducted a study with undergraduate nursing students on their satisfaction, confidence, and educational practice levels, as it related to simulation activities throughout the curriculum. The study was a voluntary survey conducted on junior and senior year nursing students. It consisted of 30 items based on the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning and the Educational Practices Questionnaire (Jeffries, 2012). Mean averages were obtained for each of the 30 items from both groups and were compared using T scores for unpaired means. The results showed that 8 of the items had a 95% confidence level and when combined the items were significant for p <.001. The items identified were those related to self-confidence and active learning. Based on these findings, it can be assumed that repeated simulation experiences can lead to an increase in student confidence and active learning.

  9. Reduced hnRNPA3 increases C9orf72 repeat RNA levels and dipeptide-repeat protein deposition.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohji; Nihei, Yoshihiro; Arzberger, Thomas; Zhou, Qihui; Mackenzie, Ian R; Hermann, Andreas; Hanisch, Frank; Kamp, Frits; Nuscher, Brigitte; Orozco, Denise; Edbauer, Dieter; Haass, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Intronic hexanucleotide (G4C2) repeat expansions in C9orf72 are genetically associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The repeat RNA accumulates within RNA foci but is also translated into disease characterizing dipeptide repeat proteins (DPR). Repeat-dependent toxicity may affect nuclear import. hnRNPA3 is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, which specifically binds to the G4C2 repeat RNA We now report that a reduction of nuclear hnRNPA3 leads to an increase of the repeat RNA as well as DPR production and deposition in primary neurons and a novel tissue culture model that reproduces features of the C9orf72 pathology. In fibroblasts derived from patients carrying extended C9orf72 repeats, nuclear RNA foci accumulated upon reduction of hnRNPA3. Neurons in the hippocampus of C9orf72 patients are frequently devoid of hnRNPA3. Reduced nuclear hnRNPA3 in the hippocampus of patients with extended C9orf72 repeats correlates with increased DPR deposition. Thus, reduced hnRNPA3 expression in C9orf72 cases leads to increased levels of the repeat RNA as well as enhanced production and deposition of DPR proteins and RNA foci. PMID:27461252

  10. Aberrant methylation and associated transcriptional mobilization of Alu elements contributes to genomic instability in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pal, Arnab; Srivastava, Tapasya; Sharma, Manish K; Mehndiratta, Mohit; Das, Prerna; Sinha, Subrata; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad

    2010-11-01

    Hypoxia is an integral part of tumorigenesis and contributes extensively to the neoplastic phenotype including drug resistance and genomic instability. It has also been reported that hypoxia results in global demethylation. Because a majority of the cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) islands are found within the repeat elements of DNA, and are usually methylated under normoxic conditions, we suggested that retrotransposable Alu or short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) which show altered methylation and associated changes of gene expression during hypoxia, could be associated with genomic instability. U87MG glioblastoma cells were cultured in 0.1% O₂ for 6 weeks and compared with cells cultured in 21% O₂ for the same duration. Real-time PCR analysis showed a significant increase in SINE and reverse transcriptase coding long interspersed nuclear element (LINE) transcripts during hypoxia. Sequencing of bisulphite treated DNA as well as the Combined Bisulfite Restriction Analysis (COBRA) assay showed that the SINE loci studied underwent significant hypomethylation though there was patchy hypermethylation at a few sites. The inter-alu PCR profile of DNA from cells cultured under 6-week hypoxia, its 4-week revert back to normoxia and 6-week normoxia showed several changes in the band pattern indicating increased alu mediated genomic alteration. Our results show that aberrant methylation leading to increased transcription of SINE and reverse transcriptase associated LINE elements could lead to increased genomic instability in hypoxia. This might be a cause of genetic heterogeneity in tumours especially in variegated hypoxic environment and lead to a development of foci of more aggressive tumour cells.

  11. Evidence for large diversity in the human transcriptome created by Alu RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Barak, Michal; Levanon, Erez Y; Eisenberg, Eli; Paz, Nurit; Rechavi, Gideon; Church, George M; Mehr, Ramit

    2009-11-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing alters the original genomic content of the human transcriptome and is essential for maintenance of normal life in mammals. A-to-I editing in Alu repeats is abundant in the human genome, with many thousands of expressed Alu sequences undergoing editing. Little is known so far about the contribution of Alu editing to transcriptome complexity. Transcripts derived from a single edited Alu sequence can be edited in multiple sites, and thus could theoretically generate a large number of different transcripts. Here we explored whether the combinatorial potential nature of edited Alu sequences is actually fulfilled in the human transcriptome. We analyzed datasets of editing sites and performed an analysis of a detailed transcript set of one edited Alu sequence. We found that editing appears at many more sites than detected by earlier genomic screens. To a large extent, editing of different sites within the same transcript is only weakly correlated. Thus, rather than finding a few versions of each transcript, a large number of edited variants arise, resulting in immense transcript diversity that eclipses alternative splicing as mechanism of transcriptome diversity, although with less impact on the proteome. PMID:19740767

  12. Evidence for large diversity in the human transcriptome created by Alu RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Barak, Michal; Levanon, Erez Y; Eisenberg, Eli; Paz, Nurit; Rechavi, Gideon; Church, George M; Mehr, Ramit

    2009-11-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing alters the original genomic content of the human transcriptome and is essential for maintenance of normal life in mammals. A-to-I editing in Alu repeats is abundant in the human genome, with many thousands of expressed Alu sequences undergoing editing. Little is known so far about the contribution of Alu editing to transcriptome complexity. Transcripts derived from a single edited Alu sequence can be edited in multiple sites, and thus could theoretically generate a large number of different transcripts. Here we explored whether the combinatorial potential nature of edited Alu sequences is actually fulfilled in the human transcriptome. We analyzed datasets of editing sites and performed an analysis of a detailed transcript set of one edited Alu sequence. We found that editing appears at many more sites than detected by earlier genomic screens. To a large extent, editing of different sites within the same transcript is only weakly correlated. Thus, rather than finding a few versions of each transcript, a large number of edited variants arise, resulting in immense transcript diversity that eclipses alternative splicing as mechanism of transcriptome diversity, although with less impact on the proteome.

  13. Alu-mediated diverse and complex pathogenic copy-number variants within human chromosome 17 at p13.3.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shen; Yuan, Bo; Campbell, Ian M; Beck, Christine R; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Erez, Ayelet; Patel, Ankita; Bacino, Carlos A; Shaw, Chad A; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Cheung, Sau Wai; Bi, Weimin; Lupski, James R

    2015-07-15

    Alu repetitive elements are known to be major contributors to genome instability by generating Alu-mediated copy-number variants (CNVs). Most of the reported Alu-mediated CNVs are simple deletions and duplications, and the mechanism underlying Alu-Alu-mediated rearrangement has been attributed to non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Chromosome 17 at the p13.3 genomic region lacks extensive low-copy repeat architecture; however, it is highly enriched for Alu repetitive elements, with a fraction of 30% of total sequence annotated in the human reference genome, compared with the 10% genome-wide and 18% on chromosome 17. We conducted mechanistic studies of the 17p13.3 CNVs by performing high-density oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization, specifically interrogating the 17p13.3 region with ∼150 bp per probe density; CNV breakpoint junctions were mapped to nucleotide resolution by polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Studied rearrangements include 5 interstitial deletions, 14 tandem duplications, 7 terminal deletions and 13 complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs). Within the 17p13.3 region, Alu-Alu-mediated rearrangements were identified in 80% of the interstitial deletions, 46% of the tandem duplications and 50% of the CGRs, indicating that this mechanism was a major contributor for formation of breakpoint junctions. Our studies suggest that Alu repetitive elements facilitate formation of non-recurrent CNVs, CGRs and other structural aberrations of chromosome 17 at p13.3. The common observation of Alu-mediated rearrangement in CGRs and breakpoint junction sequences analysis further demonstrates that this type of mechanism is unlikely attributed to NAHR, but rather may be due to a recombination-coupled DNA replicative repair process.

  14. Model-based adhesive shrinkage compensation for increased bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Tobias; Schlette, Christian; Lakshmanan, Shunmuganathan; Haag, Sebastian; Zontar, Daniel; Sauer, Sebastian; Wenzel, Christian; Brecher, Christian; Roβmann, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The assembly process of optical components consists of two phases - the alignment and the bonding phase. Precision - or better process repeatability - is limited by the latter one. The limitation of the alignment precision is given by the measurement equipment and the manipulation technology applied. Today's micromanipulators in combination with beam imaging setups allow for an alignment in the range of far below 100nm. However, once precisely aligned optics need to be fixed in their position. State o f the art in optics bonding for laser systems is adhesive bonding with UV-curing adhesives. Adhesive bonding is a multi-factorial process and thus subject to statistical process deviations. As a matter of fact, UV-curing adhesives inherit shrinkage effects during their curing process, making offsets for shrinkage compensation mandatory. Enhancing the process control of the adhesive bonding process is the major goal of the activities described in this paper. To improve the precision of shrinkage compensation a dynamic shrinkage prediction is envisioned by Fraunhofer IPT. Intense research activities are being practiced to gather a deeper understanding of the parameters influencing adhesive shrinkage behavior. These effects are of different nature - obviously being the raw adhesive material itself as well as its condition, the bonding geometry, environmental parameters like surrounding temperature and of course process parameters such as curing properties. Understanding the major parameters and linking them in a model-based shrinkage-prediction environment is the basis for improved process control. Results are being deployed by Fraunhofer in prototyping, as well as volume production solutions for laser systems.

  15. Assembly and characterization of novel Alu inserts detected from next-generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Harun; David, Matei; Brudno, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive elements generally, and Alu inserts specifically are a large contributor to the recent evolution of the human genome. By assembling the sequences of novel Alu inserts using their respective subfamily consensus sequences as references, we found an exponential decay in the Alu subfamily call enrichment with increased number of sequence variants (Pearson correlation r=−0.68, p<0.0039). By mapping the sequences of these inserts to a human reference genome, we infer the reference Alu sources of a subset of the novel Alus, of which 85% were previously shown to be active. We also evaluate relationships between the loci of the novel inserts and their inferred sources. PMID:26442170

  16. Repeated administration of fresh garlic increases memory retention in rats.

    PubMed

    Haider, Saida; Naz, Nosheen; Khaliq, Saima; Perveen, Tahira; Haleem, Darakhshan J

    2008-12-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is regarded as both a food and a medicinal herb. Increasing attention has focused on the biological functions and health benefits of garlic as a potentially major dietary component. Chronic garlic administration has been shown to enhance memory function. Evidence also shows that garlic administration in rats affects brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) levels. 5-HT, a neurotransmitter involved in a number of physiological functions, is also known to enhance cognitive performance. The present study was designed to investigate the probable neurochemical mechanism responsible for the enhancement of memory following garlic administration. Sixteen adult locally bred male albino Wistar rats were divided into control (n = 8) and test (n = 8) groups. The test group was orally administered 250 mg/kg fresh garlic homogenate (FGH), while control animals received an equal amount of water daily for 21 days. Estimation of plasma free and total tryptophan (TRP) and whole brain TRP, 5-HT, and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. For assessment of memory, a step-through passive avoidance paradigm (electric shock avoidance) was used. The results showed that the levels of plasma free TRP significantly increased (P < .01) and plasma total TRP significantly decreased (P < .01) in garlic-treated rats. Brain TRP, 5-HT, and 5-HIAA levels were also significantly increased following garlic administration. A significant improvement in memory function was exhibited by garlic-treated rats in the passive avoidance test. Increased brain 5-HT levels were associated with improved cognitive performance. The present results, therefore, demonstrate that the memory-enhancing effect of garlic may be associated with increased brain 5-HT metabolism in rats. The results further support the use of garlic as a food supplement for the enhancement of memory. PMID:19053859

  17. Evolution of an Alu DNA element of type Sx in the lineage of primates and the origin of an associated tetranucleotide microsatellite.

    PubMed

    Crouau-Roy, B; Clisson, I

    2000-08-01

    A 394-bp DNA fragment, which in human is on chromosome 6 near the MOG (myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein) gene and encompasses an Alu element and an associated tetranucleotide microsatellite, was sequenced from a large range of primate species to follow its evolutionary divergence and to understand the origin of the microsatellite. This Alu element is found at the same orthologous position in all primates sequenced, but the tetranucleotide repeat is present only in Catarrhini between the 3'-oligo(dA) of the Alu element and the 3' flanking direct repeat. Little intraspecific variation was found. Sequence identity values for this orthologous primate Alu averaged 90% (82-99%) with transitions comprising between 70% and 100% of the observed nucleotide substitutions. Although the insertion of the Alu element predates the separation of these species, the original sequence of the site of integration can still be identified. This identification of the direct repeats suggests an active role of the oligo(dA) of the Alu element in the origin of the tetranucleotide repeats. The microsatellite probably appeared after the insertion of the Alu element, early in the lineage leading to the common ancestor of the hominoids and the Old World monkeys.

  18. Decreased Rate of Evolution in Y Chromosome STR Loci of Increased Size of the Repeat Unit

    PubMed Central

    Järve, Mari; Zhivotovsky, Lev A.; Rootsi, Siiri; Help, Hela; Rogaev, Evgeny I.; Khusnutdinova, Elza K.; Kivisild, Toomas; Sanchez, Juan J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Polymorphic Y chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs) have been widely used in population genetic and evolutionary studies. Compared to di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats, STRs with longer repeat units occur more rarely and are far less commonly used. Principal Findings In order to study the evolutionary dynamics of STRs according to repeat unit size, we analysed variation at 24 Y chromosome repeat loci: 1 tri-, 14 tetra-, 7 penta-, and 2 hexanucleotide loci. According to our results, penta- and hexanucleotide repeats have approximately two times lower repeat variance and diversity than tri- and tetranucleotide repeats, indicating that their mutation rate is about half of that of tri- and tetranucleotide repeats. Thus, STR markers with longer repeat units are more robust in distinguishing Y chromosome haplogroups and, in some cases, phylogenetic splits within established haplogroups. Conclusions Our findings suggest that Y chromosome STRs of increased repeat unit size have a lower rate of evolution, which has significant relevance in population genetic and evolutionary studies. PMID:19789645

  19. Ku antigen binds to Alu family DNA.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, T; Saëgusa, Y; Taira, T; Mimori, T; Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Ariga, H

    1998-01-01

    The GC-rich segment containing GGAGGC (Alu core) is conserved within the RNA polymerase III (pol III) promoters of Alu family sequences. We have shown that the GGAGGC motif functions as a modulator of DNA replication as well as of transcription, and identified the proteins binding to the motif in human HeLa cells. In this study, the Alu core binding proteins were partially purified from human Raji cells by using an Alu core DNA affinity column. Both the proteins thus purified were implied to be subunits of Ku antigen based on the following criteria: The molecular weights of the proteins estimated on gel electrophoreses were 70 and 85 kDa, respectively, under denaturing conditions, while under non-denaturing conditions only one band was observed for the same sample at 150 kDa, probably representing hetero-dimer formed between the 70 and 85 kDa proteins. The sizes and the hetero-dimer formation are reminiscent of the 70 and 80 kDa subunits of Ku antigen (Ku-p70 and Ku-p80). Moreover, the purified proteins were immunoreactive with anti-Ku antibodies, and the specific DNA-protein complex on the Alu core element was cancelled by the anti-Ku antibodies. The nucleoprotein complex showed the same clipping patterns as those of the complex between the Alu core element and an authentically purified Ku antigen after proteolytic cleavage with trypsin and chymotrypsin.

  20. Consumption of repeatedly heated soy oil increases the serum parameters related to atherosclerosis in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Adam, Siti Khadijah; Das, Srijit; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Umar, Nor Aini; Jaarin, Kamsiah

    2008-07-01

    Repeated heating of soy oil may promote lipid peroxidation. Oxidized unsaturated fatty acids may contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, especially in estrogen-deficient states. This study was performed to explore the deleterious effects of repeatedly heated soy oil on the development of atherosclerosis using ovariectomized rats, which represent an estrogen-deficient state. Twenty-four female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and were divided equally into four groups. The control group was fed with 2% cholesterol diet without any oil. The three treatment groups each received 2% cholesterol diet fortified with fresh, once-heated or five-times-heated (repeatedly heated) soy oil, respectively. Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), lipid profile and homocysteine levels were measured prior to ovariectomy and at the end of four months. Ovariectomized rats treated with repeatedly heated soy oil showed significant increases in lipid peroxidation and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels. Treatment with once-heated or repeatedly heated soy oil caused a significant increase in total cholesterol, while fresh soy oil caused significant reduction in homocysteine level as compared to other groups. Repeatedly heated soy oil caused significant increases in TBARS and LDL as compared to fresh oil. The higher level of homocysteine in the ovariectomized rats fed with repeatedly heated oil, as compared to those fed with fresh oil, also suggests the repeatedly heated oil contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Importantly, the protective effect of the soy oil may be lost once it was being repeatedly heated. In conclusion, the consumption of repeatedly heated oil may predispose to atherosclerosis in estrogen-deficient states.

  1. The Basques according to polymorphic Alu insertions.

    PubMed

    de Pancorbo, M M; López-Martínez, M; Martínez-Bouzas, C; Castro, A; Fernández-Fernández, I; de Mayolo, G A; de Mayolo, A A; de Mayolo, P A; Rowold, D J; Herrera, R J

    2001-08-01

    Polymorphic Alu insertions provide a set of DNA markers of interest in human population genetics. Approximately 1000-2000 of these insertions have not reached fixation within the human genome. Each one of these polymorphic loci most probably resulted from a unique insertional event, and therefore all individuals possessing the insertion are related by descent not just state. In addition, the direction of mutational change is toward the gain of the Alu element at a particular locus. Therefore, the improved knowledge of both the ancestral state and the direction of mutational change greatly facilitates the analysis of population relationships. As a result, Alu insertion polymorphisms represent a significant tool for population genetic studies. In this study, polymorphic Alu insertions have been employed to ascertain phylogenetic relationships among Basque groups and worldwide populations. The Basques are considered to be a geographic isolate with a unique language and customs. They may be direct descendants of Cro-Magnon enclaves from the upper Paleolithic (38,000 to 10,000 years). The Basques are distributed among narrow valleys in northeastern Spain with little migration between them until recently. This characteristic may have had an effect on allelic frequency distributions. With the aim of studying this possible effect, we have analyzed six autosomal polymorphic Alu loci from four different sites within the Spanish Basque region in order to ascertain any genetic heterogeneity among the Basques. The results are consistent with a lack of homogeneity among these four autochthonous Basque groups.

  2. The Basques according to polymorphic Alu insertions.

    PubMed

    de Pancorbo, M M; López-Martínez, M; Martínez-Bouzas, C; Castro, A; Fernández-Fernández, I; de Mayolo, G A; de Mayolo, A A; de Mayolo, P A; Rowold, D J; Herrera, R J

    2001-08-01

    Polymorphic Alu insertions provide a set of DNA markers of interest in human population genetics. Approximately 1000-2000 of these insertions have not reached fixation within the human genome. Each one of these polymorphic loci most probably resulted from a unique insertional event, and therefore all individuals possessing the insertion are related by descent not just state. In addition, the direction of mutational change is toward the gain of the Alu element at a particular locus. Therefore, the improved knowledge of both the ancestral state and the direction of mutational change greatly facilitates the analysis of population relationships. As a result, Alu insertion polymorphisms represent a significant tool for population genetic studies. In this study, polymorphic Alu insertions have been employed to ascertain phylogenetic relationships among Basque groups and worldwide populations. The Basques are considered to be a geographic isolate with a unique language and customs. They may be direct descendants of Cro-Magnon enclaves from the upper Paleolithic (38,000 to 10,000 years). The Basques are distributed among narrow valleys in northeastern Spain with little migration between them until recently. This characteristic may have had an effect on allelic frequency distributions. With the aim of studying this possible effect, we have analyzed six autosomal polymorphic Alu loci from four different sites within the Spanish Basque region in order to ascertain any genetic heterogeneity among the Basques. The results are consistent with a lack of homogeneity among these four autochthonous Basque groups. PMID:11511929

  3. Alu-mediated diverse and complex pathogenic copy-number variants within human chromosome 17 at p13.3

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shen; Yuan, Bo; Campbell, Ian M.; Beck, Christine R.; Carvalho, Claudia M.B.; Nagamani, Sandesh C.S.; Erez, Ayelet; Patel, Ankita; Bacino, Carlos A.; Shaw, Chad A.; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Cheung, Sau Wai; Bi, Weimin; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Alu repetitive elements are known to be major contributors to genome instability by generating Alu-mediated copy-number variants (CNVs). Most of the reported Alu-mediated CNVs are simple deletions and duplications, and the mechanism underlying Alu–Alu-mediated rearrangement has been attributed to non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Chromosome 17 at the p13.3 genomic region lacks extensive low-copy repeat architecture; however, it is highly enriched for Alu repetitive elements, with a fraction of 30% of total sequence annotated in the human reference genome, compared with the 10% genome-wide and 18% on chromosome 17. We conducted mechanistic studies of the 17p13.3 CNVs by performing high-density oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization, specifically interrogating the 17p13.3 region with ∼150 bp per probe density; CNV breakpoint junctions were mapped to nucleotide resolution by polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Studied rearrangements include 5 interstitial deletions, 14 tandem duplications, 7 terminal deletions and 13 complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs). Within the 17p13.3 region, Alu–Alu-mediated rearrangements were identified in 80% of the interstitial deletions, 46% of the tandem duplications and 50% of the CGRs, indicating that this mechanism was a major contributor for formation of breakpoint junctions. Our studies suggest that Alu repetitive elements facilitate formation of non-recurrent CNVs, CGRs and other structural aberrations of chromosome 17 at p13.3. The common observation of Alu-mediated rearrangement in CGRs and breakpoint junction sequences analysis further demonstrates that this type of mechanism is unlikely attributed to NAHR, but rather may be due to a recombination-coupled DNA replicative repair process. PMID:25908615

  4. Structural Variation of Alu Element and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Songmi; Cho, Chun-Sung; Han, Kyudong

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements are one of major sources to cause genomic instability through various mechanisms including de novo insertion, insertion-mediated genomic deletion, and recombination-associated genomic deletion. Among them is Alu element which is the most abundant element, composing ~10% of the human genome. The element emerged in the primate genome 65 million years ago and has since propagated successfully in the human and non-human primate genomes. Alu element is a non-autonomous retrotransposon and therefore retrotransposed using L1-enzyme machinery. The 'master gene' model has been generally accepted to explain Alu element amplification in primate genomes. According to the model, different subfamilies of Alu elements are created by mutations on the master gene and most Alu elements are amplified from the hyperactive master genes. Alu element is frequently involved in genomic rearrangements in the human genome due to its abundance and sequence identity between them. The genomic rearrangements caused by Alu elements could lead to genetic disorders such as hereditary disease, blood disorder, and neurological disorder. In fact, Alu elements are associated with approximately 0.1% of human genetic disorders. The first part of this review discusses mechanisms of Alu amplification and diversity among different Alu subfamilies. The second part discusses the particular role of Alu elements in generating genomic rearrangements as well as human genetic disorders. PMID:27729835

  5. Alu- and 7SL RNA Analogues Suppress MCF-7 Cell Viability through Modulating the Transcription of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response Genes.

    PubMed

    Baryakin, D N; Semenov, D V; Savelyeva, A V; Koval, O A; Rabinov, I V; Kuligina, E V; Richter, V A

    2013-10-01

    11% of the human genome is composed of Alu-retrotransposons, whose transcription by RNA polymerase III (Pol III) leads to the accumulation of several hundreds to thousands of Alu-RNA copies in the cytoplasm. Expression of Alu-RNA Pol III is significantly increased at various levels of stress, and the increase in the Alu-RNA level is accompanied by a suppression of proliferation, a decrease in viability, and induction of apoptotic processes in human cells. However, the question about the biological functions of Pol III Alu-transcripts, as well as their mechanism of action, remains open. In this work, analogues of Alu-RNA and its evolutionary ancestor, 7SL RNA, were synthesized. Transfection of human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells with the Alu-RNA and 7SL RNA analogues is accompanied by a decrease in viability and by induction of proapoptotic changes in these cells. The analysis of the combined action of these analogues and actinomycin D or tamoxifen revealed that the decreased viability of MCF-7 cells transfected with Alu-RNA and 7SL RNA was due to the modulation of transcription. A whole transcriptome analysis of gene expression revealed that increased gene expression of the transcription regulator NUPR1 (p8), as well as the transcription factor DDIT3 (CHOP), occurs under the action of both the Alu- and 7SL RNA analogues on MCF-7 cells. It has been concluded that induction of proapoptotic changes in human cells under the influence of the Alu-RNA and 7SL RNA analogues is related to the transcriptional activation of the genes of cellular stress factors, including the endoplasmic reticulum stress response factors.

  6. Repeated exposure to noise increases tolerance in a coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Sophie L; Mills, Suzanne C; Lecchini, David; Nedelec, Brendan; Simpson, Stephen D; Radford, Andrew N

    2016-09-01

    Some anthropogenic noise is now considered pollution, with evidence building that noise from human activities such as transportation, construction and exploration can impact behaviour and physiology in a broad range of taxa. However, relatively little research has considered the effects of repeated or chronic noise; extended exposures may result in habituation or sensitisation, and thus changes in response. We conducted a field-based experiment at Moorea Island to investigate how repeated exposure to playback of motorboat noise affected a coral reef fish (Dascyllus trimaculatus). We found that juvenile D. trimaculatus increased hiding behaviour during motorboat noise after two days of repeated exposure, but no longer did so after one and two weeks of exposure. We also found that naïve individuals responded to playback of motorboat noise with elevated ventilation rates, but that this response was diminished after one and two weeks of repeated exposure. We found no strong evidence that baseline blood cortisol levels, growth or body condition were affected by three weeks of repeated motorboat-noise playback. Our study reveals the importance of considering how tolerance levels may change over time, rather than simply extrapolating from results of short-term studies, if we are to make decisions about regulation and mitigation. PMID:27325546

  7. Sequence Analysis and Characterization of Active Human Alu Subfamilies Based on the 1000 Genomes Pilot Project.

    PubMed

    Konkel, Miriam K; Walker, Jerilyn A; Hotard, Ashley B; Ranck, Megan C; Fontenot, Catherine C; Storer, Jessica; Stewart, Chip; Marth, Gabor T; Batzer, Mark A

    2015-08-29

    The goal of the 1000 Genomes Consortium is to characterize human genome structural variation (SV), including forms of copy number variations such as deletions, duplications, and insertions. Mobile element insertions, particularly Alu elements, are major contributors to genomic SV among humans. During the pilot phase of the project we experimentally validated 645 (611 intergenic and 34 exon targeted) polymorphic "young" Alu insertion events, absent from the human reference genome. Here, we report high resolution sequencing of 343 (322 unique) recent Alu insertion events, along with their respective target site duplications, precise genomic breakpoint coordinates, subfamily assignment, percent divergence, and estimated A-rich tail lengths. All the sequenced Alu loci were derived from the AluY lineage with no evidence of retrotransposition activity involving older Alu families (e.g., AluJ and AluS). AluYa5 is currently the most active Alu subfamily in the human lineage, followed by AluYb8, and many others including three newly identified subfamilies we have termed AluYb7a3, AluYb8b1, and AluYa4a1. This report provides the structural details of 322 unique Alu variants from individual human genomes collectively adding about 100 kb of genomic variation. Many Alu subfamilies are currently active in human populations, including a surprising level of AluY retrotransposition. Human Alu subfamilies exhibit continuous evolution with potential drivers sprouting new Alu lineages.

  8. An Alu-based phylogeny of gibbons (hylobatidae).

    PubMed

    Meyer, Thomas J; McLain, Adam T; Oldenburg, J Michael; Faulk, Christopher; Bourgeois, Matthew G; Conlin, Erin M; Mootnick, Alan R; de Jong, Pieter J; Roos, Christian; Carbone, Lucia; Batzer, Mark A

    2012-11-01

    Gibbons (Hylobatidae) are small, arboreal apes indigenous to Southeast Asia that diverged from other apes ∼15-18 Ma. Extant lineages radiated rapidly 6-10 Ma and are organized into four genera (Hylobates, Hoolock, Symphalangus, and Nomascus) consisting of 12-19 species. The use of short interspersed elements (SINEs) as phylogenetic markers has seen recent popularity due to several desirable characteristics: the ancestral state of a locus is known to be the absence of an element, rare potentially homoplasious events are relatively easy to resolve, and samples can be quickly and inexpensively genotyped. During radiation of primates, one particular family of SINEs, the Alu family, has proliferated in primate genomes. Nomascus leucogenys (northern white-cheeked gibbon) sequences were analyzed for repetitive content with RepeatMasker using a custom library. The sequences containing Alu elements identified as members of a gibbon-specific subfamily were then compared with orthologous positions in other primate genomes. A primate phylogenetic panel consisting of 18 primate species, including 13 gibbon species representing all four extant genera, was assayed for all loci, and a total of 125 gibbon-specific Alu insertions were identified. The resulting amplification patterns were used to generate a phylogenetic tree. We demonstrate significant support for Symphalangus as the most basal lineage within the family. Our findings also place Nomascus as a derived lineage, sister to Hoolock, with the Nomascus-Hoolock clade sister to Hylobates. Further, our analysis groups N. leucogenys and Nomascus siki as sister taxa to the exclusion of the other Nomascus species assayed. This study represents the first use of SINEs to determine the genus level phylogenetic relationships within the family Hylobatidae. These relationships have been resolved with robust support at most internal nodes, demonstrating the utility of SINE-based phylogenetic analysis. We postulate that hybridization

  9. Under the genomic radar: The Stealth model of Alu amplification

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyudong; Xing, Jinchuan; Wang, Hui; Hedges, Dale J.; Garber, Randall K.; Cordaux, Richard; Batzer, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    Alu elements are the most successful SINEs (Short INterspersed Elements) in primate genomes and have reached more than 1,000,000 copies in the human genome. The amplification of most Alu elements is thought to occur through a limited number of hyperactive “master” genes that produce a high number of copies during long evolutionary periods of time. However, the existence of long-lived, low-activity Alu lineages in the human genome suggests a more complex propagation mechanism. Using both computational and wet-bench approaches, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of the AluYb lineage, one of the most active Alu lineages in the human genome. We show that the major AluYb lineage expansion in humans is a species-specific event, as nonhuman primates possess only a handful of AluYb elements. However, the oldest existing AluYb element resided in an orthologous position in all hominoid primate genomes examined, demonstrating that the AluYb lineage originated 18–25 million years ago. Thus, the history of the AluYb lineage is characterized by ∼20 million years of retrotranspositional quiescence preceding a major expansion in the human genome within the past few million years. We suggest that the evolutionary success of the Alu family may be driven at least in part by “stealth-driver” elements that maintain low retrotranspositional activity over extended periods of time and occasionally produce short-lived hyperactive copies responsible for the formation and remarkable expansion of Alu elements within the genome. PMID:15867427

  10. Alu Elements as Novel Regulators of Gene Expression in Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility Genes?

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies implicating Alu repeat elements in various diseases, there is sparse information available with respect to the potential functional and biological roles of the repeat elements in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Therefore, we performed a genome-wide sequence analysis of T1D candidate genes to identify embedded Alu elements within these genes. We observed significant enrichment of Alu elements within the T1D genes (p-value < 10e−16), which highlights their importance in T1D. Functional annotation of T1D genes harboring Alus revealed significant enrichment for immune-mediated processes (p-value < 10e−6). We also identified eight T1D genes harboring inverted Alus (IRAlus) within their 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) that are known to regulate the expression of host mRNAs by generating double stranded RNA duplexes. Our in silico analysis predicted the formation of duplex structures by IRAlus within the 3'UTRs of T1D genes. We propose that IRAlus might be involved in regulating the expression levels of the host T1D genes. PMID:26184322

  11. Alu Elements as Novel Regulators of Gene Expression in Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility Genes?

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-07-13

    Despite numerous studies implicating Alu repeat elements in various diseases, there is sparse information available with respect to the potential functional and biological roles of the repeat elements in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Therefore, we performed a genome-wide sequence analysis of T1D candidate genes to identify embedded Alu elements within these genes. We observed significant enrichment of Alu elements within the T1D genes (p-value < 10e-16), which highlights their importance in T1D. Functional annotation of T1D genes harboring Alus revealed significant enrichment for immune-mediated processes (p-value < 10e-6). We also identified eight T1D genes harboring inverted Alus (IRAlus) within their 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) that are known to regulate the expression of host mRNAs by generating double stranded RNA duplexes. Our in silico analysis predicted the formation of duplex structures by IRAlus within the 3'UTRs of T1D genes. We propose that IRAlus might be involved in regulating the expression levels of the host T1D genes.

  12. Repeat mild heat shock increases dermal fibroblast activity and collagen production.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Andrew E; Holyoak, Caroline D

    2008-04-01

    Repeat mild heat shock (RMHS) has been shown to have anti-aging effects on cellular and biological processes within human dermal fibroblasts. We have investigated the potential of an abridged mild heat shock regime to impact upon the functional properties of human dermal fibroblasts derived from three donors (male, 12 years; female, 22 years; female, 65 years). For each donor mild heat shock increased the rate of contraction of fibroblast-containing collagen gels and increased the de novo synthesis of collagen. Thus, hormetic mechanisms are proposed to provide functional anti-aging benefits to skin cells.

  13. Characterization and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of an Alu deletion polymorphism in total linkage disequilibrium with myotonic dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, M.S. ); Foitzik, M.A. ); Surh, L.C.; Korneluk, R.G. Univ. of Ottawa )

    1993-02-01

    The mutation causing myotonic dystrophy has been identified as an unstable trinucleotide CRG repeat located in the 3[prime] untranslated region of a gene putatively encoding a serine-threonine protein kinase. The mutation has been reported to be in total linkage disequilibrium with an insertion/deletion polymorphism located within the kinase gene. To determine the nature of this polymorphism, we have sequenced this genomic fragment and have found that the sequence of this region consists of five consecutive Alu repeats. Further analysis suggests that the smaller of two alleles is actually due to a proposed deletion event that resulted in the loss of an equivalent of three Alu repeats. We have developed a PCR-based assay to detect this polymorphism, the closest, distal marker to the DM mutation. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Repeated exposure to moderate doses of ethanol augments hippocampal glutamate neurotransmission by increasing release

    PubMed Central

    Chefer, Vladimir; Meis, Jennifer; Wang, Grace; Kuzmin, Alexander; Bakalkin, Georgy; Shippenberg, Toni

    2013-01-01

    The present study used conventional and quantitative microdialysis to assess glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the hippocampal CA3 area of the rat following a moderate-dose ethanol treatment regimen. Male Wistar rats received 3.4 g/kg of ethanol or water for 6 days via gastric gavage. Microdialysis experiments commenced 2 days later. Basal and depolarization-induced glutamate overflow were significantly elevated in ethanol-treated animals. Basal and depolarization-induced gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) overflow were unaltered. Quantitative no-net-flux microdialysis was used to determine if changes in dialysate glutamate levels following ethanol administration are due to an increase in release or a decrease in uptake.To confirm the validity of this method for quantifying basal glutamate dynamics, extracellular concentrations of glutamate and the extraction fraction, which reflects changes in analyte clearance, were quantified in response to retro-dialysis of the glutamate uptake blocker trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (tPDC). tPDC significantly decreased the extraction fraction for glutamate, resulting in augmented extracellular glutamate concentrations. Repeated ethanol administration did not alter the glutamate extraction fraction. However, extracellular glutamate concentrations were significantly elevated, indicating that glutamate release is increased as a consequence of repeated ethanol administration. These data demonstrate that repeated bouts of moderate ethanol consumption alter basal glutamate dynamics in the CA3 region of the dorsal hippocampus. Basal glutamate release is augmented, whereas glutamate uptake is unchanged. Furthermore, they suggest that dysregulation of glutamate transmission in this region may contribute to the previously documented deficits in cognitive function associated with moderate dose ethanol use. PMID:21182572

  15. Breakpoint Associated with a novel 2.3 Mb deletion in the VCFS region of 22q11 and the role of Alu (SINE) in recurring microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Raihan K; Zhang, Yang; Siu, Victoria Mok; Fan, Yao-Shan; O'Reilly, Richard L; Rao, Jay; Singh, Shiva M

    2006-01-01

    Background Chromosome 22q11.2 region is highly susceptible to rearrangement, specifically deletions that give rise to a variety of genomic disorders including velocardiofacial or DiGeorge syndrome. Individuals with this 22q11 microdeletion syndrome are at a greatly increased risk to develop schizophrenia. Methods Genotype analysis was carried out on the DNA from a patient with the 22q11 microdeletion using genetic markers and custom primer sets to define the deletion. Bioinformatic analysis was performed for molecular characterization of the deletion breakpoint sequences in this patient. Results This 22q11 deletion patient was established to have a novel 2.3 Mb deletion with a proximal breakpoint located between genetic markers RH48663 and RH48348 and a distal breakpoint between markers D22S1138 and SHGC-145314. Molecular characterization of the sequences at the breakpoints revealed a 270 bp shared sequence of the breakpoint regions (SSBR) common to both ends that share >90% sequence similarity to each other and also to short interspersed nuclear elements/Alu elements. Conclusion This Alu sequence like SSBR is commonly in the proximity of all known deletion breakpoints of 22q11 region and also in the low copy repeat regions (LCRs). This sequence may represent a preferred sequence in the breakpoint regions or LCRs for intra-chromosomal homologous recombination mechanisms resulting in common 22q11 deletion. PMID:16512914

  16. The current source of human Alu retroposons is a conserved gene shared with Old World monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, R.J.; Stout, D.B.; Davidson, E.H. )

    1989-05-01

    A significant fraction of human Alu repeated sequences are members of the precise, recently inserted class. A cloned member of this class has been used as a probe for interspecies hybridization and thermal stability determination. The probe was reassociated with human, mandrill, and spider monkey DNA under conditions such that only almost perfectly matching duplexes could form. Equally precise hybrids were formed with human and mandrill DNA (Old World monkey) but not with spider monkey DNA (New World). These measurements as well as reassociation kinetics show the presence in mandrill DNA of many precise class Alu sequences that are very similar or identical in quantity and sequence to those in human DNA. Human and mandrill are moderately distant species with a single-copy DNA divergence of about 6%. Nevertheless, their recently inserted Alu sequences arise by retroposition of transcripts of source genes with nearly identical sequences. Apparently a gene present in our common ancestor at the time of branching was inherited and highly conserved in sequence in both the lineage of Old World monkeys and the lineage of apes and man.

  17. Long term repeated prescribed burning increases evenness in the basidiomycete laccase gene pool in forest soils.

    PubMed

    Artz, Rebekka R E; Reid, Eileen; Anderson, Ian C; Campbell, Colin D; Cairney, John W G

    2009-03-01

    Repeated prescribed burning alters the biologically labile fraction of nutrients and carbon of soil organic matter (SOM). Using a long-term (30 years) repeated burning experiment where burning has been carried out at a 2- or 4-year frequency, we analysed the effect of prescribed burning on gross potential C turnover rates and phenol oxidase activity in relation to shifts in SOM composition as observed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. In tandem, we assessed the genetic diversity of basidiomycete laccases. While the overall effect of burning was a decline in phenol oxidase activity, Shannon diversity and evenness of laccases was significantly higher in burned sites. Co-correspondence analysis of SOM composition and laccase operational taxonomic unit frequency data also suggested a strong correlation. While this correlation could indicate that the observed increase in laccase genetic diversity due to burning is due to increased resource diversity, a temporal replacement of the most abundant members of the assembly by an otherwise dormant pool of fungi cannot be excluded. As such, our results fit the intermediate disturbance hypothesis. Effects were stronger in plots burned in 2-year rotations, suggesting that the 4-year burn frequency may be a more sustainable practice to ensure the long-term stability of C cycling in such ecosystems.

  18. Repeated bonding of fixed retainer increases the risk of enamel fracture.

    PubMed

    Chinvipas, Netrporn; Hasegawa, Yuh; Terada, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influences of repeated bonding, using 2 different orthodontic adhesive systems, on the shear bond strength (SBS) and the enamel surface morphology. Sixty premolars were divided into 2 groups (n = 30), and either Transbond XT (T group) or Fuji Ortho LC (F group) adhesives were used. SBS was measured 24 h after bonding, using a universal testing machine. Then, the enamel surfaces were investigated and the mode of failure was described using adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores. After each debonding, 10 teeth from each group were examined by scanning electron microscopy to determine the penetration of adhesives, the length of resin tags, and the state of the enamel surface. The other teeth were subjected to two more bonding/debonding procedures. In T group, the second debonding sequences had significantly higher bond strengths than the other sequences. The length of resin tags was greatest in the second debonding sequence, although there was no significant difference. In F group, the SBS increased with further rebonding and the failure mode tended towards cohesive failure. In both groups, the ARI scores increased with rebonding. Enamel loss could have occurred with both adhesives, although the surfaces appeared unchanged to the naked eye. From this study, we suggest that enamel damage caused by repeated bonding is of concern. To prevent bond failure, we should pay attention to the adhesion method used for bondable retainers.

  19. Repeated bonding of fixed retainer increases the risk of enamel fracture.

    PubMed

    Chinvipas, Netrporn; Hasegawa, Yuh; Terada, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influences of repeated bonding, using 2 different orthodontic adhesive systems, on the shear bond strength (SBS) and the enamel surface morphology. Sixty premolars were divided into 2 groups (n = 30), and either Transbond XT (T group) or Fuji Ortho LC (F group) adhesives were used. SBS was measured 24 h after bonding, using a universal testing machine. Then, the enamel surfaces were investigated and the mode of failure was described using adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores. After each debonding, 10 teeth from each group were examined by scanning electron microscopy to determine the penetration of adhesives, the length of resin tags, and the state of the enamel surface. The other teeth were subjected to two more bonding/debonding procedures. In T group, the second debonding sequences had significantly higher bond strengths than the other sequences. The length of resin tags was greatest in the second debonding sequence, although there was no significant difference. In F group, the SBS increased with further rebonding and the failure mode tended towards cohesive failure. In both groups, the ARI scores increased with rebonding. Enamel loss could have occurred with both adhesives, although the surfaces appeared unchanged to the naked eye. From this study, we suggest that enamel damage caused by repeated bonding is of concern. To prevent bond failure, we should pay attention to the adhesion method used for bondable retainers. PMID:23239387

  20. Learning to smell: repeated exposure increases sensitivity to androstenone, a major component of boar taint.

    PubMed

    Mörlein, Daniel; Meier-Dinkel, Lisa; Moritz, Jasmin; Sharifi, Ahmad Reza; Knorr, Christoph

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to assess whether repeated exposure affects subjects' ability to detect androstenone. Olfactory acuity of 77 female and 44 male subjects (age 37.5 ± 11.7 years) was assessed three times during six weeks. Replicate triangle tests using various dilutions of androstenone (0.5, 5.0, and 50.0 μg/g) on filter paper smell strips were applied. Subjects were either assigned to a test group (TRAIN) using androstenone for daily training, or to a control group (CONTR) using a placebo. For the low, the intermediate, and the high level of androstenone presented, detection rate increased from 14.1 to 30.6%, 40.5 to 62.8%, and 65.3 to 78.5% respectively within 6 weeks from the initial assessment. Results suggest that mere exposure during repeated olfactory testing increased subjects' ability to correctly discriminate androstenone. The olfactory improvement was, however, more pronounced in the TRAIN group. Androstenone detection appears to be associated with its individual appreciation.

  1. Effects of a Randomized Controlled Trial to Increase Repeat Mammography Screening in Iranian Women

    PubMed Central

    Taymoori, Parvaneh; Molina, Yamile; Roshani, Daem

    2014-01-01

    Background Although mammography use has increased in developed countries, regular screening in developing countries including Iran remains low. Multiple frameworks, including the Health Belief Model (HBM) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), have been used to understand screening practices among Iranians. The HBM includes intrapersonal constructs such as perceptions of breast cancer and mammography. The TPB includes interpersonal and environmental constructs, such as perceived control and subjective norms. Objectives The current study had 2 objectives: (1) to examine changes in the HBM and TPB constructs and repeat mammography screening in women receiving either intervention and women in the control group and (2) to compare changes in the HBM and TPB constructs and repeat mammography screening across the 2 interventions. Methods One hundred eight-four women from 3 randomly selected health centers in Sanandaj, Iran, participated. Eligibility criteria were being 50 years or older, having received a mammogram in the past 2 to 3 years, and no intention to obtain a mammogram within the next year. Results The TPB and HBM participants exhibited greater changes in the HBM and TPB constructs and were more likely to have a mammogram relative to control participants. The TPB and HBM participants exhibited comparable changes in constructs and repeat mammography. Conclusion Findings suggest both interventions equally improved mammography screening. Additional studies are furthermore warranted to address nonadherent Iranian women’s needs in line with these conceptual models. Implications for Practice Use of the HBM and TPB constructs in clinical practice may be helpful to promote continued screening among this population. PMID:25122130

  2. Increases in cycling performance in response to caffeine ingestion are repeatable.

    PubMed

    Astorino, Todd A; Cottrell, Trisha; Lozano, Andrea Talhami; Aburto-Pratt, Kylan; Duhon, Jessica

    2012-02-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine the repeatability of caffeine's ergogenic effects on cycling performance. It was hypothesized that improvements in performance would be similar when caffeine was ingested on 2 separate days. Nine endurance-trained men and women (mean age and maximal oxygen uptake, 27.4 ± 5.9 years and 57.5 ± 3.9 mL kg⁻¹ min⁻¹) initially completed 2 familiarization trials. During 3 subsequent sessions separated by at least 48 hours, the subjects completed a 10-km cycling time trial preceded by ingestion of a drink containing caffeine (5 mg/kg) or placebo. Treatments were ingested using a randomized, single-blind, crossover design, and the subjects were deceived as to the specific content of all drinks. During exercise, heart rate, rating of perceived exertion, and time were recorded every 1.6 km. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to compare the differences in variables across distance and treatment. In both caffeine trials, caffeine increased (P = .02) cycling performance by 1.6% and 1.9% vs placebo (16.98 ± 0.96 and 16.92 ± 0.97 minutes with caffeine vs 17.25 ± 0.96 minutes in placebo), and 7 of 9 subjects revealed improved performance. The mean performance improvement in the caffeine trials was similar (P = .35; -0.27 and -0.32 minutes, respectively) across days. Heart rate during exercise was higher (P b .001) with caffeine vs placebo, although the rating of perceived exertion was similar (P = .65). Data reveal that caffeine's ergogenic effects on cycling performance are repeatable across days, yet some individuals did not exhibit improved performance with caffeine.

  3. Exposing Students to Repeat Photography: Increasing Cultural Understanding on a Short-Term Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemmons, Kelly K.; Brannstrom, Christian; Hurd, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, repeat photography has been used to analyze land cover change. This paper describes how repeat photography may be used as a tool to enhance the short-term study abroad experience by facilitating cultural interaction and understanding. We present evidence from two cases and suggest a five-step repeat photography method for educators…

  4. Mitochondrial Complex 1 Inhibition Increases 4-Repeat Isoform Tau by SRSF2 Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    De Andrade, Anderson; Höglinger, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterised by intracellular aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau. The tau protein exists in 6 predominant isoforms. Depending on alternative splicing of exon 10, three of these isoforms have four microtubule-binding repeat domains (4R), whilst the others only have three (3R). In PSP there is an excess of the 4R tau isoforms, which are thought to contribute significantly to the pathological process. The cause of this 4R increase is so far unknown. Several lines of evidence link mitochondrial complex I inhibition to the pathogenesis of PSP. We demonstrate here for the first time that annonacin and MPP+, two prototypical mitochondrial complex I inhibitors, increase the 4R isoforms of tau in human neurons. We show that the splicing factor SRSF2 is necessary to increase 4R tau with complex I inhibition. We also found SRSF2, as well as another tau splicing factor, TRA2B, to be increased in brains of PSP patients. Thereby, we provide new evidence that mitochondrial complex I inhibition may contribute as an upstream event to the pathogenesis of PSP and suggest that splicing factors may represent an attractive therapeutic target to intervene in the disease process. PMID:25402454

  5. Repeated static contractions increase mitochondrial vulnerability toward oxidative stress in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sahlin, Kent; Nielsen, Jens Steen; Mogensen, Martin; Tonkonogi, Michail

    2006-09-01

    Repeated static contractions (RSC) induce large fluctuations in tissue oxygen tension and increase the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study investigated the effect of RSC on muscle contractility, mitochondrial respiratory function, and in vitro sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) kinetics in human muscle. Ten male subjects performed five bouts of static knee extension with 10-min rest in between. Each bout of RSC (target torque 66% of maximal voluntary contraction torque) was maintained to fatigue. Muscle biopsies were taken preexercise and 0.3 and 24 h postexercise from vastus lateralis. Mitochondria were isolated and respiratory function measured after incubation with H(2)O(2) (HPX) or control medium (Con). Mitochondrial function was not affected by RSC during Con. However, RSC exacerbated mitochondrial dysfunction during HPX, resulting in decreased respiratory control index, decreased mitochondrial efficiency (phosphorylated ADP-to-oxygen consumed ratio), and increased noncoupled respiration (HPX/Con post- vs. preexercise). SR Ca(2+) uptake rate was lower 0.3 vs. 24 h postexercise, whereas SR Ca(2+) release rate was unchanged. RSC resulted in long-lasting changes in muscle contractility, including reduced maximal torque, low-frequency fatigue, and faster torque relaxation. It is concluded that RSC increases mitochondrial vulnerability toward ROS, reduces SR Ca(2+) uptake rate, and causes low-frequency fatigue. Although conclusive evidence is lacking, we suggest that these changes are related to increased formation of ROS during RSC. PMID:16728514

  6. Alu Sb2 subfamily is present in all higher primates but was most succesfully amplified in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Richer, C.; Zietkiewicz, E.; Labuda, D.

    1994-09-01

    Alu repeats can be classified into subfamilies which amplified in primate genomes at different evolutionary time periods. A young Alu subfamily, Sb2, with a characteristic 7-nucleotide duplication at position 256, has been described in seven human loci. An Sb2 insertion found near the HD gene was unique to two HD families, indicating that Sb2 was still retropositionally active. Here, we have shown that the Sb2 insertion in the CHOL locus was similarly rare, being absent in 120 individuals of Caucasian, Oriental and Black origin. In contrast, Sb2 inserts in five other loci were found fixed (non-polymorphic), based on measurements in the same population sample, but absent from orthologous positions in higher apes. This suggest that Sb2 repeats spread relatively early in the human lineage following divergence from other primates and that these elements may be human-specific. By quantitative PCR, we investigated the presence of Sb2 sequences in different primate DNA, using one PCR primer anchored at the 5{prime} Alu-end and the other complementary to the duplicated Sb2-specific segment. With an Sb2-containing plasmid as a standard, we estimated the number of Sb2 repeats at 1500-1800 copies per human haploid equivalent; corresponding numbers in chimpanzee and gorilla were almost two orders of magnitude lower, while the signal observed in orangutan and gibbon DNAs was consistent with the presence of a single copy. The analysis of 22 human, 11 chimpanzee and 10 gorilla sequences indicates that the Alu Sb2 dispersed independently in these three primate lineages; gorilla consensus differs from the human Sb2 sequence by one position, while all chimpanzee repeats have their linker expanded by up to eight A-residues. Should they be thus considered as separate subfamilies? It is possible that sequence modifications with respect to the human consensus are responsible for poor retroposition of Sb2 in apes.

  7. Polymorphic Alu insertions among Mayan populations.

    PubMed

    Herrera, R J; Rojas, D P; Terreros, M C

    2007-01-01

    The Mayan homeland within Mesoamerica spans five countries: Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico. There are indications that the people we call the Maya migrated from the north to the highlands of Guatemala as early as 4000 B.C. Their existence was village-based and agricultural. The culture of these Preclassic Mayans owes much to the earlier Olmec civilization, which flourished in the southern portion of North America. In this study, four different Mayan groups were examined to assess their genetic variability. Ten polymorphic Alu insertion (PAI) loci were employed to ascertain the genetic affinities among these Mayan groups. North American, African, European and Asian populations were also examined as reference populations. Our results suggest that the Mayan groups examined in this study are not genetically homogeneous. PMID:17151812

  8. Increased impulsivity in rats as a result of repeated cycles of alcohol intoxication and abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Cristina; Wiskerke, Joost; Natividad, Luis A.; Polis, Ilham Y.; de Vries, Taco J.; Pattij, Tommy; Parsons, Loren H.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is a risk factor for alcoholism and long-term alcohol exposure may further impair impulse control in a manner that propels problematic alcohol use. The present study employed the rat 5-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task (5-CSRTT) to measure behavioral inhibition and attentional capacity during abstinence from repeated 5d cycles of alcohol liquid diet consumption. Task performance was not disrupted following the first cycle of alcohol exposure, however, evidence of impaired behavioral inhibition emerged following the third cycle of alcohol exposure. In comparison with controls, alcohol rats exhibited deficits in inhibitory control during cognitively challenging 5-CSRTT tests employing variable inter-trial intervals (varITI). This behavioral disruption was not present during early abstinence (3d) but was evident by 7d abstinence and persisted for at least 34d. Interestingly, renewed alcohol consumption ameliorated these disruptions in impulse control, though deficient behavioral inhibition re-emerged during subsequent abstinence. Indices of increased impulsivity were no longer present in tests conducted after 49 days of abstinence. Alcohol-related impairments in impulse control were not evident in sessions employing highly familiar task parameters regardless of abstinence period and control experiments confirmed that performance deficits during the challenge sessions were unlikely to result from alcohol-related disruption in the adaptation to repeated varITI testing. Together, the current findings demonstrate that chronic intermittent alcohol consumption results in decreased behavioral inhibition in rats that is temporally similar to clinical observations of disrupted impulsive control in abstinent alcoholics performing tasks of behavioral inhibition. PMID:24341858

  9. Analysis of the regions flanking the human insulin gene and sequence of an Alu family member.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, G I; Pictet, R; Rutter, W J

    1980-01-01

    The regions around the human insulin gene have been studied by heteroduplex, hybridization and sequence analysis. These studies indicated that there is a region of heterogeneous length located approximately 700 bp before the 5' end of the gene; and that the 19 kb of cloned DNA which includes the 1430 bp insulin gene as well as 5650 bp before and 11,500 bp after the gene is single copy sequence except for 500 bp located 6000 bp from the 3' end of the gene. This 500 bp segment contains a member of the Alu family of dispersed middle repetitive sequences as well as another less highly repeated homopolymeric segment. The sequence of this region was determined. This Alu repeat is bordered by 19 bp direct repeats and also contains an 83 bp sequence which is present twice. The regions flanking the human and rat I insulin genes were compared by heteroduplex analysis to localize homologous sequences in the flanking regions which could be involved in the regulation of insulin biosynthesis. The homology between the two genes is restricted to the region encoding preproinsulin and a short region of approximately 60 bp flanking the 5' side of the genes. Images PMID:6253909

  10. The genomic architecture of NLRP7 is Alu rich and predisposes to disease-associated large deletions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Ramesh; Nguyen, Ngoc M P; Sarrabay, Guillaume; Rezaei, Maryam; Rivas, Mayra C G; Kavasoglu, Aysenur; Berkil, Hakan; Elshafey, Alaa; Nunez, Kristin P; Dreyfus, Hélène; Philippe, Merviel; Hadipour, Zahra; Durmaz, Asude; Eaton, Erin E; Schubert, Brittany; Ulker, Volkan; Hadipour, Fatemeh; Ahmadpour, Fatemeh; Touitou, Isabelle; Fardaei, Majid; Slim, Rima

    2016-10-01

    NLRP7 is a major gene responsible for recurrent hydatidiform moles. Here, we report 11 novel NLRP7 protein truncating variants, of which five deletions of more than 1-kb. We analyzed the transcriptional consequences of four variants. We demonstrate that one large homozygous deletion removes NLRP7 transcription start site and results in the complete absence of its transcripts in a patient in good health besides her reproductive problem. This observation strengthens existing data on the requirement of NLRP7 only for female reproduction. We show that two other variants affecting the splice acceptor of exon 6 lead to its in-frame skipping while another variant affecting the splice donor site of exon 9 leads to an in-frame insertion of 54 amino acids. Our characterization of the deletion breakpoints demonstrated that most of the breakpoints occurred within Alu repeats and the deletions were most likely mediated by microhomology events. Our data define a hotspot of Alu instability and deletions in intron 5 with six different breakpoints and rearrangements. Analysis of NLRP7 genomic sequences for repetitive elements demonstrated that Alu repeats represent 48% of its intronic sequences and these repeats seem to have been inserted into the common NLRP2/7 primate ancestor before its duplication into two genes.

  11. The use of dimorphic Alu insertions in human DNA fingerprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, G.E.; Gonzalez, T.; Garrison, J.; Novick, C.C.; Herrera, R.J.; Batzer, M.A.; Deininger, P.L.

    1992-12-04

    We have characterized certain Human Specific Alu Insertions as either dimorphic (TPA25, PV92, APO), sightly dimorphic (C2N4 and C4N4) or monomorphic (C3N1, C4N6, C4N2, C4N5, C4N8), based on studies of Caucasian, Asian, American Black and African Black populations. Our approach is based upon: (1) PCR amplification using primers directed to the sequences that flank the site of insertion of the different Alu elements studied; (2) gel electrophoresis and scoring according to the presence or absence of an Alu insertion in one or both homologous chromosomes; (3) allelic frequencies calculated and compared according to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Our DNA fingerprinting procedure using PCR amplification of dimorphic Human Specific Alu insertions, is stable enough to be used not only as a tool for genetic mapping but also to characterize populations, study migrational patterns and track the inheritance of human genetic disorders.

  12. Exposure to repeated immobilization stress inhibits cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in the rat ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor-Zárate, Ramón; Abarca, Jorge; Araya, Katherine A; Renard, Georgina M; Andrés, María E; Gysling, Katia

    2015-11-01

    A higher vulnerability to drug abuse has been observed in human studies of individuals exposed to chronic or persistent stress, as well as in animal models of drug abuse. Here, we explored the effect of repeated immobilization stress on cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in VTA and its regulation by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and GABA systems. Cocaine (10mg/Kg i.p.) induced an increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in control rats. However, this effect was not observed in repeated stress rats. Considering the evidence relating stress with CRF, we decided to perfuse CRF and CP-154526 (selective antagonist of CRF1 receptor) in the VTA of control and repeated stress rats, respectively. We observed that perfusion of 20μM CRF inhibited the increase of VTA DA extracellular levels induced by cocaine in control rats. Interestingly, we observed that in the presence of 10μM CP-154526, cocaine induced a significant increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats. Regarding the role of VTA GABA neurotransmission, cocaine administration induced a significant increase in VTA GABA extracellular levels only in repeated stress rats. Consistently, cocaine was able to increase VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats when 100μM bicuculline, an antagonist of GABAA receptor, was perfused intra VTA. Thus, both CRF and GABA systems are involved in the lack of response to cocaine in the VTA of repeated stress rats. It is tempting to suggest that the loss of response in VTA dopaminergic neurons to cocaine, after repeated stress, is due to an interaction between CRF and GABA systems. PMID:26318765

  13. Exposure to repeated immobilization stress inhibits cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in the rat ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor-Zárate, Ramón; Abarca, Jorge; Araya, Katherine A; Renard, Georgina M; Andrés, María E; Gysling, Katia

    2015-11-01

    A higher vulnerability to drug abuse has been observed in human studies of individuals exposed to chronic or persistent stress, as well as in animal models of drug abuse. Here, we explored the effect of repeated immobilization stress on cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in VTA and its regulation by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and GABA systems. Cocaine (10mg/Kg i.p.) induced an increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in control rats. However, this effect was not observed in repeated stress rats. Considering the evidence relating stress with CRF, we decided to perfuse CRF and CP-154526 (selective antagonist of CRF1 receptor) in the VTA of control and repeated stress rats, respectively. We observed that perfusion of 20μM CRF inhibited the increase of VTA DA extracellular levels induced by cocaine in control rats. Interestingly, we observed that in the presence of 10μM CP-154526, cocaine induced a significant increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats. Regarding the role of VTA GABA neurotransmission, cocaine administration induced a significant increase in VTA GABA extracellular levels only in repeated stress rats. Consistently, cocaine was able to increase VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats when 100μM bicuculline, an antagonist of GABAA receptor, was perfused intra VTA. Thus, both CRF and GABA systems are involved in the lack of response to cocaine in the VTA of repeated stress rats. It is tempting to suggest that the loss of response in VTA dopaminergic neurons to cocaine, after repeated stress, is due to an interaction between CRF and GABA systems.

  14. The domain structure and distribution of Alu elements in long noncoding RNAs and mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eugene Z; Wespiser, Adam R; Caffrey, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 75% of the human genome is transcribed and many of these spliced transcripts contain primate-specific Alu elements, the most abundant mobile element in the human genome. The majority of exonized Alu elements are located in long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and the untranslated regions of mRNA, with some performing molecular functions. To further assess the potential for Alu elements to be repurposed as functional RNA domains, we investigated the distribution and evolution of Alu elements in spliced transcripts. Our analysis revealed that Alu elements are underrepresented in mRNAs and lncRNAs, suggesting that most exonized Alu elements arising in the population are rare or deleterious to RNA function. When mRNAs and lncRNAs retain exonized Alu elements, they have a clear preference for Alu dimers, left monomers, and right monomers. mRNAs often acquire Alu elements when their genes are duplicated within Alu-rich regions. In lncRNAs, reverse-oriented Alu elements are significantly enriched and are not restricted to the 3' and 5' ends. Both lncRNAs and mRNAs primarily contain the Alu J and S subfamilies that were amplified relatively early in primate evolution. Alu J subfamilies are typically overrepresented in lncRNAs, whereas the Alu S dimer is overrepresented in mRNAs. The sequences of Alu dimers tend to be constrained in both lncRNAs and mRNAs, whereas the left and right monomers are constrained within particular Alu subfamilies and classes of RNA. Collectively, these findings suggest that Alu-containing RNAs are capable of forming stable structures and that some of these Alu domains might have novel biological functions.

  15. Alu-associated enhancement of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Ng, Siu-Kin; Xue, Hong

    2006-03-01

    Identifying features shaping the architecture of sequence variations is important for understanding genome evolution and mapping disease loci. In this study, high-resolution scanning of Alu-centered alignments of the human genome sequences has revealed a striking elevation of the frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the body and tail of Alu sequences compared to flanking regions. This enhancement in SNP density is evident for all twenty-four chromosomes, and in both the Alu-body and Alu-tail, which together may be referred to as the Alu-SNPs. Reduced levels of Alu-SNPs in the sex chromosomes, especially in the non-recombining NRY region of the Y chromosome, are consistent with recombination events playing an important role in the enhancement. The Alu elements are unstable recombination-mutation hotspots in the human genome, and it is suggested that the Alu-SNPs represent a key manifestation of this instability. Variations in Alu-SNPs among the HapMap populations of northern and western European ancestry (CEU), Han Chinese from Beijing (CHB), Japanese from Tokyo (JPT), and Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI) indicate that the Alu-SNPs provide useful sequence markers, in addition to the Alu-insertion polymorphisms themselves, for the delineation of human genome evolution. That Alu-SNP levels are highest in the youngest Alu-Y, intermediate in the Alu-S of intermediate age, and lowest in the oldest Alu-J is consistent with the occurrence of not only genetic drift but also natural selection on the Alu-SNPs. Such evolutionary selection in turn suggests that Alu-SNPs might include potential sites of disease association, and therefore deserve detailed investigation. PMID:16380220

  16. Widespread establishment and regulatory impact of Alu exons in human genes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shihao; Lin, Lan; Cai, James J; Jiang, Peng; Kenkel, Elizabeth J; Stroik, Mallory R; Sato, Seiko; Davidson, Beverly L; Xing, Yi

    2011-02-15

    The Alu element has been a major source of new exons during primate evolution. Thousands of human genes contain spliced exons derived from Alu elements. However, identifying Alu exons that have acquired genuine biological functions remains a major challenge. We investigated the creation and establishment of Alu exons in human genes, using transcriptome profiles of human tissues generated by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) combined with extensive RT-PCR analysis. More than 25% of Alu exons analyzed by RNA-Seq have estimated transcript inclusion levels of at least 50% in the human cerebellum, indicating widespread establishment of Alu exons in human genes. Genes encoding zinc finger transcription factors have significantly higher levels of Alu exonization. Importantly, Alu exons with high splicing activities are strongly enriched in the 5'-UTR, and two-thirds (10/15) of 5'-UTR Alu exons tested by luciferase reporter assays significantly alter mRNA translational efficiency. Mutational analysis reveals the specific molecular mechanisms by which newly created 5'-UTR Alu exons modulate translational efficiency, such as the creation or elongation of upstream ORFs that repress the translation of the primary ORFs. This study presents genomic evidence that a major functional consequence of Alu exonization is the lineage-specific evolution of translational regulation. Moreover, the preferential creation and establishment of Alu exons in zinc finger genes suggest that Alu exonization may have globally affected the evolution of primate and human transcriptomes by regulating the protein production of master transcriptional regulators in specific lineages.

  17. Germline Chromothripsis Driven by L1-Mediated Retrotransposition and Alu/Alu Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Nazaryan-Petersen, Lusine; Bertelsen, Birgitte; Bak, Mads; Jønson, Lars; Tommerup, Niels; Hancks, Dustin C; Tümer, Zeynep

    2016-04-01

    Chromothripsis (CTH) is a phenomenon where multiple localized double-stranded DNA breaks result in complex genomic rearrangements. Although the DNA-repair mechanisms involved in CTH have been described, the mechanisms driving the localized "shattering" process remain unclear. High-throughput sequence analysis of a familial germline CTH revealed an inserted SVAE retrotransposon associated with a 110-kb deletion displaying hallmarks of L1-mediated retrotransposition. Our analysis suggests that the SVAE insertion did not occur prior to or after, but concurrent with the CTH event. We also observed L1-endonuclease potential target sites in other breakpoints. In addition, we found four Alu elements flanking the 110-kb deletion and associated with an inversion. We suggest that chromatin looping mediated by homologous Alu elements may have brought distal DNA regions into close proximity facilitating DNA cleavage by catalytically active L1-endonuclease. Our data provide the first evidence that active and inactive human retrotransposons can serve as endogenous mutagens driving CTH in the germline.

