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Sample records for alumina scale spallation

  1. Moisture-Induced Alumina Scale Spallation: The Hydrogen Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2010-01-01

    For some time the oxidation community has been concerned with interfacial spallation of protective alumina scales, not just upon immediate cool down, but as a time-delayed phenomenon. Moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) and desktop spallation (DTS) of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) refer to this process. It is most apparent for relatively adherent alumina scales that have survived initial cool down in a dry environment, have built up considerable thickness and strain energy, and have been somewhat damaged, such as by cyclic oxidation cracking. Indeed, a "sensitive zone" can be described that maximizes the observed effect as a function of all the relevant factors. Moisture has been postulated to serve as a source of interfacial hydrogen embrittlement. Hydrogen is derived from reaction with aluminum in the alloy at an exposed interface. The purpose of this monograph is to trace the close analogy of this phenomenon to other hydrogen-induced effects, such as embrittlement of aluminides and blistering of alloys and anodic alumina films. A formalized, top-down, logic-tree structure is presented as a guide to this discussion. A theoretical basis for interfacial weakening by hydrogen is first cited, as are demonstrations of hydrogen detection as a reaction product or interfacial species. Further support is provided by critical experiments that recreate the moisture effect, but by isolating hydrogen from other potential causative factors. These experiments include tests in H 2-containing atmospheres or cathodic hydrogen charging. Accordingly, they strongly indicate that interfacial hydrogen, derived from moisture, is the key chemical species accounting for delayed alumina scale spallation.

  2. Moisture-Induced Alumina Scale Spallation: The Hydrogen Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2009-01-01

    For some time our community has been concerned with interfacial spallation of protective alumina scales, not just upon immediate cooldown, but as a time-delayed phenomenon. Moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) and desktop spallation (DTS) of TBC's refer to this process. It is most apparent for relatively adherent alumina scales that have survived cool down in a dry environment, built up considerable thickness and strain energy, and have been somewhat damaged, such as by cyclic oxidation cracking. Indeed, a "sweet zone" can be defined that maximizes the observed effect as a function of all the relevant factors. Moisture has been postulated to serve as a source of interfacial hydrogen embrittlement derived from reaction with aluminum in the alloy at an exposed interface. The purpose of this monograph is to trace the close analogy of this phenomenon to other hydrogen effects, such as embrittlement of aluminides and blistering of alloys and anodic alumina films. A formalized, top-down, logic tree structure is presented as a guide to this discussion. A theoretical basis for interfacial weakening by hydrogen is first cited, as are demonstrations of hydrogen as a reaction product or detected interfacial species. Further support is provided by critical experiments that produce the same moisture effect, but by isolating hydrogen from other potential causative factors. These experiments include tests in H2-containing atmospheres or cathodic hydrogen charging.

  3. Sulfur and Moisture Effects on Alumina Scale and TBC Spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2007-01-01

    It has been well established that a few ppmw sulfur impurity may segregate to the interface of thermally grown alumina scales and the underlying substrate, resulting in bond degradation and premature spallation. This has been shown for NiAl and NiCrAl-based alloys, bare single crystal superalloys, or coated superalloys. The role of reactive elements (especially Y) has been to getter the sulfur in the bulk and preclude interfacial segregation. Pt additions are also very beneficial, however a similar thermodynamic explanation does not apply. The purpose of the present discussion is to highlight some observations of these effects on Rene'142, Rene'N5, PWA1480, and PWA1484. For PWA1480, we have mapped cyclic oxidation and spallation in terms of potential sulfur interfacial layers and found that a cumulative amount of about one monolayer is sufficient to degrade long term adhesion. Depending on substrate thickness, optimum performance occurs if sulfur is reduced below about 0.2-0.5 ppmw. This is accomplished in the laboratory by hydrogen annealing or commercially by melt-fluxing. Excellent 1150 C cyclic oxidation is thus demonstrated for desulfurized Rene'142, Rene'N5, and PWA1484. Alternatively, a series of N5 alloys provided by GE-AE have shown that as little as 15 ppmw of Y dopant was effective in providing remarkable scale adhesion. In support of a Y-S gettering mechanism, hydrogen annealing was unable to desulfurize these alloys from their initial level of 5 ppmw S. This impurity and critical doping level corresponds closely to YS or Y2S3 stoichiometry. In many cases, Y-doped alloys or alloys with marginal sulfur levels exhibit an oxidative sensitivity to the ambient humidity called Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation (MIDS). After substantial scale growth, coupled with damage from repeated cycling, cold samples may spall after a period of time, breathing on them, or immersing them in water. While stress corrosion arguments may apply, we propose that the underlying

  4. Moisture-Induced Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal expansion mismatch stresses and interfacial sulfur activity are the major factors producing primary Al2O3 scale spallation on high temperature alloys. However, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but often dramatic, illustration of an additional mechanistic detail. A historical review of delayed failure of alumina scales and TBC s on superalloys is presented herein. Similarities with metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al+3H2O=Al(OH)3+3H(+)+3e(-), is the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, applied to Rene N5 pre-oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 1-hr cycles, and monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Here cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the electrolyte alone produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. These experiments thus highlight the detrimental effects of hydrogen charging on alumina scale adhesion. It is proposed that interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is produced by moist air and is the root cause of both moisture-induced, delayed scale spallation and desktop TBC failures.

  5. Moisture-Induced Delayed Alumina Scale Spallation on a Ni(Pt)Al Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2009-01-01

    Delayed interfacial scale failure takes place after cooling for samples of a Ni(Pt)Al-coated CMSX4 single crystal superalloy, cycled at 1150 C for up to 2000 hr. One sample exhibited premature coating grain boundary wrinkling, alumina scale spallation to bare metal, and a final weight loss of 3.3 mg/cm2 . Spallation under ambient conditions was monitored with time after cooldown and was found to continue for 24 hr. This produced up to 0.05 mg/cm2 additional loss for each hold, accumulating 0.7 mg/cm 2 (20 percent of the total) over the course of the test. After test termination, water immersion produced an additional 0.15 mg/cm2 loss. (A duplicate sample produced much less wrinkling and time dependent spalling, maintaining a net weight gain.) The results are consistent with the general phenomena of moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) of mature, distressed alumina scales formed on oxidation resistant M-Al alloys. Relative ambient humidity is discussed as the factor controlling adsorbed moisture, reaction with the substrate, and hydrogen effects on interface strength.

  6. Delayed Alumina Scale Spallation on Rene'n5+y: Moisture Effects and Acoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    2001-01-01

    The single crystal superalloy Rene'N5 (with or without Y-doping and hydrogen annealing) was cyclically oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 hours. After considerable scale growth (>= 500 hours), even the adherent alumina scales formed on Y-doped samples exhibited delayed interfacial spallation during subsequent water immersion tests, performed up to one year after oxidation. Spallation was characterized by weight loss, the amount of spalled area, and acoustic emission response. Hydrogen annealing (prior to oxidation) reduced spallation both before and after immersion, but without measurably reducing the bulk sulfur content of the Y-doped alloys. The duration and frequency of sequential, co-located acoustic emission events implied an interfacial crack growth rate at least 10(exp -3) m/s, but possibly higher than 10(exp 2) m/s. This is much greater than classic moisture-assisted slow crack growth rates in bulk alumina (10(exp -6) to 10(exp -3) m/s), which may still have occurred undetected by acoustic emission. An alternative failure sequence is proposed: an incubation process for preferential moisture ingress leads to a local decrease in interfacial toughness, thus allowing fast fracture driven by stored strain energy.

  7. The influence of interfacial toughness, as influenced by sulfur and reactive elements, and stress on the cracking and spallation of alumina scales from metallic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarioglu, Cevat

    1998-12-01

    Ni-based superalloys, such as single crystal PWA 1480 and 1484, are being used in aircraft engines as turbine blades and vanes. Fe-base alloys (FeCrAl) are used in automobiles (in catalytic converters) and in high temperature furnaces as heating elements. The protection of these alloys against oxidation is provided by the formation of a slow-growing alumina scale. The adherence of the alumina scale to the alloy is necessary to maintain the oxidation resistance under isothermal and cyclic conditions. It has been established that small additions of reactive elements (Y, Hf and Ce) and removal of impurities such as sulfur from the alloy substantially improve the adherence of the alumina layer to the alloy. Despite a significant amount of research over the past 50 years, there is still much controversy regarding the detailed mechanisms responsible for the improvement of the adherence. Following previous research reported in the literature, a program was carried out to investigate the factors which affect the adherence or cracking and spallation of protective alumina scale and how the reactive elements and sulfur content affect these factors for Ni-based superalloys (PWA 1480, 1484) and Fe-based alloys (FeCrAl, +Ti, +Y). New advanced techniques such as high resolution SEM, EDS, TEM, STEM, and XRD techniques have been employed to elucidate the "reactive element" and "sulfur" effects. Also, state of the art XRD equipment has been used to measure the strain or stress in the alumina scale at room temperature and at high temperature. The adhesion of the alumina scale to alloys was measured using indentation testing such as Rockwell C. It was found that the major benefit of adding a reactive element is to tie up sulfur in the alloy and lower residual sulfur which is free to segregate to the alumina/alloy interface. Residual sulfur in the alloy diffuses to the intact alloy/alumina interfaces and voids, resulting in weakening of an otherwise strong interfacial bond. Classical

  8. Surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, Elizabeth V; Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenning; Stevenson, Jeffry W; Surdoval, Wayne; Khaleel, Mohammad A

    2013-07-16

    A surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation is disclosed. The surface modification includes a ferritic stainless steel substrate having a modified surface. A cross-section of the modified surface exhibits a periodic morphology. The periodic morphology does not exceed a critical buckling length, which is equivalent to the length of a wave attribute observed in the cross section periodic morphology. The modified surface can be created using at least one of the following processes: shot peening, surface blasting and surface grinding. A coating can be applied to the modified surface.

  9. Stress determination in thermally grown alumina scales using ruby luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Renusch, D.; Veal, B.W.; Koshelev, I.; Natesan, K.; Grimsditch; Hou, P.Y.

    1996-06-01

    By exploiting the strain dependence of the ruby luminescence line, we have measured the strain in alumina scales thermally grown on Fe-Cr- Al alloys. Results are compared and found to be reasonably consistent with strains determined using x rays. Oxidation studies were carried out on alloys Fe - 5Cr - 28Al and Fe - 18Cr - 10Al (at.%). Significantly different levels of strain buildup were observed in scales on these alloys. Results on similar alloys containing a ``reactive element`` (Zr or Hf) in dilute quantity are also presented. Scales on alloys containing a reactive element (RE) can support significantly higher strains than scales on RE-free alloys. With the luminescence technique, strain relief associated with spallation thresholds is readily observed.

  10. Sulfur Impurities and the Microstructure of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between the microstructure of alumina scales, adhesion, and sulfur content was examined through a series of nickel alloys oxidized in 1100 to 1200 deg. C cyclic or isothermal exposures in air. In cyclic tests of undoped NiCrAl, adhesion was produced when the sulfur content was reduced, without any change in scale microstructure. Although interfacial voids were not observed in cyclic tests of NiCrAl, they were promoted by long-term isothermal exposures, by sulfur doping, and in most exposures of NiAl. Two single crystal superalloys, PWA 1480 and Rene' N5, were also tested, either in the as-received condition or after the sulfur content had been reduced to less than 1 ppmw by hydrogen annealing. The unannealed alloys always exhibited spalling to bare metal, but interfacial voids were not observed consistently. Desulfurized PWA 1480 and Rene' N5 exhibited remarkable adhesion and no voidage for either isothermal or cyclic exposures. The most consistent microstructural feature was that, for the cases where voids did form, the scale undersides exhibited corresponding areas with ridged oxide grain boundaries. Voids were not required for spallation nor were other microstructural features essential for adhesion. These observations are consistent with the model whereby scale spallation is controlled primarily by interfacial sulfur segregation and the consequent degradation of oxide-metal bonding.

  11. GRAIN-SCALE FAILURE IN THERMAL SPALLATION DRILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, S C; Lomov, I; Roberts, J J

    2012-01-19

    Geothermal power promises clean, renewable, reliable and potentially widely-available energy, but is limited by high initial capital costs. New drilling technologies are required to make geothermal power financially competitive with other energy sources. One potential solution is offered by Thermal Spallation Drilling (TSD) - a novel drilling technique in which small particles (spalls) are released from the rock surface by rapid heating. While TSD has the potential to improve drilling rates of brittle granitic rocks, the coupled thermomechanical processes involved in TSD are poorly described, making system control and optimization difficult for this drilling technology. In this paper, we discuss results from a new modeling effort investigating thermal spallation drilling. In particular, we describe an explicit model that simulates the grain-scale mechanics of thermal spallation and use this model to examine existing theories concerning spalling mechanisms. We will report how borehole conditions influence spall production, and discuss implications for macro-scale models of drilling systems.

  12. Strain measurements in thermally grown alumina scales using ruby fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Veal, B.W.; Natesan, K.; Koshelev, I.; Grimsditch, M.; Renusch, D. Hou, P.Y.

    1996-12-31

    We have measured strains in alumina scales thermally grown on Fe-Cr- Al alloys by exploiting the strain dependence of the ruby luminescence line. Measurements were done on Fe-5Cr-28Al and Fe-18Cr-10Al (at.%, bal. Fe) oxidized between 300-1300 C with periodic cycling to room temperature. Significantly different levels of strain buildup were observed in scales on these alloys. Results on similar alloys containing a dilute reactive element (Zr or Hf) are also presented. We observe that scales on alloys containing a reactive element (RE) can support higher strains than scales on RE-free alloys. With the luminescence technique, strain relief associated with spallation thresholds is readily observed. In early stage oxidation, the evolution of transition phases is monitored using Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies. The fluorescence technique also provides a sensitive probe of early stage formation of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. It appears that, in presence of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the {alpha}-alumina phase can form at anomalously low temperatures.

  13. Chemical and microstructural characterization of thermally grown alumina scales

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Richier, C.; Veal, B.W.

    1995-09-01

    An experimental program has been initiated to evaluate the chemical, microstructural, and mechanical integrity of thermally grown oxide scales to establish requirements for improved corrosion performance in terms of composition, structure, and properties. Iron aluminides of several compositions were selected for the study. Oxidation studies were conducted in air and oxygen environments at 1000{degrees}C. The results showed that the scaling kinetics followed a parabolic rate law but that the rates in early stages of oxidation were significantly greater than in later stages; the difference could be attributed to the presence of fast-growing transient iron oxides in the layer during the early stages. Further, scale failure occurred via gross spallation, scale cracking, and nodule formation and was influenced by alloy composition. Auger electron spectroscopy of Ar-exposed specimens of ternary Fe-Cr-Al alloy showed sulfur on the gas/scale side of the interface; the sulfur decreased as the exposure time increased. Raman spectroscopy and ruby fluorescence were used to examine the scale development as a function of oxidation temperature. Ruby-line shift is used to examine phase transformations in alumina and to calculate compressive strains in thermally grown scales.

  14. Multiple-Scale Geomechanical Models for Thermal Spallation Drilling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, I.; Walsh, S. D.; Roberts, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread adoption of geothermal energy will require access to deeply buried geothermal sources in granitic basement rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Exploiting these resources necessitates novel methods for drilling, stimulation, and maintenance, under operating conditions difficult or impossible to test in laboratory settings. Physically rigorous numerical modeling tools are vital to highlight potential risks, guide process optimization and reduce the uncertainties involved in these developing technologies. In this presentation, we discuss a numerical modeling effort investigating the multiscale mechanics of thermal spallation drilling (TSD) - a technique in which rock is fragmented into small flakes by a high temperature fluid jet. This process encompasses interconnected phenomena on several length and time scales: from system-scale fluid dynamics to grain-scale thermomechanics of spallation. Here we describe how these disperate scales are simulated using GEODYN, a parallel Eulerian compressible solid and fluid dynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capabilities. GEODYN is able to simulate materials under extremely large deformations, resolve details of wave propagation within grains, and uses a continuum damage mechanics approach to represent fracture. We will present results from both system- and grain-scale simulations describing the transfer of heat from the high temperature jet to the rock face, and the effect of grain-scale properties such as incipient flaw distribution, grain size and grain size distribution, heat flux, applied temperature and material heterogeneity on the onset of spallation. Detailed computer modeling helps to address several of the uncertainties surrounding TSD: 1) What rock compositions are drillable with TSD? 2) How do grain size and grain size distribution affect TSD and drilling rates? 3) What combination of macroscopic (Poisson ratio, heat capacity and thermal conductivity) and microscopic (flaw distribution

  15. The microstructure and mechanical reliability of alumina scales and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, K.B.; Pruessner, K.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1997-09-01

    Alumina scales on iron-aluminides (Fe{sub 3}Al-based) and NiCrAl- based alloys were characterized in order to develop the knowledge to control the oxidation performance of alloys by controlling the microstructure and microchemistry of their scales. Plasma-deposited amorphous alumina coatings on iron-aluminides were used to study phase transformations, transport processes in the scales, and S segregation to the scale/metal interface. It was found that during heat treatment in absence of oxidation, amorphous coatings first transform to {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and eventually {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nucleates at the scale/metal interface. Sulfur from the Zr- free alloy segregates to the scale/metal interface during heat treatment. Thermally grown scales on Zr-doped iron-aluminides were compared to those formed after oxidation of a specimen with an alumina coating. Microstructural and gravimetric results showed that the primarily amorphous alumina coating promoted the nucleation and growth of metastable alumina phases, which resulted in more rapid oxidation. The thermally grown oxide was found on top of the coating. The NiCrAl-based alloys formed columnar alumina scales underneath a layer of mixed oxides. Segregation of alloying elements like Y, Hf, and At was found at both oxide grain boundaries and scale/metal interfaces.

  16. The mechanical reliability of alumina scales and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, K.B.; Pruebner, K.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-08-01

    The mechanical integrity of oxide scales ultimately determines their ability to protect materials from corrosion and other environmental effects arising from deleterious reactions with gases and condensable products. The microstructure and mechanical behavior of alumina products thermally grown or deposited on Fe-28 at.% Al intermetallic alloys are being characterized in order to develop the knowledge and means to control the mechanical reliability of alumina scales by microstructural manipulation through design and processing. Mechanical characterization involved gravimetric data from cyclic oxidation experiments, in-situ observation of oxidized specimens undergoing flexural loading in a scanning electron microscope, and measurements of hardness, elastic modulus and cracking resistance by nanoindentation. Values of cracking thresholds for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales were consistent with other measurements for surface and bulk alumina. The oxidation behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys coated with a thin (0.5 - 1 {mu}m) alumina film deposited by plasma synthesis has been studied. During exposure in the oxidizing environment, new oxide was formed between the coating and the substrate. The presence of the deposited amorphous oxide inhibited the subsequent thermal oxidation of the metal. Because the thermally grown alumina forms under the deposit, the adherence of the coating is controlled by the strength of the metal/oxide interface that develops during oxidation.

  17. Ionic Segregation on Grain Boundaries in Thermally Grown Alumina Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Unocic, Kinga A

    2012-01-01

    This study first examined segregation behaviour in the alumina scale formed after 100 h at 1100 C on bare and MCrAlYHfSi-coated single-crystal superalloys with {approx}10 ppma La and Y. For the bare superalloy, Hf and Ti were detected on the grain boundaries of the inner columnar alumina layer. Increasing the oxidation temperature to 1200 C for 2 h did not change the segregation behavior. With the bond coating, both Y and Hf were segregated to the grain boundaries as expected. However, there was evidence of Ti-rich oxide particles near the gas interface suggesting that Ti diffused from the superalloy through the coating. To further understand these segregation observations with multiple dopants, other alumina-forming systems were examined. Alumina scale grain boundary co-segregation of Ti with Y is common for FeCrAl alloys. Co-segregation of Hf and Ti was observed in the scale formed on co-doped NiAl. No La segregation was detected in the scale formed on NiCrAl with only a 19 ppma La addition, however, the scale was adherent.

  18. Atomic scale insights on chlorinated gamma-alumina surfaces.

    PubMed

    Digne, Mathieu; Raybaud, Pascal; Sautet, Philippe; Guillaume, Denis; Toulhoat, Hervé

    2008-08-20

    The thermochemistry of chlorinated gamma-alumina surfaces is explored by means of density functional calculations as a function of relevant reaction conditions used in experiments and in high-octane fuel production in the refining industry such as hydrocarbon isomerization and reforming. The role of chlorine as a dope of the Brønsted acidity of gamma-alumina surfaces is investigated at an atomic scale. Combining infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, the most favorable location of chlorine atoms on the (110), (100) and (111) surfaces of gamma-alumina is found to result either from direct adsorption or from the exchange of basic hydroxyl groups. Moreover, the modification of the hydrogen bond network upon chlorine adsorption is put forward as a key parameter for changing the Brønsted acidity. In a second step, we use a thermodynamic approach based on DFT total energy calculations corrected by the chemical potentials of HCl and H2O to determine the adsorption isotherms of chlorine and the relative surface concentration of hydroxyl groups and chlorine species on the gamma-alumina surfaces. The determination of chlorine content as a function of temperature and partial pressures of H2O and HCl offers new quantitative data required for optimizing the state of the support surface in industrial conditions. The mechanisms of chlorination are also discussed as a function of reaction conditions. PMID:18646849

  19. Conduction in alumina with atomic scale copper filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xu; Liu, Jie; Anantram, M. P.

    2014-10-01

    The conductance of atomic scale filaments with three and seven Cu atoms in α-alumina are calculated using ab initio density functional theory. We find that the filament with 3 Cu atoms is sufficient to increase the conductance of 1.3 nm thick alumina film by more than 103 times in linear response. As the applied voltage increases, the current quickly saturates and differential resistance becomes negative. Compared to the filament with three Cu atoms, while the conductance of the filament with seven Cu atoms is comparable in linear response, they carry as much as twenty times larger current at large biases. The electron transport is analyzed based on local density of states, and the negative differential resistance in the seven Cu filaments occurs due to their narrow bandwidth.

  20. Conduction in alumina with atomic scale copper filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xu; Liu, Jie; Anantram, M. P.

    2014-10-28

    The conductance of atomic scale filaments with three and seven Cu atoms in α-alumina are calculated using ab initio density functional theory. We find that the filament with 3 Cu atoms is sufficient to increase the conductance of 1.3 nm thick alumina film by more than 10{sup 3} times in linear response. As the applied voltage increases, the current quickly saturates and differential resistance becomes negative. Compared to the filament with three Cu atoms, while the conductance of the filament with seven Cu atoms is comparable in linear response, they carry as much as twenty times larger current at large biases. The electron transport is analyzed based on local density of states, and the negative differential resistance in the seven Cu filaments occurs due to their narrow bandwidth.

  1. Mitigation and Prediction of Spallation of Oxide Scales on Ferritic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Xu, Zhijie; Xu, Wei; Koeppel, Brian J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2015-02-04

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program. The results indicate that application of physical surface modifications, such as surface blasting, prior to application of protective surface coatings can substantially increase oxide scale spallation resistance during long-term exposure to elevated temperatures (e.g., 800-850ºC). To better understand and predict the benefits of surface modification, an integrated modeling framework was developed and applied to the obtained experimental results.

  2. Corrosion performance of alumina scales in coal gasification environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1997-02-01

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials in complex gas environments of coal gasification is a potential problem. The corrosion process is dictated by concentrations of two key constituents: sulfur as H{sub 2}S and Cl as HCl. This paper examines the corrosion performance of alumina scales that are thermally grown on Fe-base alloys during exposure to O/S mixed-gas environments. The results are compared with the performance of chromia-forming alloys in similar environments. The paper also discusses the available information on corrosion performance of alloys whose surfaces were enriched with Al by the pack-diffusion process, by the electrospark deposition process, or by weld overlay techniques.

  3. Lightweight alumina refractory aggregate. Phase 2, Pilot scale development

    SciTech Connect

    Swansiger, T.G.; Pearson, A.

    1994-11-01

    Kilogram quantities of refractory aggregate were prepared from both a paste and a pelletized form of extruder feed material in both bench and pilot-scale equipment. The 99{sup +} % alumina aggregate exhibited a bulk density approaching 2.5 g/cm{sup 3} and a fired strength slightly lower than fused alumina. Based on initial evaluation by two refractory manufacturers in brick or castable applications, the new aggregate offered adequate strength with thermal conductivity reductions up to 34%, depending on the temperature and application of the new aggregate in these initial trials. The new aggregate was simply substituted for Tabular{trademark} in the refractory formulation. Thus, there is room for improvement through formulation optimization with the lightweight aggregate. The new aggregate offers a unique combination of density, strength, and thermal properties not available in current aggregate. To this point in time, technical development has led to a pelletized formulation with borderline physical form leaving the Eirich mixer. The formulation requires further development to provide more latitude for the production of pelletized material without forming paste, while still reducing the bulk density slightly to reach the 2.5 g/cm{sup 3} target. The preferred, pelletized process flowsheet was outlined and a preliminary economic feasibility study performed based on a process retrofit into Alcoa`s Arkansas tabular production facilities. Based on an assumed market demand of 20,000 mt/year and an assumed selling price of $0.65/lb (25% more than the current selling price of Tabular{trademark}, on a volume basis), economics were favorable. Decision on whether to proceed into Phase 3 (full- scale demonstration) will be based on a formal market survey in 1994 October.

  4. Diffusivity in Alumina Scales Grown on Al-MAX Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Ti3AlC2, Ti2AlC, and Cr2AlC are oxidation resistant MAX phase compounds distinguished by the formation of protective Al2O3 scales with well controlled kinetics. A modified Wagner treatment was used to obtain interfacial grain boundary diffusivity, deltaD(sub gb,O,int.), from scale growth rates and corresponding grain size. It is based on the p(O2)(exp -1/6) dependency of the double charged oxygen vacancy and oxygen diffusivity, coupled with the effective diffusion constant for short circuit grain boundary paths. Data from the literature for MAX phases was analyzed accordingly, and deltaD(sub gb,O,int.) was found to nearly coincide with the Arrhenius line developed for Zr-doped FeCrAl, where: deltaD(sub gb,O,int.) = 1.8x10(exp -10) exp(-375 kJ/RT) cubic meters/s. Furthermore, this oxidation relation suggests the more general format applicable to bulk samples under ambient conditions: deltaD(sub gb,O) = 7.567x10(exp -8) exp(-544 kJ/RT) p(O2)(exp -1/6) cubic meters/[s x Pa(exp -1/6)]. Data from many other FeCrAl(X) studies were similarly assessed to show general agreement with the relation for deltaD(sub gb,O,int.). This analysis reinforces the view that protective alumina scales grow by similar mechanisms for these Al-MAX phases and oxidation resistant FeCrAl alloys.

  5. Lightweight alumina refractory aggregate: Phase 3, Full-scale demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Swansiger, T.G.; Pearson, A.

    1996-07-16

    Technical problems (higher than target fired density, and poor intermediate strength after burnout but before sintering) were addressed and solved; solution involved use of large loading of CP-5 alumina (controlled pore, rehydratable), increased loading of one of the binders, and a steam aging step. Resistance of the lightweight aggregate in a brick formulation to steel slag penetration was assessed in a preliminary test and found to be almost as good as that of T-64. Pelletized process economic feasibility study was updated, based on production levels of 10,000 and 20,000 mt/year, the most up- to-date raw material costs, and the assumption of a retrofit into the Arkansas plant tabular production facility. For the 10,000 mt/y production level, the required selling price of 35% more than the T- 64 selling price exceeds the {le}25% objective. The market survey will determine whether to proceed with the full scale demonstration that will produce at least 54.4 mt (120,000 lb) of the aggregate for incorporation into products, followed by end-user testing and evaluation.

  6. Moisture-Induced TBC Spallation on Turbine Blade Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James

    2011-01-01

    Delayed failure of TBCs is a widely observed laboratory phenomenon, although many of the early observations went unreported. The weekend effect or DeskTop Spallation (DTS) is characterized by initial survival of a TBC after accelerated laboratory thermal cycling, then failure by exposure to ambient humidity or water. Once initiated, failure can occur quite dramatically in less than a second. To this end, the water drop test and digital video recordings have become useful techniques in studies at NASA (Smialek, Zhu, Cuy), DECHMA (Rudolphi, Renusch, Schuetze), and CNRS Toulouse/SNECMA (Deneux, Cadoret, Hervier, Monceau). In the present study the results for a commercial turbine blade, with a standard EB-PVD 7YSZ TBC top coat and Pt-aluminide diffusion bond coat are reported. Cut sections were intermittently oxidized at 1100, 1150, and 1200 C and monitored by weight change and visual appearance. Failures were distributed widely over a 5-100 hr time range, depending on temperature. At some opportune times, failure was captured by video recording, documenting the appearance and speed of the moisture-induced spallation process. Failure interfaces exhibited alumina scale grains, decorated with Ta-rich oxide particles, and alumina inclusions as islands and streamers. The phenomenon is thus rooted in moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) of the alumina scale formed on the bond coat. In that regard, many studies show the susceptibility of alumina scales to moisture, as long as high strain energy and a partially exposed interface exist. The latter conditions result from severe cyclic oxidation conditions, which produce a highly stressed and partially damaged scale. In one model, it has been proposed that moisture reacts with aluminum in the bond coat to release hydrogen atoms that embrittle the interface. A negative synergistic effect with interfacial sulfur is also invoked.

  7. Moisture-Induced TBC Spallation on Turbine Blade Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Delayed failure of TBCs is a widely observed laboratory phenomenon, although many of the early observations went unreported. "The weekend effect" or "DeskTop Spallation" (DTS) is characterized by initial survival of a TBC after accelerated laboratory thermal cycling, then failure by exposure to ambient humidity or water. Once initiated, failure can occur quite dramatically in less than a second. To this end, the water drop test and digital video recordings have become useful techniques in studies at NASA (Smialek, Zhu, Cuy), DECHMA (Rudolphi, Renusch, Schuetze), and CNRS Toulouse/SNECMA (Deneux, Cadoret, Hervier, Monceau). In the present study the results for a commercial turbine blade, with a standard EB-PVD 7YSZ TBC top coat and Pt-aluminide diffusion bond monitored by weight change and visual appearance. Failures were distributed widely over a 5-100 hr time range, depending on temperature. At some opportune times, failure was captured by video recording, documenting the appearance and speed of the moisture-induced spallation process. Failure interfaces exhibited alumina scale grains, decorated with Ta-rich oxide particles, and alumina inclusions as islands and streamers. The phenomenon is thus rooted in moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) of the alumina scale formed on the bond coat. In that regard, many studies show the susceptibility of alumina scales to moisture, as long as high strain energy and a partially exposed interface exist. The latter conditions result from severe cyclic oxidation conditions, which produce a highly stressed and partially damaged scale. In one model, it has been proposed that moisture reacts with aluminum in the bond coat to release hydrogen atoms that 'embrittle' the interface. A negative synergistic effect with interfacial sulfur is also invoked.

  8. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of alumina scales thermally developed on iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Klug, K.L.; Renusch, D.; Grimsditch, M.; Veal, B.W.

    1996-05-01

    Several alumina-forming Fe-Al intermetallic alloys have been oxidized in oxygen for 100 h at 1000 C to understand the scaling kinetics, scale morphology, scale adhesion, and strain accommodation in the scales. Oxidation studies were conducted by thermogravimetry, followed by analyses of the surfaces of oxide scales. In addition, samples were cooled to 77 K and then fractured; then, their scale/metal interfaces were analyzed. Some of the scales were adhesion-tested by applying a tensile load to pull the scale away from the substrate. Finally, ruby fluorescence was used to measure in-plane strains in the oxide scales and values correlated with scale microstructures.

  9. Characterization of the Alumina Scale formed on Coated and Uncoated Doped Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Kinga A; Parish, Chad M; Pint, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms by which Y and La dopants affect the oxidation behavior of Ni base single crystal superalloys, the oxide scales formed on two variants of a commercial X4 alloy, each with and without a MCrAlYHfSi coating were characterized. The alloy systems were oxidized for 100h at 1100 C and then examined using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Without a coating, a duplex scale was formed on the superalloy surface comprised of an outer Ni rich spinel type layer and an inner columnar Al2O3 layer. In this case, Hf and Ti were found segregated to the alumina grain boundaries in the outer part of the scale on both alloys but only Hf was detected near the metal alumina interface. There was no evidence of Ta, Y or La segregation to the scale grain boundaries after this exposure. The scale formed on the alloys with the thermally sprayed coating was primarily alumina, and Y and Hf segregated to the alumina grain boundaries for both alloys. There was evidence of Ti rich oxides in the outer part of the scale indicating that Ti had diffused through the coating into the thermally grown oxide but La was not found.

  10. FEG-SEM investigation of α-alumina scales formed on FeCrAlY alloys oxidised at 1200° C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Badairy, H.; Tatlock, G.; Fawcett, S.; Beahan, P.; Hunt, J.

    2005-05-01

    This work is part of an ongoing European funded project, “SMILER”, with the aim of improving the performance of alumina forming Fe-20Cr-5Al-Y alloys for high temperature industrial applications. One aspect of the project is to investigate the influence of additives on the oxidation behaviour of these alloys. During this study a LEO 1550 FESEM (field emission scanning electron microscope), equipped with INCA X-ray microanalysis facilities was used. Ultra-high-purity model alloys, where the levels of additives (Hf, Zr, Ti, Si, La and Y) were carefully controlled, and two commercial Aluchrom YHfAl and Kanthal AMPT alloys were oxidised at 1200° C for up to 3100h (100h/cycle). The YHfAl, (Y+Ti+Zr)- and (Y+Zr+Hf)-containing alloys showed the highest oxidation rates when oxidised, whereas the La-containing alloy showed the lowest oxidation rate. However, the La-containing alloy spalled the most, while the (Y+Zr+Hf)-containing and YHfAl alloys showed little spallation, and the additives appeared to have a major influence on the spallation of the α -alumina scale formed. On the alloys with La and Si respectively, the scale spalled at the scale/metal interface (adhesively), whereas on alloys containing (Y+Hf+Ti) and (Y+Hf+Zr) and the YHfAl alloy, the scale spalled mainly in a cohesive manner (within the scale). Also, the added elements affected the scale topography. In general the scale had a columnar structure at the scale/metal interface, whereas the grains were equiaxed at the scale/gas interface. However, in the case of YHfAl and (Y+Zr+Hf)-containing alloys, a sunflower type structure was observed in both fractured samples, in the regions where the scale spalled cohesively. Preliminary EDX analyses revealed that, in the case of YHfAl, for example, the center of the sunflower structure was rich in Mg. This suggests that there may be inhomogeneities in the metal substrate, prior to oxidation, where high concentrations of Mg increase the local oxide growth rate.

  11. Finite element modeling of the effect of interface anomalies on thermal stresses in alumina scales.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. K.

    1998-06-10

    The scales that grow from oxidation often develop a convoluted morphology or interface pores. High thermal stresses can develop locally and are potentially detrimental to the scale or interface integrity. Finite element simulations are used to examine residual thermal stresses and strains that result when these deviations from a flat interface have formed, and the resulting geometry is subsequently cooled to room temperature. A variety of geometries will be considered for alumina scales on a FeCrAl substrate.

  12. Finite element modeling of the effect of interface anomalies on thermal stresses in alumina scales

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.K.; Williamson, R.L.; Hou, P.Y.; Cannon, R.M.; Renusch, D.; Veal, B.; Grimsditch, M.

    1998-07-01

    The scales that grow from oxidation often develop a convoluted morphology or interface pores. High thermal stresses can develop locally and are potentially detrimental to the scale or interface integrity. Finite element simulations are used to examine residual thermal stresses and strains that result when these deviations from a flat interface have formed, and the resulting geometry is subsequently cooled to room temperature. A variety of geometries will be considered for alumina scales on a FeCrAl substrate.

  13. Effects of thermal cycling parameters on residual stresses in alumina scales of CoNiCrAlY and NiCoCrAlY bond coats

    SciTech Connect

    Nordhorn, Christian; Mücke, Robert; Unocic, Kinga A.; Lance, Michael J.; Pint, Bruce A.; Vaßen, Robert

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, furnace cycling experiments were performed on free-standing high-velocity oxygen-fuel bond coat samples to investigate the effect of material composition, surface texture, and cycling conditions on the average stresses in the formed oxide scales after cooling. The oxide scale thicknesses were determined by SEM image analyses and information about the stresses were acquired by photo-stimulated luminescence-spectroscopy. Additionally, the scale thickness dependent stress fields were calculated in finite-element analyses including approximation functions for the surface roughness derived on the basis of profilometry data. The evolution of the average residual stress as a function of oxide scale thickness was subject to stochastic fluctuations predominantly caused by local scale spallations. In comparison to the supplemental modeling results, thermal stresses due to mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients are identified as the main contribution to the residual stresses. Finally, the theoretical results emphasize that analyses of spectroscopic data acquired for average stress investigations of alumina scales rely on detailed information about microstructural features.

  14. Effects of thermal cycling parameters on residual stresses in alumina scales of CoNiCrAlY and NiCoCrAlY bond coats

    DOE PAGES

    Nordhorn, Christian; Mücke, Robert; Unocic, Kinga A.; Lance, Michael J.; Pint, Bruce A.; Vaßen, Robert

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, furnace cycling experiments were performed on free-standing high-velocity oxygen-fuel bond coat samples to investigate the effect of material composition, surface texture, and cycling conditions on the average stresses in the formed oxide scales after cooling. The oxide scale thicknesses were determined by SEM image analyses and information about the stresses were acquired by photo-stimulated luminescence-spectroscopy. Additionally, the scale thickness dependent stress fields were calculated in finite-element analyses including approximation functions for the surface roughness derived on the basis of profilometry data. The evolution of the average residual stress as a function of oxide scale thickness was subjectmore » to stochastic fluctuations predominantly caused by local scale spallations. In comparison to the supplemental modeling results, thermal stresses due to mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients are identified as the main contribution to the residual stresses. Finally, the theoretical results emphasize that analyses of spectroscopic data acquired for average stress investigations of alumina scales rely on detailed information about microstructural features.« less

  15. The mechanical reliability of alumina scales and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, K.B.; Pruebner, K.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    In many high-temperature fossil energy systems, corrosion and deleterious reactions with gases and condensable products in the operating environment often compromise materials performance. The presence of a stable surface oxide (either as thermally-grown scales or deposited coatings) can effectively protect the materials from these reactions if the oxides are slow-growing, dense and adherent to the substrate. The protection these brittle oxide films provide has long been a critical issue, particularly for applications involving severe high-temperature thermal cycles or very aggressive (for example, sulfidizing) environments. The various factors which control the scale/coating integrity and adherence are not well understood. The present multilaboratory collaborative work is intended to define the relationships between substrate characteristics (composition, microstructure, and mechanical behavior) and the structure and protective properties of deposited oxide coatings and/or thermally grown scales. Through such studies, the ultimate goal is to assure environmental protection through effective processing and materials selection leading to the development of corrosion-resistant, high-temperature materials for improved energy and environmental control systems.

  16. Development and Exploratory Scale-Up of Alumina-Forming Austenitic (AFA) Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Magee, John H; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maziasz, Philip J; Santella, Michael L; Pint, Bruce A; Bei, Hongbin

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the continued development of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys, which exhibit a unique combination of excellent oxidation resistance via protective alumina (Al2O3) scale formation and high-temperature creep strength through the formation of stable nano-scale MC carbides and intermetallic precipitates. Efforts in fiscal year 2009 focused on the characterization and understanding of long-term oxidation resistance and tensile properties as a function of alloy composition and microstructure. Computational thermodynamic calculations of the austenitic matrix phase composition and the volume fraction of MC, B2-NiAl, and Fe2(Mo,Nb) base Laves phase precipitates were used to interpret oxidation behavior. Of particular interest was the enrichment of Cr in the austenitic matrix phase by additions of Nb, which aided the establishment and maintenance of alumina. Higher levels of Nb additions also increased the volume fraction of B2-NiAl precipitates, which served as an Al reservoir during long-term oxidation. Ageing studies of AFA alloys were conducted at 750C for times up to 2000 h. Ageing resulted in near doubling of yield strength at room temperature after only 50 h at 750C, with little further increase in yield strength out to 2000 h of ageing. Elongation was reduced on ageing; however, levels of 15-25% were retained at room temperature after 2000 h of total ageing.

  17. Facile Transferring of Wafer-Scale Ultrathin Alumina Membranes onto Substrates for Nanostructure Patterning.

    PubMed

    Al-Haddad, Ahmed; Zhan, Zhibing; Wang, Chengliang; Tarish, Samar; Vellacheria, Ranjith; Lei, Yong

    2015-08-25

    Ordered nanostructure arrays have attracted intensive attention because of their various applications. However, it is still a great challenge to achieve ordered nanostructure patterning over a large area (such as wafer-scale) by a technique that allows high throughput, large pattern area and low equipment costs. Here, through a unique design of the fabrication and transferring processes, we achieve a facile transferring of wafer-scale ultrathin alumina membranes (UTAMs) onto substrates without any twisting, folding, cracking and contamination. The most important in our method is fixing the UTAM onto the wafer-scale substrate before removing the backside Al and alumina barrier layer. It is also demonstrated that the thickness and surface smoothing of UTAMs play crucial roles in this transferring process. By using these perfectly transferred UTAMs as masks, various nanostructure patterning including nanoparticle, nanopore (nanomesh) and nanowire arrays are fabricated on wafer-scale substrates with tunable and uniform dimension. Because there are no requirements for UTAMs, substrates and materials to be deposited, the method presented here shall provide a cost-effective platform for the fabrication of ordered nanostructures on large substrates for various applications in nanotechnology.

  18. Development of advanced materials for spallation neutron sources and radiation damage simulation based on multi-scale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Kurishita, Hiroaki; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Seiichi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Kikuchi, Kenji; Saito, Shigeru; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Iwase, Hiroshi; Ito, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Kaneko, Yoshihisa; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Ishino, Shiori; JSPS Grant Team

    2012-12-01

    This report describes the status review of the JSPS Grant Team to develop advanced materials for the spallation neutron sources and modeling of radiation damage. One of the advanced materials is a toughness enhanced, fine-grained tungsten material (W-TiC) having four-times larger fracture toughness than ordinary tungsten and appreciable RT ductility in the recrystallized state. The other is an intergranular crack (IGC)-resistant austenitic stainless steel which was processed by the grain-boundary engineering (GBE). The experimental results are devoted to corrosion in a lead-bismuth eutectic, arrest of corrosion of weld-decay, radiation damage and creep rupture as well as new technique of GBE using a laser and annealing procedure. New technique seems to be applicable to large or complicated-shaped components. A series of the multi-scale models is built up from nuclear reaction between incident particles and medium nuclei to material property change due to radiation damage. Sample calculation is made on 3 mm-thick nickel bombarded by 3 GeV protons.

  19. Oxygen Permeability and Grain-Boundary Diffusion Applied to Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Gleeson, Brian; Hovis, David B.; Heuer, Arthur H.

    2013-01-01

    High-temperature oxygen permeability measurements had determined grain-boundary diffusivities (deltaD(sub gb)) in bulk polycrystalline alumina (Wada, Matsudaira, and Kitaoka). They predict that oxygen deltaD(sub gb,O) varies with oxygen pressure as P(O2)(sup -1/6) at low pressure whereas aluminum deltaD(sub gb),Al varies with P(O2)(sup +3/16) at high pressure. These relations were used to evaluate alumina scale growth in terms of diffusivity and grain size. A modified Wagner treatment for dominant inward oxygen growth produces the concise solution: ?(sub i) = k(sub p,i)×G(sub i) = 12 deltaD(sub gb,O,int), where ?(sub i) is a constant and k(sub p,i) and G(sub i) refer to instantaneous values of the scale parabolic growth constant and grain size, respectively. A commercial FeCrAl(Zr) alloy was oxidized at 1100 to 1400 degC to determine k(sub p,i), interfacial grain size, ?, and thus deltaD(sub gb,O,int). The deltaD(sub gb,O,int) values predicted from oxidation at (375 kJ/mole) were about 20 times less than those obtained above (at 298 kJ/mole), but closer than extrapolations from high-temperature bulk measurements. The experimental oxidation results agree with similar FeCrAl(X) studies, especially where both k(sub p,i) and G(sub i) were characterized. This complete approach accounts for temperature-sensitive oxidation effects of grain enlargement, equilibrium interface pressure variation, and grain-boundary diffusivity.

  20. Wear degradation of long-term in vivo exposed alumina-on-alumina hip joints: linking nanometer-scale phenomena to macroscopic joint design.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Zhu, Wenliang; Nishii, Takashi; Sakai, Takashi; Takao, Masaki; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2012-02-01

    The wear behavior of alumina femoral heads was examined at follow-up periods between 7.7 and 10.7 years. Four head retrievals of the same size (28 mm in diameter) were divided into two groups with different design characteristics. Systematically using scanning electron and atomic force microscopy procedures, wear characteristics could be classified on the entire heads according to five zones with increasing degrees of wear damage (Grade 1-5), in addition to one zone of stripe wear (Grade SW). The stripe wear zone showed quite different topographical features as compared to frictionally worn zones. Furthermore, hip implants designed with different clearances are shown to lead to different wear patterns on the femoral head surface, the smaller the clearance the wider the worn surface area. Cathodoluminescence piezo-spectroscopy provided information about the residual stress state in surfaces worn to different degrees and helped clarifying the wear mechanisms on the microscopic scale.

  1. Highly efficient and large-scale fabrication of superhydrophobic alumina surface with strong stability based on self-congregated alumina nanowires.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shan; Tian, Dong; Yang, Xiaojun; Deng, Wenli

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a large-area superhydrophobic alumina surface with a series of superior properties was fabricated via an economical, simple, and highly effective one-step anodization process, and subsequently modified with low-surface-energy film. The effects of the anodization parameters including electrochemical anodization time, current density, and electrolyte temperature on surface morphology and surface wettability were investigated in detail. The hierarchical alumina pyramids-on-pores (HAPOP) rough structure which was produced quickly through the one-step anodization process together with a low-surface-energy film deposition [1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (PDES) and stearic acid (STA)] confer excellent superhydrophobicity and an extremely low sliding angle. Both the PDES-modified superhydrophobic (PDES-MS) and the STA-modified superhydrophobic (STA-MS) surfaces present fascinating nonwetting and extremely slippery behaviors. The chemical stability and mechanical durability of the PDES-MS and STA-MS surfaces were evaluated and discussed. Compared with the STA-MS surface, the as-prepared PDES-MS surface possesses an amazing chemical stability which not only can repel cool liquids (water, HCl/NaOH solutions, around 25 °C), but also can show excellent resistance to a series of hot liquids (water, HCl/NaOH solutions, 30-100 °C) and hot beverages (coffee, milk, tea, 80 °C). Moreover, the PDES-MS surface also presents excellent stability toward immersion in various organic solvents, high temperature, and long time period. In particular, the PDES-MS surface achieves good mechanical durability which can withstand ultrasonication treatment, finger-touch, multiple fold, peeling by adhesive tape, and even abrasion test treatments without losing superhydrophobicity. The corrosion resistance and durability of the diverse-modified superhydrophobic surfaces were also examined. These fascinating performances makes the present method suitable for large-scale

  2. Characterization of the alumina scale formed on a commercial MCrAlYHfSi coating

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Kinga A; Pint, Bruce A

    2010-01-01

    A commercial NiCoCrAlYHfSi coating deposited on a Ni-base superalloy substrate was characterized before and after high temperature oxidation. The combination of Y, Hf and Si additions are reported to improve coating performance. Advanced characterization techniques including scanning transmission electron microscopy were used to study the segregation behavior of Y and Hf ions to the alumina grain boundaries after 200h at 1050 C and 100 and 200h exposures at 1100 C. After both exposure times, two distinct oxide layers were observed. The outer transient layer included many Y- and Hf-rich oxide particles. The inner layer consisted of columnar -Al2O3 grains normal to the surface of the coating. Segregation of Y and Hf ions was found on the alumina grain boundaries as has been observed in model alloys with similar compositions. Isothermal exposures for up to 200h at 1050 and 1100 C caused a minimal increase in surface roughness. However, 200 one-hour cycles at 1100 C resulted in a more significant increase in surface roughness.

  3. Characterization of the alumina scale formed on a commercial MCrAlYHfSi coating

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Kinga A; Pint, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    A commercial NiCoCrAlYHfSi coating deposited on a Ni-base superalloy substrate was characterized before and after high temperature oxidation. The combination of Y, Hf and Si additions is reported to improve coating performance. Advanced characterization techniques including scanning-transmission electron microscopy were used to study the segregation behavior of Y and Hf ions to the alumina grain boundaries after 200 h at 1050 C and 100 and 200 h exposures at 1100 C. After both exposure times, two distinct oxide layers were observed. The outer transient layer included many Y- and Hf-rich oxide particles. The inner layer consisted of columnar -Al2O3 grains normal to the surface of the coating. Segregation of Y and Hf ions was found on the alumina grain boundaries as has been observed in model alloys with similar compositions. Isothermal exposures for up to 200 h at 1050 and 1100 C caused a minimal increase in surface roughness. However, 200 1-h cycles at 1100 C resulted in a more significant increase in surface roughness.

  4. Mechanically reliable scales and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Alexander, K.B.

    1995-07-01

    As the first stage in examining the mechanical reliability of protective surface oxides, the behavior of alumina scales formed on iron-aluminum alloys during high-temperature cyclic oxidation was characterized in terms of damage and spallation tendencies. Scales were thermally grown on specimens of three iron-aluminum composition using a series of exposures to air at 1000{degrees}C. Gravimetric data and microscopy revealed substantially better integrity and adhesion of the scales grown on an alloy containing zirconium. The use of polished (rather than just ground) specimens resulted in scales that were more suitable for subsequent characterization of mechanical reliability.

  5. Formation of α-alumina scales in the Fe-Al(Cr) diffusion coating on China low activation martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Qin; Zhao, Weiwei; Yang, Hongguang; Hatano, Yuji; Yuan, Xiaoming; Nozaki, Teo; Zhu, Xinxin

    2015-09-01

    To study the formation mechanism of stable α-Al2O3 scales, the oxidation behavior of Fe-Al(Cr) diffusion coating on China low activation martensitic steel has been investigated under the oxygen partial pressure ranging from 1 to 20,000 Pa at 1253 K. A single, continuous Al2O3 scale with the maximum thickness of about 2000 nm was formed on the Fe-Al(Cr) diffusion layer. The phase transformation of alumina scales on the surface of Fe-Al(Cr) layer was studied at different oxidation times ranging from 3 to 180 min. With the increase in oxygen partial pressure, the phase transformation time of α-Al2O3 is decreased. The metastable γ-Al2O3 and transition α-(Al0.948Cr0.052)2O3 phases were formed in the earlier oxidation process and finally transformed to the stable α-Al2O3 phase, which were detected by grazing incidence angle X-ray diffraction and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. This implies that Cr shows the third element effect and serves as a template for the nucleation of the stable α-Al2O3.

  6. Towards large scale preparation of graphene in molten salts and its use in the fabrication of highly toughened alumina ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Ali Reza; Feighan, John; Fray, Derek J

    2016-08-15

    Highly crystalline graphene nanosheets were reproducibly generated by the electrochemical exfoliation of graphite electrodes in molten LiCl containing protons. The graphene product has been successfully applied in several applications. This paper discusses the effect of molten salt produced graphene on the microstructures and mechanical properties of alumina articles produced by slip casting and pressureless sintering, which is one of the most convenient methods for the commercial production of alumina ceramics. In addition to graphene, graphite powder and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were also used to prepare alumina articles for comparative purposes. A graphene strengthening effect was realized through microstructural refinement and by influencing the formation of alumina nanorods during the sintering of α-Al2O3 articles. The fracture toughness of the sintered alumina articles increased to an impressive value of 6.98 MPa m(1/2) by adding 0.5 wt% graphene nanosheets. This was attributed to the unique microstructure obtained, comprised of micrometer sized alumina grains separated by alumina nanorods. PMID:27231211

  7. Towards large scale preparation of graphene in molten salts and its use in the fabrication of highly toughened alumina ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Ali Reza; Feighan, John; Fray, Derek J

    2016-08-15

    Highly crystalline graphene nanosheets were reproducibly generated by the electrochemical exfoliation of graphite electrodes in molten LiCl containing protons. The graphene product has been successfully applied in several applications. This paper discusses the effect of molten salt produced graphene on the microstructures and mechanical properties of alumina articles produced by slip casting and pressureless sintering, which is one of the most convenient methods for the commercial production of alumina ceramics. In addition to graphene, graphite powder and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were also used to prepare alumina articles for comparative purposes. A graphene strengthening effect was realized through microstructural refinement and by influencing the formation of alumina nanorods during the sintering of α-Al2O3 articles. The fracture toughness of the sintered alumina articles increased to an impressive value of 6.98 MPa m(1/2) by adding 0.5 wt% graphene nanosheets. This was attributed to the unique microstructure obtained, comprised of micrometer sized alumina grains separated by alumina nanorods.

  8. Growth of alumina scale on Fe-Cr-Al : a multiprobe study.

    SciTech Connect

    Veal, B. W.

    1998-06-03

    The use of local probes at specific spatial locations provides a clear picture of the scale growth. The thermal evolution of the oxide scale on 72Fe-18Cr-10Al-0.15Hf (at.%) has been investigated using a number of spectroscopic techniques. Well defined regions ({approx}70 mm in diameter) were probed by a battery of techniques as a function of oxidation at different temperatures (Between 800 C--1100 C). This study provides information about the dependence of scale evolution on fluctuations in the local composition and/or grain structure of the starting material. Results suggest that properties of the starting material, which were not investigated in this study, strongly influence the scale evolution, even to the stage of mature scales.