  18. Reciprocal Peer Tutoring and Repeated Reading: Increasing Practicality Using Student Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oddo, Maria; Barnett, David W.; Hawkins, Renee O.; Musti-Rao, Shobana

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has investigated the efficacy of peer-mediated repeated reading (RR) interventions carried out by student dyads. This research extends the existing research by investigating the impact of RR on oral reading fluency and comprehension when carried out by a teacher in small groups of fourth-grade students. Outcomes were analyzed…

  19. Cellular inhibitors of long interspersed element 1 and Alu retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Hal P; Wiegand, Heather L; Hulme, Amy E; Garcia-Perez, José L; O'Shea, K Sue; Moran, John V; Cullen, Bryan R

    2006-06-01

    Long interspersed element (LINE) 1 retrotransposons are major genomic parasites that represent approximately 17% of the human genome. The LINE-1 ORF2 protein is also responsible for the mobility of Alu elements, which constitute a further approximately 11% of genomic DNA. Representative members of each element class remain mobile, and deleterious retrotransposition events can induce spontaneous genetic diseases. Here, we demonstrate that APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B, two members of the APOBEC3 family of human innate antiretroviral resistance factors, can enter the nucleus, where LINE-1 and Alu reverse transcription occurs, and specifically inhibit both LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposition. These data suggest that the APOBEC3 protein family may have evolved, at least in part, to defend the integrity of the human genome against endogenous retrotransposons.

  20. Alu Sequences in Undifferentiated Human Embryonic Stem Cells Display High Levels of A-to-I RNA Editing

    PubMed Central

    Osenberg, Sivan; Paz Yaacov, Nurit; Safran, Michal; Moshkovitz, Sharon; Shtrichman, Ronit; Sherf, Ofra; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Keshet, Gilmor; Amariglio, Ninette; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Rechavi, Gideon

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine to Inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a site-specific modification of RNA transcripts, catalyzed by members of the ADAR (Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA) protein family. RNA editing occurs in human RNA in thousands of different sites. Some of the sites are located in protein-coding regions but the majority is found in non-coding regions, such as 3′UTRs, 5′UTRs and introns - mainly in Alu elements. While editing is found in all tissues, the highest levels of editing are found in the brain. It was shown that editing levels within protein-coding regions are increased during embryogenesis and after birth and that RNA editing is crucial for organism viability as well as for normal development. In this study we characterized the A-to-I RNA editing phenomenon during neuronal and spontaneous differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We identified high editing levels of Alu repetitive elements in hESCs and demonstrated a global decrease in editing levels of non-coding Alu sites when hESCs are differentiating, particularly into the neural lineage. Using RNA interference, we showed that the elevated editing levels of Alu elements in undifferentiated hESCs are highly dependent on ADAR1. DNA microarray analysis showed that ADAR1 knockdown has a global effect on gene expression in hESCs and leads to a significant increase in RNA expression levels of genes involved in differentiation and development processes, including neurogenesis. Taken together, we speculate that A-to-I editing of Alu sequences plays a role in the regulation of hESC early differentiation decisions. PMID:20574523

  1. A novel PCR technique using Alu-specific primers to identify unknown flanking sequences from the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, M.; Poussin, K.; Brechot, C.; Paterlini, P.

    1995-09-20

    The rapid and reproducible identification of new cellular DNA sequences is difficult to achieve with the currently available procedures. Here we describe a novel approach based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a primer specific to the known sequence and another directed to a human Alu repeat. To avoid undesirable amplifications between Alu sequences, primers are constructed with dUTPs and destroyed by uracil DNA glycosylase treatment after 10 initial cycles of amplification. Only desirable fragments are then further amplified with specific primers to the known region and to a tag sequence introduced in the Alu-specific primer. Using this protocol, we have successfully indentified cellular sequences flanking integrated hepatitis B virus DNA from the human genome of three hepatoma tissues. The method enables a direct specific amplification without any ligation or nonspecific annealing steps as required by previous PCR-based protocols. This rapid and straightforward approach will be a powerful tool for the study of viral integration sites, but is also widely applicable to other studies of the human genome. 39 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Effect of repeated insertions of curved sequences in DNA plasmids: a light-scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beretta, Stefano; Chirico, Giuseppe; Baldini, Giancarlo; Kapp, U.; Badaracco, G.

    1993-06-01

    The effect of the insertion of different amounts (from 0 to 6) of the curved sequence AluI in pUC18m plasmid (2686 base pairs, bp) is studied by dynamic light scattering. This sequence is a highly repeated 113 base pairs long sequence from Artemia Franciscana shrimp. A 30% compaction of the plasmids containing 2 and 6 adjacent AluI sequences compared to pUC8 plasmid (2717 bp) is observed. Furthermore the behavior of the translational diffusion coefficient Dt versus the number of adjacent AluI insertion is not monotonic.

  3. The organization, structure, and in vitro transcription of Alu family RNA polymerase III transcription units in the human alpha-like globin gene cluster: precipitation of in vitro transcripts by lupus anti-La antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shen, C K; Maniatis, T

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the location, structure, and in vitro transcription of repetitive DNA sequences within the human alpha-like globin gene cluster. At least eight different Alu family repeats were identified, each of which is transcribed in vitro to produce discrete RNA transcripts. The nucleotide sequence of one Alu repeat sequence, located on the 3' side of the alpha l globin gene (3'-alpha l), was determined and compared to published Alu repeat sequences. In vitro transcription of this repeat sequence generates RNA fragments of approximately 410, 260, 160, and 86 nucleotides. To determine whether these transcripts associate with specific proteins in vitro, we carried out immunoprecipitation experiments using an antiserum from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. We find that the antiserum anti-La, which was shown to precipitate ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) containing the adenovirus VAI RNA from virus infected cells, preferentially precipitates the smallest two in vitro transcripts of the 3'-alpha l Alu repeat. These results suggest that the RNAs interact with specific factors in the in vitro transcription reaction mix to form RNP.

  4. Increases in fruit intakes in older low consumers of fruit following two community-based repeated exposure interventions.

    PubMed

    Appleton, K M

    2013-03-14

    The present study investigated the value of two repeated exposure interventions for increasing intakes of fruit in older people. A total of ninety-five participants (aged 65 years and over) were randomised to receive either one (E1), five (E5) or five plus (E5+) exposures to fruit over a 5-week period. Fruit exposures occurred in community-based church and social groups, through fruit-tasting sessions involving familiar fruits and novel fruit products and dishes (E1, E5, E5+), and through fruit provision (E5+). Daily intakes of fruit and vegetables were assessed before and after all interventions. Liking for all fruits was also measured during repeated exposure (E5, E5+). In low consumers of fruit (one portion/d or less), fruit intakes increased significantly in the repeated exposure groups (E5, E5+) (t(30) = 5·79, P< 0·01), but did not change in the E1 group (t(16) = 0·29, P= 0·78). No differences were found between E5 and E5+ groups (F(3,87) = 1·22, P= 0·31). Similar effects were also found in fruit and vegetable intakes. No effects were found in other participants. Also, no changes in liking were found. These findings suggest that compared to single exposure, repeated exposure to fruit via fruit-tasting sessions once per week for 5 weeks in a community setting significantly improved fruit intakes, and fruit and vegetable intakes in older low consumers of fruit, although no benefits of additional fruit provision were found. Repeated exposure was also easy to implement, of low cost and enjoyable.

  5. Repeated oral administration of capsaicin increases anxiety-like behaviours with prolonged stress-response in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y-J; Kim, J Y; Yoo, S B; Lee, J-H; Jahng, J W

    2013-09-01

    This study was conducted to examine the psycho-emotional effects of repeated oral exposure to capsaicin, the principal active component of chili peppers. Each rat received 1 mL of 0.02 percent capsaicin into its oral cavity daily, and was subjected to behavioural tests following 10 daily administrations of capsaicin. Stereotypy counts and rostral grooming were significantly increased, and caudal grooming decreased, in capsaicin-treated rats during the ambulatory activity test. In elevated plus maze test, not only the time spent in open arms but also the percent arm entry into open arms was reduced in capsaicin-treated rats compared with control rats. In forced swim test, although swimming duration was decreased, struggling increased in the capsaicin group, immobility duration did not differ between the groups. Repeated oral capsaicin did not affect the basal levels of plasma corticosterone; however, the stress-induced elevation of plasma corticosterone was prolonged in capsaicin treated rats. Oral capsaicin exposure significantly increased c-Fos expression not only in the nucleus tractus of solitarius but also in the paraventricular nucleus. Results suggest that repeated oral exposure to capsaicin increases anxiety-like behaviours in rats, and dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis may play a role in its pathophysiology. PMID:23938388

  6. DNA sequences of Alu elements indicate a recent replacement of the human autosomal genetic complement

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, A.; Deininger, P.L.; Batzer, M.A.

    1996-04-30

    DNA sequences of neutral nuclear autosomal loci, compared across diverse human populations, provide a previously untapped perspective into the mode and tempo of the emergence of modern humans and a critical comparison with published clonally inherited mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome measurements of human diversity. We obtained over 55 kilobases of sequence from three autosomal loci encompassing Alu repeats for representatives of diverse human populations as well as orthologous sequences for other hominoid species at one of these loci. Nucleotide diversity was exceedingly low. Most individuals and populations were identical. Only a single nucleotide difference distinguished presumed ancestral alleles from descendants. These results differ from those expected if alleles from divergent archaic populations were maintained through multiregional continuity. The observed virtual lack of sequence polymorphism is the signature of a recent single origin for modern humans, with general replacement of archaic populations. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Methylation status of individual CpG sites within Alu elements in the human genome and Alu hypomethylation in gastric carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Alu methylation is correlated with the overall level of DNA methylation and recombination activity of the genome. However, the maintenance and methylation status of each CpG site within Alu elements (Alu) and its methylation status have not well characterized. This information is useful for understanding natural status of Alu in the genome and helpful for developing an optimal assay to quantify Alu hypomethylation. Methods Bisulfite clone sequencing was carried out in 14 human gastric samples initially. A Cac8I COBRA-DHPLC assay was developed to detect methylated-Alu proportion in cell lines and 48 paired gastric carcinomas and 55 gastritis samples. DHPLC data were statistically interpreted using SPSS version 16.0. Results From the results of 427 Alu bisulfite clone sequences, we found that only 27.2% of CpG sites within Alu elements were preserved (4.6 of 17 analyzed CpGs, A ~ Q) and that 86.6% of remaining-CpGs were methylated. Deamination was the main reason for low preservation of methylation targets. A high correlation coefficient of methylation was observed between Alu clones and CpG site J (0.963), A (0.950), H (0.946), D (0.945). Comethylation of the sites H and J were used as an indicator of the proportion of methylated-Alu in a Cac8I COBRA-DHPLC assay. Validation studies showed that hypermethylation or hypomethylation of Alu elements in human cell lines could be detected sensitively by the assay after treatment with 5-aza-dC and M.SssI, respectively. The proportion of methylated-Alu copies in gastric carcinomas (3.01%) was significantly lower than that in the corresponding normal samples (3.19%) and gastritis biopsies (3.23%). Conclusions Most Alu CpG sites are deaminated in the genome. 27% of Alu CpG sites represented in our amplification products. 87% of the remaining CpG sites are methylated. Alu hypomethylation in primary gastric carcinomas could be detected with the Cac8I COBRA-DHPLC assay quantitatively. PMID:20163738

  8. Repeated Isoflurane Exposures Impair Long-Term Potentiation and Increase Basal GABAergic Activity in the Basolateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Long II, Robert P.; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Prager, Eric M.; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr I.; Figueiredo, Taiza H.; Braga, Maria F. M.

    2016-01-01

    After surgery requiring general anesthesia, patients often experience emotional disturbances, but it is unclear if this is due to anesthetic exposure. In the present study, we examined whether isoflurane anesthesia produces long-term pathophysiological alterations in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a brain region that plays a central role in emotional behavior. Ten-week-old, male rats were administered either a single, 1 h long isoflurane (1.5%) anesthesia or three, 1 h long isoflurane exposures, separated by 48 h. Long-term potentiation (LTP) and spontaneous GABAergic activity in the BLA were studied 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month later. Single isoflurane anesthesia had no significant effect on the magnitude of LTP. In contrast, after repeated isoflurane exposures, LTP was dramatically impaired at both 1 day and 1 week after the last exposure but was restored by 1 month after the exposures. Spontaneous GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs were increased at 1 day and 1 week after repeated exposures but had returned to control levels by 1 month after exposure. Thus, repeated exposures to isoflurane cause a long-lasting—but not permanent—impairment of synaptic plasticity in the BLA, which could be due to increased basal GABAergic activity. These pathophysiological alterations may produce emotional disturbances and impaired fear-related learning. PMID:27313904

  9. Repeated Isoflurane Exposures Impair Long-Term Potentiation and Increase Basal GABAergic Activity in the Basolateral Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Long Ii, Robert P; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Prager, Eric M; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr I; Figueiredo, Taiza H; Braga, Maria F M

    2016-01-01

    After surgery requiring general anesthesia, patients often experience emotional disturbances, but it is unclear if this is due to anesthetic exposure. In the present study, we examined whether isoflurane anesthesia produces long-term pathophysiological alterations in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a brain region that plays a central role in emotional behavior. Ten-week-old, male rats were administered either a single, 1 h long isoflurane (1.5%) anesthesia or three, 1 h long isoflurane exposures, separated by 48 h. Long-term potentiation (LTP) and spontaneous GABAergic activity in the BLA were studied 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month later. Single isoflurane anesthesia had no significant effect on the magnitude of LTP. In contrast, after repeated isoflurane exposures, LTP was dramatically impaired at both 1 day and 1 week after the last exposure but was restored by 1 month after the exposures. Spontaneous GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs were increased at 1 day and 1 week after repeated exposures but had returned to control levels by 1 month after exposure. Thus, repeated exposures to isoflurane cause a long-lasting-but not permanent-impairment of synaptic plasticity in the BLA, which could be due to increased basal GABAergic activity. These pathophysiological alterations may produce emotional disturbances and impaired fear-related learning.

  10. Over-representation of repeats in stress response genes: a strategy to increase versatility under stressful conditions?

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Matic, Ivan; Taddei, François

    2002-01-01

    The survival of individual organisms facing stress is enhanced by the induction of a set of changes. As the intensity, duration and nature of stress is highly variable, the optimal response to stress may be unpredictable. To face such an uncertain future, it may be advantageous for a clonal population to increase its phenotypic heterogeneity (bet-hedging), ensuring that at least a subset of cells would survive the current stress. With current techniques, assessing the extent of this variability experimentally remains a challenge. Here, we use a bioinformatic approach to compare stress response genes with the rest of the genome for the presence of various kinds of repeated sequences, elements known to increase variability during the transfer of genetic information (i.e. during replication, but also during gene expression). We investigated the potential for illegitimate and homologous recombination of 296 Escherichia coli genes related to repair, recombination and physiological adaptations to different stresses. Although long repeats capable of engaging in homologous recombination are almost absent in stress response genes, we observed a significant high number of short close repeats capable of inducing phenotypic variability by slipped-mispair during DNA, RNA or protein synthesis. PMID:11972324

  11. Repeated Isoflurane Exposures Impair Long-Term Potentiation and Increase Basal GABAergic Activity in the Basolateral Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Long Ii, Robert P; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Prager, Eric M; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr I; Figueiredo, Taiza H; Braga, Maria F M

    2016-01-01

    After surgery requiring general anesthesia, patients often experience emotional disturbances, but it is unclear if this is due to anesthetic exposure. In the present study, we examined whether isoflurane anesthesia produces long-term pathophysiological alterations in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a brain region that plays a central role in emotional behavior. Ten-week-old, male rats were administered either a single, 1 h long isoflurane (1.5%) anesthesia or three, 1 h long isoflurane exposures, separated by 48 h. Long-term potentiation (LTP) and spontaneous GABAergic activity in the BLA were studied 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month later. Single isoflurane anesthesia had no significant effect on the magnitude of LTP. In contrast, after repeated isoflurane exposures, LTP was dramatically impaired at both 1 day and 1 week after the last exposure but was restored by 1 month after the exposures. Spontaneous GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs were increased at 1 day and 1 week after repeated exposures but had returned to control levels by 1 month after exposure. Thus, repeated exposures to isoflurane cause a long-lasting-but not permanent-impairment of synaptic plasticity in the BLA, which could be due to increased basal GABAergic activity. These pathophysiological alterations may produce emotional disturbances and impaired fear-related learning. PMID:27313904

  12. Does a Repeated Guided-Instruction Approach with Multiple Assessments Increase Student Learning of Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert; Peethambaran, Bela; Pontiggia, Laura; Blumberg, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    Guided instruction is an approach that fully explains the concepts and procedures that students are required to learn. It seems intuitive that this approach should increase student learning; however, there is evidence in the literature that this may not always be the case. We wanted to assess the effectiveness of our own repeated…

  13. Repeated burning of eastern tallgrass prairie increases richness and diversity, stabilizing late successional vegetation.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Marlin L; Jones, Michael D

    2013-03-01

    Understanding temporal effects of fire frequency on plant species diversity and vegetation structure is critical for managing tallgrass prairie (TGP), which occupies a mid-continental longitudinal precipitation and productivity gradient. Eastern TGP has contributed little information toward understanding whether vegetation-fire interactions are uniform or change across this biome. We resampled 34 fire-managed mid- and late-successional ungrazed TGP remnants occurring across a dry to wet-mesic moisture gradient in the Chicago region of Illinois, USA. We compared hypotheses that burning acts either as a stabilizing force or causes change in diversity and structure, depending upon fire frequency and successional stage. Based on western TGP, we expected a unimodal species richness distribution across a cover-productivity gradient, variable functional group responses to fire frequency, and a negative relationship between fire frequency and species richness. Species diversity was unimodal across the cover gradient and was more strongly humpbacked in stands with greater fire frequency. In support of a stabilizing hypothesis, temporal similarity of late-successional vegetation had a logarithmic relationship with increasing fire frequency, while richness and evenness remained stable. Temporal similarity within mid-successional stands was not correlated with fire frequency, while richness increased and evenness decreased over time. Functional group responses to fire frequency were variable. Summer forb richness increased under high fire frequency, while C4 grasses, spring forbs, and nitrogen-fixing species decreased with fire exclusion. On mesic and wet-mesic sites, vegetation structure measured by the ratio of woody to graminoid species was negatively correlated with abundance of forbs and with fire frequency. Our findings that species richness responds unimodally to an environmental-productivity gradient, and that fire exclusion increases woody vegetation and leads to loss

  14. Increasing viscosity and yields of bacterial exopolysaccharides by repeatedly exposing strains to ampicillin.

    PubMed

    Li, Ou; Liu, Ao; Lu, Cui; Zheng, Dao-qiong; Qian, Chao-dong; Wang, Pin-Mei; Jiang, Xin-Hang; Wu, Xue-Chang

    2014-09-22

    A universal method to enhance productivity and viscosity of bacterial exopolysaccharides was developed. The technique was based on the principle that ampicillin can inhibit the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, which shares a common synthetic pathway with that of bacterial exopolysaccharides. Serial passages of three typical representatives of bacterial EPS-producing strains, namely Sphingomonas elodea, Xanthomonas campestris, and Paenibacillus elgii, were subjected to ampicillin, which was used as a stressor and a mutagen. These mutant strains are advantageous over other strains because of two major factors. First, all of the resulting strains were almost mutants with increase in EPS productivity and viscosity. Second, isolated serial strains showed different levels of increase in EPS production and viscosity to satisfy the different requirements of practical applications. No differences were observed in the monosaccharide composition produced by the mutant and parent strains; however, high-viscosity mutant strains exhibited higher molecular weights. The results confirmed that the developed method is a controlled universal one that can improve exopolysaccharides productivity and viscosity.

  15. Repeat work bouts increase thermal strain for Australian firefighters working in the heat

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Anthony; Argus, Christos; Driller, Matthew; Rattray, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Background: Firefighters regularly re-enter fire scenes during long duration emergency events with limited rest between work bouts. It is unclear whether this practice is impacting on the safety of firefighters. Objectives:To evaluate the effects of multiple work bouts on firefighter physiology, strength, and cognitive performance when working in the heat. Methods: Seventy-seven urban firefighters completed two 20-minute simulated search and rescue tasks in a heat chamber (105 ± 5°C), separated by a 10-minute passive recovery. Core and skin temperature, rate of perceived exertion (RPE), thermal sensation (TS), grip strength, and cognitive changes between simulations were evaluated. Results: Significant increases in core temperature and perceptual responses along with declines in strength were observed following the second simulation. No differences for other measures were observed. Conclusions: A significant increase in thermal strain was observed when firefighters re-entered a hot working environment. We recommend that longer recovery periods or active cooling methods be employed prior to re-entry. PMID:25849044

  16. Increased 5-HT Levels Following Repeated Administration of Nigella sativa L. (Black Seed) Oil Produce Antidepressant Effects in Rats.

    PubMed

    Perveen, Tahira; Haider, Saida; Zuberi, Nudrat Anwar; Saleem, Sadia; Sadaf, Sana; Batool, Zehra

    2014-03-01

    The seeds of Nigella sativa L., commonly known as black seed or black cumin, and its extracts are used in folk medicine in the Middle East and in Asian countries for the promotion of good health and as a remedy for many ailments. These seeds have many acclaimed medicinal properties such as broncho-dilatory, immunopotentiating, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and hypotensive. In the present study, the antidepressant activity following the repeated administration of Nigella sativa L. oil has been monitored using the forced swim test. Rats treated with Nigella sativa L. oil exhibited a significant increase in struggling time after oral administration of Nigella sativa L. oil (0.1 ml/kg/day) for four weeks. Nigella sativa L. oil increased brain 5-HT levels and decreased 5-HT turnover (5-HT/5-HIAA ratio). Levels of tryptophan increased significantly in the brain and plasma following the repeated administration of Nigella sativa L. oil. Nigella sativa L. oil showed a potential antidepressant-like effect.

  17. Repeated Glacial-Lake Outburst Floods in Patagonia: An Increasing Hazard?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussaillant, A.; Benito, G.; Buytaert, W.; Carling, P.; Gonzalez, F.; Link, O.; Meier, C.

    2009-04-01

    Patagonian glaciers are recording one of the fastest glacial retreats on Earth, inferred to be a direct response to recorded climate change in South America. The dynamic response of the region's glaciers to climate change was evident when two self-similar glacial-lake outburst floods occurred in April and October 2008, the largest floods from this glacier on record. On each occasion, the lake Cachet 2, in the Northern Patagonia Ice-Field, dammed by the Colonia glacier, released about 200 million m3 water into the Colonia river. The lake is refilling rapidly, such that further outbreak floods can be expected. This paper anticipates future events, by providing an assessment of the hydraulic properties of the 2008 events. Pipeflow calculations of the subglacial tunnel drainage and hydraulic models of the river flood give consistent results, with an estimated peak discharge of between 2500 and 3000 m3s-1. However, geomorphological analysis of the Colonia valley shows evidence of former catastrophic outburst floods, with flood discharges possibly as high as 16,000 m3s-1. Given the impacts of climate change on glacier dynamics in the area, the frequency and high magnitude jökulhlaups may increase future flood risks for infrastructure and population, particularly relevant in view of the current development of hydropower projects in Chilean Patagonia.

  18. An alu-based phylogeny of lemurs (infraorder: Lemuriformes).

    PubMed

    McLain, Adam T; Meyer, Thomas J; Faulk, Christopher; Herke, Scott W; Oldenburg, J Michael; Bourgeois, Matthew G; Abshire, Camille F; Roos, Christian; Batzer, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    LEMURS (INFRAORDER: Lemuriformes) are a radiation of strepsirrhine primates endemic to the island of Madagascar. As of 2012, 101 lemur species, divided among five families, have been described. Genetic and morphological evidence indicates all species are descended from a common ancestor that arrived in Madagascar ∼55-60 million years ago (mya). Phylogenetic relationships in this species-rich infraorder have been the subject of debate. Here we use Alu elements, a family of primate-specific Short INterspersed Elements (SINEs), to construct a phylogeny of infraorder Lemuriformes. Alu elements are particularly useful SINEs for the purpose of phylogeny reconstruction because they are identical by descent and confounding events between loci are easily resolved by sequencing. The genome of the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) was computationally assayed for synapomorphic Alu elements. Those that were identified as Lemuriformes-specific were analyzed against other available primate genomes for orthologous sequence in which to design primers for PCR (polymerase chain reaction) verification. A primate phylogenetic panel of 24 species, including 22 lemur species from all five families, was examined for the presence/absence of 138 Alu elements via PCR to establish relationships among species. Of these, 111 were phylogenetically informative. A phylogenetic tree was generated based on the results of this analysis. We demonstrate strong support for the monophyly of Lemuriformes to the exclusion of other primates, with Daubentoniidae, the aye-aye, as the basal lineage within the infraorder. Our results also suggest Lepilemuridae as a sister lineage to Cheirogaleidae, and Indriidae as sister to Lemuridae. Among the Cheirogaleidae, we show strong support for Microcebus and Mirza as sister genera, with Cheirogaleus the sister lineage to both. Our results also support the monophyly of the Lemuridae. Within Lemuridae we place Lemur and Hapalemur together to the exclusion of

  19. An Alu-Based Phylogeny of Lemurs (Infraorder: Lemuriformes)

    PubMed Central

    McLain, Adam T.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Faulk, Christopher; Herke, Scott W.; Oldenburg, J. Michael; Bourgeois, Matthew G.; Abshire, Camille F.

    2012-01-01

    Lemurs (infraorder: Lemuriformes) are a radiation of strepsirrhine primates endemic to the island of Madagascar. As of 2012, 101 lemur species, divided among five families, have been described. Genetic and morphological evidence indicates all species are descended from a common ancestor that arrived in Madagascar ∼55–60 million years ago (mya). Phylogenetic relationships in this species-rich infraorder have been the subject of debate. Here we use Alu elements, a family of primate-specific Short INterspersed Elements (SINEs), to construct a phylogeny of infraorder Lemuriformes. Alu elements are particularly useful SINEs for the purpose of phylogeny reconstruction because they are identical by descent and confounding events between loci are easily resolved by sequencing. The genome of the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) was computationally assayed for synapomorphic Alu elements. Those that were identified as Lemuriformes-specific were analyzed against other available primate genomes for orthologous sequence in which to design primers for PCR (polymerase chain reaction) verification. A primate phylogenetic panel of 24 species, including 22 lemur species from all five families, was examined for the presence/absence of 138 Alu elements via PCR to establish relationships among species. Of these, 111 were phylogenetically informative. A phylogenetic tree was generated based on the results of this analysis. We demonstrate strong support for the monophyly of Lemuriformes to the exclusion of other primates, with Daubentoniidae, the aye-aye, as the basal lineage within the infraorder. Our results also suggest Lepilemuridae as a sister lineage to Cheirogaleidae, and Indriidae as sister to Lemuridae. Among the Cheirogaleidae, we show strong support for Microcebus and Mirza as sister genera, with Cheirogaleus the sister lineage to both. Our results also support the monophyly of the Lemuridae. Within Lemuridae we place Lemur and Hapalemur together to the exclusion of

  20. Detecting Alu insertions from high-throughput sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    David, Matei; Mustafa, Harun; Brudno, Michael

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the cataloguing of variation in personal human genomes. In this manuscript, we present alu-detect, a tool that combines read-pair and split-read information to detect novel Alus and their precise breakpoints directly from either whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing data while also identifying insertions directly in the vicinity of existing Alus. To set the parameters of our method, we use simulation of a faux reference, which allows us to compute the precision and recall of various parameter settings using real sequencing data. Applying our method to 100 bp paired Illumina data from seven individuals, including two trios, we detected on average 1519 novel Alus per sample. Based on the faux-reference simulation, we estimate that our method has 97% precision and 85% recall. We identify 808 novel Alus not previously described in other studies. We also demonstrate the use of alu-detect to study the local sequence and global location preferences for novel Alu insertions. PMID:23921633

  1. The Zinc-Finger Antiviral Protein ZAP Inhibits LINE and Alu Retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, John B; Moran, John V

    2015-05-01

    Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) is the only active autonomous retrotransposon in the human genome. To investigate the interplay between the L1 retrotransposition machinery and the host cell, we used co-immunoprecipitation in conjunction with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry to identify cellular proteins that interact with the L1 first open reading frame-encoded protein, ORF1p. We identified 39 ORF1p-interacting candidate proteins including the zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP or ZC3HAV1). Here we show that the interaction between ZAP and ORF1p requires RNA and that ZAP overexpression in HeLa cells inhibits the retrotransposition of engineered human L1 and Alu elements, an engineered mouse L1, and an engineered zebrafish LINE-2 element. Consistently, siRNA-mediated depletion of endogenous ZAP in HeLa cells led to a ~2-fold increase in human L1 retrotransposition. Fluorescence microscopy in cultured human cells demonstrated that ZAP co-localizes with L1 RNA, ORF1p, and stress granule associated proteins in cytoplasmic foci. Finally, molecular genetic and biochemical analyses indicate that ZAP reduces the accumulation of full-length L1 RNA and the L1-encoded proteins, yielding mechanistic insight about how ZAP may inhibit L1 retrotransposition. Together, these data suggest that ZAP inhibits the retrotransposition of LINE and Alu elements.

  2. The Zinc-Finger Antiviral Protein ZAP Inhibits LINE and Alu Retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, John B; Moran, John V

    2015-05-01

    Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) is the only active autonomous retrotransposon in the human genome. To investigate the interplay between the L1 retrotransposition machinery and the host cell, we used co-immunoprecipitation in conjunction with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry to identify cellular proteins that interact with the L1 first open reading frame-encoded protein, ORF1p. We identified 39 ORF1p-interacting candidate proteins including the zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP or ZC3HAV1). Here we show that the interaction between ZAP and ORF1p requires RNA and that ZAP overexpression in HeLa cells inhibits the retrotransposition of engineered human L1 and Alu elements, an engineered mouse L1, and an engineered zebrafish LINE-2 element. Consistently, siRNA-mediated depletion of endogenous ZAP in HeLa cells led to a ~2-fold increase in human L1 retrotransposition. Fluorescence microscopy in cultured human cells demonstrated that ZAP co-localizes with L1 RNA, ORF1p, and stress granule associated proteins in cytoplasmic foci. Finally, molecular genetic and biochemical analyses indicate that ZAP reduces the accumulation of full-length L1 RNA and the L1-encoded proteins, yielding mechanistic insight about how ZAP may inhibit L1 retrotransposition. Together, these data suggest that ZAP inhibits the retrotransposition of LINE and Alu elements. PMID:25951186

  3. Iron toxicity in the retina requires Alu RNA and the NLRP3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Bradley D.; Wright, Charles B.; Kim, Younghee; Yasuma, Tetsuhiro; Yasuma, Reo; Li, Shengjian; Fowler, Benjamin J.; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Kerur, Nagaraj; Uittenbogaard, Annette; Han, Youn Seon; Lou, Dingyuan; Kleinman, Mark E.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Núñez, Gabriel; Georgel, Philippe; Dunaief, Joshua L.; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Excess iron induces tissue damage and is implicated in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Iron toxicity is widely attributed to hydroxyl radical formation through Fenton's reaction. We report that excess iron, but not other Fenton catalytic metals, induces activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, a pathway also implicated in AMD. Additionally, iron-induced degeneration of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is suppressed in mice lacking inflammasome components Caspase-1/11 or Nlrp3 or by inhibition of Caspase-1. Iron overload increases abundance of RNAs transcribed from short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs): Alu RNAs and the rodent equivalent B1 and B2 RNAs, which are inflammasome agonists. Targeting Alu or B2 RNA prevents iron-induced inflammasome activation and RPE degeneration. Iron-induced SINE RNA accumulation is due to suppression of DICER1 via sequestration of the co-factor poly(C)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2). These findings reveal an unexpected mechanism of iron toxicity, with implications for AMD and neurodegenerative diseases associated with excess iron. PMID:26074074

  4. Repeated sauna therapy attenuates ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction in rats by increasing coronary vascularity of noninfarcted myocardium.

    PubMed

    Sobajima, Mitsuo; Nozawa, Takashi; Shida, Takuya; Ohori, Takashi; Suzuki, Takayuki; Matsuki, Akira; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    Repeated sauna therapy (ST) increases endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and improves cardiac function in heart failure as well as peripheral blood flow in ischemic limbs. The present study investigates whether ST can increase coronary vascularity and thus attenuate cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We induced MI by ligating the left coronary artery of Wistar rats. The rats were placed in a far-infrared dry sauna at 41°C for 15 min and then at 34°C for 20 min once daily for 4 wk. Cardiac hemodynamic, histopathological, and gene analyses were performed. Despite the similar sizes of MI between the ST and non-ST groups (51.4 ± 0.3 vs. 51.1 ± 0.2%), ST reduced left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic (9.7 ± 0.4 vs. 10.7 ± 0.5 mm, P < 0.01) and end-systolic (8.6 ± 0.5 vs. 9.6 ± 0.6 mm, P < 0.01) dimensions and attenuated MI-induced increases in LV end-diastolic pressure. Cross-sectional areas of cardiomyocytes were smaller in ST rats and associated with a significant reduction in myocardial atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA levels. Vascular density was reduced in the noninfarcted myocardium of non-ST rats, and the density of cells positive for CD31 and for α-smooth muscle actin was decreased. These decreases were attenuated in ST rats compared with non-ST rats and associated with increases in myocardial eNOS and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels. In conclusion, ST attenuates cardiac remodeling after MI, at least in part, through improving coronary vascularity in the noninfarcted myocardium. Repeated ST might serve as a novel noninvasive therapy for patients with MI.

  5. Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Fatigue Failure Is Increased by Limited Internal Femoral Rotation During In Vitro Repeated Pivot Landings

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Mélanie L.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A reduced range of hip internal rotation is associated with increased peak anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) strain and risk for injury. It is unknown, however, whether limiting the available range of internal femoral rotation increases the susceptibility of the ACL to fatigue failure. Hypothesis Risk of ACL failure is significantly greater in female knee specimens with a limited range of internal femoral rotation, smaller femoral-ACL attachment angle, and smaller tibial eminence volume during repeated in vitro simulated single-leg pivot landings. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods A custom-built testing apparatus was used to simulate repeated single-leg pivot landings with a 4×-body weight impulsive load that induces knee compression, knee flexion, and internal tibial torque in 32 paired human knee specimens from 8 male and 8 female donors. These test loads were applied to each pair of specimens, in one knee with limited internal femoral rotation and in the contralateral knee with femoral rotation resisted by 2 springs to simulate the active hip rotator muscles’ resistance to stretch. The landings were repeated until ACL failure occurred or until a minimum of 100 trials were executed. The angle at which the ACL originates from the femur and the tibial eminence volume were measured on magnetic resonance images. Results The final Cox regression model (P = .024) revealed that range of internal femoral rotation and sex of donor were significant factors in determining risk of ACL fatigue failure. The specimens with limited range of internal femoral rotation had a failure risk 17.1 times higher than did the specimens with free rotation (P = .016). The female knee specimens had a risk of ACL failure 26.9 times higher than the male specimens (P = .055). Conclusion Limiting the range of internal femoral rotation during repetitive pivot landings increases the risk of an ACL fatigue failure in comparison with free rotation in a cadaveric model

  6. DNA methylation of LINE-1 and Alu repetitive elements in relation to sex hormones and pubertal timing in Mexican-American children

    PubMed Central

    Huen, Karen; Harley, Kim; Kogut, Katherine; Rauch, Stephen; Eskenazi, Brenda; Holland, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanisms linking environmental exposures to earlier pubertal development are not well characterized. Epigenetics may play an important role, but data on the relationship between epigenetic marks and puberty, particularly in humans, is limited. Methods We used pyrosequencing to measure Alu and long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINE-1) methylation in DNA isolated from whole blood samples collected from newborns and 9-year-old children (n=266). Tanner staging was completed six times between ages 9 and 12 years to determine pubertal status, and hormone levels were measured in 12-year-old boys. Results Among girls, we observed a suggestive trend of increased odds of breast and pubic hair development with higher Alu and LINE-1 methylation in 9-year-old blood, respectively. The strongest association identified was an inverse association of LINE-1 methylation in 9-year-old girls with odds of experiencing menarche by age 12 (OR(95%CI): 0.63(0.46,0.87); p=0.005). We observed a consistent inverse relationship for Alu and LINE-1 methylation at 9 years with luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone and follicle stimulating hormone levels in boys but it was only significant between LINE-1 and LH. Conclusion DNA methylation of Alu and LINE-1 may be involved in puberty initiation and development. This relationship should be confirmed in future studies. PMID:26882368

  7. Alu Insertions and Genetic Diversity: A Preliminary Investigation by an Undergraduate Bioinformatics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elwess, Nancy L.; Duprey, Stephen L.; Harney, Lindesay A.; Langman, Jessie E.; Marino, Tara C.; Martinez, Carolina; McKeon, Lauren L.; Moss, Chantel I. E.; Myrie, Sasha S.; Taylor, Luke Ryan

    2008-01-01

    "Alu"-insertion polymorphisms were used by an undergraduate Bioinformatics class to study how these insertion sites could be the basis for an investigation in human population genetics. Based on the students' investigation, both allele and genotype "Alu" frequencies were determined for African-American and Japanese populations as well as a…

  8. Assessment of Azorean ancestry by Alu insertion polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Branco, Claudia C; Palla, Raquel; Lino, Sílvia; Pacheco, Paula R; Cabral, Rita; De Fez, Laura; Peixoto, Bernardo R; Mota-Vieira, Luisa

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of population ancestry from genetic markers is essential, for example, to understand the history of human migration and to carry out admixture and association studies. Here we assess the genome ancestry of the Azorean population through analysis of six Alu polymorphic sites (TPA-25, ACE, APO, B65, PV92, and D1) in 65 Azoreans and 30 Portuguese unrelated blood donors and compare data for the Y-chromosome and mtDNA. Allele frequencies were calculated by direct counting. Statistical analysis was performed using Arlequin 2.0. Nei's genetic distance was calculated with DISPAN software, and trees were constructed by neighbor joining (NJ) using PHYLIP 3.63. The results show that all Alu insertions were polymorphic. APO is the closest to fixation. The less frequent insertions are PV92 and D1 in the Azores and Portugal, respectively. ACE and TPA-25 show the highest values of heterozygosity in both populations. Allele frequencies are very similar to those obtained in European populations. These results are validated by the Y-chromosome and mtDNA data, where the majority of the maternal and paternal lineages are European. Overall, these data are reflected in the phylogenetic tree, in which the Azoreans and the Portuguese branch with Catalans, Andalusians, Moroccans, and Algerians. We conclude that the population of the Azores shows no significant genetic differences from that of mainland Portugal and that it is an outbred population. Moreover, the data validate the use of Alu insertion polymorphisms to assess the origin and history of human populations. PMID:16493635

  9. Terrestrial Sediment and Nutrient Fluxes to the Faga'alu Reefs in American Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    Land-based sources of pollution including increased sediment and nutrient fluxes to coastal waters have been identified and linked to degraded coral health in reef ecosystems adjacent to impacted streams such as Faga'alu in American Samoa. Monthly monitoring since 2002 has shown that Faga'alu stream has the highest turbidity of monitored streams on Tutuila, where degraded water quality is linked to lower reef health and fish biomass. To guide local and federal managers in mitigating land-based sources of pollution from agricultural, mining, urban, and residential areas, fluxes of sediment and nutrients were measured upstream and downstream of disturbed areas to identify and quantify significant pollution sources and guide mitigation efforts. Sediment flux from disturbed areas, mainly an open-pit aggregate quarry, contributed over 75% of the sediment loading to the bay. Faga'alu stream is characterized by flashy response to rainfall events and the total observed sediment yield was contributed by a small number of large storm events. Event-total sediment yield was more closely correlated with event-total discharge than event-total precipitation. It is hypothesized that the intensity of rainfall controls sediment yield for small events where sheetwash erosion from the quarry is more important. For larger events where easily available sediment is washed away in the first part of the storm it is hypothesized that increased sediment yield is due to streambank erosion and gullying from both disturbed and undisturbed areas. Based on sediment yield measurements and modeled sediment loading to the bay, recommendations for mitigation of land-based sources of pollution are focused on sediment mitigation at the quarry and runoff from the large impervious areas associated with the hospital. Measurements of sediment accumulation on the coral reef itself show sedimentation is controlled by sediment loading from the watershed and sediment scouring by increased wave and wind

  10. Alu-alu recombination results in a duplication of seven exons in the lysyl hydroxylase gene in a patient with the type VI variant of Ethlers-Danlos syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Pousi, B.; Hautala, T.; Heikkinen, J.; Pajunen, L.; Kivirikko, K.I.; Myllylae, R.

    1994-11-01

    The type VI variant of the Ethlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a recessively inherited connective-tissue disorder. The characteristic features of the variant are muscular hyptonia, kyphoscoliosis, ocular manifestations, joint hypermobility, skin fragility and hyperextensibility, and other signs of connective-tissue involvement. The biochemical defect in most but not all patients is a deficiency in lysyl hydroxylase activity. Lysyl hydroxylase is an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of hydroxylysine in collagens and other proteins with collagen-like amino acid sequences. We have recently reported an apparently homozygous large-duplication rearrangement in the gene for lysyl hydroxylase, leading to the type VI variant of EDS in two siblings. We now report an identical, apparently homozygous large duplication in an unrelated 49-year-old female originally analyzed by Sussman et al. Our simple-sequence-repeat-polymorphism analysis does not support uniparental isodisomy inheritance for either of the two duplications. Furthermore, we indicate in this study that the duplication in the lysyl hydroxylase gene is caused by an Alu-Alu recombination in both families. Cloning of the junction fragment of the duplication has allowed synthesis of appropriate primers for rapid screening for this rearrangement in other families with the type VI variant of EDS. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Alu methylation serves as a biomarker for non-invasive diagnosis of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hao; Zhao, Longxiang; Huang, Chuanjun; Liu, Xiaojiang; Hou, Shiqiang; Qi, Jing; Shi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Current techniques for diagnosing glioma are invasive and do not accurately predict prognosis. We developed a novel, non-invasive liquid chip assay to diagnose glioma and predict prognosis. Using this method, we determined the methylation state of the Alu element in cell-free DNA extracted from the serum of 109 glioma patients. Controls included 56 patients with benign intracranial tumors and 50 healthy subjects. Matched tumor tissues were processed for 36 patients. The cfDNA from glioma patients showed lower levels of Alu methylation than the controls (P<0.01). Alu methylation was also lower in high-grade than low-grade gliomas (P<0.01), indicating that Alu methylation correlates negatively with disease severity. Moreover, Alu methylation correlated positively with survival (P<0.01). These findings suggest high-throughput liquid chip could serve as a non-invasive diagnostic assay for glioma. PMID:27028997

  12. Altering a gene involved in nuclear distribution increases the repeat-induced point mutation process in the fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed Central

    Bouhouche, Khaled; Zickler, Denise; Debuchy, Robert; Arnaise, Sylvie

    2004-01-01

    Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is a homology-dependent gene-silencing mechanism that introduces C:G-to-T:A transitions in duplicated DNA segments. Cis-duplicated sequences can also be affected by another mechanism called premeiotic recombination (PR). Both are active over the sexual cycle of some filamentous fungi, e.g., Neurospora crassa and Podospora anserina. During the sexual cycle, several developmental steps require precise nuclear movement and positioning, but connections between RIP, PR, and nuclear distributions have not yet been established. Previous work has led to the isolation of ami1, the P. anserina ortholog of the Aspergillus nidulans apsA gene, which is required for nuclear positioning. We show here that ami1 is involved in nuclear distribution during the sexual cycle and that alteration of ami1 delays the fruiting-body development. We also demonstrate that ami1 alteration affects loss of transgene functions during the sexual cycle. Genetically linked multiple copies of transgenes are affected by RIP and PR much more frequently in an ami1 mutant cross than in a wild-type cross. Our results suggest that the developmental slowdown of the ami1 mutant during the period of RIP and PR increases time exposure to the duplication detection system and thus increases the frequency of RIP and PR. PMID:15166143

  13. Gradual increase in secondary ionization coefficient γ and charge accumulation on a dielectric electrode during DBD with repeated breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Itoh, H.

    2015-10-01

    We have investigated the effect of the surface roughness of a dielectric electrode for dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). We prepared three alumina plates made from the same material with different surface roughnesses for use as electrodes. During the repeated breakdown from the first breakdown to the stationary state, we observed gradual increases in the secondary ionization coefficient and the charge accumulated on the alumina electrodes under the application of a sinusoidal voltage in argon up to a pressure of 105 Torr. A strong correlation was also observed between them, similarly to in a previous paper on CaO film electrodes. The results suggest that increasing the surface roughness of an alumina electrode results in a larger secondary ionization coefficient and greater charge accumulation on the electrode. Moreover, it is concluded that the charges that accumulate on the alumina can be liberated from the surface as initial electrons when it acts as a cathode, depending on the polarity of the alternating gap voltage. These electrons induce the formation of an atmospheric-pressure Townsend discharge. Finally, we discuss the effect of the secondary ionization coefficient in DBD.

  14. Characterization of Alu and recombination-associated motifs mediating a large homozygous SPG7 gene rearrangement causing hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    López, Eva; Casasnovas, Carlos; Giménez, Javier; Matilla-Dueñas, Antoni; Sánchez, Ivelisse; Volpini, Víctor

    2015-04-01

    Spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7) is one of the most common forms of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia (AR-HSP). Although over 77 different mutations have been identified in SPG7 patients, only 9 gross deletions have been reported with only a few of them being fully characterized. Here, we present a detailed description of a large homozygous intragenic SPG7 gene rearrangement involving a 5144-base pair (bp) genomic loss (c. 1450-446_1779 + 746 delinsAAAGTGCT) encompassing exons 11 to 13, identified in a Spanish AR-HSP family. Analysis of the deletion junction sequences revealed that the 5' breakpoint of this SPG7 gene deletion was located within highly homologous Alu sequences where the 3' breakpoint appears to be flanked by the core crossover hotspot instigator (chi)-like sequence (GCTGG). Furthermore, an 8-bp (AAAGTTGCT) conserved sequence at the breakpoint junction was identified, suggesting that the most likely mechanism for the occurrence of this rearrangement is by Alu microhomology and chi-like recombination-associated motif-mediated multiple exon deletion. Our results are consistent with non-allelic homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining in deletion mutagenesis for the generation of rearrangements. This study provides more evidence associating repeated elements as a genetic mechanism underlying neurodegenerative disorders, highlighting their importance in human diseases. PMID:25398481

  15. Alu and LINE-1 hypomethylation is associated with HER2 enriched subtype of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, So Yeon; Seo, An Na; Jung, Hae Yoen; Gwak, Jae Moon; Jung, Namhee; Cho, Nam-Yun; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The changes in DNA methylation status in cancer cells are characterized by hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands and diffuse genomic hypomethylation. Alu and long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) are non-coding genomic repetitive sequences and methylation of these elements can be used as a surrogate marker for genome-wide methylation status. This study was designed to evaluate the changes of Alu and LINE-1 hypomethylation during breast cancer progression from normal to pre-invasive lesions and invasive breast cancer (IBC), and their relationship with characteristics of IBC. We analyzed the methylation status of Alu and LINE-1 in 145 cases of breast samples including normal breast tissue, atypical ductal hyperplasia/flat epithelial atypia (ADH/FEA), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and IBC, and another set of 129 cases of IBC by pyrosequencing. Alu methylation showed no significant changes during multistep progression of breast cancer, although it tended to decrease during the transition from DCIS to IBC. In contrast, LINE-1 methylation significantly decreased from normal to ADH/FEA, while it was similar in ADH/FEA, DCIS and IBC. In IBC, Alu hypomethylation correlated with negative estrogen receptor (ER) status, and LINE-1 hypomethylation was associated with negative ER status, ERBB2 (HER2) amplification and p53 overexpression. Alu and LINE-1 methylation status was significantly different between breast cancer subtypes, and the HER2 enriched subtype had lowest methylation levels. In survival analyses, low Alu methylation status tended to be associated with poor disease-free survival of the patients. Our findings suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation is an early event and Alu hypomethylation is probably a late event during breast cancer progression, and prominent hypomethylation of Alu and LINE-1 in HER2 enriched subtype may be related to chromosomal instability of this specific subtype.

  16. High Altitude Increases Alteration in Maximal Torque but Not in Rapid Torque Development in Knee Extensors after Repeated Treadmill Sprinting.

    PubMed

    Girard, Olivier; Brocherie, Franck; Millet, Grégoire P

    2016-01-01

    (P > 0.05), whereas it increased (P < 0.05) for RF muscle during all epochs post-exercise, independently of the conditions. In summary, alteration in repeated-sprint ability and post-exercise MVC decrease were greater at high altitude than in normoxia or at low altitude. However, the post-exercise alterations in RTD were similar between normoxia and low-to-high hypoxia. PMID:27014095

  17. High Altitude Increases Alteration in Maximal Torque but Not in Rapid Torque Development in Knee Extensors after Repeated Treadmill Sprinting

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Olivier; Brocherie, Franck; Millet, Grégoire P.

    2016-01-01

    . Additionally, the EMG rise for VL muscle was similar (P > 0.05), whereas it increased (P < 0.05) for RF muscle during all epochs post-exercise, independently of the conditions. In summary, alteration in repeated-sprint ability and post-exercise MVC decrease were greater at high altitude than in normoxia or at low altitude. However, the post-exercise alterations in RTD were similar between normoxia and low-to-high hypoxia. PMID:27014095

  18. Amphiphysin I but not dynamin I nor synaptojanin mRNA expression increased after repeated methamphetamine administration in the rat cerebrum and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Mitsuko; Okouchi, Jiro; Ozawa, Hidetoshi; Kimuro, Yoshihiko; Iwaki, Akiko; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki

    2013-07-01

    Dopamine increases/decreases synaptic vesicle recycling and in schizophrenia the proteins/mRNA is decreased. We isolated cDNA clone, similar to amphiphysin 1 (vesicle protein) mRNA from the neocortex of rats injected repeatedly with methamphetamine using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) differential display. This clone is highly homologous to the 3' region of the human amphiphysin gene. PCR extension study using a primer specific for the rat amphiphysin 1 gene and a primer located within the clone revealed that it is the 3' UTR region of the rat amphiphysin 1 gene. Furthermore, in situ hybridization revealed that amphiphysin 1 mRNA is expressed in the cerebrum, medial thalamus, hippocampus and cerebellum. In the cerebellum, amphiphysin mRNA expression was confined to upper granule cell layer. Repeated methamphetamine administration increased amphiphysin I mRNA expression in both anterior part of the cerebrum, and the cerebellum. However, the repeated administration did not alter mRNA expression of the other vesicle proteins, synaptotagmin I, synapsin I, synaptojanin and dynamin I, we conclude that the repeated administration selectively increased amphiphysin 1 mRNA expression. Thus, amphiphysin 1 does not work as synaptic recycling, but it is suggested, as a part of pathogenesis of brain tissue injury (under Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺ devoid environment) in repeated methamphetamine-injected states, the gene regulate actin-asssembly, learning, cell stress signaling and cell polarity.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of the human Alu Yb-lineage

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The Alu Yb-lineage is a 'young' primarily human-specific group of short interspersed element (SINE) subfamilies that have integrated throughout the human genome. In this study, we have computationally screened the draft sequence of the human genome for Alu Yb-lineage subfamily members present on autosomal chromosomes. A total of 1,733 Yb Alu subfamily members have integrated into human autosomes. The average ages of Yb-lineage subfamilies, Yb7, Yb8 and Yb9, are estimated as 4.81, 2.39 and 2.32 million years, respectively. In order to determine the contribution of the Alu Yb-lineage to human genomic diversity, 1,202 loci were analysed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays, which amplify the genomic regions containing individual Yb-lineage subfamily members. Approximately 20 per cent of the Yb-lineage Alu elements are polymorphic for insertion presence/absence in the human genome. Fewer than 0.5 per cent of the Yb loci also demonstrate insertions at orthologous positions in non-human primate genomes. Genomic sequencing of these unusual loci demonstrates that each of the orthologous loci from non-human primate genomes contains older Y, Sg and Sx Alu family members that have been altered, through various mechanisms, into Yb8 sequences. These data suggest that Alu Yb-lineage subfamily members are largely restricted to the human genome. The high copy number, level of insertion polymorphism and estimated age indicate that members of the Alu Yb elements will be useful in a wide range of genetic analyses. PMID:15588477

  20. The 2-repeat allele of the MAOA gene confers an increased risk for shooting and stabbing behaviors.

    PubMed

    Beaver, Kevin M; Barnes, J C; Boutwell, Brian B

    2014-09-01

    There has been a great deal of research examining the link between a polymorphism in the promoter region of the MAOA gene and antisocial phenotypes. The results of these studies have consistently revealed that low activity MAOA alleles are related to antisocial behaviors for males who were maltreated as children. Recently, though, some evidence has emerged indicating that a rare allele of the MAOA gene-that is, the 2-repeat allele-may have effects on violence that are independent of the environment. The current study builds on this research and examines the association between the 2-repeat allele and shooting and stabbing behaviors in a sample of males drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Analyses revealed that African-American males who carry the 2-repeat allele are significantly more likely than all other genotypes to engage in shooting and stabbing behaviors and to report having multiple shooting and stabbing victims. The limitations of the study are discussed and suggestions for future research are offered.

  1. Alu Insertion Polymorphisms and Human Evolution: Evidence for a Larger Population Size in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Stoneking, Mark; Fontius, Jennifer J.; Clifford, Stephanie L.; Soodyall, Himla; Arcot, Santosh S.; Saha, Nilmani; Jenkins, Trefor; Tahir, Mohammad A.; Deininger, Prescott L.; Batzer, Mark A.

    1997-01-01

    Alu insertion polymorphisms (polymorphisms consisting of the presence/absence of an Alu element at a particular chromosomal location) offer several advantages over other nuclear DNA polymorphisms for human evolution studies. First, they are typed by rapid, simple, PCR-based assays; second, they are stable polymorphisms—newly inserted Alu elements rarely undergo deletion; third, the presence of an Alu element represents identity by descent—the probability that different Alu elements would independently insert into the exact same chromosomal location is negligible; and fourth, the ancestral state is known with certainty to be the absence of an Alu element. We report here a study of 8 loci in 1500 individuals from 34 worldwide populations. African populations exhibit the most between-population differentiation, and the population tree is rooted in Africa; moreover, the estimated effective time of separation of African versus non-African populations is 137,000 ± 15,000 years ago, in accordance with other genetic data. However, a principal coordinates analysis indicates that populations from Sahul (Australia and New Guinea) are nearly as close to the hypothetical ancestor as are African populations, suggesting that there was an early expansion of tropical populations of our species. An analysis of heterozygosity versus genetic distance suggests that African populations have had a larger effective population size than non-African populations. Overall, these results support the African origin of modern humans in that an earlier expansion of the ancestors of African populations is indicated. PMID:9371742

  2. Crystal structure of a signal recognition particle Alu domain in the elongation arrest conformation.

    PubMed

    Bousset, Luc; Mary, Camille; Brooks, Mark A; Scherrer, Anne; Strub, Katharina; Cusack, Stephen

    2014-12-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a conserved ribonucleoprotein particle that targets membrane and secreted proteins to translocation channels in membranes. In eukaryotes, the Alu domain, which comprises the 5' and 3' extremities of the SRP RNA bound to the SRP9/14 heterodimer, is thought to interact with the ribosome to pause translation elongation during membrane docking. We present the 3.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a chimeric Alu domain, comprising Alu RNA from the archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii bound to the human Alu binding proteins SRP9/14. The structure reveals how intricate tertiary interactions stabilize the RNA 5' domain structure and how an extra, archaeal-specific, terminal stem helps constrain the Alu RNA into the active closed conformation. In this conformation, highly conserved noncanonical base pairs allow unusually tight side-by-side packing of 5' and 3' RNA stems within the SRP9/14 RNA binding surface. The biological relevance of this structure is confirmed by showing that a reconstituted full-length chimeric archaeal-human SRP is competent to elicit elongation arrest in vitro. The structure will be useful in refining our understanding of how the SRP Alu domain interacts with the ribosome.

  3. Increasing the reliability of the shutdown of 500 - 750-kV overhead lines equipped with shunt reactors in an unsuccessful three-phase automatic repeated closure cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Kuz'micheva, K. I.; Merzlyakov, A. S.; Fokin, G. G.

    2013-05-15

    The reasons for circuit-breaker failures during repeated disconnection of 500 - 750 kV overhead lines with shunt reactors in a cycle of unsuccessful three-phase automatic reconnection (TARC) are analyzed. Recommendations are made for increasing the operating reliability of power transmission lines with shunt reactors when there is unsuccessful reconnection.

  4. Social Stories: Mechanisms of Effectiveness in Increasing Game Play Skills in Children Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder Using a Pretest Posttest Repeated Measures Randomized Control Group Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quirmbach, Linda M.; Lincoln, Alan J.; Feinberg-Gizzo, Monica J.; Ingersoll, Brooke R.; Andrews, Siri M.

    2009-01-01

    An increasing body of literature has indicated that social stories are an effective way to teach individuals diagnosed with autism appropriate social behavior. This study compared two formats of a social story targeting the improvement of social skills during game play using a pretest posttest repeated measures randomized control group design. A…

  5. General strategies to increase the repeatability in non-target screening by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bader, Tobias; Schulz, Wolfgang; Kümmerer, Klaus; Winzenbacher, Rudi

    2016-09-01

    This article focuses on the data evaluation of non-target high-resolution LC-MS profiles of water samples. Taking into account multiple technical replicates, the difficulties in peak recognition and the related problems of false positive and false negative findings are systematically demonstrated. On the basis of a combinatorial approach, different models involving sophisticated workflows are evaluated, particularly with regard to the repeatability. In addition, the improvement resulting from data processing was systematically taken into consideration where the recovery of spiked standards emphasized that real peaks of interest were barely or not removed by the derived filter criteria. The comprehensive evaluation included different matrix types spiked with up to 263 analytical standards which were analyzed repeatedly leading to a total number of more than 250 injections that were incorporated in the assessment of different models of data processing. It was found that the analysis of multiple replicates is the key factor as, on the one hand, it provides the option of integrating valuable filters in order to minimize the false positive rate and, on the other hand, allows correcting partially false negative findings occurring during the peak recognition. The developed processing strategies including replicates clearly point to an enhanced data quality since both the repeatability as well as the peak recognition could be considerably improved. As proof of concept, four different matrix types, including a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, were spiked with 130 isotopically labeled standards at different concentration levels. Despite the stringent filter criteria, at 100 ng L(-1) recovery rates of up to 93% were reached in the positive ionization mode. The proposed model, comprising three technical replicates, filters less than 5% and 2% of the standards recognized at 100 and 500 ng L(-1), respectively and thus indicates the general applicability of the

  6. General strategies to increase the repeatability in non-target screening by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bader, Tobias; Schulz, Wolfgang; Kümmerer, Klaus; Winzenbacher, Rudi

    2016-09-01

    This article focuses on the data evaluation of non-target high-resolution LC-MS profiles of water samples. Taking into account multiple technical replicates, the difficulties in peak recognition and the related problems of false positive and false negative findings are systematically demonstrated. On the basis of a combinatorial approach, different models involving sophisticated workflows are evaluated, particularly with regard to the repeatability. In addition, the improvement resulting from data processing was systematically taken into consideration where the recovery of spiked standards emphasized that real peaks of interest were barely or not removed by the derived filter criteria. The comprehensive evaluation included different matrix types spiked with up to 263 analytical standards which were analyzed repeatedly leading to a total number of more than 250 injections that were incorporated in the assessment of different models of data processing. It was found that the analysis of multiple replicates is the key factor as, on the one hand, it provides the option of integrating valuable filters in order to minimize the false positive rate and, on the other hand, allows correcting partially false negative findings occurring during the peak recognition. The developed processing strategies including replicates clearly point to an enhanced data quality since both the repeatability as well as the peak recognition could be considerably improved. As proof of concept, four different matrix types, including a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, were spiked with 130 isotopically labeled standards at different concentration levels. Despite the stringent filter criteria, at 100 ng L(-1) recovery rates of up to 93% were reached in the positive ionization mode. The proposed model, comprising three technical replicates, filters less than 5% and 2% of the standards recognized at 100 and 500 ng L(-1), respectively and thus indicates the general applicability of the

  7. Polymorphic Alu insertions and genetic diversity among African populations.

    PubMed

    Terreros, Maria C; Martinez, Laisel; Herrera, Rene J

    2005-10-01

    Thorough assessment of modern genetic diversity and interpopulation affinities within the African continent is essential for understanding the processes that have been at work during the course of worldwide human evolution. Regardless of whether autosomal, Y-chromosome, or mtDNA markers are used, allele- or haplotype-frequency data from African populations are necessary in setting the framework for the construction of global population phylogenies. In the present study we analyze genetic differentiation and population structure in a data set of nine African populations using 12 polymorphic Alu insertions (PAls). Furthermore, to place our findings within a global context, we also examined an equal number of non-African groups. Frequency data from 456 individuals presented for the first time in this work plus additional data obtained from the literature indicate an overall pattern of higher intrapopulation diversity in sub-Saharan populations than in northern Africa, a prominent differentiation between these two locations, an appreciably high degree of transcontinental admixture in Egypt, and significant discontinuity between Morocco and the Iberian peninsula. Moreover, the topologies of our phylogenetic analyses suggest that out of the studied sub-Saharan groups, the southern Bantu population of Sotho/ Tswana presents the highest level of antiquity, perhaps as a result of ancestral or acquired Khoisan genetic signals. Close affinities of eastern sub-Saharan populations with Egypt in the phylogenetic trees may indicate the existence of gene flow along the Nile River.

  8. Influences of increased daily repeated upstream releases and varying meteorological conditions on temperature distributions in a river-reservoir system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Fang, X.

    2016-08-01

    Temperature distribution in a river-reservoir system was simulated using a calibrated three-dimensional Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code model under various hypothetical weather conditions and daily repeated large releases (DRLRs) from the upstream boundary. Both DRLRs and weather conditions affect and control the formation and spread of density currents and then affect the bottom-layer temperatures. The DRLRs with longer durations (e.g., 6 or 8 hours) can relatively quickly push cooler release water to the Gorgas upstream monitoring station (GOUS) and the river intake. With the air temperature drops in the first 6 days, simulated bottom temperatures at GOUS for 6- and 8-hr DRLRs are lower than one under 4-hr DRLR, but relatively larger bottom-layer temperature drops only primarily occur during the air-temperature drop and rise period. The release with larger flow rate can also maintain the cooler water temperature downstream. Releasing the same amounts of water, with different release durations and flow rates, has a very similar effect on the downstream water temperatures.

  9. Transfer of genetic therapy across human populations: molecular targets for increasing patient coverage in repeat expansion diseases.

    PubMed

    Varela, Miguel A; Curtis, Helen J; Douglas, Andrew G L; Hammond, Suzan M; O'Loughlin, Aisling J; Sobrido, Maria J; Scholefield, Janine; Wood, Matthew J A

    2016-02-01

    Allele-specific gene therapy aims to silence expression of mutant alleles through targeting of disease-linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, SNP linkage to disease varies between populations, making such molecular therapies applicable only to a subset of patients. Moreover, not all SNPs have the molecular features necessary for potent gene silencing. Here we provide knowledge to allow the maximisation of patient coverage by building a comprehensive understanding of SNPs ranked according to their predicted suitability toward allele-specific silencing in 14 repeat expansion diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, myotonic dystrophy 1, myotonic dystrophy 2, Huntington's disease and several spinocerebellar ataxias. Our systematic analysis of DNA sequence variation shows that most annotated SNPs are not suitable for potent allele-specific silencing across populations because of suboptimal sequence features and low variability (>97% in HD). We suggest maximising patient coverage by selecting SNPs with high heterozygosity across populations, and preferentially targeting SNPs that lead to purine:purine mismatches in wild-type alleles to obtain potent allele-specific silencing. We therefore provide fundamental knowledge on strategies for optimising patient coverage of therapeutics for microsatellite expansion disorders by linking analysis of population genetic variation to the selection of molecular targets.