  9. Feasibility and process scale-up low cost alumina fibers for advanced Re-usable Surface Insulation (RSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, A.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of this program was to establish feasibility of a process to produce low cost aluminum oxide fibers having sufficient strength, flexibility, and thermal stability for multiple re-use at temperatures to 1480 C in advanced RSI type heat shields for reentry vehicles. Using bench-scale processing apparatus, the Alcoa 'Saphiber' process was successfully modified to produce nominally 8 microns diameter polycrystalline alpha-alumina fiber. Thermal stability was demonstrated in vacuum reheating tests to 1371 C and in atmospheric reheating to 1483 C. Individual fiber properties of strength, modulus, and flexibility were not determined because of friability and short length of the fiber. Rigidized tile produced from fiber of nominally 8, 20 and 40 micron diameter had thermal conductivities significantly higher than those of RSI SiO2 or mullite at relatively low temperature but became comparable above about 1000 C. Tile densities were high due to short fiber length, especially in the coarser diameter fiber. No significant effect of fiber diameter on thermal properties could be determined form the data. Mechanical properties of tiles deteriorated as fiber diameter increased.

  10. Enigmatic Moisture Effects on Al2O3 Scale and TBC Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Alumina scale adhesion to high temperature alloys is known to be affected primarily by sulfur segregation and reactive element additions. However adherent scales can become partially compromised by excessive strain energy and cyclic cracking. With time, exposure of such scales to moisture can lead to spontaneous interfacial decohesion, occurring while the samples are maintained at ambient conditions. Examples of this Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation (MIDS) are presented for NiCrAl and single crystal superalloys, becoming more severe with sulfur level and cyclic exposure conditions. Similarly, delayed failure or Desk Top Spallation (DTS) results are reviewed for TBC s, culminating in the water drop failure test. Both phenomena are discussed in terms of moisture effects on bulk alumina and bulk aluminides. A mechanism is proposed based on hydrogen embrittlement and is supported by a cathodic hydrogen charging experiment. Hydroxylation of aluminum from the alloy interface appears to be the relevant basic reaction.

  11. Enigmatic Moisture Effects on Al2O3 Scale and TBC Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Alumina scale adhesion to high temperature alloys is known to be affected primarily by sulfur segregation and reactive element additions. However, adherent scales can become partially compromised by excessive strain energy and cyclic cracking. With time, exposure of such scales to moisture can lead to spontaneous interfacial decohesion, occurring while the samples are maintained at ambient conditions. Examples of this Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation (MIDS) are presented for NiCrAl and single crystal superalloys, becoming more severe with sulfur level and cyclic exposure conditions. Similarly, delayed failure or Desk Top Spallation (DTS) results are reviewed for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), culminating in the water drop failure test. Both phenomena are discussed in terms of moisture effects on bulk alumina and bulk aluminides. A mechanism is proposed based on hydrogen embrittlement and is supported by a cathodic hydrogen charging experiment. Hydroxylation of aluminum from the alloy interface appears to be the relevant basic reaction.

  12. Pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development ar Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provide a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  13. Pulsed spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development at Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provides a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  14. The European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lindroos M.; Calaga R.; Bousson S.; Danared H.; Devanz G. et al

    2011-04-20

    In 2003 the joint European effort to design a European Spallation Source (ESS) resulted in a set of reports, and in May 2009 Lund was agreed to be the ESS site. The ESS Scandinavia office has since then worked on setting all the necessary legal and organizational matters in place so that the Design Update and construction can be started in January 2011, in collaboration with European partners. The Design Update phase is expected to end in 2012, to be followed by a construction phase, with first neutrons expected in 2018-2019.

  15. Developing a Small-scale De-fluoridation Filter for use in Rural Northern Ghana with Activated Alumina as the Sorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, L.; Stillings, L. L.; Decker, D.; Thomas, J.

    2013-12-01

    reaction time). The F- loading onto activated alumina did not change with grain size. However time to equilibrium increased dramatically with a decrease in grain size - after one hour of reaction time, the larger grain size adsorbed only 59% of F-, while at the finer grain size 90% was adsorbed. Future work will determine the volume of high F- water that can be treated before activated alumina needs to be regenerated or changed. These data will be incorporated into the design of a small-scale F-1 adsorption filter in the study area, and will predict the longevity of activated alumina as the sorbent.

  16. The thermal spallation drilling process

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Holes can be produced in very hard rock more easily and less expensively by thermal spallation than by conventional means. This drilling process has been used for producing blast holes in the taconite iron mines and for quarrying granite. It is potentially valuable for drilling holes in very hard rock for the exploitation of geothermal energy and the storage of various commodities. However, investigation and development of the thermal spallation drilling process is proceeding slowly.

  17. Developing a Small-Scale De-Fluoridation Filter for Use in Rural Northern Ghana with Activated Alumina As the Sorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, L.; Stillings, L. L.

    2014-12-01

    reaction time, the larger grain size adsorbed only 59% of F-, while at the finer grain size 90% was adsorbed. Future work will determine the volume of high F- water that can be treated before activated alumina needs to be regenerated or changed. These data will aid in the design of a small-scale F- adsorption filter in the study area, and will predict the longevity of activated alumina as the sorbent.

  18. Materials for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, W.F.; Daemen, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    The Workshop on Materials for Spallation Neutron Sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, February 6 to 10, 1995, gathered scientists from Department of Energy national laboratories, other federal institutions, universities, and industry to discuss areas in which work is needed, successful designs and use of materials, and opportunities for further studies. During the first day of the workshop, speakers presented overviews of current spallation neutron sources. During the next 3 days, seven panels allowed speakers to present information on a variety of topics ranging from experimental and theoretical considerations on radiation damage to materials safety issues. An attempt was made to identify specific problems that require attention within the context of spallation neutron sources. This proceedings is a collection of summaries from the overview sessions and the panel presentations.

  19. Alumina-on-Alumina in THA

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rey, Eduardo; Murcia-Mazón, Antonio; Blanco-Pozo, Agustín; Martí, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    Different bearing surfaces, including alumina-on-alumina, have been used to avoid osteolysis. We prospectively followed 288 patients (319 hips) in which an alumina-on-alumina cup was used with a hydroxyapatite stem. The patients’ mean age was 52.7 (range, 14–70 years), and the minimum followup was 3 years (mean, 4.7 years; range, 3–8 years). At final followup, five cups (including one with an alumina liner fracture) and two stems underwent revision. The cumulative probability of not having a revision of one or both components for any cause was 97% (95% confidence interval, 94.7%–99.1%). No patient spontaneously reported any noises from the hip and none reported noises when specifically questioned. All patients who had not undergone revision had good clinical results, but five of these patients had radiographic cup loosening at last followup. These data suggest alumina-on-alumina prostheses had reasonable outcomes after 5 years. One acetabular component fractured from trauma. We observed no linear femoral head penetration. Continued followup will be required to determine if reduction in wear between the alumina-on-alumina bearings results in less osteolysis and loosening. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196411

  20. Oxide growth stress measurements and relaxation mechanisms for alumina scales grown on FeCrAlY: Oxide growth stress measurements and relaxation mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P. F.; Specht, E. D.; More, K. L.; Hou, P. Y.

    2012-08-08

    Early-stage tensile stress evolution in α-Al2O3 scales during oxidation of FeCrAlY at 1000, 1050, 1100, and 1200 °C was monitored in situ by use of synchrotron radiation. Tensile stress development as a function of oxidation temperature indicated a dynamic interplay between stress generation and relaxation. An analysis of the time dependence of the data indicated that the observed relaxation of the initial tensile stress in the oxide scales at 1100 and 1200°C is dominated by creep in the α-Al2O3. A thin layer of a (Fe,Cr,Al) oxide was observed at the oxide-gas interface, consistent with a mechanism whereby the conversion of (Fe,Cr,Al)2O3 to α-Al2O3 produces an initial tensile stress in the alumina scale.

  1. Calcium aluminate in alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altay, Arzu

    The properties of ceramic materials are determined not only by the composition and structure of the phases present, but also by the distribution of impurities, intergranular films and second phases. The phase distribution and microstructure both depend on the fabrication techniques, the raw materials used, the phase-equilibrium relations, grain growth and sintering processes. In this dissertation research, various approaches have been employed to understand fundamental phenomena such as grain growth, impurity segregation, second-phase formation and crystallization. The materials system chosen was alumina intentionally doped with calcium. Atomic-scale structural analyses of grain boundaries in alumina were carried on the processed samples. It was found that above certain calcium concentrations, CA6 precipitated as a second phase at all sintering temperatures. The results also showed that abnormal grain growth can occur after precipitation and it is not only related to the calcium level, but it is also temperature dependent. In order to understand the formation mechanism of CA6 precipitates in calcium doped alumina samples, several studies have been carried out using either bulk materials or thin films The crystallization of CA2 and CA6 powders has been studied. Chemical processing techniques were used to synthesize the powders. It was observed that CA2 powders crystallized directly, however CA6 powders crystallized through gamma-Al 2O3 solid solution. The results of energy-loss near-edge spectrometry confirmed that gamma-Al2O3 can dissolve calcium. Calcium aluminate/alumina reaction couples have also been investigated. All reaction couples were heat treated following deposition. It was found that gamma-Al2O3 was formed at the interface as a result of the interfacial reaction between the film and the substrate. gamma-Al 2O3 at the interface was stable at much higher temperatures compared to the bulk gamma-Al2O3 formed prior to the CA6 crystallization. In order to

  2. Neutron spallation sources in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, P. J.

    1996-11-01

    After a brief general and historical discussion, the main design features of spallation sources are described. At the present time, Europe not only has the world-leading pulsed neutron spallation source, the SNS-ISIS at RAL, UK, but it is on the point of commissioning a world-leading continuous cyclotron-driven source, the SINQ at PSI, Switzerland. Looking to the future, yet more powerful pulsed sources are actively under study and the difficult problem of high-power target design (>250 kW) is leading to a new technology for liquid targets. The accelerator designs, although basically classical, require custom-built solutions that are often at the limit of present day accelerator technology.

  3. Neutron spallation sources in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, P. J.

    1996-11-01

    After a brief general and historical discussion, the main design features of spallation sources are described. At the present time, Europe not only has the world-leading pulsed neutron spallation source, the SNS-ISIS at RAL, UK, but it is on the point of commissioning a world-leading continuous cyclotron-driven source, the SINQ at PSI, Switzerland. Looking to the future, yet more powerful pulsed sources are actively under study and the difficult problem of high-power target design (>250 kW) is leading to a new technology for liquid targets. The accelerator designs, although basically classical, require custom-built solutions that are often at the limit of presentday accelerator technology.

  4. Spallation radiation effects in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, L.K.; Farrell, K.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1996-06-01

    Spallation refers to the process whereby particles (chiefly neutrons) are ejected from nuclei upon bombardment by high-energy protons. Spallation neutron sources (SNS`s) use these neutrons for neutron scattering and diffraction research, and SNS`s are proposed as the basis for systems for tritium production and transmutation of nuclear waste. Materials in SNS`s are exposed to the incident proton beam (energies typically about 1000 MeV) and to the spallation neutrons (spectrum of energies extending up to about 1000 MeV). By contrast the fission neutrons in nuclear reactors have an average energy of only about 2 MeV, and the neutrons in fusion reactors would have energies below about 14 MeV. Furthermore, the protons and neutrons in SNS`s for scattering and diffraction research are pulsed at frequencies of about 10 to 60 Hz, from which significant changes in the kinetics of point and extended defects may be expected. In addition, much higher transmutation rates occur in SNS-irradiated materials, On the whole, then, significant differences in microstructural development and macroscopic properties may result upon exposure in SNS systems, as compared with fission and fusion irradiations. In a more general sense, subjecting materials to new radiation environments has almost routinely led to new discoveries. To the extent that data are avaiable, however, the spallation environment appears to increase the degree of damage without introducing totally new effects. The first part of this presentation is an overview of radiation effects in materials, outlining essential concepts and property changes and their physical bases. This background is followed by a description of SNS irradiation environments and the effects on materials of exposure to these environments. A special discussion is given of the selection of target (e.g., liquid mercury), container (e.g., austenitic stainless steel or ferritic/martensitic steel), and structural materials in SNS systems.

  5. Shock-induced consolidation and spallation of Cu nanopowders

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Han, W. Z.; Luo, S. N.; An, Q.; Goddard, W. A. III

    2012-01-01

    A useful synthesis technique, shock synthesis of bulk nanomaterials from nanopowders, is explored here with molecular dynamics simulations. We choose nanoporous Cu ({approx}11 nm in grain size and 6% porosity) as a representative system, and perform consolidation and spallation simulations. The spallation simulations characterize the consolidated nanopowders in terms of spall strength and damage mechanisms. The impactor is full density Cu, and the impact velocity (u{sub i}) ranges from 0.2 to 2 km s{sup -1}. We present detailed analysis of consolidation and spallation processes, including atomic-level structure and wave propagation features. The critical values of u{sub i} are identified for the onset plasticity at the contact points (0.2 km s{sup -1}) and complete void collapse (0.5 km s{sup -1}). Void collapse involves dislocations, lattice rotation, shearing/friction, heating, and microkinetic energy. Plasticity initiated at the contact points and its propagation play a key role in void collapse at low u{sub i}, while the pronounced, grain-wise deformation may contribute as well at high u{sub i}. The grain structure gives rise to nonplanar shock response at nanometer scales. Bulk nanomaterials from ultrafine nanopowders ({approx}10 nm) can be synthesized with shock waves. For spallation, grain boundary (GB) or GB triple junction damage prevails, while we also observe intragranular voids as a result of GB plasticity.

  6. Tensile property changes of metals irradiated to low doses with fission, fusion and spallation neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.; Hamilton, M.L.; Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1991-11-01

    Radiation effects due to low doses of spallation neutrons are compared directly to those produced by fission and fusion neutrons. Yield stress changes of pure Cu, alumina-dispersion-strengthened Cu and AISI 316 stainless steel irradiated at 36--55{degrees}C in the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) are compared with earlier results of irradiations at 90{degrees}C using 14 MeV D-T fusion neutrons at the Rotating Target Neutron Source and fission reactor neutrons in the Omega West Reactor. At doses up to 0.04 displacements per atom (dpa), the yield stress changes due to the three quite different neutron spectra correlate well on the basis of dpa in the stainless steel and the Cu alloy. However, in pure Cu, the measured yield stress changes due to spallation neutrons were anomalously small and should be verified by additional irradiations. With the exception of pure Cu, the low dose, low temperature experiments reveal no fundamental differences in radiation hardening by fission, fusion or spallation neutrons when compared on the basis of dpa.

  7. Bauxite and alumina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bray, E.L.

    2009-01-01

    The article provides information on bauxite and alumina mining. U.S. states like Alabama, Arkansas and Georgia produced small amounts of bauxite and bauxitic clays for nonmetallurgical uses. Total metallurgical-grade bauxite imports in 2008 is cited. The leading suppliers of bauxite to the U.S. are Jamaica, Guinea and Brazil. The estimated domestic production of alumina in 2008 is mentioned. It also discusses consumption and prices of both bauxite and alumina.

  8. Large Scale Laser Crystallization of Solution-based Alumina-doped Zinc Oxide (AZO) Nanoinks for Highly Transparent Conductive Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Nian, Qiong; Callahan, Michael; Saei, Mojib; Look, David; Efstathiadis, Harry; Bailey, John; Cheng, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    A new method combining aqueous solution printing with UV Laser crystallization (UVLC) and post annealing is developed to deposit highly transparent and conductive Aluminum doped Zinc Oxide (AZO) films. This technique is able to rapidly produce large area AZO films with better structural and optoelectronic properties than most high vacuum deposition, suggesting a potential large-scale manufacturing technique. The optoelectronic performance improvement attributes to UVLC and forming gas annealing (FMG) induced grain boundary density decrease and electron traps passivation at grain boundaries. The physical model and computational simulation developed in this work could be applied to thermal treatment of many other metal oxide films. PMID:26515670

  9. Large Scale Laser Crystallization of Solution-based Alumina-doped Zinc Oxide (AZO) Nanoinks for Highly Transparent Conductive Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nian, Qiong; Callahan, Michael; Saei, Mojib; Look, David; Efstathiadis, Harry; Bailey, John; Cheng, Gary J.

    2015-10-01

    A new method combining aqueous solution printing with UV Laser crystallization (UVLC) and post annealing is developed to deposit highly transparent and conductive Aluminum doped Zinc Oxide (AZO) films. This technique is able to rapidly produce large area AZO films with better structural and optoelectronic properties than most high vacuum deposition, suggesting a potential large-scale manufacturing technique. The optoelectronic performance improvement attributes to UVLC and forming gas annealing (FMG) induced grain boundary density decrease and electron traps passivation at grain boundaries. The physical model and computational simulation developed in this work could be applied to thermal treatment of many other metal oxide films.

  10. Spallator: a new option for nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.; Grand, P.; Takahashi, H.; Powell, J.R.; Kouts, H.J.

    1983-06-01

    The principles of the spallator reactor are reviewed. Advances in linear accelerator technology allow the design and construction of high current (hundreds of mA) continuous wave high energy (thousands of MeV) proton machines in the near term. Spallation neutronic calculations building on existing experimental results, indicate substantial neutron yields on uranium targets. Spallator target assembly designs based on water cooled reactor technology indicate operable efficient systems. Fuel cycles are presented which supply fissile material to thermal power reactors and reduce fission product waste. Preliminary comparative analysis indicates an economically competitive system in which a single purpose self-sufficient spallator supplies fuel to a number of LWRs. The spallator assures a long-term LWR power reactor economy. International interest in advancing the technology is indicated.

  11. The characteristics of alumina scales formed on HVOF-sprayed MCrAlY coatings[High Velocity Oxygen Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, D.; Brandl, W.; Koester, U.

    2000-02-01

    HVOF MCrAlY (M = Ni, Co) coatings were isothermally oxidized in synthetic air between 850 and 1050 C for times up to 167 hr. During thermal spraying, aluminum and yttrium oxidized to form a fine oxide dispersion. The HVOF MCrAlY coatings exhibited a microstructure similar to ODS alloys. The fine dispersion consisted of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and aluminum-yttrium oxides. The oxidation experiments showed that the oxidation rate of HVOF coatings was two times slower than the oxidation rate of VPS MCrAlY coatings. The oxidation mechanism changed mainly in the transient-stage (no metastable modification of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed) and it was assumed that the oxide dispersion hindered diffusion of various elements from the bulk material during oxidation. The formation of the fine oxide dispersion also influenced the adherence of the oxide scale. The microstructures of the transient oxide scales were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  12. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Sheng, Guangyao

    1993-01-01

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  13. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, M.A.; Guangyao Sheng.

    1993-05-04

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  14. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2009-09-30

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  15. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2016-07-12

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  16. Reuse of activated alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Hobensack, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    Activated alumina is used as a trapping media to remove trace quantities of UF{sub 6} from process vent streams. The current uranium recovery method employs concentrated nitric acid which destroys the alumina pellets and forms a sludge which is a storage and disposal problem. A recently developed technique using a distilled water rinse followed by three dilute acid rinses removes on average 97% of the uranium, and leaves the pellets intact with crush strength and surface area values comparable with new material. Trapping tests confirm the effectiveness of the recycled alumina as UF{sub 6} trapping media.

  17. New head picked for European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The UK physicist John Womersley is to become the next director-general of the €1.8bn European Spallation Source (ESS), which is currently being built in Lund, Sweden, by a 17-member consortium of European countries.

  18. Physics and technology of spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G. S.

    2001-05-01

    A substantial body of research is necessary in order to be able to make reliable predictions on the performance and safety of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), in particular of their spallation targets. So far, practical experience has resulted from the development of research neutron sources only. Next to fission and fusion, spallation is an efficient process for releasing neutrons from nuclei. Unlike the other two reactions, it is an endothermal process and can, therefore, not be used per se in energy generation. In order to sustain a spallation reaction, an energetic beam of particles, most commonly protons, must be supplied onto a heavy target. Spallation can, however, play an important role as a source of neutrons whose flux can be easily controlled via the driving beam. Although sophisticated Monte Carlo codes exist to compute all aspects of a spallation facility, many features can be understood on the basis of simple physics arguments. Technically a spallation facility is very demanding, not only because a reliable and economic accelerator of high power is needed to drive the reaction, but also, and in particular, because high levels of radiation and heat are generated in the target which are difficult to cope with. Radiation effects in a spallation environment are different from those commonly encountered in a reactor and are probably even more temperature dependent than the latter because of the high gas production rate. A commonly favored solution is the use of molten heavy metal targets. While radiation damage is not a problem in this case, except for the container, other issues need to be considered. R&D carried out for the development of spallation neutron sources will thus be beneficial also directly for ADS.

  19. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  20. Bauxite and alumina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bray, E.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the bauxite and alumina industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It claims that the U.S. mainly relies on imports for its bauxite consumption. Several states, including Alabama, Arkansas and Georgia, however, produce small amounts of bauxite and bauxitic clays for nonmetallurgical purposes. The major exporters of alumina to the U.S. include Australia, Brazil and Jamaica.

  1. European Spallation Source and Neutron Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeck, James

    2014-03-01

    International collaborations in large-scale scientific projects can link Sciences and Society. Following this goal, the European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries. Scandinavia is providing 50 percent of the construction cost whilst the other member states are providing financial support mainly via in-kind contribution from institutes, laboratories or industries of the given countries. Scientists and engineers from 35 different countries are members of the workforce in Lund who participate in its design and construction. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics by producing very high flux neutrons to study condensed matter physics, chemistry, biology, nuclear physics and materials science. The ESS will be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. A tungsten target and a 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator, composed mainly of superconducting Radio-Frequency components, are used to achieve these goals.

  2. Large pore alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Ternan, M. )

    1994-04-01

    Earlier the authors reported preparation conditions for an alumina material which contained large diameter macropores (0.1-100 [mu]). The preparation variable that caused the formation of the uncommonly large macropores was the large acid/alumina ratios which were very much greater than the ones used in the preparation of conventional porous aluminas. The alumina material had large BET surface areas (200 m[sup 2]/g) and small mercury porosimetry surface areas (1 m[sup 2]/g). This indicated that micropores (d[sub MIP]<2 nm) were present in the alumina, since they were large enough for nitrogen gas molecules to enter, but too small for mercury to enter. As a result they would be too small for significant diffusion rates of residuum molecules. In earlier work, the calcining temperature was fixed at 500[degrees]C. In the current work, variations in both calcining temperature and calcining time were used in an attempt to convert some of the micropores into mesopores. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Spallation of the Galileo probe heat shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1982-06-01

    The Galileo probe heat shield will encounter severe radiative and convective heating during entry into Jupiter's atmosphere. The shield is made of two different carbon phenolic composites; one is chopped-molded, and the other is tape-wrapped, both of which tend to spall under intense heating conditions. To characterize this phenomenon, an experimental program, using a gasdynamic laser, was initiated. Tests were performed at a variety of radiation intensities, and both the total and spallation mass-loss rates were measured and correlated with intensity. These correlations were then applied to calculated flight heating conditions for two model atmospheres. Entry of a 310-kg probe into the nominal atmosphere would result in a spallation mass loss of 6.3 kg, or 7.4% of the expected thermochemical mass loss. Similarly, entry of that probe into the cool-dense atmosphere would result in 11.9 kg of spallation, or about 10% of the expected thermochemical mass loss.

  4. Bauxite and alumina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bray, E.L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of bauxite and alumina in 2009 and presents an outlook for their 2010 performance. There were only several U.S. states that could produce bauxite and bauxitic clays including Georgia, Arkansas, and Alabama. The prices for imported refractory-grade calcined bauxite ranged between 426 U.S. dollars and 554 dollars per ton.

  5. Solid Lubricant For Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Pepper, Stephen V.; Honecy, Frank S.

    1993-01-01

    Outer layer of silver lubricates, while intermediate layer of titanium ensures adhesion. Lubricating outer films of silver deposited on thin intermediate films of titanium on alumina substrates found to reduce sliding friction and wear. Films provide effective lubrication for ceramic seals, bearings, and other hot sliding components in advanced high-temperature engines.

  6. Alumina Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2002-02-01

    The Alumina Technology Roadmap outlines a comprehensive long-term research and development plan that defines the industry's collective future and establishes a clear pathway forward. It emphasizes twelve high-priority R&D areas deemed most significant in addressing the strategic goals.

  7. Neutron Production by Muon Spallation I: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Luu, T; Hagmann, C

    2006-11-13

    We describe the physics and codes developed in the Muon Physics Package. This package is a self-contained Fortran90 module that is intended to be used with the Monte Carlo package MCNPX. We calculate simulated energy spectra, multiplicities, and angular distributions of direct neutrons and pions from muon spallation.

  8. Unified description of fission in fusion and spallation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mancusi, Davide; Charity, Robert J.; Cugnon, Joseph

    2010-10-15

    We present a statistical-model description of fission, in the framework of compound-nucleus decay, which is found to simultaneously reproduce data from both heavy-ion-induced fusion reactions and proton-induced spallation reactions at around 1 GeV. For the spallation reactions, the initial compound-nucleus population is predicted by the Liege intranuclear cascade model. We are able to reproduce experimental fission probabilities and fission-fragment mass distributions in both reactions types with the same parameter sets. However, no unique parameter set was obtained for the fission probability. The introduction of fission transients can be offset by an increase of the ratio of level-density parameters for the saddle-point and ground-state configurations. Changes to the finite-range fission barriers could be offset by a scaling of the Bohr-Wheeler decay width as predicted by Kramers. The parameter sets presented allow accurate prediction of fission probabilities for excitation energies up to 300 MeV and spins up to 60 ({h_bar}/2{pi}).

  9. Alumina forming iron base superalloy

    DOEpatents

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Brady, Michael P.

    2014-08-26

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, consists essentially of, in weight percent 2.5 to 4 Al; 25 to 35 Ni; 12 to 19 Cr; at least 1, up to 4 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; 0.5 to 3 Ti; less than 0.5 V; 0.1 to 1 of at least on element selected from the group consisting of Zr and Hf; 0.03 to 0.2 C; 0.005 to 0.1 B; and base Fe. The weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni. The alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, and contains coherent precipitates of .gamma.'-Ni.sub.3Al, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure. The austenitic matrix is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  10. Deformation Behaviour of Coarse Grain Alumina under Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Satish

    2013-06-01

    To develop better understanding of the shock wave induced deformation behavior of coarse grain alumina ceramics, and for measurement of its Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), in-situ and recovery gas gun experiments have been carried out on coarse grain alumina (grain size ~ 10 μm), prepared in the form of discs (>99.9% TMD) by pressure-less sintering of alpha alumina powder at 1583 K. The HEL value of 1.9 GPa has been determined from the kink in the pressure history recorded using piezoresistance gauge and also from the free surface velocity history of the sample shocked to 9 GPa. The nano-indentation measurements on the alumina samples shocked to 6.5 GPa showed hardness value 15% lower than 21.3 GPa for unshocked alumina, and strong Indentation Size Effect (ISE); the hardness value was still lower and the ISE was stronger for the sample shocked to 12 GPa. The XRD measurements showed reduced particle size and increased microstrains in the shocked alumina fragments. SEM, FESEM and TEM measurements on shock treated samples showed presence of grain localized micro- and nano-scale deformations, micro-cleavages, grain-boundary microcracks, extensive shear induced deformations, and localized micro-fractures, etc. These observations led to the development of a qualitative model for the damage initiation and its subsequent growth mechanisms in shocked alumina. The work performed in collaboration with K.D. Joshi of BARC and A.K. Mukhopadhyay of CGCRI.

  11. Heat Deposit Calculation in Spallation Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmanov, F. I.; Travleev, A. A.; Latysheva, L. N.; Vecchi, M.

    2001-11-01

    The present study concerns the calculation of the heat deposition in one of the EAP-80 basic units - the spallation module including the beam window, lead-bismuth spallation target and primary liquid metal cooling system. It is assumed that the model of sub-critical reactor under investigation is based on ANSALDO-INFN-ENEA-CRS4 reference configuration1. The calculation have been done by means of a couple computer codes: INCC 2 and GEANT3.21 3. These codes have been preliminary tested on the experimental data obtained in 4 for the case of interaction of proton beam and lead-bismuth targets at the energy Ep= 800MeV which is close to energy range relevant for ADS configuration.

  12. INJECTION CHOICE FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRODOWSKI,J.; FEDOTOV,A.; GARDNER,C.; LEE,Y.Y.; RAPARIA,D.; DANILOV,V.; HOLMES,J.; PRIOR,C.; REES,G.; MACHIDA,S.

    2001-06-18

    Injection is key in the low-loss design of high-intensity proton facilities like the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). During the design of both the accumulator and the rapid-cycling-synchrotron version of the SNS, extensive comparison has been made to select injection scenarios that satisfy SNS's low-loss design criteria. This paper presents issues and considerations pertaining to the final choice of the SNS injection systems.

  13. Linac-driven spallation-neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.J.

    1995-05-01

    Strong interest has arisen in accelerator-driven spallation-neutron sources that surpass existing facilities (such as ISIS at Rutherford or LANSCE at Los Alamos) by more than an order of magnitude in beam power delivered to the spallation target. The approach chosen by Los Alamos (as well as the European Spallation Source) provides the full beam energy by acceleration in a linac as opposed to primary acceleration in a synchrotron or other circular device. Two modes of neutron production are visualized for the source. A short-pulse mode produces 1 MW of beam power (at 60 pps) in pulses, of length less than 1 ms, by compression of the linac macropulse through multi-turn injection in an accumulator ring. A long-pulse mode produces a similar beam power with 1-ms-long pulses directly applied to a target. This latter mode rivals the performance of existing reactor facilities to very low neutron energies. Combination with the short-pulse mode addresses virtually all applications.

  14. High Temperature Stability of Potassium Beta Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Kisor, A.; Ryan, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    None. From Objectives section: Evaluate the stability of potassium beta alumina under potassium AMTEC operating conditions. Evaluate the stability regime in which potassium beta alumina can be fabricated.

  15. Bauxite Mining and Alumina Refining

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Neale; Olney, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe bauxite mining and alumina refining processes and to outline the relevant physical, chemical, biological, ergonomic, and psychosocial health risks. Methods: Review article. Results: The most important risks relate to noise, ergonomics, trauma, and caustic soda splashes of the skin/eyes. Other risks of note relate to fatigue, heat, and solar ultraviolet and for some operations tropical diseases, venomous/dangerous animals, and remote locations. Exposures to bauxite dust, alumina dust, and caustic mist in contemporary best-practice bauxite mining and alumina refining operations have not been demonstrated to be associated with clinically significant decrements in lung function. Exposures to bauxite dust and alumina dust at such operations are also not associated with the incidence of cancer. Conclusions: A range of occupational health risks in bauxite mining and alumina refining require the maintenance of effective control measures. PMID:24806720

  16. Basic physics with spallation-neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Michaudon, A.F.

    1994-05-01

    The neutron has unique intrinsic properties widely used in basic and applied sciences. The neutron plays a well-known role in applied sciences and technology and is a unique probe well suited for the exploration of condensed-matter properties. But the neutron is also used for many other basic-physics studies, including nuclear physics, particle physics, fundamental physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. These last studies are briefly reviewed in this paper. Spallation-neutron sources today have unmatched neutron-beam properties for such studies and have great potential in future technological developments whereby these studies could be carried out under much improved conditions.

  17. Gelcasting Polycrystalline Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, M.A.; Zuk, K.J.; Wei, G.C.

    2000-01-01

    OSRAM SYLVANIA INC. is a major U.S. manufacturer of high-intensity lighting. Among its products is the Lumalux TM line of high-pressure sodium vapor arc lamps, which are used for industrial, highway, and street lighting. The key to the performance of these lamps is the polycrystalline alumina (PCA) tube that is used to contain the plasma that is formed in the electric arc. That plasma consists of ionized sodium, mercury, and xenon vapors. The key attributes of the PCA tubes are their transparency ({approximately}97% total transmittance in the visible), their refractoriness (inner wall temperature can reach l2OOC), and their chemical resistance (sodium and mercury vapor are extremely corrosive). The current efficiency of the lamps is very high, up to 100 initial lumens per watt. (Compare incandescent lamps 10-20 lumens per watt, fluorescent lamps 25-90 lumens per watt.)

  18. NOBLE GAS PRODUCTION FROM MERCURY SPALLATION AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, Joe R; Lu, Wei; Schwahn, Scott O

    2013-01-01

    Calculations for predicting the distribution of the products of spallation reactions between high energy protons and target materials are well developed and are used for design and operational applications in many projects both within DOE and in other arenas. These calculations are based on theory and limited experimental data that verifies rates of production of some spallation products exist. At the Spallation Neutron Source, a helium stream from the mercury target flows through a system to remove radioactivity from this mercury target offgas. The operation of this system offers a window through which the production of noble gases from mercury spallation by protons may be observed. This paper describes studies designed to measure the production rates of twelve noble gas isotopes within the Spallation Neutron Source mercury target.

  19. A Compendium of Scale Surface Microstructures: Ni(pt)al Coatings Oxidized at 1150 C for 2000 1-h Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Garg, Anita

    2010-01-01

    The surface structure of scales formed on Ni(Pt)Al coatings was characterized by SEM/EDS/BSE in plan view. Two nominally identical {100} samples of aluminide coated CMSX4 single crystal were oxidized at 1150 C for 2000 1-h cycles and were found to produce somewhat disparate behavior. One sample, with less propensity for coating grain boundary ridge deformation, presented primarily alpha-Al2O3 scale structures, with minimal weight loss and spallation. The original scale structure, still retained over most of the sample, consisted of the classic theta-alpha transformation-induced ridge network structure, with approx. 25 nm crystallographic steps and terraces indicative of surface rearrangement to low energy alumina planes. The scale grain boundary ridges were often decorated with a fine, uniform distribution of (Hf,Ti)O2 particles. Another sample, producing steady state weight losses, exhibited much interfacial spallation and a complex assortment of different structures. Broad areas of interfacial spalling, crystallographically-faceted (Ni,Co)(Al,Cr)2O4 spinel, with an alpha-Al2O3 base scale, were the dominant features. Other regions exhibited nodular spinel grains, with fine or (Ta,Ti)-rich (rutile) particles decorating or interspersed with the spinel. While these features were consistent with a coating that presented more deformation at extruded grain boundaries, the root cause of the different behavior between the duplicate samples could not be conclusively identified.

  20. Status Report on the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1998-10-12

    The purpose of the Spallation Neutron Source Project (SNS) is to generate low-energy neutrons (ambient [{approximately}200 meV] and cold [{approximately}50 meV]) which can be used by up to 18 neutron beam lines to study the structure and functionality of materials. The neutrons are generated by the spallation process initiated by the interactions of 1-GeV protons with a Hg target. These neutrons are reflected by a Pb reflector and are moderated by 2 water (ambient) and 2 super critical hydrogen (cryogenic) moderators. The pulse structure for the 1 MW proton beam is 60 Hertz and < 0.7 {micro}s/pulse. The facility must be upgradable to higher power levels (2- and 4- MW) with minimal operational interruptions. Although not included in the current funding or baseline, a second target station and associated support structure which will be designed to utilize cold neutrons is also considered to be an upgrade that must be incorporated with minimal impact on operations.

  1. Management of tritium European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ene, D.; Andersson, K.; Jensen, M.; Nielsen, S.; Severin, G.

    2015-03-15

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) will produce tritium via spallation and activation processes during operational activities. Within the location of ESS facility in Lund, Sweden site it is mandatory to demonstrate that the management strategy of the produced tritium ensures the compliance with the country regulation criteria. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the different aspects of the tritium management in ESS facility. Besides the design parameter study of the helium coolant purification system of the target the consequences of the tritium releasing into the environment were also analyzed. Calculations show that the annual release of tritium during the normal operations represents a small fraction from the estimated total dose. However, more refined calculations of migration of activated-groundwater should be performed for higher hydraulic conductivities, with the availability of the results on soil examinations. With the assumption of 100% release of tritium to the atmosphere during the occurring of the extreme accidents, it was found as well that the total dose complies with the constraint. (authors)

  2. Using spallation neutron sources for defense research

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Sterbenz, S.M.; Weinacht, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced characterization techniques and accelerated simulation are the cornerstones of the Energy Department`s science-based program to maintain confidence in the safety, reliability, and performance of the US nuclear deterrent in an era of no nuclear testing. Neutrons and protons provided by an accelerator-based facility have an important role to play in this program, impacting several of the key stockpile stewardship and management issues identified by the Department of Defense. Many of the techniques used for defense research at a spallation source have been used for many years for the basic research community, and to a lesser extent by industrial scientists. By providing access to a broad spectrum of researchers with different backgrounds, a spallation source such as the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is able to promote synergistic interaction between defense, basic and industrial researchers. This broadens the scientific basis of the stockpile stewardship program in the short term and will provide spin-off to industrial and basic research in the longer term.

  3. Spallation studies on shock loaded uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.; Hixson, R.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Vorthman, J.E.; Kelly, A.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissel, W.R.

    1997-12-31

    Uranium samples at two different purity levels were used for spall strength measurements at three different stress levels. A 50 mm single-stage gas-gun was used to produce planar impact conditions using Z-cut quartz impactors. Samples of depleted uranium were taken from very high purity material and from material that had 300 ppm of carbon added. A pair of shots was done for each impact strength, one member of the pair with VISAR diagnostics and the second with soft recovery for metallographical examination. A series of increasing final stress states were chosen to effectively freeze the microstructural damage at three places in the development to full spall separation. This allowed determination of the dependence of spall mechanisms on stress level and sample purity. This report will discuss both the results of the metallurgical examination of soft recovered samples and the modeling of the free surface VISAR data. The micrographs taken from the recovered samples show brittle cracking as the spallation failure mechanism. Deformation induced twins are plentiful and obviously play a role in the spallation process. The twins are produced in the initial shock loading and, so, are present already before the fracture process begins. The 1 d characteristics code CHARADE has been used to model the free surface VISAR data.

  4. Alumina-Reinforced Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Alumina-reinforced zirconia composites, used as electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells, were fabricated by hot pressing 10 mol percent yttria-stabilized zirconia (10-YSZ) reinforced with two different forms of alumina particulates and platelets each containing 0 to 30 mol percent alumina. Major mechanical and physical properties of both particulate and platelet composites including flexure strength, fracture toughness, slow crack growth, elastic modulus, density, Vickers microhardness, thermal conductivity, and microstructures were determined as a function of alumina content either at 25 C or at both 25 and 1000 C. Flexure strength and fracture toughness at 1000 C were maximized with 30 particulate and 30 mol percent platelet composites, respectively, while resistance to slow crack growth at 1000 C in air was greater for 30 mol percent platelet composite than for 30 mol percent particulate composites.

  5. Gelcast zirconia-alumina composites

    SciTech Connect

    Omatete, O.O.; Bleier, A.; Westmoreland, C.G.; Young, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Near net-shaped parts of zirconia-alumina composites have been successfully formed by gelcasting, a technique which utilizes in situ polymerization of acrylamide monomers. The high solids loading required for gelcasting ({approximately}50 vol %) was obtained by controlling the pH-dependent stability of the aqueous zirconia-alumina suspensions. A strong correspondence was found among the surface charges on the particles, colloidal stability, and the maximum solids loading. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Development of a gas layer to mitigate cavitation damage in liquid mercury spallation targets

    SciTech Connect

    Felde, David K; Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie

    2008-01-01

    Establish of a gas layer between the flowing liquid and container wall is proposed for mitigating the effects of cavitation in mercury spallation targets. Previous work has shown an order of magnitude decrease in damage for a gas layer developed in a stagnant mercury target for an in-beam experiment. This work is aimed at extending these results to the more complex conditions introduced by a flowing mercury target system. A water-loop has been fabricated to provide initial insights on potential gas injection methods into a flowing liquid. An existing full-scale flow loop designed to simulate the Spallation Neutron Source target system will be used to extend these studies to mercury. A parallel analytical effort is being conducted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to provide direction to the experimental effort. Some preliminary simulations of gas injection through a single hole have been completed and show behavior of the models that is qualitatively meaningful.

  7. Determination of spallation neutron flux through spectral adjustment techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, M. A.; Engle, J. W.; Jackman, K. R.; Nortier, F. M.; Birnbaum, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF) creates medical isotopes using a proton beam impinged on a target stack. Spallation neutrons are created in the interaction of the beam with target. The use of these spallation neutrons to produce additional radionuclides has been proposed. However, the energy distribution and magnitude of the flux is not well understood. A modified SAND-II spectral adjustment routine has been used with radioactivation foils to determine the differential neutron fluence for these spallation neutrons during a standard IPF production run.

  8. Laser-Induced Spallation of Microsphere Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Morgan; Stossel, Melicent; Khanolkar, Amey; Wang, Junlan; Boechler, Nicholas

    2016-08-01

    The detachment of a semiordered monolayer of polystyrene microspheres adhered to an aluminum-coated glass substrate is studied using a laser-induced spallation technique. The microsphere-substrate adhesion force is estimated from substrate surface displacement measurements obtained using optical interferometry, and a rigid-body model that accounts for the inertia of the microspheres. The estimated adhesion force is compared with estimates obtained using an adhesive contact model together with interferometric measurements of the out-of-plane microsphere contact resonance, and with estimated work of adhesion values for the polystyrene-aluminum interface. Scanning electron microscope images of detached monolayer regions reveal a unique morphology, namely, partially detached monolayer flakes composed of single hexagonal close packed crystalline domains. This work contributes to the fields of microsphere adhesion and contact dynamics, and demonstrates a unique monolayer delamination morphology. PMID:27409715

  9. Spallation neutron source/proposed rf system

    SciTech Connect

    Meth, M.; Brennan, J.M.

    1993-09-30

    The rf system for the synchrotrons of the spallation neutron source is designed to accelerate 1.4 {times} 10{sup 14} protons/pulse to an energy of 3.6 GeV. Injection energy is 600 MeV. The synchrotron repetition frequency is 30 Hz, with a 50% duty factor. The choice of operating frequency is somewhat arbitrary. The authors propose a low frequency of 1.3 to 1.6 MHz, which is the second harmonic of the revolution frequency. The advantages of such a low frequency system are: (1) There will be two bunches in the machines and the time between bunches will be sufficiently long to allow for the rise time of the extraction kicker. No missing bunches will be necessary, which simplifies injection, and transient beam loading problems are avoided. (2) With only two bunches there are no unstable coupled-bunch modes of longitudinal instability. (3) In multi-gap low frequency cavities the transient time factor is essentially unity because the rf wavelength is much longer than the cavity dimensions. (4) Cavities in this low frequency range are basically lumped-element type structures, where the sources of the inductance and capacitance are clearly identified. This allows effective control of higher order mode impedances in such cavities. (5) Ferrite-loaded low-frequency cavities are necessarily low impedance structures; ferrites are lossy. This low impedance makes it possible to achieve system stability without large amounts of feedback in a heavily beam loaded system. (6) BNL has a good deal of experience in building rf systems in this range of frequency, voltage, and power level. This report outlines the essential parameters of a practical rf system for the synchrotrons of the Spallation Neutron Source. The design uses materials, ferrites and vacuum tubes, that are commercially available and with which the laboratory has recent experience.

  10. The European scene regarding spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.S.

    1996-06-01

    In Europe, a short pulse spallation neutron source, ISIS, has been operating for over 10 years, working its way up to a beam power level of 200 kW. A continuous source, SINQ, designed for a beam power of up to 1 MW, is scheduled to start operating at the end of 1996, and a detailed feasibility study has been completed for a 410 kW short pulse source, AUSTRON. Each of these sources seems to have settled for a target concept which is at or near the limits of its feasibility: The ISIS depleted uranium plate targets, heavy water cooled and Zircaloy clad, have so far not shown satisfactory service time and operation is likely to continue with a Ta-plate target, which, in the past has been used successfully for the equivalent of one full-beam-year before it was taken out of service due to degrading thermal properties. SINQ will initially use a rod target, made of Zircaloy only, but plans exist to move on to clad lead rods as quickly as possible. Apart from the not yet explored effect of hydrogen and helium production, there are also concerns about the generation of 7-Be in the cooling water from the spallation of oxygen, which might result in undesirably high radioactivity in the cooling plant room. A Liquid metal target, also under investigation for SINQ, would not only reduce this problem to a level of about 10 %, but would also minimize the risk of radiolytic corrosion in the beam interaction zone. Base on similar arguments, AUSTRON has been designed for edge cooled targets, but thermal and stress analyses show, that this concept is not feasible at higher power levels.

  11. Spallation nucleosynthesis by accelerated charged-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2008-05-12

    Recent observations have suggested the presence of radioactive elements, such as Pm and 84{<=}Z{<=}99 elements) at the surface of the magnetic star HD101065, also known as Przybylski's star. This star is know to be a chemically peculiar star and its anomalous 38spallation processes resulting from the interaction of the stellar material with stellar energetic particle can by themselves only explain the abundances determined by observation at the surface of HD101065. We show that specific parametric simulations can explain many different observational aspects, and in particular that a significant production of Z>30 heavy elements can be achieved. In this nucleosynthesis process, the secondary-neutron captures play a crucial role. The most attractive feature of the spallation process is the systematic production of Pm and Tc and the possible synthesis of actinides and sub-actinides.Based on such a parametric model, it is also shown that intense fluences of accelerated charged-particles interacting with surrounding material can efficiently produce elements heavier than iron. Different regimes are investigated and shown to be at the origin of p- and s-nuclei in the case of high-fluence low-flux events and r-nuclei for high-fluence high-flux irradiations. The possible existence of such irradiation events need to be confirmed by hydrodynamics simulations, but most of all by spectroscopic observations through the detection of short-lived radio-elements.

  12. Gelcasting polycrystalline alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, M.A.

    1997-04-01

    This work is being done as part of a CRADA with Osram-Sylvania, Inc. (OSI) OSI is a major U.S. manufacturer of high-intensity lighting. Among its products is the Lumalux{reg_sign} line of high-pressure sodium vapor arc lamps, which are used for industrial, highway, and street lighting. The key to the performance of these lamps is the polycrystalline alumina (PCA) tube that is used to contain the plasma that is formed in the electric arc. That plasma consists of ionized sodium, mercury, and xenon vapors. The key attributes of the PCA tubes are their transparency (95% total transmittance in the visible region), their refractoriness (inner wall temperature can reach 1400{degrees}C), and their chemical resistance (sodium and mercury vapor are extremely corrosive). The current efficiency of the lamps is very high, on the order of several hundred lumens / watt. (Compare - incandescent lamps -13 lumens/watt fluorescent lamps -30 lumens/watt.) Osram-Sylvania would like to explore using gelcasting to form PCA tubes for Lumalux{reg_sign} lamps, and eventually for metal halide lamps (known as quartz-halogen lamps). Osram-Sylvania, Inc. currently manufactures PCA tubes by isostatic pressing. This process works well for the shapes that they presently use. However, there are several types of tubes that are either difficult or impossible to make by isostatic pressing. It is the desire to make these new shapes and sizes of tubes that has prompted Osram-Sylvania`s interest in gelcasting. The purpose of the CRADA is to determine the feasibility of making PCA items having sufficient optical quality that they are useful in lighting applications using gelcasting.

  13. Estimation of neutron-induced spallation yields of krypton isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karol, Paul J.; Tobin, Michael J.; Shibata, Seiichi

    1983-10-01

    A procedure is outlined for estimating cross sections for neutron-induced spallation products relative to those for proton-induced reactions. When combined with known proton spallation systematics, it is demonstrated that cumulative yields for cosmogenically-important stable 84Kr and 86Kr isotopes are ~1.4 and ~2.8 times greater, respectively, for incident neutrons compared to protons at 0.2<=E<=3.0 GeV for nearby medium mass targets. Yields for lighter kryptons are relatively insensitive to the identity of the incident nucleon. NUCLEAR REACTIONS (n, spallation), 0.2<=En<=3.0 GeV, stable Kr product yield estimates from proton spallation systematics.

  14. Proceedings of the international workshop on spallation materials technology

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, L.K.; Ullmaier, H.

    1996-10-01

    This document contains papers which were presented at the International Workshop on Spallation Materials Technology. Topics included: overviews and thermal response; operational experience; materials experience; target station and component design; particle transport and damage calculations; neutron sources; and compatibility.

  15. Influence of Alumina Reaction Tube Impurities on the Oxidation of Chemically-Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth

    1995-01-01

    Pure coupons of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were oxidized for 100 h in dry flowing oxygen at 1300 C. The oxidation kinetics were monitored using thermogravimetry (TGA). The experiments were first performed using high-purity alumina reaction tubes. The experiments were then repeated using fused quartz reaction tubes. Differences in oxidation kinetics, scale composition, and scale morphology were observed. These differences were attributed to impurities in the alumina tubes. Investigators interested in high-temperature oxidation of silica formers should be aware that high-purity alumina can have significant effects on experiment results.

  16. Development of Cast Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, G.; Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; Walker, L. R.; Meyer, H. M., III; Leonard, D. N.

    2016-09-01

    Cast Fe-Ni-Cr chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels with Ni levels up to 45 wt.% are used at high temperatures in a wide range of industrial applications that demand microstructural stability, corrosion resistance, and creep strength. Although alumina scales offer better corrosion protection at these temperatures, designing cast austenitic alloys that form a stable alumina scale and achieve creep strength comparable to existing cast chromia-forming alloys is challenging. This work outlines the development of cast Fe-Ni-Cr-Al austenitic stainless steels containing about 25 wt.% Ni with good creep strength and the ability to form a protective alumina scale for use at temperatures up to 800-850°C in H2O-, S-, and C-containing environments. Creep properties of the best alloy were comparable to that of HK-type cast chromia-forming alloys along with improved oxidation resistance typical of alumina-forming alloys. Challenges in the design of cast alloys and a potential path to increasing the temperature capability are discussed.

  17. Nickel in high-alumina basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedge, C.E.

    1971-01-01

    New analyses of high-alumina basalts reveal an average nickel content higher than previously indicated. Ni in high-alumina basalts correlates with magnesium in the same way as it does in other basalt types. There is therefore no reason, based on Ni contents, to hypothesize a special origin for high-alumina basalts and it is permissible (based on Ni contents) to form andesites by fractional crystallization from high-alumina basalts. ?? 1971.

  18. Porous alumina scaffold produced by sol-gel combined polymeric sponge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasmaliza, M.; Fazliah, M. N.; Shafinaz, R. J.

    2012-09-01

    Sol gel is a novel method used to produce high purity alumina with nanometric scale. In this study, three-dimensional porous alumina scaffold was produced using sol-gel polymeric sponge method. Briefly, sol gel alumina was prepared by evaporation and polymeric sponge cut to designated sizes were immersed in the sol gel followed by sintering at 1250 and 1550°C. In order to study the cell interaction, the porous alumina scaffold was sterilized using autoclave prior to Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (HMSCs) seeding on the scaffold and the cell proliferation was assessed by alamarBlue® assay. SEM results showed that during the 21 day period, HMSCs were able to attach on the scaffold surface and the interconnecting pores while maintaining its proliferation. These findings suggested the potential use of the porous alumina produced as a scaffold for implantation procedure.

  19. Attrition resistant gamma-alumina catalyst support

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2006-03-14

    A .gamma.-alumina catalyst support having improved attrition resistance produced by a method comprising the steps of treating a particulate .gamma.-alumina material with an acidic aqueous solution comprising water and nitric acid and then, prior to adding any catalytic material thereto, calcining the treated .gamma.-alumina.

  20. Deexcitation Modes in Spallation Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, F. G.; Guzmán, F.; Rodriguez, O.; Tumbarell, O.; Souza, D. A.; Samana, A. R.; Andrade-II, E.; Bernal Castillo, J. L.; Deppman, A.

    2016-08-01

    Spallation nuclear reactions in the range of 0.2 to 1.2 GeV are studied using the CRISP code. A new approach for the deexcitation stage of the compound nucleus was introduced. For the calculations of the level densities, this approach is based on the Back-shifted Fermi gas model (BSFG), which takes into account pairing effects and shell corrections, whereas the calculation of the fission barriers were performed by means of the Extended Thomas-Fermi plus Strutinsky Integral (ETFSI) method, which is a high-speed approximation to the Hartree-Fock method with pairing correlations treated as in the usual BCS plus blocking approach. This procedure is more appropriate to calculate level densities for exotic nuclei. Satisfactory results were obtained and compared with experimental data obtained in the GSI experiments. As another important result, we highlight some directions for the development of a qualitatively superior version of the CRISP code with the implementation of more realistic and suitable physical models to be applied in stable and exotic nuclei that participate in the process. This new version of the code includes several substantial changes in the decay of the hot compound nucleus which allow satisfactory agreement with the experimental data and a reduction of the adjustment parameters.

  1. Cryogenics at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisend, J. G., II; Arnold, P.; Hees, J. Fydrych. W.; Jurns, J. M.; Wang, X. L.

    Cryogenics plays an important role at the European Spallation Source, a world class neutron science center, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. Three principal applications of cryogenics are found at ESS. The SRF cryomodules of the ESS proton linac require cooling at 2 K, 4.5 K and 40 K; the hydrogenmoderator surrounding the target that produces neutrons, requires cooling via 16.5 K helium and LHe is required for many of the scientific instruments. These needs will be met by a set of three cryogenic refrigeration/liquefaction plants and an extensive cryogenic distribution system. Significant progress has been made on the ESS cryogenic system in preparation for the expected first beam on target in 2019. This work includes: funding of industry studies for the accelerator cryoplant, preliminary design of the cryogenic distribution system, investigation of possible in kind contributors and release of the invitation to tender for the accelerator cryoplant.This paper describes the requirements, design solutions and current status of the ESS cryogenic system. The planned recovery of waste heat from the cryogenic plants, a unique aspect of ESS, is described. The procurement of the cryogenic system, expected to be done via a combination of purchase via competitive bids and in kind contributions is also discussed.

  2. Cryogenic System for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Arenius, D.; Chronis, W.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2004-06-23

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a neutron-scattering facility being built at Oak Ridge, TN for the US Department of Energy. The SNS accelerator linac consists of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities in cryostats (cryomodules). The linac cryomodules are cooled to 2.1 K by a 2300 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. As an SNS partner laboratory, Jefferson Lab is responsible for the installed integrated cryogenic system design for the SNS linac accelerator consisting of major subsystem equipment engineered and procured from industry. Jefferson Lab's work included developing the major vendor subsystem equipment procurement specifications, equipment procurement, and the integrated system engineering support of the field installation and commissioning. The major cryogenic system components include liquid nitrogen storage, gaseous helium storage, cryogen distribution transfer line system, 2.1-K cold box consisting of four stages of cold compressors, 4.5-K cold box, warm helium compressors with its associated oil removal, gas management, helium purification, gas impurity monitoring systems, and the supportive utilities of electrical power, cooling water and instrument air. The system overview, project organization, the important aspects, and the capabilities of the cryogenic system are described.

  3. The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Abraham, W.; Aleksandrov, A.; Allen, C.; Alonso, J.; Anderson, D.; Arenius, D.; Arthur, T.; Assadi, S.; Ayers, J.; Bach, P.; Badea, V.; Battle, R.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Bergmann, B.; Bernardin, J.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Birke, T.; Bjorklund, E.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Blind, B.; Blokland, W.; Bookwalter, V.; Borovina, D.; Bowling, S.; Bradley, J.; Brantley, C.; Brennan, J.; Brodowski, J.; Brown, S.; Brown, R.; Bruce, D.; Bultman, N.; Cameron, P.; Campisi, I.; Casagrande, F.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Champion, M.; Champion, M.; Chen, Z.; Cheng, D.; Cho, Y.; Christensen, K.; Chu, C.; Cleaves, J.; Connolly, R.; Cote, T.; Cousineau, S.; Crandall, K.; Creel, J.; Crofford, M.; Cull, P.; Cutler, R.; Dabney, R.; Dalesio, L.; Daly, E.; Damm, R.; Danilov, V.; Davino, D.; Davis, K.; Dawson, C.; Day, L.; Deibele, C.; Delayen, J.; DeLong, J.; Demello, A.; DeVan, W.; Digennaro, R.; Dixon, K.; Dodson, G.; Doleans, M.; Doolittle, L.; Doss, J.; Drury, M.; Elliot, T.; Ellis, S.; Error, J.; Fazekas, J.; Fedotov, A.; Feng, P.; Fischer, J.; Fox, W.; Fuja, R.; Funk, W.; Galambos, J.; Ganni, V.; Garnett, R.; Geng, X.; Gentzlinger, R.; Giannella, M.; Gibson, P.; Gillis, R.; Gioia, J.; Gordon, J.; Gough, R.; Greer, J.; Gregory, W.; Gribble, R.; Grice, W.; Gurd, D.; Gurd, P.; Guthrie, A.; Hahn, H.; Hardek, T.; Hardekopf, R.; Harrison, J.; Hatfield, D.; He, P.; Hechler, M.; Heistermann, F.; Helus, S.; Hiatt, T.; Hicks, S.; Hill, J.; Hill, J.; Hoff, L.; Hoff, M.; Hogan, J.; Holding, M.; Holik, P.; Holmes, J.; Holtkamp, N.; Hovater, C.; Howell, M.; Hseuh, H.; Huhn, A.; Hunter, T.; Ilg, T.; Jackson, J.; Jain, A.; Jason, A.; Jeon, D.; Johnson, G.; Jones, A.; Joseph, S.; Justice, A.; Kang, Y.; Kasemir, K.; Keller, R.; Kersevan, R.; Kerstiens, D.; Kesselman, M.; Kim, S.; Kneisel, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kuneli, T.; Kurennoy, S.; Kustom, R.; Kwon, S.; Ladd, P.; Lambiase, R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Lewis, S.; Liaw, C.; Lionberger, C.; Lo, C. C.; Long, C.; Ludewig, H.; Ludvig, J.; Luft, P.; Lynch, M.; Ma, H.; MacGill, R.; Macha, K.; Madre, B.; Mahler, G.; Mahoney, K.; Maines, J.; Mammosser, J.; Mann, T.; Marneris, I.; Marroquin, P.; Martineau, R.; Matsumoto, K.; McCarthy, M.; McChesney, C.; McGahern, W.; McGehee, P.; Meng, W.; Merz, B.; Meyer, R.; Meyer, R.; Miller, B.; Mitchell, R.; Mize, J.; Monroy, M.; Munro, J.; Murdoch, G.; Musson, J.; Nath, S.; Nelson, R.; Nelson, R.; O`Hara, J.; Olsen, D.; Oren, W.; Oshatz, D.; Owens, T.; Pai, C.; Papaphilippou, I.; Patterson, N.; Patterson, J.; Pearson, C.; Pelaia, T.; Pieck, M.; Piller, C.; Plawski, T.; Plum, M.; Pogge, J.; Power, J.; Powers, T.; Preble, J.; Prokop, M.; Pruyn, J.; Purcell, D.; Rank, J.; Raparia, D.; Ratti, A.; Reass, W.; Reece, K.; Rees, D.; Regan, A.; Regis, M.; Reijonen, J.; Rej, D.; Richards, D.; Richied, D.; Rode, C.; Rodriguez, W.; Rodriguez, M.; Rohlev, A.; Rose, C.; Roseberry, T.; Rowton, L.; Roybal, W.; Rust, K.; Salazer, G.; Sandberg, J.; Saunders, J.; Schenkel, T.; Schneider, W.; Schrage, D.; Schubert, J.; Severino, F.; Shafer, R.; Shea, T.; Shishlo, A.; Shoaee, H.; Sibley, C.; Sims, J.; Smee, S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K.; Spitz, R.; Staples, J.; Stein, P.; Stettler, M.; Stirbet, M.; Stockli, M.; Stone, W.; Stout, D.; Stovall, J.; Strelo, W.; Strong, H.; Sundelin, R.; Syversrud, D.; Szajbler, M.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Tang, J.; Tanke, E.; Tepikian, S.; Thomae, R.; Thompson, D.; Thomson, D.; Thuot, M.; Treml, C.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tuzel, W.; Vassioutchenko, A.; Virostek, S.; Wallig, J.; Wanderer, P.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. G.; Wangler, T.; Warren, D.; Wei, J.; Weiss, D.; Welton, R.; Weng, J.; Weng, W.-T.; Wezensky, M.; White, M.; Whitlatch, T.; Williams, D.; Williams, E.; Wilson, K.; Wiseman, M.; Wood, R.; Wright, P.; Wu, A.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Young, K.; Young, L.; Yourd, R.; Zachoszcz, A.; Zaltsman, A.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was designed and constructed by a collaboration of six U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories. The SNS accelerator system consists of a 1 GeV linear accelerator and an accumulator ring providing 1.4 MW of proton beam power in microsecond-long beam pulses to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. The accelerator complex consists of a front-end negative hydrogen-ion injector system, an 87 MeV drift tube linear accelerator, a 186 MeV side-coupled linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, a 248-m circumference accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines. The accelerator complex is supported by ~100 high-power RF power systems, a 2 K cryogenic plant, ~400 DC and pulsed power supply systems, ~400 beam diagnostic devices and a distributed control system handling ~100,000 I/O signals. The beam dynamics design of the SNS accelerator is presented, as is the engineering design of the major accelerator subsystems.

  4. Synchrotron based spallation neutron source concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.

    1998-07-01

    During the past 20 years, rapid-cycling synchrotrons (RCS) have been used very productively to generate short-pulse thermal neutron beams for neutron scattering research by materials science communities in Japan (KENS), the UK (ISIS) and the US (IPNS). The most powerful source in existence, ISIS in the UK, delivers a 160-kW proton beam to a neutron-generating target. Several recently proposed facilities require proton beams in the MW range to produce intense short-pulse neutron beams. In some proposals, a linear accelerator provides the beam power and an accumulator ring compresses the pulse length to the required {approx} 1 {micro}s. In others, RCS technology provides the bulk of the beam power and compresses the pulse length. Some synchrotron-based proposals achieve the desired beam power by combining two or more synchrotrons of the same energy, and others propose a combination of lower and higher energy synchrotrons. This paper presents the rationale for using RCS technology, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of synchrotron-based spallation sources.

  5. Alumina-Enhanced Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Marnell; Leiser, Dan; Goldstein, Howard

    1989-01-01

    Rigid, fibrous ceramic tile material called "alumina-enhanced thermal barrier" (AETB) extends temperature capability of insulating materials. Material has obvious potential for terrestrial use in kilns, furnaces, heat engines, and other applications in which light weight and high operating temperature are specified. Three kinds of ceramic fibers are blended, molded, and sintered to make refractory tiles.

  6. Spallation reactions: A successful interplay between modeling and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, J.-C.

    2015-06-01

    The spallation reactions are a type of nuclear reaction which occur in space by interaction of the cosmic rays with interstellar bodies. The first spallation reactions induced with an accelerator took place in 1947 at the Berkeley cyclotron (University of California) with 200MeV deuterons and 400MeV alpha beams. They highlighted the multiple emission of neutrons and charged particles and the production of a large number of residual nuclei far different from the target nuclei. In the same year, R. Serber described the reaction in two steps: a first and fast one with high-energy particle emission leading to an excited remnant nucleus, and a second one, much slower, the de-excitation of the remnant. In 2010 IAEA organized a workshop to present the results of the most widely used spallation codes within a benchmark of spallation models. If one of the goals was to understand the deficiencies, if any, in each code, one remarkable outcome points out the overall high-quality level of some models and so the great improvements achieved since Serber. Particle transport codes can then rely on such spallation models to treat the reactions between a light particle and an atomic nucleus with energies spanning from few tens of MeV up to some GeV. An overview of the spallation reactions modeling is presented in order to point out the incomparable contribution of models based on basic physics to numerous applications where such reactions occur. Validations or benchmarks, which are necessary steps in the improvement process, are also addressed, as well as the potential future domains of development. Spallation reactions modeling is a representative case of continuous studies aiming at understanding a reaction mechanism and which end up in a powerful tool.

  7. Spallation Characteristics of Poly-Methyl Meth-Acrylic (PMMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowski, Peter; Dandekar, D. P.

    1999-06-01

    This work describes the results derived from plane shock wave spallation experiments performed on Poly-Methyl Meth-Acrylic (PMMA) Polymer. These experiments were conducted using the Army Research Laboratories 102 mm Bore, 8 m long Light Gas Gun located at Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD. The PMMA used in this work was manufactured by Rohm & Haas as their Ultra-Violet Absorbing (UVA), Type II Plexiglass. Its density is 1.188 Mg/m3 and longitudinal shock velocity is 2.72 mm/μ s. Spallation experiments were conducted at impact stresses between 0.2 and 2.0 GPa. The PMMA appears to exhibit a constant tensile strength of 0.15 GPa up to an impact stress of 0.75 GPa. Unlike metal and ceramic materials, the PMMA exhibits a dwell time in the spallation inversly proportional to the impact stress. At a low impact stress of 0.40 GPa, spallation of the PMMA occurs over a time period of 0.80 micro-seconds. At an impact stress of 0.75 GPa, the spallation occurs over 0.40 micro-seconds. This variation in time required to spall the PMMA will be analyzed and theories discussed.

  8. Radiation damage problems in high power spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmaier, H.; Carsughi, F.

    1995-08-01

    In planning the next generation of spallation sources with proton beam powers of several MW (as, for example, the European Spallation Source, ESS), it was soon recognized that materials' degradation by radiation damage will be the most problematic factor in determining the efficiency, lifetime and availability of high power spallation targets. This article gives a short introduction to the physics of radiation damage in metals and points out the differences in the irradiation conditions for materials in fission, fusion and spallation environments, respectively. Based on the expected displacement damage (dpa), hydrogen and helium production, temperatures and stresses we then attempt to identify the critical radiation damage effects for target, window and structural materials. The following compilation of data on proton irradiation of candidate materials (Ta, W, Al and their alloys) shows that the present data base is by far too narrow for materials' selection or lifetime predictions. Since such information is urgently needed for conceptual designs, further investigations are planned beginning with the examination (mechanical tests and TEM in hot cells) of already irradiated specimens: a Ta target assembly removed recently from ISIS at RAL; steel and Al beam windows and TEM specimens irradiated in LANL and PSI, respectively. Parallel to these efforts new irradiations are foreseen in a dual beam facility, in ISOLDE at CERN, and in the spallation source SINQ which is expected to start operation in 1996.

  9. Comparison between experiments and molecular dynamic simulations of spallation induced by ultra-short laser shock on micrometric Tantalum targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuq-Lelandais, Jean-Paul; Boustie, Michel; Soulard, Laurent; Berthe, Laurent; Sollier, Arnaud; Bontaz-Carion, Joelle; Combis, Patrick; de Resseguier, Thibaut; Lescoute, Emilien

    2009-06-01

    Shock wave propagation and the spallation within materials induced by laser shock have been investigated for roughly two decades. With the latest laser technologies evolution, one can access to shorter regimes in durations, going below the picosecond range. Shots performed with the LULI 100TW facility evidence the possibility to obtain spallation in a few microns thick metallic target. Such conditions provide an experimental data layout directly comparable with molecular dynamic simulations accessible to these scales. Molecular dynamic simulations on a single crystal of Tantalum have been performed with the CEA TERA 10 computer. First, the Hugoniot calculated by the equilibrium molecular dynamics has been compared with experimental data to check the potential (EAM) relevance to reproduce the shock wave propagation. Then, a large scale simulation on a micrometric target has been performed. We have observed the microscopic ductile damage process, the pore apparition and their time and space evolution. The results are compared with experimental results and classical one- dimensional hydrodynamic simulations.

  10. Modeling of water radiolysis at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Daemen, L.L.; Kanner, G.S.; Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Brun, T.O.; Sommer, W.F.

    1998-12-01

    In spallation neutron sources neutrons are produced when a beam of high-energy particles (e.g., 1 GeV protons) collides with a (water-cooled) heavy metal target such as tungsten. The resulting spallation reactions produce a complex radiation environment (which differs from typical conditions at fission and fusion reactors) leading to the radiolysis of water molecules. Most water radiolysis products are short-lived but extremely reactive. When formed in the vicinity of the target surface they can react with metal atoms, thereby contributing to target corrosion. The authors will describe the results of calculations and experiments performed at Los Alamos to determine the impact on target corrosion of water radiolysis in the spallation radiation environment. The computational methodology relies on the use of the Los Alamos radiation transport code, LAHET, to determine the radiation environment, and the AEA code, FACSIMILE, to model reaction-diffusion processes.

  11. Monte Carlo modeling of spallation targets containing uranium and americium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshkin, Yury; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2014-09-01

    Neutron production and transport in spallation targets made of uranium and americium are studied with a Geant4-based code MCADS (Monte Carlo model for Accelerator Driven Systems). A good agreement of MCADS results with experimental data on neutron- and proton-induced reactions on 241Am and 243Am nuclei allows to use this model for simulations with extended Am targets. It was demonstrated that MCADS model can be used for calculating the values of critical mass for 233,235U, 237Np, 239Pu and 241Am. Several geometry options and material compositions (U, U + Am, Am, Am2O3) are considered for spallation targets to be used in Accelerator Driven Systems. All considered options operate as deep subcritical targets having neutron multiplication factor of k∼0.5. It is found that more than 4 kg of Am can be burned in one spallation target during the first year of operation.

  12. Characterization of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, Douglas D.; Cherkashyna, Nataliia; Scherzinger, Julius; Khaplanov, Anton; Pfeiffer, Dorothea; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Fissum, Kevin G.; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kirstein, Oliver; Ehlers, Georg; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Hornbach, Donald E.; Iverson, Erik B.; Newby, Robert J.; Hall-Wilton, Richard J.; Bentley, Phillip M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a survey of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN, USA during routine daily operation. A broad range of detectors was used to characterize primarily the neutron and photon fields throughout the facility. These include a WENDI-2 extended range dosimeter, a thermoscientific NRD, an Arktis 4He detector, and a standard NaI photon detector. The information gathered from the detectors was used to map out the neutron dose rates throughout the facility and also the neutron dose rate and flux profiles of several different beamlines. The survey provides detailed information useful for developing future shielding concepts at spallation neutron sources, such as the European Spallation Source (ESS), currently under construction in Lund, Sweden.

  13. Split-target neutronics and the MLNSC spallation target system

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Ferguson, P.D.; Pitcher, E.J.; Court, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The Manuel Lujan, Jr., Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is one of four operating Short-Pulse Spallation Sources worldwide. The MLNSC target system (composed of targets, moderators, and reflectors) was first installed in 1985. The target system employs a split tungsten spallation target with a void space in between (the flux-trap gap); this target system will be upgraded in 1998. The ability to efficiently split a spallation target allowed us to introduce the concept of flux-trap moderators and ultimately the notion of backscattering and upstream moderators. The upgraded MLNSC target system will employ both flux-trap and upstream/backscattering moderators to simultaneously service 16 neutron flight paths with high-intensity neutron beams for materials science research.

  14. Production and segregation of transmutation elements Ca, Ti, Sc in the F82H steel under mixed spectrum irradiation of high energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksenko, Viacheslav; Pareige, Cristelle; Pareige, Philippe; Dai, Yong

    2014-04-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steel F82H was irradiated at 345 °C in a mixed proton-neutron spectrum in the Swiss spallation neutron source up to 20.3 dpa. Nanoscale investigations using the atom probe tomography (APT) technique were performed in order to study the atomic scale evolution of the microstructure of the F82H steel under irradiation. Spallation products Ca, Ti and Sc have been detected. The irradiation led to the production of about 370 appm of Ca, 90 appm of Sc and 800 appm of Ti. APT experiments revealed that regardless their low bulk concentrations, the spallation products extensively participate in the evolution of the microstructure: formation of radiation-induced clusters, segregation at the dislocation loops and alteration of the microchemistry of carbides. In this paper, a quantitative description of the observed features is presented and results are compared with TEM data of the literature obtained on the same steel and under similar irradiation conditions.

  15. Neutron scattering instrumentation for biology at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1994-12-31

    Conventional wisdom holds that since biological entities are large, they must be studied with cold neutrons, a domain in which reactor sources of neutrons are often supposed to be pre-eminent. In fact, the current generation of pulsed spallation neutron sources, such as LANSCE at Los Alamos and ISIS in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a capability for small angle scattering (SANS) - a typical cold- neutron application - that was not anticipated five years ago. Although no one has yet built a Laue diffractometer at a pulsed spallation source, calculations show that such an instrument would provide an exceptional capability for protein crystallography at one of the existing high-power spoliation sources. Even more exciting is the prospect of installing such spectrometers either at a next-generation, short-pulse spallation source or at a long-pulse spallation source. A recent Los Alamos study has shown that a one-megawatt, short-pulse source, which is an order of magnitude more powerful than LANSCE, could be built with today`s technology. In Europe, a preconceptual design study for a five-megawatt source is under way. Although such short-pulse sources are likely to be the wave of the future, they may not be necessary for some applications - such as Laue diffraction - which can be performed very well at a long-pulse spoliation source. Recently, it has been argued by Mezei that a facility that combines a short-pulse spallation source similar to LANSCE, with a one-megawatt, long-pulse spallation source would provide a cost-effective solution to the global shortage of neutrons for research. The basis for this assertion as well as the performance of some existing neutron spectrometers at short-pulse sources will be examined in this presentation.

  16. Alumina as a Thermoluminescent Material

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, Erdem; Yarar, Yasemin

    2007-04-23

    Thermoluminescence dosimeters are extensively used for quantitative dose measurements in various irradiation fields. They are also important for environmental monitoring after nuclear accident and weapon tests. In this work, the principles of TLD dosimeter and characteristics of several TLD materials are presented. Besides, taken into account the importance as a raw material, the utilization of domestic alumina (Al2O3) in TLDs as a thermoluminescent material is discussed.

  17. Charge-induced reversible bending in nanoporous alumina-aluminum composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chuan; Ngan, A. H. W.

    2013-05-01

    Upon electrical charging, reversible bending was found in nanoporous anodic alumina-aluminum foil composites, as directly observed by an optical microscope and detected by in situ nanoindentation. The bending is thought to be the result of charge-induced surface stresses in the nanoporous alumina. The results suggest the possibility of a type of composite foil materials for applications as micro-scale actuators to transform electrical energy into mechanical energy.

  18. BEAM LOSS MITIGATION IN THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator complex routinely delivers 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. Due to this high beam power, understanding and minimizing the beam loss is an ongoing focus area of the accelerator physics program. In some areas of the accelerator facility the equipment parameters corresponding to the minimum loss are very different from the design parameters. In this presentation we will summarize the SNS beam loss measurements, the methods used to minimize the beam loss, and compare the design vs. the loss-minimized equipment parameters.

  19. Detection of supernova neutrinos at spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Yang; Guo, Xin-Heng; Young, Bing-Lin

    2016-07-01

    After considering supernova shock effects, Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, neutrino collective effects, and Earth matter effects, the detection of supernova neutrinos at the China Spallation Neutron Source is studied and the expected numbers of different flavor supernova neutrinos observed through various reaction channels are calculated with the neutrino energy spectra described by the Fermi-Dirac distribution and the “beta fit” distribution respectively. Furthermore, the numerical calculation method of supernova neutrino detection on Earth is applied to some other spallation neutron sources, and the total expected numbers of supernova neutrinos observed through different reactions channels are given. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205185, 11175020, 11275025, 11575023)

  20. Method for preparing Pb-. beta. ''-alumina ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Hellstrom, E.E.

    1984-08-30

    A process is disclosed for preparing impermeable, polycrystalline samples of Pb-..beta..''-alumina ceramic from Na-..beta..''-alumina ceramic by ion exchange. The process comprises two steps. The first step is a high-temperature vapor phase exchange of Na by K, followed by substitution of Pb for K by immersing the sample in a molten Pb salt bath. The result is a polycrystalline Pb-..beta..''-alumina ceramic that is substantially crack-free.

  1. RESULTS FROM CAVITATION DAMAGE EXPERIMENTS WITH MERCURY SPALLATION TARGETS AT THE LANSCE WNR IN 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Abdou, Ashraf A; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    Damage assessment from proton beam induced cavitation experiments on mercury spallation targets done at the LANSCE WNR facility has been completed. The experiments investigated two key questions for the Spallation Neutron Source target, namely, how damage is affected by flow velocity in the SNS coolant channel geometry, and how damage scales with proton beam intensity at a given constant charge per pulse. With regard to the former question, prior in-beam experiments indicated that the coolant channel geometry with stagnant mercury was especially vulnerable to damage which might warrant a design change. Yet other results indicated a reduction in damage with the introduction of flow. Using more prototypic to the SNS, the 2008 experiment damage results show the channel is less vulnerable than the bulk mercury side of the vessel wall. They also show no benefit from increasing channel flow velocity beyond nominal SNS speeds. The second question probed a consensus belief that damage scales with beam intensity (protons per unit area) by a power law dependence with exponent of around 4. Results from a 2005 experiment did not support this power law dependence but some observations were inconsistent and unexplained. These latest results show weaker damage dependence.

  2. Physical chemistry of carbothermic reduction of alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Robert A.

    1985-09-01

    Production of aluminium, by means of carbothermic reduction of alumina, is discussed. By employing a solvent metal bath to absorb the alumina metal, carbothermic reduction of alumina was accomplished at temperatures 300/degree/C lower than the temperatures reported in the literature. Reduction occurred without the formation of intermediate compounds and without the high volatilization of aluminum bearing species. Reduction of alumina immersed in a solvent bath appeared to be rate limited by chemical reaction control. The rates seemed to be a function of the activity of aluminum in the solvent metal bath. Reduction of alumina particles, above the surface of the bath, seemed to occur via vapor transport with carbon in the particles or in the crucible walls. Mass transport in the gas phase appeared to be rate limiting. The rates seemed to be a function of the distance separating the alumina and carbon sources. With both submerged alumina and alumina particles, increasing the surface area of the alumina increased the rate of reduction. 58 refs., 65 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Optimal conditions for alumina coating formation on the MA956 superalloy for prosthetic bearing applications.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J; Escudero, M L; Canahua, H; García-Alonso, M C

    1999-08-01

    An experimental study of the oxidation treatment at high temperature of the ODS MA956 superalloy was conducted in an attempt to achieve a protective alumina scale for biomedical applications. A quadratic response-surface model was developed in order to study the effects of treatment time and temperature (in the range of 1000 degrees C to 1250 degrees C) on scale thickness. The obtained model adequately represents the experimental response and shows that the thickness gradients of the layer increase with the temperature for each exposure time and decrease steadily to zero as the treatment time increases. The microstructural characterization reveals that the alumina scale formed at or above 1000 degrees C consists of an alpha-alumina phase. Treatments at temperatures above 1150 degrees C give rise to an alumina scale with some defect probability. An increase in the temperature up to 1200 degrees C gives rise to the appearance of some blistering of the superficial scale. An oxidation treatment of 100 h at 1100 degrees C was found to be the best for guaranteeing the formation of a defect-free, compact, adherent, and continuous alpha-alumina scale thick enough to support satisfactory wear and biological conditions. PMID:10379995

  4. Post irradiation examination of the Spallation Neutron Source target vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Ferguson, Phillip D; Mansur, Louis K

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source that produces high-energy spallation neutrons by bombarding liquid mercury flowing through a stainless steel target vessel. During operation the proton beam and spallation neutrons produce radiation damage in the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel target vessel and water-cooled shroud. The beam pulses also cause rapid heating of the liquid mercury, which may produce cavitation erosion damage on the inner surface of the target vessel. The cavitation erosion rate is thought to be highly sensitive to beam power and predicted to be the primary life-limiting factor of target vessel. Though mitigation of cavitation erosion and radiation damage to the target vessel will be a critical for successful high-power operation of the SNS facility, the effects of radiation damage and cavitation erosion to target vessels in liquid metal spallation systems are not well known. Therefore preparations are being undertaken to perform post irradiation examination (PIE) of the liquid mercury target vessel and water-cooled shroud after end-of-life occurs. An overview of the planned PIE for the SNS target vessel is presented here, including proposed techniques for specimen acquisition and subsequent material properties characterization.

  5. Opportunities for Neutrino Physics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Efremenko, Yuri; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss opportunities for a neutrino program at the Spallation Neutrons Source (SNS) being commissioning at ORNL. Possible investigations can include study of neutrino-nuclear cross sections in the energy rage important for supernova dynamics and neutrino nucleosynthesis, search for neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering, and various tests of the standard model of electro-weak interactions.

  6. The Spallation Neutron Source and the Neutrino Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Stancu, Ion

    2008-02-21

    In this paper we describe the recently-completed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), along with a proposed long-term neutrino physics program to study neutrino-nucleus cross-sections and neutrino oscillations.

  7. Neutrino Cross-Section Measurements at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stancu, Ion

    2008-02-21

    In this paper we discuss the proposal to build a neutrino facility at the recently-completed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This facility can host an extensive, long-term program to study neutrino-nucleus cross-sections in the range of interest for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear theory.

  8. HYSPEC : A CRYSTAL TIME OF FLIGHT HYBRID SPECTROMETER FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; ZALIZNYAK,I.A.

    2002-12-30

    This document lays out a proposal by the Instrument Development Team (IDT) composed of scientists from leading Universities and National Laboratories to design and build a conceptually new high-flux inelastic neutron spectrometer at the pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge. This instrument is intended to supply users of the SNS and scientific community, of which the IDT is an integral part, with a platform for ground-breaking investigations of the low-energy atomic-scale dynamical properties of crystalline solids. It is also planned that the proposed instrument will be equipped with a polarization analysis capability, therefore becoming the first polarized beam inelastic spectrometer in the SNS instrument suite, and the first successful polarized beam inelastic instrument at a pulsed spallation source worldwide. The proposed instrument is designed primarily for inelastic and elastic neutron spectroscopy of single crystals. In fact, the most informative neutron scattering studies of the dynamical properties of solids nearly always require single crystal samples, and they are almost invariably flux-limited. In addition, in measurements with polarization analysis the available flux is reduced through selection of the particular neutron polarization, which puts even more stringent limits on the feasibility of a particular experiment. To date, these investigations have mostly been carried out on crystal spectrometers at high-flux reactors, which usually employ focusing Bragg optics to concentrate the neutron beam on a typically small sample. Construction at Oak Ridge of the high-luminosity spallation neutron source, which will provide intense pulsed neutron beams with time-averaged fluxes equal to those at medium-flux reactors, opens entirely new opportunities for single crystal neutron spectroscopy. Drawing upon experience acquired during decades of studies with both crystal and time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometers, the IDT has developed a conceptual

  9. Perfluoropolyalkylether decomposition on catalytic aluminas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo

    1994-01-01

    The decomposition of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyalkylether liquid lubricant, was studied using the Penn State Micro-oxidation Test, and a thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry unit. The micro-oxidation test was conducted using 440C stainless steel and pure iron metal catalyst specimens, whereas the thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry tests were conducted using catalytic alumina pellets. Analysis of the thermal data, high pressure liquid chromatography data, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data support evidence that there are two different decomposition mechanisms for Fomblin Z25, and that reductive sites on the catalytic surfaces are responsible for the decomposition of Fomblin Z25.

  10. Nanohardness of Sintered and Shock Deformed Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Riya; Dey, Arjun; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop K.; Joshi, Keshaw D.; Rav, Amit; Mandal, Ashok K.; Bysakh, Sandip; Biswas, Sampad K.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2012-02-01

    To understand how high-strain rate, flyer-plate impact affects the nanohardness of a coarse (~10 μm) grain, high-density (~3.978 gm cc-1) alumina, load controlled nanoindentation experiments were conducted with a Berkovich indenter on as-sintered disks and shock-recovered alumina fragments obtained from an earlier flyer-plate shock impact study. The nanohardness of the shock-recovered alumina was much lower than that of the as-sintered alumina. The indentation size effect was severe in the shock-recovered alumina but only mild in the as-sintered alumina. Extensive additional characterization by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and analysis of the experimental load depth data were used to provide a new explanation for the presence of strong indentation size effect in the shock-recovered alumina. Finally, a qualitative model was proposed to provide a rationale for the whole scenario of nanoindentation responses in the as-sintered and shock-recovered alumina ceramics.

  11. Hydrogen and the structure of transition aluminas

    SciTech Connect

    Sohlberg, K.; Pennycook, S.J.; Pantelides, S.T.

    1999-08-25

    {alpha}-Alumina results from the complete dehydration of several minerals of the form Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center{underscore}dot}nH{sub 2}O. The ``transition'' aluminas, {gamma}-alumina, {eta}-alumina, and {delta}-alumina are known to have a spinel structure but the possibility that they contain hydrogen (H) has been the subject of debate. The authors present a series of density-functional theory calculations which, together with available experimental data, show that the spinel aluminas exist over a range of hydrogen content captured by the empirical formula H{sub 3m}Al{sub 2{minus}m}O{sub 3}, with a different greek-letter phases corresponding to different distributions of the Aluminum (Al) ions on the two cation sublattices. Calculations of densities and vibrational frequencies of bulk OH bonds are in excellent agreement with available data. The theory reconciles seemingly inconsistent data and reveals a remarkable property of the spinel aluminas: They are ``reactive sponges'' in that they can store and release water in a reactive way. This chemical activity offers a basis for understanding long-standing puzzles in the behavior of aluminas in catalytic systems.

  12. Development of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Bei, Hongbin; Santella, Michael L; Maziasz, Philip J

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the continued development of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys, which exhibit a unique combination of excellent oxidation resistance via protective alumina (Al2O3) scale formation and high-temperature creep strength through the formation of stable nano-scale MC carbides and intermetallic precipitates. Efforts in fiscal year 2009 focused on the characterization and understanding of long-term oxidation resistance and tensile properties as a function of alloy composition and microstructure. Computational thermodynamic calculations of the austenitic matrix phase composition and the volume fraction of MC, B2-NiAl, and Fe2(Mo,Nb) base Laves phase precipitates were used to interpret oxidation behavior. Of particular interest was the enrichment of Cr in the austenitic matrix phase by additions of Nb, which aided the establishment and maintenance of alumina. Higher levels of Nb additions also increased the volume fraction of B2-NiAl precipitates, which served as an Al reservoir during long-term oxidation. Ageing studies of AFA alloys were conducted at 750 C for times up to 2000 h. Ageing resulted in near doubling of yield strength at room temperature after only 50 h at 750 C, with little further increase in yield strength out to 2000 h of ageing. Elongation was reduced on ageing; however, levels of 15-25% were retained at room temperature after 2000 h of total ageing.

  13. Effects of Impurities on Alumina-Niobium InterfacialMicrostructures

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Sugar, Joshua D.; Gronsky, Ronald; Glaeser,Andreas M.

    2005-06-20

    Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were employed to examine the interfacial microstructural effects of impurities in alumina substrates used to fabricate alumina-niobium interfaces via liquid-film-assisted joining. Three types of alumina were used: undoped high-purity single-crystal sapphire; a high-purity, high-strength polycrystalline alumina; and a lower-purity, lower-strength polycrystalline alumina. Interfaces formed between niobium and both the sapphire and high-purity polycrystalline alumina were free of detectable levels of impurities. In the lower-purity alumina, niobium silicides were observed at the alumina-niobium interface and on alumina grain boundaries near the interface. These silicides formed in small-grained regions of the alumina and were found to grow from the interface into the alumina along grain boundaries. Smaller silicide precipitates found on grain boundaries are believed to form upon cooling from the bonding temperature.

  14. High-Power Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.

    2002-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be the world’s most intense source of neutrons for fundamental science and industrial applications. Design and construction of this facility, located at Oak Ridge, is a joint venture between six DOE laboratories. Construction began in 1999 and is currently ahead of the scheduled 2006 completion date. Injecting a high-power, pulsed proton beam into a mercury target produces neutrons. In this talk, we review the physics requirements, design, and status of the construction of the 1-GeV, 1.4-MW average power RF linac for SNS. The accelerator consists of a drift tube linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and a superconducting rf (SRF) linac. The phase and quadrupole settings are set to avoid structure and parametric resonances, with coherent resonances posing minimal risk for emittance growth. The DTL is 37 m long and accelerates the ions to 87 MeV. The CCL is 55 m long and accelerates the ions to 186 MeV. The rf structure design and stability for both the DTL and CCL have been validated with scale models. The SRF linac has a modular design to accelerate ions to 1000 MeV, with a straightforward upgrade to 1.3 GeV at a later date. 3D particle-in-cell simulations of beam dynamics are performed to validate performance. The accelerator utilizes 93 MW of pulsed power operating continuously at 60-Hz with an 8factor. Approximately one hundred 402.5 or 805-MHz klystrons, with outputs between 0.55 and 5 MW, are used. The klystrons are powered by a novel converter-modulator that takes advantage of recent advances in IGBT switch plate assemblies and low-loss material cores for boost transformer. Beam diagnostics include position, phase, profile, and current monitors. They are designed to enable accurate beam steering and matching, and to minimize beam loss that would lead to activation and prevent hands-on maintenance.

  15. NOTE: Fabrication of a gecko-like hierarchical fibril array using a bonded porous alumina template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryadi Kustandi, Tanu; Samper, Victor Donald; Ng, Wan Sing; Chong, Ai Shing; Gao, Han

    2007-10-01

    We report a new method to fabricate a hierarchical microfibril array by using bonded porous alumina templates. The fabrication approach extends a powerful and well-established technique of creating porous alumina to create a polymer multilevel structure, mimicking the hierarchical structure of gecko adhesive foot hairs. The nanoporous alumina (pore diameter ≈60 nm; interpore distance ≈100 nm) was generated by the anodization of an aluminum film in an oxalic acid solution. The microporous alumina was produced by exploiting the parallel wafer-scale processing of conventional lithography and anisotropic chemical etching of the thick film of anodic alumina pores. The micro- and nanoporous alumina membranes were subsequently brought into intimate contact and their bonding was accomplished by means of capillary forces and then van der Waals bonding. Hierarchical polymeric microfibrils (fibril diameter ≈10 µm fibril length ≈70 µm) with nanofibril arrays at their tips were obtained after depositing a desired material into the pores and selective etching of the template membranes. The nanofibril has a lateral dimension of approximately 60 nm with length-to-diameter aspect ratios as high as 100:1.

  16. Target Operational Experience at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Janney, Jim G; Kaminskas, Saulius; McClintock, David A; Rosenblad, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has operated at unprecedented power levels for a short-pulse spallation source. Target operations have been successful but not without difficulties. Three targets out of the eight used to date have ended life unexpectedly causing interruptions to the neutron science users. The first of a kind mercury target design experiences beam-pulse induced cavitation damage that is suspected in one of the target leaks. The two other targets suffered early failures due to defective welds. Diagnosing the causes of target leaks and understanding of the progression of cavitation erosion and radiation damage effects has made use of post-irradiation examination (PIE) capabilities. As a result of PIE, review of quality assurance practices and related investigations, design changes are being implemented and manufacturing oversight improved. This paper describes SNS target operating experience, including the more important observations and lessons learned.

  17. Spallation processes and nuclear interaction products of cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, R; Tsao, C H

    1990-08-01

    Most cosmic-ray nuclei heavier than helium have suffered nuclear collisions in the interstellar gas, with transformation of nuclear composition. The isotopic and elemental composition at the sources has to be inferred from the observed composition near the Earth. The source composition permits tests of current ideas on sites of origin, nucleosynthesis in stars, evolution of stars, the mixing and composition of the interstellar medium and injection processes prior to acceleration. The effects of nuclear spallation, production of radioactive nuclides and the time dependence of their decay provide valuable information on the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays, their nuclear transformations, and their confinement time in the Galaxy. The formation of spallation products that only decay by electron capture and are relatively long-lived permits an investigation of the nature and density fluctuations (like clouds) of the interstellar medium. Since nuclear collisions yield positrons, antiprotons, gamma rays and neutrinos, we shall discuss these topics briefly.

  18. Spallation processes and nuclear interaction products of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C. H.

    1990-01-01

    Most cosmic-ray nuclei heavier than helium have suffered nuclear collisions in the interstellar gas, with transformation of nuclear composition. The isotopic and elemental composition at the sources has to be inferred from the observed composition near the Earth. The source composition permits tests of current ideas on sites of origin, nucleosynthesis in stars, evolution of stars, the mixing and composition of the interstellar medium and injection processes prior to acceleration. The effects of nuclear spallation, production of radioactive nuclides and the time dependence of their decay provide valuable information on the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays, their nuclear transformations, and their confinement time in the Galaxy. The formation of spallation products that only decay by electron capture and are relatively long-lived permits an investigation of the nature and density fluctuations (like clouds) of the interstellar medium. Since nuclear collisions yield positrons, antiprotons, gamma rays and neutrinos, we shall discuss these topics briefly.

  19. Current status of JAERI spallation target material program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Sasa, T.; Ishikura, S.; Mukugi, K.; Kai, T.; Ouchi, N.; Ioka, I.

    2001-07-01

    In the joint project of spallation neutron source between JAERI and KEK, material technology has been developed for the mercury target in the neutron source facility, the lead-bismuth target in the transmutation test facility, superconducting accelerator, post-irradiation examination and the ion beam test. Design of target system is progressing for the mercury spallation target: a pressure test of moderator, an impacting test in mercury and a corrosion test have been carried out. For nuclear transmutation with ADS an engineering facility is proposed. A material corrosion test loop is built-up and SS316 and F82H steels are to be tested in a flowing Pb-Bi. Fracture toughness of superconducting cavity material was found to be considerably large at 4 K. Irradiated samples at SINQ are to be transported to JAERI Hot Laboratory. For simulating radiation damage small disk specimens were irradiated in single, dual and triple ion beam modes.

  20. Fission of 232Th in a spallation neutron field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurevich, V. I.; Nikolaev, V. A.; Yakovlev, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    The spatial distributions of thorium fission reaction rate in a spallation neutron field of thick lead target bombarded by protons or deuterons with energy between 1.0 and 3.7 GeV were measured. Approximately a linear dependence of the thorium fission rate on the beam energy is observed. The mean fission cross section of 232Th <σ f > ≈ 123 mb and it does not depend on energy and type of the beam particles.

  1. Decommissioning and PIE of the MEGAPIE spallation target

    SciTech Connect

    Latge, C.; Henry, J.; Wohlmuther, M.; Dai, Y.; Gavillet, D.; Hammer, B.; Heinitz, S.; Neuhausen, J.; Schumann, D.; Thomsen, K.; Tuerler, A.; Wagner, W.; Gessi, A.; Guertin, A.; Konstantinovic, M.; Lindau, R.; Maloy, S.; Saito, S.

    2013-07-01

    A key experiment in the Accelerated Driven Systems roadmap, the MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment (MEGAPIE) (1 MW) was initiated in 1999 in order to design and build a liquid lead-bismuth spallation target, then to operate it into the Swiss spallation neutron facility SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute. The target has been designed, manufactured, and tested during integral tests, before irradiation carried out end of 2006. During irradiation, neutron and thermo hydraulic measurements were performed allowing deep interpretation of the experiment and validation of the models used during design phase. The decommissioning, Post Irradiation Examinations and waste management phases were defined properly. The phases dedicated to cutting, sampling, cleaning, waste management, samples preparation and shipping to various laboratories were performed by PSI teams: all these phases constitute a huge work, which allows now to perform post-irradiation examination (PIE) of structural material, irradiated in relevant conditions. Preliminary results are presented in the paper, they concern chemical characterization. The following radio-nuclides have been identified by γ-spectrometry: {sup 60}Co, {sup 101}Rh, {sup 102}Rh, {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 172}Hf/Lu, {sup 173}Lu, {sup 194}Hg/Au, {sup 195}Au, {sup 207}Bi. For some of these nuclides the activities can be easily evaluated from γ-spectrometry results ({sup 207}Bi, {sup 194}Hg/Au), while other nuclides can only be determined after chemical separations ({sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 195}Au, {sup 129}I, {sup 36}Cl and α-emitting {sup 208-210}Po). The concentration of {sup 129}I is lower than expected. The chemical analysis already performed on spallation and corrosion products in the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) are very relevant for further applications of LBE as a spallation media and more generally as a coolant.

  2. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT 1 MW

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been operating at the MW level for about one year. Experience in beam loss control and machine activation at this power level is presented. Also experience with machine protection systems is reviewed, which is critical at this power level. One of the most challenging operational aspects of high power operation has been attaining high availability, which is also discussed

  3. Fabrication of thin layer beta alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennenhouse, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    Beta alumina tubes having walls 700 microns, 300 microns, and 140 microns were processed by extrusion and sintering utilizing Ford proprietary binder and fabrication systems. Tubes prepared by this method have properties similar to tubes prepared by isostatic pressing and sintering, i.e. density greater than 98% of theoretical and a helium leak rate less than 3 x 10 to the -9th power cc/sq cm/sec. Ford ultrasonic bonding techniques were used for bonding beta alumina end caps to open ended beta -alumina tubes prior to sintering. After sintering, the bond was hermetic, and the integrity of the bonded area was comparable to the body of the tube.

  4. Nanoporous alumina enhanced surface plasmon resonance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsioubas, Alexandros G.; Spiliopoulos, Nikolaos; Anastassopoulos, Dimitris; Vradis, Alexandros A.; Priftis, George D.

    2008-05-01

    The signal enhancement of an easy to fabricate, nanoporous alumina assisted surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is investigated. It is theoretically shown that the presence of a thin (under 200nm) porous alumina layer on top of an aluminum film supporting the surface plasmons, may significantly increase (over one order of magnitude) the sensitivity of the SPR method in the case where the adsorption of relatively small molecules is probed. The comparative experimental investigation of self-assembled monolayer formation on planar metal films and porous alumina layers verifies the theoretical predictions. Based on these results, we discuss the extended applicability of this setup in biosensor and other related applications.

  5. New spallation neutron sources, their performance and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Pulsed spallation sources now operating in the world are at the KEK Laboratory in Japan (the KENS source), at Los Alamos National Laboratory (WNR) and at Argonne National Laboratory (IPNS), both the latter being in the US. The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) is currently the world's most intense source with a peak neutron flux of 4 x 10/sup 14/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ at a repetition rate of 30 Hz, and globally producing approx. 1.5 x 10/sup 15/ n/sec. Present pulsed sources are still relatively weak compared to their potential. In 1985 the Rutherford Spallation Neutron Source will come on line, and eventually be approx. 30 more intense than the present IPNS. Later, in 1986 the WNR/PSR option at Los Alamos will make that facility of comparable intensity, while a subcritical fission booster at IPNS will keep IPNS competitive. These new sources will expand the applications of pulsed neutrons but are still based on accelerators built for other scientific purposes, usually nuclear or high-energy physics. Accelerator physicists are now designing machines expressly for spallation neutron research, and the proton currents attainable appear in the milliamps. (IPNS now runs at 0.5 GeV and 14 ..mu..A). Such design teams are at the KFA Laboratory Julich, Argonne National Laboratory and KEK. Characteristics, particularly the different time structure of the pulses, of these new sources will be discussed. S

  6. Energy deposition calculated by PHITS code in Pb spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Quanzhi

    2016-01-01

    Energy deposition in a Pb spallation target irradiated by high energetic protons was calculated by PHITS2.52 code. The validation of the energy deposition and neutron production calculated by PHITS code was performed. Results show good agreements between the simulation results and the experimental data. Detailed comparison shows that for the total energy deposition, PHITS simulation result was about 15% overestimation than that of the experimental data. For the energy deposition along the length of the Pb target, the discrepancy mainly presented at the front part of the Pb target. Calculation indicates that most of the energy deposition comes from the ionizations of the primary protons and the produced secondary particles. With the event generator mode of PHITS, the deposit energy distribution for the particles and the light nulclei is presented for the first time. It indicates that the primary protons with energy more than 100 MeV are the most contributors to the total energy deposition. The energy depositions peaking at 10 MeV and 0.1 MeV, are mainly caused by the electrons, pions, d, t, 3He and also α particles during the cascade process and the evaporation process, respectively. The energy deposition density caused by different proton beam profiles are also calculated and compared. Such calculation and analyses are much helpful for better understanding the physical mechanism of energy deposition in the spallation target, and greatly useful for the thermal hydraulic design of the spallation target.

  7. GEM-based thermal neutron beam monitors for spallation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, G.; Claps, G.; Caniello, R.; Cazzaniga, C.; Grosso, G.; Murtas, F.; Tardocchi, M.; Vassallo, E.; Gorini, G.; Horstmann, C.; Kampmann, R.; Nowak, G.; Stoermer, M.

    2013-12-01

    The development of new large area and high flux thermal neutron detectors for future neutron spallation sources, like the European Spallation Source (ESS) is motivated by the problem of 3He shortage. In the framework of the development of ESS, GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) is one of the detector technologies that are being explored as thermal neutron sensors. A first prototype of GEM-based thermal neutron beam monitor (bGEM) has been built during 2012. The bGEM is a triple GEM gaseous detector equipped with an aluminum cathode coated by 1 μm thick B4C layer used to convert thermal neutrons to charged particles through the 10B(n,7Li)α nuclear reaction. This paper describes the results obtained by testing a bGEM detector at the ISIS spallation source on the VESUVIO beamline. Beam profiles (FWHMx=31 mm and FWHMy=36 mm), bGEM thermal neutron counting efficiency (≈1%), detector stability (3.45%) and the time-of-flight spectrum of the beam were successfully measured. This prototype represents the first step towards the development of thermal neutrons detectors with efficiency larger than 50% as alternatives to 3He-based gaseous detectors.

  8. Effect of alumina composition on interfacial chemistry and strength of direct bonded copper-alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Holowczak, J.E.; Greenhut, V.A.; Shanefield, D.J.

    1989-10-01

    The gas-metal eutectic method was used to bond copper to sintered high alumina ceramics which had different sintering aid compositions in the magnesia-calcia-silica system. The highest average copper-alumina peel adhesion strength, 205 N/cm, was observed for alumina which contained 0.2 percent magnesia and 0.2 percent calcia. The lowest peel adhesion strength, 103 N/cm, was observed for copper bonded to 95 percent alumina which contained magnesia, calcia, and silica additions. This bond strength was similar to that for commercial 96 percent alumina. Statistical matrix experiments showed that alumina containing calcium silicate had significantly lower copper bond strength. This may be attributed to the formation of a transition compound other than the copper aluminate phase identified for well bonded samples in this study. 10 refs.

  9. Astrophysical Li-7 as a product of big bang nucleosynthesis and galactic cosmic-ray spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olive, Keith A.; Schramm, David N.

    1992-01-01

    The astrophysical Li-7 abundance is considered to be largely primordial, while the Be and B abundances are thought to be due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) spallation reactions on top of a much smaller big bang component. But GCR spallation should also produce Li-7. As a consistency check on the combination of big bang nucleosynthesis and GCR spallation, the Be and B data from a sample of hot population II stars is used to subtract from the measured Li-7 abundance an estimate of the amount generated by GCR spallation for each star in the sample, and then to add to this baseline an estimate of the metallicity-dependent augmentation of Li-7 due to spallation. The singly reduced primordial Li-7 abundance is still consistent with big bang nucleosynthesis, and a single GCR spallation model can fit the Be, B, and corrected Li-7 abundances for all the stars in the sample.

  10. Use of fracture mechanics theory in lifetime predictions for alumina and bioglass-coated alumina.

    PubMed

    Ritter, J E; Greenspan, D C; Palmer, R A; Hench, L L

    1979-03-01

    The fatigue behavior of alumina and bioglass-coated alumina was determined in air and biological test environments by the dynamic fatigue test technique in which strength is measured as a function of stressing rate. The good correlation found between the test data and fracture mechanics theory indicates that fatigue failure is controlled by the slow crack growth of preexisting flaws and that fracture mechanics theory can be used in making failure predictions for alumina and bioglass-coated alumina in biological environments. Thus, it is believed that lifetime predictions can be made for ceramic implants on the basis of short-term test data utilizing fracture mechanics principles.

  11. Rationale for a spallation neutron source target system test facility at the 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, W.F.

    1995-12-01

    The conceptual design study for a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has shown the feasibility of including a spallation neutron test facility at a relatively low cost. This document presents a rationale for developing such a test bed. Currently, neutron scattering facilities operate at a maximum power of 0.2 MW. Proposed new designs call for power levels as high as 10 MW, and future transmutation activities may require as much as 200 MW. A test bed will allow assessment of target neutronics; thermal hydraulics; remote handling; mechanical structure; corrosion in aqueous, non-aqueous, liquid metal, and molten salt systems; thermal shock on systems and system components; and materials for target systems. Reliable data in these areas are crucial to the safe and reliable operation of new high-power facilities. These tests will provide data useful not only to spallation neutron sources proposed or under development, but also to other projects in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies such as the production of tritium.

  12. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; <0.3Ti+V; <0.03N; and, balance Fe, where the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  13. Sorption of metal ions on alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgarten, E.; Kirchhausen-Duesing, U.

    1997-10-01

    The adsorption of metal ions on aluminas is of great interest in different fields such as geochemistry, oceanography, limnology, and pollution control. Precipitation and adsorption of metal ions (Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Cr(III)) on {gamma}-alumina were investigated experimentally. A surface chemical reaction model to calculate concentrations of aluminum ions, metal ions, and pH as variables depending on amount of alumina, volume of liquid and gas phase, initial metal concentration, and amount of acid or base added is presented. In the case of Co(II) the pH dependence of rest concentrations with and without alumina is equal; adsorption may be disregarded. For the other ions adsorption is important. Considering the charge of the surface does not improve the fit. In the pH region, where adsorption leads to lower rest concentrations than precipitation, adsorption may be described by a Henry isotherm.

  14. Loss tangent measurements on unirradiated alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Goulding, R.H.

    1996-04-01

    Unirradiated room temperature loss tangent for sapphire and several commercial grades of polycrystalline alumina are complied for frequencies between 10{sup 5} and 4x10{sup 11} Hz. Sapphire exhibits significantly lower values for the loss tangent at frequencies up to 10{sup 11} Hz. The loss tangents of 3 different grades of Wesgo alumina (AL300, AL995, AL998) and 2 different grades of Coors alumina (AD94, AD995) have typical values near {approx}10{sup -4} at a frequency of 10{sup 8} Hz. On the other hand, the loss tangent of Vitox alumina exhibits a large loss peak tan d{approx} 5x10{sup -3} at this frequency.

  15. Processing of Alumina-Toughened Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2003-01-01

    Dense and crack-free 10-mol%-yttria-stabilized zirconia (10YSZ)-alumina composites, containing 0 to 30 mol% of alumina, have been fabricated by hot pressing. Release of pressure before onset of cooling was crucial in obtaining crack-free material. Hot pressing at 1600 C resulted in the formation of ZrC by reaction of zirconia with grafoil. However, no such reaction was observed at 1500 C. Cubic zirconia and -alumina were the only phases detected from x-ray diffraction indicating no chemical reaction between the composite constituents during hot pressing. Microstructure of the composites was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Density and elastic modulus of the composites followed the rule-of-mixtures. Addition of alumina to 10YSZ resulted in lighter, stronger, and stiffer composites by decreasing density and increasing strength and elastic modulus.