  10. Repeated methylphenidate administration during lactation reduces maternal behavior, induces maternal tolerance, and increases anxiety-like behavior in pups in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Ponchio, R A; Teodorov, E; Kirsten, T B; Coelho, C P; Oshiro, A; Florio, J C; Bernardi, M M

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a dopamine uptake inhibitor and the most commonly prescribed drug for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children. Several studies have shown that such stimulants as cocaine and amphetamine that are administered during gestation and lactation may disrupt maternal behavior. Also, MPD is used in lactation. Repeated MPD administration can induce either sensitization or tolerance. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether repeated MPD administration alters maternal behavior and promotes tolerance or sensitization in these females. The effects in adult offspring were also examined in models of anxiety. Methylphenidate (5mg/kg) was administered from lactation day 2 to 4, and maternal pup retrieval behavior was assessed. This treatment was continued until lactation day 7. At weaning, the dams received a challenge dose of MPD, and general activity was evaluated in the open field. Striatal monoamine and metabolite levels were also measured to determine whether this treatment promotes behavioral or biochemical plasticity. The long-term behavioral effects of MPD exposure were evaluated in pups in adulthood. The results showed an increase in the latency to retrieve the first, second, and third pups and a decrease in the number of dams that retrieved all pups. After a challenge dose of MPD, the dams exhibited a decrease in locomotion frequency, an increase in immobility duration in the open field, and a decrease in striatal serotonin levels. In pups, anxiety-like behavior increased in the light/dark box test. These results indicate that repeated MPD administration during early lactation impairs maternal behavior, likely by decreasing maternal motivation. Repeated MPD administration induced maternal tolerance at weaning after a challenge dose of MPD, suggesting the development of central nervous system plasticity. In pups, maternal exposure to MPD during early lactation induced long-term effects and increased

  11. Repeated methylphenidate administration during lactation reduces maternal behavior, induces maternal tolerance, and increases anxiety-like behavior in pups in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Ponchio, R A; Teodorov, E; Kirsten, T B; Coelho, C P; Oshiro, A; Florio, J C; Bernardi, M M

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a dopamine uptake inhibitor and the most commonly prescribed drug for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children. Several studies have shown that such stimulants as cocaine and amphetamine that are administered during gestation and lactation may disrupt maternal behavior. Also, MPD is used in lactation. Repeated MPD administration can induce either sensitization or tolerance. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether repeated MPD administration alters maternal behavior and promotes tolerance or sensitization in these females. The effects in adult offspring were also examined in models of anxiety. Methylphenidate (5mg/kg) was administered from lactation day 2 to 4, and maternal pup retrieval behavior was assessed. This treatment was continued until lactation day 7. At weaning, the dams received a challenge dose of MPD, and general activity was evaluated in the open field. Striatal monoamine and metabolite levels were also measured to determine whether this treatment promotes behavioral or biochemical plasticity. The long-term behavioral effects of MPD exposure were evaluated in pups in adulthood. The results showed an increase in the latency to retrieve the first, second, and third pups and a decrease in the number of dams that retrieved all pups. After a challenge dose of MPD, the dams exhibited a decrease in locomotion frequency, an increase in immobility duration in the open field, and a decrease in striatal serotonin levels. In pups, anxiety-like behavior increased in the light/dark box test. These results indicate that repeated MPD administration during early lactation impairs maternal behavior, likely by decreasing maternal motivation. Repeated MPD administration induced maternal tolerance at weaning after a challenge dose of MPD, suggesting the development of central nervous system plasticity. In pups, maternal exposure to MPD during early lactation induced long-term effects and increased

  12. A novel composite retrotransposon derived from or generated independently of the SVA (SINE/VNTR/Alu) transposon has undergone proliferation in gibbon genomes.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toru; Hirai, Yuriko; Baicharoen, Sudarath; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hirai, Hirohisa; Koga, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    The superfamily Hominoidea (hominoids) comprises two families: Hominidae (hominids) and Hylobatidae (gibbons, also called small apes). The SVA transposon is a composite retrotransposon that occurs widely in hominoids and is considered to have been generated by stepwise fusions of three genetic elements: SINE-R, a variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) sequence, and Alu. We identified a novel transposon whose basic structure is the same as that of SVA, with one prominent difference being the presence of part of prostaglandin reductase 2 (PTGR2) in place of SINE-R. We designate this composite transposon as PVA and propose two possible mechanisms regarding its generation. One is the derivation of PVA from SVA: the SINE-R region of SVA was replaced with a PTGR2 fragment by template switching. The other is the formation of PVA independently of SVA: a PTGR2 fragment was fused to an evolutionary intermediate comprising the VNTR and Alu regions. The nucleotide sequence of the junction between the VNTR and PTGR2 regions supports the second hypothesis. We identified PVA in the white-cheeked gibbon Nomascus leucogenys by analysis of genome sequence databases, and subsequent experimental analysis revealed its presence in all four gibbon genera. The white-cheeked gibbon harbors at least 93 PVA copies in its haploid genome. Another SVA-like composite transposon carrying parts of the LINE1 and Alu transposons in place of SINE-R, designated as LAVA, has recently been reported. The significance of the discovery of PVA is that its substituted fragment originates not from a transposon but from a single-copy gene. PVA should provide additional insights into the transposition mechanism of this type of composite transposon; the transposition activity is conferred even if the substituted fragment is not related to a transposon.

  13. Alu retrotransposons promote differentiation of human carcinoma cells through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Hernández, Antonio; González-Rico, Francisco J.; Román, Angel C.; Rico-Leo, Eva; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Sánchez, Laura; Macia, Ángela; Heras, Sara R.; García-Pérez, José L.; Merino, Jaime M.; Fernández-Salguero, Pedro M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell differentiation is a central process in development and in cancer growth and dissemination. OCT4 (POU5F1) and NANOG are essential for cell stemness and pluripotency; yet, the mechanisms that regulate their expression remain largely unknown. Repetitive elements account for almost half of the Human Genome; still, their role in gene regulation is poorly understood. Here, we show that the dioxin receptor (AHR) leads to differentiation of human carcinoma cells through the transcriptional upregulation of Alu retrotransposons, whose RNA transcripts can repress pluripotency genes. Despite the genome-wide presence of Alu elements, we provide evidences that those located at the NANOG and OCT4 promoters bind AHR, are transcribed by RNA polymerase-III and repress NANOG and OCT4 in differentiated cells. OCT4 and NANOG repression likely involves processing of Alu-derived transcripts through the miRNA machinery involving the Microprocessor and RISC. Consistently, stable AHR knockdown led to basal undifferentiation, impaired Alus transcription and blockade of OCT4 and NANOG repression. We suggest that transcripts produced from AHR-regulated Alu retrotransposons may control the expression of stemness genes OCT4 and NANOG during differentiation of carcinoma cells. The control of discrete Alu elements by specific transcription factors may have a dynamic role in genome regulation under physiological and diseased conditions. PMID:26883630

  14. Retrotransposition and Crystal Structure of an Alu RNP in the Ribosome-Stalling Conformation.

    PubMed

    Ahl, Valentina; Keller, Heiko; Schmidt, Steffen; Weichenrieder, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    The Alu element is the most successful human genomic parasite affecting development and causing disease. It originated as a retrotransposon during early primate evolution of the gene encoding the signal recognition particle (SRP) RNA. We defined a minimal Alu RNA sufficient for effective retrotransposition and determined a high-resolution structure of its complex with the SRP9/14 proteins. The RNA adopts a compact, closed conformation that matches the envelope of the SRP Alu domain in the ribosomal translation elongation factor-binding site. Conserved structural elements in SRP RNAs support an ancient function of the closed conformation that predates SRP9/14. Structure-based mutagenesis shows that retrotransposition requires the closed conformation of the Alu ribonucleoprotein particle and is consistent with the recognition of stalled ribosomes. We propose that ribosome stalling is a common cause for the cis-preference of the mammalian L1 retrotransposon and for the efficiency of the Alu RNA in hijacking nascent L1 reverse transcriptase. PMID:26585389

  15. Methylation Status of Alu and LINE-1 Interspersed Repetitive Sequences in Behcet's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Şahru; Kucukazman, Selma Ozbek; Karataş, Gülten Sungur; Ozturk, Mehmet Akif; Prombhul, Sasiprapa; Hirankarn, Nattiya

    2016-01-01

    Behcet's Disease (BD) is a multisystem chronic inflammatory disease. The pathology is believed to involve both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Hypomethylation leading to activation of interspersed repetitive sequences (IRSs) such as LINE-1 and Alu contributes to the pathologies of autoimmune diseases and cancer. Herein, the epigenetic changes of IRSs in BD were evaluated using combined bisulfite restriction analysis-interspersed repetitive sequences (COBRA-IRS). DNA from neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of BD patients with ocular involvement that were in active or inactive states and healthy controls were used to analyze LINE-1 and Alu methylation levels. For Alu sequences, significant differences were observed in the frequency of uCuC alleles between PBMCs of patients and controls (p = 0.03), and between inactive patients and controls (p = 0.03). For neutrophils, the frequency of uCuC was significantly higher between patients and controls (p = 0.006) and between inactive patients and controls (p = 0.002). The partial methylation (uCmC + mCuC) frequencies of Alu between inactive patients and control samples also differed (p = 0.02). No statistically significant differences for LINE-1 were detected. Thus, changes in the methylation level of IRS elements might contribute to the pathogenesis of BD. The role of Alu transcripts in BD should be investigated further. PMID:27123441

  16. Repeated administration of aripiprazole produces a sensitization effect in the suppression of avoidance responding and phencyclidine-induced hyperlocomotion and increases D2 receptor-mediated behavioral function.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Qin, Rongyin; Li, Ming

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated how repeated administration of aripiprazole (a novel antipsychotic drug) alters its behavioral effects in two behavioral tests of antipsychotic activity and whether this alteration is correlated with an increase in dopamine D2 receptor function. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were first repeatedly tested with aripiprazole (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg, subcutaneously (sc)) or vehicle in a conditioned avoidance response (CAR) test or a phencyclidine (PCP) (3.20 mg/kg, sc)-induced hyperlocomotion test daily for five consecutive days. After 2-3 days of drug-free retraining or resting, all rats were then challenged with aripiprazole (1.5 or 3.0 mg/kg, sc). Repeated administration of aripiprazole progressively increased its inhibition of avoidance responding and PCP-induced hyperlocomotion. More importantly, rats previously treated with aripiprazole showed significantly lower avoidance response and lower PCP-induced hyperlocomotion than those previously treated with vehicle in the challenge tests. An increased sensitivity to quinpirole (a selective D2/3 agonist) in prior aripiprazole-treated rats was also found in the quinpirole-induced hyperlocomotion test, suggesting an enhanced D2/3-mediated function. These findings suggest that aripiprazole, despite its distinct receptor mechanisms of action, induces a sensitization effect similar to those induced by other antipsychotic drugs and this effect may be partially mediated by brain plasticity involving D2/3 receptor systems.

  17. Increased Sushi repeat-containing protein X-linked 2 is associated with progression of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, K L; Wu, J; Zhou, Y; Fan, J H

    2015-04-01

    Sushi repeat-containing protein X-linked 2 (SRPX2) is a novel chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancer. Its role in tumor biology remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of SRPX2 in colorectal cancer and its potential association with cancer progression. The expression of SRPX2 and its clinicopathological significance was evaluated using immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray including 88 colon cancer and pairing normal tissues. The impact of SRPX2 on behavior of colorectal cancer cells and possible mechanism was explored using gene transfection and silencing. Strong staining of SRPX2 was noted in 71 (80.7 %) of 88 colon cancer specimen and 30 (34.1 %) of 88 adjacent normal tissues (P < 0.001). The expression of SRPX2 was significantly correlated with histological differentiation grade (P = 0.003), infiltration depth (P = 0.003), and clinical stage (P = 0.006). The expression of SRPX2 was significantly higher in HCT116 than in HT29 and SW480 cells. Suppression of endogenous SRPX2 expression by small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) in HCT116 cells resulted in significant reduction in the ability of cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion. Up-regulation of endogenous SRPX2 in SW480 cells significantly promoted the migration and invasion of SW480 cells. In addition, inhibition of SRPX2 by siRNA led to notable down-regulation of β-catenin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. These findings indicate that overexpressed SRPX2 exerts an oncogenic role in colorectal cancer. SRPX2 may promote the invasion of colorectal cancer through MMP-2 and MMP-9 modulated by Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  18. R Region Sequences in the Long Terminal Repeat of a Murine Retrovirus Specifically Increase Expression of Unspliced RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Trubetskoy, Alla M.; Okenquist, Sharon A.; Lenz, Jack

    1999-01-01

    A stem-loop structure at the 5′ end of the R region of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the murine leukemia virus SL3 and other type C mammalian retroviruses is important for maximum levels of expression of a reporter gene under the control of the viral LTR. This element, termed the R region stem-loop (RSL), has a small effect on transcriptional initiation and no effect on RNA polymerase processivity. Its major effect is on posttranscriptional processing of LTR-driven transcripts. Here we tested whether the RSL affected the production of RNAs from a full-length SL3 genome. Mutation of the RSL in the 5′ LTR of SL3 reduced the cytoplasmic levels of full-length viral transcripts but not those of spliced, env mRNA transcripts. Thus, the RSL specifically affected the cytoplasmic levels of the unspliced viral RNA. To test further whether the effect was specific for unspliced transcripts, a system was devised in which the expression of a reporter gene under the control of the viral LTR was tested in the presence or absence of an intron. Mutation of the RSL resulted in only about a twofold decline in the level of reporter gene expression when the transcripts contained an intron. However, when the intron was removed, mutation of the RSL reduced expression of the reporter gene about 10- to 60-fold in various cell lines. The secondary structure of the RSL was essential for its activity on the intronless transcript. Thus, the RSL appears to be important for the cytoplasmic accumulation of unspliced viral RNA and unspliced RNA from chimeric transcription units under the control of the viral LTR. PMID:10074206

  19. R region sequences in the long terminal repeat of a murine retrovirus specifically increase expression of unspliced RNAs.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, A M; Okenquist, S A; Lenz, J

    1999-04-01

    A stem-loop structure at the 5' end of the R region of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the murine leukemia virus SL3 and other type C mammalian retroviruses is important for maximum levels of expression of a reporter gene under the control of the viral LTR. This element, termed the R region stem-loop (RSL), has a small effect on transcriptional initiation and no effect on RNA polymerase processivity. Its major effect is on posttranscriptional processing of LTR-driven transcripts. Here we tested whether the RSL affected the production of RNAs from a full-length SL3 genome. Mutation of the RSL in the 5' LTR of SL3 reduced the cytoplasmic levels of full-length viral transcripts but not those of spliced, env mRNA transcripts. Thus, the RSL specifically affected the cytoplasmic levels of the unspliced viral RNA. To test further whether the effect was specific for unspliced transcripts, a system was devised in which the expression of a reporter gene under the control of the viral LTR was tested in the presence or absence of an intron. Mutation of the RSL resulted in only about a twofold decline in the level of reporter gene expression when the transcripts contained an intron. However, when the intron was removed, mutation of the RSL reduced expression of the reporter gene about 10- to 60-fold in various cell lines. The secondary structure of the RSL was essential for its activity on the intronless transcript. Thus, the RSL appears to be important for the cytoplasmic accumulation of unspliced viral RNA and unspliced RNA from chimeric transcription units under the control of the viral LTR.

  20. Increased Sushi repeat-containing protein X-linked 2 is associated with progression of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, K L; Wu, J; Zhou, Y; Fan, J H

    2015-04-01

    Sushi repeat-containing protein X-linked 2 (SRPX2) is a novel chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancer. Its role in tumor biology remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of SRPX2 in colorectal cancer and its potential association with cancer progression. The expression of SRPX2 and its clinicopathological significance was evaluated using immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray including 88 colon cancer and pairing normal tissues. The impact of SRPX2 on behavior of colorectal cancer cells and possible mechanism was explored using gene transfection and silencing. Strong staining of SRPX2 was noted in 71 (80.7 %) of 88 colon cancer specimen and 30 (34.1 %) of 88 adjacent normal tissues (P < 0.001). The expression of SRPX2 was significantly correlated with histological differentiation grade (P = 0.003), infiltration depth (P = 0.003), and clinical stage (P = 0.006). The expression of SRPX2 was significantly higher in HCT116 than in HT29 and SW480 cells. Suppression of endogenous SRPX2 expression by small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) in HCT116 cells resulted in significant reduction in the ability of cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion. Up-regulation of endogenous SRPX2 in SW480 cells significantly promoted the migration and invasion of SW480 cells. In addition, inhibition of SRPX2 by siRNA led to notable down-regulation of β-catenin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. These findings indicate that overexpressed SRPX2 exerts an oncogenic role in colorectal cancer. SRPX2 may promote the invasion of colorectal cancer through MMP-2 and MMP-9 modulated by Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:25737434

  1. Polymorphic Alu insertions in six Brazilian African-derived populations.

    PubMed

    Cotrim, Nelson Henderson; Auricchio, Maria Teresa B M; Vicente, João Pedro; Otto, Paulo A; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia

    2004-01-01

    At least 25 African-derived populations (quilombo remnants) are believed to exist in the Ribeira River Valley, located in the southern part of São Paulo State, Brazil. We studied four Alu polymorphic loci (APO, ACE, TPA25, and FXIIIB) in individuals belonging to six quilombo remnants in addition to individuals sampled from the city of São Paulo. The allelic frequencies observed in the quilombo remnants were similar to those previously observed in African-derived populations from Central and North America. Genetic variability indexes (Fst and Gst values) in our quilombos were higher than the reported values for the majority of other populations analyzed for the same kind of markers, but lower than the variability usually observed in Amerindian groups. The observed high degree of genetic differentiation may be due to genetic drift, especially the founder effect. Our results suggest that these populations behave genetically as semi-isolates. The degree of genetic variability within populations was larger than among them, a finding described in other studies. In the neighbor-joining tree, some of the Brazilian quilombos clustered with the African and African-derived populations (São Pedro and Galvão), others with the Europeans (Pilões, Maria Rosa, and Abobral). Pedro Cubas was placed in an isolated branch. Principal component analysis was also performed and confirmed the trends observed in the neighbor-joining tree. Overall, the quilombos showed a higher degree of gene flow than average when compared to other worldwide populations, but similar to other African-derived populations.

  2. The specificity of stimulus-specific adaptation in human auditory cortex increases with repeated exposure to the adapting stimulus.

    PubMed

    Briley, Paul M; Krumbholz, Katrin

    2013-12-01

    The neural response to a sensory stimulus tends to be more strongly reduced when the stimulus is preceded by the same, rather than a different, stimulus. This stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA) is ubiquitous across the senses. In hearing, SSA has been suggested to play a role in change detection as indexed by the mismatch negativity. This study sought to test whether SSA, measured in human auditory cortex, is caused by neural fatigue (reduction in neural responsiveness) or by sharpening of neural tuning to the adapting stimulus. For that, we measured event-related cortical potentials to pairs of pure tones with varying frequency separation and stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA). This enabled us to examine the relationship between the degree of specificity of adaptation as a function of frequency separation and the rate of decay of adaptation with increasing SOA. Using simulations of tonotopic neuron populations, we demonstrate that the fatigue model predicts independence of adaptation specificity and decay rate, whereas the sharpening model predicts interdependence. The data showed independence and thus supported the fatigue model. In a second experiment, we measured adaptation specificity after multiple presentations of the adapting stimulus. The multiple adapters produced more adaptation overall, but the effect was more specific to the adapting frequency. Within the context of the fatigue model, the observed increase in adaptation specificity could be explained by assuming a 2.5-fold increase in neural frequency selectivity. We discuss possible bottom-up and top-down mechanisms of this effect.

  3. Lithium chloride administration prevents spatial learning and memory impairment in repeated cerebral ischemia-reperfusion mice by depressing apoptosis and increasing BDNF expression in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mingyue; Jin, Wei; Zhao, Haifeng; Xiao, Yining; Jia, Yanqiu; Yin, Yu; Jiang, Xin; Xu, Jing; Meng, Nan; Lv, Peiyuan

    2015-09-15

    Lithium has been reported to have neuroprotective effects, but the preventive and treated role on cognition impairment and the underlying mechanisms have not been determined. In the present study, C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to repeated bilateral common carotid artery occlusion to induce the learning and memory deficits. 2 mmol/kg or 5 mmol/kg of lithium chloride (LiCl) was injected intraperitoneally per day before (for 7 days) or post (for 28 days) the operation. This repeated cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (IR) induced dynamic overexpression of ratio of Bcl-2/Bax and BDNF in hippocampus of mice. LiCl pretreatment and treatment significantly decreased the escape latency and increased the percentage of time that the mice spent in the target quadrant in Morris water maze. 2 mmol/kg LiCl evidently reversed the morphologic changes, up-regulated the survival neuron count and increased the BDNF gene and protein expression. 5 mmol/kg pre-LiCl significantly increased IR-stimulated reduce of Bcl-2/Bax and p-CREB/CREB. These results described suggest that pre-Li and Li treatment may induce a pronounced prevention on cognitive impairment. These effects may relay on the inhibition of apoptosis and increasing BDNF and p-CREB expression.

  4. Repeat Sequences and Base Correlations in Human Y Chromosome Palindromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Neng-zhi; Liu, Zi-xian; Qi, Yan-jiao; Qiu, Wen-yuan

    2009-06-01

    On the basis of information theory and statistical methods, we use mutual information, n-tuple entropy and conditional entropy, combined with biological characteristics, to analyze the long range correlation and short range correlation in human Y chromosome palindromes. The magnitude distribution of the long range correlation which can be reflected by the mutual information is P5>P5a>P5b (P5a and P5b are the sequences that replace solely Alu repeats and all interspersed repeats with random uncorrelated sequences in human Y chromosome palindrome 5, respectively); and the magnitude distribution of the short range correlation which can be reflected by the n-tuple entropy and the conditional entropy is P5>P5a>P5b>random uncorrelated sequence. In other words, when the Alu repeats and all interspersed repeats replace with random uncorrelated sequence, the long range and short range correlation decrease gradually. However, the random uncorrelated sequence has no correlation. This research indicates that more repeat sequences result in stronger correlation between bases in human Y chromosome. The analyses may be helpful to understand the special structures of human Y chromosome palindromes profoundly.

  5. Increases in schistosome-specific IgE and CD23+ B cells in a cohort of Kenyan children undergoing repeated treatment and reinfection with Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Black, Carla L.; Muok, Erick M. O.; Mwinzi, Pauline M. N.; Carter, Jennifer M.; Karanja, Diana M. S.; Secor, W. Evan; Colley, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Age prevalence curves from areas endemic for schistosomiasis suggest that humans develop partial immunity to reinfection beginning in early adolescence. We conducted a 2-year longitudinal study to determine if children infected with S. mansoni develop protection-related immune responses upon treatment with PZQ and if the development of these immune responses is accelerated by frequent treatment upon reinfection. Methods 8-10 year old children were tested for S. mansoni every four months and treated with praziquantel (PZQ) when positive (Arm A, N=68) or tested and treated at the end of the 2-year follow-up (Arm B, N=49). Results Children in Arm A who remained free of infection during follow-up had significantly higher baseline levels of schistosome-specific IgE than children with ≥2 repeat S. mansoni diagnoses. Children with ≥2 repeat S. mansoni diagnoses significantly increased their levels of anti-schistosome IgE and CD23+ B cells after receiving ≥3 PZQ treatments over the course of follow-up. No increase in either parameter was seen in children who received only the baseline PZQ treatment. Conclusions B cell activation and anti-schistosomal IgE are associated with resistance to S. mansoni in children, and these immunological parameters can be increased by multiple rounds of infections and PZQ-induced cures. PMID:20560767

  6. Repeated exposure to corticosterone increases depression-like behavior in two different versions of the forced swim test without altering nonspecific locomotor activity or muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Marks, Wendie; Fournier, Neil M; Kalynchuk, Lisa E

    2009-08-01

    We have recently shown that repeated high dose injections of corticosterone (CORT) reliably increase depression-like behavior on a modified one-day version of the forced swim test. The main purpose of this experiment was to compare the effect of these CORT injections on our one-day version of the forced swim test and the more traditional two-day version of the test. A second purpose was to determine whether altered behavior in the forced swim test could be due to nonspecific changes in locomotor activity or muscle strength. Separate groups of rats received a high dose CORT injection (40 mg/kg) or a vehicle injection once per day for 21 consecutive days. Then, half the rats from each group were exposed to the traditional two-day forced swim test and the other half were exposed to our one-day forced swim test. After the forced swim testing, all the rats were tested in an open field and in a wire suspension grip strength test. The CORT injections significantly increased the time spent immobile and decreased the time spent swimming in both versions of the forced swim test. However, they had no significant effect on activity in the open field or grip strength in the wire suspension test. These results show that repeated CORT injections increase depression-like behavior regardless of the specific parameters of forced swim testing, and that these effects are independent of changes in locomotor activity or muscle strength.

  7. Agar-agar entrapment increases the stability of endo-β-1,4-xylanase for repeated biodegradation of xylan.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Zainab; Shahid, Faiza; Ul Qader, Shah Ali; Aman, Afsheen

    2015-04-01

    Microbial xylanases, specially endo-β-1,4-xylanase catalyzes the hydrolysis of xylan, is considered one of the most significant hydrolases. It has numerous applications but most extensively is utilized in paper and pulp industry as a bio-bleaching agent. Immobilization technique is comprehensively studied with the expectation of modifying and improving enzyme stability and characteristics for commercial purposes. Currently, matrix entrapment technique is applied to immobilize endo-β-1,4-xylanase within agar-agar gel beads produced by Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29. Maximal enzyme immobilization yield was achieved at 2.5% of agar-agar concentration. Optimized conditions demonstrated an increase in the optimal reaction time from 05 min to 30 min and incubation temperature from 50 °C to 60 °C with reference to free enzyme whereas; no effect was observed for optimum pH. Entrapment technique uniquely changed the kinetic parameters of immobilized endo-β-1,4-xylanase (Km: 0.5074 mg min(-1) to 0.5230 mg min(-1) and Vmax: 4773 U min(-1) to 968 U min(-1)) as compared to free enzyme. However, immobilized enzyme displayed broad thermal stability and retained 79.0% of its initial activity at 80 °C up to 30 min whereas; free enzyme completely lost its activity at this temperature. With respect to economic feasibility, the immobilized enzyme showed impressive recycling efficiency up to six reaction cycles. PMID:25603143

  8. Repeated maternal dexamethasone treatments in late gestation increases 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 expression in the hippocampus of the newborn rat.

    PubMed

    Wan, Shunlun; Hao, Rusong; Sun, Kang

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of repeated maternal injections of dexamethasone in late gestation on the expression of newborn hippocampal 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1), the enzyme amplifying glucocorticoids' action by converting biologically inactive 11-ketone metabolites into active glucocorticoids. Daily dexamethasone treatments (0.10 mg/kg body weight) in the last week of gestation were carried out in the pregnant rat. The expression of 11beta-HSD1 in the newborn hippocampal tissue was analyzed with Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The effect of corticosterone on the expression of 11beta-HSD1 was studied in cultured hippocampal neurons derived from newborn offspring received prenatal dexamethasone treatments. Both body and brain weights of the offspring were reduced significantly by repeated dexamethasone treatments in the last week of gestation. Western blot and real-time PCR analysis showed that both 11beta-HSD1 protein and mRNA expressions were increased significantly in the hippocampus of the newborn offspring on the first and seventh days after birth. Corticosterone could induce 11beta-HSD1 expression in cultured hippocampal neurons prepared from newborns received prenatal dexamethasone treatments, which was blocked by glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU38486. The above findings suggest that repeated prenatal dexamethasone treatments at the end of gestation increase 11beta-HSD1 expression in the hippocampal tissue of the offspring, which may trigger a positive feedback pathway for the generation of biologically active glucocorticoids in the hippocampal tissue of the newborns.

  9. Genetic variation among world populations: inferences from 100 Alu insertion polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Watkins, W Scott; Rogers, Alan R; Ostler, Christopher T; Wooding, Steve; Bamshad, Michael J; Brassington, Anna-Marie E; Carroll, Marion L; Nguyen, Son V; Walker, Jerilyn A; Prasad, B V Ravi; Reddy, P Govinda; Das, Pradipta K; Batzer, Mark A; Jorde, Lynn B

    2003-07-01

    We examine the distribution and structure of human genetic diversity for 710 individuals representing 31 populations from Africa, East Asia, Europe, and India using 100 Alu insertion polymorphisms from all 22 autosomes. Alu diversity is highest in Africans (0.349) and lowest in Europeans (0.297). Alu insertion frequency is lowest in Africans (0.463) and higher in Indians (0.544), E. Asians (0.557), and Europeans (0.559). Large genetic distances are observed among African populations and between African and non-African populations. The root of a neighbor-joining network is located closest to the African populations. These findings are consistent with an African origin of modern humans and with a bottleneck effect in the human populations that left Africa to colonize the rest of the world. Genetic distances among all pairs of populations show a significant product-moment correlation with geographic distances (r = 0.69, P < 0.00001). F(ST), the proportion of genetic diversity attributable to population subdivision is 0.141 for Africans/E. Asians/Europeans, 0.047 for E. Asians/Indians/Europeans, and 0.090 for all 31 populations. Resampling analyses show that approximately 50 Alu polymorphisms are sufficient to obtain accurate and reliable genetic distance estimates. These analyses also demonstrate that markers with higher F(ST) values have greater resolving power and produce more consistent genetic distance estimates.

  10. Enrichment analysis of Alu elements with different spatial chromatin proximity in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhuoya; Jin, Ke; Crabbe, M James C; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Xiaolin; Huang, Yanyan; Hua, Mengyi; Nan, Peng; Zhang, Zhaolei; Zhong, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) have no longer been totally considered as "junk DNA" for quite a time since the continual discoveries of their multifunctional roles in eukaryote genomes. As one of the most important and abundant TEs that still active in human genome, Alu, a SINE family, has demonstrated its indispensable regulatory functions at sequence level, but its spatial roles are still unclear. Technologies based on 3C (chromosome conformation capture) have revealed the mysterious three-dimensional structure of chromatin, and make it possible to study the distal chromatin interaction in the genome. To find the role TE playing in distal regulation in human genome, we compiled the new released Hi-C data, TE annotation, histone marker annotations, and the genome-wide methylation data to operate correlation analysis, and found that the density of Alu elements showed a strong positive correlation with the level of chromatin interactions (hESC: r = 0.9, P < 2.2 × 10(16); IMR90 fibroblasts: r = 0.94, P < 2.2 × 10(16)) and also have a significant positive correlation with some remote functional DNA elements like enhancers and promoters (Enhancer: hESC: r = 0.997, P = 2.3 × 10(-4); IMR90: r = 0.934, P = 2 × 10(-2); Promoter: hESC: r = 0.995, P = 3.8 × 10(-4); IMR90: r = 0.996, P = 3.2 × 10(-4)). Further investigation involving GC content and methylation status showed the GC content of Alu covered sequences shared a similar pattern with that of the overall sequence, suggesting that Alu elements also function as the GC nucleotide and CpG site provider. In all, our results suggest that the Alu elements may act as an alternative parameter to evaluate the Hi-C data, which is confirmed by the correlation analysis of Alu elements and histone markers. Moreover, the GC-rich Alu sequence can bring high GC content and methylation flexibility to the regions with more distal chromatin contact, regulating the transcription of tissue-specific genes. PMID:26861146

  11. Lack of increased signal intensity in the dentate nucleus after repeated administration of a macrocyclic contrast agent in multiple sclerosis: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Eisele, Philipp; Alonso, Angelika; Szabo, Kristina; Ebert, Anne; Ong, Melissa; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Gass, Achim

    2016-09-01

    Recently, several studies reported increased signal intensity (SI) in the dentate nucleus (DN) after repeated application of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), suggesting a deposition of gadolinium in this location. Patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) frequently show increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier as part of the inflammatory process in the brain parenchyma, which theoretically might increase the risk of gadolinium deposition. In this retrospective study, we investigated a possible increasing SI in the DN after repeated administrations of the macrocyclic contrast agent gadoterate meglumine.Forty-one RRMS patients (33 women, mean age 38 years) with at least 6 prior gadolinium-enhanced examinations (single dose gadoterate meglumine) were identified. A total of 279 unenhanced T1-weighted examinations were analyzed.SI ratio differences did not differ between the first and last MRI examination, neither for the DN-to-pons ratio (P = 0.594) nor for the DN-to-cerebellum ratio (P = 0.847). There was no correlation between the mean DN-to-pons, or between the mean DN-to-cerebellum SI ratio and the number of MRI examinations (P = 0.848 and 0.891), disease duration (P = 0.676 and 0.985), and expanded disability status scale (EDSS) (P = 0.639 and 0.945).We found no signal increases in the DN after a minimum of 6 injections of the macrocyclic GBCA gadoterate meglumine in RRMS patients. This warrants further investigations in regard to the true pathophysiologic basis of intracerebral gadolinium deposition. PMID:27684794

  12. Polymorphic CAG repeat length within the androgen receptor gene: identification of a subgroup of patients with increased risk of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Santarosa, Manuela; Bidoli, Ettore; Gallo, Angelo; Steffan, Agostino; Boiocchi, Mauro; Viel, Alessandra

    2002-01-01

    The CAG repeat (CAGn) present in the N-terminal region of the androgen receptor (AR) inversely correlates with AR transactivation activity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether polymorphic variation in the CAGn length is associated with the risk of developing ovarian cancer. Using a case-control study design 121 women with histologically confirmed ovarian cancer and 100 controls (healthy women) were genotyped for AR-CAG length. No marked difference in the mean length of CAGn was observed between ovarian cancer patients and controls. However, when considering patients with positive personal or family history of tumor (PPFHT), the mean lengths of the long allele, the short allele and the average of the 2 alleles were longer than in the controls. Odds ratios (OR) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed after allowance for age. We observed an increase in the risk of ovarian cancer, in terms of OR, in women with CAGn >or=22 (OR=2.17, 95% CI:1.10-4.27). The increase of relative risk was particularly high in women with CAGn >or=22 belonging to the PPFHT group: OR=3.52 (95% CI 1.18-10.47). We also found a statistically significant trend (chi2 trend=4.91; p=0.03) towards an increased risk of ovarian cancer with increasing CAGn length (from or=26). Again, a strong association between increase in CAGn and risk of ovarian cancer was observed in PPFHT patients (chi2 trend=6.38; p=0.01). The results suggest that AR-CAG repeat length could play a role as modifier of the ovarian cancer risk conferred by highly penetrant genes rather than itself conferring a low risk. PMID:11956643

  13. Repetition counts: repeated exposure increases intake of a novel vegetable in UK pre-school children compared to flavour-flavour and flavour-nutrient learning.

    PubMed

    Caton, Samantha J; Ahern, Sara M; Remy, Eloise; Nicklaus, Sophie; Blundell, Pam; Hetherington, Marion M

    2013-06-01

    Children are not consuming sufficient amounts of fruits and vegetables in their habitual diet. Methods derived from associative learning theories could be effective at promoting vegetable intake in pre-school children. The objective of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of different learning strategies in promoting the intake of a novel vegetable. Children aged between 9 and 38 months were recruited from UK nurseries. The children (n 72) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions (repeated exposure, flavour-flavour learning or flavour-nutrient learning). Each child was offered ten exposures to their respective version of a novel vegetable (artichoke). Pre- and post-intervention measures of artichoke purée and carrot purée (control vegetable) intake were taken. At pre-intervention, carrot intake was significantly higher than artichoke intake (P<0·05). Intake of both vegetables increased over time (P<0·001); however, when changes in intake were investigated, artichoke intake increased significantly more than carrot intake (P<0·001). Artichoke intake increased to the same extent in all three conditions, and this effect was persistent up to 5 weeks post-intervention. Five exposures were sufficient to increase intake compared to the first exposure (P<0·001). Repeated exposure to three variants of a novel vegetable was sufficient to increase intake of this vegetable, regardless of the addition of a familiar taste or energy. Repetition is therefore a critical factor for promoting novel vegetable intake in pre-school children. PMID:23110783

  14. Pharmacokinetics of repeated sodium salicylate administration to laying hens: evidence for time dependent increase in drug elimination from plasma and eggs.

    PubMed

    Poźniak, Błażej; Grabowski, Tomasz; Motykiewicz-Pers, Karolina; Bobrek, Kamila; Rak, Lech; Bobusia, Katarzyna; Gaweł, Andrzej; Świtała, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Salicylates were the first non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to be used in any species and are still widely used in humans and livestock. However, the data on their pharmacokinetics in animals is limited, especially after repeated administration. Evidence exist that in chickens (Gallus gallus) salicylate (SA) may induce its own elimination. The aim of this study was to investigate salicylate pharmacokinetics and egg residues during repeated administration of sodium salicylate (SS) to laying hens. Pharmacokinetics of SA was assessed during 14 d oral administration of SS at daily doses of 50 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg body weight to laying hens. On the 1st, 7th and 14th d a 24 h-long pharmacokinetic study was carried out, whereas eggs were collected daily. Salicylate concentrations in plasma and eggs were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and pharmacokinetic variables were calculated using a non-compartmental model. Mean residence time (MRT), minimal plasma concentration (Cmin, C16h) and elimination half-life (T1/2el) of SA showed gradual decrease in layers administered with a lower dose. Total body clearance (ClB) increased. Layers administered with the higher dose showed a decrease only in the T1/2el. In the low dose group, SA was found only in the egg white and was low throughout the experiment. Egg whites from the higher dose group showed initially high SA levels which significantly decreased during the experiment. Yolk SA levels were lower and showed longer periods of accumulation and elimination. Repeated administration of SS induces SA elimination, although this effect may differ depending on the dose and production type of a chicken. Decreased plasma drug concentration may have clinical implications during prolonged SS treatment. PMID:25893240

  15. Alu elements in primates are preferentially lost from areas of high GC content

    PubMed Central

    Brookfield, John FY

    2013-01-01

    The currently-accepted dogma when analysing human Alu transposable elements is that ‘young’ Alu elements are found in low GC regions and ‘old’ Alus in high GC regions. The correlation between high GC regions and high gene frequency regions make this observation particularly difficult to explain. Although a number of studies have tackled the problem, no analysis has definitively explained the reason for this trend. These observations have been made by relying on the subfamily as a proxy for age of an element. In this study, we suggest that this is a misleading assumption and instead analyse the relationship between the taxonomic distribution of an individual element and its surrounding GC environment. An analysis of 103906 Alu elements across 6 human chromosomes was carried out, using the presence of orthologous Alu elements in other primate species as a proxy for age. We show that the previously-reported effect of GC content correlating with subfamily age is not reflected by the ages of the individual elements. Instead, elements are preferentially lost from areas of high GC content over time. The correlation between GC content and subfamily may be due to a change in insertion bias in the young subfamilies. The link between Alu subfamily age and GC region was made due to an over-simplification of the data and is incorrect. We suggest that use of subfamilies as a proxy for age is inappropriate and that the analysis of ortholog presence in other primate species provides a deeper insight into the data. PMID:23717800

  16. LCR-initiated rearrangements at the IDS locus, completed with Alu-mediated recombination or non-homologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Junko; Lee, Jennifer A; Breman, Amy M; Fernandes, Priscilla H; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Ward, Patricia A; Wolfe, Lynne A; Eng, Christine M; Del Gaudio, Daniela

    2011-07-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is caused by mutations in the IDS gene, which encodes the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. In ∼20% of MPS II patients the disorder is caused by gross IDS structural rearrangements. We identified two male cases harboring complex rearrangements involving the IDS gene and the nearby pseudogene, IDSP1, which has been annotated as a low-copy repeat (LCR). In both cases the rearrangement included a partial deletion of IDS and an inverted insertion of the neighboring region. In silico analyses revealed the presence of repetitive elements as well as LCRs at the junctions of rearrangements. Our models illustrate two alternative consequences of rearrangements initiated by non-allelic homologous recombination of LCRs: resolution by a second recombination event (that is, Alu-mediated recombination), or resolution by non-homologous end joining repair. These complex rearrangements have the potential to be recurrent and may be present among those MSP II cases with previously uncharacterized aberrations involving IDS.

  17. Expansion of GA Dinucleotide Repeats Increases the Density of CLAMP Binding Sites on the X-Chromosome to Promote Drosophila Dosage Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Jessica; Siggers, Trevor; Boor, Sonia; Bliss, Jacob; Liu, Wei; Jogl, Gerwald; Rohs, Remo; Singh, Nadia D.; Bulyk, Martha L.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Larschan, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Dosage compensation is an essential process that equalizes transcript levels of X-linked genes between sexes by forming a domain of coordinated gene expression. Throughout the evolution of Diptera, many different X-chromosomes acquired the ability to be dosage compensated. Once each newly evolved X-chromosome is targeted for dosage compensation in XY males, its active genes are upregulated two-fold to equalize gene expression with XX females. In Drosophila melanogaster, the CLAMP zinc finger protein links the dosage compensation complex to the X-chromosome. However, the mechanism for X-chromosome identification has remained unknown. Here, we combine biochemical, genomic and evolutionary approaches to reveal that expansion of GA-dinucleotide repeats likely accumulated on the X-chromosome over evolutionary time to increase the density of CLAMP binding sites, thereby driving the evolution of dosage compensation. Overall, we present new insight into how subtle changes in genomic architecture, such as expansions of a simple sequence repeat, promote the evolution of coordinated gene expression. PMID:27414415

  18. Development and validation of InnoQuant™, a sensitive human DNA quantitation and degradation assessment method for forensic samples using high copy number mobile elements Alu and SVA.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Gina M; Montgomery, Anne H; Thompson, Robyn; Indest, Brooke; Carroll, Marion; Sinha, Sudhir K

    2014-11-01

    There is a constant need in forensic casework laboratories for an improved way to increase the first-pass success rate of forensic samples. The recent advances in mini STR analysis, SNP, and Alu marker systems have now made it possible to analyze highly compromised samples, yet few tools are available that can simultaneously provide an assessment of quantity, inhibition, and degradation in a sample prior to genotyping. Currently there are several different approaches used for fluorescence-based quantification assays which provide a measure of quantity and inhibition. However, a system which can also assess the extent of degradation in a forensic sample will be a useful tool for DNA analysts. Possessing this information prior to genotyping will allow an analyst to more informatively make downstream decisions for the successful typing of a forensic sample without unnecessarily consuming DNA extract. Real-time PCR provides a reliable method for determining the amount and quality of amplifiable DNA in a biological sample. Alu are Short Interspersed Elements (SINE), approximately 300bp insertions which are distributed throughout the human genome in large copy number. The use of an internal primer to amplify a segment of an Alu element allows for human specificity as well as high sensitivity when compared to a single copy target. The advantage of an Alu system is the presence of a large number (>1000) of fixed insertions in every human genome, which minimizes the individual specific variation possible when using a multi-copy target quantification system. This study utilizes two independent retrotransposon genomic targets to obtain quantification of an 80bp "short" DNA fragment and a 207bp "long" DNA fragment in a degraded DNA sample in the multiplex system InnoQuant™. The ratio of the two quantitation values provides a "Degradation Index", or a qualitative measure of a sample's extent of degradation. The Degradation Index was found to be predictive of the observed loss

  19. Repeated stressor exposure enhances contextual fear memory in a beta-adrenergic receptor-dependent process and increases impulsivity in a non-beta receptor-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Camp, Robert M; Johnson, John D

    2015-10-15

    Memory formation is promoted by stress via the release of norepinephrine and stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs). Previous data demonstrate that repeated stressor exposure increases norepinephrine turnover and β-AR signaling within the amygdala, which led to the hypothesis that some stress-induced behavioral changes are likely due to facilitated associative learning. To test this, Fischer rats were exposed to chronic mild stress for four days. On day 5, subjects (including non-stressed controls) were injected with the beta-blocker propranolol or vehicle prior to conditioning in an operant box (animals receive two mild foot shocks) or passive avoidance apparatus (animals received a foot shock upon entry into the dark chamber). Twenty-four hours later, subjects were returned to the operant box for measurement of freezing or returned to the passive avoidance apparatus for measurement of latency to enter the dark chamber. Subjects were also tested in an open field to assess context-independent anxiety-like behavior. Animals exposed to chronic stress showed significantly more freezing behavior in the operant box than did controls, and this exaggerated freezing was blocked by propranolol during the conditioning trial. There was no effect of stress on behavior in the open field. Unexpectedly, retention latency was significantly reduced in subjects exposed to chronic stress. These results indicate that chronic exposure to stress results in complex behavioral changes. While repeated stress appears to enhance the formation of fearful memories, it also results in behavioral responses that resemble impulsive behaviors that result in poor decision-making.

  20. The relation between dopamine oxidation currents in the nucleus accumbens and conditioned increases in motor activity in rats following repeated administration of d-amphetamine or cocaine.

    PubMed

    Di Ciano, P; Blaha, C D; Phillips, A G

    1998-03-01

    Chronoamperometric recording techniques were used to monitor extracellular dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens associated with unconditioned and conditioned increases in motor activity in rats, following the intravenous administration of either d-amphetamine (0.63 mg/kg) or cocaine (3 mg/kg), or the presentation of a conditioned stimulus paired repeatedly with one of these psychostimulants. Each drug was administered daily for 7 days, either in the home cage or an environment in which a compound stimulus (light offset, odour) was presented. Rats in control groups received saline instead of drug in the distinctive test environment. On day 7 of training, significant increases in unconditioned motor activity were observed in the 30 min session following infusions of either d-amphetamine or cocaine. Associated dopamine oxidation currents in the nucleus accumbens increased immediately following administration of either drug and remained significantly elevated above baseline during the entire 30 min recording period. On the test day, presentation of the conditioned stimulus with vehicle infusions, in the distinct environment, was accompanied by an increase in dopamine oxidation currents and a conditioned increase in motor activity, only in the groups in which these stimuli had been paired with d-amphetamine or cocaine. Neither the magnitude or duration of the conditioned motor activity matched the corresponding change in extracellular dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens. Accordingly, it is argued that the increase in dopamine concentration serves as a neurochemical correlate of the unconditioned and conditioned stimuli. The change in motor activity constitutes the unconditioned and conditioned responses that are subserved by the neural systems activated by the initial rise in extracellular dopamine. PMID:9753179

  1. Detection of Alu sequences and mtDNA in comets using padlock probes.

    PubMed

    Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Larsson, Chatarina; Henriksson, Sara; Collins, Andrew; Nilsson, Mats

    2006-07-01

    Single cell gel electrophoresis, or the comet assay, is widely used to measure DNA damage and repair. However, the behaviour of the DNA under the conditions used for the comet assay is not fully understood. In developing a method for studying specific gene sequences within comets, using 'padlock probes' (circularizable oligonucleotide probes), we have first applied probes that hybridize to Alu repetitive elements and to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). During the sequence of stages in the comet assay, mtDNA progressively disperses into the surrounding agarose gel, showing no tendency to remain with nuclear DNA in the comets. In contrast, Alu probes remain associated with both tail and head DNA. PMID:16940044

  2. Polymorphic Alu Insertion/Deletion in Different Caste and Tribal Populations from South India

    PubMed Central

    Chinniah, Rathika; Vijayan, Murali; Thirunavukkarasu, Manikandan; Mani, Dhivakar; Raju, Kamaraj; Ravi, Padma Malini; Sivanadham, Ramgopal; C, Kandeepan; N, Mahalakshmi; Karuppiah, Balakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Seven human-specific Alu markers were studied in 574 unrelated individuals from 10 endogamous groups and 2 hill tribes of Tamil Nadu and Kerala states. DNA was isolated, amplified by PCR-SSP, and subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis, and genotypes were assigned for various Alu loci. Average heterozygosity among caste populations was in the range of 0.292–0.468. Among tribes, the average heterozygosity was higher for Paliyan (0.3759) than for Kani (0.2915). Frequency differences were prominent in all loci studied except Alu CD4. For Alu CD4, the frequency was 0.0363 in Yadavas, a traditional pastoral and herd maintaining population, and 0.2439 in Narikuravars, a nomadic gypsy population. The overall genetic difference (Gst) of 12 populations (castes and tribes) studied was 3.6%, which corresponds to the Gst values of 3.6% recorded earlier for Western Asian populations. Thus, our study confirms the genetic similarities between West Asian populations and South Indian castes and tribes and supported the large scale coastal migrations from Africa into India through West Asia. However, the average genetic difference (Gst) of Kani and Paliyan tribes with other South Indian tribes studied earlier was 8.3%. The average Gst of combined South and North Indian Tribes (CSNIT) was 9.5%. Neighbor joining tree constructed showed close proximity of Kani and Paliyan tribal groups to the other two South Indian tribes, Toda and Irula of Nilgiri hills studied earlier. Further, the analysis revealed the affinities among populations and confirmed the presence of North and South India specific lineages. Our findings have documented the highly diverse (micro differentiated) nature of South Indian tribes, predominantly due to isolation, than the endogamous population groups of South India. Thus, our study firmly established the genetic relationship of South Indian castes and tribes and supported the proposed large scale ancestral migrations from Africa, particularly into South India

  3. Heritability and heteromorphic distributions of AluI chromosome banding variants in twins

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, B.; Meyer, J.M.; Jackson-Cook, C.K.

    1995-07-03

    The heritability and heteromorphic appearance of chromosomal banding patterns induced through in situ digestion with the restriction enzyme AluI were studied by analyzing the chromosomes of 25 monozygotic and 25 dizygotic twin pairs selected at random from a juvenile twin registry. A total of 19 AluI banding variants were found to be heteromorphic, with the pericentromeric region of chromosome 3 and the satellites of chromosome 22 being most and least heteromorphic, respectively. As expected, the correlations of the semi-quantitative scores for each of the chromosomal variants were significantly higher between MZ twin pairs (ranging from 0.48 to 0.95) than DZ twin pairs (ranging from -0.02 to 0.69), suggesting that genetic factors play an important role in their appearance. This finding was confirmed in a model fitting analysis in which the heritabilities of the AluI-induced chromosome variants were found to range from 70 to 96% for 12/13 heteromorphisms studied. These consistent findings are significant in that these variants may be useful for family studies in clinical genetics. 23 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Design and implementation of low power clock gated 64-bit ALU on ultra scale FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ashutosh; Murgai, Shruti; Gulati, Anmol; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-03-01

    64-bit energy efficient Arithmetic and Logic Unit using negative latch based clock gating technique is designed in this paper. The 64-bit ALU is designed using multiplexer based full adder cell. We have designed a 64-bit ALU with a gated clock. We have used negative latch based circuit for generating gated clock. This gated clock is used to control the multiplexer based 64-bit ALU. The circuit has been synthesized on kintex FPGA through Xilinx ISE Design Suite 14.7 using 28 nm technology in Verilog HDL. The circuit has been simulated on Modelsim 10.3c. The design is verified using System Verilog on QuestaSim in UVM environment. We have achieved 74.07%, 92. 93% and 95.53% reduction in total clock power, 89.73%, 91.35% and 92.85% reduction in I/Os power, 67.14%, 62.84% and 74.34% reduction in dynamic power and 25.47%, 29.05% and 46.13% reduction in total supply power at 20 MHz, 200 MHz and 2 GHz frequency respectively. The power has been calculated using XPower Analyzer tool of Xilinx ISE Design Suite 14.3.

  5. The crystal structure of the signal recognition particle Alu RNA binding heterodimer, SRP9/14.

    PubMed Central

    Birse, D E; Kapp, U; Strub, K; Cusack, S; Aberg, A

    1997-01-01

    The mammalian signal recognition particle (SRP) is an 11S cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein that plays an essential role in protein sorting. SRP recognizes the signal sequence of the nascent polypeptide chain emerging from the ribosome, and targets the ribosome-nascent chain-SRP complex to the rough endoplasmic reticulum. The SRP consists of six polypeptides (SRP9, SRP14, SRP19, SRP54, SRP68 and SRP72) and a single 300 nucleotide RNA molecule. SRP9 and SRP14 proteins form a heterodimer that binds to the Alu domain of SRP RNA which is responsible for translation arrest. We report the first crystal structure of a mammalian SRP protein, that of the mouse SRP9/14 heterodimer, determined at 2.5 A resolution. SRP9 and SRP14 are found to be structurally homologous, containing the same alpha-beta-beta-beta-alpha fold. This we designate the Alu binding module (Alu bm), an additional member of the family of small alpha/beta RNA binding domains. The heterodimer has pseudo 2-fold symmetry and is saddle like, comprising a strongly curved six-stranded amphipathic beta-sheet with the four helices packed on the convex side and the exposed concave surface being lined with positively charged residues. PMID:9233785

  6. Retrotransposon Alu is enriched in the epichromatin of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Olins, Ada L; Ishaque, Naveed; Chotewutmontri, Sasithorn; Langowski, Jörg; Olins, Donald E

    2014-01-01

    Epichromatin, the surface of chromatin facing the nuclear envelope in an interphase nucleus, reveals a "rim" staining pattern with specific mouse monoclonal antibodies against histone H2A/H2B/DNA and phosphatidylserine epitopes. Employing a modified ChIP-Seq procedure on undifferentiated and differentiated human leukemic (HL-60/S4) cells,>95% of assembled epichromatin regions overlapped with Alu retrotransposons. They also exhibited enrichment of the AluS subfamily and of Alu oligomers. Furthermore, mapping epichromatin regions to the human chromosomes revealed highly similar localization patterns in the various cell states and with the different antibodies. Comparisons with available epigenetic databases suggested that epichromatin is neither "classical" heterochromatin nor highly expressing genes, implying another function at the surface of interphase chromatin. A modified chromatin immunoprecipitation procedure (xxChIP) was developed because the studied antibodies react generally with mononucleosomes and lysed chromatin. A second fixation is necessary to securely attach the antibodies to the epichromatin epitopes of the intact nucleus. PMID:24824428

  7. Repeated exposure of infants at complementary feeding to a vegetable puree increases acceptance as effectively as flavor-flavor learning and more effectively than flavor-nutrient learning.

    PubMed

    Remy, Eloïse; Issanchou, Sylvie; Chabanet, Claire; Nicklaus, Sophie

    2013-07-01

    Children's vegetable consumption is below the public health recommendations. This study aimed to compare learning mechanisms to increase vegetable acceptance in infants at complementary feeding, namely repeated exposure (RE), flavor-flavor learning (FFL), and flavor-nutrient learning (FNL); measure the stability of the learning effect; and examine the impact of infants' feeding history on vegetable acceptance. The study was composed of a preexposure test, an exposure period, a postexposure test, and tests at 2-wk, 3-mo, and 6-mo follow-ups. At pre- and postexposure, a basic artichoke purée and carrot purée were presented to 95 French infants (6.4 ± 0.8 mo). During the exposure period, infants were randomly split into 3 groups and were exposed 10 times to the basic (RE group; 2 kJ/g; n = 32), a sweet (FFL group; 2 kJ/g; n = 32), or an energy-dense (FNL group; 6 kJ/g; n = 31) artichoke purée 2 or 3 times/wk. To evaluate acceptance, intake (g) and liking were recorded at home by parents. Between pre- and postexposure, intake of the basic artichoke purée significantly increased in the RE (+63%) and FFL (+39%) groups but not in the FNL group; liking increased only in the RE group (+21%). After exposure, artichoke was as much consumed and as much liked as carrot only in the RE group. Learning of artichoke acceptance was stable up to 3 mo postexposure. Initial artichoke intake was significantly related to the number of vegetables offered before the study started. RE is as effective as and simpler to implement than FFL and more effective than FNL for increasing vegetable acceptance at complementary feeding. PMID:23700337

  8. Repeated exposure of infants at complementary feeding to a vegetable puree increases acceptance as effectively as flavor-flavor learning and more effectively than flavor-nutrient learning.

    PubMed

    Remy, Eloïse; Issanchou, Sylvie; Chabanet, Claire; Nicklaus, Sophie

    2013-07-01

    Children's vegetable consumption is below the public health recommendations. This study aimed to compare learning mechanisms to increase vegetable acceptance in infants at complementary feeding, namely repeated exposure (RE), flavor-flavor learning (FFL), and flavor-nutrient learning (FNL); measure the stability of the learning effect; and examine the impact of infants' feeding history on vegetable acceptance. The study was composed of a preexposure test, an exposure period, a postexposure test, and tests at 2-wk, 3-mo, and 6-mo follow-ups. At pre- and postexposure, a basic artichoke purée and carrot purée were presented to 95 French infants (6.4 ± 0.8 mo). During the exposure period, infants were randomly split into 3 groups and were exposed 10 times to the basic (RE group; 2 kJ/g; n = 32), a sweet (FFL group; 2 kJ/g; n = 32), or an energy-dense (FNL group; 6 kJ/g; n = 31) artichoke purée 2 or 3 times/wk. To evaluate acceptance, intake (g) and liking were recorded at home by parents. Between pre- and postexposure, intake of the basic artichoke purée significantly increased in the RE (+63%) and FFL (+39%) groups but not in the FNL group; liking increased only in the RE group (+21%). After exposure, artichoke was as much consumed and as much liked as carrot only in the RE group. Learning of artichoke acceptance was stable up to 3 mo postexposure. Initial artichoke intake was significantly related to the number of vegetables offered before the study started. RE is as effective as and simpler to implement than FFL and more effective than FNL for increasing vegetable acceptance at complementary feeding.

  9. Repeated muscle biopsies through a single skin incision do not elicit muscle signaling, but IL-6 mRNA and STAT3 phosphorylation increase in injured muscle.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Borja; Gómez-Cabrera, M Carmen; Ponce-González, Jesús Gustavo; Martinez-Bello, Vladimir E; Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Santana, Alfredo; Sebastia, Vicente; Viña, Jose; Calbet, José A L

    2011-06-01

    To determine if muscle biopsies can be repeated using a single small (5-6 mm) skin incision without inducing immediate MAPK activation or inflammation in the noninjured areas, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38-MAPK, c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases (JNKs), IκBα, IKKα, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was examined concurrent with IL-6 mRNA in six muscle biopsies obtained from the vastus lateralis of five men. Four biopsies were obtained through the same incision (5-6 mm) from the right leg (taken at 0, 30, 123, and 126 min) and another two each from new incisions performed in the left leg (at 31 and 120 min), while the subjects rested supine. The first three biopsies from the right leg were taken ∼3 cm apart from prebiopsied areas. The last biopsy was obtained from the same point from which the second biopsy was sampled. The three biopsies performed through the same skin incision from noninjured muscle areas showed similar levels of ERK1/2, p38-MAPK, JNK, IKKα, IκBα, and STAT3 phosphorylation and similar IL-6 mRNA content. There were no significant differences in the levels of ERK1/2, p38-MAPK, JNK, IKKα, and IκBα phosphorylation between the mean of the three biopsies obtained from the same incision and the sixth biopsy obtained from an injured area. STAT3 phosphorylation was increased by ∼3.5-fold in the sixth biopsy compared with the mean the three biopsies obtained from the same incision (P < 0.05), and IL-6 mRNA content was increased by 1.8-fold (P < 0.05). In summary, repeated muscle biopsies can be performed through a single 5- to 6-mm skin incision without eliciting muscle signaling through cascades responding to cellular stress, inflammation, or muscle damage. STAT3 phosphorylation is an early event in the healing response to muscle injury, probably mediated by the autocrine production of IL-6.

  10. Alu RNA regulates the cellular pool of active ribosomes by targeted delivery of SRP9/14 to 40S subunits.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Elena; Berger, Audrey; Scherrer, Anne; Alkalaeva, Elena; Strub, Katharina

    2015-03-11

    The human genome contains about 1.5 million Alu elements, which are transcribed into Alu RNAs by RNA polymerase III. Their expression is upregulated following stress and viral infection, and they associate with the SRP9/14 protein dimer in the cytoplasm forming Alu RNPs. Using cell-free translation, we have previously shown that Alu RNPs inhibit polysome formation. Here, we describe the mechanism of Alu RNP-mediated inhibition of translation initiation and demonstrate its effect on translation of cellular and viral RNAs. Both cap-dependent and IRES-mediated initiation is inhibited. Inhibition involves direct binding of SRP9/14 to 40S ribosomal subunits and requires Alu RNA as an assembly factor but its continuous association with 40S subunits is not required for inhibition. Binding of SRP9/14 to 40S prevents 48S complex formation by interfering with the recruitment of mRNA to 40S subunits. In cells, overexpression of Alu RNA decreases translation of reporter mRNAs and this effect is alleviated with a mutation that reduces its affinity for SRP9/14. Alu RNPs also inhibit the translation of cellular mRNAs resuming translation after stress and of viral mRNAs suggesting a role of Alu RNPs in adapting the translational output in response to stress and viral infection.

  11. Branched DNA-based Alu quantitative assay for cell-free plasma DNA levels in patients with sepsis or systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yan-Qiang; Liang, Dong-Yu; Lou, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Zhen-huan; Zhang, Lu-rong

    2016-02-01

    Cell-free circulating DNA (cf-DNA) can be detected by various of laboratory techniques. We described a branched DNA-based Alu assay for measuring cf-DNA in septic patients. Compared to healthy controls and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) patients, serum cf-DNA levels were significantly higher in septic patients (1426.54 ± 863.79 vs 692.02 ± 703.06 and 69.66 ± 24.66 ng/mL). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of cf-DNA for normal vs sepsis and SIRS vs sepsis were 0.955 (0.884-1.025), and 0.856 (0.749-0.929), respectively. There was a positive correlation between cf-DNA and interleukin 6 or procalcitonin or Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II. The cf-DNA concentration was higher in intensive care unit nonsurviving patients compared to surviving patients (2183.33 ± 615.26 vs 972.46 ± 648.36 ng/mL; P < .05). Branched DNA-based Alu assays are feasible and useful to quantify serum cf-DNA levels. Increased cf-DNA levels in septic patients might complement C-reactive protein and procalcitonin in a multiple marker format. Cell-free circulating DNA might be a new marker in discrimination of sepsis and SIRS.

  12. Increased number of glutamine repeats in the C-terminal of Candida albicans Rlm1p enhances the resistance to stress agents.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Paula; Nogueira, Eugénia; Loureiro, Ana Sá; Delgado-Silva, Yolanda; Correia, Alexandra; Pais, Célia

    2009-11-01

    The highly polymorphic microsatellite CAI described for Candida albicans genotyping was found to be located within the RLM1 gene which codes for a transcription factor from the MADS box family that, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is known to regulate the expression of genes involved in the cell wall integrity pathway. The aim of this work was to study CAI genetic variability in a wide group of C. albicans isolates and determine the response of genetic variants to cell wall damaging stress agents. One hundred twenty-three C. albicans isolates were genotyped with CAI microsatellite (CAA/G)(n), and 35 alleles were found with repeat units varying from 11 to 49. Alleles with less than 29 repetitions were the most frequent, while the longer ones were underrepresented and had a more complex internal structure. Combinations of RLM1 alleles generated 66 different genotypes. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in the susceptibility patterns to menadione, hydrogen peroxide, SDS, acetic acid, and CFW, stress agents affecting cell integrity, were found between strains harbouring alleles ranging from 17 to 28 repetitions and strains with longer alleles, suggesting that an increased number of repetitive units in the C. albicans RLM1 gene could be related to stress response. PMID:19484503

  13. Repeated 6-Hz Corneal Stimulation Progressively Increases FosB/ΔFosB Levels in the Lateral Amygdala and Induces Seizure Generalization to the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Carmela; Vinet, Jonathan; Curia, Giulia; Biagini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to repetitive seizures is known to promote convulsions which depend on specific patterns of network activity. We aimed at evaluating the changes in seizure phenotype and neuronal network activation caused by a modified 6-Hz corneal stimulation model of psychomotor seizures. Mice received up to 4 sessions of 6-Hz corneal stimulation with fixed current amplitude of 32 mA and inter-stimulation interval of 72 h. Video-electroencephalography showed that evoked seizures were characterized by a motor component and a non-motor component. Seizures always appeared in frontal cortex, but only at the fourth stimulation they involved the hippocampus, suggesting the establishment of an epileptogenic process. Duration of seizure non-motor component progressively decreased after the second session, whereas convulsive seizures remained unchanged. In addition, a more severe seizure phenotype, consisting of tonic-clonic generalized convulsions, was predominant after the second session. Immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence experiments revealed a significant increase in neuronal activity occurring in the lateral amygdala after the fourth session, most likely due to activity of principal cells. These findings indicate a predominant role of amygdala in promoting progressively more severe convulsions as well as the late recruitment of the hippocampus in the seizure spread. We propose that the repeated 6-Hz corneal stimulation model may be used to investigate some mechanisms of epileptogenesis and to test putative antiepileptogenic drugs. PMID:26555229

  14. Statistical analysis of simple repeats in the human genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, F.; Liò, P.

    2005-03-01

    The human genome contains repetitive DNA at different level of sequence length, number and dispersion. Highly repetitive DNA is particularly rich in homo- and di-nucleotide repeats, while middle repetitive DNA is rich of families of interspersed, mobile elements hundreds of base pairs (bp) long, among which belong the Alu families. A link between homo- and di-polymeric tracts and mobile elements has been recently highlighted. In particular, the mobility of Alu repeats, which form 10% of the human genome, has been correlated with the length of poly(A) tracts located at one end of the Alu. These tracts have a rigid and non-bendable structure and have an inhibitory effect on nucleosomes, which normally compact the DNA. We performed a statistical analysis of the genome-wide distribution of lengths and inter-tract separations of poly(X) and poly(XY) tracts in the human genome. Our study shows that in humans the length distributions of these sequences reflect the dynamics of their expansion and DNA replication. By means of general tools from linguistics, we show that the latter play the role of highly-significant content-bearing terms in the DNA text. Furthermore, we find that such tracts are positioned in a non-random fashion, with an apparent periodicity of 150 bases. This allows us to extend the link between repetitive, highly mobile elements such as Alus and low-complexity words in human DNA. More precisely, we show that Alus are sources of poly(X) tracts, which in turn affect in a subtle way the combination and diversification of gene expression and the fixation of multigene families.

  15. Alu-miRNA interactions modulate transcript isoform diversity in stress response and reveal signatures of positive selection.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Rajesh; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Bhardwaj, Vivek; Jha, Vineet; Mandal, Amit K; Mukerji, Mitali

    2016-09-02

    Primate-specific Alus harbor different regulatory features, including miRNA targets. In this study, we provide evidence for miRNA-mediated modulation of transcript isoform levels during heat-shock response through exaptation of Alu-miRNA sites in mature mRNA. We performed genome-wide expression profiling coupled with functional validation of miRNA target sites within exonized Alus, and analyzed conservation of these targets across primates. We observed that two miRNAs (miR-15a-3p and miR-302d-3p) elevated in stress response, target RAD1, GTSE1, NR2C1, FKBP9 and UBE2I exclusively within Alu. These genes map onto the p53 regulatory network. Ectopic overexpression of miR-15a-3p downregulates GTSE1 and RAD1 at the protein level and enhances cell survival. This Alu-mediated fine-tuning seems to be unique to humans as evident from the absence of orthologous sites in other primate lineages. We further analyzed signatures of selection on Alu-miRNA targets in the genome, using 1000 Genomes Phase-I data. We found that 198 out of 3177 Alu-exonized genes exhibit signatures of selection within Alu-miRNA sites, with 60 of them containing SNPs supported by multiple evidences (global-FST > 0.3, pair-wise-FST > 0.5, Fay-Wu's H < -20, iHS > 2.0, high ΔDAF) and implicated in p53 network. We propose that by affecting multiple genes, Alu-miRNA interactions have the potential to facilitate population-level adaptations in response to environmental challenges.

  16. Alu-miRNA interactions modulate transcript isoform diversity in stress response and reveal signatures of positive selection

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Rajesh; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Bhardwaj, Vivek; Jha, Vineet; Mandal, Amit K.; Mukerji, Mitali

    2016-01-01

    Primate-specific Alus harbor different regulatory features, including miRNA targets. In this study, we provide evidence for miRNA-mediated modulation of transcript isoform levels during heat-shock response through exaptation of Alu-miRNA sites in mature mRNA. We performed genome-wide expression profiling coupled with functional validation of miRNA target sites within exonized Alus, and analyzed conservation of these targets across primates. We observed that two miRNAs (miR-15a-3p and miR-302d-3p) elevated in stress response, target RAD1, GTSE1, NR2C1, FKBP9 and UBE2I exclusively within Alu. These genes map onto the p53 regulatory network. Ectopic overexpression of miR-15a-3p downregulates GTSE1 and RAD1 at the protein level and enhances cell survival. This Alu-mediated fine-tuning seems to be unique to humans as evident from the absence of orthologous sites in other primate lineages. We further analyzed signatures of selection on Alu-miRNA targets in the genome, using 1000 Genomes Phase-I data. We found that 198 out of 3177 Alu-exonized genes exhibit signatures of selection within Alu-miRNA sites, with 60 of them containing SNPs supported by multiple evidences (global-FST > 0.3, pair-wise-FST > 0.5, Fay-Wu’s H < −20, iHS > 2.0, high ΔDAF) and implicated in p53 network. We propose that by affecting multiple genes, Alu-miRNA interactions have the potential to facilitate population-level adaptations in response to environmental challenges. PMID:27586304

  17. Alu-miRNA interactions modulate transcript isoform diversity in stress response and reveal signatures of positive selection.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Rajesh; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Bhardwaj, Vivek; Jha, Vineet; Mandal, Amit K; Mukerji, Mitali

    2016-01-01

    Primate-specific Alus harbor different regulatory features, including miRNA targets. In this study, we provide evidence for miRNA-mediated modulation of transcript isoform levels during heat-shock response through exaptation of Alu-miRNA sites in mature mRNA. We performed genome-wide expression profiling coupled with functional validation of miRNA target sites within exonized Alus, and analyzed conservation of these targets across primates. We observed that two miRNAs (miR-15a-3p and miR-302d-3p) elevated in stress response, target RAD1, GTSE1, NR2C1, FKBP9 and UBE2I exclusively within Alu. These genes map onto the p53 regulatory network. Ectopic overexpression of miR-15a-3p downregulates GTSE1 and RAD1 at the protein level and enhances cell survival. This Alu-mediated fine-tuning seems to be unique to humans as evident from the absence of orthologous sites in other primate lineages. We further analyzed signatures of selection on Alu-miRNA targets in the genome, using 1000 Genomes Phase-I data. We found that 198 out of 3177 Alu-exonized genes exhibit signatures of selection within Alu-miRNA sites, with 60 of them containing SNPs supported by multiple evidences (global-FST > 0.3, pair-wise-FST > 0.5, Fay-Wu's H < -20, iHS > 2.0, high ΔDAF) and implicated in p53 network. We propose that by affecting multiple genes, Alu-miRNA interactions have the potential to facilitate population-level adaptations in response to environmental challenges. PMID:27586304

  18. Design of Wallace tree multiplier and other components of a quantum ALU using reversible TSG gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapliyal, Himanshu; Srinivas, M. B.

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents the design of a novel modified Wallace tree multiplier, using the reversible TSG gate proposed by the authors earlier. The novelty of the TSG gate is that it can also work singly as a reversible full adder. The TSG gate is also used in this paper to design various other reversible arithmetic and logical components that can be assembled to realize a primitive reversible/quantum ALU. It is also shown that these components are optimal, in terms of number of reversible gates and garbage outputs, compared to other designs existing in literature.

  19. Flash x-ray test of the CMOS/SOS SCP-STAR ALU

    SciTech Connect

    Brucker, G.J.; Kertesz, C.; Miller, M.; Oey, K.K.

    1984-12-01

    This paper reports on the measurement of the x-ray upset dose rate for a subsystem which was designed to represent the ALU part of the SCP-STAR spacecraft computer. This computer was fabricated totally with radhard, CMOS/SOS devices. The test was conducted at the OWL flash x-ray facility of Physics International. The results showed that the upset dose rate for the subsystem was 9.8 x 10/sup 10/ and 1.7 x 10/sup 11/ rads(Si)/s during dynamic and static modes of operation, respectively. Subsystem interactions did not compromise the upset levels of the discrete components.

  20. Signal Increase on Unenhanced T1-Weighted Images in the Rat Brain After Repeated, Extended Doses of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin Andrew; Lohrke, Jessica; Frenzel, Thomas; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In this prospective preclinical study, we evaluated T1-weighted signal intensity in the deep cerebellar nuclei (CN) and globus pallidus (GP) up to 24 days after repeated administration of linear and macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) using homologous imaging and evaluation methods as in the recently published retrospective clinical studies. In a second part of the study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces were evaluated for contrast enhancement by fluid-attenuated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods Sixty adult male Wistar-Han rats were randomly divided into a control and 5 GBCA groups (n = 10 per group). The administered GBCAs were gadodiamide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadobenate dimeglumine (linear GBCAs) as well as gadobutrol and gadoterate meglumine (macrocyclic GBCAs) and saline (control). Over a period of 2 weeks, the animals received 10 intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight, each on 5 consecutive days per week. Before GBCA administration, as well as 3 and 24 days after the last injection, a whole-brain MRI was performed using a standard T1-weighted 3-dimensional turbo spin echo sequence on a clinical 1.5 T scanner. The ratios of signal intensities in deep CN to pons (CN/Po) and GP to thalamus (GP/Th) were determined. For the evaluation of the CSF spaces, 18 additional rats were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 3 per group) that received the same GBCAs as in the first part of the study. After MR cisternography for anatomical reference, a fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence was performed before and 1 minute after intravenous injection of a dose of 1 mmol Gd/kg body weight GBCA or saline. Results A significantly increased signal intensity ratio of CN/Po was observed 3 and 24 days after the last injection of gadodiamide and gadobenate dimeglumine. No significant changes were observed between the 2 time points. Gadopentetate dimeglumine injection led to a moderately elevated

  1. Identification of homogeneously staining regions by G-banding and chromosome microdissection, and FISH marker selection using human Alu sequence primers in a scleractinian coral Coelastrea aspera Verrill, 1866 (Cnidaria)

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Takahiro; Kubota, Satoshi; Mezaki, Takuma; Tagami, Erika; Sekida, Satoko; Nakachi, Shu; Okuda, Kazuo; Tominaga, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Karyotype analysis was performed on the scleractinian coral Coelastrea aspera Verrill, 1866, commonly found along temperate coasts in Japan (30–35°N) and in coastal waters in the Indian and Pacific oceans. G-banding of Coelastrea aspera was successfully performed, although the banding pattern was not as clear as that in mammals. The karyogram clearly revealed that this coral had a homogeneously staining region (hsr) in chromosome 11. This hsr consisted of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) related genes, which was demonstrated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with probes generated using 28S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) primers and those generated through chromosome microdissection. In addition, we conducted silver-stained nucleolus organizer region (Ag-NOR) analysis and found Ag depositions in the interphase nuclei but not on rRNA gene loci and hsr(s) in the mitotic stage. The hsr of this coral was observed in approximately 50% of the metaphase spreads analyzed. This may explain the diversity of coral rDNA based on the molecular study of sequence analysis. Furthermore, it was discovered that human telomere and Alu repeated sequences were present in this Coelastrea aspera. Probes derived from human Alu sequences are expected to play an important role in the classification of corals. Overall, our data can be of great value in discriminating among scleractinian coral species and understanding their genetics, including chromosomal evolution. PMID:27186338

  2. Identification of homogeneously staining regions by G-banding and chromosome microdissection, and FISH marker selection using human Alu sequence primers in a scleractinian coral Coelastrea aspera Verrill, 1866 (Cnidaria).

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Takahiro; Kubota, Satoshi; Mezaki, Takuma; Tagami, Erika; Sekida, Satoko; Nakachi, Shu; Okuda, Kazuo; Tominaga, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Karyotype analysis was performed on the scleractinian coral Coelastrea aspera Verrill, 1866, commonly found along temperate coasts in Japan (30-35°N) and in coastal waters in the Indian and Pacific oceans. G-banding of Coelastrea aspera was successfully performed, although the banding pattern was not as clear as that in mammals. The karyogram clearly revealed that this coral had a homogeneously staining region (hsr) in chromosome 11. This hsr consisted of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) related genes, which was demonstrated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with probes generated using 28S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) primers and those generated through chromosome microdissection. In addition, we conducted silver-stained nucleolus organizer region (Ag-NOR) analysis and found Ag depositions in the interphase nuclei but not on rRNA gene loci and hsr(s) in the mitotic stage. The hsr of this coral was observed in approximately 50% of the metaphase spreads analyzed. This may explain the diversity of coral rDNA based on the molecular study of sequence analysis. Furthermore, it was discovered that human telomere and Alu repeated sequences were present in this Coelastrea aspera. Probes derived from human Alu sequences are expected to play an important role in the classification of corals. Overall, our data can be of great value in discriminating among scleractinian coral species and understanding their genetics, including chromosomal evolution. PMID:27186338

  3. A spontaneously arising mutation in connexin32 with repeated passage of FRTL-5 cells coincides with increased growth rate and reduced thyroxine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, L. M.; Murray, D. K.; Tran, D. T.; Nelson, G. A.; Shah, M. M.; Luben, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    regions of the Cx32 molecule contain the sequences and epitopes to which probes and antibodies are directed, and as such alterations of these regions with repeated passage explains reports by others that FRTL-5 cells do not express Cx32, and implies that cultures used for these assessments were passed more than 15 times. To determine if genetic or epigenetic abnormalities existed in FRTL-5 cells we performed chromosome spreads from various passage cultures. FRTL-5 cells have been reported to be diploid and more recently non-diploid; however, we found them to be fully tetraploid. This tetraploidy appears to be unstable in that later passes are tetraploid plus two or three extra chromosomes. There were no obvious translocations, breaks or large-scale interstitial deletions of any chromosomes in the FRTL-5 cultures tested. As FRTL-5 cells were repeatedly passed their morphology changed. Monolayer areas spread from beneath the follicles, and the follicles became flattened in appearance. These physical changes were coincident with dramatically increased growth rates. Early cultures (passed 3-12 times) divided on average every 49+/-1 h, whereas later passes (passes 20-25) divided every 28+/-3 h. To correlate these changes with a measure of thyroid function we assayed T(4) output. Early passage follicular cultures incubated for 6 h with sodium iodide, released on average 5.27+/- 0.33 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. Later passes, or early passes treated with heptanol to down-regulate Cx32, released an average of 3.84+/-0.50 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. There was a 27% difference in T(4) release between early follicular cultures, that were coupled by Cx32, and late or down-regulated early follicular cultures, that were uncoupled (P<0.0001). Collectively, the physical changes documented in this study were coincident with the loss of functional Cx32. This implies a relationship between the loss of intercellular communication and changes in morphogenic appearance, growth rate and

  4. A spontaneously arising mutation in connexin32 with repeated passage of FRTL-5 cells coincides with increased growth rate and reduced thyroxine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, L. M.; Murray, D. K.; Tran, D. T.; Nelson, G. A.; Shah, M. M.; Luben, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    regions of the Cx32 molecule contain the sequences and epitopes to which probes and antibodies are directed, and as such alterations of these regions with repeated passage explains reports by others that FRTL-5 cells do not express Cx32, and implies that cultures used for these assessments were passed more than 15 times. To determine if genetic or epigenetic abnormalities existed in FRTL-5 cells we performed chromosome spreads from various passage cultures. FRTL-5 cells have been reported to be diploid and more recently non-diploid; however, we found them to be fully tetraploid. This tetraploidy appears to be unstable in that later passes are tetraploid plus two or three extra chromosomes. There were no obvious translocations, breaks or large-scale interstitial deletions of any chromosomes in the FRTL-5 cultures tested. As FRTL-5 cells were repeatedly passed their morphology changed. Monolayer areas spread from beneath the follicles, and the follicles became flattened in appearance. These physical changes were coincident with dramatically increased growth rates. Early cultures (passed 3-12 times) divided on average every 49+/-1 h, whereas later passes (passes 20-25) divided every 28+/-3 h. To correlate these changes with a measure of thyroid function we assayed T(4) output. Early passage follicular cultures incubated for 6 h with sodium iodide, released on average 5.27+/- 0.33 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. Later passes, or early passes treated with heptanol to down-regulate Cx32, released an average of 3.84+/-0.50 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. There was a 27% difference in T(4) release between early follicular cultures, that were coupled by Cx32, and late or down-regulated early follicular cultures, that were uncoupled (P<0.0001). Collectively, the physical changes documented in this study were coincident with the loss of functional Cx32. This implies a relationship between the loss of intercellular communication and changes in morphogenic appearance, growth rate and

  5. Reprogramming triggers endogenous L1 and Alu retrotransposition in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Klawitter, Sabine; Fuchs, Nina V.; Upton, Kyle R.; Muñoz-Lopez, Martin; Shukla, Ruchi; Wang, Jichang; Garcia-Cañadas, Marta; Lopez-Ruiz, Cesar; Gerhardt, Daniel J.; Sebe, Attila; Grabundzija, Ivana; Merkert, Sylvia; Gerdes, Patricia; Pulgarin, J. Andres; Bock, Anja; Held, Ulrike; Witthuhn, Anett; Haase, Alexandra; Sarkadi, Balázs; Löwer, Johannes; Wolvetang, Ernst J.; Martin, Ulrich; Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Garcia-Perez, Jose L.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Schumann, Gerald G.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are capable of unlimited proliferation and can differentiate in vitro to generate derivatives of the three primary germ layers. Genetic and epigenetic abnormalities have been reported by Wissing and colleagues to occur during hiPSC derivation, including mobilization of engineered LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. However, incidence and functional impact of endogenous retrotransposition in hiPSCs are yet to be established. Here we apply retrotransposon capture sequencing to eight hiPSC lines and three human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines, revealing endogenous L1, Alu and SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA) mobilization during reprogramming and pluripotent stem cell cultivation. Surprisingly, 4/7 de novo L1 insertions are full length and 6/11 retrotransposition events occurred in protein-coding genes expressed in pluripotent stem cells. We further demonstrate that an intronic L1 insertion in the CADPS2 gene is acquired during hiPSC cultivation and disrupts CADPS2 expression. These experiments elucidate endogenous retrotransposition, and its potential consequences, in hiPSCs and hESCs. PMID:26743714

  6. Reprogramming triggers endogenous L1 and Alu retrotransposition in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Klawitter, Sabine; Fuchs, Nina V; Upton, Kyle R; Muñoz-Lopez, Martin; Shukla, Ruchi; Wang, Jichang; Garcia-Cañadas, Marta; Lopez-Ruiz, Cesar; Gerhardt, Daniel J; Sebe, Attila; Grabundzija, Ivana; Merkert, Sylvia; Gerdes, Patricia; Pulgarin, J Andres; Bock, Anja; Held, Ulrike; Witthuhn, Anett; Haase, Alexandra; Sarkadi, Balázs; Löwer, Johannes; Wolvetang, Ernst J; Martin, Ulrich; Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Garcia-Perez, Jose L; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Schumann, Gerald G

    2016-01-08

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are capable of unlimited proliferation and can differentiate in vitro to generate derivatives of the three primary germ layers. Genetic and epigenetic abnormalities have been reported by Wissing and colleagues to occur during hiPSC derivation, including mobilization of engineered LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. However, incidence and functional impact of endogenous retrotransposition in hiPSCs are yet to be established. Here we apply retrotransposon capture sequencing to eight hiPSC lines and three human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines, revealing endogenous L1, Alu and SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA) mobilization during reprogramming and pluripotent stem cell cultivation. Surprisingly, 4/7 de novo L1 insertions are full length and 6/11 retrotransposition events occurred in protein-coding genes expressed in pluripotent stem cells. We further demonstrate that an intronic L1 insertion in the CADPS2 gene is acquired during hiPSC cultivation and disrupts CADPS2 expression. These experiments elucidate endogenous retrotransposition, and its potential consequences, in hiPSCs and hESCs.

  7. Reprogramming triggers endogenous L1 and Alu retrotransposition in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Klawitter, Sabine; Fuchs, Nina V; Upton, Kyle R; Muñoz-Lopez, Martin; Shukla, Ruchi; Wang, Jichang; Garcia-Cañadas, Marta; Lopez-Ruiz, Cesar; Gerhardt, Daniel J; Sebe, Attila; Grabundzija, Ivana; Merkert, Sylvia; Gerdes, Patricia; Pulgarin, J Andres; Bock, Anja; Held, Ulrike; Witthuhn, Anett; Haase, Alexandra; Sarkadi, Balázs; Löwer, Johannes; Wolvetang, Ernst J; Martin, Ulrich; Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Garcia-Perez, Jose L; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Schumann, Gerald G

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are capable of unlimited proliferation and can differentiate in vitro to generate derivatives of the three primary germ layers. Genetic and epigenetic abnormalities have been reported by Wissing and colleagues to occur during hiPSC derivation, including mobilization of engineered LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. However, incidence and functional impact of endogenous retrotransposition in hiPSCs are yet to be established. Here we apply retrotransposon capture sequencing to eight hiPSC lines and three human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines, revealing endogenous L1, Alu and SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA) mobilization during reprogramming and pluripotent stem cell cultivation. Surprisingly, 4/7 de novo L1 insertions are full length and 6/11 retrotransposition events occurred in protein-coding genes expressed in pluripotent stem cells. We further demonstrate that an intronic L1 insertion in the CADPS2 gene is acquired during hiPSC cultivation and disrupts CADPS2 expression. These experiments elucidate endogenous retrotransposition, and its potential consequences, in hiPSCs and hESCs. PMID:26743714

  8. Cross-reaction of snRNA and an Alu I-like sequence from rat with DNAs from different eucaryotic species.

    PubMed Central

    Blin, N; Weber, T; Alonso, A

    1983-01-01

    Sequence homologies to rat U1-snRNA and U2-snRNA were investigated in DNA from 23 eucaryotic species (3 lower eucaryotes, 4 plants, and 16 animals) using dot hybridization at various stringency conditions. Cross-hybridization among very distantly related species in e.g. plants-insects or mold-vertebrates is not the rule; there are, however, examples for stronger homologies like Rattus-Dictyostelium. Furthermore, DNA from all 23 species was analysed for sequence homologies with the repetitive DNA sequence B1 (an Alu I family equivalent) from rat. We observed a wide range of homologies covering some plants and insects, up to vertebrates. Hybridization at increasing stringency conditions revealed species with higher degree of homology to the rat B1 sequence: maize, chicken, and hamster. Images PMID:6186992

  9. Gain of a New Exon by a Lineage-Specific Alu Element-Integration Event in the BCS1L Gene during Primate Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Je; Kim, Young-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Rae; Choe, Se-Hee; Kim, Myung-Jin; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Ji-Su; Sim, Bo-Woong; Song, Bong-Seok; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Jin, Yeung-Bae; Lee, Youngjeon; Park, Young-Ho; Park, Young Il; Huh, Jae-Won; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2015-01-01

    BCS1L gene encodes mitochondrial protein and is a member of conserved AAA protein family. This gene is involved in the incorporation of Rieske FeS and Qcr10p into complex III of respiratory chain. In our previous study, AluYRa2-derived alternative transcript in rhesus monkey genome was identified. However, this transcript has not been reported in human genome. In present study, we conducted evolutionary analysis of AluYRa2-exonized transcript with various primate genomic DNAs and cDNAs from humans, rhesus monkeys, and crab-eating monkeys. Remarkably, our results show that AluYRa2 element has only been integrated into genomes of Macaca species. This Macaca lineage-specific integration of AluYRa2 element led to exonization event in the first intron region of BCS1L gene by producing a conserved 3′ splice site. Intriguingly, in rhesus and crab-eating monkeys, more diverse transcript variants by alternative splicing (AS) events, including exon skipping and different 5′ splice sites from humans, were identified. Alignment of amino acid sequences revealed that AluYRa2-exonized transcript has short N-terminal peptides. Therefore, AS events play a major role in the generation of various transcripts and proteins during primate evolution. In particular, lineage-specific integration of Alu elements and species-specific Alu-derived exonization events could be important sources of gene diversification in primates. PMID:26537194

  10. Repeated consumption of a large volume of liquid and semi-solid foods increases ad libitum intake, but does not change expected satiety.

    PubMed

    Hogenkamp, P S; Mars, M; Stafleu, A; de Graaf, C

    2012-10-01

    Food intake and a food's expected satiating effect initially rely on sensory attributes. People will learn about the food's satiating capacity by exposure. We investigated whether repeated consumption changed the expected satiety effects and intake of iso-energetic liquid and semi-solid foods. In a randomised cross-over study, participants (n=53; age: 21±2.9 y; BMI: 21.8±2.0 kg/m²) consumed one of two iso-energetic dairy foods (liquid or semi-solid) for breakfast in each 5-day test condition. Expectations regarding satiety were measured on days 1, 2, and 5. Foods were offered ad libitum on days 1 and 5 and in a fixed volume on days 2-4. Appetite sensations were rated up to 180 min after the start of the session on fixed time points. Expected satiety effects of the semi-solid food were higher than of the liquid food on all days (p<0.0001). Ad libitum intake of the liquid food was higher than of the semi-solid food on day 1 (liquid: 391±177 g, semi-solid: 277±98 g; p<0.0001) and day 5 (liquid: 477±161 g, semi-solid: 375±148 g; p<0.0001). On day 2, hunger was rated lower and fullness rated higher after the semi-solid compared with the liquid food; on day 4, no differences were observed (significant product∗ exposure interaction AUC). Changes in hunger and fullness indicated that the fixed volumes of liquid and solid food were perceived to be equally satiating after repeated consumption, but this did not result in the anticipated changes: expected satiety effects remained lower, and ad libitum intake higher for the liquid compared with the semi-solid food. The effect of texture on a food's expected satiety effects and its ad libitum intake appears to be large, also after repeated consumption. Expectations based on sensory cues are not easily changed.

  11. Association of the Alu insertion polymorphism in the progesterone receptor gene with breast cancer in a Mexican population

    PubMed Central

    Figuera, Luis E.; Flores-Ramos, Liliana Gómez; Puebla-Pérez, Ana María; Zúñiga-González, Guillermo Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The progesterone receptor (PR) gene plays an important role in reproduction-related events. Data on polymorphisms in the PR gene have revealed associations with cancer, particularly for the Alu insertion polymorphism, which has been suggested to affect progesterone receptor function and contribute to tumor promotion in the mammary gland. Material and methods We examined the role of the Alu insertion polymorphism in the PR gene by comparing the genotypes of 209 healthy Mexican women with those of 481 Mexican women with breast cancer (BC). Results The genotype frequencies observed in the controls and BC patients were 0% and 4% for T2/T2 (Alu insertion), 16% and 21% for T1/T2, and 84% and 75% for T1/T1 (Alu deletion), respectively. The obtained odds ratio (OR) was 1.7, with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 1.1–2.6, p = 0.009, for the T1/T2–T2/T2 genotypes. The association was also evident when the distributions of the T1/T2–T2/T2 genotypes in patients in the following categories were compared: obesity grade II (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.03–3.18, p = 0.039) and the chemotherapy response (OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.27–3.067, p = 0.002). Conclusions The T1/T2–T2/T2 genotypes of the Alu insertion polymorphism in the PR gene are associated with BC susceptibility in the analyzed Mexican population. PMID:26170848

  12. Gene flow and genetic structure in the Galician population (NW Spain) according to Alu insertions

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Tito A; Fariña, José; Diéguez, Lois Pérez; Lodeiro, Rosa

    2008-01-01

    Background The most recent Alu insertions reveal different degrees of polymorphism in human populations, and a series of characteristics that make them particularly suitable genetic markers for Human Biology studies. This has led these polymorphisms to be used to analyse the origin and phylogenetic relationships between contemporary human groups. This study analyses twelve Alu sequences in a sample of 216 individuals from the autochthonous population of Galicia (NW Spain), with the aim of studying their genetic structure and phylogenetic position with respect to the populations of Western and Central Europe and North Africa, research that is of special interest in revealing European population dynamics, given the peculiarities of the Galician population due to its geographical situation in western Europe, and its historical vicissitudes. Results The insertion frequencies of eleven of the Alu elements analysed were within the variability range of European populations, while Yb8NBC125 proved to be the lowest so far recorded to date in Europe. Taking the twelve polymorphisms into account, the GD value for the Galician population was 0.268. The comparative analyses carried out using the MDS, NJ and AMOVA methods reveal the existence of spatial heterogeneity, and identify three population groups that correspond to the geographic areas of Western-Central Europe, Eastern Mediterranean Europe and North Africa. Galicia is shown to be included in the Western-Central European cluster, together with other Spanish populations. When only considering populations from Mediterranean Europe, the Galician population revealed a degree of genetic flow similar to that of the majority of the populations from this geographic area. Conclusion The results of this study reveal that the Galician population, despite its geographic situation in the western edge of the European continent, occupies an intermediate position in relation to other European populations in general, and Iberian

  13. TLR-Independent and P2X7-Dependent Signaling Mediate Alu RNA-Induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in Geographic Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kerur, Nagaraj; Hirano, Yoshio; Tarallo, Valeria; Fowler, Benjamin J.; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Yasuma, Tetsuhiro; Yasuma, Reo; Kim, Younghee; Hinton, David R.; Kirschning, Carsten J.; Gelfand, Bradley D.; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Accumulation of Alu RNA transcripts due to DICER1 deficiency in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) promotes geographic atrophy. Recently we showed that Alu RNA activated the NLRP3 inflammasome, leading to RPE cell death via interleukin-18 (IL-18)-mediated MyD88 signaling. However, the molecular basis for NLRP3 inflammasome activation by Alu RNA is not well understood. We sought to decipher the key signaling events triggered by Alu RNA that lead to priming and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and, ultimately, to RPE degeneration by investigating the roles of the purinoreceptor P2X7, the transcription factor NF-κB, and the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in these processes. Methods. Human and mouse RPE cells were transfected with a plasmid encoding an Alu element (pAlu) or an in vitro-transcribed Alu RNA. Inflammasome priming was assessed by measuring NLRP3 and IL18 mRNA levels by real-time quantitative PCR. Using immunoblotting, we assessed NF-κB activation by monitoring phosphorylation of its p65 subunit, and inflammasome activation by monitoring caspase-1 cleavage into its active form. RPE degeneration was induced in mice by subretinal transfection of pAlu or Alu RNA. The NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7082, the P2X7 receptor antagonist A-740003, and the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor glyburide were delivered by intravitreous injections. We studied wild-type (WT) C57Bl/6J, P2rx7−/−, Nfkb1−/−, and Tlr23479−/− mice. RPE degeneration was assessed by fundus photography and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) staining of mouse RPE. Results. Alu RNA-induced NF-κB activation, independent of TLR-1, -2, -3, -4, -6, -7, and -9 signaling, was required for priming the NLRP3 inflammasome. Nfkb1−/− and P2rx7−/− mice and WT mice treated with the pharmacological inhibitors of NF-κB, P2X7, or NLRP3, were protected against Alu RNA-induced RPE degeneration. Conclusions. NF-κB and P2X7 are critical signaling intermediates in Alu RNA-induced inflammasome priming and

  14. [Collection of low copy number repeats for use as probes in human DNA Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    To isolate novel families of repeated human sequences our basic plan is to (i) construct repeated sequence libraries, (ii) discard known repeats by hybridization and (iii) sort through the remaining clones to eliminate single copy sequences as well as known repeats that slipped through the first screening. During the previous grant period, we completed the library construction and initial screening. Six size selected sublibraries of renatured human DNA were constructed, e.g. sublibrary II contains 250 nt to 380 nt inserts. The released inserts were hybridized to Alu, L1, THE 1, [alpha] satellite and satellite M (which crosshybridizes to satellites I and H) hybridization probes. We have adopted two strategies to sort through these candidate clones.

  15. Alu sequence involvement in transcriptional insulation of the keratin 18 gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Thorey, I S; Ceceña, G; Reynolds, W; Oshima, R G

    1993-01-01

    The human keratin 18 (K18) gene is expressed in a variety of adult simple epithelial tissues, including liver, intestine, lung, and kidney, but is not normally found in skin, muscle, heart, spleen, or most of the brain. Transgenic animals derived from the cloned K18 gene express the transgene in appropriate tissues at levels directly proportional to the copy number and independently of the sites of integration. We have investigated in transgenic mice the dependence of K18 gene expression on the distal 5' and 3' flanking sequences and upon the RNA polymerase III promoter of an Alu repetitive DNA transcription unit immediately upstream of the K18 promoter. Integration site-independent expression of tandemly duplicated K18 transgenes requires the presence of either an 825-bp fragment of the 5' flanking sequence or the 3.5-kb 3' flanking sequence. Mutation of the RNA polymerase III promoter of the Alu element within the 825-bp fragment abolishes copy number-dependent expression in kidney but does not abolish integration site-independent expression when assayed in the absence of the 3' flanking sequence of the K18 gene. The characteristics of integration site-independent expression and copy number-dependent expression are separable. In addition, the formation of the chromatin state of the K18 gene, which likely restricts the tissue-specific expression of this gene, is not dependent upon the distal flanking sequences of the 10-kb K18 gene but rather may depend on internal regulatory regions of the gene. Images PMID:7692231

  16. Increased WD-repeat containing protein 1 in interstitial fluid from ovarian carcinomas shown by comparative proteomic analysis of malignant and healthy gynecological tissue.

    PubMed

    Haslene-Hox, Hanne; Oveland, Eystein; Woie, Kathrine; Salvesen, Helga B; Wiig, Helge; Tenstad, Olav

    2013-11-01

    We aimed to identify differentially expressed proteins in interstitial fluid from ovarian cancer employing multiple fractioning and high resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis, and asked whether specific proteins that may serve as biomarker candidates or therapeutic targets could be identified. High throughput proteomics was conducted on immunodepleted and fractioned interstitial fluid from pooled samples of ovarian carcinomas, using endometrial carcinomas and healthy ovarian tissue as controls. Differential analysis revealed the up-regulation of extracellular proteasomes in tumor interstitial fluid compared to the healthy control. Moreover, a number of differentially expressed proteins in interstitial fluid from ovarian carcinomas compared with control tissues were identified. Detection of proteasome 20S related proteins in TIF compared to IF from healthy tissue indicates that the 20S proteasome can have a role in the tumor microenvironment. Six selected proteins, CEACAM5, FREM2, MUC5AC, TFF3, PYCARD and WDR1, were independently validated in individual tumor lysates from ovarian carcinomas by multiple reaction monitoring initiated detection and sequence analysis, Western blot and/or selected reaction monitoring. Quantification of specific proteins revealed substantial heterogeneity between individual samples. Nevertheless, WD repeat-containing protein 1 was confirmed as being significantly overexpressed in interstitial fluid from ovarian carcinomas compared to healthy ovarian tissue by Orbitrap analysis of individual native interstitial fluid from ovarian and endometrial carcinomas and healthy ovarian tissue. We suggest that this protein should be explored as a therapeutic target in ovarian carcinomas. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: An Updated Secretome.

  17. The Infertility of Repeat-Breeder Cows During Summer Is Associated with Decreased Mitochondrial DNA and Increased Expression of Mitochondrial and Apoptotic Genes in Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Roberta Machado; Chiaratti, Marcos Roberto; Macabelli, Carolina Habermann; Rodrigues, Carlos Alberto; Ferraz, Márcio Leão; Watanabe, Yeda Fumie; Smith, Lawrence Charles; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira; Baruselli, Pietro Sampaio

    2016-03-01

    Oocyte quality is known to be a major cause of infertility in repeat-breeder (RB) and heat-stressed dairy cows. However, the mechanisms by which RB oocytes become less capable of supporting embryo development remain largely unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the decreased oocyte competence of RB cows (RBs) during summer is associated with an altered gene expression profile and a decrease in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number. Therefore, oocytes collected from heifers, non-RBs in peak lactation (PLs), and RBs were used to evaluate mtDNA amounts as well as the expression levels of genes associated with the mitochondria (MT-CO1, NRF1, POLG, POLG2, PPARGC1A, and TFAM), apoptosis (BAX, BCL2, and ITM2B), and oocyte maturation (BMP15, FGF8, FGF10, FGF16, FGF17, and GDF9). The oocytes retrieved from RBs during winter contained over eight times more mtDNA than those retrieved from RBs during summer. They also contained significantly less mtDNA than oocytes retrieved from heifers and PLs during summer. Moreover, the expression of mitochondria- (NRF1, POLG, POLG2, PPARGC1A, and TFAM) and apoptosis-related (BAX and ITM2B) genes, as well as of GDF9, in RB oocytes collected during summer was significantly greater than that in oocytes collected from heifers and PLs during the same season. In oocytes from heifers and PLs, the expression levels of these genes were lower in those collected during summer compared with winter, but this difference was not observed in oocytes collected from RBs. Altogether, these data provide evidence of altered gene expression and reduced mtDNA copy number in the oocytes collected from RBs during summer. This indicates a loss of fertility in RBs during summer, which might be caused by a possible mitochondrial dysfunction associated with a greater chance of oocytes to undergo apoptosis.

  18. The Infertility of Repeat-Breeder Cows During Summer Is Associated with Decreased Mitochondrial DNA and Increased Expression of Mitochondrial and Apoptotic Genes in Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Roberta Machado; Chiaratti, Marcos Roberto; Macabelli, Carolina Habermann; Rodrigues, Carlos Alberto; Ferraz, Márcio Leão; Watanabe, Yeda Fumie; Smith, Lawrence Charles; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira; Baruselli, Pietro Sampaio

    2016-03-01

    Oocyte quality is known to be a major cause of infertility in repeat-breeder (RB) and heat-stressed dairy cows. However, the mechanisms by which RB oocytes become less capable of supporting embryo development remain largely unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the decreased oocyte competence of RB cows (RBs) during summer is associated with an altered gene expression profile and a decrease in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number. Therefore, oocytes collected from heifers, non-RBs in peak lactation (PLs), and RBs were used to evaluate mtDNA amounts as well as the expression levels of genes associated with the mitochondria (MT-CO1, NRF1, POLG, POLG2, PPARGC1A, and TFAM), apoptosis (BAX, BCL2, and ITM2B), and oocyte maturation (BMP15, FGF8, FGF10, FGF16, FGF17, and GDF9). The oocytes retrieved from RBs during winter contained over eight times more mtDNA than those retrieved from RBs during summer. They also contained significantly less mtDNA than oocytes retrieved from heifers and PLs during summer. Moreover, the expression of mitochondria- (NRF1, POLG, POLG2, PPARGC1A, and TFAM) and apoptosis-related (BAX and ITM2B) genes, as well as of GDF9, in RB oocytes collected during summer was significantly greater than that in oocytes collected from heifers and PLs during the same season. In oocytes from heifers and PLs, the expression levels of these genes were lower in those collected during summer compared with winter, but this difference was not observed in oocytes collected from RBs. Altogether, these data provide evidence of altered gene expression and reduced mtDNA copy number in the oocytes collected from RBs during summer. This indicates a loss of fertility in RBs during summer, which might be caused by a possible mitochondrial dysfunction associated with a greater chance of oocytes to undergo apoptosis. PMID:26843447

  19. Opposing Control by Transcription Factors MYB61 and MYB3 Increases Freezing Tolerance by Relieving C-Repeat Binding Factor Suppression1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunqin; Miao, Zhenyan; Xie, Can; Meng, Xiangzhao; Deng, Jie; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Frugier, Florian; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Cold acclimation is an important process by which plants respond to low temperature and enhance their winter hardiness. C-REPEAT BINDING FACTOR1 (CBF1), CBF2, and CBF3 genes were shown previously to participate in cold acclimation in Medicago truncatula. In addition, MtCBF4 is transcriptionally induced by salt, drought, and cold stresses. We show here that MtCBF4, shown previously to enhance drought and salt tolerance, also positively regulates cold acclimation and freezing tolerance. To identify molecular factors acting upstream and downstream of the MtCBF4 transcription factor (TF) in cold responses, we first identified genes that are differentially regulated upon MtCBF4 overexpression using RNAseq Digital Gene Expression Profiling. Among these, we showed that MtCBF4 directly activates the transcription of the COLD ACCLIMATION SPECIFIC15 (MtCAS15) gene. To gain insights into how MtCBF4 is transcriptionally regulated in response to cold, an R2R3-MYB TF, MtMYB3, was identified based on a yeast one-hybrid screen as binding directly to MYB cis-elements in the MtCBF4 promoter, leading to the inhibition of MtCBF4 expression. In addition, another MYB TF, MtMYB61, identified as an interactor of MtMYB3, can relieve the inhibitory effect of MtMYB3 on MtCBF4 transcription. This study, therefore, supports a model describing how MtCBF4 is regulated by antagonistic MtMYB3/MtMYB61 TFs, leading to the up-regulation of downstream targets such as MtCAS15 acting in cold acclimation in M. truncatula. PMID:27578551

  20. Saturation of repeated quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapasalo, Erkka; Heinosaari, Teiko; Kuramochi, Yui

    2016-08-01

    We study sequential measurement scenarios where the system is repeatedly subjected to the same measurement process. We first provide examples of such repeated measurements where further repetitions of the measurement do not increase our knowledge on the system after some finite number of measurement steps. We also prove, however, that repeating the Lüders measurement of an unsharp two-outcome observable never saturates in this sense, and we characterize the observable measured in the limit of infinitely many repetitions. Our result implies that a repeated measurement can be used to correct the inherent noise of an unsharp observable.

  1. The Y Alu polymorphism in southern African populations and its relationship to other Y-specific polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Spurdle, A.B.; Jenkins, T. ); Hammer, M.F. )

    1994-02-01

    Y-linked polymorphisms were studied in a number of African populations. The frequency of the alleles of a Y-specific Alu insertion polymorphism, termed the [open quotes]Y Alu polymorphism,[close quotes] was determined in 889 individuals from 23 different African population groups. A trend in frequency was observed, with the insert largely absent in Caucasoid populations, at intermediate frequency in the Khoisan, and at high frequency in Negroids. The insert predates diversification of Homo sapiens, since it occurs in all groups. The Alu insertion is believed to result from a unique mutation event, and comparisons between this and several other Y-linked polymorphisms were carried out in an attempt to validate their usefulness in population and evolutionary studies. The p21A1/Taql and pDP31/EcoRI polymorphisms and 49a/TaqI alleles were all shown to have arisen on more than one occasion, and evidence exists for a preraciation crossover event between the Y-linked pseudoautosomal XY275 locus and the Y chromosome pseudoautosomal boundary. 33 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Inhibition of LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposition by exosomes encapsidating APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F.

    PubMed

    Khatua, Atanu K; Taylor, Harry E; Hildreth, James E K; Popik, Waldemar

    2010-04-25

    Human cytidine deaminases, including APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F, are part of a cellular defense system against retroviruses and retroelements including non-LTR retrotransposons LINE-1 (L1) and Alu. Expression of cellular A3 proteins is sufficient for inhibition of L1 and Alu retrotransposition, but the effect of A3 proteins transferred in exosomes on retroelement mobilization is unknown. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that exosomes secreted by CD4(+)H9 T cells and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells encapsidate A3G and A3F and inhibit L1 and Alu retrotransposition. A3G is the major contributor to the inhibitory activity of exosomes, however, the contribution of A3F in H9 exosomes cannot be excluded. Additionally, we show that exosomes encapsidate mRNAs coding for A3 proteins. A3G mRNA, and less so A3F, was enriched in exosomes secreted by H9 cells. Exosomal A3G mRNA was functional in vitro. Whether exosomes inhibit retrotransposons in vivo requires further investigation.

  3. Women, but not men, report increasingly more pain during repeated (un)predictable painful electrocutaneous stimulation: Evidence for mediation by fear of pain.

    PubMed

    Meulders, Ann; Vansteenwegen, Debora; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2012-05-01

    An abundance of animal research suggests that fear inhibits pain whereas anxiety increases it. Human studies on this topic are more scarce, and the existing evidence seems rather inconsistent. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the divergent effects of both negative emotional states-that is, pain-related fear and anxiety on pain sensitivity and unpleasantness. Possible sex-related differences were also under investigation, as well as the potential mediational role of fear of movement-related pain on the differences in pain intensity and unpleasantness between both sexes. We employed a voluntary joystick movement paradigm using movements as conditioned stimuli (CSs) and a painful electrocutaneous stimulus as the unconditioned stimulus. Healthy participants received predictable shocks in one condition and unpredictable shocks in another condition. The former procedure is known to induce fear of movement-related pain to the CS+ movement (movement consistently followed by pain), whereas the latter procedure induces (contextual) pain-related anxiety. Results showed that fear of movement-related pain indeed resulted in decreased pain intensity/unpleasantness ratings, while pain-related anxiety led to increased pain intensity/unpleasantness reports. Further, the anticipated sex difference was modulated by time. That is, women gradually reported more pain/unpleasantness, whereas men do not show such a sensitization effect. Moreover, this sex-specific sensitization is partially mediated by (conditioned) fear of movement-related pain. Women also report increasingly more fear of pain over conditioning blocks, while men do not. These results might be interesting in the light of the overrepresentation of women in a number of clinical pain conditions as well as anxiety disorders.

  4. The distribution of interspersed repeats is nonuniform and conserved in the mouse and human genomes.

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, P; Meunier-Rotival, M; Bernardi, G

    1983-01-01

    We investigated the genomic distribution of mouse and human repeated sequences by assessing their relative amounts in the four major components into which these genomes can be resolved by density gradient centrifugation techniques. These components are families of fragments that account for most or all of main-band DNAs, range in dG + dC content from 37% to 49%, and are derived by preparative breakage from long DNA segments (greater than 300 kb) of fairly homogeneous composition, the isochores. The results indicate that the short repeats of the B1 family of mouse and of the Alu I family of man are most frequent in the heavy components, whereas the long repeats of the BamHI family of mouse and of the Kpn I family of man are mainly present in the two light components. These results show that the genomic distribution of repeated sequences is nonuniform and conserved in two mammalian species. In addition, we observed that the base composition of two classes of repeats (60% dG + dC for short repeats; 39% dG + dC for long repeats) is correlated with the composition of the major components in which they are embedded. Finally, we obtained evidence that not only the short repeats but also the long repeats are transcribed, these transcripts having been found in mouse poly(A)+ mRNA. Images PMID:6572942

  5. A Repeated Measures Experiment of School Playing Environment to Increase Physical Activity and Enhance Self-Esteem in UK School Children

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Carly; Gladwell, Valerie; Barton, Jo

    2014-01-01

    School playtime provides daily opportunities for children to be active outdoors, but only makes small contributions to physical activity (PA) requirements. Natural environments facilitate unstructured PA and children report a preference for play in nature. Thus, play on the school field might encourage children to be more active during playtime. The primary aim of this study was to examine the impact of the school playing environment on children's PA. Descriptive data and fitness were assessed in 25 children aged 8–9 years from a single primary school. Over two consecutive weeks participants were allocated to either play on the school field or playground during playtime. The order of play in the two areas was randomised and counterbalanced. Moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) was assessed during playtime on the last two days of each week using accelerometers. There was a significant interaction of environment and sex on MVPA during morning play (F(1,22) = 6.27; P<0.05; np2 = 0.222), but not during lunch (P>0.05; np2 = 0.060) or all of playtime combined (P>0.05; np2 = 0.140). During morning play boys were significantly more active than girls on the playground (t(23) = 1.32; P<0.01; n2 = 0.291), but not on the field (P>0.05; n2 = 0.071). For lunch (F(1,22) = 24,11; P<0.001; np2 = 0.523) and all of playtime combined (F(1,22) = 33.67; P<0.001; np2 = 0.616) there was a significant effect of environment. There was also a significant main effect of sex during lunch (F(1,22) = 11.56; P<0.01; np2 = 0.344) and all of playtime combined (F(1,22) = 12.37; P<0.01; np2 = 0.371). MVPA was higher on the field and boys were more active than girls. Play on the field leads to increases in MVPA, particularly in girls. The promising trend for the effect of the natural environment on MVPA indicates that interventions aimed at increasing MVPA should use the natural environment and that schools should encourage greater use of their

  6. School-based intervention with children. Peer-modeling, reward and repeated exposure reduce food neophobia and increase liking of fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Laureati, Monica; Bergamaschi, Valentina; Pagliarini, Ella

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of the 'Food Dudes' school-based intervention consisting of rewards, peer-modeling and food exposure on food neophobia and the liking of fruits and vegetables (FV) in a large cohort of children. Five-hundred sixty children recruited from three schools were assigned to the experimental or control group. For 16 days, children in the experimental group watched motivational videos, were read letters to encourage them to eat FV and received a small reward for eating one portion of both a fruit and a vegetable. The control group was only provided with FV for the same time period. Food neophobia and liking were measured in both groups of children before and after the intervention, and a follow-up measurement was carried out 6 months later. The intervention was effective in reducing food neophobia and, most importantly, a persistent effect was observed 6 months after the intervention as children of the experimental group showed significantly lower neophobia scores than the control group. Additionally, the program was effective in increasing liking for both FV; however, this effect was maintained only for fruit after 6 months.

  7. Questioning the "melting pot": analysis of Alu inserts in three population samples from Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Pedro C; Mut, Patricia; Ackermann, Elizabeth; Figueiro, Gonzalo; Sans, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The way that immigrants integrate into recipient societies has been discussed for decades, mainly from the perspective of the social sciences. Uruguay, as other American countries, received diffferent waves of European immigrants, although the details of the process of assimilation, when it did occur, are unclear. In this study we used genetic markers to understand the process experienced by the Basques, one of the major migration waves that populated Uruguay, and their relation to other immigrants, as well as to Native American and African descendants. For this purpose, we analyzed the allele frequencies of 10 ALU loci (A25, ACE, APOA1, B65, D1, F13B, PV92, TPA25, HS2.43, and HS4.65) in three samples from Uruguay (two of Basque descendants, one of non-Basque descendants) from two locations: Montevideo and Trinidad. No departure from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed, with the exceptions of the APOA1 and D1 loci in the non-Basque descendants' samples. Our data show that the major genetic contribution in the three samples comes from Europe (78-88%), with minor African (10-15%) and Native American (0-10%) contributions. Genetic distances reveal that Basque descendants from Trinidad cluster with Europeans, whereas both Montevideo samples cluster together and are separate from other populations, showing two diffferent types of integration, related to the general characteristics of each regional population.

  8. Human diversity in Jordan: polymorphic Alu insertions in general Jordanian and Bedouin groups.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Daniela; Sadiq, May; Carreras-Torres, Robert; Khabour, Omar; Alkaraki, Almuthanna; Esteban, Esther; Via, Marc; Moral, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Jordan, located in the Levant region, is an area crucial for the investigation of human migration between Africa and Eurasia. However, the genetic history of Jordanians has yet to be clarified, including the origin of the Bedouins today resident in Jordan. Here, we provide new genetic data on autosomal independent markers in two Jordanian population samples (Bedouins and the general population) to begin to examine the genetic diversity inside this country and to provide new information about the genetic position of these populations in the context of the Mediterranean and Middle East area. The markers analyzed were 18 Alu polymorphic insertions characterized by their identity by descent, known ancestral state (lack of insertion), and apparent selective neutrality. The results indicate significant genetic diffferences between Bedouins and general Jordanians (p = 0.038). Whereas Bedouins show a close genetic proximity to North Africans, general Jordanians appear genetically more similar to other Middle East populations. In general, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that Bedouins had an important role in the peopling of Jordan and constitute the original substrate of the current population. However, migration into Jordan in recent years likely has contributed to the diversity among current Jordanian population groups.

  9. N-Terminal Ile-Orn- and Trp-Orn-Motif Repeats Enhance Membrane Interaction and Increase the Antimicrobial Activity of Apidaecins against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bluhm, Martina E. C.; Schneider, Viktoria A. F.; Schäfer, Ingo; Piantavigna, Stefania; Goldbach, Tina; Knappe, Daniel; Seibel, Peter; Martin, Lisandra L.; Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a life-threatening nosocomial pathogen due to its generally low susceptibility toward antibiotics. Furthermore, many strains have acquired resistance mechanisms requiring new antimicrobials with novel mechanisms to enhance treatment options. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides, such as the apidaecin analog Api137, are highly efficient against various Enterobacteriaceae infections in mice, but less active against P. aeruginosa in vitro. Here, we extended our recent work by optimizing lead peptides Api755 (gu-OIORPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH; gu = N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylguanidino, O = L-ornithine) and Api760 (gu-OWORPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) by incorporation of Ile-Orn- and Trp-Orn-motifs, respectively. Api795 (gu-O(IO)2RPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) and Api794 (gu-O(WO)3RPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) were highly active against P. aeruginosa with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 8–16 and 8–32 μg/mL against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Assessed using a quartz crystal microbalance, these peptides inserted into a membrane layer and the surface activity increased gradually from Api137, over Api795, to Api794. This mode of action was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy indicating some membrane damage only at the high peptide concentrations. Api794 and Api795 were highly stable against serum proteases (half-life times >5 h) and non-hemolytic to human erythrocytes at peptide concentrations of 0.6 g/L. At this concentration, Api795 reduced the cell viability of HeLa cells only slightly, whereas the IC50 of Api794 was 0.23 ± 0.09 g/L. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed no colocalization of 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein-labeled Api794 or Api795 with the mitochondria, excluding interactions with the mitochondrial membrane. Interestingly, Api795 was localized in endosomes, whereas Api794 was present in endosomes and the cytosol. This was verified using flow cytometry showing a 50% higher uptake of Api794 in HeLa cells compared

  10. N-Terminal Ile-Orn- and Trp-Orn-Motif Repeats Enhance Membrane Interaction and Increase the Antimicrobial Activity of Apidaecins against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Martina E C; Schneider, Viktoria A F; Schäfer, Ingo; Piantavigna, Stefania; Goldbach, Tina; Knappe, Daniel; Seibel, Peter; Martin, Lisandra L; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a life-threatening nosocomial pathogen due to its generally low susceptibility toward antibiotics. Furthermore, many strains have acquired resistance mechanisms requiring new antimicrobials with novel mechanisms to enhance treatment options. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides, such as the apidaecin analog Api137, are highly efficient against various Enterobacteriaceae infections in mice, but less active against P. aeruginosa in vitro. Here, we extended our recent work by optimizing lead peptides Api755 (gu-OIORPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH; gu = N,N,N',N'-tetramethylguanidino, O = L-ornithine) and Api760 (gu-OWORPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) by incorporation of Ile-Orn- and Trp-Orn-motifs, respectively. Api795 (gu-O(IO)2RPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) and Api794 (gu-O(WO)3RPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) were highly active against P. aeruginosa with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 8-16 and 8-32 μg/mL against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Assessed using a quartz crystal microbalance, these peptides inserted into a membrane layer and the surface activity increased gradually from Api137, over Api795, to Api794. This mode of action was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy indicating some membrane damage only at the high peptide concentrations. Api794 and Api795 were highly stable against serum proteases (half-life times >5 h) and non-hemolytic to human erythrocytes at peptide concentrations of 0.6 g/L. At this concentration, Api795 reduced the cell viability of HeLa cells only slightly, whereas the IC50 of Api794 was 0.23 ± 0.09 g/L. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed no colocalization of 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein-labeled Api794 or Api795 with the mitochondria, excluding interactions with the mitochondrial membrane. Interestingly, Api795 was localized in endosomes, whereas Api794 was present in endosomes and the cytosol. This was verified using flow cytometry showing a 50% higher uptake of Api794 in HeLa cells compared with Api

  11. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  12. A Repeat Look at Repeating Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markworth, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    A "repeating pattern" is a cyclical repetition of an identifiable core. Children in the primary grades usually begin pattern work with fairly simple patterns, such as AB, ABC, or ABB patterns. The unique letters represent unique elements, whereas the sequence of letters represents the core that is repeated. Based on color, shape,…

  13. Repeated Reading. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Repeated reading" is an academic practice that aims to increase oral reading fluency. "Repeated reading" can be used with students who have developed initial word reading skills but demonstrate inadequate reading fluency for their grade level. During "repeated reading," a student sits in a quiet location with a…

  14. Alu and L1 sequence distributions in Xq24-q28 and their comparative utility in YAC contig assembly and verification

    SciTech Connect

    Porta, G.; Zucchi, I.; Schlessinger, D.; Hillier, L.; Green, P.; Nowotny, V.; D`Urso, M.

    1993-05-01

    The contents of Alu- and L1-containing TaqI restriction fragments were assessed by Southern blot analyses across YAC contigs already assembled by other means and localized within Xq24-q28. Fingerprinting patterns of YACs in contigs were concordant. Using software based on that of M. V. Olson et al. to analyze digitized data on fragment sizes, fingerprinting itself could establish matches among about 40% of a test group of 435 YACs. At 100-kb resolution, both repetitive elements were found throughout the region, with no apparent enrichment of Alu or L1 in DNA of G compared to that found in R bands. However, consistent with a random overall distribution, delimited regions of up to 100 kb contained clusters of repetitive elements. The local concentrations may help to account for the reported differential hybridization of Alu and L1 probes to segments of metaphase chromosomes. 40 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Physical mapping of BK virus DNA with SacI, MboII, and AluI restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, R C; Wu, R

    1978-01-01

    A new restriction endonuclease, SacI from Streptomyces achromogenes cleaves BK virus (strain MM) DNA into 3 fragments, whereas MboII from Moraxella bovis and AluI from Arthrobacter luteus give 22 and 30 fragments, respectively. All these specific DNA fragments were ordered and mapped on the viral genome by two methods first, by the reciprocal digestion method using uniformly 32P-labeled DNA; and second, by the partial digestion technique using the single-end 32P-labeled DNA. This study, together with those reported earlier, defined the location of 90 cleavage sites on the BK virus DNA. Images PMID:215783

  16. Identification of an Alu retrotransposition event in close proximity to a strong candidate gene for Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Y P; Rommens, J M; Andrew, S E; Hutchinson, G B; Lin, B; Theilmann, J; Graham, R; Glaves, M L; Starr, E; McDonald, H

    1993-03-25

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a late-onset autosomal dominant neuropsychiatric disorder presenting in mid-adult life with personality disturbance and involuntary movements, cognitive and affective disturbance, and inexorable progression to death. The underlying genetic defect has been mapped to chromosomal band 4p16.3 (refs 2, 3). Analysis of specific recombination events in some families with HD has further refined the location of the HD defect to a 2.2 megabase DNA interval. Using a direct complementary DNA selection strategy we have identified at least seven transcriptional units within the minimal region believed to contain the HD gene. Screening with one of the cDNA clones identified an Alu insertion in genomic DNA from two persons with HD which showed complete cosegregation with the disease in these families but was not found in 1,000 control chromosomes. Two genes including the previously identified alpha-adducin gene and another that encodes for a 12-kilobase transcript, map in close proximity to the Alu insertion site. The 12-kilobase transcript should be regarded as a strong candidate for the HD gene.

  17. Rat dams exposed repeatedly to a daily brief separation from the pups exhibit increased maternal behavior, decreased anxiety and altered levels of receptors for estrogens (ERα, ERβ), oxytocin and serotonin (5-HT1A) in their brain.

    PubMed

    Stamatakis, Antonios; Kalpachidou, Theodora; Raftogianni, Androniki; Zografou, Efstratia; Tzanou, Athanasia; Pondiki, Stavroula; Stylianopoulou, Fotini

    2015-02-01

    In the present study we investigated the neurobiological mechanisms underlying expression of maternal behavior. Increased maternal behavior was experimentally induced by a brief 15-min separation between the mother and the pups during postnatal days 1 to 22. On postnatal days (PND) 12 and 22, we determined in experimental and control dams levels of anxiety in the elevated plus maze (EPM) as well as the levels of receptors for estrogens (ERα, ERβ), oxytocin (OTR) and serotonin (5-HT1AR) in areas of the limbic system (prefrontal cortex-PFC, hippocampus, lateral septum-SL, medial preoptic area-MPOA, shell of nucleus accumbens-nAc-Sh, central-CeA and basolateral-BLA amygdala), involved in the regulation of maternal behavior. Experimental dams, which showed increased maternal behavior towards their offspring, displayed reduced anxiety in the EPM on both PND12 and PND22. These behavioral differences could be attributed to neurochemical alterations in their brain: On both PND12 and PND22, experimental mothers had higher levels of ERα and OTRs in the PFC, hippocampus, CeA, SL, MPOA and nAc-Sh. The experimental manipulation-induced increase in ERβ levels was less widespread, being localized in PFC, the hippocampal CA2 area, MPOA and nAc-Sh. In addition, 5-HT1ARs were reduced in the PFC, hippocampus, CeA, MPOA and nAc-Sh of the experimental mothers. Our results show that the experience of the daily repeated brief separation from the pups results in increased brain ERs and OTRs, as well as decreased 5-HT1ARs in the dam's brain; these neurochemical changes could underlie the observed increase in maternal behavior and the reduction of anxiety.

  18. Repeated intermittent alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent increases expression of the GABA(A) receptor δ subunit in cerebellar granule neurons and delays motor development in rats.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Marvin R; Vollmer, Cyndel C; Zamudio-Bulcock, Paula A; Vollmer, William; Blomquist, Samantha L; Morton, Russell A; Everett, Julie C; Zurek, Agnieszka A; Yu, Jieying; Orser, Beverley A; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2014-04-01

    Exposure to ethanol (EtOH) during fetal development can lead to long-lasting alterations, including deficits in fine motor skills and motor learning. Studies suggest that these are, in part, a consequence of cerebellar damage. Cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) are the gateway of information into the cerebellar cortex. Functionally, CGNs are heavily regulated by phasic and tonic GABAergic inhibition from Golgi cell interneurons; however, the effect of EtOH exposure on the development of GABAergic transmission in immature CGNs has not been investigated. To model EtOH exposure during the 3rd trimester-equivalent of human pregnancy, neonatal pups were exposed intermittently to high levels of vaporized EtOH from postnatal day (P) 2 to P12. This exposure gradually increased pup serum EtOH concentrations (SECs) to ∼60 mM (∼0.28 g/dl) during the 4 h of exposure. EtOH levels gradually decreased to baseline 8 h after the end of exposure. Surprisingly, basal tonic and phasic GABAergic currents in CGNs were not significantly affected by postnatal alcohol exposure (PAE). However, PAE increased δ subunit expression at P28 as detected by immunohistochemical and western blot analyses. Also, electrophysiological studies with an agonist that is highly selective for δ-containing GABA(A) receptors, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP), showed an increase in THIP-induced tonic current. Behavioral studies of PAE rats did not reveal any deficits in motor coordination, except for a delay in the acquisition of the mid-air righting reflex that was apparent at P15 to P18. These findings demonstrate that repeated intermittent exposure to high levels of EtOH during the equivalent of the last trimester of human pregnancy has significant but relatively subtle effects on motor coordination and GABAergic transmission in CGNs in rats.

  19. Noninvasive pulsed focused ultrasound allows spatiotemporal control of targeted homing for multiple stem cell types in murine skeletal muscle and the magnitude of cell homing can be increased through repeated applications

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Scott R.; Ziadloo, Ali; Kim, Saejeong J.; Nguyen, Ben A.; Frank, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are promising therapeutics for cardiovascular diseases and intravenous injection is the most desirable route of administration clinically. Subsequent homing of exogenous stem cells to pathological loci is frequently required for therapeutic efficacy and is mediated by chemo attractants (cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, and growth factors). Homing processes are inefficient and depend on short-lived pathological inflammation that limits the window of opportunity for cell injections. Noninvasive pulsed focused ultrasound (plus), which emphasizes mechanical ultrasound-tissue interactions, can be precisely targeted in the body and is a promising approach to target and maximize stem cell delivery by stimulating chemo attractant expression in plus-treated tissue prior to cell infusions. We demonstrate that plus is nondestructive to marine skeletal muscle tissue (no necrosis, hemorrhage, or muscle stem cell activation) and initiates a largely M2-type macrophage response. We also demonstrate local up regulation of chemo attractants in plus-treated skeletal muscle leads to enhance homing, permeability, and retention of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and human endothelial precursor cells (EPC). Furthermore, the magnitude of MSC or EPC homing was increased when plus treatments and cell infusions were repeated daily. This study demonstrates that plus defines transient “molecular zip codes” of elevated chemo attractants in targeted muscle tissue, which effectively provides spatiotemporal control and tenability of the homing process for multiple stem cell types. plus is a clinically-translatable modality that may ultimately improve homing efficiency and flexibility of cell therapies for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23922277

  20. The Role of the Y-Chromosome in the Establishment of Murine Hybrid Dysgenesis and in the Analysis of the Nucleotide Sequence Organization, Genetic Transmission and Evolution of Repeated Sequences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallaseth, Ferez Soli

    The Y-chromosome presents a unique cytogenetic framework for the evolution of nucleotide sequences. Alignment of nine Y-chromosomal fragments in their increasing Y-specific/non Y-specific (male/female) sequence divergence ratios was directly and inversely related to their interspersion on these two respective genomic fractions. Sequence analysis confirmed a direct relationship between divergence ratios and the Alu, LINE-1, Satellite and their derivative oligonucleotide contents. Thus their relocation on the Y-chromosome is followed by sequence divergence rather than the well documented concerted evolution of these non-coding progenitor repeated sequences. Five of the nine Y-chromosomal fragments are non-pseudoautosomal and transcribed into heterogeneous PolyA^+ RNA and thus can be retrotransposed. Evolutionary and computer analysis identified homologous oligonucleotide tracts in several human loci suggesting common and random mechanistic origins. Dysgenic genomes represent the accelerated evolution driving sequence divergence (McClintock, 1984). Sex reversal and sterility characterizing dysgenesis occurs in C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos} derivative strains. High frequency, random, multi-locus deletion products of the feral Y^{ rm Pos}-chromosome are generated in the germlines of F1(C57BL/6J X 129/SvY^{ rm Pos})(male) and C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos}(male) but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos}(male). Equal, 10^{-1}, 10^ {-2}, and 0 copies (relative to males) of Y^{rm Pos}-specific deletion products respectively characterize C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} (HC), (LC), (T) and (F) females. The testes determining loci of inactive Y^{rm Pos}-chromosomes in C57BL/6JY^{rm Pos} HC females are the preferentially deleted/rearranged Y ^{rm Pos}-sequences. Disruption of regulation of plasma testosterone and hepatic MUP-A mRNA levels, TRD of a 4.7 Kbp EcoR1 fragment suggest disruption of autosomal/X-chromosomal sequences. These data and the highly repeated progenitor (Alu, GATA, LINE-1

  1. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  2. Activation of RNA polymerase III transcription of human Alu repetitive elements by adenovirus type 5: requirement for the E1b 58-kilodalton protein and the products of E4 open reading frames 3 and 6.

    PubMed Central

    Panning, B; Smiley, J R

    1993-01-01

    We found that transcription of endogenous human Alu elements by RNA polymerase III was strongly stimulated following infection of HeLa cells with adenovirus type 5, leading to the accumulation of high levels of Alu transcripts initiated from Alu polymerase III promoters. In contrast to previously reported cases of adenovirus-induced activation of polymerase III transcription, induction required the E1b 58-kDa protein and the products of E4 open reading frames 3 and 6 in addition to the 289-residue E1a protein. In addition, E1a function was not required at high multiplicities of infection, suggesting that E1a plays an indirect role in Alu activation. These results suggest previously unsuspected regulatory properties of the adenovirus E1b and E4 gene products and provide a novel approach to the study of the biology of the most abundant class of dispersed repetitive DNA in the human genome. Images PMID:7684492

  3. Benthic habitat map of U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Faga‘alu Bay priority study area, Tutuila, American Samoa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochran, Susan A.; Gibbs, Ann E.; D'Antonio, Nicole L.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2016-05-18

    The coral reef in Faga‘alu Bay, Tutuila, American Samoa, has suffered numerous natural and anthropogenic stresses. Areas once dominated by live coral are now mostly rubble surfaces covered with turf or macroalgae. In an effort to improve the health and resilience of the coral reef system, the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force selected Faga‘alu Bay as a priority study area. To support these efforts, the U.S. Geological Survey mapped nearly 1 km2 of seafloor to depths of about 60 m. Unconsolidated sediment (predominantly sand) constitutes slightly greater than 50 percent of the seafloor in the mapped area; reef and other hardbottom potentially available for coral recruitment constitute nearly 50 percent of the mapped area. Of this potentially available hardbottom, only slightly greater than 37 percent is covered with at least 10 percent coral, which is fairly evenly distributed between the reef flat, fore reef, and offshore bank/shelf. 

  4. Benthic habitat map of U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Faga‘alu Bay priority study area, Tutuila, American Samoa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochran, Susan A.; Gibbs, Ann E.; D'Antonio, Nicole L.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2016-01-01

    The coral reef in Faga‘alu Bay, Tutuila, American Samoa, has suffered numerous natural and anthropogenic stresses. Areas once dominated by live coral are now mostly rubble surfaces covered with turf or macroalgae. In an effort to improve the health and resilience of the coral reef system, the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force selected Faga‘alu Bay as a priority study area. To support these efforts, the U.S. Geological Survey mapped nearly 1 km2 of seafloor to depths of about 60 m. Unconsolidated sediment (predominantly sand) constitutes slightly greater than 50 percent of the seafloor in the mapped area; reef and other hardbottom potentially available for coral recruitment constitute nearly 50 percent of the mapped area. Of this potentially available hardbottom, only slightly greater than 37 percent is covered with at least 10 percent coral, which is fairly evenly distributed between the reef flat, fore reef, and offshore bank/shelf. 