  16. Everlasting Dark Printing on Alumina by Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penide, J.; Quintero, F.; Arias-González, F.; Fernández, A.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Riveiro, A.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    Marks or prints are needed in almost every material, mainly for decorative or identification purposes. Despite alumina is widely employed in many different industries, the need of printing directly on its surface is still a complex problem. In this sense, lasers have largely demonstrated their high capacities to mark almost every material including ceramics, but performing dark permanent marks on alumina is still an open challenge. In this work we present the results of a comprehensive experimental analysis on the process of marking alumina by laser. Four different laser sources were used in this study: a fiber laser (1075 nm) and three diode pumped Nd:YVO4 lasers emitting at near-infrared (1064 nm), visible (532 nm) and ultraviolet (355 nm) wavelengths, respectively. The results obtained with the four lasers were compared and physical processes involved were explained in detail. Colorimetric analyses allowed to identify the optimal parameters and conditions to produce everlasting and high contrast marks on alumina.

  17. Small-angle scattering instruments on a 1 MW long pulse spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, G.A.; Hjelm, R.P.; Seeger, P.A.

    1995-12-01

    Two small-angle neutron scattering instruments have been designed and optimized for installation at a 1 MW long pulse spallation source. The first of these instruments allows access to length scales in materials from 10 to 400 {angstrom}, and the second instrument from 40 to 1200 {angstrom}. Design characteristics were determined and optimization was done using the MCLIB Monte Carlo instrument simulation package. The code has been {open_quote}benchmarked{close_quote} by simulating the {open_quote}as-built{close_quote} D11 spectrometer at ILL and a performance comparison of the three instruments was made. Comparisons were made by evaluating the scattered intensity for {delta} scatterers at different Q values for various instrument configurations needed to span a Q-range of 0.0007 - 0.44 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1}.

  18. LANSCE linac RF performance for a long pulse spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, J.; Regan, A.; Bolme, G.

    1996-09-01

    The present LANL Long Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS) design consists of a 1 MW neutron spallation target fed by a pulsed proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE, formerly LAMPF) accelerator. This proton beam would have a repetition rate of 60 Hz and a pulse length of 1 ms for a duty factor of 6%. An average/peak currentof 1.25 mA/21 mA would be required foran 800 MeV beam to provide this power at this duty factor. The spallation target would reside in Area A and use the H+ beam. The LANSCE accelerator would also be required to simultaneoulsy deliver H- beams to the Manual Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC) and Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility. Presently LANSCE delivers 16.5 mA peak of H+ beam at 120 Hz, with a 625 {mu}S beam pulsewidth; H- beams are also accelerated for MLNSC and WNR. In Nov. 1995, linac operation shifted to LPSS pulse parameters, except for the peak curent which remained at 16.5 mA. In addition to delivering 800 kW H+ proton beam to physics production targets, H- beams were simultaneously delivered to customers for the PSR feeding MLNSC and to researchers using WNR. Performance of the RF powerplants for the 201.25 MHz drift tube linac 805 MHz side coupled linac, and associated electronics is described. Conclusion of the experiment is that the LANSCE linac can be upgraded through modest improvements to drive a 1 MW LPSS.

  19. VESPA: The vibrational spectrometer for the European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Fedrigo, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Bertelsen, Mads; Hartl, Monika; Lefmann, Kim; Deen, Pascale P; Strobl, Markus; Grazzi, Francesco; Zoppi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    VESPA, Vibrational Excitation Spectrometer with Pyrolytic-graphite Analysers, aims to probe molecular excitations via inelastic neutron scattering. It is a thermal high resolution inverted geometry time-of-flight instrument designed to maximise the use of the long pulse of the European Spallation Source. The wavelength frame multiplication technique was applied to provide simultaneously a broad dynamic range (about 0-500 meV) while a system of optical blind choppers allows to trade flux for energy resolution. Thanks to its high flux, VESPA will allow the investigation of dynamical and in situ experiments in physical chemistry. Here we describe the design parameters and the corresponding McStas simulations.

  20. Shielding calculations for the Long Pulse Spallation Source Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.S.; Pitcher, E.J.; Brael, R.E.; Russell, G.J.

    1996-04-01

    We describe tools under development for use in deep penetration shielding problems in accelerator environments. The LAHET monte carlo code is now being upgraded in anticipation of a merger of this code with MCNP. Variance reduction via Geometry Splitting/Russian Roulette has recently been added to LAHET and is now being tested in the design of shielding for the Long Pulse Spallation Source Facility. In addition, we demonstrate methods of visualizing fluence based quantities such as equivalent dose and heating throughout the target and shielding.

  1. VESPA: The vibrational spectrometer for the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedrigo, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Bertelsen, Mads; Hartl, Monika; Lefmann, Kim; Deen, Pascale P.; Strobl, Markus; Grazzi, Francesco; Zoppi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    VESPA, Vibrational Excitation Spectrometer with Pyrolytic-graphite Analysers, aims to probe molecular excitations via inelastic neutron scattering. It is a thermal high resolution inverted geometry time-of-flight instrument designed to maximise the use of the long pulse of the European Spallation Source. The wavelength frame multiplication technique was applied to provide simultaneously a broad dynamic range (about 0-500 meV) while a system of optical blind choppers allows to trade flux for energy resolution. Thanks to its high flux, VESPA will allow the investigation of dynamical and in situ experiments in physical chemistry. Here we describe the design parameters and the corresponding McStas simulations.

  2. Beginnings of remote handling at the RAL Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Liska, D.J.; Hirst, J.

    1985-01-01

    Expenditure of funds and resources for remote maintenance systems traditionally are delayed until late in an accelerator's development. However, simple remote-surveillance equipment can be included early in facility planning to set the stage for future remote-handling needs and to identify appropriate personnel. Some basic equipment developed in the UK at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) that serves this function and that has been used to monitor beam loss during commissioning is described. A photograph of this equipment, positioned over the extractor septum magnet, is shown. This method can serve as a pattern approach to the problem of initiating remote-handling activities in other facilities.

  3. Study of accelerator neutrino detection at a spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Yang

    2016-06-01

    We study the detection of accelerator neutrinos produced at the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS). Using the code FLUKA, we have simulated the production of neutrinos in a proton beam on a tungsten target and obtained the yield efficiency, numerical flux, and average energy of different flavors of neutrinos. Furthermore, detection of these accelerator neutrinos is investigated in two reaction channels: neutrino-electron reactions and neutrino-carbon reactions. The expected numbers of different flavors of neutrinos have also been calculated. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205185, 11175020)

  4. Workshop: Research and development plans for high power spallation neutron testing at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-05

    This report consists of vugraphs from presentations at the meeting. The papers covered the following topics: (1) APS as a proton source; (2) target status for NSNS (National Spallation Neutron Source); (3) spallation neutron source in Japan; (4) liquid LiBi flow loop; and (5) research and development plans for high power tests at the AGS.

  5. A negative surface energy for alumina.

    PubMed

    Łodziana, Zbigniew; Topsøe, Nan-Yu; Nørskov, Jens K

    2004-05-01

    The surface energy of a solid measures the energy cost of increasing the surface area. All normal solids therefore have a positive surface energy-if it had been negative, the solid would disintegrate. For this reason it is also generally believed that when certain ceramics can be found in a highly porous form, this is a metastable state, which will eventually sinter into the bulk solid at high temperatures. We present theoretical evidence suggesting that for theta-alumina, the surface energy is strongly dependent on the size of the crystallites, and that for some facets it is negative for thicknesses larger than approximately 1 nm. This suggests a completely new picture of porous alumina in which the high-surface-area, nanocrystalline form is the thermodynamic ground state. The negative surface energy is found to be related to a particularly strongly adsorbed state of dissociated water on some alumina surfaces. We also present new experimental evidence based on infrared spectroscopy, in conjunction with X-ray diffraction and surface-area measurements, that theta-alumina has indeed very stable surface OH groups at high temperatures, and that this form of alumina does not sinter even at temperatures up to 1,300 K.

  6. Enhanced gas separation factors of microporous polymer constrained in the channels of anodic alumina membranes.

    PubMed

    Chernova, Ekaterina; Petukhov, Dmitrii; Boytsova, Olga; Alentiev, Alexander; Budd, Peter; Yampolskii, Yuri; Eliseev, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    New composite membranes based on porous anodic alumina films and polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1) have been prepared using a spin-coating technique. According to scanning electron microscopy, partial penetration of polymer into the pores of alumina supports takes place giving rise to selective polymeric layers with fiber-like microstructure. Geometric confinement of rigid PIM-1 in the channels of anodic alumina causes reduction of small-scale mobility in polymeric chains. As a result, transport of permanent gases, such as CH4, becomes significantly hindered across composite membranes. Contrary, the transport of condensable gases (CO2, С4H10), did not significantly suffer from the confinement due to high solubility in the polymer matrix. This strategy enables enhancement of selectivity towards CO2 and C4H10 without significant loss of the membrane performance and seems to be prospective for drain and sweetening of natural gas. PMID:27498607

  7. Enhanced gas separation factors of microporous polymer constrained in the channels of anodic alumina membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernova, Ekaterina; Petukhov, Dmitrii; Boytsova, Olga; Alentiev, Alexander; Budd, Peter; Yampolskii, Yuri; Eliseev, Andrei

    2016-08-01

    New composite membranes based on porous anodic alumina films and polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1) have been prepared using a spin-coating technique. According to scanning electron microscopy, partial penetration of polymer into the pores of alumina supports takes place giving rise to selective polymeric layers with fiber-like microstructure. Geometric confinement of rigid PIM-1 in the channels of anodic alumina causes reduction of small-scale mobility in polymeric chains. As a result, transport of permanent gases, such as CH4, becomes significantly hindered across composite membranes. Contrary, the transport of condensable gases (CO2, C4H10), did not significantly suffer from the confinement due to high solubility in the polymer matrix. This strategy enables enhancement of selectivity towards CO2 and C4H10 without significant loss of the membrane performance and seems to be prospective for drain and sweetening of natural gas.

  8. Enhanced gas separation factors of microporous polymer constrained in the channels of anodic alumina membranes.

    PubMed

    Chernova, Ekaterina; Petukhov, Dmitrii; Boytsova, Olga; Alentiev, Alexander; Budd, Peter; Yampolskii, Yuri; Eliseev, Andrei

    2016-08-08

    New composite membranes based on porous anodic alumina films and polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1) have been prepared using a spin-coating technique. According to scanning electron microscopy, partial penetration of polymer into the pores of alumina supports takes place giving rise to selective polymeric layers with fiber-like microstructure. Geometric confinement of rigid PIM-1 in the channels of anodic alumina causes reduction of small-scale mobility in polymeric chains. As a result, transport of permanent gases, such as CH4, becomes significantly hindered across composite membranes. Contrary, the transport of condensable gases (CO2, С4H10), did not significantly suffer from the confinement due to high solubility in the polymer matrix. This strategy enables enhancement of selectivity towards CO2 and C4H10 without significant loss of the membrane performance and seems to be prospective for drain and sweetening of natural gas.

  9. Enhanced gas separation factors of microporous polymer constrained in the channels of anodic alumina membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernova, Ekaterina; Petukhov, Dmitrii; Boytsova, Olga; Alentiev, Alexander; Budd, Peter; Yampolskii, Yuri; Eliseev, Andrei

    2016-08-01

    New composite membranes based on porous anodic alumina films and polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1) have been prepared using a spin-coating technique. According to scanning electron microscopy, partial penetration of polymer into the pores of alumina supports takes place giving rise to selective polymeric layers with fiber-like microstructure. Geometric confinement of rigid PIM-1 in the channels of anodic alumina causes reduction of small-scale mobility in polymeric chains. As a result, transport of permanent gases, such as CH4, becomes significantly hindered across composite membranes. Contrary, the transport of condensable gases (CO2, С4H10), did not significantly suffer from the confinement due to high solubility in the polymer matrix. This strategy enables enhancement of selectivity towards CO2 and C4H10 without significant loss of the membrane performance and seems to be prospective for drain and sweetening of natural gas.

  10. Enhanced gas separation factors of microporous polymer constrained in the channels of anodic alumina membranes

    PubMed Central

    Chernova, Ekaterina; Petukhov, Dmitrii; Boytsova, Olga; Alentiev, Alexander; Budd, Peter; Yampolskii, Yuri; Eliseev, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    New composite membranes based on porous anodic alumina films and polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1) have been prepared using a spin-coating technique. According to scanning electron microscopy, partial penetration of polymer into the pores of alumina supports takes place giving rise to selective polymeric layers with fiber-like microstructure. Geometric confinement of rigid PIM-1 in the channels of anodic alumina causes reduction of small-scale mobility in polymeric chains. As a result, transport of permanent gases, such as CH4, becomes significantly hindered across composite membranes. Contrary, the transport of condensable gases (CO2, С4H10), did not significantly suffer from the confinement due to high solubility in the polymer matrix. This strategy enables enhancement of selectivity towards CO2 and C4H10 without significant loss of the membrane performance and seems to be prospective for drain and sweetening of natural gas. PMID:27498607

  11. Mercury Cavitation Phenomenon in Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Naoe, Takashi; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2008-06-24

    Innovative researches will be performed at Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility in J-PARC, in which a mercury target system will be installed as MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. Proton beams will be injected into mercury target to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by micro-jets and/or shock waves which are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. The pitting damage which degrades the structural integrity of target vessels is a crucial issue for high power mercury targets. Micro-gas-bubbles injection into mercury may be useful to mitigate the pressure wave and the pitting damage. The visualization of cavitation-bubble and gas-bubble collapse behaviors was carried out by using a high-speed video camera. The differences between them are recognized.

  12. Slow neutron leakage spectra from spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S G; Carpenter, J M; Prael, R E

    1980-02-01

    An efficient technique is described for Monte Carlo simulation of neutron beam spectra from target-moderator-reflector assemblies typical of pulsed spallation neutron sources. The technique involves the scoring of the transport-theoretical probability that a neutron will emerge from the moderator surface in the direction of interest, at each collision. An angle-biasing probability is also introduced which further enhances efficiency in simple problems. These modifications were introduced into the VIM low energy neutron transport code, representing the spatial and energy distributions of the source neutrons approximately as those of evaporation neutrons generated through the spallation process by protons of various energies. The intensity of slow neutrons leaking from various reflected moderators was studied for various neutron source arrangements. These include computations relating to early measurements on a mockup-assembly, a brief survey of moderator materials and sizes, and a survey of the effects of varying source and moderator configurations with a practical, liquid metal cooled uranium source Wing and slab, i.e., tangential and radial moderator arrangements, and Be vs CH/sub 2/ reflectors are compared. Results are also presented for several complicated geometries which more closely represent realistic arrangements for a practical source, and for a subcritical fission multiplier such as might be driven by an electron linac. An adaptation of the code was developed to enable time dependent calculations, and investigated the effects of the reflector, decoupling and void liner materials on the pulse shape.

  13. Generic guide concepts for the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendler, C.; Martin Rodriguez, D.; Bentley, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The construction of the European Spallation Source (ESS) faces many challenges from the neutron beam transport point of view: the spallation source is specified as being driven by a 5 MW beam of protons, each with 2 GeV energy, and yet the requirements in instrument background suppression relative to measured signal vary between 10-6 and 10-8. The energetic particles, particularly above 20 MeV, which are expected to be produced in abundance in the target, have to be filtered in order to make the beamlines safe, operational and provide good quality measurements with low background. We present generic neutron guides of short and medium length instruments which are optimised for good performance at minimal cost. Direct line of sight to the source is avoided twice, with either the first point out of line of sight or both being inside the bunker (20 m) to minimise shielding costs. These guide geometries are regarded as a baseline to define standards for instruments to be constructed at ESS. They are used to find commonalities and develop principles and solutions for common problems. Lastly, we report the impact of employing the over-illumination concept to mitigate losses from random misalignment passively, and that over-illumination should be used sparingly in key locations to be effective. For more widespread alignment issues, a more direct, active approach is likely to be needed.

  14. Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) target station design integration

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, T.; Booth, R.; Cleaves, J.; Gabriel, T.

    1996-06-01

    The conceptual design for a 1- to 3-MW short pulse spallation source with a liquid mercury target has been started recently. The design tools and methods being developed to define requirements, integrate the work, and provide early cost guidance will be presented with a summary of the current target station design status. The initial design point was selected with performance and cost estimate projections by a systems code. This code was developed recently using cost estimates from the Brookhaven Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source study and experience from the Advanced Neutron Source Project`s conceptual design. It will be updated and improved as the design develops. Performance was characterized by a simplified figure of merit based on a ratio of neutron production to costs. A work breakdown structure was developed, with simplified systems diagrams used to define interfaces and system responsibilities. A risk assessment method was used to identify potential problems, to identify required research and development (R&D), and to aid contingency development. Preliminary 3-D models of the target station are being used to develop remote maintenance concepts and to estimate costs.

  15. Effect of alumina contents on phase stability and mechanical properties of magnesium fluorapatite/alumina composites.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, M S; Ahmadian, M; Meratian, M; Fathi, M H

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present work was twofold: to prepare biphasic magnesium fluorapatite (MFA) composites with different amounts of alumina using a two-step sintering process, and to evaluate the effects of various amounts of alumina on the mechanical properties, phase stability, and densification of the composite samples. Initially, MFA powders were prepared with different amounts of alumina by mechanical activation and the MFA composite samples were subsequently prepared using the two-step sintering (TSS) method. In order to determine the appropriate temperature of the first step sintering, conventional sintering of MFA/50% alumina was carried out at temperatures in the range of 1000-1300°C. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were used to characterize the prepared MFA/alumina composites. The results showed fracture toughness and hardness in the MFA/50% alumina composite samples to increase as a result of alumina addition to their maximum values of 5.82±1.05MPam(1/2) and 22.09±3.5GPa, respectively. PMID:25218990

  16. Dielectric Performance of a High Purity HTCC Alumina at High Temperatures - a Comparison Study with Other Polycrystalline Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liangyu

    2014-01-01

    A very high purity (99.99+%) high temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) alumina has recently become commercially available. The raw material of this HTCC alumina is very different from conventional HTCC alumina, and more importantly there is no glass additive in this alumina material for co-firing processing. Previously, selected HTCC and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) alumina materials were evaluated at high temperatures as dielectric and compared to a regularly sintered 96% polycrystalline alumina (96% Al2O3), where 96% alumina was used as the benchmark. A prototype packaging system based on regular 96% alumina with Au thickfilm metallization successfully facilitated long term testing of high temperature silicon carbide (SiC) electronic devices for over 10,000 hours at 500 C. In order to evaluate this new high purity HTCC alumina for possible high temperature packaging applications, the dielectric properties of this HTCC alumina substrate were measured and compared with those of 96% alumina and a previously tested LTCC alumina from room temperature to 550 C at frequencies of 120 Hz, 1 KHz, 10 KHz, 100 KHz, and 1 MHz. A parallel-plate capacitive device with dielectric of the HTCC alumina and precious metal electrodes were used for measurements of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the co-fired alumina material in the temperature and frequency ranges. The capacitance and AC parallel conductance of the capacitive device were directly measured by an AC impedance meter, and the dielectric constant and parallel AC conductivity of the dielectric were calculated from the capacitance and conductance measurement results. The temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the HTCC alumina substrate are presented and compared to those of 96% alumina and a selected LTCC alumina. Other technical advantages of this new co-fired material for possible high packaging applications are also discussed.

  17. Iron films deposited on porous alumina substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Kenichi; Nishida, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-12-01

    Iron films were deposited on porous alumina substrates using an arc plasma gun. The pore sizes (120 - 250 nm) of the substrates were controlled by changing the temperature during the anodic oxidation of aluminum plates. Iron atoms penetrated into pores with diameters of less than 160 nm, and were stabilized by forming γ-Fe, whereas α-Fe was produced as a flat plane covering the pores. For porous alumina substrates with pore sizes larger than 200 nm, the deposited iron films contained many defects and the resulting α-Fe had smaller hyperfine magnetic fields. In addition, only a very small amount of γ-Fe was obtained. It was demonstrated that the composition and structure of an iron film can be affected by the surface morphology of the porous alumina substrate on which the film is grown.

  18. Comparison Between Experiments and Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Spallation Induced by Ultra-Short Laser Shock on Micrometric Tantalum Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuq-Lelandais, J.-P.; Boustie, M.; Soulard, L.; Berthe, L.; Sollier, A.; Bontaz-Carion, J.; Combis, P.; de Rességuier, T.; Lescoute, E.

    2009-12-01

    Shock wave propagation and the spallation within materials induced by laser shock have been investigated for roughly two decades. With the latest laser technologies evolution, one can access to shorter regimes in durations, going below the picosecond range. Shots performed with the LULI 100 TW facility evidence the possibility to obtain spallation in a few microns thick metallic target. Such conditions provide an experimental data layout which may be directly comparable with molecular dynamic simulations reachable to these scales. Molecular dynamic simulations on a single crystal of Tantalum have been performed with the CEA TERA 10 computer. First, the Hugoniot calculated by the equilibrium molecular dynamics has been compared with experimental data to check the potential (EAM) relevance to reproduce the shock wave propagation. Then, large scale simulations on a micrometric target have been performed. We have observed the microscopic ductile damage process, the pore apparition and their time and space evolution. The results are compared with experimental results and classical one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations.

  19. Nanoporous alumina-based interferometric transducers ennobled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dronov, Roman; Jane, Andrew; Shapter, Joseph G.; Hodges, Alastair; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2011-08-01

    A high fidelity interferometric transducer is designed based on platinum-coated nanoporous alumina films. The ultrathin metal coating significantly improves fidelity of the interferometric fringe patterns in aqueous solution and increases the signal-to-noise ratio. The performance of this transducer is tested with respect to refractive index unit (RIU) sensitivity measured as a change in effective optical thickness (EOT) in response to a solvent change and compared to porous silicon based transducers. RIU sensitivity in the order of 55% is attainable for porous alumina providing excellent signal-to-noise ratio, which exceeds the sensitivity of current interferometric transducers. Finally, as a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate biosensing with two distinct immunoglobulin antibodies.A high fidelity interferometric transducer is designed based on platinum-coated nanoporous alumina films. The ultrathin metal coating significantly improves fidelity of the interferometric fringe patterns in aqueous solution and increases the signal-to-noise ratio. The performance of this transducer is tested with respect to refractive index unit (RIU) sensitivity measured as a change in effective optical thickness (EOT) in response to a solvent change and compared to porous silicon based transducers. RIU sensitivity in the order of 55% is attainable for porous alumina providing excellent signal-to-noise ratio, which exceeds the sensitivity of current interferometric transducers. Finally, as a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate biosensing with two distinct immunoglobulin antibodies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: EOT sensorgram of adsorption of BSA and normal human IgG onto hydroxylated porous alumina, FWHM of interferometric spectra, and theoretical comparison of calculated RIU sensitivities for 1 µm thick porous alumina and porous silicon films. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00897d

  20. Chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grob, B.; Richarz, W.

    1984-09-01

    The chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay with Cl2 and CO gas mixtures was studied gravimetrically. The effects of the calcination method and of NaCl addition on the reactivity of the clay were examined. Fast reaction rates were achieved only with samples previously exposed to a sulfating treatment. Optimum conditions, with maximum yield and selectivity to A1C13 and minimum SiO2 conversion, were found between 770 and 970 K. At higher temperatures the SiCl4 formed poisons the reactive alumina surface by selective chemisorption with a marked decrease of the reaction rate.

  1. Erosion damage in glass and alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.E.; Strzepa, P.; Jakus, K.; Rosenfeld, L.; Buckman, K.J.

    1984-08-14

    The effect of room-temperature erosion on material removal from and strength properties of soda-lime glass and sintered alumina was determined. The results were compared to the elastic/plastic indentation fracture model. The dependence of erosion rate and strength of soda-lime glass on the kinetic energy of the impacting particles was in good agreement with predictions. The lack of agreement between theory and experiment for sintered alumina was attributed to microstructural aspects of the erosion damage that are not modeled by indentation fracture.

  2. Delayed Failure in a Shock Loaded Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, G. A.; Millett, J. C. F.; Bourne, N. K.; Dandekar, D. P.

    2006-07-28

    Manganin stress gauges have been used to measure the lateral stress in a shock-loaded alumina. In combination with known longitudinal stresses, these have been used to determine the shear strength of this material, behind the shock front. The two-step nature of the lateral stress traces shows a slow moving front behind the main shock, behind which shear strength undergoes a significant decrease. Results also show that this front decreases markedly in velocity as the HEL is crossed, suggesting that limited plasticity occurs during inelastic deformation. Finally, comparison of measured shear strengths with other aluminas shows a high degree of agreement.

  3. Structural transformations in reactively sputtered alumina films

    SciTech Connect

    Nayar, P. Khanna, A.

    2014-04-24

    Thin films of amorphous alumina of thickness ∼350 nm were prepared on silicon wafer by DC cathode reactive sputtering. The effects of thermal annealing on the structural properties were investigated at annealing temperatures of 600°C, 800°C, 1100°C and 1220°C. X-ray diffraction showed that crystallization starts at 800°C and produces δ and θ alumina phases, the latter phase grows with heat treatment and the film was predominantly δ-phase with small amount of a-phase after annealing at 1220°C. AFM studies found that the surface of thin films smoothened upon crystallization.

  4. Aqueous dual-tailed surfactants simulated on the alumina surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Yu, Jian-Guo; O'Rear, Edgar A; Striolo, Alberto

    2014-08-14

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to compare the morphology of aqueous surfactant self-assembled aggregates on a flat alumina substrate. The substrate was modeled using the CLAYFF force field, and it was considered fully protonated. Three ionic surfactants were considered, all with a sulfate headgroup. The first surfactant was the single-tailed, widely studied sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), for which previous simulation results are available on several substrates. The results obtained for this surfactant were used for benchmarking the behavior of two dual-tailed surfactants. These latter surfactants have equal structure, except that in one case both linear tails are composed by seven fully protonated carbon atoms [CH3(CH2)6CHOSO3(CH2)6CH3(-), 2H7], whereas in the other, one tail is composed by seven fully protonated carbon atoms and the other tail is composed by seven fully fluorinated carbon atoms [CF3(CF2)6CHOSO3(CH2)6CH3(-), H7F7]. Our results suggest that preferential interactions lead to surfactant aggregates for H7F7 that differ compared to both those obtained for SDS and 2H7. Although molecular-level geometric structural differences can be invoked to explain differences between H7F7 and SDS aggregates, those between H7F7 and 2H7 aggregates can only be ascribed to atomic-scale interactions. Because as the adsorbed amount of surfactant increases, the self-assembled surfactant aggregates change, suggesting that the substrate on which adsorption occurs effectively evolves as adsorption progresses, compared to bare alumina. The morphological differences observed in our simulations coupled with molecular-level microphase separation might explain, in part, the unusual retrograde adsorption isotherm that has been observed experimentally for H7F7 surfactants on alumina. PMID:25089638

  5. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Siloxane modified alumina... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Siloxane modified alumina... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Siloxane modified alumina... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Siloxane modified alumina... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  9. REMOVING RADIUM FROM WATER BY PLAIN AND TREATED ACTIVATED ALUMINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research determined the feasibility of using BaSO4-impregnated activated alumina and plain activated alumina for radium removal from groundwater by fixed-bed adsorption. The major factors influencing radium adsorption onto the two types of alumina were identified. The radium ...

  10. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  11. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  12. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  13. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  14. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  15. Evaluation of mechanical properties and biological response of an alumina-forming Ni-free ferritic alloy.

    PubMed

    González-Carrasco, J L; Ciapetti, G; Montealegre, M A; Pagani, S; Chao, J; Baldini, N

    2005-06-01

    PM 2000 is a Ni-free oxide dispersion strengthened Fe-20Cr-5Al alloy able to develop a fine, dense and tightly adherent alpha-alumina scale during high-temperature oxidation. Despite the high temperature involved during thermal oxidation (1100 degrees C), microstructural changes in the candidate material, a hot rolled product, hardly occurs. Consequently, the good mechanical properties of the as-received material are not significantly affected. Moreover, due to the high compressive residual stresses at the alumina scale, an increase in the fatigue limit from 500 to 530 MPa is observed. Such stresses also account for the high capability of the coating/metal system to withstand more than 1% tensile deformation without cracking. The biocompatibility of the alloy was assessed in comparison to commercial alumina. Saos-2 osteoblast-like cells were either challenged with PM 2000 particles, or seeded onto PM 2000 (with and without scale) solid samples. Viability, growth, and ALP release from cells were assessed after 3 or 7 days, while mineralization was checked at 18 days. This study has demonstrated that PM 2000 with and without scale are capable of supporting in vitro growth and function of osteoblast-like cells over a period of 18 days. Results from this study suggest that the resulting alumina/alloy system combines the good mechanical properties of the alloy with the superior biocompatibility of the alpha-alumina, for which there is very good clinical experience. PMID:15626434

  16. Spallation occurrence from polyamide materials irradiated by thermal plasma with water absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Yasunori; Nakagawa, T.; Shinsei, N.; Uesugi, Y.; Ishijima, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper first describes the effect of water absorption in polyamide material irradiated by thermal plasmas on the occurrence of spallation phenomena. The interaction between polyamide materials and arc plasmas occurs particularly in the low voltage circuit breaker and aerospace fields. Spallation phenomena are those in which polymer particles are ejected from polymer bulk materials irradiated by high heat flux. To confirm the effect of water absorption into the polyamide material on spallation phenomena, polyamide specimens with and without water absorption were irradiated by Ar inductively coupled thermal plasma. The results show that the polyamide specimen with water absorption ejected spallation particles, whereas the polyamide specimen without water absorption were only slightly ejected, indicating that water absorption promotes the occurrence of spallation. The cooling effects of the spallation polyamide 66 (PA66) particles ablation were also estimated in hot air to assess the arc quenching ability from the spallation particle inclusion. This estimation showed that 10 and more PA66 particles inclusion might decrease the air temperature by 3000 K effectively, which can be useful to enhance arc quenching in circuit breakers working in air.

  17. The effects of water vapor on the oxidation behavior of alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yanar, N. M.; Lutz, B. S.; Garcia-Fresnillo, L.; Brady, Michael P.; Meier, G. H.

    2015-08-19

    The isothermal oxidation behavior of three alumina forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels with varying composition was studied at 650 and 800 °C in dry air and gases which contained water vapor. The AFA alloys exhibited better oxidation resistance than a “good chromia former” at 650 °C, particularly in H2O-containing atmospheres by virtue of alumina-scale formation. Although the AFA alloys were more resistant than chromia formers, their oxidation resistance was degraded at 650 °C in the presence of water vapor. In dry air the AFA alloys formed, thin continuous alumina scales, whereas in Ar–4%H2–3%H2O the areas of continuous alumina were reduced and Fe oxide-rich nodules and regions of Cr, Mn-rich oxides formed. In some regions internal oxidation of the aluminum occurred in the H2O-containing gas. The alloy OC8 had slightly better resistance than OC4 or OC5 in this atmosphere. The alumina-forming capability of the AFA alloys decreases with increasing temperature and, at 800 °C, they are borderline alumina formers, even in dry air. The oxidation resistance of all three alloys was degraded at 800 °C in atmospheres, which contained water vapor (Air–10%H2O, Ar–3%H2O and Ar–4%H2–3%H2O). The areas, which formed continuous alumina, were reduced in these atmospheres and areas of internal oxidation occurred. However, as a result of the borderline alumina-forming capability of the AFA alloys it was not possible to determine which of the H2O-containing atmospheres was more severe or to rank the alloys in terms of their performance. The experimental results indicate that the initial microstructure of the AFA alloys also plays a role in their oxidation performance. Less protective oxides formed at 800 °C when alloy OC8 was equilibrated before exposure rather than being exposed in the as-processed condition. As a result, the reason for this is the presence of different

  18. The effects of water vapor on the oxidation behavior of alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOE PAGES

    Yanar, N. M.; Lutz, B. S.; Garcia-Fresnillo, L.; Brady, Michael P.; Meier, G. H.

    2015-08-19

    The isothermal oxidation behavior of three alumina forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels with varying composition was studied at 650 and 800 °C in dry air and gases which contained water vapor. The AFA alloys exhibited better oxidation resistance than a “good chromia former” at 650 °C, particularly in H2O-containing atmospheres by virtue of alumina-scale formation. Although the AFA alloys were more resistant than chromia formers, their oxidation resistance was degraded at 650 °C in the presence of water vapor. In dry air the AFA alloys formed, thin continuous alumina scales, whereas in Ar–4%H2–3%H2O the areas of continuous alumina were reducedmore » and Fe oxide-rich nodules and regions of Cr, Mn-rich oxides formed. In some regions internal oxidation of the aluminum occurred in the H2O-containing gas. The alloy OC8 had slightly better resistance than OC4 or OC5 in this atmosphere. The alumina-forming capability of the AFA alloys decreases with increasing temperature and, at 800 °C, they are borderline alumina formers, even in dry air. The oxidation resistance of all three alloys was degraded at 800 °C in atmospheres, which contained water vapor (Air–10%H2O, Ar–3%H2O and Ar–4%H2–3%H2O). The areas, which formed continuous alumina, were reduced in these atmospheres and areas of internal oxidation occurred. However, as a result of the borderline alumina-forming capability of the AFA alloys it was not possible to determine which of the H2O-containing atmospheres was more severe or to rank the alloys in terms of their performance. The experimental results indicate that the initial microstructure of the AFA alloys also plays a role in their oxidation performance. Less protective oxides formed at 800 °C when alloy OC8 was equilibrated before exposure rather than being exposed in the as-processed condition. As a result, the reason for this is the presence of different phases in the bulk of the two specimens.« less

  19. Alumina-on-alumina Total Hip Arthroplasty in Young Patients: Diagnosis is More Important than Age

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rey, Eduardo; Cruz-Pardos, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Total hip arthroplasty (THA) in young patients has a high loosening rate, due in part to acetabular deformities that may compromise bone fixation and polyethylene wear. We therefore asked whether wear or osteolysis and loosening differ in patients under 40 years of age with alumina-on-alumina THA compared to those who are older. We prospectively followed 56 patients (63 hips) younger than 40 years (Group 1) and 247 patients (274 hips) older than 40 (Group 2) who had an alumina-on-alumina THA. The minimum followup was 4 years (mean, 5.6 years; range, 4–9 years). The two groups differed in various features: there were no patients with primary osteoarthritis in Group 1 and they had worse preoperative function and range of mobility, while weight, activity level, and implant size were greater in Group 2. The survival rate for cup loosening at 80 months postsurgery was 90.8% (95% confidence interval, 82.9–98.6%) for Group 1 and 96.5% (95% confidence interval, 94.2–98.7%) for Group 2. Cup loosening was less frequent with primary osteoarthritis than with severe developmental dysplasia of the hip. Although an alumina-on-alumina THA provided similar midterm survival and radiographic loosening in both age groups, the preoperative diagnosis seems more important than age for outcome. Continued followup will be required to determine if the alumina-on-alumina bearings in young patients result less risk of osteolysis and loosening. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19495898

  20. Ordered mesoporous alumina-supported metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Morris, Stacy M; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2008-11-12

    The one-pot synthesis of alumina-supported metal oxides via self-assembly of a metal precursor and aluminum isopropoxide in the presence of triblock copolymer (as a structure directing agent) is described in detail for nickel oxide. The resulting mesoporous mixed metal oxides possess p6 mm hexagonal symmetry, well-developed mesoporosity, relatively high BET surface area, large pore widths, and crystalline pore walls. In comparison to pure alumina, nickel aluminum oxide samples exhibited larger mesopores and improved thermal stability. Also, long-range ordering of the aforementioned samples was observed for nickel molar percentages as high as 20%. The generality of the recipe used for the synthesis of mesoporous nickel aluminum oxide was demonstrated by preparation of other alumina-supported metal oxides such as MgO, CaO, TiO 2, and Cr 2O 3. This method represents an important step toward the facile and reproducible synthesis of ordered mesoporous alumina-supported materials for various applications where large and accessible pores with high loading of catalytically active metal oxides are needed.

  1. Method of making nanocrystalline alpha alumina

    DOEpatents

    Siegel, Richard W.; Hahn, Horst; Eastman, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Method of making selected phases of nanocrystalline ceramic materials. Various methods of controlling the production of nanocrystalline alpha alumina and titanium oxygen phases are described. Control of the gas atmosphere and use of particular oxidation treatments give rise to the ability to control the particular phases provided in the aluminum/oxygen and titanium/oxygen system.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Alumina-Toughened Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2003-01-01

    10-mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (10YSZ)-alumina composites containing 0 to 30 mol% alumina were fabricated by hot pressing at 1500 C in vacuum. Thermal conductivity of the composites, determined at various temperatures using a steady-state laser heat flux technique, increased with increase in alumina content. Composites containing 0, 5, and 10-mol% alumina did not show any change in thermal conductivity with temperature. However, those containing 20 and 30-mol% alumina showed a decrease in thermal conductivity with increase in temperature. The measured values of thermal conductivity were in good agreement with those calculated from simple rule of mixtures.

  3. Dielectric breakdown of polycrystalline alumina: A weakest-link failure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Benjamin

    The effects of varying electrode geometry (ball and ring) and size (radius), dielectric media (castor oil and DialaRTM oil), specimen thickness, and concentration of defects on the dielectric breakdown strength of commercial-grade alumina and high-purity fine-grained (HPFG) alumina were investigated. The breakdown strength was expressed in terms of the maximum electric field in the ceramic at the breakdown voltage calculated by finite element analysis (FEA). The breakdown strength decreased systematically with increasing electrode radius and specimen thickness. The breakdown strength increased with decreasing concentration of defects. The breakdown strength was higher in the Diala RTM oil (dielectric constant, epsilonr = 2.3 +/- 0.12) as compared to the castor oil (epsilonr = 4.59 +/- 0.06). The breakdown strength was higher for the HPFG alumina as compared to the commercial- grade alumina. These effects of the electrode geometry, specimen thickness, concentration of defects, and of the dielectric media were analyzed with a weakest-link failure model employing the Laplace and Weibull distributions for a population of defects in the material. The measured size or scaling effects of the electrodes, specimen thickness, concentration of defects, and of the liquid media on breakdown strength were in better agreement with the Laplace distribution for the population. The measured concentration of surface defects was in good agreement with the concentration of surface defects estimated from the surface area scaling of the breakdown field with the Laplace distribution.

  4. Radiological Hazard of Spallation Products in Accelerator-Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M.; Stankovskii, A.; Artisyuk, V.; Korovin, Yu.; Shmelev, A.; Titarenko, Yu.

    2002-09-15

    The central issue underlying this paper is related to elucidating the hazard of radioactive spallation products that might be an important factor affecting the design option of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs). Hazard analysis based on the concept of Annual Limit on Intake identifies alpha-emitting isotopes of rare earths (REs) (dysprosium, gadolinium, and samarium) as the dominant contributors to the overall toxicity of traditional (W, Pb, Pb-Bi) targets. The matter is addressed from several points of view: code validation to simulate their yields, choice of material for the neutron producing targets, and challenging the beam type. The paper quantitatively determines the domain in which the toxicity of REs exceeds that of polonium activation products broadly discussed now in connection with advertising lead-bismuth technology for the needs of ADSs.

  5. Probing neutrino magnetic moments at the Spallation Neutron Source facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmas, T. S.; Miranda, O. G.; Papoulias, D. K.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2015-07-01

    Majorana neutrino electromagnetic properties are studied through neutral current coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. We focus on the potential of the recently planned COHERENT experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source to probe muon-neutrino magnetic moments. The resulting sensitivities are determined on the basis of a χ2 analysis employing realistic nuclear structure calculations in the context of the quasiparticle random phase approximation. We find that they can improve existing limits by half an order of magnitude. In addition, we show that these facilities allow for standard model precision tests in the low energy regime, with a competitive determination of the weak mixing angle. Finally, they also offer the capability to probe other electromagnetic neutrino properties, such as the neutrino charge radius. We illustrate our results for various choices of experimental setup and target material.

  6. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE HIGH-POWER PROTECTION MODULE TEST STAND

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Ball, Jeffrey Allen; Crofford, Mark T; Davidson Jr, Taylor L; Jones, Stacey L; Hardek, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) High-Power Protection Module (HPM) provides interlocks and fast shutdown for the radio frequency (RF) system to protect the accelerating structures and high power RF (HPRF) Distribution System. The HPM has required some functional upgrades since the start of beam operations and an upgrade to the HPM test stand was required to support these added features. The HPM test stand currently verifies functionality, RF channel calibration, and measurement of the speed of shutdown to ensure the specifications are met. The upgraded test stand was implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to allow for future growth and flexibility. Work is currently progressing on automation of the test stand to better perform the required module calibration schedule.

  7. COMMISSIONING OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ACCELERATOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator complex consists of a 2.5 MeV H- front-end injector system, a 186 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, and associated beam transport lines. The linac was commissioned in five discrete runs, starting in 2002 and completed in 2005. The accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines were commissioned in two runs from January to April 2006. With the completed commissioning of the SNS accelerator, the facility has begun initial low-power operations. In the course of beam commissioning, most beam performance parameters and beam intensity goals have been achieved at low duty factor. A number of beam dynamics measurements have been performed, including emittance evolution, transverse coupling in the ring, beam instability thresholds, and beam distributions on the target. The commissioning results, achieved beam performance and initial operating experience of the SNS will be discussed

  8. The Spallation Neutron Source Beam Commissioning and Initial Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Stuart; Aleksandrov, Alexander V.; Allen, Christopher K.; Assadi, Saeed; Bartoski, Dirk; Blokland, Willem; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Chu, C.; Cousineau, Sarah M.; Crofford, Mark T.; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Deibele, Craig E.; Dodson, George W.; Feshenko, A.; Galambos, John D.; Han, Baoxi; Hardek, T.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.; Holtkamp, N.; Howell, Matthew P.; Jeon, D.; Kang, Yoon W.; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kravchuk, L.; Long, Cary D.; McManamy, T.; Pelaia, II, Tom; Piller, Chip; Plum, Michael A.; Pogge, James R.; Purcell, John David; Shea, T.; Shishlo, Andrei P; Sibley, C.; Stockli, Martin P.; Stout, D.; Tanke, E.; Welton, Robert F; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2015-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator delivers a one mega-Watt beam to a mercury target to produce neutrons used for neutron scattering materials research. It delivers ~ 1 GeV protons in short (< 1 us) pulses at 60 Hz. At an average power of ~ one mega-Watt, it is the highest-powered pulsed proton accelerator. The accelerator includes the first use of superconducting RF acceleration for a pulsed protons at this energy. The storage ring used to create the short time structure has record peak particle per pulse intensity. Beam commissioning took place in a staged manner during the construction phase of SNS. After the construction, neutron production operations began within a few months, and one mega-Watt operation was achieved within three years. The methods used to commission the beam and the experiences during initial operation are discussed.

  9. Electron Cloud Mitigation in the Spallation Neutron Source Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brodowski, J.; Cameron, P.; Davino, Daniele; Fedotov, A.; He, P.; Hseuh, H.; Lee, Y.Y.; Ludewig, H.; Meng, W.; Raparia, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Macek, R.J.; Furman, Miguel A.; Aleksandrov, A.; Cousineau, S.; Danilov, V.; Henderson, S.; /Brookhaven /CERN /LANL, Ctr. for Nonlinear Studies /LBL, Berkeley /Oak Ridge /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring is designed to accumulate, via H{sup -} injection, protons of 2 MW beam power at 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz [1]. At such beam intensity, electron-cloud is expected to be one of the intensity-limiting mechanisms that complicate ring operations. This paper summarizes mitigation strategy adopted in the design, both in suppressing electron-cloud formation and in enhancing Landau damping, including tapered magnetic field and monitoring system for the collection of stripped electrons at injection, TiN coated beam chamber for suppression of the secondary yield, clearing electrodes dedicated for the injection region and parasitic on BPMs around the ring, solenoid windings in the collimation region, and planning of vacuum systems for beam scrubbing upon operation.

  10. Spallation Target Design for Accelerator-Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Yousry

    2010-06-01

    A design methodology for the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) spallation target has been developed and applied. This methodology includes the target interface with the subcritical assembly and the different engineering aspects of the target design, physics, heat-transfer, hydraulics, structural, radiological, and safety analyses. Several design constrains were defined and utilized for the target design process to satisfy different engineering requirements and to minimize the time and the cost of the design development. Target interface requirements with the subcritical assembly were defined based on performance parameters and material damage issues to enhance the lifetime of the target structure. Different structural materials were considered to define the most promising candidate based on the current database including radiation effects.

  11. Core Vessel Insert Handling Robot for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Van B; Dayton, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source provides the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams for scientific research and industrial development. Its eighteen neutron beam lines will eventually support up to twenty-four simultaneous experiments. Each beam line consists of various optical components which guide the neutrons to a particular instrument. The optical components nearest the neutron moderators are the core vessel inserts. Located approximately 9 m below the high bay floor, these inserts are bolted to the core vessel chamber and are part of the vacuum boundary. They are in a highly radioactive environment and must periodically be replaced. During initial SNS construction, four of the beam lines received Core Vessel Insert plugs rather than functional inserts. Remote replacement of the first Core Vessel Insert plug was recently completed using several pieces of custom-designed tooling, including a highly complicated Core Vessel Insert Robot. The design of this tool are discussed.

  12. Electron-cloud mitigation in the spallation neutron source ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brodowski, J.; Cameron, P.; Davino, D.; Fedotov, A.; He, P.; Hseuh, H.; Lee, Y.Y.; Meng, W.; Raparia, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Danilov, V.; Henderson, S.; Furman, M.; Pivi, M.; Macek, R.

    2003-05-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring is designed to accumulate, via H- injection, protons of 2 MW beam power at 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz [1]. At such beam intensity, electron cloud is expected to be one of the intensity-limiting mechanisms that complicate ring operations. This paper summarizes mitigation strategy adopted in the design, both in suppressing electron-cloud formation and in enhancing Landau damping, including tapered magnetic field and monitoring system for the collection of stripped electrons at injection, TiN coated beam chamber for suppression of the secondary yield, clearing electrodes dedicated for the injection region and parasitic on BPMs around the ring, solenoid windings in the collimation region, and planning of vacuum systems for beam scrubbing upon operation.

  13. Preliminary Numerical and Experimental Analysis of the Spallation Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Alexandre; Bailey, Sean C. C.; Panerai, Francesco; Davuluri, Raghava S. C.; Vazsonyi, Alexander R.; Zhang, Huaibao; Lippay, Zachary S.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Bathel, Brett F.; Splinter, Scott C.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The spallation phenomenon was studied through numerical analysis using a coupled Lagrangian particle tracking code and a hypersonic aerothermodynamics computational fluid dynamics solver. The results show that carbon emission from spalled particles results in a significant modification of the gas composition of the post shock layer. Preliminary results from a test-campaign at the NASA Langley HYMETS facility are presented. Using an automated image processing of high-speed images, two-dimensional velocity vectors of the spalled particles were calculated. In a 30 second test at 100 W/cm2 of cold-wall heat-flux, more than 1300 particles were detected, with an average velocity of 102 m/s, and most frequent observed velocity of 60 m/s.

  14. A multitask neutron beam line for spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaolo, A.; Festa, G.; Grazzi, F.; Barzagli, E.; Scherillo, A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Civita, F.

    2011-08-01

    Here we present a new concept for a time-of-flight neutron scattering instrument allowing for simultaneous application of three different techniques: time-of-flight neutron diffraction, neutron resonance capture analysis and Bragg edge transmission analysis. The instrument can provide average resolution neutron radiography too. The potential of the proposed concept was explored by implementing the necessary equipment on INES (Italian Neutron Experimental Station) at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). The results obtained show the effectiveness of the proposed instrument to acquire relevant quantitative information in a non-invasive way on a historical metallurgical sample, namely a Japanese hand guard (tsuba). The aforementioned neutron techniques simultaneously exploited the extended neutron energy range available from 10 meV to 1 keV. This allowed a fully satisfactory characterization of the sample in terms of metal components and their combination in different phases, and forging and assembling methods.

  15. VESPA: The vibrational spectrometer for the European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Fedrigo, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Bertelsen, Mads; Hartl, Monika; Lefmann, Kim; Deen, Pascale P; Strobl, Markus; Grazzi, Francesco; Zoppi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    VESPA, Vibrational Excitation Spectrometer with Pyrolytic-graphite Analysers, aims to probe molecular excitations via inelastic neutron scattering. It is a thermal high resolution inverted geometry time-of-flight instrument designed to maximise the use of the long pulse of the European Spallation Source. The wavelength frame multiplication technique was applied to provide simultaneously a broad dynamic range (about 0-500 meV) while a system of optical blind choppers allows to trade flux for energy resolution. Thanks to its high flux, VESPA will allow the investigation of dynamical and in situ experiments in physical chemistry. Here we describe the design parameters and the corresponding McStas simulations. PMID:27370491

  16. STATUS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE SUPERCONDUCTING RF FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, Daniel S; Assadi, Saeed; Campisi, Isidoro E; Casagrande, Fabio; Crofford, Mark T; DeVan, Bill; Hardek, Thomas W; Henderson, Stuart D; Howell, Matthew P; Kang, Yoon W; Geng, Xiaosong; Stone Jr, William C; Strong, William Herb; Williams, Derrick C; Wright, Paul Alan

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project was completed with only limited superconducting RF (SRF) facilities installed as part of the project. A concerted effort has been initiated to install the infrastructure and equipment necessary to maintain and repair the superconducting Linac, and to support power upgrade research and development (R&D). Installation of a Class10/100/10,000 cleanroom and outfitting of the test cave with RF, vacuum, controls, personnel protection and cryogenics systems is underway. A horizontal cryostat, which can house a helium vessel/cavity and fundamental power coupler for full power, pulsed testing, is being procured. Equipment for cryomodule assembly and disassembly is being procured. This effort, while derived from the experience of the SRF community, will provide a unique high power test capability as well as long term maintenance capabilities. This paper presents the current status and the future plans for the SNS SRF facilities.

  17. THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE CRYOMODULE TEST STAND RF SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Crofford, Mark T; Ball, Jeffrey Allen; Davidson Jr, Taylor L; Hardek, Thomas W; Heidenreich, Dale A; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kang, Yoon

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has recently commissioned a cryomodule test facility for the repair and testing of the super-conducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. This facility utilizes the original 402.5/805 MHz Radio Frequency (RF) Klystron Test Stand as its power source along with dual Low Level RF (LLRF) control systems. One control system is based on the standard SNS Linac LLRF controls with a second system for open-loop only control. The system is designed to allow simultaneous testing of devices in the test cave and other devices which can be tested outside of the enclosure. Initial tests have shown good results; some improvements are yet to be implemented.

  18. Mesoscale polycrystal calculations of damage in spallation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, Davis L; Bingert, John F; Livescu, Veronica; Luo, Shengnian; Bronkhorst, C A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this project is to produce a damage model for spallation in metals informed by the polycrystalline grain structure at the mesoscale. Earlier damage models addressed the continuwn macroscale in which these effects were averaged out. In this work we focus on cross sections from recovered samples examined with EBSD (electron backscattered diffraction), which reveal crystal grain orientations and voids. We seek to understand the loading histories of specific sample regions by meshing up the crystal grain structure of these regions and simulating the stress, strain, and damage histories in our hydro code, FLAG. The stresses and strain histories are the fundamental drivers of damage and must be calculated. The calculated final damage structures are compared with those from the recovered samples to validate the simulations.

  19. Spallation recoil and age of presolar grains in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, U.; Begemann, F.

    2000-01-01

    We have determined the recoil losses from silicon carbide grain size fractions of spallation neon produced by irradiation with 1.6 GeV protons. During the irradiation the SiC grains were dispersed in paraffin wax in order to avoid re-implantation into neighboring grains. Analysis for spallogenic 21Ne of grain size separates in the size range 0.3 μm to 6 μm and comparison with the 22Na activity of the SiC+paraffin mixture indicates an effective recoil range of 2-3 μm with no apparent effect from acid treatments such as routinely used in the isolation of meteoritic SiC grains. Our results indicate that the majority of presolar SiC grains in primitive meteorites, which are ~μm-sized, will have lost essentially all spallogenic Ne produced by cosmic ray interaction in the interstellar medium. This argues against the validity of previously published presolar ages of Murchison SiC (~10 to ~130 Ma; increasing with grain size; Lewis et al., 1994), where recoil losses had been based on calculated recoil energies. It is argued that the observed variations in meteoritic SiC grain size fractions of 21Ne/22Ne ratios are more likely due to the effects of nucleosynthesis in the He burning shell of the parent AGB stars which imposes new boundary conditions on nuclear parameters and stellar models. It is suggested that spallation-Xe produced on the abundant Ba and REE in presolar SiC, rather than spallogenic Ne, may be a promising approach to the presolar age problem. There is a hint in the currently available Xe data (Lewis et al., 1994) that the large (>1 μm) grains may be younger than the smaller (<1 μm) ones.

  20. Critical beam dynamical issues in neutron spallation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabst, M.; Bongardt, K.; Letchford, A. P.