  5. Calcitonin Receptor AluI (rs1801197) and Taq1 Calcitonin Genes Polymorphism in 45-and Over 45-year-old Women and their Association with Bone Density

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Morteza; Pourahmad-Jaktaji, Razieh; Farzaneh, Zarghampoor

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Calcitonin receptor gene has also a polymorphism which is associated with bone mass density. This study evaluates the association between calcitonin receptor AluI (rs1801197) and Taq1 calcitonin genes polymorphism with bone density rate. Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study in 2013 in southwestern Iran, 200 blood samples, per the Cochran sample size formula, were taken from women aged 45 and older. DNA was extracted from the samples using the phenol– chloroform method and the genomic fragments in question were proliferated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Results: The genotypic distribution of polymorphism AluI for TT, TC, and CC genotypes in control group was 31.4%, 38.6%, and 30% and in patients 25.4%, 55.4%, and 19.2%, respectively. There was no significant difference in polymorphism AluI between patients and control group and no significant association was found between this gene and bone density rate (P > 0.05). All patients and the individuals in the control group exhibited tt genotype for TaqI calcitonin gene and no significant association was found between these participants and osteoporosis. Conclusion: There was no association between two polymorphisms and osteoporosis, and between polymorphism of these two genes and osteoporosis development rate in the participants. PMID:27708484

  6. Tandem repeats derived from centromeric retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    generated the initial repeat structure, and gene conversions increased the size of each tandem repeat locus. PMID:23452340

  7. Sill emplacement and corresponding ground deformation processes at the Alu-Dalafilla volcanic centre in the Danakil Depression, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Craig; Bastow, Ian; Hetherington, Rachel; van Wyk de Vries, Ben; Jackson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    A consensus has emerged from a variety of disciplines over the past 15 years that Quaternary magmatism in Ethiopia is almost entirely dominated by dike intrusion. Focused dike intrusion within 60 km long, 20 km wide, rift zones is considered to mark the present day locus of extension in Ethiopia, and represent the proto-ridge axis location of an incipient ocean spreading centre. However, it has been suggested on the strength of Moho depths and Quaternary eruptive volumes in northernmost Ethiopia, that the final transition from continental rifting to incipient oceanic spreading may instead be characterised by an abrupt, rheologically driven, late-phase of crustal thinning. Development of a sedimentary basin and mantle decompression melting occurring in the Danakil Depression, driven by this late-phase crustal thinning, should result in a markedly different style of magmatism in the upper crust: i.e. field observations, high-resolution seismic reflection studies, and experimental modelling suggest that interconnected networks of sill intrusions dominate in sedimentary basins. Here, we present the first evidence from the Danakil Depression that links surficial structures, observed at the Alu-Dalafilla volcanic centre, to the ongoing emplacement of an underlying sill. In particular, we use satellite imagery to examine a dome-shaped fold, associated fracture patterns, and surrounding lava flows, which we suggest likely formed in response to roof uplift above and extrusion from a saucer-shaped sill; i.e. a sub-horizontal inner sill encircled by an inward-dipping, transgressive inclined rim. InSAR observations by Pagli et al. (2012) of ground uplift and deflation occurring during the eruption of basaltic lava at Alu-Dalafilla in 2008 capture what we believe to be the first real-time evidence for intrusion-induced forced folding dynamics above a saucer-shaped sill. InSAR data further suggest that intrusion occurred at a depth of ~1 km, likely placing the sill within an

  8. Honesty through repeated interactions.

    PubMed

    Rich, Patricia; Zollman, Kevin J S

    2016-04-21

    In the study of signaling, it is well known that the cost of deception is an essential element for stable honest signaling in nature. In this paper, we show how costs for deception can arise endogenously from repeated interactions between individuals. Utilizing the Sir Philip Sidney game as an illustrative case, we show that repeated interactions can sustain honesty with no observable signal costs, even when deception cannot be directly observed. We provide a number of potential experimental tests for this theory which distinguish it from the available alternatives.

  9. Slit Wheel Repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiFelice, Audrey

    2012-10-01

    Test the repeatibility of the slit wheel by taking a sequence of comparison lamp spectra with grating G230MB {2697} and the three smallest long slits {52X0.2, 52X0.1, and 52X0.05}. This is a clone of Cycle 19 Program 12771.

  10. Slit Wheel Repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chris

    2011-10-01

    Test the repeatibility of the slit wheel by taking a sequence of comparison lamp spectra with grating G230MB {2697} and the three smallest long slits {52X0.2, 52X0.1, and 52X0.05}. This is a clone of Cycle 18 Program 12410.

  11. Slit Wheel Repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiFelice, Audrey

    2013-10-01

    Test the repeatibility of the slit wheel by taking a sequence of comparison lamp spectra with grating G230MB {2697} and the three smallest long slits {52X0.2, 52X0.1, and 52X0.05}. This is a clone of Cycle 20 Program 13140.

  12. Slit Wheel Repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei

    2010-09-01

    Test the repeatibility of the slit wheel by taking a sequence of comparison lamp spectra with grating G230MB {2697} and the three smallest long slits {52X0.2, 52X0.1, and 52X0.05}. This is a clone of Cycle 17 Program 11851.

  13. Repeated Causal Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagmayer, York; Meder, Bjorn

    2013-01-01

    Many of our decisions refer to actions that have a causal impact on the external environment. Such actions may not only allow for the mere learning of expected values or utilities but also for acquiring knowledge about the causal structure of our world. We used a repeated decision-making paradigm to examine what kind of knowledge people acquire in…

  14. All-optical repeater.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  15. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  16. Modulation of LINE-1 and Alu/SVA retrotransposition by Aicardi-Goutières syndrome-related SAMHD1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ke; Du, Juan; Han, Xue; Goodier, John L; Li, Peng; Zhou, Xiaohong; Wei, Wei; Evans, Sean L; Li, Linzhang; Zhang, Wenyan; Cheung, Ling E; Wang, Guanjun; Kazazian, Haig H; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2013-09-26

    Long interspersed elements 1 (LINE-1) occupy at least 17% of the human genome and are its only active autonomous retrotransposons. However, the host factors that regulate LINE-1 retrotransposition are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the Aicardi-Goutières syndrome gene product SAMHD1, recently revealed to be an inhibitor of HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infectivity and neutralized by the viral Vpx protein, is also a potent regulator of LINE-1 and LINE-1-mediated Alu/SVA retrotransposition. We also found that mutant SAMHD1s of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome patients are defective in LINE-1 inhibition. Several domains of SAMHD1 are critical for LINE-1 regulation. SAMHD1 inhibits LINE-1 retrotransposition in dividing cells. An enzymatic active site mutant SAMHD1 maintained substantial anti-LINE-1 activity. SAMHD1 inhibits ORF2p-mediated LINE-1 reverse transcription in isolated LINE-1 ribonucleoproteins by reducing ORF2p level. Thus, SAMHD1 may be a cellular regulator of LINE-1 activity that is conserved in mammals.

  17. Association between birth weight and DNA methylation of IGF2, glucocorticoid receptor and repetitive elements LINE-1 and Alu

    PubMed Central

    Burris, Heather H; Braun, Joe M; Byun, Hyang-Min; Tarantini, Letizia; Mercado, Adriana; Wright, Rosalind J; Schnaas, Lourdes; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Wright, Robert O; Tellez-Rojo, Martha M

    2013-01-01

    Aim We examined the association between birth weight and methylation in the imprinted IGF/H19 loci, the nonimprinted gene NR3C1 and repetitive element DNA (LINE-1 and Alu). Materials & methods We collected umbilical cord venous blood from 219 infants born in Mexico City (Mexico) as part of a prospective birth cohort study and analyzed DNA methylation using pyrosequencing. Results Birth weight was not associated with DNA methylation of the regions studied. One of the CpG dinucleotides in the IGF2 imprinting control region (ICR)1 includes a potential C–T SNP. Among individuals with an absence of methylation at this site, probably due to a paternally inherited T allele, birth weight was associated with mean methylation status of both IGF2 ICR1 and ICR2. However, this association would not have survived adjustment for multiple testing. Conclusion While we did not detect an association between DNA methylation and birth weight, our study suggests a potential gene–epigene interaction between a T allele in the IGF2 ICR1 and methylation of ICRs of IGF2, and fetal growth. PMID:23750643

  18. Stalled DNA Replication Forks at the Endogenous GAA Repeats Drive Repeat Expansion in Friedreich's Ataxia Cells.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Jeannine; Bhalla, Angela D; Butler, Jill Sergesketter; Puckett, James W; Dervan, Peter B; Rosenwaks, Zev; Napierala, Marek

    2016-08-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is caused by the expansion of GAA repeats located in the Frataxin (FXN) gene. The GAA repeats continue to expand in FRDA patients, aggravating symptoms and contributing to disease progression. The mechanism leading to repeat expansion and decreased FXN transcription remains unclear. Using single-molecule analysis of replicated DNA, we detected that expanded GAA repeats present a substantial obstacle for the replication machinery at the FXN locus in FRDA cells. Furthermore, aberrant origin activation and lack of a proper stress response to rescue the stalled forks in FRDA cells cause an increase in 3'-5' progressing forks, which could enhance repeat expansion and hinder FXN transcription by head-on collision with RNA polymerases. Treatment of FRDA cells with GAA-specific polyamides rescues DNA replication fork stalling and alleviates expansion of the GAA repeats, implicating DNA triplexes as a replication impediment and suggesting that fork stalling might be a therapeutic target for FRDA.

  19. Stalled DNA Replication Forks at the Endogenous GAA Repeats Drive Repeat Expansion in Friedreich's Ataxia Cells.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Jeannine; Bhalla, Angela D; Butler, Jill Sergesketter; Puckett, James W; Dervan, Peter B; Rosenwaks, Zev; Napierala, Marek

    2016-08-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is caused by the expansion of GAA repeats located in the Frataxin (FXN) gene. The GAA repeats continue to expand in FRDA patients, aggravating symptoms and contributing to disease progression. The mechanism leading to repeat expansion and decreased FXN transcription remains unclear. Using single-molecule analysis of replicated DNA, we detected that expanded GAA repeats present a substantial obstacle for the replication machinery at the FXN locus in FRDA cells. Furthermore, aberrant origin activation and lack of a proper stress response to rescue the stalled forks in FRDA cells cause an increase in 3'-5' progressing forks, which could enhance repeat expansion and hinder FXN transcription by head-on collision with RNA polymerases. Treatment of FRDA cells with GAA-specific polyamides rescues DNA replication fork stalling and alleviates expansion of the GAA repeats, implicating DNA triplexes as a replication impediment and suggesting that fork stalling might be a therapeutic target for FRDA. PMID:27425605

  20. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  1. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  2. Erroneous Memories Arising from Repeated Attempts to Remember

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkel, Linda A.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of repeated and prolonged attempts at remembering on false memory rates was assessed in three experiments. Participants saw and imagined pictures and then made repeated recall attempts before taking a source memory test. Although the number of items recalled increased with repeated tests, the net gains were associated with more source…

  3. Divergence of satellite DNA and interspersion of dispersed repeats in the genome of the wild beet Beta procumbens.

    PubMed

    Dechyeva, Daryna; Gindullis, Frank; Schmidt, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Several repetitive sequences of the genome of Beta procumbens Chr. Sm., a wild beet species of the section Procumbentes of the genus Beta have been isolated. According to their genomic organization, the repeats were assigned to satellite DNA and families of dispersed DNA sequences. The tandem repeats are 229-246 bp long and belong to an AluI restriction satellite designated pAp11. Monomers of this satellite DNA form subfamilies which can be distinguished by the divergence or methylation of an internal restriction site. The satellite is amplified in the section Procumbentes, but is also found in species of the section Beta including cultivated beet (Beta vulgaris). The existence of the pAp11 satellite in distantly related species suggests that the AluI sequence family is an ancient component of Beta genomes and the ancestor of the diverged satellite subfamily pEV4 in B. vulgaris. Comparative fluorescent in-situ hybridization revealed remarkable differences in the chromosomal position between B. procumbens and B. vulgaris, indicating that the pAp11 and pEV4 satellites were most likely involved in the expansion or rearrangement of the intercalary B. vulgaris heterochromatin. Furthermore, we describe the molecular structure, and genomic and chromosomal organization of two repetitive DNA families which were designated pAp4 and pAp22 and are 1354 and 582 bp long, respectively. The families consist of sequence elements which are widely dispersed along B. procumbens chromosomes with local clustering and exclusion from distal euchromatic regions. FISH on meiotic chromosomes showed that both dispersed repeats are colocalized in some chromosomal regions. The interspersion of repeats of the pAp4 and pAp22 family was studied by PCR and enabled the determination of repeat flanking sequences. Sequence analysis revealed that pAp22 is either derived from or part of a long terminal repeat (LTR) of an Athila-like retrotransposon. Southern analysis and FISH with pAp4 and pAp22 showed

  4. Repeat hepatectomy for colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Adam, R; Bismuth, H; Castaing, D; Waechter, F; Navarro, F; Abascal, A; Majno, P; Engerran, L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors assess the long-term results of repeat hepatectomies for recurrent metastases of colorectal cancer and determine the factors that can predict survival. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Safer techniques of hepatic resection have allowed surgeons to consider repeat hepatectomy for colorectal metastases in an increasing number of patients. However, higher operative bleeding and increased morbidity have been reported after repeat hepatectomies, and the long-term benefit of these procedures needs to be evaluated. STUDY POPULATION: Sixty-four patients from a group of 243 patients resected for colorectal liver metastases were submitted to 83 repeat hepatectomies (64 second, 15 third, and 4 fourth hepatectomies). Combined extrahepatic surgery was performed in 21 (25%) of these 83 repeat hepatectomies. RESULTS: There was no intraoperative or postoperative mortality. Operative bleeding was not significantly increased in repeat hepatectomies as compared to first resections. Morbidity and duration of hospital stay were comparable to first hepatectomies. Overall and disease-free survival after a second hepatectomy were 60% and 42%, respectively, at 3 years and 41% and 26%, respectively, at 5 years. Factors of prognostic value on univariate analysis included the curative nature of first and second hepatectomies (p = 0.04 and p = 0.002, respectively), an interval between the two procedures of more than 1 year (p = 0.003), the number of recurrent tumors (p = 0.002), serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels (p = 0.03), and the presence of extrahepatic disease (p = 0.03). Only the curative nature of the second hepatectomy and an interval of more than 1 year between the two procedures were independently related to survival on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Repeat hepatectomies can provide long-term survival rates similar to those of first hepatectomies, with no mortality and comparable morbidity. Combined extrahepatic surgery can be required to achieve tumor

  5. Microlunatus cavernae sp. nov., a novel actinobacterium isolated from Alu ancient cave, Yunnan, South-West China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Juan; Chen, Wei; Huo-Zhang, Bing; Nimaichand, Salam; Zhou, En-Min; Lu, Xin-Hua; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Li, Wen-Jun

    2013-07-01

    A Gram-positive, coccoid, non-endospore-forming actinobacterium, designated YIM C01117(T), was isolated from a soil sample collected from Alu ancient cave, Yunnan province, south-west China. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain YIM C01117(T) was shown to belong to the genus Microlunatus, with highest sequence similarity of 97.4 % to Microlunatus soli DSM 21800(T). The whole genomic DNA relatedness as shown by the DNA-DNA hybridization study between YIM C01117(T) and M. soli DSM 21800(T) had a low value (47 ± 2 %). Strain YIM C01117(T) was determined to contain LL-diaminopimelic acid with Gly, Glu and Ala amino acids (A3γ' type) in the cell wall. Whole-cell hydrolysates were found to contain glucose, galactose, mannose and ribose. The major polar lipids were determined to be phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. The predominant menaquinone system present is MK-9(H4), while the major fatty acids were identified to be anteiso-C15:0 (24.1 %), iso-C16:0 (22.3 %) and iso-C15:0 (11.4 %). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was determined to be 65.9 mol%. The chemotaxonomic and genotypic data support the affiliation of the strain YIM C01117(T) to the genus Microlunatus. The results of physiological and biochemical tests allow strain YIM C01117(T) to be differentiated phenotypically from recognized Microlunatus species. Strain YIM C01117(T) is therefore considered to represent a novel species of the genus Microlunatus, for which the name Microlunatus cavernae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YIM C01117(T) (= DSM 26248(T) = JCM 18536(T)).

  6. Wilson's disease caused by alternative splicing and Alu exonization due to a homozygous 3039-bp deletion spanning from intron 1 to exon 2 of the ATP7B gene.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Eva; Lepori, Maria Barbara; Chiappe, Francesca; Ranucci, Giusy; Di Dato, Fabiola; Iorio, Raffaele; Loudianos, Georgios

    2015-09-15

    We describe a case of Wilson's disease (WD) diagnosed at 5 years after routine biochemical test showed increased aminotransferases. Mutation analysis of the ATP7B gene revealed a 3039-bp deletion in the homozygous state spanning from the terminal part of intron 1 to nt position 368 of exon 2. This deletion results in the activation of 3 cryptic splice sites: an AG acceptor splice site in nt positions 578-579 producing a different breakpoint and removing the first 577 nts of exon 2, an acceptor and a donor splice site in nt positions 20363-4 and 20456-7, respectively, in intron 1, resulting in the activation of a 94-bp cryptic Alu exon being incorporated into the mature transcript. The resulting alternative transcript contains a TAG stop codon in the first amino acid position of the cryptic exon, likely producing a truncated, non-functional protein. This study shows that intron exonization can also occur in humans through naturally occurring gross deletions. The results suggest that the combination of DNA and RNA analyses can be used for molecular characterization of gross ATP7B deletions, thus improving genetic counseling and diagnosis of WD. Moreover these studies help to better establish new molecular mechanisms producing Wilson's disease.

  7. Digital repeat analysis; setup and operation.

    PubMed

    Nol, J; Isouard, G; Mirecki, J

    2006-06-01

    Since the emergence of digital imaging, there have been questions about the necessity of continuing reject analysis programs in imaging departments to evaluate performance and quality. As a marketing strategy, most suppliers of digital technology focus on the supremacy of the technology and its ability to reduce the number of repeats, resulting in less radiation doses given to patients and increased productivity in the department. On the other hand, quality assurance radiographers and radiologists believe that repeats are mainly related to positioning skills, and repeat analysis is the main tool to plan training needs to up-skill radiographers. A comparative study between conventional and digital imaging was undertaken to compare outcomes and evaluate the need for reject analysis. However, digital technology still being at its early development stages, setting a credible reject analysis program became the major task of the study. It took the department, with the help of the suppliers of the computed radiography reader and the picture archiving and communication system, over 2 years of software enhancement to build a reliable digital repeat analysis system. The results were supportive of both philosophies; the number of repeats as a result of exposure factors was reduced dramatically; however, the percentage of repeats as a result of positioning skills was slightly on the increase for the simple reason that some rejects in the conventional system qualifying for both exposure and positioning errors were classified as exposure error. The ability of digitally adjusting dark or light images reclassified some of those images as positioning errors. PMID:16421768

  8. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  9. Repeated measures with zeros.

    PubMed

    Berk, K N; Lachenbruch, P A

    2002-08-01

    Consider repeated measures data with many zeros. For the case with one grouping factor and one repeated measure, we examine several models, assuming that the nonzero data are roughly lognormal. One of the simplest approaches is to model the zeros as left-censored observations from the lognormal distribution. A random effect is assumed for subjects. The censored model makes a strong assumption about the relationship between the zeros and the nonzero values. To check on this, you can instead assume that some of the zeros are 'true' zeros and model them as Bernoulli. Then the other values are modeled with a censored lognormal. A logistic model is used for the Bernoulli p, the probability of a true nonzero. The fit of the pure left-censored lognormal can be assessed by testing the hypothesis that p is 1, as described by Moulton and Halsey. The model can also be simplified by omitting the censoring, leaving a logistic model for the zeros and a lognormal model for the nonzero values. This is approximately equivalent to modeling the zero and nonzero values separately, a two-part model. In contrast to the censored model, this model assumes only a slight relationship (a covariance component) between the occurrence of zeros and the size of the nonzero values. The models are compared in terms of an example with data from children's private speech. PMID:12197298

  10. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  11. Cumulative Intertrial Inhibition in Repeated Visual Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takeda, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    In the present study the author examined visual search when the items remain visible across trials but the location of the target varies. Reaction times for inefficient search cumulatively increased with increasing numbers of repeated search trials, suggesting that inhibition for distractors carried over successive trials. This intertrial…

  12. RepeatsDB: a database of tandem repeat protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Tomás; Potenza, Emilio; Walsh, Ian; Gonzalo Parra, R.; Giollo, Manuel; Minervini, Giovanni; Piovesan, Damiano; Ihsan, Awais; Ferrari, Carlo; Kajava, Andrey V.; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2014-01-01

    RepeatsDB (http://repeatsdb.bio.unipd.it/) is a database of annotated tandem repeat protein structures. Tandem repeats pose a difficult problem for the analysis of protein structures, as the underlying sequence can be highly degenerate. Several repeat types haven been studied over the years, but their annotation was done in a case-by-case basis, thus making large-scale analysis difficult. We developed RepeatsDB to fill this gap. Using state-of-the-art repeat detection methods and manual curation, we systematically annotated the Protein Data Bank, predicting 10 745 repeat structures. In all, 2797 structures were classified according to a recently proposed classification schema, which was expanded to accommodate new findings. In addition, detailed annotations were performed in a subset of 321 proteins. These annotations feature information on start and end positions for the repeat regions and units. RepeatsDB is an ongoing effort to systematically classify and annotate structural protein repeats in a consistent way. It provides users with the possibility to access and download high-quality datasets either interactively or programmatically through web services. PMID:24311564

  13. Do DNA double-strand breaks induced by Alu I lead to development of novel aberrations in the second and third post-treatment mitoses?

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, A.; Bonk, K.; Mueller, M.U.; Streffer, C.; Obe, G.

    1996-02-01

    Several authors have reported that ionizing radiation can give rise to novel aberrations several mitotic divisions after the exposure. At our institute this phenomenon has been observed in mouse preimplantation embryos. This cell system is uniquely well suited for such investigations because the first three cell divisions show a high degree of synchrony. Thus the expression of chromosomal aberrations at the first, second and third mitosis after irradiation can be scored unambiguously. To investigate whether DNA double-strand breaks may be the lesions responsible for the delayed expression of chromosomal aberrations, we have studied the frequencies of aberrations in the first, second and third mitosis after treatment of one-cell mouse embryos with the restriction enzyme Alu I. Embryos were permeabilized with Streptolysin-O. The results indicate that the induction of double-strand breaks does not lead to novel aberrations in the third post-treatment mitosis. Several embryos scored at the second mitosis showed very high numbers of aberrations, indicating that Alu I may remain active in the cells for a period of one cell cycle. After treatment with Streptolysin-O alone, enhanced aberration frequencies were observed in the third post-treatment mitosis, suggesting that membrane damage has a delayed effect on the cellular integrity. 44 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Structural and Energetic Characterization of the Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Verstraete, Nina; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2015-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat containing proteins are one of the most abundant solenoid folds. Usually implicated in specific protein-protein interactions, these proteins are readily amenable for design, with promising biotechnological and biomedical applications. Studying repeat protein families presents technical challenges due to the high sequence divergence among the repeating units. We developed and applied a systematic method to consistently identify and annotate the structural repetitions over the members of the complete Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family, with increased sensitivity over previous studies. We statistically characterized the number of repeats, the folding of the repeat-arrays, their structural variations, insertions and deletions. An energetic analysis of the local frustration patterns reveal the basic features underlying fold stability and its relation to the functional binding regions. We found a strong linear correlation between the conservation of the energetic features in the repeat arrays and their sequence variations, and discuss new insights into the organization and function of these ubiquitous proteins. PMID:26691182

  15. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  16. DWI Repeaters and Non-Repeaters: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeber, Stan

    1981-01-01

    Discussed how driving-while-intoxicated (DWI) repeaters differed signigicantly from nonrepeaters on 4 of 23 variables tested. Repeaters were more likely to have zero or two dependent children, attend church frequently, drink occasionally and have one or more arrests for public intoxication. (Author)

  17. Repeated checking causes memory distrust.

    PubMed

    van den Hout, Marcel; Kindt, Merel

    2003-03-01

    This paper attempts to explain why in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) checkers distrust in memory persists despite extensive checking. It is argued that: (1) repeated checking increases familiarity with the issues checked; (2) increased familiarity promotes conceptual processing which inhibits perceptual processing; (3) inhibited perceptual processing makes recollections less vivid and detailed and finally; (4) reduction in vividness and detail promotes distrust in memory. An interactive computer animation was developed in which participants had to perform checking rituals on a virtual gas stove. Two separate experiments were carried out with n=39 (Experiment I) and n=40 (Experiment II) healthy participants. In both studies, the control group and the experimental group were given the same pre-test and post-test on the virtual gas stove. In between, the experimental group engaged in 'relevant checking', i.e. checking the gas stove, while the control group engaged in 'irrelevant checking', i.e. checking virtual light bulbs. In both experiments there were powerful effects of repeated 'relevant checking': while actual memory accuracy remained unaffected, the vividness and detail of the recollections were greatly reduced. Most pertinently, in both experiments relevant checking undermined confidence in memory. No such effects were observed in the control group. One might argue that the pre-test/post-test design may have made the control group anticipate a memory assessment at the post-test and that this artifact made them relatively alert producing memory confidence at post test that was artificially high. A third experiment was carried out (n=2 x 20) in which no pre-test was given while, other than that, Experiment III was identical to the first two experiments. Results confirmed earlier findings: compared to the irrelevant checking control group, recollections in the relevant checking group were non-vivid, non-detailed while confidence in memory was low. The theory

  18. Blood Donation by Elderly Repeat Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, Thomas; Lander-Kox, Jutta; Alt, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Upper age limits for blood donors are intended to protect elderly blood donors from donor reactions. However, due to a lack of data about adverse reactions in elderly blood donors, upper age limits are arbitrary and vary considerably between different countries. Methods Here we present data from 171,231 voluntary repeat whole blood donors beyond the age of 68 years. Results Blood donations from repeat blood donors beyond the age of 68 years increased from 2,114 in 2005 to 38,432 in 2012 (from 0,2% to 4.2% of all whole blood donations). Adverse donor reactions in repeat donors decreased with age and were lower than in the whole group (0.26%), even in donors older than 71 years (0.16%). However, from the age of 68 years, the time to complete recovery after donor reactions increased. Donor deferrals were highest in young blood donors (21.4%), but increased again in elderly blood donors beyond 71 years (12.6%). Conclusion Blood donation by regular repeat blood donors older than 71 years may be safely continued. However, due to a lack of data for donors older than 75 years, blood donation in these donors should be handled with great caution. PMID:25254019

  19. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  20. Fusion of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1-derived glycine-alanine repeat to trans-dominant HIV-1 Gag increases inhibitory activities and survival of transduced cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Diana; Wild, Jens; Ludwig, Christine; Asbach, Benedikt; Notka, Frank; Wagner, Ralf

    2008-06-01

    Trans-dominant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag derivatives have been shown to efficiently inhibit late steps of HIV-1 replication in vitro by interfering with Gag precursor assembly, thus ranking among the interesting candidates for gene therapy approaches. However, efficient antiviral activities of corresponding transgenes are likely to be counteracted in particular by cell-mediated host immune responses toward the transgene-expressing cells. To decrease this potential immunogenicity, a 24-amino acid Gly-Ala (GA) stretch derived from Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) and known to overcome proteasomal degradation was fused to a trans-dominant Gag variant (sgD1). To determine the capacity of this fusion polypeptide to repress viral replication, PM-1 cells were transduced with sgD1 and GAsgD1 transgenes, using retroviral gene transfer. Challenge of stably transfected permissive cell lines with various viral strains indicated that N-terminal GA fusion even enhanced the inhibitory properties of sgD1. Further studies revealed that the GA stretch increased protein stability by blocking proteasomal degradation of Gag proteins. Immunization of BALB/c mice with a DNA vaccine vector expressing sgD1 induced substantial Gag-specific immune responses that were, however, clearly diminished in the presence of GA. Furthermore, recognition of cells expressing the GA-fused transgene by CD8(+) T cells was drastically reduced, both in vitro and in vivo, resulting in prolonged survival of the transduced cells in recipient mice.

  1. Estimating repeatability of egg size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, P.L.; Rockwell, R.F.; Sedinger, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Measures of repeatability have long been used to assess patterns of variation in egg size within and among females. We compared different analytical approaches for estimating repeatability of egg size of Black Brant. Separate estimates of repeatability for eggs of each clutch size and laying sequence number varied from 0.49 to 0.64. We suggest that using the averaging egg size within clutches results in underestimation of variation within females and thereby overestimates repeatability. We recommend a nested design that partitions egg-size variation within clutches, among clutches within females, and among females. We demonstrate little variation in estimates of repeatability resulting from a nested model controlling for egg laying sequence and a nested model in which we assumed laying sequence was unknown.

  2. All-photonic quantum repeaters.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories.

  3. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  4. A Semiparametric Bayesian Model for Repeatedly Repeated Binary Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Fernando A.; Müller, Peter; Rosner, Gary L.; Relling, Mary V.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We discuss the analysis of data from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays comparing tumor and normal tissues. The data consist of sequences of indicators for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and involve three nested levels of repetition: chromosomes for a given patient, regions within chromosomes, and SNPs nested within regions. We propose to analyze these data using a semiparametric model for multi-level repeated binary data. At the top level of the hierarchy we assume a sampling model for the observed binary LOH sequences that arises from a partial exchangeability argument. This implies a mixture of Markov chains model. The mixture is defined with respect to the Markov transition probabilities. We assume a nonparametric prior for the random mixing measure. The resulting model takes the form of a semiparametric random effects model with the matrix of transition probabilities being the random effects. The model includes appropriate dependence assumptions for the two remaining levels of the hierarchy, i.e., for regions within chromosomes and for chromosomes within patient. We use the model to identify regions of increased LOH in a dataset coming from a study of treatment-related leukemia in children with an initial cancer diagnostic. The model successfully identifies the desired regions and performs well compared to other available alternatives. PMID:19746193

  5. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Aubuchon, Adam C.; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Balamucki, Christopher J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  6. An Expanded CAG Repeat in Huntingtin Causes +1 Frameshifting.

    PubMed

    Saffert, Paul; Adamla, Frauke; Schieweck, Rico; Atkins, John F; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-08-26

    Maintenance of triplet decoding is crucial for the expression of functional protein because deviations either into the -1 or +1 reading frames are often non-functional. We report here that expression of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 with expanded CAG repeats, implicated in Huntington pathology, undergoes a sporadic +1 frameshift to generate from the CAG repeat a trans-frame AGC repeat-encoded product. This +1 recoding is exclusively detected in pathological Htt variants, i.e. those with expanded repeats with more than 35 consecutive CAG codons. An atypical +1 shift site, UUC C at the 5' end of CAG repeats, which has some resemblance to the influenza A virus shift site, triggers the +1 frameshifting and is enhanced by the increased propensity of the expanded CAG repeats to form a stem-loop structure. The +1 trans-frame-encoded product can directly influence the aggregation of the parental Htt exon 1. PMID:27382061

  7. [Tandem repeats in rodents genome and their mapping].

    PubMed

    Ostromyshenskii, D I; Kuznetsova, L S; Komissarov, A S; Kartavtseva, I V; Podgornaya, L

    2015-01-01

    Tandemly-repeated sequences represent a unique class of eukaryotic DNA. Their content in the genome of higher eukaryotes mounts to tens of percents. However, the evolution of this class of sequences is poorly-studied. In our paper, 62 families of Mus musculus tandem repeats are analyzed by bioinformatic methods, and 7 of them are analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. It is shown that the same tandem repeat sets co-occure only in closely related species of mice. But even in such species we observe differences in localization on the chromosomes and the number of individual tandem repeats. With increasing evolutionary distance only some of the tandem repeat families remain common for different species. It is shown, that the use of a combination of bioinformatics and molecular biology techniques is very perspective for further studies of the evolution of tandem repeats.

  8. Survey of simple sequence repeats in woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca).

    PubMed

    Guan, L; Huang, J F; Feng, G Q; Wang, X W; Wang, Y; Chen, B Y; Qiao, Y S

    2013-07-30

    The use of simple sequence repeats (SSRs), or microsatellites, as genetic markers has become popular due to their abundance and variation in length among individuals. In this study, we investigated linkage groups (LGs) in the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) and demonstrated variation in the abundances, densities, and relative densities of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats. Mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were more common than longer repeats in all LGs examined. Perfect SSRs were the predominant SSR type found and their abundance was extremely stable among LGs and chloroplasts. Abundances of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were positively correlated with LG size, whereas those of tetranucleotide and hexanucleotide SSRs were not. Generally, in each LG, the abundance, relative abundance, relative density, and the proportion of each unique SSR all declined rapidly as the repeated unit increased. Furthermore, the lengths and frequencies of SSRs varied among different LGs.

  9. TOO Observations Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanParadijs, J.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the project was to study the X-ray properties of the persistent and burst emission of Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) during periods of burst activity. We monitored this activity with BATSE on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, and made X-ray observations with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). SGR1806-20 became active in October 1996. We made observations with the PCA on the RXTE in November 1996. In the RXTE data we detected several hundred brief SGR events, which occurred in clear bunches, and persistent emission. From a Fouder analysis of the persistent emission (excluding time intervals with bursts) we found a period of 7.47 s. These pulsations are also present in RXTE data taken several weeks later (PI Dr. T. Strohmayer), which were combined with our data. Comparison with ASCA data taken in 1993 and 1995 shows that the period, which reflects the spin of a neutron star, increases on a time scale of 1500 years. These results show that SGR1 806-20 is a neutron star with a superstrong magnetic field (about 1"15) Gauss), thereby establishing, for the first time, the existence of magnetars.

  10. Protein Repeats from First Principles.

    PubMed

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U

    2016-01-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family. PMID:27044676

  11. Protein Repeats from First Principles.

    PubMed

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U

    2016-04-05

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family.

  12. Protein Repeats from First Principles

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2016-01-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family. PMID:27044676

  13. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in women with repeated miscarriages.

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, I; Daniel, V; Link, S; Monga, B; Runnebaum, B

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate a possible etiological role of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the pathogenesis of repeated miscarriages. The blood levels of chlorinated hydrocarbons [CHCs: pentachlorophenol, hexachlorocyclohexane, hexachlorobenzene, the dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) group, polychlorinated biphenyls] were determined in 89 women with repeated miscarriages, who were referred to the University Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Heidelberg for investigations between 1989 and 1993, and compared to a previously investigated reference population. In more than 20% of the women, at least one of the CHC levels exceeded the reference range. CHC levels did not differ significantly between women with primary or secondary and early or late miscarriages; neither did they differ between women with hormonal or immunological disorders as causes of repeated miscarriages or women with idiopathic repeated miscarriages. No significant associations were detected between CHC levels and further conceptions or the outcome of further pregnancies. As significant associations were found between increasing CHC blood concentrations and immunological and hormonal changes, CHCs may have an impact on the pregnancy course in certain cases. PMID:9755145

  14. Diversity and evolution of centromere repeats in the maize genome.

    PubMed

    Bilinski, Paul; Distor, Kevin; Gutierrez-Lopez, Jose; Mendoza, Gabriela Mendoza; Shi, Jinghua; Dawe, R Kelly; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    Centromere repeats are found in most eukaryotes and play a critical role in kinetochore formation. Though centromere repeats exhibit considerable diversity both within and among species, little is understood about the mechanisms that drive centromere repeat evolution. Here, we use maize as a model to investigate how a complex history involving polyploidy, fractionation, and recent domestication has impacted the diversity of the maize centromeric repeat CentC. We first validate the existence of long tandem arrays of repeats in maize and other taxa in the genus Zea. Although we find considerable sequence diversity among CentC copies genome-wide, genetic similarity among repeats is highest within these arrays, suggesting that tandem duplications are the primary mechanism for the generation of new copies. Nonetheless, clustering analyses identify similar sequences among distant repeats, and simulations suggest that this pattern may be due to homoplasious mutation. Although the two ancestral subgenomes of maize have contributed nearly equal numbers of centromeres, our analysis shows that the majority of all CentC repeats derive from one of the parental genomes, with an even stronger bias when examining the largest assembled contiguous clusters. Finally, by comparing maize with its wild progenitor teosinte, we find that the abundance of CentC likely decreased after domestication, while the pericentromeric repeat Cent4 has drastically increased. PMID:25190528

  15. Variable Glutamine-Rich Repeats Modulate Transcription Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gemayel, Rita; Chavali, Sreenivas; Pougach, Ksenia; Legendre, Matthieu; Zhu, Bo; Boeynaems, Steven; van der Zande, Elisa; Gevaert, Kris; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Babu, M. Madan; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Excessive expansions of glutamine (Q)-rich repeats in various human proteins are known to result in severe neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington’s disease and several ataxias. However, the physiological role of these repeats and the consequences of more moderate repeat variation remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Q-rich domains are highly enriched in eukaryotic transcription factors where they act as functional modulators. Incremental changes in the number of repeats in the yeast transcriptional regulator Ssn6 (Cyc8) result in systematic, repeat-length-dependent variation in expression of target genes that result in direct phenotypic changes. The function of Ssn6 increases with its repeat number until a certain threshold where further expansion leads to aggregation. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals that the Ssn6 repeats affect its solubility and interactions with Tup1 and other regulators. Thus, Q-rich repeats are dynamic functional domains that modulate a regulator’s innate function, with the inherent risk of pathogenic repeat expansions. PMID:26257283

  16. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    PubMed

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-23

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  17. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    PubMed

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol. PMID:25903096

  18. Repeated vitrification/warming of human sperm gives better results than repeated slow programmable freezing

    PubMed Central

    Vutyavanich, Teraporn; Lattiwongsakorn, Worashorn; Piromlertamorn, Waraporn; Samchimchom, Sudarat

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we compared the effects of repeated freezing/thawing of human sperm by our in-house method of rapid freezing with slow programmable freezing. Sperm samples from 11 normozoospermic subjects were processed through density gradients and divided into three aliquots: non-frozen, rapid freezing and slow programmable freezing. Sperm in the rapid freezing group had better motility and viability than those in the slow freezing group (P<0.01) after the first, second and third cycles of freezing/thawing, but there was no difference in morphology. In the second experiment, rapid freezing was repeated three times in 20 subjects. The samples from each thawing cycle were evaluated for DNA fragmentation using the alkaline comet assay. DNA fragmentation began to increase considerably after the second cycle of freezing/thawing, but to a level that was not clinically important. In the third experiment, rapid freezing was done repeatedly in 10 subjects, until no motile sperm were observed after thawing. The median number of repeated freezing/thawing that yielded no motile sperm was seven (range: 5–8, mean: 6.8). In conclusion, we demonstrated that repeated freezing/thawing of processed semen using our rapid freezing method gave better results than standard slow programmable freezing. This method can help maximize the usage of precious cryopreserved sperm samples in assisted reproduction technology. PMID:23064685

  19. Interoperability in encoded quantum repeater networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Shota; Choi, Byung-Soo; Devitt, Simon; Suzuki, Shigeya; Van Meter, Rodney

    2016-04-01

    The future of quantum repeater networking will require interoperability between various error-correcting codes. A few specific code conversions and even a generalized method are known, however, no detailed analysis of these techniques in the context of quantum networking has been performed. In this paper we analyze a generalized procedure to create Bell pairs encoded heterogeneously between two separate codes used often in error-corrected quantum repeater network designs. We begin with a physical Bell pair and then encode each qubit in a different error-correcting code, using entanglement purification to increase the fidelity. We investigate three separate protocols for preparing the purified encoded Bell pair. We calculate the error probability of those schemes between the Steane [[7,1,3

  20. Do Twelfths Terminate or Repeat?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Rebecca; Burnison, Erica

    2015-01-01

    When finding the decimal equivalent of a fraction with 12 in the denominator, will it terminate or repeat? This question came from a seventh grader in author Erica Burnison's class as the student was pondering a poster generated by one of her classmates. Not only was the question intriguing, but it also affirmed the belief in the power of…

  1. 78 FR 65594 - Vehicular Repeaters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... mobile repeaters by public safety licensees on certain frequencies in the VHF band. DATES: Submit..., CART, etc.) by email: FCC504@fcc.gov or phone: 202-418- 0530 or TTY: 202-418-0432. For detailed... Proceedings, 63 FR 24121 (May 1, 1998). Electronic Filers: Comments may be filed electronically using...

  2. Repeat Pregnancies among Adolescent Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillmore, Mary Rogers; Lewis, Steven M.; Lohr, Mary Jane; Spencer, Michael S.; White, Rachelle D.

    1997-01-01

    Reports the results of an event history analysis of rapidly repeated pregnancies among a sample of 170 adolescents. Results show that the best fitting model for these girls included two proximate determinants of pregnancy, contraceptive use, and other factors. Findings indicate that such pregnancies among teenagers are somewhat predictable. (RJM)

  3. Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins and Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.

    2009-10-16

    Cyanobacteria are unique in many ways and one unusual feature is the presence of a suite of proteins that contain at least one domain with a minimum of eight tandem repeated five-residues (Rfr) of the general consensus sequence A[N/D]LXX. The function of such pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs) are still unknown, however, their prevalence in cyanobacteria suggests that they may play some role in the unique biological activities of cyanobacteria. As part of an inter-disciplinary Membrane Biology Grand Challenge at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) and Washington University in St. Louis, the genome of Cyanothece 51142 was sequenced and its molecular biology studied with relation to circadian rhythms. The genome of Cyanothece encodes for 35 proteins that contain at least one PRP domain. These proteins range in size from 105 (Cce_3102) to 930 (Cce_2929) kDa with the PRP domains ranging in predicted size from 12 (Cce_1545) to 62 (cce_3979) tandem pentapeptide repeats. Transcriptomic studies with 29 out of the 35 genes showed that at least three of the PRPs in Cyanothece 51142 (cce_0029, cce_3083, and cce_3272) oscillated with repeated periods of light and dark, further supporting a biological function for PRPs. Using X-ray diffraction crystallography, the structure for two pentapeptide repeat proteins from Cyanothece 51142 were determined, cce_1272 (aka Rfr32) and cce_4529 (aka Rfr23). Analysis of their molecular structures suggests that all PRP may share the same structural motif, a novel type of right-handed quadrilateral β-helix, or Rfr-fold, reminiscent of a square tower with four distinct faces. Each pentapeptide repeat occupies one face of the Rfr-fold with four consecutive pentapeptide repeats completing a coil that, in turn, stack upon each other to form “protein skyscrapers”. Details of the structural features of the Rfr-fold are reviewed here together with a discussion for the possible role of end

  4. Agreement and repeatability of an infrared thermometer.

    PubMed

    Kelechi, Teresa J; Good, Angela; Mueller, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Recently, manufacturers have devised thermometers for home use by patients, such as the TempTouch Infrared Thermometer (TTIR; Diabetica Solutions, San Antonio, TX), which is designed with a long handle that can be used for self-monitoring localized skin temperature of the feet and legs. This study assessed the level of agreement and repeatability of the TTIR compared to a thermistor-type thermometer (TT; PeriFlux, 5020 Temperature Unit, Perimed, Stockholm, Sweden), the reference standard. In 17 healthy subjects, localized skin temperature was measured 8 cm above the right medial malleolus at baseline (Time 1), after a 10-minute rest period (Time 2), and after 10 minutes of cold provocation (Time 3) with a cryotherapy gel wrap placed around the lower legs using the TTIR and TT for temperature measurement. Scatter plots and correlation coefficients showed strong positive relationships between the two measurement methods at all three time points (Time 1: r = 0.95; Time 2: r = 0.97; and, Time 3: r = 0.87). Results showed a reasonable level of agreement between the two methods at Times 1 and 2 but not after cold provocation. Agreement between the methods appears to be better than repeatability within each method. Results for repeatability from both the TT and TTIR were very similar suggesting that there was a systematic bias with increasing temperatures between Time 1 and Time 2.

  5. Multicolor FISH mapping with Alu-PCR-amplified YAC clone DNA determines the order of markers in the BRCA1 region on chromosome 17q12-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Flejter, W.J.; Glover, T.W.; Barcroft, C.L.; Guo, Sun Wei; Boehnke, M.; Chandrasekharappa, S.; Collins, F.S. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ann Arbor, MI ); Lynch, E.D. ); Hayes, S. ); Weber, B.L. )

    1993-09-01

    A gene designated BRCA1, implicated in the susceptibility to early-onset familial breast cancer, has recently been localized to chromosome 17q12-q21. To date, the order of DNA markers mapped within this region has been based on genetic linkage analysis. The authors report the use of multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization to establish a physically based map of five polymorphic DNA markers and 10 cloned genes spanning this region. Three cosmid clones and Alu-PCR-Generated products derived from 12 yeast artificial chromosome clones representing each of these markers were used in two-color mapping experiments to determine an initial proximity of markers relative to each other on metaphase chromosomes. Interphase mapping was then employed to determine the order and orientation of closely spaced loci by direct visualization of fluorescent signals following hybridization of three probes, each detected in a different color. Statistical analysis of the combined data suggests that the order of markers in the BRCA1 regions is cen-THRA1-TOP2-GAS-OF2-17HSD-248yg9-RNU2-OF3-PPY/p131-EPB3-Mfd188-WNT3-HOX2-GP3A-tel. This map is consistent with that determined by radiation-reduced hybrid mapping and will facilitate positional cloning strategies in efforts to isolate and characterize the BRCA1 gene. 27 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Allele variation of DYS19 and Y-Alu insertion (YAP) polymorphisms in Basques: an insight into the peopling of Europe and the Mediterranean region.

    PubMed

    Calderón, R; Carrion, M; Perez-Miranda, A; Peña, J A; Dugoujon, J M; Crouau-Roy, B

    2003-02-01

    Two Y-chromosome DNA polymorphisms, the DYS19 microsatellite and the YAP (at locus DYS287), were tested in males from two autochthonous Basque populations from France and northern Navarre (Spain). The results are compared to those obtained for the same genetic markers in 32 populations from Europe, northern Africa, and western Asia. The high predominance of the DYS19*11 (190-base-pair) allele in Basques indicates that their genetic diversity for microsatellite DYS19 is around half that observed in Europeans, North Africans, and western Asians. The Y-Alu insertion (YAP+) was not detected in the Basque samples. This study attempts to throw some light on the importance of historically recent migratory movements, the main corridors of gene flow, and demographic sizes and their variations in shaping gene frequency patterns in contemporary human populations, particularly in the Mediterranean region. Historical processes may have had more significant effects on the genetic make-up of current human populations than those of prehistoric times.

  7. Validation of a quantitative polymerase chain reaction method for human Alu gene detection in microchimeric pigs used as donors for xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Abellaneda, J M; Martínez-Alarcón, L; Quereda, J J; Herrero-Medrano, J M; Mendonça, L; Mrowiec, A; García-Nicolás, O; Pallarés, F J; Ríos, A; Muñoz, A; Ramírez, P; Ramis, G

    2015-01-01

    This work was undertaken to evaluate whether a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is as an adequate method for detection and quantification of human-specific DNA elements (Alu gene) in tissues and blood samples of pigs in which human stem cells were engrafted. Real-time qPCR quantification was performed with the use of previously described primers. The human DNA was mixed with different quantities of porcine DNA. The primer concentration and specificity, the qPCR efficiency, the quantification variations due to different porcine DNA concentrations, and the dissociation curve produced by the assay were evaluated. The qPCR proved to be specific, robust, with a reproducible and specific bimodal melting curve. High porcine DNA concentration produced subquantification, especially with low human DNA quantity. However, the assay proved to be useful for the detection of chimeric piglets produced by human cells injected in utero, because the effect caused by the porcine DNA interference was corrected in quantification of human DNA from piglets.

  8. Directionality switchable gain stabilized linear repeater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Takayuki; Ohmachi, Tadashi; Aida, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    We propose a new approach to realize a bidirectional linear repeater suitable for future optical internet networks and fault location in repeater chain with OTDR. The proposed approach is the linear repeater of simple configuration whose directionality is rearranged dynamically by electrical control signal. The repeater is composed of a magneto-optical switch, a circulator, a dynamically gain stabilized unidirectional EDFA, and control circuits. The repeater directionality is rearranged as fast as 0.1ms by an electrical control pulse. It is experimentally confirmed that OTDR with the directionality switchable repeater is feasible for repeater chain. The detailed design and performance of the repeater are also discussed, including the multi-pass interference (MPI) which may arise in the proposed repeater, the effect of the MPI on SNR degradation of the repeater chain and the feed-forward EDFA gain control circuit.

  9. Monocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and type 2 diabetes mellitus display an increased production of interleukin (IL)-1β via the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing family pyrin 3(NLRP3)-inflammasome activation: a possible implication for therapeutic decision in these patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruscitti, P; Cipriani, P; Di Benedetto, P; Liakouli, V; Berardicurti, O; Carubbi, F; Ciccia, F; Alvaro, S; Triolo, G; Giacomelli, R

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding about the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) showed that inflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-1β play a pivotal role, mirroring data largely reported in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). IL-1β is produced mainly by monocytes (MO), and hyperglycaemia may be able to modulate, in the cytoplasm of these cells, the assembly of a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing family pyrin (NLRP3)-inflammosome, a cytosolic multi-protein platform where the inactive pro-IL-1β is cleaved into active form, via caspase-1 activity. In this paper, we evaluated the production of IL-1 β and TNF, in peripheral blood MO of patients affected by RA or T2D or both diseases, in order to understand if an alteration of the glucose metabolism may influence their proinflammatory status. Our data showed, after 24 h of incubation with different glucose concentrations, a significantly increased production of IL-1β and TNF in all evaluated groups when compared with healthy controls. However, a significant increase of IL-1β secretion by T2D/RA was observed when compared with other groups. The analysis of relative mRNA expression confirmed these data. After 24 h of incubation with different concentrations of glucose, our results showed a significant increase in NLRP3 expression. In this work, an increased production of IL-1β by MO obtained from patients affected by both RA and T2D via NLRP3-inflammasome activation may suggest a potential IL-1β targeted therapy in these patients. PMID:26095630

  10. Observations of Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2004-01-01

    Magnetars (Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars) are a subclass of neutron stars characterized by their recurrent X-ray bursts. While in an active (bursting) state (lasting anywhere between days and years), they are emit&ng hundreds of predominantly soft (kT=30 kev), short (0.1-100 ms long) events. Their quiescent source x-ray light ewes exhibit puhlions rotational period rate changes (spin-down) indicate that their magnetic fields are extremely high, of the order of 10^14- 10^l5 G. Such high B-field objects, dubbed "magnetars", had been predicted to exist in 1992, but the first concrete observational evidence were obtained in 1998 for two of these sources. I will discuss here the history of Soft Gamma Repeaters, and their spectral, timing and flux characteristics both in the persistent and their burst emission.

  11. Repeatability observations from a time-lapse seismic survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, S.L.; Miller, R.D.; Raef, A.E.

    2006-01-01

    Time-lapse seismic surveys have proven extremely valuable in recent years, having numerous economical and environmental applications. To fully utilize this monitoring technique, problems associated with recording repeatability must be minimized. Much work has been done to equalize data from one survey to the next via processing techniques (Huang et al., 1998). The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential for minimized processing, allowing study of extremely small changes in subsurface characteristics. The goal is to evaluate source and receiver terrain combination to optimize signal repeatability, and to improve deconvolution with the ground force to suppress different types of noise and increase repeatability. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  12. Disease-associated repeat instability and mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Monika H M; Pearson, Christopher E

    2016-02-01

    Expanded tandem repeat sequences in DNA are associated with at least 40 human genetic neurological, neurodegenerative, and neuromuscular diseases. Repeat expansion can occur during parent-to-offspring transmission, and arise at variable rates in specific tissues throughout the life of an affected individual. Since the ongoing somatic repeat expansions can affect disease age-of-onset, severity, and progression, targeting somatic expansion holds potential as a therapeutic target. Thus, understanding the factors that regulate this mutation is crucial. DNA repair, in particular mismatch repair (MMR), is the major driving force of disease-associated repeat expansions. In contrast to its anti-mutagenic roles, mammalian MMR curiously drives the expansion mutations of disease-associated (CAG)·(CTG) repeats. Recent advances have broadened our knowledge of both the MMR proteins involved in disease repeat expansions, including: MSH2, MSH3, MSH6, MLH1, PMS2, and MLH3, as well as the types of repeats affected by MMR, now including: (CAG)·(CTG), (CGG)·(CCG), and (GAA)·(TTC) repeats. Mutagenic slipped-DNA structures have been detected in patient tissues, and the size of the slip-out and their junction conformation can determine the involvement of MMR. Furthermore, the formation of other unusual DNA and R-loop structures is proposed to play a key role in MMR-mediated instability. A complex correlation is emerging between tissues showing varying amounts of repeat instability and MMR expression levels. Notably, naturally occurring polymorphic variants of DNA repair genes can have dramatic effects upon the levels of repeat instability, which may explain the variation in disease age-of-onset, progression and severity. An increasing grasp of these factors holds prognostic and therapeutic potential.

  13. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  14. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  15. RNA FISH for detecting expanded repeats in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Martyna O; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2016-04-01

    RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a widely used technique for detecting transcripts in fixed cells and tissues. Many variants of RNA FISH have been proposed to increase signal strength, resolution and target specificity. The current variants of this technique facilitate the detection of the subcellular localization of transcripts at a single molecule level. Among the applications of RNA FISH are studies on nuclear RNA foci in diseases resulting from the expansion of tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexanucleotide repeats present in different single genes. The partial or complete retention of mutant transcripts forming RNA aggregates within the nucleoplasm has been shown in multiple cellular disease models and in the tissues of patients affected with these atypical mutations. Relevant diseases include, among others, myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) with CUG repeats, Huntington's disease (HD) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) with CAG repeats, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) with CGG repeats, myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) with CCUG repeats, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD) with GGGGCC repeats and spinocerebellar ataxia type 32 (SCA32) with GGCCUG. In this article, we summarize the results obtained with FISH to examine RNA nuclear inclusions. We provide a detailed protocol for detecting RNAs containing expanded CAG and CUG repeats in different cellular models, including fibroblasts, lymphoblasts, induced pluripotent stem cells and murine and human neuronal progenitors. We also present the results of the first single-molecule FISH application in a cellular model of polyglutamine disease. PMID:26615955

  16. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  17. Crowding by a repeating pattern.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Sarah; Pelli, Denis G

    2015-01-01

    Theinability to recognize a peripheral target among flankers is called crowding. For a foveal target, crowding can be distinguished from overlap masking by its sparing of detection, linear scaling with eccentricity, and invariance with target size.Crowding depends on the proximity and similarity of the flankers to the target. Flankers that are far from or dissimilar to the target do not crowd it. On a gray page, text whose neighboring letters have different colors, alternately black and white, has enough dissimilarity that it might escape crowding. Since reading speed is normally limited by crowding, escape from crowding should allow faster reading. Yet reading speed is unchanged (Chung & Mansfield, 2009). Why? A recent vernier study found that using alternating-color flankers produces strong crowding (Manassi, Sayim, & Herzog, 2012). Might that effect occur with letters and reading? Critical spacing is the minimum center-to-center target-flanker spacing needed to correctly identify the target. We measure it for a target letter surrounded by several equidistant flanker letters of the same polarity, opposite polarity, or mixed polarity: alternately white and black. We find strong crowding in the alternating condition, even though each flanker letter is beyond its own critical spacing (as measured in a separate condition). Thus a periodic repeating pattern can produce crowding even when the individual elements do not. Further, in all conditions we find that, once a periodic pattern repeats (two cycles), further repetition does not affect critical spacing of the innermost flanker.

  18. Genomic diversity and affinities in population groups of North West India: an analysis of Alu insertion and a single nucleotide polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Saini, J S; Kumar, A; Matharoo, K; Sokhi, J; Badaruddoza; Bhanwer, A J S

    2012-12-15

    The North West region of India is extremely important to understand the peopling of India, as it acted as a corridor to the foreign invaders from Eurasia and Central Asia. A series of these invasions along with multiple migrations led to intermixture of variable populations, strongly contributing to genetic variations. The present investigation was designed to explore the genetic diversities and affinities among the five major ethnic groups from North West India; Brahmin, Jat Sikh, Bania, Rajput and Gujjar. A total of 327 individuals of the abovementioned ethnic groups were analyzed for 4 Alu insertion marker loci (ACE, PV92, APO and D1) and a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) rs2234693 in the intronic region of the ESR1 gene. Statistical analysis was performed to interpret the genetic structure and diversity of the population groups. Genotypes for ACE, APO, ESR1 and PV92 loci were found to be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all the ethnic groups, while significant departures were observed at the D1 locus in every investigated population after Bonferroni's correction. The average heterozygosity for all the loci in these ethnic groups was fairly substantial ranging from 0.3927 ± 0.1877 to 0.4333 ± 0.1416. Inbreeding coefficient indicated an overall 10% decrease in heterozygosity in these North West Indian populations. The gene differentiation among the populations was observed to be of the order of 0.013. Genetic distance estimates revealed that Gujjars were close to Banias and Jat Sikhs were close to Rajputs. Overall the study favored the recent division of the populations of North West India into largely endogamous groups. It was observed that the populations of North West India represent a more or less homogenous genetic entity, owing to their common ancestral history as well as geographical proximity.

  19. 47 CFR 22.1015 - Repeater operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repeater operation. 22.1015 Section 22.1015... Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1015 Repeater operation. Offshore central stations may be used as repeater stations provided that the licensee is able to maintain control of the station, and in...

  20. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  1. Impact of Repeated Exposures on Information Spreading in Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cangqi; Zhao, Qianchuan; Lu, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    Clustered structure of social networks provides the chances of repeated exposures to carriers with similar information. It is commonly believed that the impact of repeated exposures on the spreading of information is nontrivial. Does this effect increase the probability that an individual forwards a message in social networks? If so, to what extent does this effect influence people's decisions on whether or not to spread information? Based on a large-scale microblogging data set, which logs the message spreading processes and users' forwarding activities, we conduct a data-driven analysis to explore the answer to the above questions. The results show that an overwhelming majority of message samples are more probable to be forwarded under repeated exposures, compared to those under only a single exposure. For those message samples that cover various topics, we observe a relatively fixed, topic-independent multiplier of the willingness of spreading when repeated exposures occur, regardless of the differences in network structure. We believe that this finding reflects average people's intrinsic psychological gain under repeated stimuli. Hence, it makes sense that the gain is associated with personal response behavior, rather than network structure. Moreover, we find that the gain is robust against the change of message popularity. This finding supports that there exists a relatively fixed gain brought by repeated exposures. Based on the above findings, we propose a parsimonious model to predict the saturated numbers of forwarding activities of messages. Our work could contribute to better understandings of behavioral psychology and social media analytics. PMID:26465749

  2. Impact of Repeated Exposures on Information Spreading in Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cangqi; Zhao, Qianchuan; Lu, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    Clustered structure of social networks provides the chances of repeated exposures to carriers with similar information. It is commonly believed that the impact of repeated exposures on the spreading of information is nontrivial. Does this effect increase the probability that an individual forwards a message in social networks? If so, to what extent does this effect influence people's decisions on whether or not to spread information? Based on a large-scale microblogging data set, which logs the message spreading processes and users' forwarding activities, we conduct a data-driven analysis to explore the answer to the above questions. The results show that an overwhelming majority of message samples are more probable to be forwarded under repeated exposures, compared to those under only a single exposure. For those message samples that cover various topics, we observe a relatively fixed, topic-independent multiplier of the willingness of spreading when repeated exposures occur, regardless of the differences in network structure. We believe that this finding reflects average people's intrinsic psychological gain under repeated stimuli. Hence, it makes sense that the gain is associated with personal response behavior, rather than network structure. Moreover, we find that the gain is robust against the change of message popularity. This finding supports that there exists a relatively fixed gain brought by repeated exposures. Based on the above findings, we propose a parsimonious model to predict the saturated numbers of forwarding activities of messages. Our work could contribute to better understandings of behavioral psychology and social media analytics.

  3. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  4. Repeatability and oblique flow response characteristics of current meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.; Thibodeaux, Kirk G.; Kaehrle, William R.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory investigation into the precision and accuracy of various mechanical-current meters are presented. Horizontal-axis and vertical-axis meters that are used for the measurement of point velocities in streams and rivers were tested. Meters were tested for repeatability and response to oblique flows. Both horizontal- and vertical-axis meters were found to under- and over-register oblique flows with errors generally increasing as the velocity and angle of flow increased. For the oblique flow tests, magnitude of errors were smallest for horizontal-axis meters. Repeatability of all meters tested was good, with the horizontal- and vertical-axis meters performing similarly.

  5. Effect of repeated evaluation and repeated exposure on acceptability ratings of sentences.

    PubMed

    Zervakis, Jennifer; Mazuka, Reiko

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of repeated evaluation and repeated exposure on grammatical acceptability ratings for both acceptable and unacceptable sentence types. In Experiment 1, subjects in the Experimental group rated multiple examples of two ungrammatical sentence types (ungrammatical binding and double object with dative-only verb), and two difficult to process sentence types [center-embedded (2) and garden path ambiguous relative], along with matched grammatical/non-difficult sentences, before rating a final set of experimental sentences. Subjects in the control group rated unrelated sentences during the exposure period before rating the experimental sentences. Subjects in the Experimental group rated both grammatical and ungrammatical sentences as more acceptable after repeated evaluation than subjects in the Control group. In Experiment 2, subjects answered a comprehension question after reading each sentence during the exposure period. Subjects in the experimental group rated garden path and center-embedded (1) sentences as higher in acceptability after comprehension exposure than subjects in the control group. The results are consistent with increased fluency of comprehension being misattributed as a change in acceptability.

  6. Effect of repeated evaluation and repeated exposure on acceptability ratings of sentences.

    PubMed

    Zervakis, Jennifer; Mazuka, Reiko

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of repeated evaluation and repeated exposure on grammatical acceptability ratings for both acceptable and unacceptable sentence types. In Experiment 1, subjects in the Experimental group rated multiple examples of two ungrammatical sentence types (ungrammatical binding and double object with dative-only verb), and two difficult to process sentence types [center-embedded (2) and garden path ambiguous relative], along with matched grammatical/non-difficult sentences, before rating a final set of experimental sentences. Subjects in the control group rated unrelated sentences during the exposure period before rating the experimental sentences. Subjects in the Experimental group rated both grammatical and ungrammatical sentences as more acceptable after repeated evaluation than subjects in the Control group. In Experiment 2, subjects answered a comprehension question after reading each sentence during the exposure period. Subjects in the experimental group rated garden path and center-embedded (1) sentences as higher in acceptability after comprehension exposure than subjects in the control group. The results are consistent with increased fluency of comprehension being misattributed as a change in acceptability. PMID:23179954

  7. Aging and repeated thought suppression success.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Ann E; Smyth, Frederick L; Beadel, Jessica R; Teachman, Bethany A

    2013-01-01

    Intrusive thoughts and attempts to suppress them are common, but while suppression may be effective in the short-term, it can increase thought recurrence in the long-term. Because intentional suppression involves controlled processing, and many aspects of controlled processing decline with age, age differences in thought suppression outcomes may emerge, especially over repeated thought suppression attempts as cognitive resources are expended. Using multilevel modeling, we examined age differences in reactions to thought suppression attempts across four thought suppression sequences in 40 older and 42 younger adults. As expected, age differences were more prevalent during suppression than during free monitoring periods, with younger adults indicating longer, more frequent thought recurrences and greater suppression difficulty. Further, younger adults' thought suppression outcomes changed over time, while trajectories for older adults' were relatively stable. Results are discussed in terms of older adults' reduced thought recurrence, which was potentially afforded by age-related changes in reactive control and distractibility.

  8. Structure and expression of the human Lysyl hydroxylase gene (PLOD): Introns 9 and 16 contain Alu sequences at the sites of recombination in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI patients

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.; Hautala, T.; Kivirikko, K.I.

    1994-12-01

    Lysyl hydroxylase (EC 1.14.11.4) catalyzes the formation of hydroxylysine in collagens by the hydroxylation of lysine residues in peptide linkages. This enzyme activity is known to be reduced in patients with the type VI variant of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and the first mutations in the lysyl hydroxylase gene (PLOD) have recently been identified. We have now isolated genomic clones for human lysyl hydroxylase and determined the complete structure of the gene, which contains 19 exons and a 5{prime} flanking region with characteristics shared by housekeeping genes. The constitutive expression of the gene in different tissues further suggests that lysyl hydroxylase has an essential function. We have sequenced the introns of the gene in the region where many mutations and rearrangements analyzed to date are concentrated. Intron 9 and intron 16 show extensive homology resulting from the many Alu sequences found in these introns. Intron 9 contains five and intron 16 eight Alu sequences. The high homology and many short identical or complementary sequences in these introns generate many potential recombination sites with the gene. The delineation of the structure of the lysyl hydroxylase gene contributes significantly to our understanding of the rearrangements in the genome of Ehlers-Danlos type VI patients. 21 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Modeling Repeatedly Flaring δ Sunspots.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-03-11

    Active regions (ARs) appearing on the surface of the Sun are classified into α, β, γ, and δ by the rules of the Mount Wilson Observatory, California on the basis of their topological complexity. Amongst these, the δ sunspots are known to be superactive and produce the most x-ray flares. Here, we present results from a simulation of the Sun by mimicking the upper layers and the corona, but starting at a more primitive stage than any earlier treatment. We find that this initial state consisting of only a thin subphotospheric magnetic sheet breaks into multiple flux tubes which evolve into a colliding-merging system of spots of opposite polarity upon surface emergence, similar to those often seen on the Sun. The simulation goes on to produce many exotic δ sunspot associated phenomena: repeated flaring in the range of typical solar flare energy release and ejective helical flux ropes with embedded cool-dense plasma filaments resembling solar coronal mass ejections.