    1996-06-01

    The accelerator part of proposed neutron spallation sources consists of a high intensity linac and compressor ring or rapid cycling synchrotron. The most critical part of such a high current machine is to keep activation caused by particle loss along the linac or at ring injection down to an acceptable limit. Sources of particle loss along the linac can be beam mismatch, resonances of any kind, temperature transfer within a bunch and/or nonlinear internal or external forces. In addition machine errors like misalignments, tolerances, and rf errors have to be considered. All these sources cause emittance growth. The common way of setting up the beam dynamics of high intensity linacs is governed by avoiding these sources and testing it by Monte-Carlo simulations. To get information on the possible loss mechanism, the only way is to increase the particle number of the Monte-Carlo simulations and to study phase space distributions in detail. Monte-Carlo simulations with 50000 particles for the 1.334 GeV coupled cavity linac of the European Spallation Source (ESS) are presented. It is shown that it is possible to design a non-space charge dominated linac for 200 mA bunch current with almost constant emittances. A detailed study of the phase space distribution along the linac shows a small number of halo particles nearby the bunch core. This halo is acceptable for ring injection. Some information related to particle loss in the linac and in the compressor ring afterwards is extracted and comments for positioning scrapers are made.

  1. Simulation of a beam rotation system for a spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Tibor; Reggiani, Davide; Seidel, Mike; Talanov, Vadim; Wohlmuther, Michael

    2015-04-01

    With a nominal beam power of nearly 1 MW on target, the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ), ranks among the world's most powerful spallation neutron sources. The proton beam transport to the SINQ target is carried out exclusively by means of linear magnetic elements. In the transport line to SINQ the beam is scattered in two meson production targets and as a consequence, at the SINQ target entrance the beam shape can be described by Gaussian distributions in transverse x and y directions with tails cut short by collimators. This leads to a highly nonuniform power distribution inside the SINQ target, giving rise to thermal and mechanical stresses. In view of a future proton beam intensity upgrade, the possibility of homogenizing the beam distribution by means of a fast beam rotation system is currently under investigation. Important aspects which need to be studied are the impact of a rotating proton beam on the resulting neutron spectra, spatial flux distributions and additional—previously not present—proton losses causing unwanted activation of accelerator components. Hence a new source description method was developed for the radiation transport code MCNPX. This new feature makes direct use of the results from the proton beam optics code TURTLE. Its advantage to existing MCNPX source options is that all phase space information and correlations of each primary beam particle computed with TURTLE are preserved and transferred to MCNPX. Simulations of the different beam distributions together with their consequences in terms of neutron production are presented in this publication. Additionally, a detailed description of the coupling method between TURTLE and MCNPX is provided.

  2. Neutron spallation measurements and impacts on low-background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguayo, E.; Kouzes, R. T.; Siciliano, E. R.

    2014-09-01

    Ultralow-background experiments, such as neutrinoless double-β decay, solar neutrino, and dark-matter searches, are carried out deep underground to escape background events created by cosmic-ray muons passing through the detector volumes. However, such experiments may nevertheless be limited in sensitivity by cosmogenically induced backgrounds. This limit can be attributable to cosmogenically created radioactive isotopes produced either in situ during operation or prior to construction when the detector construction materials are above ground. An accurate knowledge of the production of the latter source of background is of paramount importance to be able to interpret the results of low-background experiments. One way to deal with the characterization of cosmogenic background production is to use Monte Carlo simulations to model the spallation reactions arising from cosmic-ray neutrons, protons, and muons. The objective of this work was to evaluate the degree of accuracy that such simulations could provide by comparing measurements for various materials to results from two standard Monte Carlo codes using the same physics model for generating intranuclear cascades. The simulated results from both codes provide the correct trends of neutron production with increasing material density. However, there was substantial disagreement between the models and experimental results for lower-density materials of Al, Fe, and Cu. The model values, when normalized to the Pb experimental results, show disagreement with experiment by a factor of about two for Fe and Cu and significantly greater for Al. It is concluded that additional neutron-induced spallation measurements are required to refine models routinely employed in underground physics research. Further data collection against the above materials is an initial list for benchmarking.

  3. Dielectric Performance of High Purity HTCC Alumina at High Temperatures - A Comparison Study with Other Polycrystalline Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu

    2012-01-01

    A very high purity (99.99+) high temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) alumina has recently become commercially available. The raw material of this HTCC alumina is very different from conventional HTCC alumina, and more importantly there is no glass additive in this co-fired material. Previously, selected HTCC and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) alumina materials were evaluated at high temperatures as dielectric and compared to a regularly sintered 96 polycrystalline alumina (96 Al2O3), where 96 alumina was used as the benchmark. A prototype packaging system based on regular 96 alumina with Au thick-film metallization successfully facilitated long term testing of high temperature silicon carbide (SiC) electronic devices for over 10,000 hours at 500C. In order to evaluate this new HTCC alumina for possible high temperature packaging applications, the dielectric properties of this HTCC alumina substrate were measured and compared with those of 96 alumina and a LTCC alumina from room temperature to 550C at frequencies of 120 Hz, 1 KHz, 10 KHz, 100 KHz, and 1 MHz. A parallel-plate capacitive device with dielectric of the HTCC alumina and precious metal electrodes were used for measurements of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the co-fired alumina material in the temperature and frequency ranges. The capacitance and AC parallel conductance of the capacitive device were directly measured by an AC impedance meter, and the dielectric constant and parallel AC conductivity of the dielectric were calculated from the capacitance and conductance measurement results. The temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the HTCC alumina substrate are presented and compared to those of 96 alumina. Other technical advantages of this new co-fired material for possible high packaging applications are also discussed.

  4. Study of alumina-trichite reinforcement of a nickel-based matric by means of powder metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walder, A.; Hivert, A.

    1982-01-01

    Research was conducted on reinforcing nickel based matrices with alumina trichites by using powder metallurgy. Alumina trichites previously coated with nickel are magnetically aligned. The felt obtained is then sintered under a light pressure at a temperature just below the melting point of nickel. The halogenated atmosphere technique makes it possible to incorporate a large number of additive elements such as chromium, titanium, zirconium, tantalum, niobium, aluminum, etc. It does not appear that going from laboratory scale to a semi-industrial scale in production would create any major problems.

  5. Initial observations of cavitation-induced erosion of liquid metal spallation target vessels at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Riemer, Bernie; Ferguson, Phillip D; Carroll, Adam J; Dayton, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    During operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory the mechanical properties of the AISI 316L target module are altered by high-energy neutron and proton radiation. The interior surfaces of the target vessel are also damaged by cavitation-induced erosion, which results from repetitive rapid heating of the liquid mercury by high-energy proton beam pulses. Until recently no observations of cavitation-induced erosion were possible for conditions prototypical to the SNS. Post irradiation examination (PIE) of the first and second operational SNS targets was performed to gain insight into the radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of the 316L target material and the extent of cavitation-induced erosion to the target vessel inner surfaces. Observations of cavitation-induced erosion of the first and second operational SNS target modules are presented here, including images of the target vessel interiors and specimens removed from the target beam-entrance regions.

  6. Rheological Properties of Aqueous Nanometric Alumina Suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chuanping

    2004-01-01

    Colloidal processing is an effective and reliable approach in the fabrication of the advanced ceramic products. Successful colloidal processing of fine ceramic powders requires accurate control of the rheological properties. The accurate control relies on the understanding the influences of various colloidal parameters on the rheological properties. Almost all research done on the rheology paid less attention to the interactions of particle and solvent. However, the interactions of the particles are usually built up through the media in which the particles are suspended. Therefore, interactions of the particle with the media, the adsorbed layers on the particle surface, and chemical and physical properties of media themselves must influence the rheology of the suspension, especially for the dense suspensions containing nanosized particles. Relatively little research work has been reported in this area. This thesis addresses the rheological properties of nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions, and paying more attention to the interactions between particle and solvent, which in turn influence the particle-particle interactions. Dense nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions with low viscosity were achieved by environmentally-benign fructose additives. The rheology of nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions and its variation with the particle volume fraction and concentration of fructose were explored by rheometry. The adsorptions of solute (fructose) and solvent (water) on the nanometric alumina particle surfaces were measured and analyzed by TG/DSC, TOC, and NMR techniques. The mobility of water molecules in the suspensions and its variation with particle volume fractions and fructose additive were determined by the 17O NMR relaxation method. The interactions between the nanometric alumina particles in water and fructose solutions were investigated by AFM. The results indicated that a large number of water layers were physically bound on the particles

  7. Shock-induced Spallation Phenomena in Copper-Niobium Nanolayered Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Niraj; Stukowski, Alexander; Baskes, Michael; Srivilliputhur, Srinivasan

    2011-03-01

    Shock-induced spallation phenomena in Copper-Niobium nanolayered composites conforming to a Kurdjumov-Sach's orientation relation were simulated using molecular dynamics to determine both spallation strength and the nature of void formation. The target structures consisted of varying numbers of alternating copper and niobium layers with thicknesses varying from 1 nm to 22 nm. Flyer velocities ranged from 3.5 to 11.5 A/ps, corresponding to an approximate strain rate of 109 s -1 . Spallation occurs in the vicinity of the Cu-Nb interface, and always in the copper layer. The proposed factors contributing to spallation will be discussed, as well as what effect the layer morphology has on the strength of the target.

  8. Technology and science at a high-power spallation source: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    These proceedings cover many aspects of the usefulness of spallation neutrons. Nine different areas are considered: surfaces and interfaces, engineering, materials science, polymers and complex fluids, chemistry, structural biology, nuclear engineering and radiation effects, condensed matter physics and fundamental physics.

  9. Rear surface spallation on single-crystal silicon in nanosecond laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jun; Orlov, Sergei S.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2005-05-01

    Rear surface spallation of single-crystal silicon under 5-ns laser pulse ablation at intensities of 0.6-60GW/cm2 is studied through postablation examination of the ablated samples. The spallation threshold energy and the spallation depth's dependences on the energy and target thickness are measured. From the linear relation between the spallation threshold energy and the target thickness, an estimation of the material spall strength around 1.4GPa is obtained, in reasonable agreement with the spall strength estimation of 0.8-1.2GPa at a strain rate of 107s-1 using Grady's model for brittle materials. The experiment reveals the internal fracturing process over an extended zone in silicon, which is controlled by the competition between the shock pressure load and the laser ablation rate. The qualities of the laser microstructuring and micromachining results are greatly improved by using an acoustic impedance matching approach.

  10. A proposal for a long-pulse spallation source at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Weinacht, D.

    1995-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is proposing a new spallation neutron source that will provide the US with an internationally competitive facility for neutron science and technology that can be built in approximately three years for less than $100 million. The establishment of a 1-MW, long-pulse spallation source (LPSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) will meet many of the present needs of scientists in the neutron scattering community and provide a significant boost to neutron research in the US. The new facility will support the development of a future, more intense spallation neutron source, that is planned by DOE`s Office of Energy Research. Together with the existing short pulse spallation source (SPSS) at the Manual Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC) at Los Alamos, the new LPSS will provide US scientists with a complementary pair of high-performance neutron sources to rival the world`s leading facilities in Europe.

  11. Stability domain of alumina thermally grown on Fe-Cr-Al-based model alloys and modified surface layers exposed to oxygen-containing molten Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianu, A.; Fetzer, R.; Weisenburger, A.; Doyle, S.; Bruns, M.; Heinzel, A.; Hosemann, P.; Mueller, G.

    2016-03-01

    The paper gives experimental results concerning the morphology, composition, structure and thickness of the oxide scales grown on Fe-Cr-Al-based bulk alloys during exposure to oxygen-containing molten lead. The results are discussed and compared with former results obtained on Al-containing surface layers, modified by melting with intense pulsed electron beam and exposed to similar conditions. The present and previous results provide the alumina stability domain and also the criterion of the Al/Cr ratio for the formation of a highly protective alumina layer on the surface of Fe-Cr-Al-based alloys and on modified surface layers exposed to molten lead with 10-6 wt.% oxygen at 400-600 °C. The protective oxide scales, grown on alumina-forming Fe-Cr-Al alloys under the given experimental conditions, were transient aluminas, namely, kappa-Al2O3 and theta-Al2O3.

  12. Mechanisms of enhanced osteoblast adhesion on nanophase alumina involve vitronectin.

    PubMed

    Webster, T J; Schadler, L S; Siegel, R W; Bizios, R

    2001-06-01

    The role, including concentration, conformation, and bioactivity, of adsorbed vitronectin in enhancing osteoblast adhesion on nanophase alumina was investigated in the present study. Vitronectin adsorbed in a competitive environment in the highest concentration on nanophase alumina compared to conventional alumina. Enhanced adsorption of vitronectin on nanophase alumina was possibly due to decreased adsorption of apolipoprotein A-I and/or increased adsorption of calcium on nanophase alumina. In a novel manner, the present study utilized surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to determine the conformation of vitronectin adsorbed on nanophase alumina. These results provided the first evidence of increased unfolding of vitronectin adsorbed on nanophase alumina. Increased adsorption of calcium on nanophase alumina may affect the conformation of adsorbed vitronectin specifically to promote unfolding of the macromolecule to expose cell-adhesive epitopes recognized by specific cell-membrane receptors. Results of the present study also provided evidence of dose-dependent inhibition of osteoblast adhesion on nanophase alumina pretreated with vitronectin following preincubation (and thus blocking respective cell-membrane receptors) with either Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic Acid-Serine (RGDS) or Lysine-Arginine-Serine-Arginine (KRSR). These events, namely, enhanced vitronectin adsorption, comformation, and bioactivity, may explain the increased osteoblast adhesion on nanophase alumina.

  13. Impact of AD995 alumina rods

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Furnish, M.D.; Reinhart, W.D.; Grady, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    Gas guns and velocity interferometric techniques have been used to determine the loading behavior of an AD995 alumina rod 19 mm in diameter by 75 mm and 150 mm long, respectively. Graded-density materials were used to impact both bare and sleeved alumina rods while the velocity interferometer was used to monitor the axial-velocity of the free end of the rods. Results of these experiments demonstrate that (1) a time-dependent stress pulse generated during impact allows an efficient transition from the initial uniaxial strain loading to a uniaxial stress state as the stress pulse propagates through the rod, and (2) the intermediate loading rates obtained in this configuration lie between split Hopkinson bar and shock-loading techniques.

  14. Activation of consolidation processes of alumina ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrenin, S. V.; Zenin, B. S.; Tayukin, R. V.

    2016-02-01

    The methods for activating sintering ceramics based on Al2O3 by mechanical activation in the planetary mill, by adding in the mixture of nanopowders (NP) Al, Al2O3, and submicron powder TiO2, and by applying the technology of spark plasma sintering (SPS) are developed. It has been shown that adding the nanopowder up to 20 wt. % Al2O3 in a coarse powder α-Al2O3 activates the sintering process resulting in increased density and hardness of the sintered alumina ceramics. Substantial effect of increasing density of alumina ceramics due to adding the submicron powder TiO2 in the compound of initial powder mixtures has been established.

  15. Fracture toughness and strength of 96% alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.B.; Chinn, R.E.; McNerney, K.R.; Brog, T.K.; Kim, C.Y.; Krutyholowa, M.W.; Chen, N.W.; Haun, M.J.

    1997-05-01

    There exists a need to understand the controlling factors that simultaneously impact strength and toughness in 96% alumina. The enhancement of both strength and toughness enables designers to extend the use limits and reliability for structural ceramics. This article presents mechanical property results from a group study examining the use of different alkaline-earth aluminosilicate intergranular compositions containing magnesium, calcium and strontium oxides (RO) in 96% alumina. Principal results address trends in indentation strength toughness and modulus of rupture. Trends in the data are presented relative to existing theories of thermal expansion mismatch toughening, grain-bridging crack-wake effect and crack deflection mechanisms. Strength is addressed in terms of strength after indentation, crack growth of indentation flaws and Weibull characterization for the strength distribution.

  16. Li + ion diffusion in nanoscale alumina coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Michelle; Bernstein, Noam

    Nanoscale coatings of alumina are used to stabilize surfaces for a variety of technologies. Diffusion of ions through these coatings is of primary importance: in some cases, diffusion is unwanted (e.g. corrosion) and in others (e.g. electrode materials), it is necessary. In this work DFT and AIMD calculations are used to investigate Li+ ion diffusion through a nano-layer of alumina, examining the phase (alpha, gamma, and amorphous), ion concentration, and electron count dependence. We look at the role of the surface itself in promoting diffusion. One of our main findings is that as the number of ions or charge increases, the diffusivity rises. We show how our data can explain electrochemical data from coated LiCoO2 cathodes and may point toward better and more efficient coatings for stabilizing electrodes.

  17. Nanoparticles in alumina: Microscopy and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrobo, Juan C.; Halabica, Andrej; Rashkeev, Sergey; Glazoff, Michael V.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Haglund, Richard F.; Pennycook, Stephen. J.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2007-03-01

    Transition-metal nanoparticles formed by ion implantation in alumina can be used to modify the optical properties of naturally oxidized and anodized aluminum. Here, we report atomic-resolution Z-contrast images using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) of CoFe and other metal nanoparticles in alumina. We also report electron energy loss spectra (EELS) and relate them to visual appearance and optical properties. Finally, we report first-principles density- functional calculations of nucleation mechanisms for these nanoparticles. This research was sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, U.S. Department of Energy, under contract DE-AC05- 00OR22725 with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed and operated by UT-Battelle, by NSF grant No. DMR-0513048, and by Alcoa Inc.

  18. Tribology of alumina-graphite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chih-Yuan

    Alumina-graphite composites, which combine high wear resistance and self-lubricity, are a potential and promising candidate for advanced tribological applications. The processing, mechanical properties and tribology of alumina-graphite composites are discussed. Full density is difficult to achieve by a pressureless sintering route. Porosity of the composites increases with graphite content which causes the strength, modulus of elasticity, and hardness of the composites to decrease. The increased porosity does cause the fracture toughness to slightly increases. Tribology of alumina-graphite composites was studied with a pin-on-disk tribometer with emphasis on the following aspects: the graphite content in both pin and disk, the graphite flake size and the orientation of the graphite flakes. Scan electronic microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction are utilized to examine and characterize the wear debris and the worn surface. Results confirmed that it is necessary to optimize the structure and the supply of lubricant to improve the tribological behavior and that the arrangements of sliding couples also affect the tribology of self-lubricated ceramic composites. Continuous measurements of the friction coefficients were collected at high frequency in an attempt to correlate the tribology of alumina-graphite composites to vibrations introduced by friction. While these measurements indicate that the time frequency behavior of tribology is an important area of study, conclusions regarding the frequency response of different sliding couples could not be definitively stated. Finally, a new concept connecting instantaneous wear coefficient and instantaneous contact stress is proposed for prediction of wear behavior of brittle materials.

  19. Bar Impact Tests on Alumina (AD995)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazamias, James U.; Reinhart, William D.; Konrad, Carl H.; Chhabildas, Lalit C.; Bless, Stephan J.

    2002-07-01

    Dynamic strength may be inferred from bar impact tests, although interpretation of the data is affected by the time-to-failure of the target bar. To clarify the mechanics, tests with graded density impactors were conducted on bare and confined bars, 12 and 19 mm in diameter, cut from blocks of AD995 alumina. Manganin gauge and VISAR diagnostics were employed. Larger rods displayed higher strength. In some tests the "true" yield stress of ˜4.5 GPa was achieved.

  20. Fast Glazing of Alumina/Silica Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creedon, J. F.; Gzowski, E. R.; Wheeler, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    Technique for applying ceramic coating to fibrous silica/alumina insulation tiles prevents cracks and substantially reduces firing time. To reduce thermal stresses in tile being coated, high-temperature, shorttime firing schedule implemented. Such schedule allows coating to mature while substrate remains at relatively low temperature, reducing stress differential between coating and substrate. Technique used to repair tiles with damaged coatings and possibly used in heat-treating objects made of materials having different thermal-expansion coefficients.

  1. High contrast laser marking of alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penide, J.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Fernández, A.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    2015-05-01

    Alumina serves as raw material for a broad range of advanced ceramic products. These elements should usually be identified by some characters or symbols printed directly on them. In this sense, laser marking is an efficient, reliable and widely implemented process in industry. However, laser marking of alumina still leads to poor results since the process is not able to produce a dark mark, yielding bad contrast. In this paper, we present an experimental study on the process of marking alumina by three different lasers working in two wavelengths: 1064 nm (Near-infrared) and 532 nm (visible, green radiation). A colorimetric analysis has been carried out in order to compare the resulting marks and its contrast. The most suitable laser operating conditions were also defined and are reported here. Moreover, the physical process of marking by NIR lasers is discussed in detail. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were also employed to analyze the results. Finally, we propose an explanation for the differences of the coloration induced under different atmospheres and laser parameters. We concluded that the atmosphere is the key parameter, being the inert one the best choice to produce the darkest marks.

  2. Compression Testing of Alumina Fiber Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.

    2006-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to measure the response of alumina fiber insulation to compression loading. The alumina fiber insulation is a candidate gasket material for the Space Shuttle Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) Tile Overlay Repair. Tests were conducted at room temperature and 2300 F. The alumina fiber insulation is a fibrous insulation blanket which was supplied to Langley in two forms, a nominal 3 lb/ft3 version and a nominal 9 lb/ft3 version. The 3 lb/ft3 material was tested as sheets 0.15 and 0.25 inches thick and the 9 lb/ft3 material in sheets 1 inch thick. The material showed very non-linear compression behavior with the compressive resistance of the material increasing as the material was compressed. The 3 lb/ft3 0.15-inch thick material required 4.1 psi to reach the nominal installation thickness of 0.045 inches and retain a load of 2.1 lbs during unloading. Testing at 2300 F resulted in a stiffer more board-like material. The 3 lb/ft3 0.15-inch thick material retained 1 psi of compressive resistance after a 10 minute hold at 2300 F and 0.045 inches thickness.

  3. Improvements to the internal and external antenna H(-) ion sources at the Spallation Neutron Source.

    PubMed

    Welton, R F; Dudnikov, V G; Han, B X; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Pillar, C; Santana, M; Stockli, M P; Turvey, M W

    2014-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), a large scale neutron production facility, routinely operates with 30-40 mA peak current in the linac. Recent measurements have shown that our RF-driven internal antenna, Cs-enhanced, multi-cusp ion sources injects ∼55 mA of H(-) beam current (∼1 ms, 60 Hz) at 65-kV into a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator through a closely coupled electrostatic Low-Energy Beam Transport system. Over the last several years a decrease in RFQ transmission and issues with internal antennas has stimulated source development at the SNS both for the internal and external antenna ion sources. This report discusses progress in improving internal antenna reliability, H(-) yield improvements which resulted from modifications to the outlet aperture assembly (applicable to both internal and external antenna sources) and studies made of the long standing problem of beam persistence with the external antenna source. The current status of the external antenna ion source will also be presented.

  4. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  5. Free-standing alumina nanobottles and nanotubes pre-integrated into nanoporous alumina membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jinghua; Levchenko, Igor; (Ken Ostrikov, Kostya

    2014-08-01

    A novel interfacial structure consisting of long (up to 5 μm), thin (about 300 nm), highly-ordered, free-standing, highly-reproducible aluminum oxide nanobottles and long tubular nanocapsules attached to a rigid, thin (less than 1 μm) nanoporous anodic alumina membrane is fabricated by simple, fast, catalyst-free, environmentally friendly voltage-pulse anodization. A growth mechanism is proposed based on the formation of straight channels in alumina membrane by anodization, followed by neck formation due to a sophisticated voltage control during the process. This process can be used for the fabrication of alumina nanocontainers with highly controllable geometrical size and volume, vitally important for various applications such as material and energy storage, targeted drug and diagnostic agent delivery, controlled drug and active agent release, gene and biomolecule reservoirs, micro-biologically protected platforms, nano-bioreactors, tissue engineering and hydrogen storage.

  6. Method for preparing Pb-.beta."-alumina ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Hellstrom, Eric E.

    1986-01-01

    A process is disclosed for preparing impermeable, polycrystalline samples of Pb-.beta."-alumina ceramic from Na-.beta."-alumina ceramic by ion exchange. The process comprises two steps. The first step is a high-temperature vapor phase exchange of Na by K, followed by substitution of Pb for K by immersing the sample in a molten Pb salt bath. The result is a polycrystalline Pb-.beta."-alumina ceramic that is substantially crack-free.

  7. Synthesis of Co2+ and Ni2+ stabilized beta alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; White, D.R.; Sato, H.; Sandberg, C.J.; Harrison, H.R.

    1983-10-01

    By using a skull melting technique, both single crystalline Ni(2+) and Co(2+) stabilized beta double prime-aluminas and doped beta-aluminas have been synthesized. Both Ni(2+) and Co(2+) beta-aluminas are blue in color, although the Co(2+) material has a deeper hue. Analysis of their visible absorption spectra indicated that the divalent transition metal ions are situated in tetrahedral sites of the spinel blocks.

  8. Neutron diffractometers for structural biology at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenborn, B.P.; Pitcher, E.

    1994-12-31

    Spallation neutron sources are ideal for diffraction studies of proteins and oriented molecular complexes. With spoliation neutrons and their time dependent wavelength structure, it is easy to electronically select data with an optimal wavelength bandwidth and cover the whole Laue spectrum as time (wavelength) resolved snapshots. This optimized data quality with best peak-to-background ratios and provides adequate spatial and energy resolution to eliminate peak overlaps. The application of this concept will use choppers to select the desired Laue wavelength spectrum and employ focusing optics and large cylindrical {sup 3}He detectors to optimize data collection rates. Such a diffractometer will cover a Laue wavelength range from 1 to 5{Angstrom} with a flight path length of 10m and an energy resolution of 0.25{Angstrom}. Moderator concepts for maximal flux distribution within this energy range will be discussed using calculated flux profiles. Since the energy resolution required for such timed data collection in this super Laue techniques is not very high, the use of a linac only (LAMPF) spoliation target is an exciting possibility with an order of magnitude increase in flux.

  9. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H- ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Y. W.; Fuja, R.; Goulding, R. H.; Hardek, T.; Lee, S.-W.; McCarthy, M. P.; Piller, M. C.; Shin, K.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.

    2010-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering ˜38 mA H- beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier.

  10. Spallation Neutron Source Accident Terms for Environmental Impact Statement Input

    SciTech Connect

    Devore, J.R.; Harrington, R.M.

    1998-08-01

    This report is about accidents with the potential to release radioactive materials into the environment surrounding the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). As shown in Chap. 2, the inventories of radioactivity at the SNS are dominated by the target facility. Source terms for a wide range of target facility accidents, from anticipated events to worst-case beyond-design-basis events, are provided in Chaps. 3 and 4. The most important criterion applied to these accident source terms is that they should not underestimate potential release. Therefore, conservative methodology was employed for the release estimates. Although the source terms are very conservative, excessive conservatism has been avoided by basing the releases on physical principles. Since it is envisioned that the SNS facility may eventually (after about 10 years) be expanded and modified to support a 4-MW proton beam operational capability, the source terms estimated in this report are applicable to a 4-MW operating proton beam power unless otherwise specified. This is bounding with regard to the 1-MW facility that will be built and operated initially. See further discussion below in Sect. 1.2.

  11. THE RF SYSTEM DESIGN FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    D. REES; M. LYNCH; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator includes a nominally 1000 MeV, 2 mA average current linac consisting of a radio frequency quadrapole (RFQ), drift tube linac (DTL), coupled cavity linac (CCL), a medium and high beta super conducting (SC) linac, and two buncher cavities for beam transport to the ring. Los Alamos is responsible for the RF systems for all sections of the linac. The SNS linac is a pulsed proton linac and the RF system must support a 1 msec beam pulse at up to a 60 Hz repetition rate. The RFQ and DTL utilize seven, 2.5 MW klystrons and operate at 402.5 MHz. The CCL, SC, and buncher cavities operate at 805 MHz. Six, 5 MW klystrons are utilized for the CCL and buncher cavities while eighty-one 550 kW klystrons are used for the SC cavities. All of the RF hardware for the SNS linac is currently in production. This paper will present details of the RF system-level design as well as specific details of the SNS RF equipment. The design parameters will be discussed. One of the design challenges has been achieving a reasonable cost with the very large number of high-power klystrons. The approaches we used to reduce cost and the resulting design compromises will be discussed.

  12. Conceptual design for one megawatt spallation neutron source at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Chio, Y.; Bailey, J.; Brown, B.

    1993-12-31

    The feasibility study of a spallation neutron source based on a rapid cycling synchrotron which delivers a proton beam of 2 GeV in energy and 0.5mA time-average current at a 30-Hz repetition rate is presented. The lattice consists of 90-degree phase advanced FODO cells with dispersion-free straight sections, and has a three-fold symmetry. The ring magnet system will be energized by 20-Hz and 60-Hz resonant circuits to decrease the dB/dt during the acceleration cycle. This lowers the peak acceleration voltage requirement to 130kV. The single turn extraction system will be used to extract the beam alternatively to two target stations. The first station will operate at 10Hz for research using long wavelength neutrons, and the second station will use the remaining pulses, collectively, providing 36 neutron beams. The 400-MeV negative-hydrogen-ion injector linac consists of an ion source, rf quadrupole, matching section, 100MeV drift-tube linac, and a 300-Mev coupled-cavity linac.

  13. A High Intensity Linac for the National Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jason, A.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Schrage, D.; Kurennoy, S.; Krawczyk, F.; Lynch, M.; Nath, S.; Shafer, R.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Wangler, T.; Wood, R.; Young, L.; Grand, P.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.

    1997-05-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source to be constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, requires a linac capable of delivering up to 5 MW of beam power to an accumulator ring with a nominal 6.2% duty factor and an energy of 1 GeV. Los Alamos, responsible for the linac design, has developed an appropriate room-temperature linac that consists of a drift-tube section from 2.5 to 20 MeV, a coupled-cavity drift-tube section to 100 MeV, and a coupled-cavity section to 1 GeV. The initial scenario requires an average 1.1-mA beam current with a corresponding 28 mA peak current and a 1.2-Mhz chopped time structure corresponding to the ring period. Upgrade to a 4.4 mA average current requires funneling with a peak current of 112 mA in the high-energy sections. Further parameters are presented along with beam dynamics and structure choices and mechanical and rf engineering considerations.

  14. Sintering of beta-type alumina bodies using alpha-alumina encapsulation

    DOEpatents

    McEntire, Bryan J.; Virkar, Anil V.

    1981-01-01

    A method of sintering a shaped green, beta-type alumina body comprising: (A) inserting said body into an open chamber prepared by exposing the interior surface of a container consisting essentially of at least about 50 weight percent of alpha-alumina and a remainder of other refractory material to a sodium oxide or sodium oxide producing environment; (B) sealing the chamber; and heating the chamber with the shaped body encapsulated therein to a temperature and for a time necessary to sinter said body to the desired density. The encapsulation chamber prepared as described above is also claimed.

  15. Low-temperature thermal conductivity of composites: Alumina fiber/epoxy and alumina fiber/PEEK

    SciTech Connect

    Rule, D.L.; Sparks, L.L.

    1989-05-01

    The thermal conductivities of poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK), of alumina fiber in a matrix of PEEK, and of alumina fiber in a matrix of epoxy, were determined along with the effects of fiber orientation and thermal cycling. Thermal conductivity was measured over the temperature range of 4.2 to 310 K using a steady-state apparatus. Data are presented and discussed relative to specimen characteristics. It appears that, after accounting for different fiber fractions in the specimens, the thermal conductivity of the PEEK composite material is less than that of the epoxy composite material in particular temperature ranges.

  16. Damping Behavior of Alumina Epoxy Nano-Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyar, Priyanka; Kumar, Anand

    2016-05-01

    Polymer nano composites, consisting of a polymer matrix with nanoparticle filler, have been predicted to be one of the most beneficial applications of nanotechnology. Addition of nano particulates to a polymer matrix enhances its performance by capitalizing on the nature and properties of the nano-scale fillers. The damping behavior of composites with nano structured phases is significantly different from that of micro structured materials. Viscoelastic homopolymer exhibit a high material damping response over a relatively narrow range of temperature and frequencies. In many practical situations, a polymeric structure is required to possess better strength and stiffness properties together with a reasonable damping behavior. Viscoelastic polymers show higher loss factor beyond the glassy region which comes with a significant drop in the specific modulus. Addition of nano alumina particles to epoxy leads to improved strength and stiffness properties with an increase in glass transition temperature while retaining its damping capability. Experimental investigations are carried out on composite beam specimen fabricated with different compositions of alumina nano particles in epoxy to evaluate loss factor, tan δ. Impact damping method is used for time response analysis. A single point Laser is used to record the transverse displacement of a point on the composite beam specimen. The experimental results are compared with theoretical estimation of loss factor using Voigt estimation. The effect of inter phase is included in theoretical estimation of loss factor. The result reveals that the study of interface properties is very important in deriving the overall loss factor of the composite since interface occupies a significant volume fraction in the composite.

  17. Finite element simulation of the film spallation process induced by the pulsed laser peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M.; Zeng, D. Y.; Kan, J. P.; Zhang, Y. K.; Cai, L.; Shen, Z. H.; Zhang, X. R.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2003-09-01

    The laser spallation technique for measuring the interface strength between a coating and a substrate is similar to laser shock peening, in which the stress wave induced by laser shock cause debond on the interface between a hard coating with micron thickness and a metal substrate. According to the modified experiment setup of the laser spallation technique, finite element analysis simulated the process of the film spallation by taking the laser loading as a direct input. We presented a numerical model of finite element that the laser spallation process includes two related, but uncoupled procedures. One was transient heat transfer in a two-layer medium. The other was the related transient elastic wave propagation in the same two-layer media, which was the result of the thermal misfit by transient heating. Based on the threshold of film spallation, we analyzed the process of laser shocking to study the propagation of stress wave and evaluate the spall resistance of sputtered films. The analysis result showed the dynamic adhesive strength of the interface between the TiN coating and the 304 stainless steel substrate was 193.0 MPa.

  18. Materials problems in the targets of high-power spallation = sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmaier, Hans

    1998-04-01

    In spallation sources, the neutrons (utilized as probes for condensed matter research or for inducing nuclear transmutations) are generated by protons of around 1 GeV energy which cause spallation of the nuclei is a heavy metal target. Since the beam powers of the proposed future facilities are in the range of 1 to several 10 MW, radiation damage will play the crucial role for the lifetime of materials in the target components in or close to the proton beam. Although the extensive knowledge accumulated in fission and fusion materials R&D provides the base for spallation materials selection, there are important issues where data are lacking. The most prominent are (a) the extremely high production rates of foreign elements especially H and He isotopes and (b) the low operating temperatures (RT-250^oC). The contribution summarizes the international efforts on spallation materials R&D with emphasis on radiation damage effects. First results of mechanical tests and microstructural studies on components of spent targets from LAMPF (LANL) and ISIS (Rutherford Lab., UK) and from simulation experiments will be reported. Based on these data, lower limits for the lifetime of the most critical target components will be estimated. Finally, the parameters and the goals of an international irradiation program in the Swiss spallation source SINQ are presented.

  19. Segregation phenomena at growing alumina/alloy interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Peggy Y.

    2005-03-30

    The chemistry and structure at the scale/alloy interface are important factors governing scale adhesion. The chemical changes can occur from segregation of impurities in the alloy, such as sulphur and carbon, or alloying elements such as chromium, aluminium and reactive elements. This paper reviews studies of the changes of interfacial composition with oxidation time for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed on several model alumina-forming alloys, and tries to relate that to the interfacial strength. Results show that sulphur segregation to oxide/metal interfaces can indeed occur, but the type and amount of segregants at the interface depend on the alloy composition and the interface structure. Co-segregation of impurities with alloying elements can also occur, resulting in multi-layer segregants at the interface. Sulphur-containing interfaces are indeed weaker, but the major role of sulphur is to enhance interfacial void formation. Reactive elements in the alloy not only gather sulfur but also exert an additional positive effect on scale adhesion.

  20. Conduction mechanism of single-crystal alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Fritz G.; Delorenzi, Horst G.; Janora, Kevin H.

    1992-01-01

    The fully guarded three-terminal technique was used to perform conductivity measurements on single-crystal alumina at temperatures of 400-1300 C. The conductivity was also determined as a function of time at various temperatures and applied fields. Further, the fractions of the current carried by Al and O ions (ionic transference numbers) were determined from long-term transference experiments in the temperature range 1100-1300 C. A mathematical model of the conduction mechanism is proposed, and model predictions are compared with experimental results.

  1. Anisotropic shrinkage characteristics of tape cast alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Jaideep Suresh

    Dimensional control during sintering is a major issue in ceramics processing to avoid high post-sintering costs associated with machining of the fired ceramic part to desired tolerances and dimensions. Ceramic forming processes such as tape casting, injection molding, and extrusion involve shear of anisotropic particles resulting in preferential alignment of the particles in the green body. This preferential alignment causes directionality in mechanical, electrical, optical, and magnetic properties and most importantly warpage or distortion during sintering. A large effort has been devoted to synthesizing ceramic green bodies with minimal density gradients and uniform packing and modeling the sintering behavior evolution but little effort has been devoted to characterizing orientation of particles and the effect of preferential alignment on sintering shrinkage anisotropy. A systematic study was initiated to study the effect of processing variables such as shear rate, solids loading, temperature, and binder content on aqueous tape cast alumina. Three different alumina systems: A16-SG, Baikowski RC-UFX DBM and RC-LS DBM were investigated. Aqueous tapes of high solids loading alumina (56 vol. %) were tape cast at various speeds and thicknesses and assuming plane Couette flow a shear rate regime of 21--270 s-1 was investigated. Higher shear rates and high solids loading resulted in higher in-plane anisotropy whereas the anisotropy in the thickness direction was higher for low solids loading systems. The anisotropy was found to be fairly constant above a certain critical shear rate (˜100 s-1) irrespective of the temperature and the solids loading and this correlated with the viscosity-shear rate relationship of the cast slips. The higher shrinkage anisotropy in the thickness direction for the low solids loading systems (35 and 45 vol. %) was attributed to the higher amount of organics in the slip required to sustain the suitable viscosity for tape casting and

  2. Improved Synthesis Of Potassium Beta' '-Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Ryan, Margaret A.; O'Connor, Dennis E.; Kisor, Adam; Underwood, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Improved formulations of precursor materials synthesize nearly-phase-pure potassium beta' '-alumina solid electrolyte (K-BASE) powder. Materials are microhomogeneous powders (or, alternatively, gels) containing K(+,) Mg(2+), and Al(3+). K-BASE powder produced used in potassium-working-fluid alkali-metal thermal-to-electric conversion (K-AMTEC), in which heat-input and heat-rejection temperatures lower than sodium-working-fluid AMTEC (Na-AMTEC). Additional potential use lies in purification of pottassium by removal of sodium and calcium.

  3. Porosity in plasma sprayed alumina coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ilavsky, J.; Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C.; Goland, A.N.; Long, G.G.; Krueger, S.; Allen, A.J.

    1994-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the porosity of plasma sprayed deposits of alumina in as-sprayed and heat-treated conditions. SANS results were compared with mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and water immersion techniques. Multiple small-angle neutron scattering yields a volume-weighted effective pore radius (R{sub eff}), for pores with sizes between 0.08 and 10{mu}m, the pore volume in this size region, and from the Porod region, the surface area of pores of all sizes.

  4. Intercalation of water into lithium. beta. -alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, N J; Bates, J B; Wang, J C; Brown, G M; Larson, B C; Engstrom, H

    1981-01-01

    Infrared absorption, neutron diffraction and weight loss techniques have been used to investigate the hydration of single crystals of Li ..beta..-alumina. The hydration is a reversible intercalation reaction. Up to approximately two water molecules per formula unit can penetrate the conduction plane. Other protonated species are formed from the dissociation of the molecular water. The rate of hydration is controlled by the diffusion of water in the conduction plane. A likely diffusion mechanism requires dissociation of the water and an interstitialcy motion of the oxygen.

  5. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Gawne, K. R.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Turvey, M. W.

    2012-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent ˜38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of ˜90%. H- beam pulses (˜1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, ˜60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of ˜0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of ˜99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of ˜75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to ˜100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  6. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R; Roseberry, Ron T; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  7. Feasibility study of a 1-MW pulsed spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Chae, Y.C.; Crosbie, E.

    1995-12-31

    A feasibility study of a 1-MW pulsed spallation source based on a rapidly cycling proton synchrotron (RCS) has been completed. The facility consists of a 400-MeV HP{sup -} linac, a 30-Hz RCS that accelerates the 400-MeV beam to 2 GeV, and two neutron-generating target stations. The design time-averaged current of the accelerator system is 0.5 mA, or 1.04{times}1014 protons per pulse. The linac system consists of an H{sup -}ion source, a 2-MeV RFQ, a 70-MeV DTL and a 330-MeV CCL. Transverse phase space painting to achieve a Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (K-V) distribution of the injected particles in the RCS is accomplished by charge exchange injection and programming of the closed orbit during injection. The synchrotron lattice uses FODO cells of {approx}90{degrees} phase advance. Dispersion-free straight sections are obtained by using a missing magnet scheme. Synchrotron magnets are powered by a dual-frequency resonant circuit that excites the magnets at a 20-Hz rate and de-excites them at a 60-Hz rate, resulting in an effective rate of 30 Hz, and reducing the required peak rf voltage by 1/3. A key feature, of the design of this accelerator system is that beam losses are from injection to extraction, reducing activation to levels consistent with hands-on maintenance. Details of the study are presented.

  8. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source.

    PubMed

    Welton, R F; Dudnikov, V G; Gawne, K R; Han, B X; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Roseberry, R T; Santana, M; Stockli, M P; Turvey, M W

    2012-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent ∼38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of ∼90%. H(-) beam pulses (∼1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, ∼60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of ∼0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of ∼99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of ∼75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance∕installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to ∼100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  9. Modeling astatine production in liquid lead-bismuth spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, J. C.; Boudard, A.; Cugnon, J.; Ghali, S.; Leray, S.; Mancusi, D.; Zanini, L.

    2013-03-01

    Astatine isotopes can be produced in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic targets through proton-induced double charge exchange reactions on bismuth or in secondary helium-induced interactions. Models implemented into the most common high-energy transport codes generally have difficulties to correctly estimate their production yields as was shown recently by the ISOLDE Collaboration, which measured release rates from a lead-bismuth target irradiated by 1.4 and 1 GeV protons. In this paper, we first study the capability of the new version of the Liège intranuclear cascade model, INCL4.6, coupled to the deexcitation code ABLA07 to predict the different elementary reactions involved in the production of such isotopes through a detailed comparison of the model with the available experimental data from the literature. Although a few remaining deficiencies are identified, very satisfactory results are found, thanks in particular to improvements brought recently on the treatment of low-energy helium-induced reactions. The implementation of the models into MCNPX allows identifying the respective contributions of the different possible reaction channels in the ISOLDE case. Finally, the full simulation of the ISOLDE experiment is performed, taking into account the likely rather long diffusion time from the target, and compared with the measured diffusion rates for the different astatine isotopes, at the two studied energies, 1.4 and 1 GeV. The shape of the isotopic distribution is perfectly reproduced as well as the absolute release rates, assuming in the calculation a diffusion time between 5 and 10hours. This work finally shows that our model, thanks to the attention paid to the emission of high-energy clusters and to low-energy cluster induced reactions, can be safely used within MCNPX to predict isotopes with a charge larger than that of the target by two units in spallation targets, and, probably, more generally to isotopes created in secondary reactions induced by composite

  10. 5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

  11. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2001-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 186 MeV to 1000 MeV. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical {beta} values of {beta} = 0.61 and {beta} = 0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at Jefferson Lab, which calls for fabricating and testing four {beta} = 0.61 cavities and two {beta} = 0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four {beta} = 0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test in early 2002. At this time four medium beta cavities and one high beta cavity have been completed at JLab. The first tests on the {beta} = 0.61 and {beta} = 0.81 exceeded the design values for gradient and Q value: E{sub acc} = 10.1 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for the {beta} = 0.61 and E{sub acc} = 12.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1 K for the {beta} = 0.81. One of the medium beta cavities has been equipped with an integrated helium vessel and measurements of the static Lorentz force detuning have been done and compared to the ''bare'' cavities. In addition two single cell cavities have been fabricated, equipped with welded-on HOM couplers. They are being used to evaluate the HOM couplers with respect to multipacting, fundamental mode rejection and HOM damping as far as possible in a single cell. This paper describes the cavity design with respect to electromagnetic and mechanical features, the fabrication efforts and the results obtained with the different cavities existing at the time of this workshop.

  12. The COHERENT Experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Steven Ray

    2015-09-30

    The COHERENT collaboration's primary objective is to measure coherent elastic neutrino- nucleus scattering (CEvNS) using the unique, high-quality source of tens-of-MeV neutrinos provided by the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In spite of its large cross section, the CEvNS process has never been observed, due to tiny energies of the resulting nuclear recoils which are out of reach for standard neutrino detectors. The measurement of CEvNS has now become feasible, thanks to the development of ultra-sensitive technology for rare decay and weakly-interacting massive particle (dark matter) searches. The CEvNS cross section is cleanly predicted in the standard model; hence its measurement provides a standard model test. It is relevant for supernova physics and supernova-neutrino detection, and enables validation of dark-matter detector background and detector-response models. In the long term, precision measurement of CEvNS will address questions of nuclear structure. COHERENT will deploy multiple detector technologies in a phased approach: a 14-kg CsI[Na] scintillating crystal, 15 kg of p-type point-contact germanium detectors, and 100 kg of liquid xenon in a two-phase time projection chamber. Following an extensive background measurement campaign, a location in the SNS basement has proven to be neutron-quiet and suitable for deployment of the COHERENT detector suite. The simultaneous deployment of the three COHERENT detector subsystems will test the N=2 dependence of the cross section and ensure an unambiguous discovery of CEvNS. This document describes concisely the COHERENT physics motivations, sensitivity and plans for measurements at the SNS to be accomplished on a four-year timescale.

  13. Depositing Adherent Ag Films On Ti Films On Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honecy, Frank S.

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses cleaning of ceramic (principally, alumina) substrates in preparation for sputter deposition of titanium intermediate films on substrates followed by sputter deposition of outer silver films. Principal intended application, substrates sliding parts in advanced high-temperature heat engines, and outer silver films serve as solid lubricants: lubricating properties described in "Solid Lubricant for Alumina" (LEW-15495).

  14. Process for the recovery of alumina from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Murtha, M.J.

    1983-08-09

    An improvement in the lime-sinter process for recovering alumina from pulverized coal fly ash is disclosed. The addition of from 2 to 10 weight percent carbon and sulfur to the fly ash-calcium carbonate mixture increase alumina recovery at lower sintering temperatures.

  15. Evaluation of nano-porous alumina membranes for hemodialysis application.

    PubMed

    Attaluri, Anil Chandra; Huang, Zhongping; Belwalkar, Amit; Van Geertruyden, William; Gao, Dayong; Misiolek, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    Globally, kidney failure has consistently been a major health problem. The number of patients suffering from kidney failure is radically increasing. Some studies forecast an exponential growth in the number of kidney failure patients during the coming years. This emphasizes the importance of hemodialysis (HD) membranes. Current dialysis membranes (cellulose based and synthetic polymer membranes) have irregular pore shapes and sizes, nonuniform pore distribution and limited reusable capability, which leads to low efficiency of toxin removal. New alumina membranes with uniform, controllable and well-structured nanoscale pores, channeled pores aligned perpendicular to the membrane plane, high porosity, high thermal and chemical resistance, and better mechanical properties are certainly preferable to currently used membranes. Determination of transport properties of alumina membranes will assist in the development of the alumina membranes for enhancing hemodialysis. Experiments were performed to evaluate hydraulic permeability, solute diffusive permeability, sieving coefficient, and clearance of four solutes (urea, creatinine, Vancomycin, and inulin) for alumina membrane. Based on comparison of these values against those of polyethersulfone (PES) membranes, transport performance of alumina membrane was determined. Hydraulic conductivity of the alumina membrane was approximately twice that of the PES membrane and inulin sieving coefficient for alumina membrane is approximately 21% higher than that for PES membrane. Alumina membrane has higher solute clearances and no albumin leakage, which makes it an effective replacement for current dialysis membranes. PMID:19293709

  16. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of Actively Brazed Alumina Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Cadden, C.H.; Stephens, J.J.; Glass, S.J.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Vianco, P.V.; Walker, C.A.

    1999-08-26

    Alumina (94 and 99.8% grade compositions) was brazed directly to itself with gold-based active brazing alloys (ABA's) containing vanadium additions of 1,2 and 3 weight percent. The effects of brazing conditions on the joint properties were investigated. Wetting behavior, interfacial reactions, microstructure, hermeticity and tensile strength were determined. Wetting was fair to good for the ABA and base material combinations. Microanalysis identified a discontinuous Al-V-O spinel reaction product at the alumina-braze interface. Tensile strength results for 94% alumina were uniformly good and generally not sensitive to the vanadium concentration, with tensile values of 85-105 MPa. There was more variability in the 99.8% alumina strength results, with values ranging from 25-95 MPa. The highest vanadium concentration (3 wt. %) yielded the highest joint strength for the brazed 99.8% alumina. Failures in the 99.8% alumina samples occurred at the braze-alumina interface, while the 94% alumina specimens exhibited fracture of the ceramic substrate.

  17. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-28

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100–1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  18. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nanoparticles (generic). 721.10120 Section 721.10120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  19. Direct Visualization of the Hydration Layer on Alumina Nanoparticles with the Fluid Cell STEM in situ

    PubMed Central

    Firlar, Emre; Çınar, Simge; Kashyap, Sanjay; Akinc, Mufit; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    Rheological behavior of aqueous suspensions containing nanometer-sized powders is of relevance to many branches of industry. Unusually high viscosities observed for suspensions of nanoparticles compared to those of micron size powders cannot be explained by current viscosity models. Formation of so-called hydration layer on alumina nanoparticles in water was hypothesized, but never observed experimentally. We report here on the direct visualization of aqueous suspensions of alumina with the fluid cell in situ. We observe the hydration layer formed over the particle aggregates and show that such hydrated aggregates constitute new particle assemblies and affect the flow behavior of the suspensions. We discuss how these hydrated nanoclusters alter the effective solid content and the viscosity of nanostructured suspensions. Our findings elucidate the source of high viscosity observed for nanoparticle suspensions and are of direct relevance to many industrial sectors including materials, food, cosmetics, pharmaceutical among others employing colloidal slurries with nanometer-scale particles. PMID:25996055

  20. Oxidative Recession, Sulfur Release, and Al203 Spallation for Y-Doped Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2001-01-01

    Second-order spallation phenomena have been noted for Y-doped Rene'N5 after long term oxidation at 1150 degrees C. The reason for this behavior has not been conclusively identified. A mass equivalence analysis has shown that the surface recession resulting from oxidation has the potential of releasing about 0.15 monolayer of sulfur for every 1 mg/sq cm of oxygen reacted for an alloy containing 5 ppmw of sulfur. This amount is significant in comparison to levels that have been shown to result in first-order spallation behavior for undoped alloys. Oxidative recession is therefore speculated to be a contributing source of sulfur and second-order spallation for Y-doped alloys.

  1. Thermal Conductivity of Alumina-reinforced Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    2005-01-01

    10-mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (10SZ) - alumina composites containing 0-30 mol% alumina were fabricated by hot pressing at 1500 C in vacuum. Thermal conductivity was determined at various temperatures using a steady-state laser heat flux technique. Thermal conductivity of the composites increased with increase in alumina content. Composites containing 0, 5, and 10-mol% alumina did not show any change in thermal conductivity with temperature. However, those containing 20 and 30-mol% alumina showed a decrease in thermal conductivity with increase in temperature. The measured values of thermal conductivity were in good agreement with those calculated from the Maxwell-Eucken model where one phase is uniformly dispersed within a second major continuous phase.

  2. Properties of Transition Metal Doped Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykwest, Erik; Limmer, Krista; Brennan, Ray; Blair, Victoria; Ramprasad, Rampi

    Crystallographic texture can have profound effects on the properties of a material. One method of texturing is through the application of an external magnetic field during processing. While this method works with highly magnetic systems, doping is required to couple non-magnetic systems with the external field. Experiments have shown that low concentrations of rare earth (RE) dopants in alumina powders have enabled this kind of texturing. The magnetic properties of RE elements are directly related to their f orbital, which can have as many as 7 unpaired electrons. Since d-block elements can have as many as 5 unpaired electrons the effects of substitutional doping of 3d transition metals (TM) for Al in alpha (stable) and theta (metastable) alumina on the local structure and magnetic properties, in addition to the energetic cost, have been calculated by performing first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. This study has led to the development of general guidelines for the magnetic moment distribution at and around the dopant atom, and the dependence of this distribution on the dopant atom type and its coordination environment. It is anticipated that these findings can aid in the selection of suitable dopants help to guide parallel experimental efforts. This project was supported in part by an internship at the Army Research Laboratory, administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, along with a grant of computer time from the DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program.

  3. Pseudopotential Computations for Metal/Alumina Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenqing

    2003-03-01

    Metal/alumina interfaces are found, for example, in electronic devices, as thermal barrier coatings in gas turbines, and in coatings to inhibit corrosion and wear. Of particular importance to their performance is their adhesion. Ultrasoft pseudopotentials combined with plane wave methods and density-functional theory have been employed to compute the properties of these relatively complex interfaces, including effects of impurity segregation. Interfacial stoichiometry and impurity content affect interfacial properties importantly. Thermodynamic links between our first principles results and metallurgical variables such as oxygen activity and oxygen partial pressure are established. This allows for a comparison between theoretical predictions and experimental measurements. Good agreement is obtained for predicted interfacial variables such as atomic structure and adhesive bond strengths on comparison with results of sessile drop, fracture, and other experiments on interfaces of Ni, Cu, Al, and Ag with alumina [1-3], including effects of water and sulfur interfacial impurities. Understanding of the nature of the adhesive bonding at the atomic level is obtained by the pseudopotential first principles approach. [1] W.Zhang, and J.R.Smith, and A.G.Evans, Acta Mater., 50,3803(2002). [2] W.Zhang, and J.R.Smith, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3225(2000). [3] W.Zhang, and J.R.Smith, Phys. Rev. B61, 16883(2000).