  10. Observations of Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2005-01-01

    Magnetars (Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars) are a subclass of neutron stars characterized by their recurrent X-ray bursts. While in an active (bursting) state (lasting anywhere between days and years), they are emitting hundreds of predominantly soft (kl'=30 kev), short (0.1 - 100 ms long) events. Their quiescent source X-ray light curves exhibit pulsations in the narrow range of 5-1 1 s; estimates of these rotational period rate changes (spin-down) indicate that their magnetic fields are extremely high, of the order of 10A14-10A15 G. Such high B-field objects, dubbed "magnetars", had been predicted to exist in 1992, but the first concrete observational evidence was obtained in 1998 for two of these sources. Very recently, SGR1806-20 emitted a giant flare, which was detected in the radio with a multitude of telescopes under an extensive international campaign. These observations have revealed exciting new results, never seen before in any of the other magnetar sources. I will discuss here these results and their relevance to our understanding of the nature of magnetars.

  11. Hsp90 modulates CAG repeat instability in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Mittelman, David; Sykoudis, Kristen; Hersh, Megan; Lin, Yunfu

    2010-01-01

    The Hsp90 molecular chaperone has been implicated as a contributor to evolution in several organisms by revealing cryptic variation that can yield dramatic phenotypes when the chaperone is diverted from its normal functions by environmental stress. In addition, as a cancer drug target, Hsp90 inhibition has been documented to sensitize cells to DNA-damaging agents, suggesting a function for Hsp90 in DNA repair. Here we explore the potential role of Hsp90 in modulating the stability of nucleotide repeats, which in a number of species, including humans, exert subtle and quantitative consequences for protein function, morphological and behavioral traits, and disease. We report that impairment of Hsp90 in human cells induces contractions of CAG repeat tracks by tenfold. Inhibition of the recombinase Rad51, a downstream target of Hsp90, induces a comparable increase in repeat instability, suggesting that Hsp90-enabled homologous recombination normally functions to stabilize CAG repeat tracts. By contrast, Hsp90 inhibition does not increase the rate of gene-inactivating point mutations. The capacity of Hsp90 to modulate repeat-tract lengths suggests that the chaperone, in addition to exposing cryptic variation, might facilitate the expression of new phenotypes through induction of novel genetic variation. PMID:20373063

  12. Strengthening concept learning by repeated testing

    PubMed Central

    Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Jonsson, Bert; Nyberg, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether repeated testing with feedback benefits learning compared to rereading of introductory psychology key-concepts in an educational context. The testing effect was examined immediately after practice, after 18 days, and at a five-week delay in a sample of undergraduate students (n = 83). The results revealed that repeated testing with feedback significantly enhanced learning compared to rereading at all delays, demonstrating that repeated retrieval enhances retention compared to repeated encoding in the short- and the long-term. In addition, the effect of repeated testing was beneficial for students irrespectively of working memory capacity. It is argued that teaching methods involving repeated retrieval are important to consider by the educational system. PMID:24313425

  13. Strengthening concept learning by repeated testing.

    PubMed

    Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Jonsson, Bert; Nyberg, Lars

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether repeated testing with feedback benefits learning compared to rereading of introductory psychology key-concepts in an educational context. The testing effect was examined immediately after practice, after 18 days, and at a five-week delay in a sample of undergraduate students (n = 83). The results revealed that repeated testing with feedback significantly enhanced learning compared to rereading at all delays, demonstrating that repeated retrieval enhances retention compared to repeated encoding in the short- and the long-term. In addition, the effect of repeated testing was beneficial for students irrespectively of working memory capacity. It is argued that teaching methods involving repeated retrieval are important to consider by the educational system.

  14. Patterns and functional roles of LINE-1 and Alu methylation in the keratinocyte from patients with psoriasis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Yooyongsatit, Surasak; Ruchusatsawat, Kriangsak; Noppakun, Nopadon; Hirankarn, Nattiya; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Wongpiyabovorn, Jongkonnee

    2015-07-01

    Alterations in LINE-1 methylation are related to many diseases. The levels and patterns of LINE-1 hypomethylation were associated with a higher risk in developing several cancers, having a poorer prognosis and more aggressiveness. To evaluate the LINE-methylated status in psoriasis, LINE-1 methylation in various cells from patients with psoriasis, squamous cell carcinoma and normal controls were assessed by combined bisulfite restriction analysis of LINE-1. The results of the epigenetic changes for intragenic LINE-1 gene expression were also tested on two known expression microarrays. In patients with psoriasis, hypomethylation of LINE-1 and increase in %(u)C(u)C were prominent in the keratinocytes when compared with normal controls (P=0.014 and P=0.020, respectively). Alternatively, %(u)C(m)C was significantly lower in patients with severe psoriasis compared with mild psoriasis (P=0.022). The receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis indicated the high specificity and sensitivity of (u)C(u)C and (u)C(m)C in detecting psoriasis and severity of psoriasis. From expression array analysis, genes with LINE-1 were downregulated more than those genes without LINE-1 (P=3.84 × 10(-27) and P=2.14 × 10(-21), respectively). Modification in LINE-1 methylation may alter the gene expression resulting in a phenotypic change of the psoriatic skin. %(u)C(u)C and %(u)C(m)C may be used as biomarkers for psoriasis.

  15. Structural Insights into the Stability and Flexibility of Unusual Erythroid Spectrin Repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Kusunoki, H.; Macdonald, R.I.; Mondragon, A.

    2010-03-08

    Erythroid spectrin, a major component of the cytoskeletal network of the red cell which contributes to both the stability and the elasticity of the red cell membrane, is composed of two subunits, {alpha} and {beta}, each formed by 16-20 tandem repeats. The properties of the repeats and their relative arrangement are thought to be key determinants of spectrin flexibility. Here we report a 2.4 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of human erythroid {beta}-spectrin repeats 8 and 9. This two-repeat fragment is unusual as it exhibits low stability of folding and one of its repeats lacks two tryptophans highly conserved among spectrin repeats. Two key factors responsible for the lower stability and, possibly, its flexibility, are revealed by the structure. A third novel feature of the structure is the relative orientation of the two repeats, which increases the range of possible conformations and provides new insights into atomic models of spectrin flexibility.

  16. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  17. Understanding and identifying amino acid repeats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Nijveen, Harm

    2014-07-01

    Amino acid repeats (AARs) are abundant in protein sequences. They have particular roles in protein function and evolution. Simple repeat patterns generated by DNA slippage tend to introduce length variations and point mutations in repeat regions. Loss of normal and gain of abnormal function owing to their variable length are potential risks leading to diseases. Repeats with complex patterns mostly refer to the functional domain repeats, such as the well-known leucine-rich repeat and WD repeat, which are frequently involved in protein–protein interaction. They are mainly derived from internal gene duplication events and stabilized by ‘gate-keeper’ residues, which play crucial roles in preventing inter-domain aggregation. AARs are widely distributed in different proteomes across a variety of taxonomic ranges, and especially abundant in eukaryotic proteins. However, their specific evolutionary and functional scenarios are still poorly understood. Identifying AARs in protein sequences is the first step for the further investigation of their biological function and evolutionary mechanism. In principle, this is an NP-hard problem, as most of the repeat fragments are shaped by a series of sophisticated evolutionary events and become latent periodical patterns. It is not possible to define a uniform criterion for detecting and verifying various repeat patterns. Instead, different algorithms based on different strategies have been developed to cope with different repeat patterns. In this review, we attempt to describe the amino acid repeat-detection algorithms currently available and compare their strategies based on an in-depth analysis of the biological significance of protein repeats. PMID:23418055

  18. Approaching improved adhesive bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlette, Christian; Müller, Tobias; Roβmann, Jürgen; Brecher, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Today, the precision of micro-optics assembly is mostly limited by the accuracy of the bonding process ― and in the case of adhesive bonding by the prediction and compensation of adhesive shrinkage during curing. In this contribution, we present a novel approach to address adhesive bonding based on hybrid control system theory. In hybrid control, dynamic systems are described as "plants" which produce discrete and/or continuous outputs from given discrete and/or continuous inputs, thus yielding a hybrid state space description of the system. The task of hybrid controllers is to observe the plant and to generate a discrete and/or continuous input sequence that guides or holds the plant in a desired target state region while avoiding invalid or unwanted intermediate states. Our approach is based on a series of experiments carried out in order to analyze, define and decouple the dependencies of adhesive shrinkage on multiple parameters, such as application geometries, fixture forces and UV intensities. As some of the dependencies describe continuous effects (e.g. shrinkage from UV intensity) and other dependencies describe discrete state transitions (e.g. fixture removal during curing), the resulting model of the overall bonding process is a hybrid dynamic system in the general case. For this plant model, we then propose a concept of sampling-based parameter search as a basis to design suitable hybrid controllers, which have the potential to optimize process control for a selection of assembly steps, thus improving the repeatability of related production steps like beam-shaping optics or mounting of turning mirrors for fiber coupling.

  19. De Novo Repeat Classification and Fragment Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Pevzner, Paul A.; Tang, Haixu; Tesler, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    Repetitive sequences make up a significant fraction of almost any genome, and an important and still open question in bioinformatics is how to represent all repeats in DNA sequences. We propose a new approach to repeat classification that represents all repeats in a genome as a mosaic of sub-repeats. Our key algorithmic idea also leads to new approaches to multiple alignment and fragment assembly. In particular, we show that our FragmentGluer assembler improves on Phrap and ARACHNE in assembly of BACs and bacterial genomes. PMID:15342561

  20. Effects of repeated application of a moisturizer.

    PubMed

    Serup, J; Winther, A; Blichmann, C W

    1989-01-01

    Epidermal hydration following repeated application of an oil in water emulsion was studied on the forearm skin of 16 healthy females by non-invasive methods. The lotion was applied twice daily for 7 days, and values were followed 7 days after cessation of treatment. The opposite forearm served as an untreated control. Electrical conductance and capacitance showed similar results, i.e. increased values (p less than 0.001) after 2 days of application, reaching a plateau during further applications. Two days after cessation, values were still increased (p less than 0.001), and the conductance was also increased 7 days after cessation of treatment. The water evaporation and the cutaneous blood flow did not change, i.e. indicating no mild irritant effect. Skin surface lipids did not change, i.e. indicating that no significant amounts of emulsion oil remained on the skin at the time of recording. Probably components of the oil phase of the emulsion are absorbed into the epidermis, which is associated with improved hydration as a later event.

  1. Repeated intravenous doxapram induces phrenic motor facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, MS; Lee, KZ; Gonzalez-Rothi, EJ; Fuller, DD

    2013-01-01

    Doxapram is a respiratory stimulant used to treat hypoventilation. Here we investigated whether doxapram could also trigger respiratory neuroplasticity. Specifically, we hypothesized that intermittent delivery of doxapram at low doses would lead to long-lasting increases (i.e., facilitation) of phrenic motor output in anesthetized, vagotomized, and mechanically-ventilated rats. Doxapram was delivered intravenously in a single bolus (2 or 6 mg/kg) or as a series of 3 injections (2 mg/kg) at 5 min intervals. Control groups received pH-matched saline injections (vehicle) or no treatment (anesthesia time control). Doxapram evoked an immediate increase in phrenic output in all groups, but a persistent increase in burst amplitude only occurred after repeated dosing with 2 mg/kg. At 60 min following the last injection, phrenic burst amplitude was 168±24% of baseline (%BL) in the group receiving 3 injections (P < 0.05 vs. controls), but was 103±8%BL and 112±4%BL in the groups receiving a single dose of 2 or 6 mg/kg, respectively. Following bilateral section of the carotid sinus nerves, the acute phrenic response to doxapram (2 mg/kg) was reduced by 68% suggesting that at low doses the drug was acting primarily via the carotid chemoreceptors. We conclude that intermittent application of doxapram can trigger phrenic neuroplasticity, and this approach might be of use in the context of respiratory rehabilitation following neurologic injury. PMID:24013015

  2. Potential Role of the Last Half Repeat in TAL Effectors Revealed by a Molecular Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hua; Chang, Shan; Hu, Jian-ping; Tian, Xu-hong

    2016-01-01

    TAL effectors (TALEs) contain a modular DNA-binding domain that is composed of tandem repeats. In all naturally occurring TALEs, the end of tandem repeats is invariantly a truncated half repeat. To investigate the potential role of the last half repeat in TALEs, we performed comparative molecular dynamics simulations for the crystal structure of DNA-bound TALE AvrBs3 lacking the last half repeat and its modeled structure having the last half repeat. The structural stability analysis indicates that the modeled system is more stable than the nonmodeled system. Based on the principle component analysis, it is found that the AvrBs3 increases its structural compactness in the presence of the last half repeat. The comparison of DNA groove parameters of the two systems implies that the last half repeat also causes the change of DNA major groove binding efficiency. The following calculation of hydrogen bond reveals that, by stabilizing the phosphate binding with DNA at the C-terminus, the last half repeat helps to adopt a compact conformation at the protein-DNA interface. It further mediates more contacts between TAL repeats and DNA nucleotide bases. Finally, we suggest that the last half repeat is required for the high-efficient recognition of DNA by TALE. PMID:27803930

  3. Implementation of bipartite or remote unitary gates with repeater nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Nemoto, Kae

    2016-08-01

    We propose some protocols to implement various classes of bipartite unitary operations on two remote parties with the help of repeater nodes in-between. We also present a protocol to implement a single-qubit unitary with parameters determined by a remote party with the help of up to three repeater nodes. It is assumed that the neighboring nodes are connected by noisy photonic channels, and the local gates can be performed quite accurately, while the decoherence of memories is significant. A unitary is often a part of a larger computation or communication task in a quantum network, and to reduce the amount of decoherence in other systems of the network, we focus on the goal of saving the total time for implementing a unitary including the time for entanglement preparation. We review some previously studied protocols that implement bipartite unitaries using local operations and classical communication and prior shared entanglement, and apply them to the situation with repeater nodes without prior entanglement. We find that the protocols using piecewise entanglement between neighboring nodes often require less total time compared to preparing entanglement between the two end nodes first and then performing the previously known protocols. For a generic bipartite unitary, as the number of repeater nodes increases, the total time could approach the time cost for direct signal transfer from one end node to the other. We also prove some lower bounds of the total time when there are a small number of repeater nodes. The application to position-based cryptography is discussed.

  4. Genome nucleotide composition shapes variation in simple sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiangjun; Strassmann, Joan E; Queller, David C

    2011-02-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are a common component of genomes but vary greatly across species in their abundance. We tested the hypothesis that this variation is due in part to AT/GC content of genomes, with genomes biased toward either high AT or high CG generating more short random repeats that are long enough to enhance expansion through slippage during replication. To test this hypothesis, we identified repeats with perfect tandem iterations of 1-6 bp from 25 protists with complete or near-complete genome sequences. As expected, the density and the frequency are highly related to genome AT content, with excellent fits to quadratic regressions with minima near a 50% AT content and rising toward both extremes. Within species, the same trends hold, except the limited variation in AT content within each species places each mainly on the descending (GC rich), middle, or ascending (AT rich) part of the curve. The base usages of repeat motifs are also significantly correlated with genome nucleotide compositions: Percentages of AT-rich motifs rise with the increase of genome AT content but vice versa for GC-rich subgroups. Amino acid homopolymer repeats also show the expected quadratic relationship, with higher abundance in species with AT content biased in either direction. Our results show that genome nucleotide composition explains up to half of the variance in the abundance and motif constitution of SSRs.

  5. Polymorphism of CAG repeats in androgen receptor of carnivores.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Xiuyue; Wang, Xiaofang; Zeng, Bo; Jia, Xiaodong; Hou, Rong; Yue, Bisong

    2012-03-01

    Androgen effect is mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). The polymorphism of CAG triplet repeat (polyCAG), in the N-terminal transactivation domain of the AR protein, has been involved either in endocrine or neurological disorders in human. We obtained partial sequence of AR exon 1 in 10 carnivore species. In most carnivore species, polyglutamine length polymorphism presented in all three CAG repeat regions of AR, in contrast, only CAG-I site polymorphism presented in primate species, and CAG-I and CAG-III sites polymorphism presented in Canidae. Therefore, studies focusing on disease-associated polymorphism of poly(CAG) in carnivore species AR should investigate all three CAG repeats sites, and should not only consider CAG-I sites as the human disease studies. The trinucleotide repeat length in carnivore AR exon 1 had undergone from expansions to contractions during carnivores evolution, unlike a linear increase in primate species. Furthermore, the polymorphisms of the triplet-repeats in the same tissue (somatic mosaicism) were demonstrated in Moutain weasel, Eurasian lynx, Clouded leopard, Chinese tiger, Black leopard and Leopard AR. And, the abnormal stop codon was found in the exon 1 of three carnivore species AR (Moutain weasel, Eurasian lynx and Black leopard). It seemed to have a high frequency presence of tissue-specific somatic in carnivores AR genes. Thus the in vivo mechanism leading to such highly variable phenotypes of the described mutations, and their impact on these animals, are worthwhile to be further elucidated.

  6. Evolution Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats in Plant Genome.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Qingmei; Li, Aixian; Hou, Fuyun; Zhang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widespread units on genome sequences, and play many important roles in plants. In order to reveal the evolution of plant genomes, we investigated the evolutionary regularities of SSRs during the evolution of plant species and the plant kingdom by analysis of twelve sequenced plant genome sequences. First, in the twelve studied plant genomes, the main SSRs were those which contain repeats of 1-3 nucleotides combination. Second, in mononucleotide SSRs, the A/T percentage gradually increased along with the evolution of plants (except for P. patens). With the increase of SSRs repeat number the percentage of A/T in C. reinhardtii had no significant change, while the percentage of A/T in terrestrial plants species gradually declined. Third, in dinucleotide SSRs, the percentage of AT/TA increased along with the evolution of plant kingdom and the repeat number increased in terrestrial plants species. This trend was more obvious in dicotyledon than monocotyledon. The percentage of CG/GC showed the opposite pattern to the AT/TA. Forth, in trinucleotide SSRs, the percentages of combinations including two or three A/T were in a rising trend along with the evolution of plant kingdom; meanwhile with the increase of SSRs repeat number in plants species, different species chose different combinations as dominant SSRs. SSRs in C. reinhardtii, P. patens, Z. mays and A. thaliana showed their specific patterns related to evolutionary position or specific changes of genome sequences. The results showed that, SSRs not only had the general pattern in the evolution of plant kingdom, but also were associated with the evolution of the specific genome sequence. The study of the evolutionary regularities of SSRs provided new insights for the analysis of the plant genome evolution.

  7. Evolution Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats in Plant Genome

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Qingmei; Li, Aixian; Hou, Fuyun; Zhang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widespread units on genome sequences, and play many important roles in plants. In order to reveal the evolution of plant genomes, we investigated the evolutionary regularities of SSRs during the evolution of plant species and the plant kingdom by analysis of twelve sequenced plant genome sequences. First, in the twelve studied plant genomes, the main SSRs were those which contain repeats of 1–3 nucleotides combination. Second, in mononucleotide SSRs, the A/T percentage gradually increased along with the evolution of plants (except for P. patens). With the increase of SSRs repeat number the percentage of A/T in C. reinhardtii had no significant change, while the percentage of A/T in terrestrial plants species gradually declined. Third, in dinucleotide SSRs, the percentage of AT/TA increased along with the evolution of plant kingdom and the repeat number increased in terrestrial plants species. This trend was more obvious in dicotyledon than monocotyledon. The percentage of CG/GC showed the opposite pattern to the AT/TA. Forth, in trinucleotide SSRs, the percentages of combinations including two or three A/T were in a rising trend along with the evolution of plant kingdom; meanwhile with the increase of SSRs repeat number in plants species, different species chose different combinations as dominant SSRs. SSRs in C. reinhardtii, P. patens, Z. mays and A. thaliana showed their specific patterns related to evolutionary position or specific changes of genome sequences. The results showed that, SSRs not only had the general pattern in the evolution of plant kingdom, but also were associated with the evolution of the specific genome sequence. The study of the evolutionary regularities of SSRs provided new insights for the analysis of the plant genome evolution. PMID:26630570

  8. Evaluating a Group Repeated Reading Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klubnik, Cynthia Adele

    2009-01-01

    Fluency has been identified as an important component of effective reading instruction, and repeated reading has been shown to improve oral reading fluency. In order to improve the efficiency of repeated reading interventions, more research is needed on the effectiveness of small group reading interventions. An alternating treatments, single…

  9. The Effects of Repeaters on Test Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrulis, Richard S.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The effects of repeaters (testees included in both administrations of two forms of a test) on the test equating process are examined. It is shown that repeaters do effect test equating and tend to lower the cutoff point for passing the test. (JKS)

  10. The Effects of Repeaters on Test Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrulis, Richard S.; And Others

    The purpose of this investigation was to establish the effects of repeaters on test equating. Since consideration was not given to repeaters in test equating, such as in the derivation of equations by Angoff (1971), the hypothetical effect needed to be established. A case study was examined which showed results on a test as expected; overall mean…

  11. Validity of repeated initial rise thermoluminescence kinetic parameter determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Kierstead, J.A.; Levy, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    The validity of thermoluminescence (TL) analysis by repeated initial rise measurements has been studied by computer simulation. Thermoluminescence described by 1st Order, 2nd Order, General One Trap and Interactive TL Kinetics was investigated. In the simulation each of the repeated temperature increase and decrease cycles contains a linear temperature increase followed by a decrease appropriate for radiative cooling, i.e. the latter is approximated by a decreasing exponential. The activation energies computed from the simulated emission are readily compared with those used to compute the TL emission. In all cases studied, the repeated initial rise technique provides reliable results only for single peak glow curves or for glow curves containing peaks that do not overlap and, if sufficiently separated, the lowest temperature peak in multipeak curves. Also the temperatures, or temperature cycles corresponding to correct activation energies occur on the low temperature side of the normal glow curve, often well below the peak temperature. A variety of misleading and/or incorrect results an be obtained when the repeated initial rise technique is applied to TL systems that produce overlapping peaks in the usual glow curve. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Native DNA repeats and methylation in Ascobolus.

    PubMed Central

    Goyon, C; Rossignol, J L; Faugeron, G

    1996-01-01

    We identified two classes of native dispersed DNA repeats in the Ascobolus genome. The first class consisted of several kilobase long, methylated repeats. These repeats, named Mars (methylated Ascobolus repeated sequences), fell in one family of LINE-like elements and in three families of LTR-containing retrotransposable elements. The methylation features of Mars elements were those expected if they were natural targets for the MIP (methylation induced premeiotically) previously discovered in Ascobolus. The second class consisted of short repeats, approximately 100 bp long, corresponding to 5S rRNA and tRNA genes. As expected from their size, which was too small to allow MIP to occur, they were unmethylated, as were 26 kb of unique sequences tested. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that MIP is targeted at natural DNA repeats and constitutes a defensive process against the detrimental consequences of the spreading of mobile elements throughout the genome. The 9 kb tandem repeats harbouring the 28S, 18S and 5.8S rRNA genes displayed methylation features suggesting that rDNA methylation proceeds through a process other than MIP. PMID:8811089

  13. Impact of Repeated Exposures on Information Spreading in Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cangqi; Zhao, Qianchuan; Lu, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    Clustered structure of social networks provides the chances of repeated exposures to carriers with similar information. It is commonly believed that the impact of repeated exposures on the spreading of information is nontrivial. Does this effect increase the probability that an individual forwards a message in social networks? If so, to what extent does this effect influence people’s decisions on whether or not to spread information? Based on a large-scale microblogging data set, which logs the message spreading processes and users’ forwarding activities, we conduct a data-driven analysis to explore the answer to the above questions. The results show that an overwhelming majority of message samples are more probable to be forwarded under repeated exposures, compared to those under only a single exposure. For those message samples that cover various topics, we observe a relatively fixed, topic-independent multiplier of the willingness of spreading when repeated exposures occur, regardless of the differences in network structure. We believe that this finding reflects average people’s intrinsic psychological gain under repeated stimuli. Hence, it makes sense that the gain is associated with personal response behavior, rather than network structure. Moreover, we find that the gain is robust against the change of message popularity. This finding supports that there exists a relatively fixed gain brought by repeated exposures. Based on the above findings, we propose a parsimonious model to predict the saturated numbers of forwarding activities of messages. Our work could contribute to better understandings of behavioral psychology and social media analytics. PMID:26465749

  14. Finding and Characterizing Repeats in Plant Genomes.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Jacques; Peterlongo, Pierre; Tempel, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Plant genomes contain a particularly high proportion of repeated structures of various types. This chapter proposes a guided tour of available software that can help biologists to look for these repeats and check some hypothetical models intended to characterize their structures. Since transposable elements are a major source of repeats in plants, many methods have been used or developed for this large class of sequences. They are representative of the range of tools available for other classes of repeats and we have provided a whole section on this topic as well as a selection of the main existing software. In order to better understand how they work and how repeats may be efficiently found in genomes, it is necessary to look at the technical issues involved in the large-scale search of these structures. Indeed, it may be hard to keep up with the profusion of proposals in this dynamic field and the rest of the chapter is devoted to the foundations of the search for repeats and more complex patterns. The second section introduces the key concepts that are useful for understanding the current state of the art in playing with words, applied to genomic sequences. This can be seen as the first stage of a very general approach called linguistic analysis that is interested in the analysis of natural or artificial texts. Words, the lexical level, correspond to simple repeated entities in texts or strings. In fact, biologists need to represent more complex entities where a repeat family is built on more abstract structures, including direct or inverted small repeats, motifs, composition constraints as well as ordering and distance constraints between these elementary blocks. In terms of linguistics, this corresponds to the syntactic level of a language. The last section introduces concepts and practical tools that can be used to reach this syntactic level in biological sequence analysis. PMID:26519414

  15. Finding and Characterizing Repeats in Plant Genomes.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Jacques; Peterlongo, Pierre; Tempel, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Plant genomes contain a particularly high proportion of repeated structures of various types. This chapter proposes a guided tour of available software that can help biologists to look for these repeats and check some hypothetical models intended to characterize their structures. Since transposable elements are a major source of repeats in plants, many methods have been used or developed for this large class of sequences. They are representative of the range of tools available for other classes of repeats and we have provided a whole section on this topic as well as a selection of the main existing software. In order to better understand how they work and how repeats may be efficiently found in genomes, it is necessary to look at the technical issues involved in the large-scale search of these structures. Indeed, it may be hard to keep up with the profusion of proposals in this dynamic field and the rest of the chapter is devoted to the foundations of the search for repeats and more complex patterns. The second section introduces the key concepts that are useful for understanding the current state of the art in playing with words, applied to genomic sequences. This can be seen as the first stage of a very general approach called linguistic analysis that is interested in the analysis of natural or artificial texts. Words, the lexical level, correspond to simple repeated entities in texts or strings. In fact, biologists need to represent more complex entities where a repeat family is built on more abstract structures, including direct or inverted small repeats, motifs, composition constraints as well as ordering and distance constraints between these elementary blocks. In terms of linguistics, this corresponds to the syntactic level of a language. The last section introduces concepts and practical tools that can be used to reach this syntactic level in biological sequence analysis.

  16. The child accident repeater: a review.

    PubMed

    Jones, J G

    1980-04-01

    The child accident repeater is defined as one who has at least three accidents that come to medical attention within a year. The accident situation has features in common with those of the child who has a single accident through simple "bad luck", but other factors predispose him to repeated injury. In the child who has a susceptible personality, a tendency for accident repetition may be due to a breakdown in adjustment to a stressful environment. Prevention of repeat accidents should involve the usual measures considered appropriate for all children as well as an attempt to provide treatment of significant maladjustment and modification of a stressful environment.

  17. Do gamma-ray burst sources repeat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, C. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Blumenthal, G.; Brock, M.

    1994-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al. 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic ad the two-point angular correlation function. We find the data to be consistent with the hypothesis that burst sources do not repeat; however, a repeater fraction of up to about 20% of the bursts cannot be excluded.

  18. Types of DNA methylation status of the interspersed repetitive sequences for LINE-1, Alu, HERV-E and HERV-K in the neutrophils from systemic lupus erythematosus patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Sukapan, Patadon; Promnarate, Paramate; Avihingsanon, Yingyos; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Hirankarn, Nattiya

    2014-04-01

    Changes of the DNA methylation at the interspersed repetitive sequences can occur in various conditions including cancer as well as autoimmune diseases. We previously reported the hypomethylation of LINE-1 and HERV-E in the lymphocytes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. As neutrophils are another important cell type contributing to SLE pathogenesis, in this study, we evaluated the methylation levels and patterns for LINE-1, ALU, HERV-E and HERV-K in the neutrophils from SLE patients compared with the healthy controls. We observed that the methylation levels, especially for LINE-1, in the neutrophils from SLE patients were significantly lower than the healthy controls (P-value < 0.0001). Interestingly, this hypomethylation was not correlated with the activity of the disease. Furthermore, the methylation levels and patterns for Alu, HERV-E and HERV-K in the neutrophils from the SLE patients were not significantly different from the healthy controls. In addition, we further investigated whether there were any correlations between the intragenic LINE-1 and differential expressions of the neutrophils from the SLE patients using public arrays data. The upregulated genes in the neutrophils from the SLE patients were significantly associated with the genes containing LINE-1s compared with the healthy controls (P-value GSE27427 = 7.74 × 10(-3); odds ratio (OR) = 1.28). Interestingly, this association was mainly found among genes with antisense LINE-1s (P-value GSE27427 = 6.22 × 10(-3); OR = 1.38). Bioinformatics data suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation may affect expression of the genes that may contribute to the pathogenesis of SLE. However, additional functional studies of these proposed genes are warranted to prove this hypothesis.

  19. Context dependency of trait repeatability and its relevance for management and conservation of fish populations.

    PubMed

    Killen, S S; Adriaenssens, B; Marras, S; Claireaux, G; Cooke, S J

    2016-01-01

    Repeatability of behavioural and physiological traits is increasingly a focus for animal researchers, for which fish have become important models. Almost all of this work has been done in the context of evolutionary ecology, with few explicit attempts to apply repeatability and context dependency of trait variation toward understanding conservation-related issues. Here, we review work examining the degree to which repeatability of traits (such as boldness, swimming performance, metabolic rate and stress responsiveness) is context dependent. We review methods for quantifying repeatability (distinguishing between within-context and across-context repeatability) and confounding factors that may be especially problematic when attempting to measure repeatability in wild fish. Environmental factors such temperature, food availability, oxygen availability, hypercapnia, flow regime and pollutants all appear to alter trait repeatability in fishes. This suggests that anthropogenic environmental change could alter evolutionary trajectories by changing which individuals achieve the greatest fitness in a given set of conditions. Gaining a greater understanding of these effects will be crucial for our ability to forecast the effects of gradual environmental change, such as climate change and ocean acidification, the study of which is currently limited by our ability to examine trait changes over relatively short time scales. Also discussed are situations in which recent advances in technologies associated with electronic tags (biotelemetry and biologging) and respirometry will help to facilitate increased quantification of repeatability for physiological and integrative traits, which so far lag behind measures of repeatability of behavioural traits. PMID:27382470

  20. Context dependency of trait repeatability and its relevance for management and conservation of fish populations

    PubMed Central

    Killen, S. S.; Adriaenssens, B.; Marras, S.; Claireaux, G.; Cooke, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Repeatability of behavioural and physiological traits is increasingly a focus for animal researchers, for which fish have become important models. Almost all of this work has been done in the context of evolutionary ecology, with few explicit attempts to apply repeatability and context dependency of trait variation toward understanding conservation-related issues. Here, we review work examining the degree to which repeatability of traits (such as boldness, swimming performance, metabolic rate and stress responsiveness) is context dependent. We review methods for quantifying repeatability (distinguishing between within-context and across-context repeatability) and confounding factors that may be especially problematic when attempting to measure repeatability in wild fish. Environmental factors such temperature, food availability, oxygen availability, hypercapnia, flow regime and pollutants all appear to alter trait repeatability in fishes. This suggests that anthropogenic environmental change could alter evolutionary trajectories by changing which individuals achieve the greatest fitness in a given set of conditions. Gaining a greater understanding of these effects will be crucial for our ability to forecast the effects of gradual environmental change, such as climate change and ocean acidification, the study of which is currently limited by our ability to examine trait changes over relatively short time scales. Also discussed are situations in which recent advances in technologies associated with electronic tags (biotelemetry and biologging) and respirometry will help to facilitate increased quantification of repeatability for physiological and integrative traits, which so far lag behind measures of repeatability of behavioural traits. PMID:27382470

  1. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  2. The Moral Maturity of Repeater Delinquents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petronio, Richard J.

    1980-01-01

    Differences in moral development (as conceived by Kohlberg) were examined in a sample of delinquent teenagers. The repeater group was not found, as had been hypothesized, to be lower on moral maturity than those who engaged in less delinquency. (GC)

  3. Investigation of a Quadruplex-Forming Repeat Sequence Highly Enriched in Xanthomonas and Nostoc sp.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Charlotte; Wurmthaler, Lena A; Li, Yuanhao; Frickey, Tancred; Hartig, Jörg S

    2015-01-01

    In prokaryotes simple sequence repeats (SSRs) with unit sizes of 1-5 nucleotides (nt) are causative for phase and antigenic variation. Although an increased abundance of heptameric repeats was noticed in bacteria, reports about SSRs of 6-9 nt are rare. In particular G-rich repeat sequences with the propensity to fold into G-quadruplex (G4) structures have received little attention. In silico analysis of prokaryotic genomes show putative G4 forming sequences to be abundant. This report focuses on a surprisingly enriched G-rich repeat of the type GGGNATC in Xanthomonas and cyanobacteria such as Nostoc. We studied in detail the genomes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ATCC 33913 (Xcc), Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. 306 (Xac), and Nostoc sp. strain PCC7120 (Ana). In all three organisms repeats are spread all over the genome with an over-representation in non-coding regions. Extensive variation of the number of repetitive units was observed with repeat numbers ranging from two up to 26 units. However a clear preference for four units was detected. The strong bias for four units coincides with the requirement of four consecutive G-tracts for G4 formation. Evidence for G4 formation of the consensus repeat sequences was found in biophysical studies utilizing CD spectroscopy. The G-rich repeats are preferably located between aligned open reading frames (ORFs) and are under-represented in coding regions or between divergent ORFs. The G-rich repeats are preferentially located within a distance of 50 bp upstream of an ORF on the anti-sense strand or within 50 bp from the stop codon on the sense strand. Analysis of whole transcriptome sequence data showed that the majority of repeat sequences are transcribed. The genetic loci in the vicinity of repeat regions show increased genomic stability. In conclusion, we introduce and characterize a special class of highly abundant and wide-spread quadruplex-forming repeat sequences in bacteria. PMID:26695179

  4. Investigation of a Quadruplex-Forming Repeat Sequence Highly Enriched in Xanthomonas and Nostoc sp.

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Charlotte; Wurmthaler, Lena A.; Li, Yuanhao; Frickey, Tancred; Hartig, Jörg S.

    2015-01-01

    In prokaryotes simple sequence repeats (SSRs) with unit sizes of 1–5 nucleotides (nt) are causative for phase and antigenic variation. Although an increased abundance of heptameric repeats was noticed in bacteria, reports about SSRs of 6–9 nt are rare. In particular G-rich repeat sequences with the propensity to fold into G-quadruplex (G4) structures have received little attention. In silico analysis of prokaryotic genomes show putative G4 forming sequences to be abundant. This report focuses on a surprisingly enriched G-rich repeat of the type GGGNATC in Xanthomonas and cyanobacteria such as Nostoc. We studied in detail the genomes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ATCC 33913 (Xcc), Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. 306 (Xac), and Nostoc sp. strain PCC7120 (Ana). In all three organisms repeats are spread all over the genome with an over-representation in non-coding regions. Extensive variation of the number of repetitive units was observed with repeat numbers ranging from two up to 26 units. However a clear preference for four units was detected. The strong bias for four units coincides with the requirement of four consecutive G-tracts for G4 formation. Evidence for G4 formation of the consensus repeat sequences was found in biophysical studies utilizing CD spectroscopy. The G-rich repeats are preferably located between aligned open reading frames (ORFs) and are under-represented in coding regions or between divergent ORFs. The G-rich repeats are preferentially located within a distance of 50 bp upstream of an ORF on the anti-sense strand or within 50 bp from the stop codon on the sense strand. Analysis of whole transcriptome sequence data showed that the majority of repeat sequences are transcribed. The genetic loci in the vicinity of repeat regions show increased genomic stability. In conclusion, we introduce and characterize a special class of highly abundant and wide-spread quadruplex-forming repeat sequences in bacteria. PMID:26695179

  5. Star repeaters for fiber optic links.

    PubMed

    McMahon, D H; Gravel, R L

    1977-02-01

    A star repeater combines the functions of a passive star coupler and a signal regenerating amplifier. By more effectively utilizing the light power radiated by a light emitting diode, the star repeater can, when used with small diameter channels, couple as much power to all receivers of a multiterminal link as would be coupled to the single receiver of a simple point-to-point link.

  6. Central and Peripheral Autorefraction Repeatability in Normal Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kelly E.; Berntsen, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the between-visit repeatability of peripheral autorefraction measurements using the Grand Seiko WAM-5500 in normal eyes. Methods Cycloplegic autorefraction of the right eye was measured on 25 myopic young adults using a modified Grand Seiko autorefractor. Measurements were made centrally (along the line of sight) and ±20°, ±30°, and ±40° from the line of sight in the horizontal meridian at two visits separated by 1 to 15 days. Five autorefraction measurements at each location were converted to vector space and averaged. Relative peripheral refraction (RPR) was calculated as the difference between the peripheral and central spherical equivalent (SE). Between-visit repeatability was evaluated by plotting the difference versus the mean of the measurements at the two visits (bias) and by calculating the 95% limits of agreement (LoA). Results The mean (±SD) age and SE refractive error centrally (at visit 1) were 24.0 ± 1.3 years and −3.45 ± 1.42 D, respectively. There was no significant between-visit bias for any refractive component evaluated (M, J0, J45, and RPR) at any location measured (all p>0.05). The 95% LoA of defocus (M) was ±0.21 D centrally and increased with increasing eccentricity to ±0.73 D and ±0.88 D at 40° nasally and temporally on the retina, respectively. The 95% LoA of RPR increased with increasing eccentricity to ±0.67 D and ±0.82 D at 40° nasally and temporally on the retina, respectively. Conclusions In normal eyes, the repeatability of cycloplegic autorefraction was best centrally and decreased as eccentricity increased; however, repeatability in the far periphery was still better than previously reported between-visit repeatability for foveal cycloplegic subjective refraction. With clear knowledge of the repeatability of on- and off-axis cycloplegic autorefraction with the Grand Seiko, peripheral measurements can be properly interpreted in longitudinal studies. PMID:25062133

  7. Repeated corticosterone administration sensitizes the locomotor response to amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Deroche, V; Piazza, P V; Maccari, S; Le Moal, M; Simon, H

    1992-07-01

    Repeated exposures to stressful situations has been shown to increase individual reactivity to psychostimulants, although the biological factors involved in such stress-induced changes are still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of corticosterone in the effects of stress on the response to psychostimulants. We found that repeated corticosterone administration (both 1.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally and 50 micrograms/ml in drinking water, once per day for 15 days) increased the locomotor response to amphetamine (1.15 mg/kg, i.p.). At the doses used in these experiments, corticosterone administration induced similar increases in plasma levels of the hormone to those induced by stress. These results suggest that corticosterone secretion may be one of the mechanisms by which repeated stress increases the behavioral responses to amphetamine. Since an enhanced reactivity to psychostimulants has been found to be an index of a propensity for drug self-administration and a model of certain psychopathological conditions, these findings point to a role for glucocorticoids in such abnormal states. PMID:1515947

  8. Structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins show propagation of inter-repeat interface effects.

    PubMed

    Reichen, Christian; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Hansen, Simon; Grütter, Markus G; Plückthun, Andreas; Mittl, Peer R E

    2016-01-01

    The armadillo repeat serves as a scaffold for the development of modular peptide-recognition modules. In order to develop such a system, three crystal structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins with third-generation N-caps (YIII-type), four or five internal repeats (M-type) and second-generation C-caps (AII-type) were determined at 1.8 Å (His-YIIIM4AII), 2.0 Å (His-YIIIM5AII) and 1.95 Å (YIIIM5AII) resolution and compared with those of variants with third-generation C-caps. All constructs are full consensus designs in which the internal repeats have exactly the same sequence, and hence identical conformations of the internal repeats are expected. The N-cap and internal repeats M1 to M3 are indeed extremely similar, but the comparison reveals structural differences in internal repeats M4 and M5 and the C-cap. These differences are caused by long-range effects of the C-cap, contacting molecules in the crystal, and the intrinsic design of the repeat. Unfortunately, the rigid-body movement of the C-terminal part impairs the regular arrangement of internal repeats that forms the putative peptide-binding site. The second-generation C-cap improves the packing of buried residues and thereby the stability of the protein. These considerations are useful for future improvements of an armadillo-repeat-based peptide-recognition system. PMID:26894544

  9. The development of ingroup favoritism in repeated social dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Dorrough, Angela R.; Glöckner, Andreas; Hellmann, Dshamilja M.; Ebert, Irena

    2015-01-01

    In two comprehensive and fully incentivized studies, we investigate the development of ingroup favoritism as one of two aspects of parochial altruism in repeated social dilemmas. Specifically, we test whether ingroup favoritism is a fixed phenomenon that can be observed from the very beginning and remains stable over time, or whether it develops (increases vs. decreases) during repeated contact. Ingroup favoritism is assessed through cooperation behavior in a repeated continuous prisoner's dilemma where participants sequentially interact with 10 members of the ingroup (own city and university) and subsequently with 10 members of the outgroup (other city and university), or vice versa. In none of the experiments do we observe initial differences in cooperation behavior for interaction partners from the ingroup, as compared to outgroup, and we only observe small differences in expectations regarding the interaction partners' cooperation behavior. After repeated interaction, however, including a change of groups, clear ingroup favoritism can be observed. Instead of being due to gradual and potentially biased updating of expectations, we found that these emerging differences were mainly driven by the change of interaction partners' group membership that occurred after round 10. This indicates that in social dilemma settings ingroup favoritism is to some degree dynamic in that it is enhanced and sometimes only observable if group membership is activated by thinking about both the interaction with the ingroup and the outgroup. PMID:25972821

  10. Activating frataxin expression by repeat-targeted nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Liande; Matsui, Masayuki; Corey, David R

    2016-02-04

    Friedreich's ataxia is an incurable genetic disorder caused by a mutant expansion of the trinucleotide GAA within an intronic FXN RNA. This expansion leads to reduced expression of frataxin (FXN) protein and evidence suggests that transcriptional repression is caused by an R-loop that forms between the expanded repeat RNA and complementary genomic DNA. Synthetic agents that increase levels of FXN protein might alleviate the disease. We demonstrate that introducing anti-GAA duplex RNAs or single-stranded locked nucleic acids into patient-derived cells increases FXN protein expression to levels similar to analogous wild-type cells. Our data are significant because synthetic nucleic acids that target GAA repeats can be lead compounds for restoring curative FXN levels. More broadly, our results demonstrate that interfering with R-loop formation can trigger gene activation and reveal a new strategy for upregulating gene expression.

  11. Genome-Wide Demethylation Promotes Triplet Repeat Instability Independently of Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Vincent; Lin, Yunfu; Price, Brandee A.; Fyffe, Sharyl L.; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Wilson, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat instability is intrinsic to a family of human neurodegenerative diseases. The mechanism leading to repeat length variation is unclear. We previously showed that treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) dramatically increases triplet repeat instability in mammalian cells. Based on previous reports that demethylation increases homologous recombination (HR), and our own observations that HR destabilizes triplet repeats, we hypothesized that demethylation alters repeat stability by stimulating HR. Here, we test that hypothesis at the Aprt (adenosine phosphoribosyl transferase) locus in CHO cells, where CpG demethylation and HR have both been shown to increase CAG repeat instability. We find that the rate of HR at the Aprt locus is not altered by demethylation. The spectrum of recombinants, however, was shifted from the usual 6:1 ratio of conversions to crossovers to more equal proportions in 5-aza-CdR-treated cells. The subtle influences of demethylation on HR at the Aprt locus are not sufficient to account for its dramatic effects on repeat instability. We conclude that 5-aza-CdR promotes triplet repeat instability independently of HR. PMID:18083071

  12. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. |

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  13. Analysis of Laboratory Repeat Critical Values at a Large Tertiary Teaching Hospital in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dagan; Zhou, Yunxian; Yang, Chunwei

    2013-01-01

    Context As a patient safety measure, laboratories are required to have a critical values policy by regulatory agencies. Unfortunately, little information is available on repeat critical values for the same analyte(s) on the same patient. Objective To investigate the occurrence and distribution of repeat critical values and the relationship between the frequency of such values and patient outcome to provide information for hospitals on improving reporting policies. Methods Eleven laboratory critical value lists, including chemistry and hematology analytes, were selected from a tertiary hospital in China in the year 2010. The distribution and interval time for each repeat critical value were calculated. Serum potassium and platelet count were used as examples to illustrate the relationship between the frequency of the repeat critical values and patient outcome. Results All test items on the critical value list were prone to the occurrence of repeat critical values. On average, each patient who experienced critical values had 2.10 occurrences. The median interval time for each repeat critical value varied, with most being longer than 8 hours. For those patients who had repeat critical values of serum potassium and platelet count, along with the increased frequency, the patients had a longer hospital stay and a generally worse outcome. Conclusions Patient can have a number of repeat critical values and the frequency of these values is closely related to patient outcome. A careful evaluation is warranted if a laboratory chooses to adopt a policy of not reporting each repeat critical value. PMID:23516637

  14. Novel triplet repeat containing genes in human brain: Cloning, expression, and length polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shi Hua; Margolis, R.L.; Ross, C.A.; McInnis, M.G.; Antonarakis, S.E. )

    1993-06-01

    Human genes containing triplet repeats may markedly expand in length and cause neuropsychiatric disease, explaining the phenomenon of anticipation (increasing severity or earlier age of onset in successive generations in a pedigree). To identify novel genes with triplet repeats, the authors screened a human brain cDNA library with oligonucleotide probes containing CTG or CCG triplet repeats. Fourteen of 40 clones encoded novel human genes, and 8 of these inserts have been sequenced on both strands. All contain repeats, and 5 of the 8 have 9 or more consecutive perfect repeats. All are expressed in brain. Chromosomal assignments reveal a distribution of these genes on multiple autosomes and the X-chromosome. Further, the repeat length in two of the genes is highly polymorphic, making them valuable index linkage markers. The authors predict that many triplet repeat-containing genes exist; screening with the CTG probe suggests approximately 50-100 genes containing this type of repeat are expressed in the human brain. Since additional disorders, such as Huntington's disease, bipolar affective disorder, and possibly others, show features of anticipation, they suggest that these novel human genes with triplet repeats are candidates for causing neuropsychiatric diseases.

  15. Effects of repeated Valsalva maneuver straining on cardiac and vasoconstrictive baroreflex responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Ratliff, Duane A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Ludwig, David A.; Muniz, Gary W.; Benedetti, Erik; Chavarria, Jose; Koreen, Susan; Nguyen, Claude; Wang, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We hypothesized that repeated respiratory straining maneuvers (repeated SM) designed to elevate arterial BPs (arterial baroreceptor loading) would acutely increase baroreflex responses. METHODS: We tested this hypothesis by measuring cardiac baroreflex responses to carotid baroreceptor stimulation (neck pressures), and changes in heart rate and diastolic BP after reductions in BP induced by a 15-s Valsalva maneuver in 10 female and 10 male subjects at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after performing repeated SM. Baroreflex responses were also measured in each subject at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h at the same time on a separate day without repeated SM (control) in a randomized, counter-balanced cross-over experimental design. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference in carotid-cardiac and peripheral vascular baroreflex responses measured across time following repeated SM compared with the control condition. Integrated cardiac baroreflex response (deltaHR/ deltaSBP) measured during performance of a Valsalva maneuver was increased by approximately 50% to 1.1 +/- 0.2 bpm x mm Hg(-1) at 1 h and 1.0 +/- 0.1 bpm x mm Hg(-1) at 3 h following repeated SM compared with the control condition (0.7 +/- 0.1 bpm x mm Hg(-1) at both 1 and 3 h, respectively). However, integrated cardiac baroreflex response after repeated SM returned to control levels at 6 and 24 h after training. These responses did not differ between men and women. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with the notion that arterial baroreceptor loading induced by repeated SM increased aortic, but not carotid, cardiac baroreflex responses for as long as 3 h after repeated SM. We conclude that repeated SM increases cardiac baroreflex responsiveness which may provide patients, astronauts, and high-performance aircraft pilots with protection from development of orthostatic hypotension.

  16. Variable efficacy of repeated annual influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Forrest, S; Ackley, D H; Perelson, A S

    1999-11-23

    Conclusions have differed in studies that have compared vaccine efficacy in groups receiving influenza vaccine for the first time to efficacy in groups vaccinated more than once. For example, the Hoskins study [Hoskins, T. W., Davis, J. R., Smith, A. J., Miller, C. L. & Allchin, A. (1979) Lancet i, 33-35] concluded that repeat vaccination was not protective in the long term, whereas the Keitel study [Keitel, W. A., Cate, T. R., Couch, R. B., Huggins, L. L. & Hess, K. R. (1997) Vaccine 15, 1114-1122] concluded that repeat vaccination provided continual protection. We propose an explanation, the antigenic distance hypothesis, and test it by analyzing seven influenza outbreaks that occurred during the Hoskins and Keitel studies. The hypothesis is that variation in repeat vaccine efficacy is due to differences in antigenic distances among vaccine strains and between the vaccine strains and the epidemic strain in each outbreak. To test the hypothesis, antigenic distances were calculated from historical hemagglutination inhibition assay tables, and a computer model of the immune response was used to predict the vaccine efficacy of individuals given different vaccinations. The model accurately predicted the observed vaccine efficacies in repeat vaccinees relative to the efficacy in first-time vaccinees (correlation 0.87). Thus, the antigenic distance hypothesis offers a parsimonious explanation of the differences between and within the Hoskins and Keitel studies. These results have implications for the selection of influenza vaccine strains, and also for vaccination strategies for other antigenically variable pathogens that might require repeated vaccination. PMID:10570188

  17. Variable efficacy of repeated annual influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Forrest, S; Ackley, D H; Perelson, A S

    1999-11-23

    Conclusions have differed in studies that have compared vaccine efficacy in groups receiving influenza vaccine for the first time to efficacy in groups vaccinated more than once. For example, the Hoskins study [Hoskins, T. W., Davis, J. R., Smith, A. J., Miller, C. L. & Allchin, A. (1979) Lancet i, 33-35] concluded that repeat vaccination was not protective in the long term, whereas the Keitel study [Keitel, W. A., Cate, T. R., Couch, R. B., Huggins, L. L. & Hess, K. R. (1997) Vaccine 15, 1114-1122] concluded that repeat vaccination provided continual protection. We propose an explanation, the antigenic distance hypothesis, and test it by analyzing seven influenza outbreaks that occurred during the Hoskins and Keitel studies. The hypothesis is that variation in repeat vaccine efficacy is due to differences in antigenic distances among vaccine strains and between the vaccine strains and the epidemic strain in each outbreak. To test the hypothesis, antigenic distances were calculated from historical hemagglutination inhibition assay tables, and a computer model of the immune response was used to predict the vaccine efficacy of individuals given different vaccinations. The model accurately predicted the observed vaccine efficacies in repeat vaccinees relative to the efficacy in first-time vaccinees (correlation 0.87). Thus, the antigenic distance hypothesis offers a parsimonious explanation of the differences between and within the Hoskins and Keitel studies. These results have implications for the selection of influenza vaccine strains, and also for vaccination strategies for other antigenically variable pathogens that might require repeated vaccination.

  18. Characterization of conservative somatic instability of the CAG repeat region in Huntington`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, F.V.; Calikoglu, A.S.; Whetsell, L.H.

    1994-09-01

    Instability and enlargement of a CAG repeat region at the beginning of the huntingtin gene (IT-15) has been linked with Huntington`s disease. The CAG repeat size shows a highly significant correlation with age-of-onset of clinicial features in individuals with 40 or more repeats who have Huntington disease. The clinical status of nonsymptomatic individuals with 30 to 39 CAG repeats is considered ambiguous. In order to define more carefully the nature of the HD expansion instability, we examined patients in our HD population using a discriminating fluorescence-based PCR approach. The degree of somatic mutation increases with both earlier age of onset and the size of the inherited allele. A single prominent band one repeat larger than the index peak was typical in individuals with 40-41 CAG repeats. Three to four larger bands are typically discerned in individuals with 50 or more repeats. In an extreme example, an individual with approximately 95 repeats had at least 8 prominent bands. Plotting the degree of somatic mutation relative to the size of the HD allele shows somatic mutation activity increases with size. By this approach 40-60% of the alleles in a 40-41 CAG repeat HD loci is represented in the primary allele. In contrast, the primary allele represents a relatively minor proportion of the total alleles for expansions greater than 50 CAG repeats (10-20%). The limited range of somatic mutation suggest that the instability is restricted to very early stages of embryogenesis before tissue development diverges or that persistent somatic instability occurs at a slow rate. Therefore, the properties of somatic instability in Huntington`s disease have aspects that are both in common but also different from that found in other trinucleotide repeat expanding diseases such as myotonic muscular dystrophy and fragile X syndrome.

  19. Tracking the processing of damaged DNA double-strand break ends by ligation-mediated PCR: increased persistence of 3′-phosphoglycolate termini in SCAN1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Akopiants, Konstantin; Mohapatra, Susovan; Menon, Vijay; Zhou, Tong; Valerie, Kristoffer; Povirk, Lawrence F.

    2014-01-01

    To track the processing of damaged DNA double-strand break (DSB) ends in vivo, a method was devised for quantitative measurement of 3′-phosphoglycolate (PG) termini on DSBs induced by the non-protein chromophore of neocarzinostatin (NCS-C) in the human Alu repeat. Following exposure of cells to NCS-C, DNA was isolated, and labile lesions were chemically stabilized. All 3′-phosphate and 3′-hydroxyl ends were enzymatically capped with dideoxy termini, whereas 3′-PG ends were rendered ligatable, linked to an anchor, and quantified by real-time Taqman polymerase chain reaction. Using this assay and variations thereof, 3′-PG and 3′-phosphate termini on 1-base 3′ overhangs of NCS-C-induced DSBs were readily detected in DNA from the treated lymphoblastoid cells, and both were largely eliminated from cellular DNA within 1 h. However, the 3′-PG termini were processed more slowly than 3′-phosphate termini, and were more persistent in tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1-mutant SCAN1 than in normal cells, suggesting a significant role for tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 in removing 3′-PG blocking groups for DSB repair. DSBs with 3′-hydroxyl termini, which are not directly induced by NCS-C, were formed rapidly in cells, and largely eliminated by further processing within 1 h, both in Alu repeats and in heterochromatic α-satellite DNA. Moreover, absence of DNA-PK in M059J cells appeared to accelerate resolution of 3′-PG ends. PMID:24371269

  20. Unusual Structures Are Present in DNA Fragments Containing Super-Long Huntingtin CAG Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Duzdevich, Daniel; Li, Jinliang; Whang, Jhoon; Takahashi, Hirohide; Takeyasu, Kunio; Dryden, David T. F.; Morton, A. Jennifer; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background In the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD), expansion of the CAG trinucleotide repeat length beyond about 300 repeats induces a novel phenotype associated with a reduction in transcription of the transgene. Methodology/Principal Findings We analysed the structure of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-generated DNA containing up to 585 CAG repeats using atomic force microscopy (AFM). As the number of CAG repeats increased, an increasing proportion of the DNA molecules exhibited unusual structural features, including convolutions and multiple protrusions. At least some of these features are hairpin loops, as judged by cross-sectional analysis and sensitivity to cleavage by mung bean nuclease. Single-molecule force measurements showed that the convoluted DNA was very resistant to untangling. In vitro replication by PCR was markedly reduced, and TseI restriction enzyme digestion was also hindered by the abnormal DNA structures. However, significantly, the DNA gained sensitivity to cleavage by the Type III restriction-modification enzyme, EcoP15I. Conclusions/Significance “Super-long” CAG repeats are found in a number of neurological diseases and may also appear through CAG repeat instability. We suggest that unusual DNA structures associated with super-long CAG repeats decrease transcriptional efficiency in vitro. We also raise the possibility that if these structures occur in vivo, they may play a role in the aetiology of CAG repeat diseases such as HD. PMID:21347256

  1. Rate analysis for a hybrid quantum repeater

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardes, Nadja K.; Loock, Peter van

    2011-01-15

    We present a detailed rate analysis for a hybrid quantum repeater assuming perfect memories and using optimal probabilistic entanglement generation and deterministic swapping routines. The hybrid quantum repeater protocol is based on atomic qubit-entanglement distribution through optical coherent-state communication. An exact, analytical formula for the rates of entanglement generation in quantum repeaters is derived, including a study on the impacts of entanglement purification and multiplexing strategies. More specifically, we consider scenarios with as little purification as possible and we show that for sufficiently low local losses, such purifications are still more powerful than multiplexing. In a possible experimental scenario, our hybrid system can create near-maximally entangled (F=0.98) pairs over a distance of 1280 km at rates of the order of 100 Hz.

  2. Do gamma-ray burst sources repeat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb, 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter, 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al., 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and the two-point angular correlation function. We find the data to be consistent with the hypothesis that burst sources do not repeat; however, a repeater fraction of up to about 20% of the observed bursts cannot be excluded.

  3. Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Louie, John D.; Iagaru, Andrei H.; Goris, Michael L.; Sze, Daniel Y.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Repeated radioembolization (RE) treatments carry theoretically higher risk of radiation-induced hepatic injury because of the liver's cumulative memory of previous exposure. We performed a retrospective safety analysis on patients who underwent repeated RE. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 247 patients were treated by RE. Eight patients (5 men, 3 women, age range 51-71 years) underwent repeated treatment of a targeted territory, all with resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres; Sirtex, Lane Cove, Australia). Adverse events were graded during a standardized follow-up. In addition, the correlation between the occurrence of RE-induced liver disease (REILD) and multiple variables was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses in all 247 patients who received RE. Results: Two patients died shortly after the second treatment (at 84 and 107 days) with signs and symptoms of REILD. Both patients underwent whole liver treatment twice (cumulative doses 3.08 and 2.66 GBq). The other 6 patients demonstrated only minor toxicities after receiving cumulative doses ranging from 2.41 to 3.88 GBq. All patients experienced objective tumor responses. In the whole population, multifactorial analysis identified three risk factors associated with REILD: repeated RE (p = 0.036), baseline serum total bilirubin (p = 0.048), and baseline serum aspartate aminotransferase (p = 0.043). Repeated RE proved to be the only independent risk factor for REILD in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 9.6; p = 0.002). Additionally, the administered activity per target volume (in GBq/L) was found to be an independent risk factor for REILD, but only in whole liver treatments (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The risk of REILD appears to be elevated for repeated RE. Objective tumor responses were observed, but establishment of safety limits will require improvement in dosimetric measurement and prediction.

  4. The puzzle of the triple repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, V.

    1993-06-04

    Two years ago, when researchers discovered the gene that causes a hereditary form of mental retardation known as fragile-X syndrome, they also turned up a mutation so unexpected geneticists are still scratching their heads over it. The defect, which makes genes balloon in size by adding extra copies of a three base-pair repeated sequence of DNA, was the first of its kind. Despite decades of study, nothing like it had ever been seen in any of the species that laid the foundations for modern genetics: bacteria, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and the mouse. The mutations caused by these expanding trinucleotide repeats turned out be common causes of human disease. In the past 2 years, they have been fingered as the culprits in three hereditary disorders besides fragile-X syndrome: myotronic dystrophy, spinobullar muscular atrophy (also known as Kennedy's disease), and just this March-Huntington's disease. The FMR-1 gene, which is the one at fault in fragile-X syndrome, shows just how much the trinucleotide repeats can expand. The normal gene carries at most 50 copies of the CGG trinucleotide. But in children who inherit the gene from these carriers and actually develop mental retardation and the other fragile-X symptoms, the FMR-1 gene may have hundreds to thousands of CGG repeats. Huge expansions of another trinucleotide repeat (CTG) can also occur from one generation to the next in the gene that causes myotonic dystrophy (DM), while smaller, although no less devastating, expansions in the CAG trinucleotide repeat lead to Huntington's and Kennedy's diseases.

  5. Temporally multiplexed quantum repeaters with atomic gases

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Christoph; Riedmatten, Hugues de; Afzelius, Mikael

    2010-07-15

    We propose a temporally multiplexed version of the Duan-Lukin-Cirac-Zoller (DLCZ) quantum-repeater protocol using controlled inhomogeneous spin broadening in atomic gases. A first analysis suggests that the advantage of multiplexing is negated by noise due to spin-wave excitations corresponding to unobserved directions of Stokes photon emission. However, this problem can be overcome with the help of a moderate-finesse cavity which is in resonance with Stokes photons, but invisible to the anti-Stokes photons. Our proposal promises greatly enhanced quantum repeater performance with atomic gases.

  6. Repeat-containing protein effectors of plant-associated organisms

    PubMed Central

    Mesarich, Carl H.; Bowen, Joanna K.; Hamiaux, Cyril; Templeton, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Many plant-associated organisms, including microbes, nematodes, and insects, deliver effector proteins into the apoplast, vascular tissue, or cell cytoplasm of their prospective hosts. These effectors function to promote colonization, typically by altering host physiology or by modulating host immune responses. The same effectors however, can also trigger host immunity in the presence of cognate host immune receptor proteins, and thus prevent colonization. To circumvent effector-triggered immunity, or to further enhance host colonization, plant-associated organisms often rely on adaptive effector evolution. In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that several effectors of plant-associated organisms are repeat-containing proteins (RCPs) that carry tandem or non-tandem arrays of an amino acid sequence or structural motif. In this review, we highlight the diverse roles that these repeat domains play in RCP effector function. We also draw attention to the potential role of these repeat domains in adaptive evolution with regards to RCP effector function and the evasion of effector-triggered immunity. The aim of this review is to increase the profile of RCP effectors from plant-associated organisms. PMID:26557126

  7. Hippocampal ER stress and learning deficits following repeated pyrethroid exposure.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Muhammad M; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel; Richardson, Jason R

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated as a significant contributor to neurodegeneration and cognitive dysfunction. Previously, we reported that the widely used pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin causes ER stress-mediated apoptosis in SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells. Whether or not this occurs in vivo remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that repeated deltamethrin exposure (3 mg/kg every 3 days for 60 days) causes hippocampal ER stress and learning deficits in adult mice. Repeated exposure to deltamethrin caused ER stress in the hippocampus as indicated by increased levels of C/EBP-homologous protein (131%) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (96%). This was accompanied by increased levels of caspase-12 (110%) and activated caspase-3 (50%). To determine whether these effects resulted in learning deficits, hippocampal-dependent learning was evaluated using the Morris water maze. Deltamethrin-treated animals exhibited profound deficits in the acquisition of learning. We also found that deltamethrin exposure resulted in decreased BrdU-positive cells (37%) in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, suggesting potential impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis. Collectively, these results demonstrate that repeated deltamethrin exposure leads to ER stress, apoptotic cell death in the hippocampus, and deficits in hippocampal precursor proliferation, which is associated with learning deficits.

  8. CAG repeat expansions in bipolar and unipolar disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Oruc, L.; Verheyen, G.R.; Raeymaekers, P.; Van Broeckhoven, C.

    1997-03-01

    Family, twin, and adoption studies consistently have indicated that the familial aggregation of bipolar (BP) disorder and unipolar recurrent major depression (UPR) is accounted for largely by genetic factors. However, the mode of inheritance is complex. One of the possible explanations could be that a gene with variable penetrance and variable expression is involved. Recently there have been reports on a new class of genetic diseases caused by an abnormal trinucleotide-repeat expansion (TRE). In a number of genetic disorders, these dynamic mutations were proved to be the biological basis for the clinically observed phenomenon of anticipation. DNA consisting of repeated triplets of nucleotides becomes unstable and increases in size over generations within families, giving rise to an increased severity and/or an earlier onset of the disorder. It has been recognized for a long time that anticipation occurs in multiplex families transmitting mental illness. More recent studies also suggest that both BP disorder and UPR show features that are compatible with anticipation. Although the findings of anticipation in BP disorders and in UPR must be interpreted with caution because of the possible presence of numerous ascertainment biases, they support the hypothesis that pathological TREs are implicated in the transmission of these disorders. TRE combined with variable penetrance of expression could explain the complex transmission pattern observed in BP disorder. In view of this, the recent reports of an association between CAG-repeat length and BP disorder in a Belgian, Swedish, and British population are promising. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Repeated Witnessing of Conspecifics in Pain: Effects on Emotional Contagion.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Maria; Migliorati, Filippo; Bruls, Rune; Han, Yingying; Heinemans, Mirjam; Pruis, Ilanah; Gazzola, Valeria; Keysers, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Witnessing of conspecifics in pain has been shown to elicit socially triggered freezing in rodents. It is unknown how robust this response is to repeated exposure to a cage-mate experiencing painful stimulation. To address this question, shock-experienced Observer rats repeatedly witnessed familiar Demonstrators receive painful footshocks (six sessions). Results confirm that Observers freeze during the first testing session. The occurrence of this behaviour however gradually diminished as the experimental sessions progressed, reaching minimal freezing levels by the end of the experiments. In contrast, the appearance and continuous increase in the frequency of yawning, a behavior that was inhibited by metyrapone (i.e,. a glucocorticoid synthesis blocker), might represent an alternative coping strategy, suggesting that the observer's reduced freezing does not necessarily indicate a disappearance in the affective response to the Demonstrator's distress. PMID:26356506

  10. Repeated Witnessing of Conspecifics in Pain: Effects on Emotional Contagion

    PubMed Central

    Bruls, Rune; Han, Yingying; Heinemans, Mirjam; Pruis, Ilanah; Gazzola, Valeria; Keysers, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Witnessing of conspecifics in pain has been shown to elicit socially triggered freezing in rodents. It is unknown how robust this response is to repeated exposure to a cage-mate experiencing painful stimulation. To address this question, shock-experienced Observer rats repeatedly witnessed familiar Demonstrators receive painful footshocks (six sessions). Results confirm that Observers freeze during the first testing session. The occurrence of this behaviour however gradually diminished as the experimental sessions progressed, reaching minimal freezing levels by the end of the experiments. In contrast, the appearance and continuous increase in the frequency of yawning, a behavior that was inhibited by metyrapone (i.e,. a glucocorticoid synthesis blocker), might represent an alternative coping strategy, suggesting that the observer’s reduced freezing does not necessarily indicate a disappearance in the affective response to the Demonstrator’s distress. PMID:26356506

  11. A low-magnetic-field soft gamma repeater.

    PubMed

    Rea, N; Esposito, P; Turolla, R; Israel, G L; Zane, S; Stella, L; Mereghetti, S; Tiengo, A; Götz, D; Göğüş, E; Kouveliotou, C

    2010-11-12

    Soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous x-ray pulsars form a rapidly increasing group of x-ray sources exhibiting sporadic emission of short bursts. They are believed to be magnetars, that is, neutron stars powered by extreme magnetic fields, B ~ 10(14) to 10(15) gauss. We report on a soft gamma repeater with low magnetic field, SGR 0418+5729, recently detected after it emitted bursts similar to those of magnetars. X-ray observations show that its dipolar magnetic field cannot be greater than 7.5 × 10(12) gauss, well in the range of ordinary radio pulsars, implying that a high surface dipolar magnetic field is not necessarily required for magnetar-like activity. The magnetar population may thus include objects with a wider range of B-field strengths, ages, and evolutionary stages than observed so far.

  12. Effect of Repeated Evaluation and Repeated Exposure on Acceptability Ratings of Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zervakis, Jennifer; Mazuka, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of repeated evaluation and repeated exposure on grammatical acceptability ratings for both acceptable and unacceptable sentence types. In Experiment 1, subjects in the Experimental group rated multiple examples of two ungrammatical sentence types (ungrammatical binding and double object with dative-only verb),…

  13. Copy number of tandem direct repeats within the inverted repeats of Marek's disease virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, A; Nakajima, K; Ikuta, K; Ueda, S; Kato, S; Hirai, K

    1986-12-01

    We previously reported that DNA of the oncogenic strain BC-1 of Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1) contains three units of tandem direct repeats with 132 base pair (bp) repeats within the inverted repeats of the long regions of the MDV1 genome, whereas the attenuated, nononcogenic viral DNA contains multiple units of tandem direct repeats (Maotani et al., 1986). In the present study, the difference in the copy numbers of 132 bp repeats of oncogenic and nononcogenic MDV1 DNAs in other strains of MDV1 was investigated by Southern blot hybridization. The main copy numbers in different oncogenic MDV1 strains differed: those of BC-1, JM and highly oncogenic Md5 were 3, 5 to 12 and 2, respectively. The viral DNA population with two units of repeats was small, but detectable, in cells infected with either the oncogenic BC-1 or JM strain. The MDV1 DNA in various MD cell lines contained either two units or both two and three units of repeats. The significance of the copy number of repeats in oncogenicity of MDV1 is discussed.

  14. Structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins show propagation of inter-repeat interface effects

    PubMed Central

    Reichen, Christian; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Hansen, Simon; Grütter, Markus G.; Plückthun, Andreas; Mittl, Peer R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The armadillo repeat serves as a scaffold for the development of modular peptide-recognition modules. In order to develop such a system, three crystal structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins with third-generation N-caps (YIII-type), four or five internal repeats (M-type) and second-generation C-caps (AII-type) were determined at 1.8 Å (His-YIIIM4AII), 2.0 Å (His-YIIIM5AII) and 1.95 Å (YIIIM5AII) resolution and compared with those of variants with third-generation C-caps. All constructs are full consensus designs in which the internal repeats have exactly the same sequence, and hence identical conformations of the internal repeats are expected. The N-cap and internal repeats M1 to M3 are indeed extremely similar, but the comparison reveals structural differences in internal repeats M4 and M5 and the C-cap. These differences are caused by long-range effects of the C-cap, contacting molecules in the crystal, and the intrinsic design of the repeat. Unfortunately, the rigid-body movement of the C-terminal part impairs the regular arrangement of internal repeats that forms the putative peptide-binding site. The second-generation C-cap improves the packing of buried residues and thereby the stability of the protein. These considerations are useful for future improvements of an armadillo-repeat-based peptide-recognition system. PMID:26894544

  15. Replication stalling and heteroduplex formation within CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats by mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Viterbo, David; Michoud, Grégoire; Mosbach, Valentine; Dujon, Bernard; Richard, Guy-Franck

    2016-06-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions are responsible for at least two dozen neurological disorders. Mechanisms leading to these large expansions of repeated DNA are still poorly understood. It was proposed that transient stalling of the replication fork by the repeat tract might trigger slippage of the newly-synthesized strand over its template, leading to expansions or contractions of the triplet repeat. However, such mechanism was never formally proven. Here we show that replication fork pausing and CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat instability are not linked, stable and unstable repeats exhibiting the same propensity to stall replication forks when integrated in a yeast natural chromosome. We found that replication fork stalling was dependent on the integrity of the mismatch-repair system, especially the Msh2p-Msh6p complex, suggesting that direct interaction of MMR proteins with secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeats in vivo, triggers replication fork pauses. We also show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that Msh2p is enriched at trinucleotide repeat tracts, in both stable and unstable orientations, this enrichment being dependent on MSH3 and MSH6. Finally, we show that overexpressing MSH2 favors the formation of heteroduplex regions, leading to an increase in contractions and expansions of CAG/CTG repeat tracts during replication, these heteroduplexes being dependent on both MSH3 and MSH6. These heteroduplex regions were not detected when a mutant msh2-E768A gene in which the ATPase domain was mutated was overexpressed. Our results unravel two new roles for mismatch-repair proteins: stabilization of heteroduplex regions and transient blocking of replication forks passing through such repeats. Both roles may involve direct interactions between MMR proteins and secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeat tracts, although indirect interactions may not be formally excluded. PMID:27045900

  16. Parturition date for a given female is highly repeatable within five roe deer populations.

    PubMed

    Plard, Floriane; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Bonenfant, Christophe; Hewison, A J Mark; Delorme, Daniel; Cargnelutti, Bruno; Kjellander, Petter; Nilsen, Erlend B; Coulson, Tim

    2013-02-23

    Births are highly synchronized among females in many mammal populations in temperate areas. Although laying date for a given female is also repeatable within populations of birds, limited evidence suggests low repeatability of parturition date for individual females in mammals, and between-population variability in repeatability has never, to our knowledge, been assessed. We quantified the repeatability of parturition date for individual females in five populations of roe deer, which we found to vary between 0.54 and 0.93. Each year, some females gave birth consistently earlier in the year, whereas others gave birth consistently later. In addition, all females followed the same lifetime trajectory for parturition date, giving birth progressively earlier as they aged. Giving birth early should allow mothers to increase offspring survival, although few females managed to do so. The marked repeatability of parturition date in roe deer females is the highest ever reported for a mammal, suggesting low phenotypic plasticity in this trait.

  17. Testing Multiple Outcomes in Repeated Measures Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lix, Lisa M.; Sajobi, Tolulope

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates procedures for controlling the familywise error rate (FWR) when testing hypotheses about multiple, correlated outcome variables in repeated measures (RM) designs. A content analysis of RM research articles published in 4 psychology journals revealed that 3 quarters of studies tested hypotheses about 2 or more outcome…

  18. Triggering of repeating earthquakes in central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Chunquan; Gomberg, Joan; Ben-Naim, Eli; Johnson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic stresses carried by transient seismic waves have been found capable of triggering earthquakes instantly in various tectonic settings. Delayed triggering may be even more common, but the mechanisms are not well understood. Catalogs of repeating earthquakes, earthquakes that recur repeatedly at the same location, provide ideal data sets to test the effects of transient dynamic perturbations on the timing of earthquake occurrence. Here we employ a catalog of 165 families containing ~2500 total repeating earthquakes to test whether dynamic perturbations from local, regional, and teleseismic earthquakes change recurrence intervals. The distance to the earthquake generating the perturbing waves is a proxy for the relative potential contributions of static and dynamic deformations, because static deformations decay more rapidly with distance. Clear changes followed the nearby 2004 Mw6 Parkfield earthquake, so we study only repeaters prior to its origin time. We apply a Monte Carlo approach to compare the observed number of shortened recurrence intervals following dynamic perturbations with the distribution of this number estimated for randomized perturbation times. We examine the comparison for a series of dynamic stress peak amplitude and distance thresholds. The results suggest a weak correlation between dynamic perturbations in excess of ~20 kPa and shortened recurrence intervals, for both nearby and remote perturbations.

  19. Epigenetics and Triplet-Repeat Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The term “junk DNA” has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterochromatinized resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide, and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasized following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease) and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA) in 1991. In this review, we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases. PMID:26733936

  20. Epigenetics and Triplet-Repeat Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The term "junk DNA" has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterochromatinized resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide, and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasized following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease) and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA) in 1991. In this review, we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases. PMID:26733936

  1. A Structured Group Program for Repeat Dieters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Kathleen

    1989-01-01

    Describes a structured group program for women who repeatedly diet and may be at risk of developing more serious eating disorders. Discusses sessions focusing on eating behavior as well as internal factors that contribute to low body esteem and food and weight preoccupation. Evaluates effectiveness of program by self-reports of members of two…

  2. Building Fluency through the Repeated Reading Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    For the last two years the author has used Repeated Reading (RR) to teach reading fluency in English as a Foreign Language classrooms in colleges and universities in Japan. RR is a method where the student reads and rereads a text silently or aloud from two to four times to reach a predetermined level of speed, accuracy, and comprehension. RR…

  3. Longer-baseline telescopes using quantum repeaters.

    PubMed

    Gottesman, Daniel; Jennewein, Thomas; Croke, Sarah

    2012-08-17

    We present an approach to building interferometric telescopes using ideas of quantum information. Current optical interferometers have limited baseline lengths, and thus limited resolution, because of noise and loss of signal due to the transmission of photons between the telescopes. The technology of quantum repeaters has the potential to eliminate this limit, allowing in principle interferometers with arbitrarily long baselines. PMID:23006349

  4. Human adaptation to repeated cold immersions.

    PubMed Central

    Golden, F S; Tipton, M J

    1988-01-01

    1. The present investigation was designed to examine human adaptation to intermittent severe cold exposure and to assess the effect of exercise on any adaptation obtained. 2. Sixteen subjects were divided into two equal groups. Each subject performed ten head-out immersions; two into thermoneutral water which was then cooled until they shivered vigorously, and eight into water at 15 degrees C for 40 min. During the majority of the 15 degrees C immersions, one group (dynamic group) exercised whilst the other (static group) rested. 3. Results showed that both groups responded to repeated cold immersions with a reduction in their initial responses to cold. The time course of these reductions varied, however, between responses. 4. Only the static group developed a reduced metabolic response to prolonged resting immersion. 5. It is concluded that repeated resting exposure to cold was the more effective way of producing an adaptation. The performance of exercise during repeated exposure to cold prevented the development of an adaptive reduction in the metabolic response to cold during a subsequent resting immersion. In addition, many of the adaptations obtained during repeated resting exposure were overridden or masked during a subsequent exercising immersion. PMID:3411500

  5. The Differential Effects of Repeating Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkam, David T.; LoGerfo, Laura; Ready, Doug; Lee, Valerie E.

    2007-01-01

    We use the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study to investigate national patterns addressing (a) who repeats kindergarten, and (b) the subsequent cognitive effects of this event. Using OLS regression techniques, we investigate 1st-time kindergartners who are promoted, 1st-time kindergartners who are retained, and children who are already repeating…

  6. Repeat abortions in New York City, 2010.

    PubMed

    Toprani, Amita; Cadwell, Betsy L; Li, Wenhui; Sackoff, Judith; Greene, Carolyn; Begier, Elizabeth

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to describe factors associated with the number of past abortions obtained by New York City (NYC) abortion patients in 2010. We calculated rates of first and repeat abortion by age, race/ethnicity, and neighborhood-level poverty and the mean number of self-reported past abortions by age, race/ethnicity, neighborhood-level poverty, number of living children, education, payment method, marital status, and nativity. We used negative binomial regression to predict number of past abortions by patient characteristics. Of the 76,614 abortions reported for NYC residents in 2010, 57% were repeat abortions. Repeat abortions comprised >50% of total abortions among the majority of sociodemographic groups we examined. Overall, mean number of past abortions was 1.3. Mean number of past abortions was higher for women aged 30-34 years (1.77), women with ≥5 children (2.50), and black non-Hispanic women (1.52). After multivariable regression, age, race/ethnicity, and number of children were the strongest predictors of number of past abortions. This analysis demonstrates that, although socioeconomic disparities exist, all abortion patients are at high risk for repeat unintended pregnancy and abortion. PMID:25779755

  7. History repeats itself: genomic divergence in copepods.

    PubMed

    Renaut, Sébastien; Dion-Côté, Anne-Marie

    2016-04-01

    Press stop, erase everything from now till some arbitrary time in the past and start recording life as it evolves once again. Would you see the same tape of life playing itself over and over, or would a different story unfold every time? The late Steven Jay Gould called this experiment replaying the tape of life and argued that any replay of the tape would lead evolution down a pathway radically different from the road actually taken (Gould 1989). This thought experiment has puzzled evolutionary biologists for a long time: how repeatable are evolutionary events? And if history does indeed repeat itself, what are the factors that may help us predict the path taken? A powerful means to address these questions at a small evolutionary scale is to study closely related populations that have evolved independently, under similar environmental conditions. This is precisely what Pereira et al. (2016) set out to do using marine copepods Tigriopus californicus, and present their results in this issue of Molecular Ecology. They show that evolution can be repeatable and even partly predictable, at least at the molecular level. As expected from theory, patterns of divergence were shaped by natural selection. At the same time, strong genetic drift due to small population sizes also constrained evolution down a similar evolutionary road, and probably contributed to repeatable patterns of genomic divergence. PMID:27012819

  8. Y Se Repite = And It Repeats Itself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzew, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses Y Se Repite [And It Repeats Itself], a project she conceptualized due to the growing number of Latino/a Mexican migrant workers in dairy farms in the state of Vermont. In 2006, approximately 2,000 Latinos/as--most of them undocumented Mexican migrant workers--worked throughout the state's dairy farms, yet…

  9. Repeater For A Digital-Communication Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Guzman, Esteban; Olson, Stephen; Heaps, Tim

    1993-01-01

    Digital repeater circuit designed to extend range of communication on MIL-STD-1553 bus beyond original maximum allowable length of 300 ft. Circuit provides two-way communication, one way at time, and conforms to specifications of MIL-STD-1553. Crosstalk and instability eliminated.

  10. The Effect of Repeaters on Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, HeeKyoung; Kolen, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Test equating might be affected by including in the equating analyses examinees who have taken the test previously. This study evaluated the effect of including such repeaters on Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) equating using a population invariance approach. Three-parameter logistic (3-PL) item response theory (IRT) true score and…

  11. Why Do Students Repeat Admissions Tests?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Martha S.

    Attitudes and beliefs about the admissions process, especially the role of standardized testing in admissions, were examined for students who took a standardized admissions test more than once. Their attitudes were compared with those of students who did not repeat the test. About 200 preveterinary students who had taken the Veterinary Aptitude…

  12. A Repeater in the Language Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, B. T.

    1969-01-01

    Discusses the feasilility of the use of repeater devices in the language laboratory in order to enable the student to "recapitulate effortlessly and and indefinitely any utterance of any length which is causing him difficulty or is of special interest. (FWB)

  13. Independent movement, dimerization and stability of tandem repeats of chicken brain alpha-spectrin

    SciTech Connect

    Kusunoki, H.; Minasov, G.; Macdonald, R.I.; Mondragon, A.

    2010-03-08

    Previous X-ray crystal structures have shown that linkers of five amino acid residues connecting pairs of chicken brain {alpha}-spectrin and human erythroid {beta}-spectrin repeats can undergo bending without losing their {alpha}-helical structure. To test whether bending at one linker can influence bending at an adjacent linker, the structures of two and three repeat fragments of chicken brain {alpha}-spectrin have been determined by X-ray crystallography. The structure of the three-repeat fragment clearly shows that bending at one linker can occur independently of bending at an adjacent linker. This observation increases the possible trajectories of modeled chains of spectrin repeats. Furthermore, the three-repeat molecule crystallized as an antiparallel dimer with a significantly smaller buried interfacial area than that of {alpha}-actinin, a spectrin-related molecule, but large enough and of a type indicating biological specificity. Comparison of the structures of the spectrin and {alpha}-actinin dimers supports weak association of the former, which could not be detected by analytical ultracentrifugation, versus strong association of the latter, which has been observed by others. To correlate features of the structure with solution properties and to test a previous model of stable spectrin and dystrophin repeats, the number of inter-helical interactions in each repeat of several spectrin structures were counted and compared to their thermal stabilities. Inter-helical interactions, but not all interactions, increased in parallel with measured thermal stabilities of each repeat and in agreement with the thermal stabilities of two and three repeats and also partial repeats of spectrin.

  14. CGG repeat-associated translation mediates neurodegeneration in fragile X tremor ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Todd, Peter K; Oh, Seok Yoon; Krans, Amy; He, Fang; Sellier, Chantal; Frazer, Michelle; Renoux, Abigail J; Chen, Kai-chun; Scaglione, K Matthew; Basrur, Venkatesha; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo; Vonsattel, Jean P; Louis, Elan D; Sutton, Michael A; Taylor, J Paul; Mills, Ryan E; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicholas; Paulson, Henry L

    2013-05-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) results from a CGG repeat expansion in the 5' UTR of FMR1. This repeat is thought to elicit toxicity as RNA, yet disease brains contain ubiquitin-positive neuronal inclusions, a pathologic hallmark of protein-mediated neurodegeneration. We explain this paradox by demonstrating that CGG repeats trigger repeat-associated non-AUG-initiated (RAN) translation of a cryptic polyglycine-containing protein, FMRpolyG. FMRpolyG accumulates in ubiquitin-positive inclusions in Drosophila, cell culture, mouse disease models, and FXTAS patient brains. CGG RAN translation occurs in at least two of three possible reading frames at repeat sizes ranging from normal (25) to pathogenic (90), but inclusion formation only occurs with expanded repeats. In Drosophila, CGG repeat toxicity is suppressed by eliminating RAN translation and enhanced by increased polyglycine protein production. These studies expand the growing list of nucleotide repeat disorders in which RAN translation occurs and provide evidence that RAN translation contributes to neurodegeneration. PMID:23602499

  15. A study on the trinucleotide repeat associated with Huntington`s disease in the Chinese

    SciTech Connect

    Bing-wen Soong; Jih-tsuu Wang

    1994-09-01

    Analysis of the polymorphic (CAG)n repeat in the hungingtin gene in the chinese confirmed the presence of an expanded repeat on all Huntington`s disease chromosomes. Measurement of the specific CAG repeat sequence in 34 HD chromosomes from 15 unrelated families and 190 control chromosomes from the Chinese population showed a range from 9 to 29 repeats in normal subjects and 40 to 58 in affected subjects. The size distributions of normal and affected alleles did not overlap. A clear correlation bewteen early onset of symptoms and very high repeat number was seen, but the spread of the age-at-onset in the major repeat range producing characteristic HD it too wide to be of diagnostic value. There was also variability in the transmitted repeat size for both sexes in the HD size range. Maternal HD alleles showed a moderate instability with a preponderance of size decrease, while paternal HD alleles had a tendency to increase in repeat size on transmission, the degree of which appeared proportional to the initial size.

  16. The Evidence for Increased L1 Activity in the Site of Human Adult Brain Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kurnosov, Alexey A.; Ustyugova, Svetlana V.; Nazarov, Vadim I.; Minervina, Anastasia A.; Komkov, Alexander Yu.; Shugay, Mikhail; Pogorelyy, Mikhail V.; Khodosevich, Konstantin V.; Mamedov, Ilgar Z.; Lebedev, Yuri B.

    2015-01-01

    Retroelement activity is a common source of polymorphisms in human genome. The mechanism whereby retroelements contribute to the intraindividual genetic heterogeneity by inserting into the DNA of somatic cells is gaining increasing attention. Brain tissues are suspected to accumulate genetic heterogeneity as a result of the retroelements somatic activity. This study aims to expand our understanding of the role retroelements play in generating somatic mosaicism of neural tissues. Whole-genome Alu and L1 profiling of genomic DNA extracted from the cerebellum, frontal cortex, subventricular zone, dentate gyrus, and the myocardium revealed hundreds of somatic insertions in each of the analyzed tissues. Interestingly, the highest concentration of such insertions was detected in the dentate gyrus—the hotspot of adult neurogenesis. Insertions of retroelements and their activity could produce genetically diverse neuronal subsets, which can be involved in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. PMID:25689626

  17. Nanoparticle role on the repeatability of stimuli-responsive nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-10-15

    Repeatability of the responsiveness with time is one important concern for effective durable functions of stimuli-responsive materials. Although the increase in the yield and tensile strength of the hybrid composite materials by nanoparticle (NP) incorporation has been reported, exact NP effect on stimuli-responsiveness is rarely reported. In this study, a set of nanoscale actuating system is demonstrated by a thermo-sensitive process operated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) linked by gold nanoparticle (AuNP). This designed nanocomposite exclusively provides an artificial on/off gate function for selective passages of permeate molecules. The results demonstrate high repetition efficiency with sharp responding in a timely manner. In terms of the morphology changes induced by repeated swelling-deswelling mechanics, the nanocomposite exhibits phase separation between AuNP clusters and PEG domains. This leads to a delay in responsiveness in a cumulative way with time. Acting as stable junction points in the nanocomposite network structures, the incorporated AuNPs contribute to maintain repeatability in responsiveness. This study contributes to new-concept smart material design and fundamental understanding on the hybrid nanomaterials for various applications in terms of a dynamic mechanical behavior.

  18. 47 CFR 80.1179 - On-board repeater limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false On-board repeater limitations. 80.1179 Section... On-board repeater limitations. When an on-board repeater is used, the following limitations must be met: (a) The on-board repeater antenna must be located no higher than 3 meters (10 feet) above...

  19. Cardiovascular adjustments and pain during repeated cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Stancák, A; Yamamotová, A; Kulls, I P; Sekyra, I V

    1996-04-01

    The cold pressor test is used in the clinical testing of the autonomic nervous system. However, little is known about changes in the autonomic control of the cardiovascular system during repeated challenge with cold. Heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), T-wave amplitude of ECG (TWA), blood pressure, body temperature and perceived pain were recorded in 18 male subjects during three CPTs which consisted of four minutes immersion of the left hand into cold water at 1 degree C. Breathing during CPT was either spontaneous or paced at 0.23 Hz or 0.1 Hz. Pain intensity and HR decreased and TWA increased during the cold immersion and in the resting period preceding cold in the second and third trials. Systolic and pulse blood pressure increased in resting periods in the third trial. RSA increased in the second and third cold challenge during paced breathing at 0.1 Hz only. A decrease in body temperature (0.48 degree C) at the end of the experiment correlated marginally with HR changes. Our study shows that sustained cardiovascular changes are induced by the first challenge with cold, and persist or increase with repeated cold pressor tests.

  20. Repeated social defeat stress enhances the anxiogenic effect of bright light on operant reward-seeking behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jaisinghani, Suraj; Rosenkranz, J. Amiel

    2015-01-01

    Repeated stress can trigger episodes of depression, along with symptoms of anhedonia and anxiety. Although often modeled separately, anxiogenic factors potently modulate hedonic, or appetitive, behavior. While repeated stress can increase anxiety and decrease appetitive behavior, it is not clear whether repeated stress can influence the impact of anxiogenic factors on appetitive behavior. This study tests whether repeated stress shifts behavior in a task that measures anxiogenic-appetitive balance. To test this, adult male rats were trained to lever press for sucrose pellet reward, and the effect of anxiogenic bright light on this behavior was measured. The impact of the bright light anxiogenic stimulus on lever pressing was compared between groups exposed to either daily repeated social defeat stress or control handling. We found that repeated stress reduced exploration in the open field and decreased social interaction, but had minimal effect on baseline lever pressing for reward. Repeated stress substantially enhanced the effect of anxiogenic bright light on lever pressing. This effect was greater two days after the last stress exposure, and began to diminish within two weeks. These data demonstrate that the anxiogenic and anhedonic features induced by repeated stress can be separately measured, and that the impact of anxiogenic stimuli can be greatly enhanced after repeated stress, even in the face of appetitive drive. The data also demonstrate that some apparent anhedonic-like effects of repeated stress can be due to increased sensitivity to anxiogenic stimuli, and may reflect an imbalance in an appetitive approach-withdrawal continuum. PMID:25956870

  1. Repeated interactions in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, Laurent; Joye, Alain; Merkli, Marco

    2014-07-15

    Analyzing the dynamics of open quantum systems has a long history in mathematics and physics. Depending on the system at hand, basic physical phenomena that one would like to explain are, for example, convergence to equilibrium, the dynamics of quantum coherences (decoherence) and quantum correlations (entanglement), or the emergence of heat and particle fluxes in non-equilibrium situations. From the mathematical physics perspective, one of the main challenges is to derive the irreversible dynamics of the open system, starting from a unitary dynamics of the system and its environment. The repeated interactions systems considered in these notes are models of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. They are relevant in quantum optics, and more generally, serve as a relatively well treatable approximation of a more difficult quantum dynamics. In particular, the repeated interaction models allow to determine the large time (stationary) asymptotics of quantum systems out of equilibrium.

  2. Overcoming fixation with repeated memory suppression.

    PubMed

    Angello, Genna; Storm, Benjamin C; Smith, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Fixation (blocks to memories or ideas) can be alleviated not only by encouraging productive work towards a solution, but, as the present experiments show, by reducing counterproductive work. Two experiments examined relief from fixation in a word-fragment completion task. Blockers, orthographically similar negative primes (e.g., ANALOGY), blocked solutions to word fragments (e.g., A_L_ _GY) in both experiments. After priming, but before the fragment completion test, participants repeatedly suppressed half of the blockers using the Think/No-Think paradigm, which results in memory inhibition. Inhibiting blockers did not alleviate fixation in Experiment 1 when conscious recollection of negative primes was not encouraged on the fragment completion test. In Experiment 2, however, when participants were encouraged to remember negative primes at fragment completion, relief from fixation was observed. Repeated suppression may nullify fixation effects, and promote creative thinking, particularly when fixation is caused by conscious recollection of counterproductive information.

  3. Emergence of Fairness in Repeated Group Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Segbroeck, S.; Pacheco, J. M.; Lenaerts, T.; Santos, F. C.

    2012-04-01

    Often groups need to meet repeatedly before a decision is reached. Hence, most individual decisions will be contingent on decisions taken previously by others. In particular, the decision to cooperate or not will depend on one’s own assessment of what constitutes a fair group outcome. Making use of a repeated N-person prisoner’s dilemma, we show that reciprocation towards groups opens a window of opportunity for cooperation to thrive, leading populations to engage in dynamics involving both coordination and coexistence, and characterized by cycles of cooperation and defection. Furthermore, we show that this process leads to the emergence of fairness, whose level will depend on the dilemma at stake.

  4. Predictability of repeating earthquakes near Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechar, J. Douglas; Nadeau, Robert M.

    2012-07-01

    We analyse sequences of repeating microearthquakes that were identified by applying waveform coherency methods to data from the Parkfield High-Resolution Seismic Network. Because by definition all events in a sequence have similar magnitudes and locations, the temporal behaviour of these sequences is naturally isolated, which, coupled with the high occurrence rates of small events, makes these data ideal for studying interevent time distributions. To characterize the temporal predictability of these sequences, we perform retrospective forecast experiments using hundreds of earthquakes. We apply three variants of a simple algorithm that produces sequence-specific, time-varying hazard functions, and we find that the sequences are predictable. We discuss limitations of these data and, more generally, challenges in identifying repeating events, and we outline the potential implications of our results for understanding the occurrence of large earthquakes.

  5. Case report: repeated neonaticides in Hokkaido.

    PubMed

    Funayama, M; Ikeda, T; Tabata, N; Azumi, J; Morita, M

    1994-02-01

    Five cases of repeated neonaticides were reported in Hokkaido, the northernmost island of Japan, during the 10 years from 1983 to 1992. Four or more neonates were involved in each case by each mother. All the suspected mothers were not mentally ill. Two of them were single and the rest were married. Each husband was not aware of the pregnancy of his wife, because he was away from home very often. The main motive of murder seemed to be economic and/or to save appearances. Sentences were 1 year penal servitude with a stay of 3 years for one case, but 30-42 months in prison for the other four cases. We rarely find reports of repeated infanticides committed by the same mother in European countries and the United States.

  6. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  7. Learning with repeated-game strategies.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Christos A; Romero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    We use the self-tuning Experience Weighted Attraction model with repeated-game strategies as a computer testbed to examine the relative frequency, speed of convergence and progression of a set of repeated-game strategies in four symmetric 2 × 2 games: Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes, Stag-Hunt, and Chicken. In the Prisoner's Dilemma game, we find that the strategy with the most occurrences is the "Grim-Trigger." In the Battle of the Sexes game, a cooperative pair that alternates between the two pure-strategy Nash equilibria emerges as the one with the most occurrences. In the Stag-Hunt and Chicken games, the "Win-Stay, Lose-Shift" and "Grim-Trigger" strategies are the ones with the most occurrences. Overall, the pairs that converged quickly ended up at the cooperative outcomes, whereas the ones that were extremely slow to reach convergence ended up at non-cooperative outcomes. PMID:25126053

  8. High-bandwidth hybrid quantum repeater.

    PubMed

    Munro, W J; Van Meter, R; Louis, Sebastien G R; Nemoto, Kae

    2008-07-25

    We present a physical- and link-level design for the creation of entangled pairs to be used in quantum repeater applications where one can control the noise level of the initially distributed pairs. The system can tune dynamically, trading initial fidelity for success probability, from high fidelity pairs (F=0.98 or above) to moderate fidelity pairs. The same physical resources that create the long-distance entanglement are used to implement the local gates required for entanglement purification and swapping, creating a homogeneous repeater architecture. Optimizing the noise properties of the initially distributed pairs significantly improves the rate of generating long-distance Bell pairs. Finally, we discuss the performance trade-off between spatial and temporal resources.

  9. Quantum repeater with continuous variable encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linshu; Albert, Victor V.; Michael, Marios; Muralidharan, Sreraman; Zou, Changling; Jiang, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Quantum communication enables faithful quantum state transfer between different parties and protocols for cryptographic purposes. However, quantum communication over long distances (>1000km) remains challenging due to optical channel attenuation. This calls for investigation on developing novel encoding schemes that correct photon loss errors efficiently. In this talk, we introduce the generalization of multi-component Schrödinger cat states and propose to encode quantum information in these cat states for ultrafast quantum repeaters. We detail the quantum error correction procedures at each repeater station and characterize the performance of this novel encoding scheme given practical imperfections, such as coupling loss. A comparison with other quantum error correcting codes for bosonic modes will be discussed.

  10. Evolution and recombination of bovine DNA repeats.

    PubMed

    Jobse, C; Buntjer, J B; Haagsma, N; Breukelman, H J; Beintema, J J; Lenstra, J A

    1995-09-01

    The history of the abundant repeat elements in the bovine genome has been studied by comparative hybridization and PCR. The Bov-A and Bov-B SINE elements both emerged just after the divergence of the Camelidae and the true ruminants. A 31-bp subrepeat motif in satellites of the Bovidae species cattle, sheep, and goat is also present in Cervidae (deer) and apparently predates the Bovidae. However, the other components of the bovine satellites were amplified after the divergence of the cattle and the Caprinae (sheep and goat). A 23-bp motif, which as subrepeat of two major satellites occupies 5% of the cattle genome, emerged only after the split of the water buffalo and other cattle species. During the evolution of the Bovidae the satellite repeat units were shaped by recombination events involving subrepeats, other satellite components, and SINE elements. Differences in restriction sites of homologous satellites indicate a continuing rapid horizontal spread of new sequence variants.

  11. Repeatability of Response to Asthma Medications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ann; Tantisira, Kelan; Li, Lingling; Schuemann, Brooke; Weiss, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Background Pharmacogenetic studies of drug response in asthma assume that patients respond consistently to a treatment but that treatment response varies across patients, however, no formal studies have demonstrated this. Objective To determine the repeatability of commonly used outcomes for treatment response to asthma medications: bronchodilator response, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and provocative concentration of methacholine producing a 20% decline in FEV1 (PC20). Methods The Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) was a multi-center clinical trial of children randomized to receiving budesonide, nedocromil, or placebo. We determined the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for each outcome over repeated visits over four years in CAMP using mixed effects regression models. We adjusted for the covariates: age, race/ethnicity, height, family income, parental education, and symptom score. We incorporated each outcome for each child as repeated outcome measurements and stratified by treatment group. Results The ICC for bronchodilator response was 0.31 in the budesonide group, 0.35 in the nedocromil group, and 0.40 in the placebo group, after adjusting for covariates. The ICC for FEV1 was 0.71 in the budesonide group, 0.60 in the nedocromil group, and 0.69 in the placebo group, after adjusting for covariates. The ICC for PC20 was 0.67 in the budesonide and placebo groups and 0.73 in the nedocromil group, after adjusting for covariates. Conclusion The within treatment group repeatability of FEV1 and PC20 are high; thus these phenotypes are heritable. FEV1 and PC20 may be better phenotypes than bronchodilator response for studies of treatment response in asthma. PMID:19064281

  12. Automatic-repeat-request error control schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S.; Costello, D. J., Jr.; Miller, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    Error detection incorporated with automatic-repeat-request (ARQ) is widely used for error control in data communication systems. This method of error control is simple and provides high system reliability. If a properly chosen code is used for error detection, virtually error-free data transmission can be attained. Various types of ARQ and hybrid ARQ schemes, and error detection using linear block codes are surveyed.

  13. A New Property of Repeating Decimals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arledge, Jane; Tekansik, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    As extended by Ginsberg, Midi's theorem says that if the repeated section of a decimal expansion of a prime is split into appropriate blocks and these are added, the result is a string of nines. We show that if the expansion of 1/p[superscript n+1] is treated the same way, instead of being a string of nines, the sum is related to the period of…

  14. Isolation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences from an Alu polymerase chain reaction library to define the breakpoint in a patient with a constitutional translocation t(1;13) (q22;q12) and ganglioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Michalski, A J; Cotter, F E; Cowell, J K

    1992-08-01

    We describe the cytogenetic and molecular characterization of a t(1;13)(q22;q12) constitutional rearrangement occurring in a patient with a relatively benign form of neuroblastoma, called ganglioneuroblastoma. Somatic cell hybrids were generated between mouse 3T3 cells and a lymphoblastoid cell line from this patient, D.G. One isolated subclone, DGF27C11, contained the derivative chromosome, 1pter-q22::13q12-qter, but no other material from either chromosome 1 or 13. Using available DNA probes the 13 breakpoint was assigned proximal to all reported markers. In order to generate flanking markers to define this translocation further, an Alu polymerase chain reaction library was constructed from a somatic cell hybrid containing only the proximal, 13pter-13q14, region of chromosome 13. Seven unique sequences have been isolated from the library, three of which lie below and four of which lie above the 13q12 breakpoint. More precise mapping of the distal markers was achieved using a panel of somatic cell hybrids with overlapping deletions of chromosome 13. The paucity of probes in the 1q22 region has made a precise assignment of this breakpoint difficult, however it has been shown to lie distal to c-SKI and proximal to APOA2. This refined characterization of the breakpoint is a prerequisite for its cloning, which may yield genes important in the pathogenesis of ganglioneuroblastoma.

  15. Genomic Repeat Abundances Contain Phylogenetic Signal

    PubMed Central

    Dodsworth, Steven; Chase, Mark W.; Kelly, Laura J.; Leitch, Ilia J.; Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Piednoël, Mathieu; Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of genomic information, particularly repetitive elements, is usually ignored when researchers are using next-generation sequencing. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of this repetitive fraction in phylogenetic analyses, utilizing comparative graph-based clustering of next-generation sequence reads, which results in abundance estimates of different classes of genomic repeats. Phylogenetic trees are then inferred based on the genome-wide abundance of different repeat types treated as continuously varying characters; such repeats are scattered across chromosomes and in angiosperms can constitute a majority of nuclear genomic DNA. In six diverse examples, five angiosperms and one insect, this method provides generally well-supported relationships at interspecific and intergeneric levels that agree with results from more standard phylogenetic analyses of commonly used markers. We propose that this methodology may prove especially useful in groups where there is little genetic differentiation in standard phylogenetic markers. At the same time as providing data for phylogenetic inference, this method additionally yields a wealth of data for comparative studies of genome evolution. PMID:25261464

  16. Genomic repeat abundances contain phylogenetic signal.

    PubMed

    Dodsworth, Steven; Chase, Mark W; Kelly, Laura J; Leitch, Ilia J; Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Piednoël, Mathieu; Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna; Leitch, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of genomic information, particularly repetitive elements, is usually ignored when researchers are using next-generation sequencing. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of this repetitive fraction in phylogenetic analyses, utilizing comparative graph-based clustering of next-generation sequence reads, which results in abundance estimates of different classes of genomic repeats. Phylogenetic trees are then inferred based on the genome-wide abundance of different repeat types treated as continuously varying characters; such repeats are scattered across chromosomes and in angiosperms can constitute a majority of nuclear genomic DNA. In six diverse examples, five angiosperms and one insect, this method provides generally well-supported relationships at interspecific and intergeneric levels that agree with results from more standard phylogenetic analyses of commonly used markers. We propose that this methodology may prove especially useful in groups where there is little genetic differentiation in standard phylogenetic markers. At the same time as providing data for phylogenetic inference, this method additionally yields a wealth of data for comparative studies of genome evolution.

  17. Repeat Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Hideyuki; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay M.Ch.; Flannery, Thomas J.; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuromas, we assessed tumor control, clinical outcomes, and the risk of adverse radiation effects in patients whose tumors progressed after initial management. Methods and Materials: During a 21-year experience at our center, 1,352 patients underwent SRS as management for their acoustic neuromas. We retrospectively identified 6 patients who underwent SRS twice for the same tumor. The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-71 years). All patients had imaging evidence of tumor progression despite initial SRS. One patient also had incomplete surgical resection after initial SRS. All patients were deaf at the time of the second SRS. The median radiosurgery target volume at the time of the initial SRS was 0.5 cc and was 2.1 cc at the time of the second SRS. The median margin dose at the time of the initial SRS was 13 Gy and was 11 Gy at the time of the second SRS. The median interval between initial SRS and repeat SRS was 63 months (range, 25-169 months). Results: At a median follow-up of 29 months after the second SRS (range, 13-71 months), tumor control or regression was achieved in all 6 patients. No patient developed symptomatic adverse radiation effects or new neurological symptoms after the second SRS. Conclusions: With this limited experience, we found that repeat SRS for a persistently enlarging acoustic neuroma can be performed safely and effectively.

  18. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  19. Chromosome breakage in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome deletions may involve recombination between a repeat at the proximal and distal breakpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Amos-Landgraf J.; Nicholls, R.D.; Gottlieb, W.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi (PWS) and Angelman (AS) syndromes most commonly arise from large deletions of 15q11-q13. Deletions in PWS are paternal in origin, while those in AS are maternal in origin, clearly demonstrating genomic imprinting in these clinically distinct neurobehavioural disorders. In at least 90% of PWS and AS deletion patients, the same 4 Mb region within 15q11-q13 is deleted with breakpoints clustering in single YAC clones at the proximal and distal ends. To study the mechanism of chromosome breakage in PWS and AS, we have previously isolated 25 independent clones from these three YACs using Alu-vector PCR. Four clones were selected that appear to detect a low copy repeat that is located in the proximal and distal breakpoint regions of chromosome 15q11-q13. Three clones detect the same 4 HindIII bands in genomic DNA, all from 15q11-q13, with differing intensities for the probes located at the proximal or distal breakpoints region, respectively. This suggests that these probes detect related members of a low-copy repeat at either location. Moreover, the 254RL2 probe detects a novel HindIII band in two unrelated PWS deletion patients, suggesting that this may represent a breakpoint fragment, with recombination occurring within a similar interval in both patients. A fourth clone, 318RL3 detects 5 bands in HindIII-digested genomic DNA, all from 15q11-q13. This YAC endclone itself is not deleted in PWS and AS deletion patients, as seen by an invariant strong band. Two other strong bands are variably intact or deleted in different PWS or AS deletion patients, suggesting a relationship of this sequence to the breakpoints. Moreover, PCR using 318RL3 primers from the distal 93C9 YAC led to the isolation of a related clone with 96% identity, demonstrating the existence of a low-copy repeat with members close to the proximal and distal breakpoints. Taken together, our data suggest a complex, low-copy repeat with members at both the proximal and distal boundaries.

  20. Interactions between canine RAD51 and full length or truncated BRCA2 BRC repeats.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, K; Yoshikawa, Y; Oonuma, T; Tomioka, Y; Hashizume, K; Morimatsu, M

    2011-11-01

    In humans, mutations in the gene for the breast cancer susceptibility protein BRCA2 affect its interactions with the recombinase RAD51 and are associated with an increased risk of cancer. This interaction occurs through a series of eight BRC repeat sequences in BRCA2. A mammalian two-hybrid assay using individual BRC repeats demonstrated that BRC6 did not bind to RAD51, whereas there was strong (BRC1, 2 and 4), intermediate (BRC8), or weak (BRC3, 5 and 7) binding of other BRC repeats to RAD51. In serial deletion mutation experiments, binding strengths were increased when the C-terminal BRC repeat was removed from BRC1-8, BRC1-5 and BRC1-3. These results may provide an insight into the effects of missense or truncation mutations in BRCA2 in canine tumours.

  1. Identification of repeat structure in large genomes using repeat probability clouds.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wanjun; Castoe, Todd A; Hedges, Dale J; Batzer, Mark A; Pollock, David D

    2008-09-01

    The identification of repeat structure in eukaryotic genomes can be time-consuming and difficult because of the large amount of information ( approximately 3 x 10(9) bp) that needs to be processed and compared. We introduce a new approach based on exact word counts to evaluate, de novo, the repeat structure present within large eukaryotic genomes. This approach avoids sequence alignment and similarity search, two of the most time-consuming components of traditional methods for repeat identification. Algorithms were implemented to efficiently calculate exact counts for any length oligonucleotide in large genomes. Based on these oligonucleotide counts, oligonucleotide excess probability clouds, or "P-clouds," were constructed. P-clouds are composed of clusters of related oligonucleotides that occur, as a group, more often than expected by chance. After construction, P-clouds were mapped back onto the genome, and regions of high P-cloud density were identified as repetitive regions based on a sliding window approach. This efficient method is capable of analyzing the repeat content of the entire human genome on a single desktop computer in less than half a day, at least 10-fold faster than current approaches. The predicted repetitive regions strongly overlap with known repeat elements as well as other repetitive regions such as gene families, pseudogenes, and segmental duplicons. This method should be extremely useful as a tool for use in de novo identification of repeat structure in large newly sequenced genomes.

  2. Huntington's disease: translating a CAG repeat into a pathogenic mechanism.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, M E; Gusella, J F

    1996-10-01

    The specific pattern of neuronal cell death in Huntington's disease (HD) is triggered by an abnormal version of the huntingtin protein, which is produced by translation of the HD gene defect, an expanded CAG repeat in a novel 4p16.3 gene. The extended amino-terminal polyglutamine segment may act via the protein's inherent activity, increasing it or decreasing it in a graded fashion, or, alternatively, it may confer the ability to interact with a completely different set of cellular pathways, focusing attention on the HD protein's normal and abnormal physiological functions.

  3. Progression-regression effects in tracking repeated patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagacinski, R. J.; Hah, S.

    1986-01-01

    Subjects used a position control system to perform compensatory tracking of a repeated input pattern. The input pattern was 20 seconds in duration and was either an arctangent function or the sum of two sine waves. Tracking error decreased with practice and increased with the addition of a concurrent memory task. The shape of the ensemble-average tracking error resembled the shape of the input velocity signal throughout these changes in performance. Regression analyses were used to parameterize these effects and compare these results with the predictions of several conceptualizations of perceptual-motor learning.

  4. Repeated buckling of composite shear panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Josef; Weller, Tanchum

    1990-01-01

    Failures in service of aerospace structures and research at the Technion Aircraft Structures Laboratory have revealed that repeatedly buckled stiffened shear panels might be susceptible to premature fatigue failures. Extensive experimental and analytical studies have been performed at Technion on repeated buckling, far in excess of initial buckling, for both metal and composite shear panels with focus on the influence of the surrounding structure. The core of the experimental investigation consisted of repeated buckling and postbuckling tests on Wagner beams in a three-point loading system under realistic test conditions. The effects of varying sizes of stiffeners, of the magnitude of initial buckling loads, of the panel aspect ratio and of the cyclic shearing force, V sub cyc, were studied. The cyclic to critical shear buckling ratios, (V sub cyc/V sub cr) were on the high side, as needed for efficient panel design, yet all within possible flight envelopes. The experiments were supplemented by analytical and numerical analyses. For the metal shear panels the test and numerical results were synthesized into prediction formulas, which relate the life of the metal shear panels to two cyclic load parameters. The composite shear panels studied were hybrid beams with graphite/epoxy webs bonded to aluminum alloy frames. The test results demonstrated that composite panels were less fatigue sensitive than comparable metal ones, and that repeated buckling, even when causing extensive damage, did not reduce the residual strength by more than 20 percent. All the composite panels sustained the specified fatigue life of 250,000 cycles. The effect of local unstiffened holes on the durability of repeatedly buckled shear panels was studied for one series of the metal panels. Tests on 2024 T3 aluminum panels with relatively small unstiffened holes in the center of the panels demonstrated premature fatigue failure, compared to panels without holes. Preliminary tests on two graphite

  5. Sensitization of locomotion following repeated ventral tegmental injections of cytisine.

    PubMed

    Museo, E; Wise, R A

    1994-06-01

    Systemic injections of nicotine increase locomotion, and repeating these injections brings about a sensitization of the locomotor response. Ventral tegmental injections of the nicotinic agonist cytisine also increase locomotion. In the present study cytisine was administered repeatedly into the ventral tegmentum to determine whether sensitization of its locomotor-activating effects would develop. Four groups of animals were tested; each group received a total of six injections at a rate of one injection every 48 h. Two of these groups received injections of cytisine (10 nmol/side): one group received injections into the ventral tegmentum, and, to insure the anatomical specificity of the locomotor effect, a second group received injections dorsal to the ventral tegmentum. The remaining two groups received vehicle injections: one group received injections into the ventral tegmentum, and the other received injections into more dorsal sites. The group of animals that received injections of cytisine into the ventral tegmentum locomoted more than any other group. In addition, only with this group was a progressive increase in the locomotor response evident across test days. These findings raise the possibility that a neural substrate in the ventral tegmentum mediates the locomotor-activating and sensitizing effects associated with the systemic administration of nicotine.

  6. Effects of repeated baking on the mechanical and physical properties of metal-ceramic systems.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Sakae; Yoshida, Takamitsu; Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Terashima, Nobuyoshi; Kamijyo, Kuni; Ito, Michio; Oshida, Yoshiki

    2004-06-01

    This study evaluates effects of repeated baking processes on the mechanical and physical properties of single and triple applications of opaque, body and enamel porcelains fused to three different metal substrates (precious metal, semi-precious metal and non-precious metal). The vintage halo porcelain system was employed and fused to metals. Fused samples were subjected to three-point bend tests to evaluate bend strength and modulus of elasticity. It was found that, by increasing repeated baking cycles, (1) body and enamel porcelains increased bend strengths but opaque porcelain did not show any changes, (2) all triple-layered porcelains fired to metals increased bend strengths, and (3) all three porcelains and metal substrates did not exhibit changes in thermal expansion percentage. It was concluded that repeating baking procedures up to 10 cycles did not exhibit any adverse effects on the final properties of porcelain-fired to metals, rather it was noticed that mechanical strengths increased by increasing cycles.

  7. The rise in carboxyhemoglobin from repeated pulmonary diffusing capacity tests.

    PubMed

    Zavorsky, Gerald S

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study determined the rise in carboxyhemoglobin percentage (COHb) from repeated pulmonary diffusing capacity tests using 5 or 10s single breath-hold maneuvers. Five male and four female non-smokers [baseline COHb=1.2 (SD 0.5%)] performed repeated pulmonary diffusing capacity testing on two separate days. The days were randomized to either repeated 10s (0.28% CO), or 5s (0.28% CO, 55ppm NO) breath-hold maneuvers. Twenty-two 5s breath-hold maneuvers, each separated by 4min rest, raised COHb to 11.1 (1.4)% and minimally raised the methemoglobin percentage (METHb) by 0.3 (0.2)% to a value of 0.8 (0.2)%. After the 22nd test, pulmonary diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced by about 4mL/min/mmHg, equating to a 0.44% increase in COHb per 5s breath-hold maneuver and a concomitant 0.35mL/min/mmHg decrease in DLCO. Pulmonary diffusing capacity for nitric oxide (DLNO) was not altered after 22 tests. On another day, the 10s single breath-hold maneuver increased COHb by 0.64% per test, and reduced DLCO by 0.44mL/min/mmHg per test. In conclusion, 5s breath-hold maneuvers do not appreciably raise METHb or DLNO, and DLCO is only significantly reduced when COHb is at least 6%.

  8. Variable number of tandem repeats in clinical strains of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, A; Scherer, S; van Leeuwen, W; Willemse, D; van Alphen, L; Verbrugh, H

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm capable of identifying short repeat motifs was developed and used to screen the whole genome sequence available for Haemophilus influenzae, since some of these repeats have been shown to affect bacterial virulence. Various di- to hexanucleotide repeats were identified, confirming and extending previous findings on the existence of variable-number-of-tandem-repeat loci (VNTRs). Repeats with units of 7 or 8 nucleotides were not encountered. For all of the 3- to 6-nucleotide repeats in the H. influenzae chromosome, PCR tests capable of detecting allelic polymorphisms were designed. Fourteen of 18 of the potential VNTRs were indeed highly polymorphic when different strains were screened. Two of the potential VNTRs appeared to be short and homogeneous in length; another one may be specific for the H. influenzae Rd strain only. One of the primer sets generated fingerprint-type DNA banding patterns. The various repeat types differed with respect to intrinsic stability as well. It was noted for separate colonies derived from a single clinical specimen or strains passaged for several weeks on chocolate agar plates that the lengths of the VNTRs did not change. When several strains from different patients infected during an outbreak of lung disease were analyzed, increased but limited variation was encountered in all VNTR sites analyzed. One of the 5-nucleotide VNTRs proved to be hypervariable. This variability may reflect the molecular basis of a mechanism used by H. influenzae bacteria to successfully colonize and infect different human individuals. PMID:9393791

  9. Differential distribution and occurrence of simple sequence repeats in diverse geminivirus genomes.

    PubMed

    George, B; Mashhood Alam, Ch; Jain, S K; Sharfuddin, Ch; Chakraborty, S

    2012-12-01

    Microsatellites are tandem repeat sequences with repeat unit of one to six base pairs. Although, microsatellites have been studied in eukaryotes as well as prokaryotes, information on their occurrence on virus genomes is limited. We examined microsatellite distribution in 263 complete geminivirus genomes. Results indicated microsatellites to be an important component of geminiviral genomes. For each geminiviral genome, mono- and dinucleotide repeats were found to be highly predominant. Occurrence of microsatellites within geminiviral genome is significantly lesser than organisms with higher genome sizes and their number decreased with an increase in the length of repeat unit. Repeats of AT/TA, GT/TG, CT/TC, CTT/TTC, and GAA/AAG occurred with high frequency, whereas CG/GC, CGA/AGC, AAC/CAA, and GCT/TCG repeats had rare incidence. Interesting observation related to differential distribution of simple sequence repeats in genomic components of begomoviruses has been noted. We discussed the possible reasons for the observed divergence. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis of microsatellites occurring in any ssDNA viral genome for such purposes and represents a general approach for analysis of other viral genomes. The presence of microsatellites in geminiviral genomes may be used to obtain information regarding viral genetic diversity, evolution, and strain (isolate) identification.

  10. Chromatin structure of repeating CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG sequences in human disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2007-05-01

    In eukaryotic cells, chromatin structure organizes genomic DNA in a dynamic fashion, and results in regulation of many DNA metabolic processes. The CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG repeating sequences involved in several neuromuscular degenerative diseases display differential abilities for the binding of histone octamers. The effect of the repeating DNA on nucleosome assembly could be amplified as the number of repeats increases. Also, CpG methylation, and sequence interruptions within the triplet repeats exert an impact on the formation of nucleosomes along these repeating DNAs. The two most common triplet expansion human diseases, myotonic dystrophy 1 and fragile X syndrome, are caused by the expanded CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG repeats, respectively. In addition to the expanded repeats and CpG methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling factors, and noncoding RNA have been shown to coordinate the chromatin structure at both myotonic dystrophy 1 and fragile X loci. Alterations in chromatin structure at these two loci can affect transcription of these disease-causing genes, leading to disease symptoms. These observations have brought a new appreciation that a full understanding of disease gene expression requires a knowledge of the structure of the chromatin domain within which the gene resides.

  11. Topoisomerase 1 and single-strand break repair modulate transcription-induced CAG repeat contraction in human cells.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Leroy; Lin, Yunfu; Dion, Vincent; Wilson, John H

    2011-08-01

    Expanded trinucleotide repeats are responsible for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy type 1. The mechanisms that underlie repeat instability in the germ line and in the somatic tissues of human patients are undefined. Using a selection assay based on contraction of CAG repeat tracts in human cells, we screened the Prestwick chemical library in a moderately high-throughput assay and identified 18 novel inducers of repeat contraction. A subset of these compounds targeted pathways involved in the management of DNA supercoiling associated with transcription. Further analyses using both small molecule inhibitors and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdowns demonstrated the involvement of topoisomerase 1 (TOP1), tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), and single-strand break repair (SSBR) in modulating transcription-dependent CAG repeat contractions. The TOP1-TDP1-SSBR pathway normally functions to suppress repeat instability, since interfering with it stimulated repeat contractions. We further showed that the increase in repeat contractions when the TOP1-TDP1-SSBR pathway is compromised arises via transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair, a previously identified contributor to transcription-induced repeat instability. These studies broaden the scope of pathways involved in transcription-induced CAG repeat instability and begin to define their interrelationships. PMID:21628532

  12. Repeatability of a running heat tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Mee, Jessica A; Doust, Jo; Maxwell, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    At present there is no standardised heat tolerance test (HTT) procedure adopting a running mode of exercise. Current HTTs may misdiagnose a runner's susceptibility to a hyperthermic state due to differences in exercise intensity. The current study aimed to establish the repeatability of a practical running test to evaluate individual's ability to tolerate exercise heat stress. Sixteen (8M, 8F) participants performed the running HTT (RHTT) (30 min, 9 km h(-1), 2% elevation) on two separate occasions in a hot environment (40 °C and 40% relative humidity). There were no differences in peak rectal temperature (RHTT1: 38.82 ± 0.47 °C, RHTT2: 38.86 ± 0.49 °C, Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.93, typical error of measure (TEM) = 0.13 °C), peak skin temperature (RHTT1: 38.12 ± 0.45, RHTT2: 38.11 ± 0.45 °C, ICC = 0.79, TEM = 0.30 °C), peak heart rate (RHTT1: 182 ± 15 beats min(-1), RHTT2: 183 ± 15 beats min(-1), ICC = 0.99, TEM = 2 beats min(-1)), nor sweat rate (1721 ± 675 g h(-1), 1716 ± 745 g h(-1), ICC = 0.95, TEM = 162 g h(-1)) between RHTT1 and RHTT2 (p>0.05). Results demonstrate good agreement, strong correlations and small differences between repeated trials, and the TEM values suggest low within-participant variability. The RHTT was effective in differentiating between individuals physiological responses; supporting a heat tolerance continuum. The findings suggest the RHTT is a repeatable measure of physiological strain in the heat and may be used to assess the effectiveness of acute and chronic heat alleviating procedures. PMID:25774031

  13. Capping motifs stabilize the leucine-rich repeat protein PP32 and rigidify adjacent repeats.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thuy P; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2014-06-01

    Capping motifs are found to flank most β-strand-containing repeat proteins. To better understand the roles of these capping motifs in organizing structure and stability, we carried out folding and solution NMR studies on the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of PP32, which is composed of five tandem LRR, capped by α-helical and β-hairpin motifs on the N- and C-termini. We were able to purify PP32 constructs lacking either cap and containing destabilizing substitutions. Removing the C-cap results in complete unfolding of PP32. Removing the N-cap has a much less severe effect, decreasing stability but retaining much of its secondary structure. In contrast, the dynamics and tertiary structure of the first two repeats are significantly perturbed, based on (1)H-(15)N relaxation studies, chemical shift perturbations, and residual dipolar couplings. However, more distal repeats (3 to C-cap) retain their native tertiary structure. In this regard, the N-cap drives the folding of adjacent repeats from what appears to be a molten-globule-like state. This interpretation is supported by extensive analysis using core packing substitutions in the full-length and N-cap-truncated PP32. This work highlights the importance of caps to the stability and structural integrity of β-strand-containing LRR proteins, and emphasizes the different contributions of the N- and C-terminal caps. PMID:24659532

  14. Distillation by repeated measurements: Continuous spectrum case

    SciTech Connect

    Bellomo, Bruno; Compagno, Giuseppe; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2010-12-15

    Repeated measurements on one part of a bipartite system strongly affect the other part that is not measured, the dynamics of which is regulated by an effective contracted evolution operator. When the spectrum of this operator is discrete, the nonmeasured system is driven into a pure state, irrespective of the initial state, provided that the spectrum satisfies certain conditions. We show here that, even in the case of continuous spectrum, an effective distillation can occur under rather general conditions. We confirm it by applying our formalism to a simple model.

  15. Innovative collaboration to prevent repeated adolescent pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Saunders, R B; Brown, H N

    1997-01-01

    Nurse educators from a university setting and staff from the county health department collaborated to establish an innovative program to prevent repeated pregnancy in adolescents. Called Dollar-A-Day and patterned after the original in Denver, CO, the program was operated jointly for 5 years and today continues to operate under the auspices of the health department. Success of the venture is attributed to use of skills in assessment, building, managing, and evaluating, as described by Loxley (1997). These elements were used to construct a context for collaboration.

  16. Multifunctional protein: cardiac ankyrin repeat protein*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Xie, Xiao-jie; Wang, Jian-an

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP) not only serves as an important component of muscle sarcomere in the cytoplasm, but also acts as a transcription co-factor in the nucleus. Previous studies have demonstrated that CARP is up-regulated in some cardiovascular disorders and muscle diseases; however, its role in these diseases remains controversial now. In this review, we will discuss the continued progress in the research related to CARP, including its discovery, structure, and the role it plays in cardiac development and heart diseases. PMID:27143260

  17. Yet another model of soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. I.; Toole, H. A.; Unruh, S. H.

    1994-01-01

    We develop a model of soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) in which a supernova leaves planets orbiting a neutron star in intersecting orbits. These planets will collide in approximately 10(exp 4) yr if their orbits are coplanar. Some fragments of debris lose their angular momentum in the collision and fall onto the neutron star, producing a SGR. The initial accretion of matter left by the collision with essntially no angular momentum may produce a superburst like that of 1979 March 5, while debris fragments which later lose their angular momentum produce an irregular but non-Poissonian pattern of smaller bursts resembling those observed in spectrum and duration.

  18. Synthesis of biotinylated keratan sulfate repeating disaccharides.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Naoko; Tamura, Jun-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized four types of keratan and keratan sulfate repeating disaccharides containing non-sulfate, Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ, and three types of sulfates, Gal6Sβ1-4GlcNAcβ, Galβ1-4GlcNAc6Sβ, and Gal6Sβ1-4GlcNAc6Sβ in an efficient and stereo-controlled manner. These disaccharides were conjugated with biotin via a hydrophilic linker at the reducing terminal.

  19. Platelet peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in repeated stress

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, D.E.; Bidder, M.; Gavish, M. ); Weizman, A.; Karp, L.; Tyano, S. ); Grinshpoon, A.; Bleich, A.

    1991-01-01

    ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding to platelet membranes and plasma stress hormones were studied in soldiers at the beginning of a parachute training course, following 6 days of preparatory exercises, and after the fourth actual parachute jump. A slight reduction (15%; NS) in the number of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) was detected at the end of the exercise period, prior to the first jump. Reduced density of PBR was observed immediately after the repeated actual jumps. Equilibrium dissociation constants were not affected by the stressful situation. Plasma cortisol and prolactin levels remained unaltered during the entire study period.

  20. On the nature of soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; Hertz, P.; Wood, K. S.; Kouveliotou, C.

    1991-01-01

    The nature of soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) is discussed on the basis of data available for the March 5, 1979 superburst described by Cline et al. (1982) and for the less intense bursts detected by instruments on board Venera 11/12 and 13/14. It is argued that the three known SGR bursters can be explained most economically and consistently as belonging to a single class, with source distances of tens of kiloparsecs. The viability of several proposed models developed for the SGR energy release mechanism is examined.

  1. Analysis of the repeatability of time-lapse 3d vsp multicomponent surveys, delhi field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Mariana Fernandes de

    Delhi Field is a producing oil field located in northeastern Louisiana. In order to monitor the CO2 sweep efficiency, time-lapse 3D seismic data have been acquired in this area. Time-lapse studies are increasingly used to evaluate changes in the seismic response induced by the production of hydrocarbons or the injection of water, CO2 or steam into a reservoir. A 4D seismic signal is generated by a combination of production and injection effects within the reservoir as well as non-repeatability effects. In order to get reliable results from time-lapse seismic methods, it is important to distinguish the production and injection effects from the non-repeatability effects in the 4D seismic signal. Repeatability of 4D land seismic data is affected by several factors. The most significant of them are: source and receiver geometry inaccuracies, differences in seismic sources signatures, variations in the immediate near surface and ambient non-repeatable noise. In this project, two 3D multicomponent VSP surveys acquired in Delhi Field were used to quantify the relative contribution of each factor that can affect the repeatability in land seismic data. The factors analyzed in this study were: source and receiver geometry inaccura- cies, variations in the immediate near surface and ambient non-repeatable noise. This study showed that all these factors had a significant impact on the repeatability of the successive multicomponent VSP surveys in Delhi Field. This project also shows the advantages and disadvantages in the use of different repeata- bility metrics, normalized-root-mean-square (NRMS) difference and signal-to-distortion ratio (SDR) attribute, to evaluate the level of seismic repeatability between successive time-lapse seismic surveys. It is observed that NRMS difference is greatly influenced by time-shifts and that SDR attribute combined with the time-shift may give more distinct and representative repeatability information than the NRMS difference.

  2. Hybrid de novo tandem repeat detection using short and long reads

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background As one of the most studied genome rearrangements, tandem repeats have a considerable impact on genetic backgrounds of inherited diseases. Many methods designed for tandem repeat detection on reference sequences obtain high quality results. However, in the case of a de novo context, where no reference sequence is available, tandem repeat detection remains a difficult problem. The short reads obtained with the second-generation sequencing methods are not long enough to span regions that contain long repeats. This length limitation was tackled by the long reads obtained with the third-generation sequencing platforms such as Pacific Biosciences technologies. Nevertheless, the gain on the read length came with a significant increase of the error rate. The main objective of nowadays studies on long reads is to handle the high error rate up to 16%. Methods In this paper we present MixTaR, the first de novo method for tandem repeat detection that combines the high-quality of short reads and the large length of long reads. Our hybrid algorithm uses the set of short reads for tandem repeat pattern detection based on a de Bruijn graph. These patterns are then validated using the long reads, and the tandem repeat sequences are constructed using local greedy assemblies. Results MixTaR is tested with both simulated and real reads from complex organisms. For a complete analysis of its robustness to errors, we use short and long reads with different error rates. The results are then analysed in terms of number of tandem repeats detected and the length of their patterns. Conclusions Our method shows high precision and sensitivity. With low false positive rates even for highly erroneous reads, MixTaR is able to detect accurate tandem repeats with pattern lengths varying within a significant interval. PMID:26399998

  3. Changes in meat quality of ovine longissimus dorsi muscle in response to repeated freeze and thaw.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jun; Li, Chunbao; Chen, Yinji; Gao, Feifei; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2012-12-01

    Changes in eating and technological quality attributes of ovine longissimus dorsi muscle during repeated freeze and thaw were investigated. Shear force value, L* value, a* value and fiber diameter decreased (P<0.05) but lipid oxidation increased (P<0.05) with repeated freeze-thaw cycles. Sarcomere length and pH decreased (P<0.05) within the first 10 freeze-thaw cycles but increased (P<0.05) after 5 further cycles. Total and myofibrillar protein solubility, and intramuscular free fatty acids concentration decreased (P<0.05) after 1 cycle of freeze and thaw but then increased (P<0.05) gradually with further cycles. Hardness, chewiness, cohesiveness and resilience of comminuted lamb products decreased (P<0.05) with increased freeze-thaw cycles. And therefore, repeated freeze and thaw should be minimized in terms of meat color for commercial value and water holding capacity for further processing. PMID:22749539

  4. Sequence analysis of Vicia faba repeated DNA, the FokI repeat element.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, A; Yakura, K; Tanifuji, S

    1984-01-01

    A type of highly repeated DNA sequences present in the genome of Vicia faba was detected by digestion its nuclear DNA with FokI endonuclease and fractionating the digests on polyacrylamide gels. Four fragments of 59, 108, 177 and 246 bp of the FokI repeated sequences were collected from the gels and their primary structures were determined by the method of Maxam and Gilbert. These repeated DNA sequences were shown to be a multiple tandem array of a 59 bp sequence element. And its nucleotide sequence was almost completely conserved among all the sequence members of each the size class and also among these classes. This sequence element consists of a duplet of an about the duplet has an incomplete dyad symmetrical structure. Images PMID:6089113

  5. Enhancement of Odor Sensitivity Following Repeated Odor and Visual Fear Conditioning.

    PubMed

    Parma, Valentina; Ferraro, Stefania; Miller, Stacie S; Åhs, Fredrik; Lundström, Johan N

    2015-09-01

    Odor detection sensitivity can be rapidly altered by fear conditioning; whether this effect is augmented over time is not known. The present study aimed to test whether repeated conditioning sessions induce changes in odor detection threshold as well as in conditioned responses and whether olfactory stimuli evoke stronger conditioned responses than visual stimuli. The repeated conditioning group participated in repeated sessions over 2 weeks whereas the single conditioning group participated in 1 conditioning session; both groups were presented with visual and olfactory stimuli, were paired with an electric shock (CS+) and 2 matched control stimuli not paired with shock (CS-) while olfactory detection threshold and skin conductance responses (SCRs) were measured before and after the last session. We found increased sensitivity for the CS+ odor in the repeated but not in the single conditioning group, consistent with changes in olfactory sensitivity following repeated aversive learning and of a similar magnitude to what has previously been demonstrated in the periphery. SCR to the visual and olfactory CS+ were similar between groups, indicating that sensory thresholds can change without corresponding change in conditioned responses. In conclusion, repeated conditioning increases detection sensitivity and reduces conditioned responses, suggesting that segregated processes influence perception and conditioned responses.