  4. Combination for electrolytic reduction of alumina

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2002-04-30

    An electrolytic bath for use during the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum. The bath comprises molten electrolyte having the following ingredients: AlF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF, and LiF; and about 0.004 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. %, based on total weight of the molten electrolyte, of at least one transition metal or at least one compound of the metal or both. The compound is, a fluoride; oxide, or carbonate. The metal is nickel, iron, copper, cobalt, or molybdenum. The bath is employed in a combination including a vessel for containing the bath and at least one non-consumable anode and at least one dimensionally stable cathode in the bath. Employing the instant bath during electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum improves the wetting of aluminum on a cathode by reducing or eliminating the formation of non-metallic deposits on the cathode.

  5. Parsing abnormal grain growth in specialty aluminas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Abigail Kremer

    Grain growth in alumina is strongly affected by the impurities present in the material. Certain impurity elements are known to have characteristic effects on abnormal grain growth in alumina. Specialty alumina powders contain multiple impurity species including MgO, CaO, SiO2, and Na 2O. In this work, sintered samples made from alumina powders containing various amounts of the impurities in question were characterized by their grain size and aspect ratio distributions. Multiple quantitative methods were used to characterize and classify samples with varying microstructures. The grain size distributions were used to partition the grain size population into subpopulations depending on the observed deviation from normal behavior. Using both grain size and aspect ratio a new visual representation for a microstructure was introduced called a morphology frequency map that gives a fingerprint for the material. The number of subpopulations within a sample and the shape of the distribution on the morphology map provided the basis for a classification scheme for different types of microstructures. Also using the two parameters a series of five metrics were calculated that describe the character of the abnormal grains in the sample, these were called abnormal character values. The abnormal character values describe the fraction of grains that are considered abnormal, the average magnitude of abnormality (including both grain size and aspect ratio), the average size, and variance in size. The final metric is the correlation between grain size and aspect ratio for the entire population of grains. The abnormal character values give a sense of how different from "normal" the sample is, given the assumption that a normal sample has a lognormal distribution of grain size and a Gaussian distribution of aspect ratios. In the second part of the work the quantified measures of abnormality were correlated with processing parameters such as composition and heat treatment conditions. A

  6. An apparatus for studying spallation neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, S. C.; Chan, Y. L.; Chen, X. C.; Chu, M. C.; Hahn, R. L.; Ho, T. H.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lau, Y. P.; Lee, K. P.; Leung, J. K. C.; Leung, K. Y.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, Y. C.; Luk, K. B.; Luk, W. H.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ngan, S. Y.; Pun, C. S. J.; Shih, K.; Tam, Y. H.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Wang, C. H.; Wong, C. M.; Wong, H. L.; Wong, H. H. C.; Wong, K. K.; Yeh, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we describe the design, construction and performance of an apparatus installed in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory in Hong Kong for studying spallation neutrons induced by cosmic-ray muons under a vertical rock overburden of 611 m water equivalent (m.w.e.). The apparatus comprises six horizontal layers of plastic-scintillator hodoscopes for determining the direction and position of the incident cosmic-ray muons. Sandwiched between the hodoscope planes is a neutron detector filled with 650 kg of liquid scintillator doped with about 0.06% of Gadolinium by weight for improving the efficiency of detecting the spallation neutrons. Performance of the apparatus is also presented.

  7. Calculations of radiation damage in target, container and window materials for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, M.S.; Ferguson, P.D.; Sommer, W.F.; Mansur, L.K.

    1996-07-01

    Radiation damage in target, container, and window materials for spallation neutron sources is am important factor in the design of target stations for accelerator-driver transmutation technologies. Calculations are described that use the LAHET and SPECTER codes to obtain displacement and helium production rates in tungsten, 316 stainless steel, and Inconel 718, which are major target, container, and window materials, respectively. Results are compared for the three materials, based on neutron spectra for NSNS and ATW spallation neutron sources, where the neutron fluxes are normalized to give the same flux of neutrons of all energies.

  8. Parametric study of spallation targets for the MYRRHA reactor using MCNPX simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebello, A. L. P.; Martinez, A. S.; Gonçalves, A. C.

    2014-06-01

    The present work aims to evaluate the behavior of neutron multiplicity in a spallation target using MCNPX simulations, focusing on its application in the MYRRHA reactor. It was studied the two types of spallation target proposed for the MYRRHA project, windowless and windows target, in order to compare them and find saturation boundaries. Some saturation boundaries were found and the windowless target proved to be as viable as the windows one. Each one produced nearly the same number of neutrons per incident proton. Using the concept of neutron cost, it was also observed that the optimum conditions on neutron production occur at about 1GeV, for both target designs.

  9. A time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, BASIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamontov, E.; Herwig, K. W.

    2011-08-01

    We describe the design and current performance of the backscattering silicon spectrometer (BASIS), a time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer built at the spallation neutron source (SNS) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). BASIS is the first silicon-based backscattering spectrometer installed at a spallation neutron source. In addition to high intensity, it offers a high-energy resolution of about 3.5 μeV and a large and variable energy transfer range. These ensure an excellent overlap with the dynamic ranges accessible at other inelastic spectrometers at the SNS.

  10. Final report on the application of chaos theory to an alumina sensor for aluminum reduction cells

    SciTech Connect

    Williford, R.E.; Windisch, C.F. Jr.

    1992-03-01

    Four chaos-related digital signal analysis (DSA) methods were applied to the analysis of voltage and current signals collected from aluminum electrolysis cells. Two separate data bases were analyzed: bench-scale laboratory experiments and a pilot-scale test. The objective was to assess the feasibility of using these types of data and analysis methods as the basis for a non-intrusive sensor to measure the alumina content in the electrolysis bath. This was the first time chaos theory approaches have been employed to analyze aluminum electrolysis cells.

  11. Development of solid state bonding processes for spallation neutron targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew T.

    Solid state bonding techniques are of vital interest to current and future spallation target design efforts for both cladding and wider fabrication requirements. The distinct needs of both water and liquid metal cooled sources were considered in this study. Development of hot isostatic pressing techniques and process controls necessary for successful cladding of tungsten with tantalum as needed for existing water cooled designs constituted the first component of this work. A second independent study performed with an emphasis on high temperature lead bismuth coolants focused on exploration of uniaxial diffusion bonding methods to join tungsten and tantalum to HT9, a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. A technique for evaluation of the thermal performance of joined interfaces was also developed and employed to study the diffusion bonded systems. Hot isostatic pressing performed at 1500°C for 3 hours and 200 MPa was found to produce an acceptable tantalum-tungsten bond provided extensive tantalum getter foil was used to wrap the target during the process. Excellent interface coherency was observed along with no oxidation or carburization on the tantalum surface. Uniaxial diffusion bonding at a temperature of 1060°C for 3 hours at pressures below 7 MPa resulted in excessive intermetallic formation at the HT9-tungsten and HT9-tantalum interfaces and significant residual interface porosity. Nickel and NiP interlayers were also observed to impart little benefit but did stabilize austenite with the HT9. A transition to lower temperatures and higher pressures improved bond quality. Conditions of 900°C for 3 hours and 70 MPa significantly improved both the HT9-tungsten and HT9-tantalum interfaces compared with the high temperature bond. An exploratory investigation of vanadium interlayers enhanced the result even further under these conditions and warrants further investigation. All interfaces produced in this study possessed a thermal resistance well below that needed

  12. Preparation and Testing of Corrosion and Spallation-Resistant Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, John

    2015-11-01

    with the Rene 80. One-inch-diameter buttons were machined from each of the bonded blocks and sent to Siemens for standard oxidation, spallation, and corrosion testing, which should be complete in the spring of 2016.

  13. Dissertation: Precompound Emission of Energetic Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kerby, Leslie Marie

    2015-08-04

    Emission of light fragments (LF) from nuclear reactions is an open question. Different reaction mechanisms contribute to their production; the relative roles of each, and how they change with incident energy, mass number of the target, and the type and emission energy of the fragments is not completely understood. None of the available models are able to accurately predict emission of LF from arbitrary reactions. However, the ability to describe production of LF (especially at energies ≳ 30 MeV) from many reactions is important for different applications, such as cosmic-ray-induced Single Event Upsets (SEUs), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and heavy-ion beams, to name just a few. The Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) version 03.03 and the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) version 03.03 event generators in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code version 6 (MCNP6) describe quite well the spectra of fragments with sizes up to ⁴He across a broad range of target masses and incident energies (up to ~ 5 GeV for CEM and up to ~ 1 TeV/A for LAQGSM). However, they do not predict the high energy tails of LF spectra heavier than ⁴He well. Most LF with energies above several tens of MeV are emitted during the precompound stage of a reaction. The current versions of the CEM and LAQGSM event generators do not account for precompound emission of LF larger than ⁴He. The aim of our work is to extend the precompound model in them to include such processes, leading to an increase of predictive power of LF-production in MCNP6. This entails upgrading the Modified Exciton Model currently used at the preequilibrium stage in CEM and LAQGSM. It also includes expansion and examination of the coalescence and Fermi break-up models used in the precompound stages of spallation reactions within CEM and LAQGSM. Extending our models to include emission of fragments heavier than ⁴He at the precompound stage has indeed provided results that have much

  14. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail…

  15. Catalytic ozonation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid using alumina in the presence of a radical scavenger.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Perez, Carlos A; Soltan, Jafar; Robertson, Jared

    2012-01-01

    Using a laboratory-scale mixed reactor, the performance of alumina in degrading 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid with ozone in the presence of tert-butyl alcohol radical scavenger was studied. The operating variables investigated were the dose of alumina catalyst and solution pH. Results showed that using ozone and alumina leads to a significant increase in 2,4-D removal in comparison to non-catalytic ozonation and adsorption processes. The observed reaction rate constants (k(obs)) for 2,4-D during ozonation were found to increase linearly with increasing catalyst dose. At pH 5, the k(obs) value increased from 19.3 to 26 M(-1) s(-1) and 67 M(-1) s(-1) when varying the alumina dose from 1 to 2 and 4 g L(-1), respectively. As pH was increased, higher reaction rates were observed for both non-catalytic ozonation and catalytic ozonation processes. Thus, at pH 3 and using a catalyst dose of 8 g L(-1), the k(obs) values for non-catalytic ozonation and catalytic ozonation processes were 3.4 and 58.9 M(-1) s(-1), respectively, whereas at pH 5 reaction rate constants of 6.5 and 128.5 M(-1) s(-1) were observed, respectively. Analysis of total organic carbon suggested that catalytic ozonation with alumina achieved a considerable level of mineralization of 2,4-D. Adsorption of 2,4-D on alumina was found to play an important role in the catalytic ozonation process.

  16. Terbium luminescence in alumina xerogel fabricated in porous anodic alumina matrix under various excitation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gaponenko, N. V.; Kortov, V. S.; Orekhovskaya, T. I.; Nikolaenko, I. A.; Pustovarov, V. A.; Zvonarev, S. V.; Slesarev, A. I.; Prislopski, S. Ya.

    2011-07-15

    Terbium-doped alumina xerogel layers are synthesized by the sol-gel method in pores of a porous anodic alumina film 1 {mu}m thick with a pore diameter of 150-180 nm; the film is grown on a silicon substrate. The fabricated structures exhibit terbium photoluminescence with bands typical of trivalent terbium terms. Terbium X-ray luminescence with the most intense band at 542 nm is observed for the first time for such a structure. Morphological analysis of the structure by scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of xerogel clusters in pore channels, while the main pore volume remains unfilled and pore mouths remain open. The data obtained confirm the promising applications of fabricated structures for developing matrix converters of X-rays and other ionizing radiations into visible light. The possibilities of increasing luminescence intensity in the matrix converter are discussed.

  17. Essentials of specifications for activated alumina in defluoridation technology.

    PubMed

    Misra, S K

    2006-10-01

    Worldwide, fluoride occurs naturally in some aquifers at concentrations above the WHO guideline values or Bureau of Indian Standards or CPHEEO - MUD - GOI parametric values. Fluoride in excess of the permissible limits in drinking water causes a number of endemic conditions referred to collectively as "fluorosis". Endemic fluorosis remains a challenging national health problem in India and Rajasthan is one of the worst affected states in India though a wide range of chemical and physical defluoridation systems were evolved and tried. Still activated alumina is one of the most widely used and liked defluoridation material currently available. Boom in the advanced and versatile alumina technology has opened new vistas to avail the strong potential of selective alumina adsorbents which are application-specific. Non-regenerable and specialty alumina offer tremendous scope to defluoridate drinking water. Indian industries are manufacturing regenerable activated alumina for defluoridation of drinking water. In order to ensure application of an adsorbent, which caters the desired results with minimum interferences, health risks and long service life span, it is inevitable to draw out dimensions which define precisely the attributes of activated alumina. Specifications for activated alumina intended for defluoridation of drinking water, specific operating and performance requirements, and limitations expressed by critical analysis of cardinal characteristics pave way for adoption of acceptable specifications and code of practice at national level.

  18. Fracture of the alumina-bearing couple delta ceramic liner.

    PubMed

    Taheriazam, Afshin; Mohajer, Mohammad Azizbaig; Aboulghasemian, Mansoour; Hajipour, Babak

    2012-01-01

    The fracture rate of third-generation ceramic liners is greatly reduced compared with first- and second-generation liners because of improvements in the design and manufacturing process. Fractures of the alumina-bearing couple are rare for the same reason.This article describes a case of a fracture of an alumina-bearing couple delta ceramic liner without trauma history that was treated with ceramic-on-polyethylene revision total hip arthroplasty. A 57-year-old man was admitted to the hip ward because of an alumina-bearing couple delta ceramic liner fracture. He underwent hip replacement by anterior approach 18 months previously in the same center because of left hip primary osteoarthritis. He received a 54×36-mm modular press-fit cup ceramic alumina-bearing couple delta insert. Probable causes of such fractures are manufacture production failure and edge loading based on cup inclination, but in our patient, inacceptable range of motion, failure of the locking mechanism during implantation insertion, or cracking were possible causes of fracture.Although the fracture rate of third-generation alumina-bearing couples is low, we believe that it may not be possible to eliminate the actual risk of alumina head fracture. Patients should be informed about the potential for this complication before receiving an alumina-bearing couple.

  19. Scattering and absorption coefficients of silica-doped alumina aerogels.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tairan; Tang, Jiaqi; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Fan

    2016-02-01

    Alumina-based aerogels are especially useful in many applications due to their excellent stability at high temperatures. This study experimentally analyzed the radiative properties of silica-doped alumina aerogels through spectral directional-hemispherical measurements for wavelengths of 0.38-25 μm. The silica-doped alumina aerogel samples were prepared with a 1.4∶1 molar ratio of silica to alumina. A two-flux model was used to describe the radiation propagation in a 1D scattering absorbing sample to derive expressions for the normal-hemispherical transmittances and reflectances based on the transport approximation. The normal-hemispherical transmittances and reflectances were measured at various spectral wavelengths and sample thicknesses using the integrating sphere method. The spectral absorption and transport scattering coefficients of silica-doped alumina aerogels were then determined from the measured normal-hemispherical data. The absorption and transport scattering coefficients of silica-doped alumina aerogels are (0.1  cm-1, 36  cm-1) and (0.1  cm-1, 112  cm-1) for wavelengths of 0.38-8.0 μm. The spectral transport scattering coefficient varies in the opposite direction from the spectral absorption coefficient for various wavelengths. The radiative properties for silica and alumina aerogels were quite different for the absorption coefficient for wavelengths of 2.5-8.0 μm and for the transport scattering coefficient for wavelengths of 0.38-2.5 and 3.5-6.0 μm. The measured radiative properties were used to predict the spectral normal-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance of the silica-doped alumina aerogels for various sample thicknesses and wavelengths. The predicted values do not change for the sample thicknesses greater than a critical value. The analysis provides valuable reference data for alumina aerogels for high-temperature applications. PMID:26836071

  20. Dermal Toxicity of Flake-Like α-Alumina Pigments.

    PubMed

    Kwon, TaeWoo; Seo, HyunJeong; Jang, Seongwan; Lee, Sang-Geun; Park, Sungkyun; Park, Kang Hyun; Youn, BuHyun

    2015-02-01

    Aluminum is one of the most widely used nonferrous metals and an important industrial material, especially for automotive coatings. However, potential toxicity caused by aluminum in humans limits the used of this metal. α-alumina is the most stable form of aluminum in various phases. Although the results of studies evaluating the dermal toxicity of α-alumina remained unclear, this compound can still be used as a pigment in cosmetics for humans. In the current study, we further evaluated the dermal cytotoxic effects of α-alumina on human skin cells and an in vivo mouse model. We also measured the in vitro penetration profile of flake-like α-alumina in porcine skin and assessed the degree of cellular metabolic disorders. Our findings demonstrated that treatment with flake-like α-alumina did not significantly affect cell viability up to 24 h. This compound was found to have a non-penetration profile based on a Franz modified diffusion cell assay. In addition, flake-like α-alumina was not found to induce dermal inflammation as assessed by histology of epidermal architecture, hyperplasia, and the expression of Interleukin-1β and Cyclooxygenase-2. Results of the cellular metabolic disorder assay indicated that flake-like α-alumina does not exert a direct effect on human skin cells. Taken together, our findings provided not only evidence that flake-like α-alumina may serve as a pearlescent pigment in cosmetics but also experimental basis utilizing α-alumina for human application. Our results also obviously provide new insight of the further toxicity study to aluminum based nanoparticles for skin. PMID:26353706

  1. Interfacial fracture toughness of alumina/niobium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.G. ); O'Dowd, N.P.; Shih, C.F. . Div. of Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    The interfacial fracture toughness of an alumina/niobium composite has been measured as a function of phase angle. The interface was formed by solid-state bonding bulk Coor's AD-999 fine-grain alumina with a commercial purity niobium at 1600{degrees}C for 0.5 hr under a pressure of 10.5 MPa. The alumina/niobium system has a number of features which makes it ideal for an investigation of interfacial fracture toughness. From HREM data we estimate that the width of the interface is no more than 10 atomic planes. Furthermore the thermal expansion coefficients of the two materials differ by less than 5% so residual stresses due to the bonding process are small. Using symmetric and asymmetric four point bend specimens we have measured the fracture toughness of homogenous alumina and that of the alumina/niobium bimaterial in combinations of in-plane shear and tension. The fracture toughness of the homogenous alumina is relatively insensitive to the loading phase. The measured fracture toughness K{sub c} of the interface, however, depended strongly on phase angle. We were unable to obtain valid alumina/niobium interfacial toughness data at negative phase angles as the fracture initiates in the alumina and not at the interface. In symmetric bending at a phase angle {approx}5{degrees}, we measured a nominal interface toughness of 4.0 MPa{radical}m, comparable to the homogeneous alumina. We found that the toughness increased with loading phase angle to a value of K{sub c} {approx} 9 MPa{radical}m at a phase between 25{degrees} and 40{degrees}. Preliminary calculations and experiments suggest that this effect is due to an asymmetric stress distribution, with respect to the interface, and plastic deformation in the niobium. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Residual Stress Predictions in Polycrystalline Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    VEDULA,VENKATA R.; GLASS,S. JILL; SAYLOR,DAVID M.; ROHRER,GREGORY S.; CARTER,W. CRAIG; LANGER,STEPHEN A.

    1999-12-13

    Microstructure-level residual stresses arise in polycrystalline ceramics during processing as a result of thermal expansion anisotropy and crystallographic disorientation across the grain boundaries. Depending upon the grain size, the magnitude of these stresses can be sufficiently high to cause spontaneous microcracking during the processing of these materials. They are also likely to affect where cracks initiate and propagate under macroscopic loading. The magnitudes of residual stresses in untextured and textured alumina samples were predicted using object oriented finite (OOF) element analysis and experimentally determined grain orientations. The crystallographic orientations were obtained by electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The residual stresses were lower and the stress distributions were narrower in the textured samples compared to those in the untextured samples. Crack initiation and propagation were also simulated using the Griffith fracture criterion. The grain boundary to surface energy ratios required for computations were estimated using AFM groove measurements.

  3. Optimized alumina coagulants for water treatment

    DOEpatents

    Nyman, May D.; Stewart, Thomas A.

    2012-02-21

    Substitution of a single Ga-atom or single Ge-atom (GaAl.sub.12 and GeAl.sub.12 respectively) into the center of an aluminum Keggin polycation (Al.sub.13) produces an optimal water-treatment product for neutralization and coagulation of anionic contaminants in water. GaAl.sub.12 consistently shows .about.1 order of magnitude increase in pathogen reduction, compared to Al.sub.13. At a concentration of 2 ppm, GaAl.sub.12 performs equivalently to 40 ppm alum, removing .about.90% of the dissolved organic material. The substituted GaAl.sub.12 product also offers extended shelf-life and consistent performance. We also synthesized a related polyaluminum chloride compound made of pre-hydrolyzed dissolved alumina clusters of [GaO.sub.4Al.sub.12(OH).sub.24(H.sub.2O).sub.12].sup.7+.

  4. Tensile creep behavior of polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Tensile creep studies were conducted on polycrystalline Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Test conditions were temperatures from 800 to 1050 C and stresses from 60 to 1000 MPa. For both fibers, only a small primary creep portion occurred followed by steady-state creep. The stress exponents for steady-state creep of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP were found to be about 3 and 1, respectively. At lower temperatures, below 1000 C, the finer grained Nextel 610 had a much higher 0.2 percent creep strength for 100 hr than the Fiber FP; while at higher temperatures, Nextel 610 had a comparable creep strength to the Fiber FP. The stress and grain size dependencies suggest Nextel 610 and Fiber FP creep rates are due to grain boundary sliding controlled by interface reaction and Nabarro-Herring mechanisms, respectively.

  5. Crystallography of Alumina-YAG-Eutectic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali; Dickerson, Robert M.; Matson, Lawrence E.

    2000-01-01

    Multiple descriptions of the alumina-YAG eutectic crystallography appear in the ceramic literature. The orientation between two phases in a eutectic system has direct impact on residual stress, morphology, microstructural stability, and high temperature mechanical properties. A study to demonstrate that the different crystallographic relationships can be correlated with different growth constraints was undertaken. Fibers produced by Laser-Heated Float Zone (LHFZ) and Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EFG) were examined. A map of the orientation relationship between Al2O3 and Y3Al5O12 and their relationship to the fiber growth axis as a function of pull rate are presented. Regions in which a single orientation predominates are identified.

  6. Alumina strength degradation in the elastic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1997-08-01

    Measurements of Kanel et. al. [1991] have suggested that deviatoric stresses in glasses shocked to nearly the Hugoniot Elastic limit (HEL) relax over a time span of microseconds after initial loading. Failure (damage) waves have been inferred on the basis of these measurements using time-resolved manganin normal and transverse stress gauges. Additional experiments on glass by other researchers, using time-resolved gauges, high-speed photography and spall strength determinations have also lead to the same conclusions. In the present study the authors have conducted transmitted-wave experiments on high-quality Coors AD995 alumina shocked to roughly 5 and 7 GPa (just below or at the HEL). The material is subsequently reshocked to just above its elastic limit. Results of these experiments do show some evidence of strength degradation in the elastic regime.

  7. Compositional characterization of atomic layer deposited alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Anu; Thomas, Subin; Kumar, K. Rajeev

    2014-01-28

    As the microelectronic industry demands feature size in the order of few and sub nanometer regime, the film composition and other film properties become critical issues and ALD has emerged as the choice of industry. Aluminum oxide is a material with wide applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices and protective and ion barrier layers. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is an excellent dielectric because of its large band gap (8.7eV), large band offsets with silicon. We have deposited thin layers of alumina on silicon wafer (p-type) for gate dielectric applications by ALD technique and compositional characterizations of the deposited thin films were done using EDS, XPS and FTIR spectra.

  8. Viscoelasticity of nano-alumina dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, B.; Fries, R.

    1996-06-01

    The flow and viscoelastic properties of electrostatically stabilized nano-alumina dispersions have been studied as a function of ionic strength and volume fraction of solids. At low ionic strength the suspensions were deflocculated and showed a transition from viscous to elastic behavior as the solid content increased associated with the onset of double layer interpenetration. The phase transition was progressively shifted to higher solids fractions with increasing ionic strength. At higher ionic strength, above the critical coagulation concentration, the suspensions formed attractive networks characterized by high elasticity. Two independent methods of estimating the effective radius of electrostatically stabilized {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} particles, a{sub eff}, are presented based on phase angle data and a modified Dougherty-Krieger equation. The results suggest that a{sub eff} is not constant for a given system but changes with both solids fraction and ionic strength.

  9. VERITAS: a high-flux neutron reflectometer with vertical sample geometry for a long pulse spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattauch, S.; Ioffe, A.; Lott, D.; Menelle, A.; Ott, F.; Medic, Z.

    2016-04-01

    An instrument concept of a reflectometer with a vertical sample geometry fitted to the long pulse structure of a spallation source, called “VERITAS” at the ESS, is presented. It focuses on designing a reflectometer with high intensity at the lowest possible background following the users' demand to investigate thin layers or interfacial areas in the sub-nanometer length scale. The high intensity approach of the vertical reflectometer fits very well to the long pulse structure of the ESS. Its main goal is to deliver as much usable intensity as possible at the sample position and be able to access a reflectivity range of 8 orders of magnitude and more. The concept assures that the reflectivity measurements can be performed in its best way to maximize the flux delivered to the sample. The reflectometer is optimized for studies of (magnetic) layers having thicknesses down to 5Å and a surface area of 1x1cm2. With reflectivity measurements the depth-resolved, laterally averaged chemical and magnetic profile can be investigated. By using polarised neutrons, additional vector information on the in-plane magnetic correlations (off-specular scattering at the pm length scale, GISANS at the nm length scale) can be studied. The full polarisation analysis could be used for soft matter samples to correct for incoherent scattering which is presently limiting neutron reflectivity studies to a reflectivity range on the order of 10-6.

  10. Aluminum-Alloy-Matrix/Alumina-Reinforcement Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday; Rozenoyer, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Isotropic composites of aluminum-alloy matrices reinforced with particulate alumina have been developed as lightweight, high-specific-strength, less-expensive alternatives to nickel-base and ferrous superalloys. These composites feature a specific gravity of about 3.45 grams per cubic centimeter and specific strengths of about 200 MPa/(grams per cubic centimeter). The room-temperature tensile strength is 100 ksi (689 MPa) and stiffness is 30 Msi (206 GPa). At 500 F (260 C), these composites have shown 80 percent retention in strength and 95 percent retention in stiffness. These materials also have excellent fatigue tolerance and tribological properties. They can be fabricated in net (or nearly net) sizes and shapes to make housings, pistons, valves, and ducts in turbomachinery, and to make structural components of such diverse systems as diesel engines, automotive brake systems, and power-generation, mining, and oil-drilling equipment. Separately, incorporation of these metal matrix composites within aluminum gravity castings for localized reinforcement has been demonstrated. A composite part of this type can be fabricated in a pressure infiltration casting process. The process begins with the placement of a mold with alumina particulate preform of net or nearly net size and shape in a crucible in a vacuum furnace. A charge of the alloy is placed in the crucible with the preform. The interior of the furnace is evacuated, then the furnace heaters are turned on to heat the alloy above its liquidus temperature. Next, the interior of the furnace is filled with argon gas at a pressure about 900 psi (approximately equal to 6.2 MPa) to force the molten alloy to infiltrate the preform. Once infiltrated, the entire contents of the crucible can be allowed to cool in place, and the composite part recovered from the mold.

  11. Processing of silicon nitride and alumina nanosize powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, E.J.; Piermarini, G.; Hockey, B.; Malghan, S.G.

    1995-08-01

    The effects of pressure on the compaction and subsequent processing of nanosize {gamma} alumina powders were studied. A 3 mm diameter piston/cylinder die was used to compact the nanosize powders to pressures of 1 and 2.5 GPa. The green bodies were sintered at temperatures up to 1600{degrees}C. Results show that green body density can be increased by higher compaction pressures. It appears that as a result of the {gamma}-to-{alpha} transformation in alumina, higher green density does not necessarily produce a higher density sintered alumina body. The microstructures of the sintered bodies are described in terms of porosity and phase content.

  12. Alumina Paste Sublimation Suppression Barrier for Thermoelectric Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah (Inventor); Caillat, Thierry (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Alumina as a sublimation suppression barrier for a Zintl thermoelectric material in a thermoelectric power generation device operating at high temperature, e.g. at or above 1000K, is disclosed. The Zintl thermoelectric material may comprise Yb.sub.14MnSb.sub.11. The alumina may be applied as an adhesive paste dried and cured on a substantially oxide free surface of the Zintl thermoelectric material and polished to a final thickness. The sublimation suppression barrier may be finalized by baking out the alumina layer on the Zintl thermoelectric material until it becomes substantially clogged with ytterbia.

  13. Porous alumina based ordered nanocomposite coating for wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Arti; Muthukumar, M.; Bobji, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    Uniformly dispersed nanocomposite coating of aligned metallic nanowires in a matrix of amorphous alumina is fabricated by pulsed electrodeposition of copper into the pores of porous anodic alumina. Uniform deposition is obtained by controlling the geometry of the dendritic structure at the bottom of pores through stepwise voltage reduction followed by mild etching. The tribological behaviour of this nanocomposite coating is evaluated using a ball on flat reciprocating tribometer under the dry contact conditions. The nanocomposite coating has higher wear resistance compared to corresponding porous alumina coating. Wear resistant nanocomposite coating has wide applications especially in protecting the internal surfaces of aluminium internal combustion engines.

  14. Fabrication of alumina films with laminated structures by ac anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, Hiroyo; Okano, Hironaga; Wada, Kenji; Inoue, Satoru

    2014-02-01

    Anodization techniques by alternating current (ac) are introduced in this review. By using ac anodization, laminated alumina films are fabricated. Different types of alumina films consisting of 50-200 nm layers were obtained by varying both the ac power supply and the electrolyte. The total film thickness increased with an increase in the total charge transferred. The thickness of the individual layers increased with the ac voltage; however, the anodization time had little effect on the film thickness. The laminated alumina films resembled the nacre structure of shells, and the different morphologies exhibited by bivalves and spiral shells could be replicated by controlling the rate of increase of the applied potentials.

  15. Preparation of Carbon Nanotube—Toughened Alumina Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, G.; Omori, M.; Hashida, T.

    2008-02-01

    With multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as reinforcement, MWCNT/alumina composites were prepared at the MWCNTs mass% of 0.5. A flexural strength of 572.1±28.3 MPa and fracture toughness of 4.80±0.42 MPaṡm1/2, 1.2 times that of MWCNT-free monolithic alumina prepared under the same processing condition, was achieved. Experimental results showed that the dispersibility of the MWCNTs in the composite was crucially important in order to improve the mechanical properties of the MWCNT/alumina composite material.

  16. Influence of Sample Geometry on Sweeping-Detonation-Wave Spallation in Tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, George, III; Hull, Larry; Livescu, Veronica; Briggs, Matt; Meyer, Ross; Los Alamos National Laboratory Team

    2015-06-01

    Widespread research over the past five decades has provided a wealth of experimental data and insight concerning shock hardening and the spallation response of materials subjected to square-topped shock-wave loading profiles. Less quantitative data have been gathered on the effect of direct, in-contact, sweeping-wave high explosive (HE)-driven Taylor wave loading profile shock loading on the shock hardening, damage evolution, or spallation response of materials. Sweeping-wave loading is a significantly different loading history than that achieved by a square-topped impulse or 1-D HE-driven plane-wave shock in terms of the evolving spherical and shear stresses applied to the specimen. The goal of this research is to quantify the combined influence of shockwave obliquity evolution plus sample geometry on the spallation response of Tantalum(Ta) by subjecting a curved Ta plate to HE-driven sweeping detonation-wave loading and quantify both the wave propagation and the post-mortem damage evolution. This talk will summarize our current understanding of the similarity and differences between the shock hardening and damage evolution during sweeping detonation-wave spallation loading observed in flat and curved Ta plate samples.

  17. Multimaterial lamination as a means of retarding penetration and spallation failures in plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibattista, J. D.; Humes, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data are presented which show that hypervelocity impact spallation and penetration failures of a single solid aluminum plate and of a solid aluminum plate spaced a distance behind a Whipple meteor bumper may be retarded by replacing the solid aluminum plate with a laminated plate. Four sets of experiments were conducted. The first set of experiments was conducted with projectile mass and velocity held constant and with polycarbonate cylinders impacted into single plates of different construction. The second set of experiments was done with single plates of various construction and aluminum spherical projectiles of similar mass but different velocities. These two experiments showed that a laminated plate of aluminum and polycarbonate or aluminum and methyl methacrylate could prevent spallation and penetration failures with a lower areal density than either an all-aluminum laminated plate or a solid aluminum plate. The aluminum laminated plate was in turn superior to the solid aluminum plate in resisting spallation and penetration failures. In addition, through an example of 6061-T6 aluminum and methyl methacrylate, it is shown that a laminated structure ballistically superior to its parent materials may be built. The last two sets of experiments were conducted using bumper-protected main walls of solid aluminum and of laminated aluminum and polycarbonate. Again, under hypervelocity impact conditions, the laminated main walls were superior to the solid aluminum main walls in retarding spallation and penetration failures.

  18. A calorimetric measurement of the heat deposition in the vicinity of a spallation neutron target

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.E.; Moritz, L.; Spitzer, H.; Thorson, I.M.

    1986-07-01

    An experiment to measure the heat deposition in various materials in the vicinity of a spallation neuron target is described. This experiment has been performed at the Thermal Neutron Facility, TRIUMF. In the analysis of the data, the contributions to the heat deposition from (n,..gamma..) capture processes, fast neutron, and prompt gamma-ray scattering are separated.

  19. High energy particle background at neutron spallation sources and possible solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkashyna, N.; Kanaki, K.; Kittelmann, T.; Filges, U.; Deen, P.; Herwig, K.; Ehlers, G.; Greene, G.; Carpenter, J.; Connatser, R.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Bentley, P. M.

    2014-07-01

    Modern spallation neutron sources are driven by proton beams ~ GeV energies. Whereas low energy particle background shielding is well understood for reactors sources of neutrons (~20 MeV), for high energies (100s MeV to multiple GeV) there is potential to improve shielding solutions and reduce instrument backgrounds significantly. We present initial measured data on high energy particle backgrounds, which illustrate the results of particle showers caused by high energy particles from spallation neutron sources. We use detailed physics models of different materials to identify new shielding solutions for such neutron sources, including laminated layers of multiple materials. In addition to the steel and concrete, which are used traditionally, we introduce some other options that are new to the neutron scattering community, among which there are copper alloys as used in hadronic calorimeters in high energy physics laboratories. These concepts have very attractive energy absorption characteristics, and simulations predict that the background suppression could be improved by one or two orders of magnitude. These solutions are expected to be great benefit to the European Spallation Source, where the majority of instruments are potentially affected by high energy backgrounds, as well as to existing spallation sources.

  20. Decay heat calculations for a 500 kW W-Ta spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Quanzhi; Lu, Youlian; Hu, Zhiliang; Zhou, Bin; Yin, Wen; Liang, Tianjiao

    2015-05-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a short-pulsed neutron scattering facility. The beam power is designed to be 100 kW in Phase I, with the capability of upgrading to 500 kW. Tantalum (Ta)-cladded tungsten (W) was chosen as the spallation target due to its high neutron yield. Ta claddings can solve the problem of the corrosiveness of W plates, although they produce high decay heat after intense irradiation. This paper presents the decay heat distributions and evolutions for the future upgraded 500 kW W-Ta spallation target. The calculations are performed using the MCNPX2.5 Monte Carlo code and the CINDER'90 activation code. The decay heat distributions show that for the W plates, decay heat is mainly produced via the spallation reaction process, whereas for the Ta claddings, it is mainly produced via the neutron capture process. An effective method of reducing the decay heat in the W-Ta target is also presented and discussed.

  1. Influence of microstructural anisotropy on the spallation of 1080 eutectoid steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, N. K.; Millett, J. C. F.; Lopez, M. F.; Vecchio, K. S.; Gray, G. T. , III

    2001-01-01

    While the influence of crystallographic texture on elastic and plastic constitutive response has seen extensive investigation in recent years, the influence of texture on the dynamic fracture of engineering materials remains less extensively explored. In particular, the influence of anisotropy, both textural and morphological, on the spallation behavior of materials remains poorly quantified. In this study, the spallation response of 1080-steel has been studied as a function of microstructural morphological anisotropy. In this study the influence of elongated MnS stringers, resident within a crystallographically isotropic eutectoid steel, on the spallation response of 1080 steel was investigated. That of a fully-pearlitic 1080 steel loaded to 5 GPa was found to be dominated by the heterogeneous nucleation of damage normal and orthogonal to the MnS stringers. Delamination between the matrix pearlitic microstructure and the MnS stringers was seen to correlate to a significantly lower pull-back signal during transverse loading than to that parallel to the stringer axis. The 'pull-back' signals and post-spallation metallographic observations are discussed with reference to the influence of microstructural anisotropy on void nucleation and growth.

  2. INFLUENCE OF MICROSTRUCTURAL ANISOTROPY ON THE SPALLATION OF 1080 EUTECTOID STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    G.T. GRAY; M.F. LOPEZ; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    While the influence of crystallographic texture on elastic and plastic constitutive response has seen extensive investigation in recent years, the influence of texture on the dynamic fracture of engineering materials remains less extensively explored. In particular, the influence of anisotropy, both textural and morphological, on the spallation behavior of materials remains poorly quantified. In this study, the spallation response of 1080-steel has been studied as a function of microstructural morphological anisotropy. In this study the influence of elongated MnS stringers, resident within a crystallographically isotropic eutectoid steel, on the spallation response of 1080 steel was investigated. That of a fully-pearlitic 1080 steel loaded to 5 GPa was found to be dominated by the heterogeneous nucleation of damage normal and orthogonal to the MnS stringers. Delamination between the matrix pearlitic microstructure and the MnS stringers was seen to correlate to a significantly lower pull-back signal during transverse loading than to that parallel to the stringer axis. The ''pull-back'' signals and post-spallation metallographic observations are discussed with reference to the influence of microstructural anisotropy on void nucleation and growth.

  3. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  4. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2016-07-12

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  5. A technical and economic evaluation of thermal spallation drilling technology

    SciTech Connect

    1984-07-10

    Thermal spallation of rock may be defined as a type of progressive rock failure caused by the creation of thermal stresses induced by a sudden application of heat from a high temperature source. This technology is applicable to only certain types of hard rock, such as dolomite, taconite, and granite. In 1981 and 1982, the deepest holes ever drilled by this process were drilled in granite to depths of 1086 feet and 425 feet respectively. Penetration rates at the bottom of the deeper hole reached a maximum of 100 ft/hr. Because of these high rates, considerable interest was generated concerning the use of this technology for the drilling of deep holes. Based on this interest, this study was undertaken to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of the technology in general. This methodology has been used for blasthole drilling, the cutting of chambers at the bottom of drilled holes, and the cutting of narrow grooves in rock. However, because of the very high temperatures generated by the flame jet and the application of the technology to only certain types of rock, other areas of use have been very limited. In this report, evaluation of the technology was performed by conceptually designing and costing a theoretical flame jet drilling rig. The design process reviews a number of different concepts of the various components needed, and then chooses those pieces of equipment that best suit the needs of the system and have the best chance of being properly developed. The final concept consists of a flexible umbilical hose containing several internal hoses for carrying the various required fluids. An evaluation of this system was then made to determine its operational characteristics. The drilling capabilities and the economics of this rig were then compared to a conventional rotary drilling rig by theoretically drilling two holes of approximately 15,000 feet in depth. This comparison was done by use of a spread sheet type computer program. The results of this study

  6. Alumina-Forming MAX Phases in Turbine Material Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Harder, Bryan J.; Garg, Arnita; Nesbitt, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Coatings for high temperature turbine components are based on low conductivity YSZ thermal barriers and protective NiAl, NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Good oxidation hot corrosion resistance, intermediate CTE, and strain tolerance of Ti2AlC and Cr2AlC MAX phases are thus of special interest. Their alumina scale growth follows a cubic law in accord with FeCrAlY alloys, with oxygen grain boundary diffusivity: Dgb 1.8 x 10-10 exp(-375 kJmole) m3s. Protective cubic kinetics are also found in high pressure burner rig (6 atm., 25 ms) and TGA tests of MAXthal 211Ti2AlC. The initial portion (0.1 hr) is dominated by fast TiO2 growth (with little evidence of scale volatility in high pressure water vapor, as found for SiO2 scales). Bulk Ti2AlC and Cr2AlC substrates show promise as potential bond coats for YSZ TBCs in 1000-1200 C furnace life (500 h) tests. Cr2AlC is proving to be very resistant to 700-900 C Na2SO4 hot corrosion and is of interest for disk alloys. Preliminary diffusion bonded Cr2AlC-superalloy hybrid couples have survived 1000 hr interrupted furnace tests at 800C with no indication of cracking or debonding. Diffusion zones of -NiAl+Cr7C3 were produced in these above 1000 C, but did not grow to any great extent after 1000 hr at 800 C. Processing as coatings presents challenges, however the basic properties of MAX phases provide novel opportunities for high temperature turbine components.

  7. Fabrication of whisker-toughened alumina tubes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Loutfy, R.O.

    1993-09-01

    A process has been developed to fabricate whisker toughened alumina composites by slip casting dense colloidal suspensions of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-15% SiC{sub w}. Optimum processing parameters for slip casting we developed with slip viscosity of 60--70 centipoise and solids content 78--79 wt %. Slip-cast parts with green densities 65 to 68% theoretical were achieved. Composite parts were pressureless sintered to 96--97% theoretical density with <1% open porosity. The composites exhibited strengths of 500 MPa, toughness of 6.5 MPa m{sup 1/2}, and hardness of 17.26 GPa (1765 kg/mm{sup 2}). High temperature strength retention was maintained up to 1200C. Good thermal shock resistance with {Delta}T{sub cr} = 500C was also achieved. The process technology was transferred into pilot scale for producing prototype heat exchanger tubing up to 4 inches in diameter at the facilities of Vesuvius/McDanel.

  8. Anodisation with dynamic current control for tailored alumina coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieber, M.; Althöfer, I.; Höhlich, D.; Scharf, I.; Böttger, D.; Böttger, S.; Böttger, E.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    The anodic oxidation process is commonly used to refine the surface of aluminium and its alloys. Compared to the substrate, the alumina layers produced by anodising exhibit an increased hardness and chemical resistance. Thus, the corrosion and wear resistance are generally improved. The coatings are also electrically isolating and may serve decorative purposes. Applying a time-variant, dynamic electrical process control by pulse-current or current-steps is a promising approach to improve the coating properties, which is partially deployed in an industrial scale. In the present work, the influence of dynamic electrical process control on the coating properties is examined by means of a design of experiments (DOE). The effects of various electrolyte compositions and temperatures as well as processing time are considered with regard to coating thickness, hardness, wear resistance and the electrical energy consumption during the formation of the coatings. Information about the statistical significance of the effects of the parameters on the considered properties is obtained by an analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  9. Ultrafast excited state deactivation of doped porous anodic alumina membranes.

    PubMed

    Makhal, Abhinandan; Sarkar, Soumik; Pal, Samir Kumar; Yan, Hongdan; Wulferding, Dirk; Cetin, Fatih; Lemmens, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Free-standing, bi-directionally permeable and ultra-thin anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes establish attractive templates (host) for the synthesis of nano-dots and rods of various materials (guest). This is due to their chemical and structural integrity and high periodicity on length scales of 5-150 nm which are often used to host photoactive nano-materials for various device applications including dye-sensitized solar cells. In the present study, AAO membranes are synthesized by using electrochemical methods and a detailed structural characterization using FEG-SEM, XRD and TGA confirms the porosity and purity of the material. Defect-mediated photoluminescence quenching of the porous AAO membrane in the presence of an electron accepting guest organic molecule (benzoquinone) is studied by means of steady-state and picosecond/femtosecond-resolved luminescence measurements. Using time-resolved luminescence transients, we have also revealed light harvesting of complexes of porous alumina impregnated with inorganic quantum dots (Maple Red) or gold nanowires. Both the Förster resonance energy transfer and the nano-surface energy transfer techniques are employed to examine the observed quenching behavior as a function of the characteristic donor-acceptor distances. The experimental results will find their relevance in light harvesting devices based on AAOs combined with other materials involving a decisive energy/charge transfer dynamics.

  10. Magnesia-alumina-aluminum phosphate-zeolite catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, E.H.; Stanulonis, J.J.; Swift, H.E.

    1980-09-16

    A catalyst for cracking gasoline feedstock with superior selectivity to gasoline production and greater metals tolerance comprises a magnesia-alumina-aluminum phosphate matrix composited with a zeolite having cracking activity.

  11. Alumina-on-Polyethylene Bearing Surfaces in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yup Lee; Kim, Shin-Yoon

    2010-01-01

    The long-term durability of polyethylene lining total hip arthroplasty (THA) mainly depends on periprosthetic osteolysis due to wear particles, especially in young active patients. In hip simulator study, reports revealed significant wear reduction of the alumina ceramic-on-polyethylene articulation of THA compared with metal-on-polyethylene bearing surfaces. However, medium to long-term clinical studies of THA using the alumina ceramic-on-polyethylene are few and the reported wear rate of this articulation is variable. We reviewed the advantages and disadvantages of ceramicon- polyethylene articulation in THA, hip simulator study and retrieval study for polyethylene wear, in vivo clinical results of THA using alumina ceramic-on-polyethylene bearing surfaces in the literature, and new trial alumina ceramic-onhighly cross linked polyethylene bearing surfaces. PMID:20224739

  12. Structure and surface properties of praseodymium modified alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankov, I.; Pawelec, B.; Arishtirova, K.; Damyanova, S.

    2011-10-01

    Mixed PrO 2-Al 2O 3 oxides with different PrO 2 content (1-20 wt.%) were prepared by wetness impregnation of γ-alumina with aqueous solution of praseodymium nitrate. The samples were characterized by different techniques, using surface adsorption-desorption of N 2 ( SBET), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and temperature-programmed desorption of CO 2 (TPD-CO 2). TGA and XRD showed the presence of small praseodymium oxide species on the alumina surface. XPS and DRS detected electron deficient interaction between deposited praseodymium oxide and alumina. It was observed a lower reduction temperature for supported Pr oxide species compared to that of the bulk Pr 6O 11. TPD-CO 2 studies suggested that the deposition of Pr oxide on alumina leaded to increase of the basicity of mixed oxides.

  13. Potassium Beta-Alumina/Molybdenum/Potassium Electrochemical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R.; Kisor, A.; Ryan, M.; Nakamura, B.; Kikert, S.; O'Connor, D.

    1994-01-01

    potassium alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (K-AMTEC) cells utilizing potassium beta alumina solid electrolyte (K-BASE) are predicted to have improved properties for thermal to electric conversion at somewhat lower temperatures than sodium AMTEC's.

  14. Removing Fluoride Ions with Continously Fed Activated Alumina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yeun C.; Itemaking, Isara Cholapranee

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the mathematical basis for determining fluoride removal during water treatment with activated alumina. The study indicates that decreasing particle size decreases the pore diffusion effect and increases fluoride removal. (AS)

  15. New Phenomena Observed in Plate Impacts onto Alumina Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beno, T.; Bless, S.; Nichols, S.

    2006-07-01

    Steel flyer plates were used to impact alumina bars at 275 m/s, nominally. Manganin gauges were used to monitor stress waves in the bars. Geometry of the impact was varied in an attempt to extend gauge records. Gauge life was best improved by careful alignment. The longest gauge records indicated that alumina retains a strength level of about 2 GPa after initial failure. Stress levels of over 5 GPa were obtained with impact-zone confinement.

  16. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, T.R.; Golden, T.C.; Mayorga, S.G.; Brzozowski, J.R.; Taylor, F.W.

    1999-06-29

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO[sub 2] from a gaseous mixture containing CO[sub 2] comprises introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100 C and 500 C to adsorb CO[sub 2] to provide a CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent and a CO[sub 2] depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO[sub 2] laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO[sub 2] from the CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100 C and 600 C, is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions. 1 fig.

  17. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Golden, Timothy Christopher; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard; Taylor, Fred William

    1999-01-01

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO.sub.2 from a gaseous mixture containing CO.sub.2 comprising introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. to adsorb CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent and a CO.sub.2 depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO.sub.2 laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO.sub.2 from the CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 600.degree. C., is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions.

  18. Procoagulant behavior and platelet microparticle generation on nanoporous alumina.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Natalia; Hong, Jaan; Karlsson Ott, Marjam

    2010-05-01

    In the present work, we have investigated platelet microparticle (PMP) generation in whole blood after contact with nanoporous alumina. Alumina membranes with pore sizes of 20 and 200 nm in diameter were incubated with whole blood and the number of PMP in the fluid phase was determined by flow cytometry. The role of the complement system in PMP generation was investigated using an analog of the potent complement inhibitor compstatin. Moreover, the procoagulant activity of the two pore size membranes were compared by measuring thrombin formation. Results indicated that PMP were not present in the fluid phase after whole blood contact with either of the alumina membranes. However, scanning electron microscope micrographs clearly showed the presence of PMP clusters on the 200 nm pore size alumina, while PMP were practically absent on the 20 nm membrane. We probed no influence of complement activation in PMP generation and adhesion and we hypothesize that other specific material-related protein-platelet interactions are taking place. A clear difference in procoagulant activity between the membranes could also be seen, 20 nm alumina showed 100% higher procoagulant activity than 200 nm membrane. By combining surface evaluation and flow cytometry analyses of the fluid phase, we are able to conclude that 200 nm pore size alumina promotes PMP generation and adhesion while the 20 nm membrane does not appreciably cause any release or adhesion of PMP, thus indicating a direct connection between PMP generation and nanoporosity.

  19. Wetting and strength issues at Al/alpha-alumina interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2003-04-15

    The wetting behavior and strength at aluminum/alumina interfaces has been an active subject of research. Al/alumina applications include ceramic-metal composites and several applications for electronic industries. In this paper the interface strength and microstructure of Al/alpha-alumina was investigated. We discovered that in a solid-state joining, the strength of the joint increases with increasing joining temperature. In a liquid-state joining, the strength of the joint gradually decreases due to the formation of unbonded areas. The strength, sigma sub b, is expressed by the following equation as a function of unbonded area, A: sigma sub b = 2.22 A + 143 (70 percent {le} A {le} 100 percent). The highest strength reached 400 MPa when the interface was formed at around the melting temperature of aluminum. An aluminum layer close to the interface became a single crystal when it was bonded to a sapphire. The following crystallographic orientation relationship is established: (1{bar 1}1){sub Al}//(001){sub {alpha}}-Al{sub 2} O{sub 3}, (110){sub Al}//<100>{sub {alpha}}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Amorphous alumina islands were formed at the interface. In the amorphous alumina, gamma-alumina nanocrystals grew from the sapphire, with the same orientation relationship to sapphire as above.

  20. Experimental measurement of surface temperatures during flame-jet induced thermal spallation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, M. A.; Tester, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal spallation is a method whereby the surface of a rock is rapidly heated causing small (100 1000 μm) flakes or spalls, to form. When applied to drilling, a supersonic, high temperature (2600 K) gas jet is directed at the rock to provide the heat source and sweep away the spalls. Previous studies of thermal spallation drilling indicate that penetration rates of up to 30 m/hr (100 ft/hr), approximately ten times greater than commonly obtained using conventional rotary mechanical methods, can be achieved in competent, non-fractured hard rock such as granite. A total direct operating cost for drilling in granite using a flame-jet spallation drill was estimated by Browning (1981) to be approximately 9/m in 1991 (about 3/ft) compared to “trouble-free” well drilling costs for conventional rotary methods in similar rock to depths of 3 to 7 km (10000 to 21000 ft) of 300 to 900/m (100 to 300/ft) (Tester and Herzog, 1990, 1992). The Browning estimates for spallation drilling are obviously optimistic in that they don't include capital costs for the rig and associated hardware. However, the substantially higher penetration rates, significantly reduced wear of downhole components, and the high efficiency of rock communition in comparison to rotary methods suggest that substantial cost reductions could be possible in deep drilling applications. For example, in the construction of hot dry rock geothermal power plants where rotary mechanical methods are used for well drilling to depths of (4 to 5 km), about half of the initial capital cost would be required for well drilling alone (Tester and Herzog, 1992). The current study has focused on gaining a better understanding of both the rock failure mechanism that occurs during thermal spallation and the heat transfer from the gas jet to the rock surface. Rock mechanics modeling leads to an expression for the surface temperature during spallation as a function of rock physical properties and the incident heat flux. Surface

  1. Effect of alumina composition and surface integrity in alumina/epoxy composites on the ultrasonic attenuation properties.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eikhyun; Park, Gwanwoo; Lee, Jae-Wan; Cho, Sung-Min; Kim, Taekyung; Kim, Joongeok; Choi, Wonjoon; Ohm, Won-Suk; Kang, Shinill

    2016-03-01

    We report a method of fabricating backing blocks for ultrasonic imaging transducers, using alumina/epoxy composites. Backing blocks contain scatterers such as alumina particles interspersed in the epoxy matrix for the effective scattering and attenuation of ultrasound. Here, the surface integrity can be an issue, where the composite material may be damaged during machining because of differences in strength, hardness and brittleness of the hard alumina particles and the soft epoxy matrix. Poor surface integrity results in the formation of air cavities between the backing block and the piezoelectric element upon assembly, hence the increased reflection off the backing block and the eventual degradation in image quality. Furthermore, with an issue of poor surface integrity due to machining, it is difficult to increase alumina as scatterers more than a specific mass fraction ratio. In this study, we increased the portion of alumina within epoxy matrix by obtaining an enhanced surface integrity using a net shape fabrication method, and verified that this method could allow us to achieve higher ultrasonic attenuation. Backing blocks were net-shaped with various mass fractions of alumina to characterize the formability and the mechanical properties, including hardness, surface roughness and the internal micro-structure, which were compared with those of machined backing blocks. The ultrasonic attenuation property of the backing blocks was also measured.

  2. Processing, characterization and mechanical properties of alumina-based nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Katherine E.

    2007-12-01

    The present study focuses on improving the fracture toughness of nanocrystalline alumina by incorporating second phases---specifically niobium and carbon nanotubes. Ceramics have many properties that lend themselves well to load bearing and armor applications. Chemical inertness, high hardness and strength, low wear rates and low densities are examples of these properties that warrant potential substitution of metals and their alloys. In this study, nanocrystalline alumina was investigated based on its impressive elevated temperature properties and high hardness. Despite these promising structural properties, pure nanocrystalline alumina has low fracture toughness (˜2.5 MPa*m1/2) and is thus limited to non-structural applications. Alumina-based nanocomposites reinforced with niobium and/or carbon nanotubes (CNT) were fabricated by advanced powder processing techniques and consolidated by spark plasma sintering (˜1200°C, 4 min). Raman spectroscopy revealed that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) begin to break down at sintering temperatures above 1150°C. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that, although thermodynamically unlikely, no Al4C3 was formed in the CNT-alumina nanocomposites. Thus, the nanocomposite is purely a physical mixture and no chemical bond was formed between the nanotubes and matrix. In addition, in-situ 3-pt and standard 4-pt bend tests were conducted on niobium and/or carbon nanotube-reinforced alumina nanocomposites in order to assess their toughness. Although stable crack growth was not achieved in the 3-pt bend testing, average fracture toughness vales of 6.1 and 3.3 MPa·m 1/2 were measured for 10 vol%Nb and 10 vol%Nb-5 vol%SWCNT-alumina, respectively. The 4-pt bend testing measured average intrinsic fracture toughness of 2.95, 2.76, 3.33 and 3.95 MPa·m1/2 for alumina nanocomposites containing 5 vol%SWCNT, 10 vol%SWCNT, 5 vol%DWCNT and 10 vol% Nb, respectively. Although nanocrystalline alumina will never be able to compete with

  3. Mechanical properties of alumina porcelain during heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šín, Peter; Podoba, Rudolf; ŠtubÅa, Igor; Trník, Anton

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical strength and Young's modulus of green alumina porcelain (50 wt. % of kaolin, 25 wt. % of Al2O3, and 25 wt. % of feldspar) were measured during heating up to 900 °C and 1100 °C, respectively. To this end, we used the three point-bending method and modulated force thermomechanical analysis (mf-TMA). The loss liberation - of the physically bound water (20 - 250 °C) strengthens the sample and Young's modulus increases its values significantly. The dehydroxylation that takes place in the range of 400 - 650 °C causes a slight decrease in Young's modulus. On the other hand, the mechanical strength slightly increases in this temperature range, although it has a sudden drop at 420 °C. Beyond the dehydroxylation range, above 650 °C, both Young's modulus and mechanical strength increase. Above 950 °C, a sharp increase of Young's modulus is caused by the solid-state sintering and the new structure created by the high-temperature reactions in metakaolinite.

  4. Annealing Would Improve beta" - Alumina Solid Electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger; Homer, Margie; Ryan, Margaret; Cortez, Roger; Shields, Virgil; Kisor, Adam

    2003-01-01

    A pre-operational annealing process is under investigation as a potential means of preventing a sudden reduction of ionic conductivity in a Beta"-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) during use. On the basis of tests, the sudden reduction of ionic conductivity, followed by a slow recovery, has been found to occur during testing of the solid electrolyte and electrode components of an alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (AMTEC) cell. At this time, high-temperature tests of limited duration have indicated the superiority of the treated BASE, but reproducible tests over thousands of hours are necessary to confirm that microcracking has been eliminated. The ionic conductivity of the treated BASE is also measured to be higher than untreated BASE at 1,073 K in low-pressure sodium vapor. Microcracking resulting in loss of conductivity was not observed with treated BASE in one high-temperature experiment, but this result must be duplicated over very long testing times to be sure of the effect. Shorter annealing times (10 to 20 hours) were found to result in significantly less loss of mass; it may be necessary for the packed powder mixture to evolve some Na2O before the Na2O can leave the ceramic.

  5. Filter-pressing of alumina dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, R.; Rand, B.

    1996-06-01

    The filter-pressing characteristics of aqueous alumina dispersions containing either submicron or nano-sized particles have been compared with respect to ionic strength. The highest green densities for both systems were achieved at electrolyte concentrations < 0.01 mol dm{sup -3} where long-range repulsive interparticle forces stabilize the slips. A slight increase in density with ionic strength in this range was attributed to an increase in the ratio of particle radius-to-double layer thickness, Ka. At higher electrolyte concentrations, above the critical coagulation concentration, the green densities dropped to significantly lower values due to the onset of flocculation and the formation of open particle networks characterized by strong attraction which resisted rearrangement into a dense green microstructure. The green densities of the compacts consolidated from the submicron dispersions at ionic strength > 1 mol dm{sup -3} were significantly higher than those prepared close to the critical coagulation concentration although the slips exhibited properties typical for a flocculated structure. The results may indicate the presence of short-range repulsive forces at high salt concentration for the submicron slips not accounted for by the classical DLVO-theory. In order to characterize the early stages of filter-cake consolidation the initial cake permeability was determined from the compaction curves.

  6. Dopant effect of yttrium and the growth and adherence of alumina on nickel-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. B.; Mehandru, S. P.; Smialek, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The atom superposition and electron delocalization molecular orbital theory and large cluster models have been employed to study cation vacancy diffusion in alpha-Al2O3 and the bonding of alpha-Al2O3 to nickel, aluminum, and yttrium surfaces. Al(3+) diffusion barriers in alpha-Al2O3 by the vacancy mechanism are in reasonable agreement with experiment. The barrier to Y(3+) diffusion is predicted to be much higher. Since addition of yttrium to transition metal alloys is known to reduce the growth rate and stress convolutions in protective alumina scales, this result suggests the rate-limiting step in scale growth is cation vacancy diffusion. This may partially explain the beneficial effect of yttrium dopants on scale adhesion. The theory also predicts a very strong bonding between alumina and yttrium at the surface of the alloy. This may also be important to the adhesion phenomenon. It is also found that aluminum and yttrium atoms bond very strongly to nickel because of charge transfer from their higher lying valence orbitals to the lower lying nickel s-d band.

  7. Modelling mesoporous alumina microstructure with 3D random models of platelets.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Pietrasanta, A; Jeulin, D; Willot, F; Faessel, M; Sorbier, L; Moreaud, M

    2015-12-01

    This work focuses on a mesoporous material made up of nanometric alumina 'platelets' of unknown shape. We develope a 3D random microstructure to model the porous material, based on 2D transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, without prior knowledge on the spatial distribution of alumina inside the material. The TEM images, acquired on samples with thickness 300 nm, a scale much larger than the platelets's size, are too blurry and noisy to allow one to distinguish platelets or platelets aggregates individually. In a first step, the TEM images correlation function and integral range are estimated. The presence of long-range fluctuations, due to the TEM inhomogeneous detection, is detected and corrected by filtering. The corrected correlation function is used as a morphological descriptor for the model. After testing a Boolean model of platelets, a two-scale model of microstructure is introduced to replicate the statistical dispersion of platelets observed on TEM images. Accordingly, a set of two-scale Boolean models with varying physically admissible platelets shapes is proposed. Upon optimization, the model takes into account the dispersion of platelets in the microstructure as observed on TEM images. Comparing it to X-ray diffraction and nitrogen porosimetry data, the model is found to be in good agreement with the material in terms of specific surface area. PMID:26280446

  8. Ion polarization behavior in alumina under pulsed gate bias stress

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yu; Diallo, Abdou Karim; Katz, Howard E.

    2015-03-16

    Alkali metal ion incorporation in alumina significantly increases alumina capacitance by ion polarization. With high capacitance, ion-incorporated aluminas become promising high dielectric constant (high-k) gate dielectric materials in field-effect transistors (FETs) to enable reduced operating voltage, using oxide or organic semiconductors. Alumina capacitance can be manipulated by incorporation of alkali metal ions, including potassium (K{sup +}), sodium (Na{sup +}), and lithium (Li{sup +}), having different bond strengths with oxygen. To investigate the electrical stability of zinc tin oxide-based transistors using ion incorporated alumina as gate dielectrics, pulsed biases at different duty cycles (20%, 10%, and 2% representing 5 ms, 10 ms, and 50 ms periods, respectively) were applied to the gate electrode, sweeping the gate voltage over series of these cycles. We observed a particular bias stress-induced decrease of saturation field-effect mobility accompanied by threshold voltage shifts (ΔV{sub th}) in potassium and sodium-incorporated alumina (abbreviated as PA and SA)-based FETs at high duty cycle that persisted over multiple gate voltage sweeps, suggesting a possible creation of new defects in the semiconductor. This conclusion is also supported by the greater change in the mobility-capacitance (μC) product than in capacitance itself. Moreover, a more pronounced ΔV{sub th} over shorter times was observed in lithium-incorporated alumina (abbreviated as LA)-based transistors, suggesting trapping of electrons in existing interfacial states. ΔV{sub th} from multiple gate voltage sweeps over time were fit to stretched exponential forms. All three dielectrics show good stability using 50-ms intervals (20-Hz frequencies), corresponding to 2% duty cycles.

  9. Ion polarization behavior in alumina under pulsed gate bias stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Diallo, Abdou Karim; Katz, Howard E.

    2015-03-01

    Alkali metal ion incorporation in alumina significantly increases alumina capacitance by ion polarization. With high capacitance, ion-incorporated aluminas become promising high dielectric constant (high-k) gate dielectric materials in field-effect transistors (FETs) to enable reduced operating voltage, using oxide or organic semiconductors. Alumina capacitance can be manipulated by incorporation of alkali metal ions, including potassium (K+), sodium (Na+), and lithium (Li+), having different bond strengths with oxygen. To investigate the electrical stability of zinc tin oxide-based transistors using ion incorporated alumina as gate dielectrics, pulsed biases at different duty cycles (20%, 10%, and 2% representing 5 ms, 10 ms, and 50 ms periods, respectively) were applied to the gate electrode, sweeping the gate voltage over series of these cycles. We observed a particular bias stress-induced decrease of saturation field-effect mobility accompanied by threshold voltage shifts (ΔVth) in potassium and sodium-incorporated alumina (abbreviated as PA and SA)-based FETs at high duty cycle that persisted over multiple gate voltage sweeps, suggesting a possible creation of new defects in the semiconductor. This conclusion is also supported by the greater change in the mobility-capacitance (μC) product than in capacitance itself. Moreover, a more pronounced ΔVth over shorter times was observed in lithium-incorporated alumina (abbreviated as LA)-based transistors, suggesting trapping of electrons in existing interfacial states. ΔVth from multiple gate voltage sweeps over time were fit to stretched exponential forms. All three dielectrics show good stability using 50-ms intervals (20-Hz frequencies), corresponding to 2% duty cycles.

  10. Alumina-on-alumina total hip replacement for femoral neck fracture in healthy patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Total hip replacement is considered the best option for treatment of displaced intracapsular fractures of the femoral neck (FFN). The size of the femoral head is an important factor that influences the outcome of a total hip arthroplasty (THA): implants with a 28 mm femoral head are more prone to dislocate than implants with a 32 mm head. Obviously, a large head coupled to a polyethylene inlay can lead to more wear, osteolysis and failure of the implant. Ceramic induces less friction and minimal wear even with larger heads. Methods A total of 35 THAs were performed for displaced intracapsular FFN, using a 32 mm alumina-alumina coupling. Results At a mean follow-up of 80 months, 33 have been clinically and radiologically reviewed. None of the implants needed revision for any reason, none of the cups were considered to have failed, no dislocations nor breakage of the ceramic components were recorded. One anatomic cementless stem was radiologically loose. Conclusions On the basis of our experience, we suggest that ceramic-on-ceramic coupling offers minimal friction and wear even with large heads. PMID:21284879

  11. Adsorption and reaction of sulfur dioxide on alumina and sodium-impregnated alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.B.; Sheinker, V.N.; White, M.G.

    1996-05-02

    The adsorption and oxidation of SO{sub 2} on alumina and sodium-impregnated alumina has been examined using thermogravimetric analysis and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy. Sulfur dioxide chemisorbs initially at basic sites to form an adsorbed sulfite, which is quantitatively converted to sulfate on oxidation. It has been observed that at low coverages, nearly 2.6 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}, sodium acts as a promoter for the formation of an adsorbed sulfite and sulfate which have structures similar to those of aluminum sulfite and sulfate, respectively. At higher sodium loadings, a second type of adsorbed SO{sub 2} is formed, similar to sodium sulfite and sulfate. The species with the aluminum sulfate structure appears to be more easily decomposed than does the sodium sulfate species and accounts for the regenerable adsorption capacity. Formation of the sodium sulfate species appears to account for the loss of adsorption capacity as the number of adsorption/regeneration cycles increases. Oxidation of the sulfite form to the sulfate form can occur in the absence of added oxygen, but it is an activated process and begins to occur in measurable amounts at temperatures between 150 and 300{degree}C. Partitioning of adsorbed SO{sub 2} between aluminum and sodium forms is not a function of temperature and depends on only sodium loading. 32 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Effect of Zirconia and Alumina Fillers on the Microstructure and Mechanical Strength of Dental Glass Ionomer Cements

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Júlio C. M.; Silva, Joel B.; Aladim, Andrea; Carvalho, Oscar; Nascimento, Rubens M.; Silva, Filipe S.; Martinelli, Antonio E.; Henriques, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glass-ionomer cements perform a protective effect on the dentin-pulp complex considering the F ions release and chemical bonding to the dental structures. On the other hand, those materials have poor physic-mechanical properties in comparison with the restorative resin composite. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of zirconia and/or alumina fillers on the microstructure and strength of a resin modified glass-ionomer cement after thermal cycling. Methods: An in vitro experimental study was carried out on 9 groups (n = 10) of cylindrical samples (6 x 4 mm) made from resin modified glass-ionomer (Vitremer, 3M, USA) with different contents of alumina and/or zirconia fillers. A nano-hybrid resin composite was tested as a control group. Samples were mechanically characterized by axial compressive tests and electron scanning microscopy (SEM) coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometry (EDS), before and after thermal cycling. Thermal cycling procedures were performed at 3000, 6000 and 10000 cycles in Fusayama´s artificial saliva at 5 and 60 oC. Results: An improvement of compressive strength was noticed on glass-ionomer reinforced with alumina fillers in comparison with the commercial glass ionomer. SEM images revealed the morphology and distribution of alumina or zirconia in the microstructure of glass-ionomers. Also, defects such as cracks and pores were detected on the glass-ionomer cements. The materials tested were not affected by thermal cycling in artificial saliva. Conclusion: Addition of inorganic particles at nano-scale such as alumina can increase the mechanical properties of glass-ionomer cements. However, the presence of cracks and pores present in glass-ionomer can negatively affect the mechanical properties of the material because they are areas of stress concentration. PMID:27053969

  13. Nanoscale Laser-Induced Spallation in SiO2 Films Containing Gold Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryashov, S.I.; Allen, S.D.; Papernov, S.; Schmid, A.W.

    2006-02-16

    A phenomenological theory of ultraviolet pulsed-laser-induced spallation is proposed to interpret crater formation in SiO2 thin films containing absorbing 18.5-nm gold particles. The theory considers a spherical thermoacoustic stress wave propagating from a thermal source produced by laser-energy absorption inside the particle and surrounding ionized volume. Calculations show that the tensile stress associated with such an acoustic wave may exceed the local strength of the material and cause fracture and spallation of the top film portion. The theory provides an explanation of the experimentally observed complex (two-cone) shape of craters formed in the film with particle-lodging depth exceeding 110 nm. Theoretical estimates for the threshold stress amplitude and peak temperature in the thermal source are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  14. Spallation model for the titanium-rich supernova remnant cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Ouyed, Amir; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2011-10-01

    Titanium-rich subluminous supernovae are rare and challenge current SN nucleosynthesis models. We present a model in which ejecta from a standard supernova is impacted by a second explosion of the neutron star (a quark nova), resulting in spallation reactions that lead to (56)Ni destruction and (44)Ti creation under the right conditions. Basic calculations of the spallation products shows that a delay between the two explosions of ∼5  days reproduces the observed abundance of (44)Ti in Cas A and explains its low luminosity as a result of the destruction of (56)Ni. Our results could have important implications for light curves of subluminous as well as superluminous supernovae.

  15. Generation of negative pressures and spallation phenomena in diamond exposed to a picosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Abrosimov, S A; Bazhulin, A P; Bol'shakov, A P; Konov, V I; Krasyuk, I K; Pashinin, P P; Ral'chenko, V G; Semenov, A Yu; Sovyk, D N; Stuchebryukhov, I A; Khomich, A A; Fortov, V E; Khishchenko, K V

    2014-06-30

    The spallation phenomena in poly- and single-crystal synthetic diamonds have been experimentally investigated. A shockwave impact on a target was implemented using a 70-ps laser pulse in the Kamerton-T facility. The ablation pressure of 0.66 TPa on the front target surface was formed by pulsed radiation of a neodymium phosphate glass laser (second harmonic λ = 0.527 mm, pulse energy 2.5 J) with an intensity as high as 2 × 10{sup 13} W cm{sup -2}. The maximum diamond spall strength σ* ≈ 16.5 GPa is found to be 24% of the theoretical ultimate strength. Raman scattering data indicate that a small amount of crystalline diamond in the spallation region on the rear side of the target is graphitised. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  16. Negative pressures and spallation in water drops subjected to nanosecond shock waves

    DOE PAGES

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Willmott, Philip R.; Stone, Howard A.; Koglin, Jason E.; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Gumerlock, Karl L.; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G.; et al

    2016-05-16

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below –100 MPamore » were reached in the drops. As a result, we model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.« less

  17. Systematic neutron guide misalignment for an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendler, C.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a long pulse spallation neutron source that is currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. A considerable fraction of the 22 planned instruments extend as far as 75-150 m from the source. In such long beam lines, misalignment between neutron guide segments can decrease the neutron transmission significantly. In addition to a random misalignment from installation tolerances, the ground on which ESS is built can be expected to sink with time, and thus shift the neutron guide segments further away from the ideal alignment axis in a systematic way. These systematic errors are correlated to the ground structure, position of buildings and shielding installation. Since the largest deformation is expected close to the target, even short instruments might be noticeably affected. In this study, the effect of this systematic misalignment on short and long ESS beam lines is analyzed, and a possible mitigation by overillumination of subsequent guide sections investigated.

  18. Challenges and design solutions of the liquid hydrogen circuit at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallimore, S.; Nilsson, P.; Sabbagh, P.; Takibayev, A.; Weisend, J. G., II; Beßler, Y.; Klaus, M.

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS), Lund, Sweden will be a 5MW long-pulse neutron spallation research facility and will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. Neutrons are produced by accelerating a high-energy proton beam into a rotating helium-cooled tungsten target. These neutrons pass through moderators to reduce their energy to an appropriate range (< 5 meV for cold neutrons); two of which will use liquid hydrogen at 17 K as the moderating and cooling medium. There are several technical challenges to overcome in the design of a robust system that will operate under such conditions, not least the 20 kW of deposited heat. These challenges and the associated design solutions will be detailed in this paper.

  19. Negative Pressures and Spallation in Water Drops Subjected to Nanosecond Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Willmott, Philip R; Stone, Howard A; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L; Robinson, Joseph S; Gumerlock, Karl L; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G; Boutet, Sébastien; Guillet, Serge A H; Curtis, Robin H; Vetter, Sharon L; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L; Decker, Franz-Josef

    2016-06-01

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below -100 MPa were reached in the drops. We model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures. PMID:27182751

  20. Spallation model for the titanium-rich supernova remnant cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Ouyed, Amir; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2011-10-01

    Titanium-rich subluminous supernovae are rare and challenge current SN nucleosynthesis models. We present a model in which ejecta from a standard supernova is impacted by a second explosion of the neutron star (a quark nova), resulting in spallation reactions that lead to (56)Ni destruction and (44)Ti creation under the right conditions. Basic calculations of the spallation products shows that a delay between the two explosions of ∼5  days reproduces the observed abundance of (44)Ti in Cas A and explains its low luminosity as a result of the destruction of (56)Ni. Our results could have important implications for light curves of subluminous as well as superluminous supernovae. PMID:22107282

  1. Synthesis of neutron-rich transuranic nuclei in fissile spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishustin, Igor; Malyshkin, Yury; Pshenichnov, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2015-04-01

    A possibility of synthesizing neutron-rich superheavy elements in spallation targets of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) is considered. A dedicated software called Nuclide Composition Dynamics (NuCoD) was developed to model the evolution of isotope composition in the targets during a long-time irradiation by intense proton and deuteron beams. Simulation results show that transuranic elements up to 249Bk can be produced in multiple neutron capture reactions in macroscopic quantities. However, the neutron flux achievable in a spallation target is still insufficient to overcome the so-called fermium gap. Further optimization of the target design, in particular, by including moderating material and covering it by a reflector could turn ADS into an alternative source of transuranic elements in addition to nuclear fission reactors.

  2. A neutron resonance capture analysis experimental station at the ISIS spallation source.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Antonino; Gorini, Giuseppe; Festa, Giulia; Reali, Enzo; Grazzi, Francesco; Schooneveld, Erik M

    2010-09-01

    Neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA) is a nuclear technique that is used to determine the elemental composition of materials and artifacts (e.g., bronze objects) of archaeological interest. NRCA experiments are mostly performed at the GELINA facility in Belgium, a pulsed neutron source operating with an electron linear accelerator. Very intense fluxes of epithermal neutrons are also provided by spallation neutron sources, such as the ISIS spallation neutron source in the United Kingdom. In the present study, the suitability of the Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) beam line for NRCA measurements is assessed using a compact (n, γ) resonance detector made of a Yttrium-Aluminum-Perovskite (YAP) scintillation crystal coupled with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout. The measurements provided a qualitative recognition of the composition of the standard sample, a lower limit for the sensitivity for NRCA for almost-in-traces elements, and an estimation of the relative isotopic concentration in the sample.

  3. Spallation Model for the Titanium-Rich Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Ouyed, Amir; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2011-10-07

    Titanium-rich subluminous supernovae are rare and challenge current SN nucleosynthesis models. We present a model in which ejecta from a standard supernova is impacted by a second explosion of the neutron star (a quark nova), resulting in spallation reactions that lead to {sup 56}Ni destruction and {sup 44}Ti creation under the right conditions. Basic calculations of the spallation products shows that a delay between the two explosions of {approx}5 days reproduces the observed abundance of {sup 44}Ti in Cas A and explains its low luminosity as a result of the destruction of {sup 56}Ni. Our results could have important implications for light curves of subluminous as well as superluminous supernovae.

  4. Negative Pressures and Spallation in Water Drops Subjected to Nanosecond Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Willmott, Philip R; Stone, Howard A; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L; Robinson, Joseph S; Gumerlock, Karl L; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G; Boutet, Sébastien; Guillet, Serge A H; Curtis, Robin H; Vetter, Sharon L; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L; Decker, Franz-Josef

    2016-06-01

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below -100 MPa were reached in the drops. We model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.

  5. RESULTS OF BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION TECHNIQUES ON THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM LOSS MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Pogge, James R; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2010-01-01

    Recent improvements to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor (BLM) designs have been made with the goal of significantly reducing background noise. This paper outlines this effort and analyzes the results. The significance of this noise reduction is the ability to use the BLM sensors [1], [2], [3] distributed throughout the SNS accelerator as a method to monitor activation of components as well as monitor beam losses.

  6. Automatic beam position control at Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF)

    SciTech Connect

    Oothoudt, M.; Pillai, C.; Zumbro, M.

    1997-08-01

    Historically the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has used manual methods to control the position of the 800 kW, 800 MeV proton beam on targets. New experiments, however, require more stringent position control more frequently than can be done manually for long periods of time. Data from an existing harp is used to automatically adjust steering magnets to maintain beam position to required tolerances.

  7. Fundamental neutron physics beamline at the spallation neutron source at ORNL

    DOE PAGES

    Fomin, N.; Greene, G. L.; Allen, R. R.; Cianciolo, V.; Crawford, C.; Tito, T. M.; Huffman, P. R.; Iverson, E. B.; Mahurin, R.; Snow, W. M.

    2014-11-04

    In this paper, we describe the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FnPB) facility located at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The FnPB was designed for the conduct of experiments that investigate scientific issues in nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology using a pulsed slow neutron beam. Finally, we present a detailed description of the design philosophy, beamline components, and measured fluxes of the polychromatic and monochromatic beams.

  8. Spallation backgrounds in Super-Kamiokande are made in muon-induced showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shirley Weishi; Beacom, John F.

    2015-05-01

    Crucial questions about solar and supernova neutrinos remain unanswered. Super-Kamiokande has the exposure needed for progress, but detector backgrounds are a limiting factor. A leading component is the beta decays of isotopes produced by cosmic-ray muons and their secondaries, which initiate nuclear spallation reactions. Cuts of events after and surrounding muon tracks reduce this spallation decay background by ≃ 90 % (at a cost of ≃ 20 % deadtime), but its rate at 6-18 MeV is still dominant. A better way to cut this background was suggested in a Super-Kamiokande paper by Bays et al. [Phys. Rev. D 85, 052007 (2012)] on a search for the diffuse supernova neutrino background. They found that spallation decays above 16 MeV were preceded near the same location by a peak in the apparent Cherenkov light profile from the muon; a more aggressive cut was applied to a limited section of the muon track, leading to decreased background without increased deadtime. We put their empirical discovery on a firm theoretical foundation. We show that almost all spallation decay isotopes are produced by muon-induced showers and that these showers are rare enough and energetic enough to be identifiable. This is the first such demonstration for any detector. We detail how the physics of showers explains the peak in the muon Cherenkov light profile and other Super-K observations. Our results provide a physical basis for practical improvements in background rejection that will benefit multiple studies. For solar neutrinos, in particular, it should be possible to dramatically reduce backgrounds at energies as low as 6 MeV.

  9. Process technology and effects of spallation products: Circuit components, maintenance, and handling

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, B.; Haines, S.J.; Dressler, R.; McManamy, T.

    1996-06-01

    Working Session D included an assessment of the status of the technology and components required to: (1) remove impurities from the liquid metal (mercury or Pb-Bi) target flow loop including the effects of spallation products, (2) provide the flow parameters necessary for target operations, and (3) maintain the target system. A series of brief presentations were made to focus the discussion on these issues. The subjects of these presentations, and presenters were: (1) Spallation products and solubilities - R. Dressler; (2) Spallation products for Pb-Bi - Y. Orlov; (3) Clean/up/impurity removal components - B. Sigg; (4) {open_quotes}Road-Map{close_quotes} and remote handling needs - T. McManamy; (5) Remote handling issues and development - M. Holding. The overall conclusion of this session was that, with the exception of (i) spallation product related processing issues, (ii) helium injection and clean-up, and (iii) specialized remote handling equipment, the technology for all other circuit components (excluding the target itself) exists. Operating systems at the Institute of Physics in Riga, Latvia (O. Lielausis) and at Ben-Gurion University in Beer Shiva, Israel (S. Lesin) have demonstrated that other liquid metal circuit components including pumps, heat exchangers, valves, seals, and piping are readily available and have been reliably used for many years. In the three areas listed above, the designs and analysis are not judged to be mature enough to determine whether and what types of technology development are required. Further design and analysis of the liquid metal target system is therefore needed to define flow circuit processing and remote handling equipment requirements and thereby identify any development needs.

  10. The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer MaNDi at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, Leighton; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Frost, Matthew J.; He, Junhong; Weiss, Kevin L.; McFeeters, Hana; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Langan, Paul; Iverson, Erik B.

    2015-07-18

    The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MaNDi) is located on beamline 11B of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Moreover, the instrument is a neutron time-of-flight wavelength-resolved Laue diffractometer optimized to collect diffraction data from single crystals. Finally, the instrument has been designed to provide flexibility in several instrumental parameters, such as beam divergence and wavelength bandwidth, to allow data collection from a range of macromolecular systems.

  11. The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer MaNDi at the Spallation Neutron Source

    DOE PAGES

    Coates, Leighton; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Frost, Matthew J.; He, Junhong; Weiss, Kevin L.; McFeeters, Hana; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Langan, Paul; Iverson, Erik B.

    2015-07-18

    The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MaNDi) is located on beamline 11B of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Moreover, the instrument is a neutron time-of-flight wavelength-resolved Laue diffractometer optimized to collect diffraction data from single crystals. Finally, the instrument has been designed to provide flexibility in several instrumental parameters, such as beam divergence and wavelength bandwidth, to allow data collection from a range of macromolecular systems.

  12. Coherent Scattering Investigations at the Spallation Neutron Source: a Snowmass White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Akimov, D.; Bernstein, A.; BarbeauP.,; Barton, P. J.; Bolozdynya, A.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Cavanna, F.; Cianciolo, Vince; Collar, J.; Cooper, R. J.; Dean, D. J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Etenko, A.; Fields, N.; Foxe, M.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fomin, N.; Gallmeier, F.; Garishvili, I.; Gerling, M.; Green, M.; Greene, Geoffrey; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Henning, Reyco; Hix, R.; Hogan, D.; Hornback, D.; Jovanovic, I.; Hossbach, T.; Iverson, Erik B; Klein, S. R.; Khromov, A.; Link, J.; Louis, W.; Lu, W.; Mauger, C.; Marleau, P.; Markoff, D.; Martin, R. D.; Mueller, Paul Edward; Newby, J.; Orrell, John L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Penttila, Seppo; Patton, K.; Poon, A. W.; Radford, David C; Reyna, D.; Ray, H.; Scholberg, K.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Tayloe, R.; Vetter, K.; Virtue, C.; Wilkerson, J.; Yoo, J.; Yu, Chang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure that is beneficial for background rejection. In this white paper, we describe how the SNS source can be used for a measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS), and the physics reach of different phases of such an experimental program (CSI: Coherent Scattering Investigations at the SNS).

  13. Status of R&D on Mitigating the Effects of Pressure Waves for the Spallation Neutron Source Mercury Target

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Abdou, Ashraf A; McClintock, David A

    2012-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been conducting R&D on mitigating the effects of pressure waves in mercury spallation targets since 2001. More precisely, cavitation damage of the target vessel caused by the short beam pulse threatens to limit its lifetime more severely than radiation damage as well as limit its ultimate power capacity and hence its neutron intensity performance. The R&D program has moved from verification of the beam-induced damage phenomena to study of material and surface treatments for damage resistance to the current emphasis on gas injection techniques for damage mitigation. Two techniques are being worked on: injection of small dispersed gas bubbles that mitigate the pressure waves volumetrically; and protective gas walls that isolate the vessel from the damaging effects of collapsing cavitation bubbles. The latter has demonstrated good damage mitigation during in-beam testing with limited pulses, and adequate gas wall coverage at the beam entrance window has been demonstrated with the SNS mercury target flow configuration using a full scale mercury test loop. A question on the required area coverage remains which depends on results from SNS target post irradiation examination. The small gas bubble technique has been less effective during past in-beam tests but those results were with un-optimized and un-verified bubble populations. Another round of in-beam tests with small gas bubbles is planned for 2011. The first SNS target was removed from service in mid 2009 and samples were cut from two locations at the target s beam entrance window. Through-wall damage was observed at the innermost mercury vessel wall (not a containment wall). The damage pattern suggested correlation with the local mercury flow condition which is nearly stagnant at the peak damage location. Detailed post irradiation examination of the samples is under way that will assess the erosion and measure irradiation-induced changes

  14. Spallation in metallic systems: Effects of microstructure, and loading pulse shape, rate and orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, S. N.

    2011-06-01

    The dynamic nature of spallation and the ubiquitous presence of microstructure may give rise to significant dependences on microstructure and loading, as indicated by indirect experimental observations. We present systematic, direct molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of spallation in metallic systems represented by Cu and a CuZr glass. The ``microstructure'' includes various defects in Cu, porous Cu, atomic-level inhomogeneities in the CuZr glass, and the Cu crystal -CuZr glass interfaces. We explore supported and decaying shock loading pulses, as well as different loading orientations. Tensile loading rates are changed via varying the flyer and target thicknesses in shock simulations, and more significantly (down to ~106 s-1), with accelerated MD simulations of single-void growth in Cu (mimicking shock). Our direct simulations reveal strong dependences of spallation on microstructure and loading, and quantitative dynamics of void nucleation/growth as well as mechanisms for plasticity, void nucleation and their interactions in the absence or presence of defects or interfaces. The future task of incorporating statistically the microstructure effects and their rate dependences into analytic models is of great interest to shock physics but a challenge. Work done in collaboration with T.C. Germann, D. Perez, Q. An, B. Arman, W.Z. Han, D.L. Tonks, J.E. Hammerberg, A.F. Voter, Los Alamos National Laboratory; W.A. Goddard III, Caltech; and T. Cagin, Texas A & M University.

  15. Heavy density liquid metal spallation target studies for Indian ADS programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyamurthy, P.; Gantayet, L. M.; Ray, A. K.

    2007-02-01

    Department of Atomic Energy, India has taken up the development of ADS in view of many attractive features like inherent safety, capability to transmute large quantities of nuclear waste, better utilization of thorium etc. A roadmap has been finalized for the development of ADS. One of the key components of the ADS is the spallation target. Considering the neutron yield, thermal-hydraulics and radiation damage issues, we are proposing to develop spallation target based on heavy density liquid metals like lead and lead{bismuth{eutectic (LBE). Both window and windowless target configurations are presently being studied. In view of the various advantages we are also studying liquid metal flow circulation based on gas lift mechanism. An R&D programme has been initiated to address various physics and technology issues of ADS target. Under this programme, mercury and LBE experimental facilities are presently being set up. Along with these facilities, computational tools related to spallation physics (FLUKA) and CFD are being developed, and the existing ones are utilized to design the entire target loop as well as sub-systems. In this presentation the details of these activities are presented.

  16. Conceptual Design of the Liquid Hydrogen Moderator Cooling Circuit for the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, M.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Quack, H.; Beßler, Y.; Butzek, M.

    The European Spallation Sourcein Lund, Sweden, will be a 5 MW beam power neutron spallation research center. As subsystem of the target station the moderators play a vital role by slowing down high energy neutrons set free during the spallation process. To provide maximum neutron flux intensities with high availability for scattering experiments a conceptual liquid hydrogen moderator cooling circulation design proposal was developed. Supercritical hydrogen at 17 K will be utilized to absorb energy of the incoming neutrons in two parallel moderator vessels. A helium refrigerator provides the necessary cooling capacity by implementing an additional helium expansion turbine downstream the refrigerator coldbox. Strategies for the mitigation of pressure fluctuations due to beam trips are being presented. Solutions in form of electrical heaters and an accumulator or an expansion vessel are discussed. Different supercritical hydrogen circulator implementation scenarios are being matched to indicate the most reliable setup. For an efficient moderation process parahydrogen concentrations higher than 99% have to be guaranteed at the moderator inlet. Due to potential conversion of parahydrogen to orthohydrogen via irradiation processes the implementation of an ortho-parahydrogen catalyst bed is being evaluated. Methods for a continuous measurement of the apparent parahydrogen concentration at the moderator in- and outlet will be introduced. The arrangement and interaction of the components will be detailed in the paper.

  17. SPACS: A semi-empirical parameterization for isotopic spallation cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Kelić-Heil, A.

    2014-12-01

    A new semi-empirical parameterization for residue cross sections in spallation reactions is presented. The prescription named SPACS, for spallation cross sections, permits calculating the fragment production in proton- and neutron-induced collisions with light up to heavy non-fissile partners from the Fermi regime to ultra-relativistic energies. The model is fully analytical, based on a new parameterization of the mass yields, accounting for the dependence on bombarding energy. The formalism for the isobaric distribution consists of a commonly used functional form, borrowed from the empirical parameterization of fragmentation cross sections EPAX, with the observed suited adjustments for spallation, and extended to the charge-pickup channel. Structural and even-odd staggering related to the last stage of the primary-residue deexcitation process is additionally explicitly introduced with a new prescription. Calculations are benchmarked with recent data collected at GSI, Darmstadt as well as with previous measurements employing various techniques. The dependences observed experimentally on collision energy, reaction-partner mass, and proton-neutron asymmetry are well described. A fast analytical parameterization, such as SPACS, can be relevant to be implemented in complex simulations as used for practical issues at nuclear facilities and plants. Its predictive power also makes it useful for cross-section estimates in astrophysics and biophysics.

  18. MEGAPIE project, experience of electromagnetic pumps operation in the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dementjev, S.; Groeschel, F.; Jekabsons, N.

    2008-09-01

    The MEGAPIE project with the aim to design, build and operate a 1 MW liquid metal target in the SINQ facility (Swiss Spallation Neutron Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland) was a key experiment on the way to experimental accelerator driven systems (ADS) for transmutation of nuclear waste and for the development of liquid metal spallation targets. The electromagnetic pump system for the target, consisting of two electromagnetic pumps and two flowmeters, was designed and fabricated at the Institute of Physics, University of Latvia (IPUL) in 2003-2004. ATEA (France) integrated the pumps into the target in the beginning of 2005. The assembled target was commissioned at PSI in the frame of the MEGAPIE integral test (MIT) at the end of 2005. The target was being irradiated in the SINQ during 18 weeks in August-December 2006 in the course of the MEGAPIE-SINQ experiment . It was one of the first high-power liquid metal targets coupled with a proton accelerator and operating in a spallation source under full-service conditions. Tables 1, Figs 6, Refs 6.

  19. Spallator and APEX nuclear fuel cycle: a new option for nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.

    1982-01-01

    A new nuclear fuel cycle is described which provides a long term supply of nuclear fuel for the thermal LWR nuclear power reactors and eliminates the need for long-term storage of radioactive waste. Fissile fuel is produced by the Spallator which depends on the production of spallation neutrons by the interaction of high-energy (1 to 2 GeV) protons on a heavy-metal target. The neutrons are absorbed in a surrounding natural-uranium or thorium blanket in which fissile Pu-239 to U-233 is produced. Advances in linear accelerator technology makes it possible to design and construct a high-beam-current continuous-wave proton linac for production purposes. The target is similar to a sub-critical reactor and produces heat which is converted to electricity for supplying the linac. The Spallator is a self-sufficient fuel producer, which can compete with the fast breeder. The APEX fuel cycle depends on recycling the transuranics and long-lived fission products while extracting the stable and short-lived fission products when reprocessing the fuel. Transmutation and decay within the fuel cycle and decay of short-lived fission products external to the fuel cycle eliminates the need for long-term geological age shortage of fission-product waste.

  20. An investigation into spallation of titanium alloy using plate impact experiments and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, P.; Cullis, I.; Bardilas, A.; Cogar, J.; Proud, W. G.; Hammond, R. I.

    2003-09-01

    Spallation studies have proved invaluable in determining the spall strengths of these materials, which are then used for various assessment and design purposes. However, there are still many uncertainties regarding the spallation process, particlllarly in alloys, due to the difficulty in developing predictive constitutive and failure models for these materials. One difficulty is that the simulation results depend as much on the constitutive and fracture behaviour as the numerical treatment, particularly post failure. The purpose of this paper is to isolate these effects by using very well controlled data for Ti6Al4Vn alloy under a range of impact scenarios using VISAR. These experiments have been simulated using the Lagrangian hydrocode DYNA and the Eulerian hydrocode CTH. The study renforces the view that the simulation of uniaxial spall signais, represents a significant challenge for the constitutive and fracture models, as well as the post failure numerical treatment within the hydrocode. The results of the simulations are discussed in the wider context of validation of constitutive and fracture models and the lack of real understanding concerning the spallation processes in these alloys.

  1. Peltier heats in cryolite melts with alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Flem, B.E.; Ratkje, S.K.; Sterten, A.

    1996-10-01

    The Seebeck coefficient was measured for cells with electrolytes of molten mixtures of sodium fluoride and aluminum fluoride saturated with alumina. The electrodes were either a pair of oxygen electrodes or a pair of aluminum electrodes. For the molar ratio NaF/AlF{sub 3} equal to 1.8, 1.2 and 1.0, the authors obtained the Seebeck coefficients {minus}1.80 mV K{sup {minus}1} at 971 C, {minus}1.63 mV K{sup {minus}1} at 813.6 C and {minus}0.583 mV K{sup {minus}1} at 758 C, respectively, for the oxygen electrodes. For the aluminum electrodes, the authors obtained the Seebeck coefficient {minus}1.23 mV K{sup {minus}1} at 962 C, for the molar ratio NaF/AlF{sub 3} equal to 1.8. The results suggest that there is a substantial reversible heat consumption at the anode during aluminum electrolysis and a large reversible heat production at the cathode. The highest temperature in the Hall-Heroult cell is then closer to the cathode than the anode. The transported entropies of Al{sup 3+} and O{sup 2{minus}} were calculated to be 77 J mol{sup {minus}1} K{sup {minus}1} and 10 J mol{sup {minus}1} K{sup {minus}1}, respectively, when the molar ratio NaF/AlF{sub 3} was equal to 1.0.

  2. Improvements to the internal and external antenna H{sup −} ion sources at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R. F. Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Pillar, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Turvey, M. W.

    2014-02-15

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), a large scale neutron production facility, routinely operates with 30–40 mA peak current in the linac. Recent measurements have shown that our RF-driven internal antenna, Cs-enhanced, multi-cusp ion sources injects ∼55 mA of H{sup −} beam current (∼1 ms, 60 Hz) at 65-kV into a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator through a closely coupled electrostatic Low-Energy Beam Transport system. Over the last several years a decrease in RFQ transmission and issues with internal antennas has stimulated source development at the SNS both for the internal and external antenna ion sources. This report discusses progress in improving internal antenna reliability, H{sup −} yield improvements which resulted from modifications to the outlet aperture assembly (applicable to both internal and external antenna sources) and studies made of the long standing problem of beam persistence with the external antenna source. The current status of the external antenna ion source will also be presented.

  3. Aluminas with dispersoids. Tribologic properties and in vivo aging.

    PubMed

    Mandrino, A; Moyen, B; Ben Abdallah, A; Treheux, D; Orange, D

    1990-07-01

    Three base alumina ceramics with dispersoids: monoclinic zirconia alumina (A5Z), tetragonal zirconia alumina (A20Z) and aluminalon (Aa20) have been investigated because of their improved mechanical properties with reference to pure alumina (AI203). Bending strength and fracture toughness are twice higher than alumina for the most toughened. These two parameters were measured by four-points bending tests after 1 week, 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 months of non loaded in vivo aging in wistar rats. They showed a little decrease for AI203 and Aa20 and a total stability for A5Z and A20Z even after one year. For tribologic study of the ceramic/polyethylene combination, cylinder against plane and pin on flat tests were conducted on an alternative movement with hip parameters of speed and load in presence of ringer solution. For the most representative test (pin on disk), the friction coefficients were nearly the same for all materials but UHMWPE wear volume was twice lower against A20Z than against AI203. A20Z/UHMWPE combination would be very interesting as new friction couple for total hip arthroplasty. Further studies are currently conducted.

  4. Corrosion resistance characterization of porous alumina membrane supports

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Yingchao; Lin Bin; Zhou Jianer; Zhang Xiaozhen; Ling Yihan; Liu Xingqin; Meng Guangyao; Hampshire, Stuart

    2011-04-15

    Tubular porous alumina ceramic membrane supports were fabricated by an extrusion-drying-sintering process and then characterized in detail in terms of corrosion resistance in both H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH aqueous solutions. Variations in the properties of the alumina supports such as mass loss percent, mechanical strength, open porosity and pore size distribution were studied before and after corrosion under different conditions. In addition, the microstructures were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction before and after corrosion. The fabricated porous alumina supports offer possibilities for some potential applications as micro-filtration or ultra-filtration membrane supports, as well as in the pre-treatment of strongly acidic industrial waste-liquids. - Research highlights: {yields} Porous alumina membrane supports fabricated by extrusion-drying-sintering process. {yields} Corrosion resistance in 20 wt.% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 1, 5, 10 wt.% NaOH aqueous solutions. {yields} Rapid mass loss and loss of flexural strength occurred in hot NaOH solution. {yields} Resistant to strong acid corrosion with low mass loss, low flexural strength loss. {yields} Porous alumina supports have potential for treatment of strong acid waste liquids.

  5. The nature of hydrogen in γ-alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yunguo Lousada, Cláudio M. Korzhavyi, Pavel A.

    2014-05-28

    Gibbs free energy models are derived from the calculated electronic and phonon structure of two possible models of γ-alumina, a defective spinel phase and a hydrogenated spinel phase. The intrinsic vacancies and hydrogen in the two structural models give rise to a considerable configurational (residual) entropy and significantly contribute to thermodynamic stability and physical-chemical properties of γ-alumina, which was neglected in previous studies but considered in this work. The electronic densities of states, calculated using a hybrid functional for the two structural models of γ-alumina, are presented. The dynamic stability of the two phases is confirmed by full-spectrum phonon calculations. The two phases share many similarities in their electronic structure, but can be distinguished by their vibrational spectra and specific heat. The defective spinel is found to be the ground state of γ-alumina, while the hydrogenated spinel to be a metastable phase. However, dehydration of the metastable phase into the ground state is expected to be slow due to the low diffusion rate of H, which leaves hydrogen as a locked-in impurity in γ-alumina.

  6. Excellent results with cementless total hip arthroplasty and alumina-on-alumina pairing: minimum ten-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kress, Alexander M.; Schmidt, Rainer; Holzwarth, Ulrich; Forst, Raimund

    2010-01-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic coupling is thought to be a durable alternative to metal- or alumina-on-polyethylene pairing. No evidence exists suggesting superior clinical and radiological results for hydroxyapatite-coated stems versus uncoated stems. The aim of this study is to report the performance of an alumina-on-alumina bearing cementless total hip arthroplasty and to compare stems with a tapered design with and without hydroxyapatite coating. We prospectively analysed the results of cementless tapered femoral stems (40 hydroxyapatite-coated versus 22 uncoated stems), a metal-backed fibre mesh hydroxyapatite-coated socket and alumina-on-alumina pairing. Of 75 hips studied, 62 were available for follow-up (mean of 10.5 years after surgery). The average Harris hip score was 90. Only one hydroxyapatite-coated stem was revised for aseptic loosening. One instance of non-progressive osteolysis was detected around a screw of a cup. All other components showed radiographic signs of stable ingrowth. Hydroxyapatite coating of the stem had no significant impact on the clinical or radiological results. Total hip arthroplasty with the presented implant and pairing provides a durable standard for all patients requiring hip joint replacement against which all newer generations of cementless implants should be judged. PMID:21079952

  7. Effects of stearic acid on the injection molding of alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, T.Y.; Lin, S.T.

    1995-10-01

    This research investigated the influence of stearic acid on the injection molding of alumina, by varying the concentration of stearic acid. The interaction between stearic acid and alumina was identified using transmission infrared spectroscopy, indicating stearic acid preferentially adsorbed onto the alumina powder surface. In addition to slightly modifying the intrinsic binder viscosity, stearic acid adsorbed onto the powder surface changed the flow behavior of the mixtures from dilatant flow to pseudoplastic flow at low temperatures. As a result, inhomogeneous distribution of binder in the injection-molded parts was minimized with increased stearic acid concentration. However, the possibility of forming bubbles in the mixtures arising from vaporization of stearic acid was enhanced. Additionally, the binder burnout temperature range was broadened with the increase of stearic acid concentration.

  8. Plastic deformation and sintering of alumina under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fangming; Liu, Pingping; Wang, Haikuo; Xu, Chao; Yin, Shuai; Yin, Wenwen; Li, Yong; He, Duanwei

    2013-12-21

    Plastic deformation of alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) under high pressure was investigated by observing the shape changes of spherical particles, and the near fully dense transparent bulks were prepared at around 5.5 GPa and 900 °C. Through analyzing the deformation features, densities, and residual micro-strain of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} compacts prepared under high pressures and temperatures (2.0–5.5 GPa and 600–1200 °C), the effects of plastic deformation on the sintering behavior of alumina have been demonstrated. Under compression, the microscopic deviatoric stress caused by grain-to-grain contact could initiate the plastic deformation of individual particles, eliminate pores of the polycrystalline samples, and enhance the local atomic diffusion at the grain boundaries, thus produced transparent alumina bulks.

  9. Porous Alumina as a Promising Biomaterial for Public Health.

    PubMed

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Gasparini, Roberto; Amicizia, Daniela; Panatto, Donatella; Larosa, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Porous aluminum is a nanostructured material characterized by unique properties, such as chemical stability, regular uniformity, dense hexagonal porous lattice with high aspect ratio nanopores, excellent mechanical strength, and biocompatibility. This overview examines how the structure and properties of porous alumina can be exploited in the field of public health. Porous alumina can be employed for fabricating membranes and filters for bioremediation, water ultrafiltration, and microfiltration/nanofiltration, being a promising technique for having clean and fresh water, which is essential for human health. Porous alumina-based nanobiosensor coated with specific antibodies or peptides seem to be a useful tool to detect and remove pathogens both in food and in water, as well as for environmental monitoring. Further, these applications, being low-energy demanding and cost-effective, are particularly valuable in resource-limited settings and contexts, and can be employed as point of use devices in developing countries, where there is an urgent need of hygiene and safety assurance.

  10. Effect of humic acid on sorption of technetium by alumina.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Rawat, N; Kar, A S; Tomar, B S; Manchanda, V K

    2011-09-15

    Sorption of technetium by alumina has been studied in absence as well as in presence of humic acid using (95)Tc(m) as a tracer. Measurements were carried out at fixed ionic strength (0.1M NaClO(4)) under varying pH (3-10) as well as redox (aerobic and reducing anaerobic) conditions. Under aerobic conditions, negligible sorption of technetium was observed onto alumina both in absence and in presence of humic acid. However, under reducing conditions (simulated with [Sn(II)] = 10(-6)M), presence of humic acid enhanced the sorption of technetium in the low pH region significantly and decreased at higher pH with respect to that in absence of humic acid. Linear additive as well as surface complexation modeling of Tc(IV) sorption in presence of humic acid indicated the predominant role of sorbed humic acid in deciding technetium sorption onto alumina.

  11. Improving fatigue damage resistance of alumina through surface grading.

    PubMed

    Ren, L; Liu, L; Bhowmick, S; Gerbig, Y B; Janal, M N; Thompson, V P; Zhang, Y

    2011-08-01

    Porcelain-veneered alumina crown restorations often fail from bulk fracture resulting from radial cracks that initiate at the cementation surface with repeated flexure of the stiffer crown layers on the soft dentin support. We hypothesized that bulk fracture may be substantially mitigated by grading the elastic modulus at the crown surfaces. In this study, we fabricated graded structures by infiltrating glass into dense alumina plates, resulting in a diminished modulus at the surface layers. The plates were then bonded to polycarbonate substrates and subjected to fatigue loading in water. Tests were terminated when fracture occurred at the cementation tensile surface or at the fatigue endurance limit (1 million cycles). Infiltrated specimens showed a significant increase in fatigue fracture loads over non-infiltrated controls. Our results indicate that controlled elastic gradients at the surface could be highly beneficial in the design of fracture-resistant alumina crowns.

  12. Origin of High-Alumina Basalt, Andesite, and Dacite Magmas.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, W

    1964-10-30

    The typical volcanic rocks of most island arcs and eugeosynclines, and of some continental environments, are basalt, andesite, and dacite, of high alumina content. The high-alumina basalt differs from tholeiitic basalt primarily in having a greater content of the components of calcic plagioclase. Laboratory data indicate that in the upper mantle, below the level at which the basaltic component of mantle rock is transformed by pressure to eclogite or pyroxenite, the entire basaltic portion probably is melted within a narrow temperature range, but that above the level of that transformation plagioclase is melted selectively before pyroxene over a wide temperature range. The broad spectrum of high-alumina magmas may represent widely varying degrees of partial melting above the transformation level, whereas narrow-spectrum tholeiite magma may represent more complete melting beneath it.

  13. Sodium-beta Alumina Batteries: Status and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, XC; Lemmon, JP; Sprenkle, V; Yang, ZG

    2010-09-01

    This paper provides a review of materials and designs for sodium-beta alumina battery technology and discusses the challenges ahead for further technology improvement. Sodium-beta alumina batteries have been extensively developed in recent years and encouraging progress in performance and cycle life has been achieved. The battery is composed of an anode, typically molten sodium, and a cathode that can be molten sulfur (Na-S battery) or a transition metal halide incorporated with a liquid phase secondary electrolyte (e.g.. ZEBRA battery). In most cases the electrolyte is a dense solid beta ''-Al(2)O(3), sodium ion-conducting membrane. The issues' prohibiting widespread commercialization of sodium-beta alumina technology are rekited to the materials and methods of manufacturing that impact cost, safety, and performance characteristics.