  6. Nanostructured functional films from engineered repeat proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Tijana Z.; Regan, Lynne; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental advances in biotechnology, medicine, environment, electronics and energy require methods for precise control of spatial organization at the nanoscale. Assemblies that rely on highly specific biomolecular interactions are an attractive approach to form materials that display novel and useful properties. Here, we report on assembly of films from the designed, rod-shaped, superhelical, consensus tetratricopeptide repeat protein (CTPR). We have designed three peptide-binding sites into the 18 repeat CTPR to allow for further specific and non-covalent functionalization of films through binding of fluorescein labelled peptides. The fluorescence signal from the peptide ligand bound to the protein in the solid film is anisotropic, demonstrating that CTPR films can impose order on otherwise isotropic moieties. Circular dichroism measurements show that the individual protein molecules retain their secondary structure in the film, and X-ray scattering, birefringence and atomic force microscopy experiments confirm macroscopic alignment of CTPR molecules within the film. This work opens the door to the generation of innovative biomaterials with tailored structure and function. PMID:23594813

  7. Airborne Radar Interferometric Repeat-Pass Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry R.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Fore, Alexander; Simard, Marc; Zebker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Earth science research often requires crustal deformation measurements at a variety of time scales, from seconds to decades. Although satellites have been used for repeat-track interferometric (RTI) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) mapping for close to 20 years, RTI is much more difficult to implement from an airborne platform owing to the irregular trajectory of the aircraft compared with microwave imaging radar wavelengths. Two basic requirements for robust airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry include the ability to fly the platform to a desired trajectory within a narrow tube and the ability to have the radar beam pointed in a desired direction to a fraction of a beam width. Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is equipped with a precision auto pilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the platform, a Gulfstream III, to nominally fly within a 5 m diameter tube and with an electronically scanned antenna to position the radar beam to a fraction of a beam width based on INU (inertial navigation unit) attitude angle measurements.

  8. Compression of strings with approximate repeats.

    PubMed

    Allison, L; Edgoose, T; Dix, T I

    1998-01-01

    We describe a model for strings of characters that is loosely based on the Lempel Ziv model with the addition that a repeated substring can be an approximate match to the original substring; this is close to the situation of DNA, for example. Typically there are many explanations for a given string under the model, some optimal and many suboptimal. Rather than commit to one optimal explanation, we sum the probabilities over all explanations under the model because this gives the probability of the data under the model. The model has a small number of parameters and these can be estimated from the given string by an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. Each iteration of the EM algorithm takes O(n2) time and a few iterations are typically sufficient. O(n2) complexity is impractical for strings of more than a few tens of thousands of characters and a faster approximation algorithm is also given. The model is further extended to include approximate reverse complementary repeats when analyzing DNA strings. Tests include the recovery of parameter estimates from known sources and applications to real DNA strings.

  9. Learning with repeated-game strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Christos A.; Romero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    We use the self-tuning Experience Weighted Attraction model with repeated-game strategies as a computer testbed to examine the relative frequency, speed of convergence and progression of a set of repeated-game strategies in four symmetric 2 × 2 games: Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes, Stag-Hunt, and Chicken. In the Prisoner's Dilemma game, we find that the strategy with the most occurrences is the “Grim-Trigger.” In the Battle of the Sexes game, a cooperative pair that alternates between the two pure-strategy Nash equilibria emerges as the one with the most occurrences. In the Stag-Hunt and Chicken games, the “Win-Stay, Lose-Shift” and “Grim-Trigger” strategies are the ones with the most occurrences. Overall, the pairs that converged quickly ended up at the cooperative outcomes, whereas the ones that were extremely slow to reach convergence ended up at non-cooperative outcomes. PMID:25126053

  10. Ultrasonic flowmeters undergo accuracy, repeatability tests

    SciTech Connect

    Grimley, T.A.

    1996-12-23

    Two commercially available multipath ultrasonic flowmeters have undergone tests at Gas Research Institute`s metering research facility (MRF) at Southwest Research institute in San Antonio. The tests were conducted in baseline and disturbed-flow installations to assess baseline accuracy and repeatability over a range of flowrates and pressures. Results show the test meters are capable of accuracies within a 1% tolerance and with repeatability of better than 0.25% when the flowrate is greater than about 5% of capacity. The data also indicates that pressure may have an effect on meter error. Results further suggest that both the magnitude and character of errors introduced by flow disturbances are a function of meter design. Shifts of up to 0.6% were measured for meters installed 10D from a tee (1D = 1 pipe diameter). Better characterization of the effects of flow disturbances on measurement accuracy is needed to define more accurately the upstream piping requirements necessary to achieve meter performance within a specified tolerance. The paper discusses reduced station costs, test methods, baseline tests, effect of pressure, speed of sound, and disturbance tests.

  11. Distribution of repeat unit differences between alleles at tandem repeat microsatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, L. |; Zhong, Y.; Chakraborty, R.

    1994-09-01

    PCR-based assays of tandemly repeated microsatellite loci detect genetic variation from which alleles may be scored by their repeat unit lengths. Comparison of allele sizes from such data yields a probability distribution (P{sub k}) of repeat unit differences (k) between alleles segregating in a population. We show that this distribution (P{sub k}; k = 0, 1,2,...) provides insight regarding the mechanism of production of new alleles at such loci and the demographic history of populations, far better than that obtained from other summary measures (e.g., heterozygosity, number of alleles, and the range of allele sizes). The distributions of P{sub k} under multi-step stepwise models of mutation are analytically derived, which show that when a population is at equilibrium under the mutation-drift balance, the distribution of repeat unit differences between alleles is positively skewed with a mode larger than zero. However, when the heterozygosity at a locus is low (say, less than 40%), P{sub k} is a monotonically decreasing function of k. Applications of this theory to data on repeat unit sizes at over 1,240 microsatellite loci from the Caucasians, categorized by the average heterozygosity of loci, indicate that at most microsatellite loci new alleles are produced by stepwise mutations, and this is consistent with the replication slippage mechanism of mutations. The repeat size changes of mutants are probably within one or two units of alleles from which the mutants arise. Distributions of P{sub k} at microsatellite loci located within genes show evidence of allele size constraints. No significant evidence of recent expansion of population sizes in the Caucasians is detected by the distribution of P{sub k}.

  12. New insights into the genetic instability in CCTG repeats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pei; Lam, Sik Lok

    2015-10-01

    Tetranucleotide CCTG repeat expansion is associated with myotonic dystrophy type 2, which is an inherited and progressive muscle degeneration disease. Yet, no cure is available and the molecular mechanism of repeat expansion remains elusive. In this study, we used high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to reveal a mini-dumbbell structure formed by two CCTG repeats. Upon slippage in the nascent strand during DNA replication, the formation of the mini-dumbbell provides a possible pathway for a two-repeat expansion. In addition, fast exchange between two competing mini-dumbbells among three repeats results in a mini-loop structure that accounts for one-repeat expansion. These mini-dumbbell and mini-loop intermediates can also co-exist at multiple sites in CCTG repeats, leading to three or larger size repeat expansions. PMID:26384951

  13. Hyperventilation as a strategy for improved repeated sprint performance.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Akihiro; Naito, Hisashi; Chow, Chin-Moi

    2014-04-01

    Repeated high-intensity sprints incur substantial anaerobic metabolic challenges and create an acidic muscle milieu that is unfavorable for subsequent performance. Hyperventilation, resulting in respiratory alkalosis, acts as a compensatory mechanism for metabolic acidosis. This study tested the hypothesis that hyperventilation performed during recovery intervals would attenuate performance decrement in repeated sprint pedaling. Thirteen male university athletes performed 10 sets of 10-second maximal pedaling on a cycle ergometer with a 60-second recovery between sets under control (spontaneous breathing) and hyperventilation conditions in a crossover counter-balanced manner. Pedaling load was set at 0.075 × body mass. Peak and mean power outputs were documented for each set to compare performance decrements for 10 sets between conditions. Hyperventilation (60 breaths per minute and end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 maintained at 20-25 mm Hg) was performed 30 seconds before each sprint set. This intervention successfully increased blood pH by 0.03-0.07 but lowered P(CO2) by 1.2-8.4 mm Hg throughout exercise (p < 0.001). The peak and mean power outputs, and blood [La] accumulation were not significantly different between the conditions. However, a significant condition × time interaction existed for peak power (p = 0.035) and mean power (p = 0.023), demonstrating an attenuation in power decrement in later sprint sets with hyperventilation. In conclusion, hyperventilation implemented during recovery intervals of repeated sprint pedaling attenuated performance decrements in later exercise bouts that was associated with substantial metabolic acidosis. The practical implication is that hyperventilation may have a strategic role for enhancing training effectiveness and may give an edge in performance outcomes.

  14. Transient CNS responses to repeated binge ethanol treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zahr, Natalie M; Rohlfing, Torsten; Mayer, Dirk; Luong, Richard; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive changes occur in response to repeated exposure to drugs. Although ethanol (EtOH) is known to induce pharmacokinetic tolerance, the effects of EtOH on in vivo, magnetic resonance (MR)-detectable brain measures across repeated exposures have not previously been reported. Of 28 rats weighing 341±22g at baseline, 15 were assigned to the EtOH group and 13 to the control (Ctrl) group. EtOH animals were exposed to 5 cycles of 4-days of EtOH treatment followed by 10 days of recovery. Rats in both groups had structural MR imaging (MRI) scans and whole brain MR spectroscopy (MRS) at baseline, immediately following each binge period, and after each recovery period (total=11 MR scans per rat). Average blood alcohol levels (BALs) across each of the 5, 4-day binge periods were 298, 300, 301, 312, 318 mg/dL. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes of the lateral ventricles and cisterns showed enlargement with each binge EtOH exposure but recovery with each abstinence period. Similarly, changes to MRS metabolites were transient: levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and total creatine (tCr) decreased, while those of choline-containing compounds (Cho) and glutamate/glutamine (Glx) increased with each binge EtOH exposure cycle, but also recovered during each abstinence period. The directionality of changes in response to EtOH were in expected directions based on previous, single-binge EtOH exposure experiments, but the current results do not provide support for accruing pathology with repeated binge EtOH exposure. PMID:26283309

  15. IMHEX fuel cell repeat component manufacturing continuous improvement accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Jakaitis, L.A.; Petraglia, V.J.; Bryson, E.S.

    1996-12-31

    M-C Power is taking a power generation technology that has been proven in the laboratory and is making it a commercially competitive product. There are many areas in which this technology required scale up and refinement to reach the market entry goals for the IMHEX{reg_sign} molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. One of the primary areas that needed to be addressed was the manufacturing of the fuel cell stack. Up to this point, the fuel cell stack and associated components were virtually hand made for each system to be tested. M-C Power has now continuously manufactured the repeat components for three 250 kW stacks. M-C Power`s manufacturing strategy integrated both evolutionary and revolutionary improvements into its comprehensive commercialization effort. M-C Power`s objectives were to analyze and continuously improve stack component manufacturing and assembly techniques consistent with established specifications and commercial scale production requirements. Evolutionary improvements are those which naturally occur as the production rates are increased and experience is gained. Examples of evolutionary (learning curve) improvements included reducing scrap rates and decreasing raw material costs by buying in large quantities. Revolutionary improvements result in significant design and process changes to meet cost and performance requirements of the market entry system. Revolutionary changes often involve identifying new methods and developing designs to accommodate the new process. Based upon our accomplishments, M-C Power was able to reduce the cost of continuously manufactured fuel cell repeat components from the first to third 250 kW stack by 63%. This paper documents the continuous improvement accomplishments realized by M-C Power during IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell repeat component manufacturing.

  16. Repeated Nrf2 stimulation using sulforaphane protects fibroblasts from ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Sherin T.; Bergström, Petra; Hammarsten, Ola

    2014-05-01

    Most of the cytotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation is mediated by radical-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Cellular protection from free radicals can be stimulated several fold by sulforaphane-mediated activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 that regulates more than 50 genes involved in the detoxification of reactive substances and radicals. Here, we report that repeated sulforaphane treatment increases radioresistance in primary human skin fibroblasts. Cells were either treated with sulforaphane for four hours once or with four-hour treatments repeatedly for three consecutive days prior to radiation exposure. Fibroblasts exposed to repeated-sulforaphane treatment showed a more pronounced dose-dependent induction of Nrf2-regulated mRNA and reduced amount of radiation-induced free radicals compared with cells treated once with sulforaphane. In addition, radiation- induced DNA double-strand breaks measured by gamma-H2AX foci were attenuated following repeated sulforaphane treatment. As a result, cellular protection from ionizing radiation measured by the 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) assay was increased, specifically in cells exposed to repeated sulforaphane treatment. Sulforaphane treatment was unable to protect Nrf2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, indicating that the sulforaphane-induced radioprotection was Nrf2-dependent. Moreover, radioprotection by repeated sulforaphane treatment was dose-dependent with an optimal effect at 10 uM, whereas both lower and higher concentrations resulted in lower levels of radioprotection. Our data indicate that the Nrf2 system can be trained to provide further protection from radical damage. - Highlights: • Repeated treatment with sulforaphane protects fibroblasts from ionizing radiation • Repeated sulforaphane treatment attenuates radiation induced ROS and DNA damage • Sulforaphane mediated protection is Nrf2 dependent.

  17. [Blood loss in dialysis in repeatedly used capillary dialysators].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, U; Senf, L; Kleinert, P; Thieler, H; Marx, M

    1980-11-01

    The blood losses increase to the twofold to threefold by capillary dialysators C-DAK 4 and C-DAK 5 are about 6.8 ml and 26 ml, respectively, in the first use. In repeated use of the C-DAK 4 the blood losses by the C-DAK 5, however, are so high that it is not to be advised to use them manifold under our conditions of dialysis. By an increase of the reperfusion quantity from 150 to 250 ml of electrolyte solution for one C-DAK 4 blood losses may considerably be reduced. In a parallel switching of two C-DAK 4 each exemplar should be perfused individually.

  18. 47 CFR 90.247 - Mobile repeater stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mobile repeater stations. 90.247 Section 90.247... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.247 Mobile repeater stations. A... repeater to extend the communications range of hand-carried units subject to the following: (a)...

  19. The Effects of Repeated Readings on the Development of Lower Identification Skills of FL Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguchi, Etsuo

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the effects of repeated readings of a passage in a foreign language (English) on the ability of slow beginning readers at a Japanese university to increase their oral and silent reading rates. Results indicate that, for practice passages, silent reading rates increased significantly. This transfer of practice effects to a new passage…

  20. [The repeated biopsy in patients with lupus nephritis].

    PubMed

    Subils, Gisella; Alba, Paula; Gobbi, Carla; Astesana, Pablo; Babini, Alejandra; Albiero, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively studied patients with SLE according to ACR criteria, with NL who underwent a repeat renal biopsy from 2005 to 2012. We analyzed the main indications of renal biopsies, the histopathological Class and activity and chronicity changes. RESULTS The total number of patients with NL was 120, of which 18 (15%) patients underwent repeat renal biopsy, 18 had 2 renal biopsies and 6 had 3 biopsies. 3 (16.7%) patients were smokers; 1 (5.6%) had a history of previous DBT, 2 (11.1%) had a history of hypertension; and 3 (16.7%) patients had previous obesity. The duration of SLE was 15 ± 96 months; the time between the 1st and the 2nd biopsy was 45 ± 11 months and the time between the 2nd and 3rd biopsy was 56 ± 12 months. Indications for repeat biopsy were proteinuria in 10 biopsies (41.6%); proteinuria with impaired renal function in 2 biopsies (8.3%); proteinuria with pathological urine sediment in 8 (33.3%); . and pathological proteinuria with pathological urine sediment and impaired renal function in 4 biopsies (16.6%) The most frequent histological changes found between first and repeat biopsies were class IV to class III: 2 (8.2%) ; Class IV to Class IV: 8 (33.3%), class IV to class III + V: 2 (8.2%); class IV to class IV + V 3 (12.5%); class IV to class V: 2 (8.2%). Changes in NL biopsies with proliferative activity and chronicity indices (A / C) were: A to A / C: 7 (29.1%), A / C to A / C: 7 (29.1%). The immunosuppressive therapy was increased in 79.1% and 16.6% remained without changes. 20% patients received cyclophosphamide 1 g every 30 days, 26% Cyclophosphamide 500 mg every 15 days, 23% induction therapy with mycophenolate mofetil; 23% with Rituximab; 8% Cyclosporin A. Maintenance therapy with mycophenolate mofetil was performed in 87.5%; azathioprine in 1 case. Hydroxychloroquine was used in all cases.

  1. Chlamydia trachomatis among Youth - Testing Behaviour and Incidence of Repeat Testing in Stockholm County, Sweden 2010-2012

    PubMed Central

    Marrone, Gaetano; De Costa, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    Background Widespread testing and screening for genital Chlamydia trachomatis is often advocated as an important method to halt the epidemic. Sweden has long tradition of opportunistic screening services. Nevertheless infections rates have continued to rise over the past two decades, despite increased access to testing and treatment services. Methods In this retrospective cohort study we describe the testing behavior for genital Chlamydia trachomatis among youth in Stockholm County, with a focus on repeated testing. Specifically we (a) study positivity rates among single and repeat testers, we (b) estimate the incidence of repeat testing and the rates of infection in repeat testing episodes, and we (c) estimate time to repeat testing and factors associated with repeat testing. All youth (aged ≥12 and <26) that tested for Chlamydia trachomatis in one of 33 Youth Health Clinics in Stockholm County between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2012 were included in the study. Results The cohort comprised a total of 65,951 individuals who did 119,699 tests during the study period. 42% of youth were repeat testers, the incidence of repeat testing was 35.0/100 person years. The overall baseline prevalence was 7.9%. Positivity rates of baseline tests among repeat testers were nearly twice as high among single testers of either sex. These were 17.1% and 9.8% among male repeat and single testers respectively. The corresponding rates for women were 9.4% and 4.3%. Positivity rates among repeat tests did not decline compared to the overall baseline positivity. Baseline test result and sex significantly influenced the occurrence of repeat testing. Conclusion Among repeat testers we found high rates of Chlamydia trachomatis both at baseline and at repeat tests which suggests the possibility that this group might be continuing to engage in unsafe sexual practices. Given the extent of repeat testing and the high positivity rates on repeat testing, further research among this group is

  2. Who Repeats Algebra, and How Does Initial Performance Relate to Improvement When the Course Is Repeated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Anthony; Jaquet, Karina; Finkelstein, Neal

    2016-01-01

    The information provided in this report shows how students perform when they repeat algebra I and how the level of improvement varies depending on initial course performance and the academic measure (course grades or CST scores). This information can help inform decisions and policies regarding whether and under what circumstances students should…

  3. Repeat Testing Effects on Credentialing Exams: Are Repeaters Misinformed or Uninformed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Richard A.; Raymond, Mark R.; Haist, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    To mitigate security concerns and unfair score gains, credentialing programs routinely administer new test material to examinees retesting after an initial failing attempt. Counterintuitively, a small but growing body of recent research suggests that repeating the identical form does not create an unfair advantage. This study builds upon and…

  4. Novel mutational mechanism in man: Expansion of trinucleotide repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Ilarioshkin, S.N.; Ivanova-Smolenskaya, I.A.; Markova, E.D.

    1995-11-01

    An analysis of a novel, recently discovered class of mutations in man - an expansion, i.e., an increase of the copy number of intragenic unstable trinucleotide repeats - is presented. The expansion of trinucleotide X chromosome syndrome (two separate variants of the disease - FRAXA and FRAXE), myotonic dystrophy, spinal and bulbar Kennedy`s amyotrophy, Huntington`s chorea, type 1 spinocerebellar ataxia, and dentatorubral-pallidolyusian atrophy. The discovery of triplet expansion allows a satisfactory explanation on the molecular level of a series of unusual clinical genetic phenomena, such as anticipation, the {open_quotes}paternal transmission{close_quotes} effect, the {open_quotes}Sherman paradox,{close_quotes} and others. The common properties and the distinctions of unstable trinucleotide mutations in the nosologic forms mentioned above are analyzed comprehensively. These features include the mechanism by which these mutations cause disease, the time of their appearance in ontogenesis, and various clinical genetic correlations. The evolutionary origin of this class of mutations and, in particular, the role of alleles with an {open_quotes}intermediate{close_quotes} triplet number, which are the persistent reservoir of mutations arising de novo in a population, are also discussed. The possible implication of unstable trinucleotide repeats for a series of other hereditary diseases, such as type 2, spinocerebellar ataxia, Machado-Joseph disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia, essential tremor, schizophrenia, and others, is also suggested. 108 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Cybersickness Following Repeated Exposure to DOME and HMD Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Laura C.; Harm, Deborah L.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Reschke, Millard F.; Loftin, R. Bowen

    2011-01-01

    Virtual environments (VE) offer unique training opportunities, including training astronauts to preadapt them to the novel sensory conditions of microgravity. However, one unresolved issue with VE use is the occurrence of cybersickness during and following exposure to VE systems. Most individuals adapt and become less ill with repeated interaction with VEs. The goal of this investigation was to compare motion sickness symptoms (MSS) produced by dome and head-mounted (HMD) displays and to examine the effects of repeated exposures on MSS. Sixty-one subjects participated in the study. Three experimental sessions were performed each separated by one day. The subjects performed a navigation and pick and place task in either a dome or HMD VE. MSS were measured using a Simulator Sickness Questionnaire before, immediately after, and at 1, 2, 4 and 6 hours following exposure to the VEs. MSS data were normalized by calculating the natural log of each score and an analysis of variance was performed. We observed significant main effects for day and time and a significant day by time interaction for total sickness and for each of the subscales, nausea, oculomotor and disorientation. However, there was no significant main effect for device. In conclusion, subjects reported a large increase in MSS immediately following exposure to both the HMD and dome, followed by a rapid recovery across time. Sickness severity also decreased over days, which suggests that subjects become dual-adapted over time making VE training a viable pre-flight countermeasure for space motion sickness.

  6. Semiconductor structures for repeated velocity overshoot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. A., Jr.; Capasso, F.; Thornber, K. K.

    1982-12-01

    The conditions required for obtaining repeated velocity overshoot in semiconductors are discussed. Two classes of structures that provide these conditions are considered. The structures are seen as holding promise for achieving average drift velocities well in excess of the maximum steady-state velocity over distances ranging from submicron to tens of microns. In structures of the first class, the stairstep in potential is achieved by using a graded bandgap that is similar to the avalanche photodetector described by Williams et al. (1982), where the composition is graded from GaAs to Al(0.2)Ga(0.8)As. The second class of structures uses alternating planar doped charge sheets, as described by Malik et al. (1980).

  7. Design principles for efficient, repeated jumpgliding.

    PubMed

    Desbiens, Alexis Lussier; Pope, Morgan T; Christensen, David L; Hawkes, Elliot W; Cutkosky, Mark R

    2014-06-01

    Combined jumping and gliding locomotion, or 'jumpgliding', can be an efficient way for small robots or animals to travel over cluttered terrain. This paper presents functional requirements and models for a simple jumpglider which formalize the benefits and limitations of using aerodynamic surfaces to augment jumping ability. Analysis of the model gives insight into design choices and control strategies for higher performance and to accommodate special conditions such as a slippery launching surface. The model informs the design of a robotic platform that can perform repeated jumps using a carbon fiber spring and a pivoting wing. Experiments with two different versions of the platform agree with predictions from the model and demonstrate a significantly greater range, and lower cost-of-transport, than a comparable ballistic jumper.

  8. Simple sequence repeats in bryophyte mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao-Xian; Zhu, Rui-Liang; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are thought to be common in plant mitochondrial (mt) genomes, but have yet to be fully described for bryophytes. We screened the mt genomes of two liverworts (Marchantia polymorpha and Pleurozia purpurea), two mosses (Physcomitrella patens and Anomodon rugelii) and two hornworts (Phaeoceros laevis and Nothoceros aenigmaticus), and detected 475 SSRs. Some SSRs are found conserved during the evolution, among which except one exists in both liverworts and mosses, all others are shared only by the two liverworts, mosses or hornworts. SSRs are known as DNA tracts having high mutation rates; however, according to our observations, they still can evolve slowly. The conservativeness of these SSRs suggests that they are under strong selection and could play critical roles in maintaining the gene functions.

  9. [The repeat reliability of somatosensory evoked potentials].

    PubMed

    Strenge, H

    1989-09-01

    The test-immediate-retest reliability of latency and amplitude values of cervical and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) to median nerve stimulation was assessed in 86 normal subjects aged 15 to 71 years. In addition to the stability of data between repeat trials within one test session the standard errors of measurement and the interpretable differences for SEP measures were calculated according to measurement theory. The study revealed retest correlations rtt greater than 0.80 for all latency measures of the cervical and cortical SEPs and all cortical amplitude parameters. The highest stability was found for the latency measures of the cervical components P10, N11, N13, the cortical components P16 and N20 and for the amplitude N20/P25. PMID:2507277

  10. Trochlear Nerve Schwannoma With Repeated Intratumoral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Bao, Yuhai; Zhang, Wenchuan

    2016-09-01

    Trochlear nerve schwannoma is extremely rare, with only 35 pathologically confirmed patients being reported in the literature. Here, the authors report a patient of trochlear nerve schwannoma in the prepontine cistern manifesting as facial pain and double vision and presenting the image characteristics of repeated intratumoral hemorrhage, which has never been reported in the literature. Total tumor along with a portion of the trochlear nerve was removed by using a retrosigmoid approach. Facial pain disappeared after operation, and the diplopia remained. Follow-up studies have shown no tumor recurrence for 2 years and the simultaneous alleviation of diplopia. Information regarding the clinical presentation, radiological features and surgical outcomes of trochlear nerve schwannoma are discussed and reviewed in the paper. PMID:27607129

  11. Hybrid quantum repeater using bright coherent light.

    PubMed

    van Loock, P; Ladd, T D; Sanaka, K; Yamaguchi, F; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, W J; Yamamoto, Y

    2006-06-23

    We describe a quantum repeater protocol for long-distance quantum communication. In this scheme, entanglement is created between qubits at intermediate stations of the channel by using a weak dispersive light-matter interaction and distributing the outgoing bright coherent-light pulses among the stations. Noisy entangled pairs of electronic spin are then prepared with high success probability via homodyne detection and postselection. The local gates for entanglement purification and swapping are deterministic and measurement-free, based upon the same coherent-light resources and weak interactions as for the initial entanglement distribution. Finally, the entanglement is stored in a nuclear-spin-based quantum memory. With our system, qubit-communication rates approaching 100 Hz over 1280 km with fidelities near 99% are possible for reasonable local gate errors.

  12. Increasing the dimensions of metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Wilhelm; Blaesing-Bangert, Carola; Paul, Hans-Helmut

    1990-06-01

    In any process that generates or measures pattern-placement (overlay), these parameters need to be regarded at least as two-dimensional. We show this on our procedure bringing a mask repeater under statistical process control SPC). In order to increase the accuracy of the overlay measurement process itself, plate bending has to be included as a third dimension. By taking the third dimension into account, the LMS 2000 Metrology System significantly reduces the maximum uncertainity of measurement results.

  13. A pan-European study of the C9orf72 repeat associated with FTLD: geographic prevalence, genomic instability, and intermediate repeats.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Julie; Gijselinck, Ilse; Dillen, Lubina; Van Langenhove, Tim; Theuns, Jessie; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Philtjens, Stéphanie; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Sleegers, Kristel; Sieben, Anne; Bäumer, Veerle; Maes, Githa; Corsmit, Ellen; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Archetti, Silvana; Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, Gabriel; Pereira, Sónia; Pimentel, José; Nacmias, Benedetta; Bagnoli, Silvia; Sorbi, Sandro; Graff, Caroline; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Westerlund, Marie; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Llado, Albert; Gelpi, Ellen; Santana, Isabel; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Santiago, Beatriz; Frisoni, Giovanni; Zanetti, Orazio; Bonvicini, Cristian; Synofzik, Matthis; Maetzler, Walter; Vom Hagen, Jennifer Müller; Schöls, Ludger; Heneka, Michael T; Jessen, Frank; Matej, Radoslav; Parobkova, Eva; Kovacs, Gabor G; Ströbel, Thomas; Sarafov, Stayko; Tournev, Ivailo; Jordanova, Albena; Danek, Adrian; Arzberger, Thomas; Fabrizi, Gian Maria; Testi, Silvia; Salmon, Eric; Santens, Patrick; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Cras, Patrick; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; van der Zee, Julie; Gijselinck, Ilse; Dillen, Lubina; Van Langenhove, Tim; Theuns, Jessie; Philtjens, Stéphanie; Sleegers, Kristel; Bäumer, Veerle; Maes, Githa; Corsmit, Ellen; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; van der Zee, Julie; Gijselinck, Ilse; Dillen, Lubina; Van Langenhove, Tim; Philtjens, Stéphanie; Theuns, Jessie; Sleegers, Kristel; Bäumer, Veerle; Maes, Githa; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P; Cras, Patrick; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Archetti, Silvana; Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Synofzik, Matthis; Maetzler, Walter; Müller Vom Hagen, Jennifer; Schöls, Ludger; Synofzik, Matthis; Maetzler, Walter; Müller Vom Hagen, Jennifer; Schöls, Ludger; Heneka, Michael T; Jessen, Frank; Ramirez, Alfredo; Kurzwelly, Delia; Sachtleben, Carmen; Mairer, Wolfgang; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, Gabriel; Pereira, Sónia; Firmo, Clara; Pimentel, José; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Llado, Albert; Antonell, Anna; Molinuevo, Jose; Gelpi, Ellen; Graff, Caroline; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Westerlund, Marie; Graff, Caroline; Kinhult Ståhlbom, Anne; Thonberg, Håkan; Nennesmo, Inger; Börjesson-Hanson, Anne; Nacmias, Benedetta; Bagnoli, Silvia; Sorbi, Sandro; Bessi, Valentina; Piaceri, Irene; Santana, Isabel; Santiago, Beatriz; Santana, Isabel; Helena Ribeiro, Maria; Rosário Almeida, Maria; Oliveira, Catarina; Massano, João; Garret, Carolina; Pires, Paula; Frisoni, Giovanni; Zanetti, Orazio; Bonvicini, Cristian; Sarafov, Stayko; Tournev, Ivailo; Jordanova, Albena; Tournev, Ivailo; Kovacs, Gabor G; Ströbel, Thomas; Heneka, Michael T; Jessen, Frank; Ramirez, Alfredo; Kurzwelly, Delia; Sachtleben, Carmen; Mairer, Wolfgang; Jessen, Frank; Matej, Radoslav; Parobkova, Eva; Danel, Adrian; Arzberger, Thomas; Maria Fabrizi, Gian; Testi, Silvia; Ferrari, Sergio; Cavallaro, Tiziana; Salmon, Eric; Santens, Patrick; Cras, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    We assessed the geographical distribution of C9orf72 G(4) C(2) expansions in a pan-European frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) cohort (n = 1,205), ascertained by the European Early-Onset Dementia (EOD) consortium. Next, we performed a meta-analysis of our data and that of other European studies, together 2,668 patients from 15 Western European countries. The frequency of the C9orf72 expansions in Western Europe was 9.98% in overall FTLD, with 18.52% in familial, and 6.26% in sporadic FTLD patients. Outliers were Finland and Sweden with overall frequencies of respectively 29.33% and 20.73%, but also Spain with 25.49%. In contrast, prevalence in Germany was limited to 4.82%. In addition, we studied the role of intermediate repeats (7-24 repeat units), which are strongly correlated with the risk haplotype, on disease and C9orf72 expression. In vitro reporter gene expression studies demonstrated significantly decreased transcriptional activity of C9orf72 with increasing number of normal repeat units, indicating that intermediate repeats might act as predisposing alleles and in favor of the loss-of-function disease mechanism. Further, we observed a significantly increased frequency of short indels in the GC-rich low complexity sequence adjacent to the G(4) C(2) repeat in C9orf72 expansion carriers (P < 0.001) with the most common indel creating one long contiguous imperfect G(4) C(2) repeat, which is likely more prone to replication slippage and pathological expansion. PMID:23111906

  14. A pan-European study of the C9orf72 repeat associated with FTLD: geographic prevalence, genomic instability, and intermediate repeats.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Julie; Gijselinck, Ilse; Dillen, Lubina; Van Langenhove, Tim; Theuns, Jessie; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Philtjens, Stéphanie; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Sleegers, Kristel; Sieben, Anne; Bäumer, Veerle; Maes, Githa; Corsmit, Ellen; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Archetti, Silvana; Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, Gabriel; Pereira, Sónia; Pimentel, José; Nacmias, Benedetta; Bagnoli, Silvia; Sorbi, Sandro; Graff, Caroline; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Westerlund, Marie; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Llado, Albert; Gelpi, Ellen; Santana, Isabel; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Santiago, Beatriz; Frisoni, Giovanni; Zanetti, Orazio; Bonvicini, Cristian; Synofzik, Matthis; Maetzler, Walter; Vom Hagen, Jennifer Müller; Schöls, Ludger; Heneka, Michael T; Jessen, Frank; Matej, Radoslav; Parobkova, Eva; Kovacs, Gabor G; Ströbel, Thomas; Sarafov, Stayko; Tournev, Ivailo; Jordanova, Albena; Danek, Adrian; Arzberger, Thomas; Fabrizi, Gian Maria; Testi, Silvia; Salmon, Eric; Santens, Patrick; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Cras, Patrick; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; van der Zee, Julie; Gijselinck, Ilse; Dillen, Lubina; Van Langenhove, Tim; Theuns, Jessie; Philtjens, Stéphanie; Sleegers, Kristel; Bäumer, Veerle; Maes, Githa; Corsmit, Ellen; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; van der Zee, Julie; Gijselinck, Ilse; Dillen, Lubina; Van Langenhove, Tim; Philtjens, Stéphanie; Theuns, Jessie; Sleegers, Kristel; Bäumer, Veerle; Maes, Githa; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P; Cras, Patrick; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Archetti, Silvana; Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Synofzik, Matthis; Maetzler, Walter; Müller Vom Hagen, Jennifer; Schöls, Ludger; Synofzik, Matthis; Maetzler, Walter; Müller Vom Hagen, Jennifer; Schöls, Ludger; Heneka, Michael T; Jessen, Frank; Ramirez, Alfredo; Kurzwelly, Delia; Sachtleben, Carmen; Mairer, Wolfgang; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, Gabriel; Pereira, Sónia; Firmo, Clara; Pimentel, José; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Llado, Albert; Antonell, Anna; Molinuevo, Jose; Gelpi, Ellen; Graff, Caroline; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Westerlund, Marie; Graff, Caroline; Kinhult Ståhlbom, Anne; Thonberg, Håkan; Nennesmo, Inger; Börjesson-Hanson, Anne; Nacmias, Benedetta; Bagnoli, Silvia; Sorbi, Sandro; Bessi, Valentina; Piaceri, Irene; Santana, Isabel; Santiago, Beatriz; Santana, Isabel; Helena Ribeiro, Maria; Rosário Almeida, Maria; Oliveira, Catarina; Massano, João; Garret, Carolina; Pires, Paula; Frisoni, Giovanni; Zanetti, Orazio; Bonvicini, Cristian; Sarafov, Stayko; Tournev, Ivailo; Jordanova, Albena; Tournev, Ivailo; Kovacs, Gabor G; Ströbel, Thomas; Heneka, Michael T; Jessen, Frank; Ramirez, Alfredo; Kurzwelly, Delia; Sachtleben, Carmen; Mairer, Wolfgang; Jessen, Frank; Matej, Radoslav; Parobkova, Eva; Danel, Adrian; Arzberger, Thomas; Maria Fabrizi, Gian; Testi, Silvia; Ferrari, Sergio; Cavallaro, Tiziana; Salmon, Eric; Santens, Patrick; Cras, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    We assessed the geographical distribution of C9orf72 G(4) C(2) expansions in a pan-European frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) cohort (n = 1,205), ascertained by the European Early-Onset Dementia (EOD) consortium. Next, we performed a meta-analysis of our data and that of other European studies, together 2,668 patients from 15 Western European countries. The frequency of the C9orf72 expansions in Western Europe was 9.98% in overall FTLD, with 18.52% in familial, and 6.26% in sporadic FTLD patients. Outliers were Finland and Sweden with overall frequencies of respectively 29.33% and 20.73%, but also Spain with 25.49%. In contrast, prevalence in Germany was limited to 4.82%. In addition, we studied the role of intermediate repeats (7-24 repeat units), which are strongly correlated with the risk haplotype, on disease and C9orf72 expression. In vitro reporter gene expression studies demonstrated significantly decreased transcriptional activity of C9orf72 with increasing number of normal repeat units, indicating that intermediate repeats might act as predisposing alleles and in favor of the loss-of-function disease mechanism. Further, we observed a significantly increased frequency of short indels in the GC-rich low complexity sequence adjacent to the G(4) C(2) repeat in C9orf72 expansion carriers (P < 0.001) with the most common indel creating one long contiguous imperfect G(4) C(2) repeat, which is likely more prone to replication slippage and pathological expansion.

  15. Characterization of robotic system passive path repeatability during specimen removal and reinstallation for in vitro knee joint testing.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Mary T; Smith, Sean D; Jansson, Kyle S; LaPrade, Robert F; Wijdicks, Coen A

    2014-10-01

    Robotic testing systems are commonly utilized for the study of orthopaedic biomechanics. Quantification of system error is essential for reliable use of robotic systems. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify a 6-DOF robotic system's repeatability during knee biomechanical testing and characterize the error induced in passive path repeatability by removing and reinstalling the knee. We hypothesized removing and reinstalling the knee would substantially alter passive path repeatability. Testing was performed on four fresh-frozen cadaver knees. To determine repeatability and reproducibility, the passive path was collected three times per knee following the initial setup (intra-setup), and a single time following two subsequent re-setups (inter-setup). Repeatability was calculated as root mean square error. The intra-setup passive path had a position repeatability of 0.23 mm. In contrast, inter-setup passive paths had a position repeatability of 0.89 mm. When a previously collected passive path was replayed following re-setup of the knee, resultant total force repeatability across the passive path increased to 28.2N (6.4N medial-lateral, 25.4N proximal-distal, and 10.5 N anterior-posterior). This study demonstrated that removal and re-setup of a knee can have substantial, clinically significant changes on our system's repeatability and ultimately, accuracy of the reported results.

  16. The autolytic activity of the recombinant amidase of Staphylococcus saprophyticus is inhibited by its own recombinant GW repeats.

    PubMed

    Hell, Wolfgang; Reichl, Sylvia; Anders, Agnes; Gatermann, Sören

    2003-10-10

    The Aas (autolysin/adhesin of Staphylococcus saprophyticus) is a multifunctional surface protein containing two enzymatic domains an N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanine amidase, an endo-beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase, and two different regions of repetitive sequences, an N-terminal and a C-terminal repetitive domain. The C-terminal repetitive domain is built up by the repeats R1, R2 and R3, which interconnect the putative active centers of the amidase and glucosaminidase. To investigate the influence of the C-terminal repeats and the N-terminal repeats on the amidase activity, the repetitive domains and fragments of them were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The influence of the different fragments on the activity of the recombinant amidase of the Aas, consisting of the active center of the enzyme and repeat R1, was investigated in a turbidimetric microassay. The different fragments derived from the C-terminal repeats inhibited the amidase activity, while the N-terminal repeats did not influence the activity of the enzyme. The inhibiting activity increased with the number of GW repeats the recombinant fragment contained. Thus we conclude, that the C-terminal GW repeats and not the N-terminal repeats are necessary for the cell wall targeting and the autolytic function of the amidase.

  17. Methylation of C9orf72 expansion reduces RNA foci formation and dipeptide-repeat proteins expression in cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Peter O

    2016-01-26

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene is the most common genetic cause of both frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), together referred to as c9FTD/ALS. It has been suggested that a loss of C9orf72 protein expression, the formation of toxic RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins contribute to C9orf72-related diseases. Interestingly, it has been shown that trimethylation of histones and methylation of CpG islands near the repeat expansion may play a role in the pathogenesis c9FTD/ALS. Recently, methylation of expanded repeat itself has been reported. To further elucidate the mechanisms underlying these diseases, the influence of epigenetic modification in the repeat expansion on its pathogenic effect was assessed. Here, a reduced formation of toxic RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins upon methylation of the GGGGCC repeat in a cellular model of c9FTD/ALS is shown. Additionally, a novel methylcytosine-capture DNA hybridization immunoassay for semi-quantitative detection of the repeat methylation levels is presented, potentially usable for methylation analysis in patients carrying C9orf72 repeat expansion carriers as a diagnostic tool. Presented results suggest that increased level of pathogenic GGGGCC expansion methylation may be sufficient to alleviate the molecular pathology of the C9orf72-related diseases.

  18. In situ detection of tandem DNA repeat length

    SciTech Connect

    Yaar, R.; Szafranski, P.; Cantor, C.R.; Smith, C.L.

    1996-11-01

    A simple method for scoring short tandem DNA repeats is presented. An oligonucleotide target, containing tandem repeats embedded in a unique sequence, was hybridized to a set of complementary probes, containing tandem repeats of known lengths. Single-stranded loop structures formed on duplexes containing a mismatched (different) number of tandem repeats. No loop structure formed on duplexes containing a matched (identical) number of tandem repeats. The matched and mismatched loop structures were enzymatically distinguished and differentially labeled by treatment with S1 nuclease and the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Mutational dynamics of short tandem repeats in human genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borstnik, B.; Pumpernik, D.

    2004-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of short tandem repeats of nucleotide sequences of the human genome is studied. It is shown that a model due to which the evolutionary repeat dynamics consists of elongations and shortenings of the repeats, combined with point mutations, is degenerate in the sense that an ambiguity exists regarding the role of point mutations and slippage asymmetry. By introducing a measure of the correlations between the positions of the repeats along the DNA sequences we were able to remove the degeneracy and to show that the slippage events which are the main factor in repeat evolution exhibit more frequent shortenings than elongations.

  20. Locating tandem repeats in weighted sequences in proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Guo, Qing; Iliopoulos, Costas S

    2013-01-01

    A weighted biological sequence is a string in which a set of characters may appear at each position with respective probabilities of occurrence. We attempt to locate all the tandem repeats in a weighted sequence. A repeated substring is called a tandem repeat if each occurrence of the substring is directly adjacent to each other. By introducing the idea of equivalence classes in weighted sequences, we identify the tandem repeats of every possible length using an iterative partitioning technique. We also present the algorithm for recording the tandem repeats, and prove that the problem can be solved in O(n²) time. PMID:23815711

  1. Digital Genotyping of Macrosatellites and Multicopy Genes Reveals Novel Biological Functions Associated with Copy Number Variation of Large Tandem Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Quilez, Javier; Hasson, Dan; Borel, Christelle; Warburton, Peter; Sharp, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repeats are common in eukaryotic genomes, but due to difficulties in assaying them remain poorly studied. Here, we demonstrate the utility of Nanostring technology as a targeted approach to perform accurate measurement of tandem repeats even at extremely high copy number, and apply this technology to genotype 165 HapMap samples from three different populations and five species of non-human primates. We observed extreme variability in copy number of tandemly repeated genes, with many loci showing 5–10 fold variation in copy number among humans. Many of these loci show hallmarks of genome assembly errors, and the true copy number of many large tandem repeats is significantly under-represented even in the high quality ‘finished’ human reference assembly. Importantly, we demonstrate that most large tandem repeat variations are not tagged by nearby SNPs, and are therefore essentially invisible to SNP-based GWAS approaches. Using association analysis we identify many cis correlations of large tandem repeat variants with nearby gene expression and DNA methylation levels, indicating that variations of tandem repeat length are associated with functional effects on the local genomic environment. This includes an example where expansion of a macrosatellite repeat is associated with increased DNA methylation and suppression of nearby gene expression, suggesting a mechanism termed “repeat induced gene silencing”, which has previously been observed only in transgenic organisms. We also observed multiple signatures consistent with altered selective pressures at tandemly repeated loci, suggesting important biological functions. Our studies show that tandemly repeated loci represent a highly variable fraction of the genome that have been systematically ignored by most previous studies, copy number variation of which can exert functionally significant effects. We suggest that future studies of tandem repeat loci will lead to many novel insights into their role in

  2. Repeated predictable stress causes resilience against colitis-induced behavioral changes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ahmed M.; Jain, Piyush; Reichmann, Florian; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Farzi, Aitak; Schuligoi, Rufina; Holzer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with an increased risk of mental disorders and can be exacerbated by stress. In this study which was performed with male 10-week old C57Bl/6N mice, we used dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis to evaluate behavioral changes caused by intestinal inflammation, to assess the interaction between repeated psychological stress (water avoidance stress, WAS) and colitis in modifying behavior, and to analyze neurochemical correlates of this interaction. A 7-day treatment with DSS (2% in drinking water) decreased locomotion and enhanced anxiety-like behavior in the open field test and reduced social interaction. Repeated exposure to WAS for 7 days had little influence on behavior but prevented the DSS-induced behavioral disturbances in the open field and SI tests. In contrast, repeated WAS did not modify colon length, colonic myeloperoxidase content and circulating proinflammatory cytokines, parameters used to assess colitis severity. DSS-induced colitis was associated with an increase in circulating neuropeptide Y (NPY), a rise in the hypothalamic expression of cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA and a decrease in the hippocampal expression of NPY mRNA, brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA. Repeated WAS significantly decreased the relative expression of corticotropin-releasing factor mRNA in the hippocampus. The effect of repeated WAS to blunt the DSS-evoked behavioral disturbances was associated with a rise of circulating corticosterone and an increase in the expression of hypothalamic NPY mRNA. These results show that experimental colitis leads to a particular range of behavioral alterations which can be prevented by repeated WAS, a model of predictable chronic stress, while the severity of colitis remains unabated. We conclude that the mechanisms underlying the resilience effect of repeated WAS involves hypothalamic NPY and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. PMID:25414650

  3. ED Patients with Prolonged Complaints and Repeat ED Visits Have an Increased Risk of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Kristopher R.; Bahl, Rajiv; Marcinkowski, Nathan F.; Ammons, Katelyn R.; Akpunonu, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to explore associations between presenting chief complaints of prolonged symptomatology, patient usage of the emergency department (ED), and underlying depression so that emergency physicians may better target patients for depression screening. Methods A convenience sample of ED patients were administered the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) to assess for depression. We correlated completed BDI-II surveys to patient information including demographics, pertinent history of present illness information, and past medical history. Results Out of 425 participants screened, we identified complaints of two weeks or longer in 92 patients (22%). Of these patients, mild to severe depression was recognized in over half of the population (47), yet only nine patients reported a prior depression diagnosis. These 92 patients also visited the ED three times as frequently as those patients with more acute complaints (p<0.001). Finally, our study showed that patients with mild to severe depression had three times as many ED visits compared to patients with minimal or no depression (p<0.001). Conclusion Patients with complaints of symptomatology two weeks or longer are more likely to have underlying depression when presenting to the ED. Patients with three or more ED visits within the past year also have a greater incidence of underlying depression. We found a strong correlation between complaints with symptomatology of two weeks or longer and multiple ED visits, in which underlying depression may have contributed to these patients’ ED visits. PMID:27625727

  4. Tianeptine modulates amygdalar glutamate neurochemistry and synaptic proteins in rats subjected to repeated stress.

    PubMed

    Piroli, Gerardo G; Reznikov, Leah R; Grillo, Claudia A; Hagar, Janel M; Fadel, Jim R; Reagan, Lawrence P

    2013-03-01

    Stress is a common environmental factor associated with depressive illness and the amygdala is thought to be integral for this association. For example, repeated stress impairs amygdalar neuroplasticity in rodents and these defects parallel amygdalar deficits in depressive illness patients. Because the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate is important in neuroplasticity, we hypothesized that alterations in amygdalar glutamatergic systems may serve as key players in depressive illness. Moreover, restoration of amygdalar glutamatergic systems may serve as important therapeutic targets in the successful management of multiple stress-related mood disorders. To address these hypotheses, we measured glutamate efflux in the basolateral and central amygdalar complexes via in vivo microdialysis, as well as the expression of synaptic proteins that regulate vesicular glutamate packaging and release, in rats subjected to repeated stress and treated daily with saline or the antidepressant tianeptine. Glutamate efflux was significantly reduced in the central amygdalar complex of animals subjected to repeated stress. In addition, repeated stress nearly eliminated amygdalar vGLUT2 expression, thereby proving a potential mechanism through which repeated stress impairs amygdalar glutamate neurochemistry. These stress-induced changes in glutamate efflux and vGLUT2 expression were inhibited by daily tianeptine administration. Moreover, tianeptine administration increased the vesicular localization of SNAP-25, which could account for the ability of tianeptine to modify glutamatergic tone in non-stressed control rats. Collectively, these results demonstrate that repeated stress differentially affects amygdalar glutamate systems and further supports our previous studies indicating that tianeptine's antidepressant efficacy may involve targeting amygdalar glutatamatergic systems.

  5. Novel Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat Variants Detected Through the Use of Massively Parallel Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Warshauer, David H.; Churchill, Jennifer D.; Novroski, Nicole; King, Jonathan L.; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technology is capable of determining the sizes of short tandem repeat (STR) alleles as well as their individual nucleotide sequences. Thus, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the repeat regions of STRs and variations in the pattern of repeat units in a given repeat motif can be used to differentiate alleles of the same length. In this study, MPS was used to sequence 28 forensically-relevant Y-chromosome STRs in a set of 41 DNA samples from the 3 major U.S. population groups (African Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics). The resulting sequence data, which were analyzed with STRait Razor v2.0, revealed 37 unique allele sequence variants that have not been previously reported. Of these, 19 sequences were variations of documented sequences resulting from the presence of intra-repeat SNPs or alternative repeat unit patterns. Despite a limited sampling, two of the most frequently-observed variants were found only in African American samples. The remaining 18 variants represented allele sequences for which there were no published data with which to compare. These findings illustrate the great potential of MPS with regard to increasing the resolving power of STR typing and emphasize the need for sample population characterization of STR alleles. PMID:26391384

  6. Repeatability of phasic muscle activity: performance of surface and intramuscular wire electrodes in gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Kadaba, M P; Wootten, M E; Gainey, J; Cochran, G V

    1985-01-01

    Repeatability is an important consideration for gait analysis data that are being used as an adjunct to clinical decision making. An index of repeatability may be based on a statistical criterion (variance ratio) that reflects similarity of wave forms over a number of identical cycles. The purpose of this study was to use the variance ratio to assess the repeatability of phasic muscle activity recorded with surface and bipolar intramuscular wire electrodes during gait on 10 normal subjects. Variance ratios were calculated using rectified and smoothed electromyographic data recorded simultaneously from the two types of electrodes. Three measures of repeatability (reproducibility, reliability, and constancy--defined as the cycle-to-cycle, run-to-run, and day-to-day repeatability of phasic muscle activity) were used to compare the performance of the two electrode techniques. Results show that the reproducibility and reliability were better for surface electrodes than for intramuscular wire electrodes, and constancy was good for surface electrodes and poor for intramuscular wire electrodes. Repeatability improved with increasing smoothing window lengths but was better for surface electrodes than wire electrodes, irrespective of the smoothing window. This study indicates that surface electrode data represent a more consistent measure of activity of superficial muscles, if comparisons are to be made between gait data from different test days.

  7. DNA CTG triplet repeats involved in dynamic mutations of neurologically related gene sequences form stable duplexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. K.; Jie, J.; Fox, G. E.; Gao, X.

    1995-01-01

    DNA triplet repeats, 5'-d(CTG)n and 5'-d(CAG)n, are present in genes which have been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders. To investigate possible stable structures formed by these repeating sequences, we have examined d(CTG)n, d(CAG)n and d(CTG).d(CAG)n (n = 2 and 3) using NMR and UV optical spectroscopy. These studies reveal that single stranded (CTG)n (n > 2) forms stable, antiparallel helical duplexes, while the single stranded (CAG)n requires at least three repeating units to form a duplex. NMR and UV melting experiments show that the Tm increases in the order of [(CAG)3]2 < [(CTG)3]2 << (CAG)3.(CTG)3. The (CTG)3 duplex is stable and exhibits similar NMR spectra in solutions containing 0.1-4 M NaCl and at a pH range from 4.6 to 8.8. The (CTG)3 duplex, which contains multiple-T.T mismatches, displays many NMR spectral characteristics similar to those of B-form DNA. However, unique NOE and 1H-31P coupling patterns associated with the repetitive T.T mismatches in the CTG repeats are discerned. These results, in conjunction with recent in vitro studies suggest that longer CTG repeats may form hairpin structures, which can potentially cause interruption in replication, leading to dynamic expansion or deletion of triplet repeats.

  8. A Repeated Impact Method and Instrument to Evaluate the Impact Fatigue Property of Drillpipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuanhua; Li, Qiang; Sun, Yongxing; Zhu, Hongjun; Zhou, Ying; Xie, Juan; Shi, Taihe

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that drillpipe failures are a pendent problem in drilling engineering. Most of drillpipe failures are low amplitude-repeated impact fatigue failures. The traditional method is using Charpy impact test to describe the fracture property of drillpipe, but it cannot veritably characterize the impact fatigue property of drillpipe under low amplitude-repeated impact. Based on the Charpy impact and other methods, a repeated impact method and instrument have been proposed to simulate the low amplitude-repeated impact of downhole conditions for drillpipe. Then, a series of tests have been performed using this instrument. Test results demonstrate the drillpipe upset transition area nonhomogeneity is more severe than drillpipe body, which is the key factor that leads to washout and fracture frequently of it. As the one time impact energy increases, the repeated impact times decrease exponentially, therefore, the rotational speed has a great effect on the fatigue life of drillpipe, and it is vital to select a suitable rotational speed for drilling jobs. In addition, based on SEM fractographs we found that the fracture surface of repeated impact is similar to the fatigue fracture, and there are many low cycle fatigue characteristic features on fracture surface that reveal very good agreement with the features of drillpipe fatigue failures in the field.

  9. The expansion of amino-acid repeats is not associated to adaptive evolution in mammalian genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The expansion of amino acid repeats is determined by a high mutation rate and can be increased or limited by selection. It has been suggested that recent expansions could be associated with the potential of adaptation to new environments. In this work, we quantify the strength of this association, as well as the contribution of potential confounding factors. Results Mammalian positively selected genes have accumulated more recent amino acid repeats than other mammalian genes. However, we found little support for an accelerated evolutionary rate as the main driver for the expansion of amino acid repeats. The most significant predictors of amino acid repeats are gene function and GC content. There is no correlation with expression level. Conclusions Our analyses show that amino acid repeat expansions are causally independent from protein adaptive evolution in mammalian genomes. Relaxed purifying selection or positive selection do not associate with more or more recent amino acid repeats. Their occurrence is slightly favoured by the sequence context but mainly determined by the molecular function of the gene. PMID:20021652

  10. Studies of an expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, P.; Wang, S.; Merry, D.

    1994-09-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by expansion of a trinucleotide repeat in the androgen receptor gene (AR{sup exp}). AR{sup exp} repeats expand further or contract in approximately 25% of transmissions. Analogous {open_quotes}dynamic mutations{close_quotes} have been reported in other expanded trinucleotide repeat disorders. We have been developing a mouse model of this disease using a transgenic approach. Expression of the SBMA AR was documented in transgenic mice with an inducible promoter. No phenotypic effects of transgene expression were observed. We have extended our previous results on stability of the expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice in two lines carrying AR{sup exp}. Tail DNA was amplified by PCR using primers spanning the repeat on 60 AR{sup exp} transgenic mice from four different transgenic lines. Migration of the PCR product through an acrylamide gel showed no change of the 45 CAG repeat length in any progeny. Similarly, PCR products from 23 normal repeat transgenics showed no change from the repeat length of the original construct. Unlike the disease allele in humans, the expanded repeat AR cDNA in transgenic mice showed no change in repeat length with transmission. The relative stability of CAG repeats seen in the transgenic mice may indicate either differences in the fidelity of replicative enzymes, or differences in error identification and repair between mice and humans. Integration site or structural properties of the transgene itself might also play a role.

  11. Analysis of separate isolates of Bordetella pertussis repeated DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    McPheat, W L; Hanson, J H; Livey, I; Robertson, J S

    1989-06-01

    Two independent isolates of a Bordetella pertussis repeated DNA unit were sequenced and shown to be an insertion sequence element with five nucleotide differences between the two copies. The sequences were 1053 bp in length with near-perfect terminal inverted repeats of 28 bp, had three open reading frames, and were each flanked by short direct repeats. The two insertion sequences showed considerable homology to two other B. pertussis repeated DNA sequences reported recently: IS481 and a 530 bp repeated DNA unit. The B. pertussis insertion sequence would appear to comprise a group of closely related sequences differing mainly in flanking direct repeats and the terminal inverted repeats. The two isolates reported here, which were from the adenylate cyclase and agglutinogen 2 regions of the genome, were numbered IS48lvl and IS48lv2 respectively. PMID:2559151

  12. Neonatal handling and gender modulate brain monoamines and plasma corticosterone levels following repeated stressors in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Panagiotaropoulos, Theofanis; Pondiki, Stavroula; Papaioannou, Agapi; Alikaridis, Filaretos; Stamatakis, Antonis; Gerozissis, Kyriaki; Stylianopoulou, Fotini

    2004-01-01

    Neonatal handling affects the response to repeated stress in a sexually dimorphic manner. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these gender-dependent effects, we investigated the consequences of neonatal androgenization and handling on adult stress reactivity by determining: (a) immobility time during repeated forced swimming, (b) plasma corticosterone levels, and (c) brain serotonin and dopamine levels and turnover after either repeated forced swimming, or repeated forced swimming followed by repeated restraint stress. In neonatally androgenized females, immobility time was lower in the handled than in the non-handled rats, a pattern resembling that of the males, suggesting that the sexually dimorphic effect of handling on immobility time can be attributed to the organizational effects of testosterone. No differences were found between androgenized females and females injected neonatally with vehicle, indicating that the gender differences in circulating corticosterone are not due to the organizational effects of testosterone. The stress of a neonatal injection interacted with neonatal handling resulting in lower plasma corticosterone and hypothalamic dopamine and serotonin levels in the neonatally injected handled animals following repeated forced swimming. The serotonergic system appears to be sensitive to both the organizational actions of testosterone and the effects of handling, since handled androgenized females had higher serotonin levels and decreased turnover following repeated forced swimming stress, compared to those injected neonatally with vehicle. Handling resulted in increased hypothalamic and striatal serotonin levels in both males and females following repeated forced swimming. Our results reveal that handling has gender-dependent effects on adult hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and brain monoaminergic system reactivity to stress and that these effects can be attributed to both the organizational and activational effects of gonadal

  13. Repeated Job Strain and the Risk of Depression: Longitudinal Analyses From the Whitehall II Study

    PubMed Central

    Shipley, Martin J.; Head, Jenny; Fuhrer, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We addressed whether repeated job strain and low work social support increase the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods. We used work characteristics from Karasek’s Job Strain model, measured on 3 occasions over 10 years in a cohort of 7732 British civil servants, to predict subsequent onset of MDD with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Results. Repeated job strain was associated with increased risk of MDD (odds ratio [OR] = 2.19; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.48, 3.26; high job strain on 2 of 3 occasions vs none) in a fully adjusted model. Repeated low work social support was associated with MDD (OR = 1.61; 95% CI = 1.10, 2.37; low work social support on 2 of 3 occasions vs none). Repeated job strain remained associated with MDD after adjustment for earlier psychological distress. Conclusions. Demonstration of an increased association for repeated job strain adds to the evidence that job strain is a risk factor for depression. Recognition and alleviation of job strain through work reorganization and staff training could reduce depression in employees. PMID:23078508

  14. Reactivity to nicotine cues over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

    PubMed

    LaRowe, Steven D; Saladin, Michael E; Carpenter, Matthew J; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P

    2007-12-01

    The present study investigated whether reactivity to nicotine-related cues would attenuate across four experimental sessions held 1 week apart. Participants were nineteen non-treatment seeking, nicotine-dependent males. Cue reactivity sessions were performed in an outpatient research center using in vivo cues consisting of standardized smoking-related paraphernalia (e.g., cigarettes) and neutral comparison paraphernalia (e.g., pencils). Craving ratings were collected before and after both cue presentations while physiological measures (heart rate, skin conductance) were collected before and during the cue presentations. Although craving levels decreased across sessions, smoking-related cues consistently evoked significantly greater increases in craving relative to neutral cues over all four experimental sessions. Skin conductance was higher in response to smoking cues, though this effect was not as robust as that observed for craving. Results suggest that, under the described experimental parameters, craving can be reliably elicited over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

  15. Temporal decorrelation in repeat pass-radar interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villasenor, John; Zebker, Howard

    1992-01-01

    Correlation in pass-to-pass, interferometric radar can be degraded by thermal noise, lack of parallelism between the radar flight tracks, spatial baseline noise, and surficial change. The effects of decorrelation due to thermal noise can be easily evaluated and removed, while those due slight angular changes between flight tracks are negligible for data acquired using near-repeat orbits. Empirical results obtained using images of Death Valley confirm that as the baseline increases, the overall correlation decreases due to spatial baseline noise. It is shown that areas of Cottonball Basin in Death Valley remained unchanged over the three-week period for which data was obtained, while a heavily forested area in Oregon exhibited significant temporal decorrelation. Lava in central Oregon also appeared to decorrelate. The results demonstrate that generation of height maps of heavily vegetated areas using pass-to-pass interferometry is practical, provided that the time between passes is at most several weeks.

  16. Requiring Clinical Justification to Override Repeat Imaging Decision Support: Impact on CT Use

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Stacy D.; Sodickson, Aaron D.; Ip, Ivan K.; Raja, Ali S.; Healey, Michael J.; Schneider, Louise I.; Khorasani, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of requiring clinical justification to override decision support alerts on repeat use of CT. SUBJECTS AND METHODS This before and after intervention study was conducted at a 793-bed tertiary hospital with computerized physician order entry and clinical decision support systems. When a CT order is placed, decision support alerts the orderer if the patient’s same body part has undergone CT within the past 90 days. The study cohort included all 28,420 CT orders triggering a repeat alert in 2010. The intervention required clinical justification, selected from a predetermined menu, to override repeat CT decision support alerts to place a CT order; otherwise the order could not be placed and was dropped. The primary outcome, dropped repeat CT orders, was analyzed using three methods: chi-square tests to compare proportions dropped before and after intervention; multiple logistic regression tests to control for orderer, care setting, and patient factors; and statistical process control for temporal trends. RESULTS The repeat CT order drop rate had an absolute increase of 1.4%; 6.1% (682/11,230) before to 7.5% (1290/17,190) after intervention, which was a 23% relative change (7.5 – 6.1) / 6.1 × 100 = 23%; p < 0.0001). Orders were dropped more often after intervention (odds ratio, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1–1.4; p < 0.0001). Statistical control analysis supported the association between the increase in the drop rate with intervention rather than underlying trends. CONCLUSION Adding a requirement for clinical justification to override alerts modestly but significantly improves the impact of repeat CT decision support (23% relative change), with the overall effect of preventing one in 13 repeat CT orders. PMID:25341162

  17. Molecular tandem repeat strategy for elucidating mechanical properties of high-strength proteins.

    PubMed

    Jung, Huihun; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Saadat, Alham; Sebastian, Aswathy; Kim, Dong Hwan; Hamilton, Reginald F; Albert, Istvan; Allen, Benjamin D; Demirel, Melik C

    2016-06-01

    Many globular and structural proteins have repetitions in their sequences or structures. However, a clear relationship between these repeats and their contribution to the mechanical properties remains elusive. We propose a new approach for the design and production of synthetic polypeptides that comprise one or more tandem copi