  14. Origin of High-Alumina Basalt, Andesite, and Dacite Magmas.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, W

    1964-10-30

    The typical volcanic rocks of most island arcs and eugeosynclines, and of some continental environments, are basalt, andesite, and dacite, of high alumina content. The high-alumina basalt differs from tholeiitic basalt primarily in having a greater content of the components of calcic plagioclase. Laboratory data indicate that in the upper mantle, below the level at which the basaltic component of mantle rock is transformed by pressure to eclogite or pyroxenite, the entire basaltic portion probably is melted within a narrow temperature range, but that above the level of that transformation plagioclase is melted selectively before pyroxene over a wide temperature range. The broad spectrum of high-alumina magmas may represent widely varying degrees of partial melting above the transformation level, whereas narrow-spectrum tholeiite magma may represent more complete melting beneath it. PMID:17794034

  15. Temperature distribution in microwave sintering of alumina cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.R. Jr.; Katz, J.D.; Blake, R.D.

    1994-04-01

    Small cylinders of high-purity alumina were encased in a `casket` of low-density zirconia insulation and heated to sintering temperature in a large multi-mode microwave oven. Optical fiber sensors were used to monitor the temperature at several locations in the system. It was found that the alumina samples heat faster than the zirconia insulation at temperatures above 1000 C, and that the temperature distribution in the sample is essentially uniform during the heating process. A two-dimensional mathematical model of the heat transfer process was developed which reproduces the essential features of the observed phenomena. Literature data for all temperature-dependent properties were incorporated into the model. The model suggests that the alumina samples absorb a significant fraction of the microwave energy.

  16. Modifying alumina red mud to support a revegetation cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xenidis, A.; Harokopou, A. D.; Mylona, E.; Brofas, G.

    2005-02-01

    Alumina red mud, a fine-textured, iron-rich, alkaline residue, is the major waste product of bauxite digestion with caustic soda to remove alumina. The high alkalinity and salinity as well as the poor nutrient status are considered to be the major constraints of red mud revegetation. This research was conducted to evaluate the ameliorating effect of gypsum, sewage sludge, ferrous sulfate, ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, and calcium phosphate on alumina red mud. The effectiveness of the mixtures was evaluated by applying extraction tests and performing experiments using six plant species. Gypsum amendment significantly reduced the pH, electrical conductivity, and sodium and aluminum content of red mud. Sewage sludge application had an extended effect in improving both the soil structure and the nutrient status of the gypsum-amended red mud. Together with the gypsum and sewage sludge, calcium phosphate application into red mud enhanced plant growth and gave the most promising results.

  17. Origin of high-alumina basalt, andesite, and dacite magmas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.

    1964-01-01

    The typical volcanic rocks of most island arcs and eugeosynclines, and of some continental environments, are basalt, andesite, and dacite, of high alumina content. The high-alumina basalt differs from tholeiitic basalt primarily in having a greater content of the components of calcic plagioclase. Laboratory data indicate that in the upper mantle, below the level at which the basaltic component of mantle rock is transformed by pressure to eclogite or pyroxenite, the entire basaltic portion probably is melted within a narrow temperature range, but that above the level of that transformation plagioclase is melted selectively before pyroxene over a wide temperature range. The broad spectrum of high-alumina magmas may represent widely varying degrees of partial melting above the transformation level, whereas narrow-spectrum tholeiite magma may represent more complete melting beneath it.

  18. The surface reaction kinetics of salicylate on alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Ainsworth, C.C.; Friedrich, D.M.; Joly, A.G.; Gassman, P.L.

    1997-12-31

    The kinetics of reaction of salicylate with colloidal alumina in aqueous suspension and with Al(III) in homogeneous aqueous solution were studied by stopped-flow laser fluorescence spectroscopy. The emission spectra confirmed the formation of both monodentate complexes and more stable bidentate chelates. Temporal evolution of the spectra indicated that the reaction was fast (within first few minutes) for both the homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions but slowed down afterwards for the latter. Reactions completed within 10 minutes in homogeneous phase at pH 3.3 but took more than 12 hours in alumina suspension. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity within first four minutes showed that in homogeneous phase the reaction followed a single pseudo-first-order kinetics. In alumina suspension log plots were nonlinear and characteristic of multiple heterogeneous reaction paths. The kinetics are interpreted in terms of the simultaneous formation of multiple species as well as subsequent conversion between species.

  19. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  20. Studies on synthesis of alumina nanopowder from synthetic Bayer liquor

    SciTech Connect

    Mazloumi, Mahyar; Arami, Hamed; Khalifehzadeh, Razieh; Sadrnezhaad, S.K. . E-mail: sadrnezh@sharif.edu

    2007-06-05

    Procedure for synthesis of alumina nanopowder from Bayer liquor (synthetic sodium aluminate solution) is investigated. Cooling, ageing and then addition of 3 ml/l Tiron (1,2-dihydroxy-3,5-benzene disulfonic acid disodium salt) to the supersaturated liquor affect purity and fineness of the nanopowder product. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) analyses indicate that purity of the alumina nanopowder increases with the aging time. Experimental observations show that highly pure alumina nanopowders could be produced by direct calcination of cold gelatinous sodium aluminate solution followed by careful washing at a Tiron concentration of 3 ml/l NaOH.

  1. Improving Fatigue Damage Resistance of Alumina through Surface Grading

    PubMed Central

    Ren, L.; Liu, L.; Bhowmick, S.; Gerbig, Y.B.; Janal, M.N.; Thompson, V.P.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Porcelain-veneered alumina crown restorations often fail from bulk fracture resulting from radial cracks that initiate at the cementation surface with repeated flexure of the stiffer crown layers on the soft dentin support. We hypothesized that bulk fracture may be substantially mitigated by grading the elastic modulus at the crown surfaces. In this study, we fabricated graded structures by infiltrating glass into dense alumina plates, resulting in a diminished modulus at the surface layers. The plates were then bonded to polycarbonate substrates and subjected to fatigue loading in water. Tests were terminated when fracture occurred at the cementation tensile surface or at the fatigue endurance limit (1 million cycles). Infiltrated specimens showed a significant increase in fatigue fracture loads over non-infiltrated controls. Our results indicate that controlled elastic gradients at the surface could be highly beneficial in the design of fracture-resistant alumina crowns. PMID:21555776

  2. Factors contributing to the breakdown of sodium beta-alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Buechele, A.C.

    1982-05-01

    Clarification of the breakdown process occurring during charge transfer in sodium beta alumina solid electrolytes was derived from: (1) studying the effects of molten sodium contact at 350/sup 0/C on single crystal sodium beta alumina and polycrystalline sodium beta alumina; (2) determination of critical current density by monitoring acoustic emissions accompanying crack growth in sodium/sodium beta alumina/sodium cells subjected to linear current ramping at 1 mA cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/; (3) failure analysis conducted on cycled electrolytes, some from commercial sodium/sulfur cells, which had been subjected to up to 703 Ahr cm/sup -2/ of charge transfer. Gray coloration developing in beta aluminas in contact with molten sodium was found to be a consequence of formation, through reduction by sodium, of oxygen vacancies charge compensated by electrons. Electronic conductivity of the electrolyte increases as a result. No second phase formation was detected. Colored electrolytes from sodium/sulfur cells show evidence of a newly recognized degradation mechanism in which fracture occurs when sodium is reduced and deposited internally under pressure as metal in regions where an electronic conductivity gradient exists. Heating colored beta aluminas in air produces reoxidation and bleaching. Kinetics and other properties of the coloration and bleaching processes were determined. Critical current density was found to bear an inverse relation to average electrolyte grain size. Evidence was found in the cycled electrolytes for a slow crack growth mechanism and a progressive mode of degradation advancing from the sulfur electrode interface. Implications of the findings for the construction and operation of sodium/sulfur battery systems are discussed.

  3. Monitoring method for neutron flux for a spallation target in an accelerator driven sub-critical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang, He, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Cui, Wen-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Hu-Shan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study a monitoring method for neutron flux for the spallation target used in an accelerator driven sub-critical (ADS) system, where a spallation target located vertically at the centre of a sub-critical core is bombarded vertically by high-energy protons from an accelerator. First, by considering the characteristics in the spatial variation of neutron flux from the spallation target, we propose a multi-point measurement technique, i.e. the spallation neutron flux should be measured at multiple vertical locations. To explain why the flux should be measured at multiple locations, we have studied neutron production from a tungsten target bombarded by a 250 MeV-proton beam with Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results indicate that the neutron flux at the central location is up to three orders of magnitude higher than the flux at lower locations. Secondly, we have developed an effective technique in order to measure the spallation neutron flux with a fission chamber (FC), by establishing the relation between the fission rate measured by FC and the spallation neutron flux. Since this relation is linear for a FC, a constant calibration factor is used to derive the neutron flux from the measured fission rate. This calibration factor can be extracted from the energy spectra of spallation neutrons. Finally, we have evaluated the proposed calibration method for a FC in the environment of an ADS system. The results indicate that the proposed method functions very well. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03010000 and XDA03030000) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China(91426301).

  4. Hydrogen removal from e-beam deposited alumina thin films by oxygen ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Arijeet Mukharjee, C. Rajiv, K. Bose, Aniruddha Singh, S. D. Rai, S. K.; Ganguli, Tapas; Joshi, S. C.; Deb, S. K.; Phase, D. M.

    2014-04-24

    Hydrogen interstitials and oxygen vacancies defects create energy levels in the band gap of alumina. This limits the application of alumina as a high-k dielectric. A low thermal budget method for removal of hydrogen from alumina is discussed. It is shown that bombardment of alumina films with low energy oxygen ion beam during electron beam evaporation deposition decreases the hydrogen concentration in the film significantly.

  5. Alumina over-coating on Pd nanoparticle catalysts by atomic layer deposition : enhanced stability and reactivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, H.; Lu, J.; Stair, P. C.; Elam, J. W.

    2011-04-01

    ALD Alumina was utilized as a protective layer to inhibit the sintering of supported nano-sized ALD Pd catalysts in the methanol decomposition reaction carried out at elevated temperatures. The protective ALD alumina layers were synthesized on Pd nanoparticles (1-2 nm) supported on high surface area alumina substrates. Up to a certain over-coat thickness, the alumina protective layers preserved or even slightly enhanced the catalytic activity and prevented sintering of the Pd nanoparticles up to 500 C.

  6. Impact spallation experiments - Fracture patterns and spall velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    The spall velocities produced by nine experimental impacts of 1 to 6.5 km/sec into San Marcos gabbro targets, using projectiles of Fe, Al, Pb, and basalt of various sizes, have been measured in conjunction with fragment-velocity high-speed filmings of the events. A detailed comparison is made between measured spall velocities and those predicted by the model of Melosh (1984), with a view to the compatibility of small-scale results and large planetary impacts. Attention is also given to the patterns of internal fracture generated by impact within the targets.

  7. Impact spallation experiments - Fracture patterns and spall velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Polanskey, C.A.; Ahrens, T.J. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena )

    1990-09-01

    The spall velocities produced by nine experimental impacts of 1 to 6.5 km/sec into San Marcos gabbro targets, using projectiles of Fe, Al, Pb, and basalt of various sizes, have been measured in conjunction with fragment-velocity high-speed filmings of the events. A detailed comparison is made between measured spall velocities and those predicted by the model of Melosh (1984), with a view to the compatibility of small-scale results and large planetary impacts. Attention is also given to the patterns of internal fracture generated by impact within the targets. 29 refs.

  8. Nanowatt threshold, alumina sensitized neodymium laser integrated on silicon

    PubMed Central

    Maker, Ashley J.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    Low threshold lasers based on rare-earth elements have enabled numerous scientific discoveries and innovations in industry. However, pushing the threshold into the sub-microwatt regime has been stymied by a fundamental material phenomenon. Specifically, rare earth dopants form clusters which quench emission and reduce efficiency. Here, we fabricate resonant cavity lasers from neodymium-doped silica films containing alumina. The alumina prevents the clustering of the Neodymium, enabling the lasers to achieve thresholds of 530nanoWatts at room temperature. PMID:24216946

  9. Atomistic force field for alumina fit to density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sarsam, Joanne; Finnis, Michael W.; Tangney, Paul

    2013-11-28

    We present a force field for bulk alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which has been parametrized by fitting the energies, forces, and stresses of a large database of reference configurations to those calculated with density functional theory (DFT). We use a functional form that is simpler and computationally more efficient than some existing models of alumina parametrized by a similar technique. Nevertheless, we demonstrate an accuracy of our potential that is comparable to those existing models and to DFT. We present calculations of crystal structures and energies, elastic constants, phonon spectra, thermal expansion, and point defect formation energies.

  10. Influence of grain boundary silica impurity on alumina toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Moya, J.S.; Kriven, W.M.; Pask, J.A.

    1980-08-01

    In a series of previous reports the effect of silica impurity on aggregation state and on electropheretic, pressing, filtering and sintering behavior on alumina powders was presented. The results obtained showed that the silica surface impurity plays an important role in the ceramic processing of powders by (a) decreasing the pH values of the isoelectric point (i.e.p.), which affects the aggregation state of the powder, and (b) decreasing the compactability and the activation energy for the initial stage of sintering. In the phase of the studies emphasis was given to the effect of the presence of silica impurity on the toughness and fracture behavior of alumina samples.

  11. The influence of aluminum grain size on alumina nanoporous structure

    SciTech Connect

    Feil, A. F.; Costa, M. V. da; Amaral, L.; Teixeira, S. R.; Migowski, P.; Dupont, J.; Machado, G.; Peripolli, S. B.

    2010-01-15

    An approach to control the interpore distances and nanopore diameters of 150-nm-thick thin aluminum films is reported here. The Al thin films were grown by sputtering on p-type silicon substrate and anodized with a conventional anodization process in a phosphoric acid solution. It was found that interpore distance and pore diameter are related to the aluminum grain size and can be controlled by annealing. The grain contours limit the sizes of alumina cells. This mechanism is valid for grain sizes supporting only one alumina cell and consequently only one pore.

  12. Photochromic isomerization of spirobenzopyran in nanoholes of anodic alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Mitsunori; Tsubokura, Yasuhiro

    2006-11-01

    A notable change in the photochromic characteristics was observed when the benzene solution of spirobenzopyran was put in nanoholes of anodic alumina. The absorption peak that appeared in the ultraviolet irradiation process shifted to a shorter wavelength, and the decay time of the decoloration process became?200 times longer than that of the original solution. After a preservation period of several days, however, both the absorption wavelength and the decay time recovered to those of the original solution. These experimental results suggest that the photochromic isomerization in the alumina nanoholes is affected by the large surface area of the matrix rather than the limited free volume.

  13. Final report on the application of chaos theory to an alumina sensor for aluminum reduction cells. Inert Electrodes Program

    SciTech Connect

    Williford, R.E.; Windisch, C.F. Jr.

    1992-03-01

    Four chaos-related digital signal analysis (DSA) methods were applied to the analysis of voltage and current signals collected from aluminum electrolysis cells. Two separate data bases were analyzed: bench-scale laboratory experiments and a pilot-scale test. The objective was to assess the feasibility of using these types of data and analysis methods as the basis for a non-intrusive sensor to measure the alumina content in the electrolysis bath. This was the first time chaos theory approaches have been employed to analyze aluminum electrolysis cells.

  14. Synthesis and textural evolution of alumina particles with mesoporous structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xun; Peng Tianyou; Yao Jinchun; Lv Hongjin; Huang Cheng

    2010-06-15

    Alumina particles with mesostructures were synthesized through a chemical precipitation method by using different inorganic aluminum salts followed by a heterogeneous azeotropic distillation and calcination process. The obtained mesoporous {gamma}-alumina particles were systematically characterized by the X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement. Effects of the aluminum salt counter anion, pH value and the azeotropic distillation process on the structural or textural evolution of alumina particles were investigated. It is found that Cl{sup -} in the reaction solution can restrain the textural evolution of the resultant precipitates into two-dimensional crystallized pseudoboehmite lamellae during the heterogeneous azeotropic distillation, and then transformed into {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles with mesostructures after further calcination at 1173 K, whereas coexisting SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} can promote above morphology evolution and then transformed into {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanofibers after calcination at 1173 K. Moreover nearly all materials retain relatively high specific surface areas larger than 100 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} even after calcinations at 1173 K. - Graphical abstract: Co-existing Cl{sup -} is beneficial for the formation of {gamma}-alumina nanoparticles with mesostructures during the precipitation process. Interparticle and intraparticle mesopores can be derived from acidic solution and near neutral solution, respectively.

  15. Viscosity of alumina nanoparticles dispersed in car engine coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kole, Madhusree; Dey, T.K.

    2010-09-15

    The present paper, describes our experimental results on the viscosity of the nanofluid prepared by dispersing alumina nanoparticles (<50 nm) in commercial car coolant. The nanofluid prepared with calculated amount of oleic acid (surfactant) was tested to be stable for more than 80 days. The viscosity of the nanofluids is measured both as a function of alumina volume fraction and temperature between 10 and 50 C. While the pure base fluid display Newtonian behavior over the measured temperature, it transforms to a non-Newtonian fluid with addition of a small amount of alumina nanoparticles. Our results show that viscosity of the nanofluid increases with increasing nanoparticle concentration and decreases with increase in temperature. Most of the frequently used classical models severely under predict the measured viscosity. Volume fraction dependence of the nanofluid viscosity, however, is predicted fairly well on the basis of a recently reported theoretical model for nanofluids that takes into account the effect of Brownian motion of nanoparticles in the nanofluid. The temperature dependence of the viscosity of engine coolant based alumina nanofluids obeys the empirical correlation of the type: log ({mu}{sub nf}) = A exp(BT), proposed earlier by Namburu et al. (author)

  16. Alumina-encapsulated vaccine formulation with improved thermostability and immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hangyu; Wang, Guangchuan; Li, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yaling; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Tang, Ruikang

    2016-05-11

    Developing vaccine formulations with excellent thermostability and immunogenicity remains a great challenge. By in situ encapsulating a live-attenuated strain of human enterovirus 71 (EV71) in alumina, we obtained a robust vaccine formulation named EV71@NanoAlum, which features significantly enhanced thermostability and immunogenicity. This attempt follows a material-based tactic for vaccine improvement. PMID:27098047

  17. Formation of {gamma}-alumina nanorods in presence of alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbagh, Hossein A.; Rasti, Elham; Yalfani, Mohammad S.; Medina, Francesc

    2011-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. Research highlights: {yields} Research highlights {yields} Boehmite was prepared using a green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine. {yields} Nanorod aluminas with a high surface area were obtained. {yields} Addition of alanine would shape the size of the holes and crevices. {yields} The morphologies of the nanorods were revealed by transmission electron microscope. -- Abstract: Boehmite and alumina nanostructures were prepared using a simple green sol-gel process in the presence of alanine in water medium at room temperature. The uncalcined (dried at 200 {sup o}C) and the calcined materials (at 500, 600 and 700 {sup o}C for 4 h) were characterized using XRD, TEM, SEM, N{sub 2} physisorption and TGA. Nanorod aluminas with a possible hexagonal symmetry, high surface area and relatively narrow pore size distribution were obtained. The surface area was enhanced and crystallization was retarded as the alanine content increased. The morphologies of the nanoparticles and nanorods were revealed by a transmission electron microscope (TEM).

  18. Nanocomposite formed by titanium ion implantation into alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Spirin, R. E.; Salvadori, M. C. Teixeira, F. S.; Sgubin, L. G.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I. G.

    2014-11-14

    Composites of titanium nanoparticles in alumina were formed by ion implantation of titanium into alumina, and the surface electrical conductivity measured in situ as the implantation proceeded, thus generating curves of sheet conductivity as a function of dose. The implanted titanium self-conglomerates into nanoparticles, and the spatial dimensions of the buried nanocomposite layer can thus be estimated from the implantation depth profile. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry was performed to measure the implantation depth profile, and was in good agreement with the calculated profile. Transmission electron microscopy of the titanium-implanted alumina was used for direct visualization of the nanoparticles formed. The measured conductivity of the buried layer is explained by percolation theory. We determine that the saturation dose, φ{sub 0}, the maximum implantation dose for which the nanocomposite material still remains a composite, is φ{sub 0} = 2.2 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}, and the corresponding saturation conductivity is σ{sub 0} = 480 S/m. The percolation dose φ{sub c}, below which the nanocomposite still has basically the conductivity of the alumina matrix, was found to be φ{sub c} = 0.84 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}. The experimental results are discussed and compared with a percolation theory model.

  19. Osseointegration of alumina bioceramic granules: A comparative experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rerikh, V. V.; Avetisyan, A. R.; Zaydman, A. M.; Anikin, K. A.; Bataev, V. A.; Nikulina, A. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Aronov, A. M.; Semantsova, E. S.

    2016-08-01

    To perform a comparative analysis of osseointegration of bioceramic alumina-based granules, hydroxyapatite-based granules, and deproteinized bone granules. The experiment was conducted on 52 adult male Kyoto-Wistar rats weighing 350 to 520 g. The animals were divided into five matched groups that differed only in the type of an implanted material. The granules were implanted in the lumbar vertebral bodies and in the distal right femur of each laboratory animal. Two months after surgery, the animals were euthanized, followed by tissue sampling for morphological studies. An examination of specimens from the groups with implanted alumina granules revealed the newly formed trabecular bone with remodeling signs. The bone tissue filled the intragranular space, tightly adhering to the granule surface. There was no connective tissue capsule on the border between bone tissue and alumina granules. Cylindrical bioceramic alumina-based granules with an open internal channel have a higher strength surpassing than that of analogs and the osseointegration ability close to that of hydroxyapatite and deproteinized bone granules.

  20. Structure factor changes in supercooled yttria-alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Wilding, Martin C.; Greaves, G. Neville; Quang Vu Van; Majerus, Odile; Hennet, Louis

    2009-01-29

    Changes in the structure factor of yttria-alumina liquids have been identified in the supercooled range. Different inter-polyhedral configurations between AlO{sub 4} and YO{sub 6} groups distinguish low density and high density liquid phases. The coexistence of phases at high temperatures have been identified in simultaneous measurements of small angle x-ray scattering.

  1. On the electrical conductivity of Ti-implanted alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Cattani, M.; Nikolaev, A.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Park, H.-K.; Phillips, L.; Yu, K. M.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-03-15

    Ion implantation of metal species into insulators provides a tool for the formation of thin, electrically conducting, surface layers with experimenter-controlled resistivity. High energy implantation of Pt and Ti into alumina accelerator components has been successfully employed to control high voltage surface breakdown in a number of cases. In the work described here we have carried out some basic investigations related to the origin of this phenomenon. By comparison of the results of alumina implanted with Ti at 75 keV with the results of prior investigations of polymers implanted with Pt at 49 eV and Au at 67 eV, we describe a physical model of the effect based on percolation theory and estimate the percolation parameters for the Ti-alumina composite. We estimate that the percolation dose threshold is about 4 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} and the maximum dose for which the system remains an insulator-conductor composite is about 10 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The saturation electrical conductivity is estimated to be about 50 S/m. We conclude that the observed electrical conductivity properties of Ti-implanted alumina can be satisfactorily described by percolation theory.

  2. Alumina contribution to CO oxidation: A TPR and IR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, P.; Barbato, P. S.; Lisi, L.; Ruoppolo, G.; Russo, G.

    2011-10-01

    The alumina contribution to CO oxidation in the absence of O2 on metal oxide supported catalysts was investigated by CO TPR and in-situ FTIR and DRIFT studies up to 800 °C. These tests were performed on two Al2O3 supported catalysts (1 wt.% Pt/La/γ-Al2O3 and 8 wt.% Cu/γ-Al2O3) and on two corresponding alumina supports (5 wt.% La2O3 stabilised γ-Al2O3 and high mechanical resistant spherical γ-Al2O3 particles). The quantitative determination of CO consumption and CO2 and H2 formation on the alumina supports was in agreement with a WGS reaction occurring between surface OH and CO with a predominantly 2:1 stoichiometry. In the CO TPR of metal oxide supported catalysts, in addition to the reduction of the metal, a WGS reaction took place with enhanced kinetics. This enhancement was the result of a CO spillover phenomenon from the metal to alumina hydroxyls. This phenomenon significantly affected the evaluation of the reduction degree of the supported metal and could not be neglected in the subsequent calculations.

  3. Modelling precursor decay in AD-99.5 Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Simha, C. Hari Manoj; Bless, S. J.; Bedford, A.

    1998-07-10

    In this paper we present a simple model to explain the absence of precursor decay in the Coor's AD-99 5 Alumina ceramic, as shown by Grady in his plate impact experiments. The model is incorporated into the Research EPIC 95 finite element code. The simulations compare well with Grady's results.

  4. Modelling precursor decay in AD-99.5 Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simha, C. Hari Manoj; Bless, S. J.; Bedford, A.

    1998-07-01

    In this paper we present a simple model to explain the absence of precursor decay in the Coor's AD-99 5 Alumina ceramic, as shown by Grady in his plate impact experiments. The model is incorporated into the Research EPIC 95 finite element code. The simulations compare well with Grady's results.

  5. Development of an imaging system for the detection of alumina on turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwell, S. J.; Kell, J.; Day, J. C. C.

    2014-03-01

    An imaging system capable of detecting alumina on turbine blades by acquiring LED-induced fluorescence images has been developed. Acquiring fluorescence images at adjacent spectral bands allows the system to distinguish alumina from fluorescent surface contaminants. Repair and overhaul processes require that alumina is entirely removed from the blades by grit blasting and chemical stripping. The capability of the system to detect alumina has been investigated with two series of turbine blades provided by Rolls-Royce plc. The results illustrate that the system provides a superior inspection method to visual assessment when ascertaining whether alumina is present on turbine blades during repair and overhaul processes.

  6. [Aluminum coordination and active sites on aluminas, Y-zeolites and pillared layered silicates]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Fripiat, J.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report is organized in four sections. In the first the authors will outline structural features which are common to all fine grained alumina, as well as to non-framework alumina in zeolites. This section will be followed by a study of the surface vs. bulk coordination of aluminum. The third section will deal with measurement of the number of acid sites and the scaling of their strength. The fourth and last section will describe three model reactions: the isomerization of 1-butene and of 2 cis-butene; the isomerization and disproportionation of oxtho-xylene; and the transformation of trichloroethane into vinyl chloride followed by the polymerization of the vinyl chloride. The relationship between chemical activity and selectivity and what is known of the local structure of the active catalytic sites will be underlined. Other kinds of zeolites besides Y zeolite have been studied. Instead of the aluminum pillared silicates they found it more interesting to study the substitution of silicon by aluminum in a layered structure containing a permanent porosity (aluminated sepiolite).

  7. Aluminum coordination and active sites on aluminas, Y zeolites and pillared silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Fripiat, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    Effort was continued to characterize the nature of the Al species responsible for Lewis acidity in zeolites and in aluminas by NMR. While numerous techniques have been successful for scaling the acid strength of Broensted sites, the situation is not satisfactory for the Lewis acid sites. Initial rate of dehydrochlorination of 1,1,1-trichloroethane is sensitive to strength of Lewis acid sites. N-Butene isomerization has been extended to the new aluminas obtained from nano-sized precursors. O-Xylene isomerization was carried out in a recirculation reactor on H-mordenite samples containing Lewis or Broensted acid sites; effects of H[sub 2] and NO were also investigated. Cracking of methylcyclohexane and 3-methylpentane was investigated by EPR on H-mordenite. Sepiolite, a Mg silicate with zeolitic channels, had Al substituted for Si; the negative charge is balanced by, say, VO[sup 2+]. Transformation of ethanol into butadiene on this dual-function catalyst appears to result from a Prins reaction between acetaldeyde formed on the redox sites and ethylene resulting from dehydration of ethanol on Lewis sites.

  8. Direct visualization of the hydration layer on alumina nanoparticles with the fluid cell STEM in situ

    DOE PAGES

    Firlar, Emre; Çınar, Simge; Kashyap, Sanjay; Akinc, Mufit; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-05-21

    Rheological behavior of aqueous suspensions containing nanometer-sized powders is of relevance to many branches of industry. Unusually high viscosities observed for suspensions of nanoparticles compared to those of micron size powders cannot be explained by current viscosity models. Formation of so-called hydration layer on alumina nanoparticles in water was hypothesized, but never observed experimentally. We report here on the direct visualization of aqueous suspensions of alumina with the fluid cell in situ. We observe the hydration layer formed over the particle aggregates and show that such hydrated aggregates constitute new particle assemblies and affect the flow behavior of the suspensions.more » We discuss how these hydrated nanoclusters alter the effective solid content and the viscosity of nanostructured suspensions. As a result, our findings elucidate the source of high viscosity observed for nanoparticle suspensions and are of direct relevance to many industrial sectors including materials, food, cosmetics, pharmaceutical among others employing colloidal slurries with nanometer-scale particles.« less

  9. Bacterial Spores in Granite Survive Hypervelocity Launch by Spallation: Implications for Lithopanspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Langenhorst, Falko; Melosh, H. Jay; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial spores are considered good candidates for endolithic life-forms that could survive interplanetary transport by natural impact processes, i. e., lithopanspermia. Organisms within rock can only embark on an interplanetary journey if they survive ejection from the surface of the donor planet and the associated extremes of compressional shock, heating, and acceleration. Previous simulation experiments have measured each of these three stresses more or less in isolation of one another, and results to date indicate that spores of the model organism Bacillus subtilis can survive each stress applied singly. Few simulations, however, have combined all three stresses simultaneously. Because considerable experimental and theoretical evidence supports a spallation mechanism for launch, we devised an experimental simulation of launch by spallation using the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). B. subtilis spores were applied to the surface of a granite target that was impacted from above by an aluminum projectile fired at 5.4 km/s. Granite spall fragments were captured in a foam recovery fixture and then recovered and assayed for shock damage by transmission electron microscopy and for spore survival by viability assays. Peak shock pressure at the impact site was calculated to be 57.1 Pa, though recovered spall fragments were only very lightly shocked at pressures of 5-7 GPa. Spore survival was calculated to be on the order of 10-5, which is in agreement with results of previous static compressional shock experiments. These results demonstrate that endolithic spores can survive launch by spallation from a hypervelocity impact, which lends further evidence in favor of lithopanspermia theory.

  10. Bacterial spores in granite survive hypervelocity launch by spallation: implications for lithopanspermia.

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Langenhorst, Falko; Melosh, H Jay; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial spores are considered good candidates for endolithic life-forms that could survive interplanetary transport by natural impact processes, i.e., lithopanspermia. Organisms within rock can only embark on an interplanetary journey if they survive ejection from the surface of the donor planet and the associated extremes of compressional shock, heating, and acceleration. Previous simulation experiments have measured each of these three stresses more or less in isolation of one another, and results to date indicate that spores of the model organism Bacillus subtilis can survive each stress applied singly. Few simulations, however, have combined all three stresses simultaneously. Because considerable experimental and theoretical evidence supports a spallation mechanism for launch, we devised an experimental simulation of launch by spallation using the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). B. subtilis spores were applied to the surface of a granite target that was impacted from above by an aluminum projectile fired at 5.4 km/s. Granite spall fragments were captured in a foam recovery fixture and then recovered and assayed for shock damage by transmission electron microscopy and for spore survival by viability assays. Peak shock pressure at the impact site was calculated to be 57.1 GPa, though recovered spall fragments were only very lightly shocked at pressures of 5-7 GPa. Spore survival was calculated to be on the order of 10(-5), which is in agreement with results of previous static compressional shock experiments. These results demonstrate that endolithic spores can survive launch by spallation from a hypervelocity impact, which lends further evidence in favor of lithopanspermia theory.

  11. Bacterial spores in granite survive hypervelocity launch by spallation: implications for lithopanspermia.

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Langenhorst, Falko; Melosh, H Jay; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial spores are considered good candidates for endolithic life-forms that could survive interplanetary transport by natural impact processes, i.e., lithopanspermia. Organisms within rock can only embark on an interplanetary journey if they survive ejection from the surface of the donor planet and the associated extremes of compressional shock, heating, and acceleration. Previous simulation experiments have measured each of these three stresses more or less in isolation of one another, and results to date indicate that spores of the model organism Bacillus subtilis can survive each stress applied singly. Few simulations, however, have combined all three stresses simultaneously. Because considerable experimental and theoretical evidence supports a spallation mechanism for launch, we devised an experimental simulation of launch by spallation using the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). B. subtilis spores were applied to the surface of a granite target that was impacted from above by an aluminum projectile fired at 5.4 km/s. Granite spall fragments were captured in a foam recovery fixture and then recovered and assayed for shock damage by transmission electron microscopy and for spore survival by viability assays. Peak shock pressure at the impact site was calculated to be 57.1 GPa, though recovered spall fragments were only very lightly shocked at pressures of 5-7 GPa. Spore survival was calculated to be on the order of 10(-5), which is in agreement with results of previous static compressional shock experiments. These results demonstrate that endolithic spores can survive launch by spallation from a hypervelocity impact, which lends further evidence in favor of lithopanspermia theory. PMID:19778276

  12. Ambient-temperature mechanical response of alumina-fluoromica laminates

    SciTech Connect

    King, T.T.; Cooper, R.F. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    Flexural delamination experiments were used to evaluate the mechanical performance of thermochemically stable alumina-fluoromica laminates. Hot-pressed, precracked laminate specimens, in which two MgAl[sub 2]O[sub 4]-spinel-coated alumina substrates were separated by a thin layer of fluorophlogopite (KMg[sub 3](AlSi[sub 3])O[sub 10]F[sub 2]), were tested in four-point flexure at room temperature. Two types of mechanical response were observed: steady-state delamination and brittle failure. Microstructural analysis showed that the delamination response was associated with fine ([le]5 [mu]m) grains of the mica; the brittle response occurred when the mica interphase consisted of large (> 30 [mu]m) grains that bridged the interphase. The steady-state strain-energy release rate (G[sub ss]) measured on the graceful, delaminating beams was 9.1 [+-] 0.4 J[center dot]m[sup [minus]2] for randomly oriented [approximately]5-[mu]m grains but only 2.8 [+-] 0.2 J[center dot]m[sup [minus]2] for [approximately]1-[mu]m grains that were aligned with easy-cleavage planes parallel to the laminate interfaces. The results suggested that debonding of the specimens occurred via cleavage of the mica grains. Observation of delamination cracks confirmed this point: propagation occurred within the fluoromica interphase rather than along the spinel/alumina or spinel/fluorophlogopite interfaces. The mechanical feasibility of laminate specimens without the protective spinel coating on the substrate containing the notch was also tested to address an issue related to the preparation of alumina fiber/mica interphase/alumina matrix composites. The delamination response again occurred for the case of a fine-grained mica interphase.

  13. Advanced morphological analysis of patterns of thin anodic porous alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Toccafondi, C.; Stępniowski, W.J.; Leoncini, M.; Salerno, M.

    2014-08-15

    Different conditions of fabrication of thin anodic porous alumina on glass substrates have been explored, obtaining two sets of samples with varying pore density and porosity, respectively. The patterns of pores have been imaged by high resolution scanning electron microscopy and analyzed by innovative methods. The regularity ratio has been extracted from radial profiles of the fast Fourier transforms of the images. Additionally, the Minkowski measures have been calculated. It was first observed that the regularity ratio averaged across all directions is properly corrected by the coefficient previously determined in the literature. Furthermore, the angularly averaged regularity ratio for the thin porous alumina made during short single-step anodizations is lower than that of hexagonal patterns of pores as for thick porous alumina from aluminum electropolishing and two-step anodization. Therefore, the regularity ratio represents a reliable measure of pattern order. At the same time, the lower angular spread of the regularity ratio shows that disordered porous alumina is more isotropic. Within each set, when changing either pore density or porosity, both regularity and isotropy remain rather constant, showing consistent fabrication quality of the experimental patterns. Minor deviations are tentatively discussed with the aid of the Minkowski measures, and the slight decrease in both regularity and isotropy for the final data-points of the porosity set is ascribed to excess pore opening and consequent pore merging. - Highlights: • Thin porous alumina is partly self-ordered and pattern analysis is required. • Regularity ratio is often misused: we fix the averaging and consider its spread. • We also apply the mathematical tool of Minkowski measures, new in this field. • Regularity ratio shows pattern isotropy and Minkowski helps in assessment. • General agreement with perfect artificial patterns confirms the good manufacturing.

  14. Synthesis and structural evaluation of freeze-cast porous alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Douglas F.; Nunes, Eduardo H.M.; Pimenta, Daiana S.; Vasconcelos, Daniela C.L.; Nascimento, Jailton F.; Grava, Wilson; Vasconcelos, Wander L.

    2014-10-15

    In this work we fabricated alumina samples by the freeze-casting technique using tert-butanol as the solvent. The prepared materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microtomography. Next, they were coated with sol–gel silica films by dip-coating. Permeability tests were carried out in order to assess the permeation behavior of the materials processed in this study. We observed that the sintering time and alumina loading showed a remarkable effect on both the structural properties and flexural strength of the freeze-cast samples. Nitrogen adsorption tests revealed that the silica prepared in this study exhibited a microporous structure. It was observed that the presence of silica coatings on the alumina surface decreased the CO{sub 2} permeance by about one order of magnitude. Because of the similar kinetic diameters of nitrogen and carbon dioxide, the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} system showed a separation efficiency that was lower than that observed for the He/CO{sub 2} and He/N{sub 2} systems. We noticed that increasing the feed pressure improved the separation capacity of the obtained materials. - Highlights: • Porous alumina samples obtained by the freeze-casting technique • Microporous silica coating prepared by a simple sol–gel dip-coating methodology • Samples examined by SEM, μ-CT, and nitrogen sorption tests • Mechanical tests were carried out in the freeze-cast samples. • The presence of silica coatings on the alumina surface decreased the CO{sub 2} permeance.

  15. Osteoblast function on nanophase alumina materials: Influence of chemistry, phase, and topography.

    PubMed

    Price, Rachel L; Gutwein, Luke G; Kaledin, Leonid; Tepper, Frederick; Webster, Thomas J

    2003-12-15

    Alumina is a material that has been used in both dental and orthopedic applications. It is with these uses in mind that osteoblast (bone-forming cell) function on alumina of varying particulate size, chemistry, and phase was tested in order to determine what formulation might be the most beneficial for bone regeneration. Specifically, in vitro osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, intracellular alkaline phosphatase activity, and calcium deposition was observed on delta-phase nanospherical, alpha-phase conventional spherical, and boehmite nanofiber alumina. Results showed for the first time increased osteoblast functions on the nanofiber alumina. Specifically, a 16% increase in osteoblast adhesion over nanophase spherical alumina and a 97% increase over conventional spherical alumina were found for nanofiber alumina after 2 h. A 29% increase in cell number after 5 days and up to a 57% greater amount of calcium was found on the surface of the nanofiber alumina compared with other alumina surfaces. Some of the possible explanations for such enhanced osteoblast behavior on nanofiber alumina may be attributed to chemistry, crystalline phase, and topography. Increased osteoblast function on nanofiber alumina suggests that it may be an ideal material for use in orthopedic and dental applications.

  16. Testing Procedures and Results of the Prototype Fundamental Power Coupler for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stirbet, M; Campisi, I E; Daly, E F; Davis, G K; Drury, M; Kneisel, P; Myneni, G; Powers, T; Schneider, W J; Wilson, K M; Kang, Y; Cummings, K A; Hardek, T

    2001-06-01

    High-power RF testing with peak power in excess of 500 kW has been performed on prototype Fundamental Power Couplers (FPC) for the Spallation Neutron Source superconducting (SNS) cavities. The testing followed the development of procedures for cleaning, assembling and preparing the FPC for installation in the test stand. The qualification of the couplers has occurred for the time being only in a limited set of conditions (travelling wave, 20 pps) as the available RF system and control instrumentation are under improvement.

  17. Emittance studies of the Spallation Neutron Source external-antenna H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.; Pennisi, T. R.; Murray, S. N.; Santana, M.; Long, C. D.

    2010-02-15

    A new Allison-type emittance scanner has been built to characterize the ion sources and low energy beam transport systems at Spallation Neutron Source. In this work, the emittance characteristics of the H{sup -} beam produced with the external-antenna rf-driven ion source and transported through the two-lens electrostatic low energy beam transport are studied. The beam emittance dependence on beam intensity, extraction parameters, and the evolution of the emittance and twiss parameters over beam pulse duration are presented.

  18. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operationa

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The H- injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operation with ~38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ~1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: 1) inconsistent dependence of the post-RFQ beam current on the ion source tilt angle, and 2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  19. The performance of neutron spectrometers AR a long-pulse spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Daemen, L.L.

    1995-12-01

    At a recent workshop at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory members of the international neutron scattering community discussed the performance to be anticipated from neutron scattering instruments installed at a 1 MW long-pulse spallation source (LPSS). Although the report of this workshop is long, its principal conclusions can be easily summarised and almost as easily understood. This article presents such a synthesis for a 60 Hz LPSS with 1 msec proton pulses. We discuss some of the limitations of the workshop conclusions and suggest a simple analysis of the performance differences that might be expected between short- and long-pulse sources both of which exploit coupled moderators.

  20. Facility for fast neutron irradiation tests of electronics at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Salsano, A.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Gerardin, S.; Frost, C. D.; Ansell, S.; Platt, S. P.

    2008-03-17

    The VESUVIO beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source was set up for neutron irradiation tests in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV. The neutron flux and energy spectrum were shown, in benchmark activation measurements, to provide a neutron spectrum similar to the ambient one at sea level, but with an enhancement in intensity of a factor of 10{sup 7}. Such conditions are suitable for accelerated testing of electronic components, as was demonstrated here by measurements of soft error rates in recent technology field programable gate arrays.

  1. Spallation neutron source saddle antenna H{sup -} ion source project

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rolland P.; Dudnikova, Galina; Stockli, Martin; Welton, Robert

    2010-02-15

    In this project we are developing an H{sup -} source which will synthesize the most important developments in the field of negative ion sources to provide high current, high brightness, good lifetime, high reliability, and high power efficiency. We describe two planned modifications to the present spallation neutron source external antenna source in order to increase the plasma density near the output aperture: (1) replacing the present 2 MHz plasma-forming solenoid antenna with a 13 MHz saddle-type antenna and (2) replacing the permanent multicusp magnetic system with a weaker electromagnet.

  2. Spallation Neutrons and Pressure SNAP DE-FG02-03ER46085 CLOSE-OUT MAY 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, John B

    2009-05-22

    The purpose of the grant was to build a community of scientist and to draw upon their expertise to design and build the world's first dedicated high pressure beamline at a spallation source - the so called Spallation Neutron And Pressure (SNAP) beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at OAk Ridge NAtional LAboratory. . Key to this endeavor was an annual meeting attended by the instrument design team and the executive committee. The discussions at those meeting set an ambitious agenda for beamline design and construction and highlighted key science areas of interest for the community. This report documents in 4 appendices the deliberations at the annual SNAP meetings and the evolution of the beamline optics from concept to construction. The appendices also contain key science opportunities for extreme conditions research.

  3. Spallation Source Modelling for an ADS Using the MCNPX and GEANT4 Packages for Sensitivity Analysis of Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolin, M. Q.; Marinho, F.; Palma, D. A. P.; Martinez, A. S.

    2014-04-01

    A simulation for the time evolution of the MYRRHA conceptual reactor was developed. The SERPENT code was used to simulate the nuclear fuel depletion and the spallation source which drives the system was simulated using both MCNPX and GEANT4 packages. The obtained results for the neutron energy spectrum from the spallation are coherent with each other and were used as input for the SERPENT code which simulated a constant power operation regime. The obtained results show that the criticality of the system is not sensitive to the spallation models employed and only relative small deviations with respect to the inverse kinetic model coming from the point kinetic equations proposed by Gandini were observed.

  4. Processing and Mechanical Properties of Various Zirconia/Alumina Composites for Fuel Cell Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2002-01-01

    Various electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells were fabricated by hot pressing 10 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (10-YSZ) reinforced with two different forms of alumina, particulates and platelets, each containing 0 to 30 mol% alumina. Flexure strength and fracture toughness of both particulate and platelet composites at ambient temperature increased with increasing alumina content, reaching a maximum at 30 mot% alumina. For a given alumina content, strength of particulate composites was greater than that of platelet composites, whereas, the difference in fracture toughness between the two composite systems was negligible. No virtual difference in elastic modulus and density was observed for a given alumina content between particulate and platelet composites. Thermal cycling up to 10 cycles between 200 to 1000 C did not show any effect on strength degradation of the 30 mol% platelet composites, indicative of negligible influence of CTE mismatches between YSZ matrix and alumina grains.

  5. Interactions of dispersants and binders with {alpha}-alumina in aqueous suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hidber, P.; Graule, T.; Gauckler, L.

    1995-12-31

    Citric acid and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) are commonly used as dispersant and binder for aqueous alumina slurries. The interaction of citric acid and PVA with the alumina surface as well as the competitive reaction of these two additives on the alumina surface have been studied by measurements of the adsorption density and electrophoretic mobility. By variation of the citric acid concentration, it is possible to adjust the isoelectric point (IEP) of alumina to any pH-value between 9 and 3. For citric acid, a high adsorption density on alumina was measured over a broad pH range, whereas the adsorption of PVA is very low. The adsorption density of citric acid on alumina is not influenced by the presence of PVA, whereas the polymer is displaced by citric acid from the alumina surface. Enhanced binder migration in wet green bodies during the drying process is a consequence of this displacement.

  6. High alumina metamorphic rocks of the Kings Mountain district, North Carolina and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Potter, Donald Brandreth

    1954-01-01

    The following evidence suggests that high alumina quartzite in this district is of metasedimentary origin: high alumina quartzite occurs as well defined thin beds that can be traced up to three and one half miles along strike; many outcrops of high alumina quartzite exhibit compositional layering (i.e., kyanigte quartzite is interlayered with staurolite quartzite, and with non-kyanitic magnetiferous quartzite); high alumina quartzite beds occur in a conformable sequence of high alumina metasedimentary and metavolcanic schists. It is suggested that the high alumina quartzite beds are metamorphosed beds of sandy or silty clay; these beds probably represent one stage in the deposition of fine grained clayey clastic sediments. No evidence was found to support the view of Smith and Newcombe (1951) that the kyanite at Henry Knob developed by hudrothermal introduction of alumina. The present study indicates that kyanite in the kyanite quartzite here, as throughout the district, is of metasedimentary origin.

  7. Big-bang nucleosynthesis with a long-lived charged massive particle including {sup 4}He spallation processes in a bound state

    SciTech Connect

    Jittoh, Toshifumi; Kohri, Kazunori; Koike, Masafumi; Sato, Joe; Sugai, Kenichi; Yamanaka, Masato; Yazaki, Koichi

    2012-07-27

    We propose helium-4 spallation processes induced by long-lived stau in supersymmetric standard models, and investigate an impact of the processes on light elements abundances. We show that, as long as the phase space of helium-4 spallation processes is open, they are more important than stau-catalyzed fusion and hence constrain the stau property.

  8. Porous alumina, zirconia and alumina/zirconia for bone repair: fabrication, mechanical and in vitro biological response.

    PubMed

    Hadjicharalambous, Chrystalleni; Buyakov, Ales; Buyakova, Svetlana; Kulkov, Sergey; Chatzinikolaidou, Maria

    2015-04-23

    Zirconia (ZrO2) and alumina (Al2O3) based ceramics are widely used for load-bearing applications in bone repair due to their excellent mechanical properties and biocompatibility. They are often regarded as bioinert since no direct bone-material interface is created unless a porous structure intercedes, leading to better bone bonding. In this regard, investigating interactions between cells and porous ceramics is of great interest. In the present study, we report on the successful fabrication of sintered alumina A-61, zirconia Z-50 and zirconia/alumina composite ZA-60 ceramics with medium porosities of 61, 50 and 60%, respectively, indicating a bimodal pore size distribution and good interconnectivity. They exhibit elastic moduli of 3-10 GPa and compressive strength values of 60-240 MPa, similar to those of human cortical bone.We performed in vitro cell-material investigations comparing the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of mouse pre-osteoblasts MC3T3-E1 on the three porous materials. While all three ceramics demonstrate a strong cell attachment, better cell spreading is observed on zirconia-containing substrates. Significantly higher cell growth was quantified on the latter ceramics, revealing an increased alkaline phosphatase activity, higher collagen production and increased calcium biomineralization compared to A-61. Hence, these porous zirconia-containing ceramics elicit superior biological responses over porous alumina of similar porosity, promoting enhanced biological interaction, with potential use as non-degradable bone grafts or as implant coatings.

  9. Synthesis of highly ordered mesoporous alumina thin films and their framework crystallization to γ-alumina phase.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiangfen; Oveisi, Hamid; Nemoto, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Norihiro; Wu, Kevin C-W; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2011-11-01

    Here we report the preparation of highly ordered mesoporous alumina films existing both as P6(3)/mmc and Fm-3m mesostructures by using triblock copolymer Pluronic P123 as the structure-directing agent. 2D grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GI-SAXS) completely proves the existence of two different mesopore structures (i.e., [001]-oriented P6(3)/mmc and [111]-oriented Fm-3m symmetries). After calcination at 1000 °C, the amorphous alumina framework is successfully converted to γ-alumina crystals. During the crystallization process, large uniaxial shrinkage occurs along the direction perpendicular to the substrate with the retention of horizontal mesoscale periodicity, thereby resulting in formation of partially vertical mesoporosity in the film. Through detailed electron microscopic study, we discuss the formation mechanism for the vertical mesoporosity upon calcination. The obtained mesoporous γ-alumina film shows high thermal stability up to 1000 °C, which is highly useful in wide research areas such as catalyst supports and separators.

  10. The reactive element effect of ceria particle dispersion on alumina growth: A model based on microstructural observations.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Peng, X; Tan, X; Wang, F

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of alumina-forming metals can be affected by adding a small amount of a reactive (normally rare earth) element oxide (RExOy) and the segregation of the reactive element (RE) ions to the growing alumina grain boundaries (GBs) has been considered as a responsible reason. However, this interpretation remains a controversial issue as to how RE ions are produced by RExOy which is thermodynamically and chemically stable in metals. The question is answered by a model that is based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of a CeO2-dispersed nickel aluminide oxidized in air at 1100 °C. The CeO2 dispersion is incorporated into the alumina scale by the inward growth of inner α-Al2O3, where it partially dissolves producing tetravalent Ce cations which then transform to trivalent cations by trapping electrons. The trivalent cations segregate to the α-Al2O3 GBs and diffuse outward along first the GBs and later the twin boundaries (TBs) in the outer γ-Al2O3 layer, being precipitated as Ce2O3 particles near surface. PMID:27406938

  11. The reactive element effect of ceria particle dispersion on alumina growth: A model based on microstructural observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Peng, X.; Tan, X.; Wang, F.

    2016-07-01

    The oxidation kinetics of alumina-forming metals can be affected by adding a small amount of a reactive (normally rare earth) element oxide (RExOy) and the segregation of the reactive element (RE) ions to the growing alumina grain boundaries (GBs) has been considered as a responsible reason. However, this interpretation remains a controversial issue as to how RE ions are produced by RExOy which is thermodynamically and chemically stable in metals. The question is answered by a model that is based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of a CeO2-dispersed nickel aluminide oxidized in air at 1100 °C. The CeO2 dispersion is incorporated into the alumina scale by the inward growth of inner α-Al2O3, where it partially dissolves producing tetravalent Ce cations which then transform to trivalent cations by trapping electrons. The trivalent cations segregate to the α-Al2O3 GBs and diffuse outward along first the GBs and later the twin boundaries (TBs) in the outer γ-Al2O3 layer, being precipitated as Ce2O3 particles near surface.

  12. Inkjet printed periodical micropatterns made of inert alumina ceramics induce contact guidance and stimulate osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Lauria, Ines; Kramer, Michael; Schröder, Teresa; Kant, Sebastian; Hausmann, Anne; Böke, Frederik; Leube, Rudolf; Telle, Rainer; Fischer, Horst

    2016-10-15

    Bioinert high performance ceramics exhibit detrimental features for implant components with direct bone contact because of their low osseointegrating capability. We hypothesized that periodical microstructures made of inert alumina ceramics can influence the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC). In this study, we manufactured pillared arrays made of alumina ceramics with periodicities as low as 100μm and pillar heights of 40μm employing direct inkjet printing (DIP) technique. The response of hMSC to the microstructured surfaces was monitored by measuring cell morphology, viability and formation of focal adhesion complexes. Osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs was investigated by alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization assays and expression analysis of respective markers. We demonstrated that MSCs react to the pillars with contact guidance. Subsequently, cells grow onto and form connections between the microstructures, and at the same time are directly attached to the pillars as shown by focal adhesion stainings. Cells build up tissue-like constructs with heights up to the micropillars resulting in increased cell viability and osteogenic differentiating properties. We conclude that periodical micropatterns on the micrometer scale made of inert alumina ceramics can mediate focal adhesion dependent cell adhesion and stimulate osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs.

  13. The reactive element effect of ceria particle dispersion on alumina growth: A model based on microstructural observations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X.; Peng, X.; Tan, X.; Wang, F.

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of alumina-forming metals can be affected by adding a small amount of a reactive (normally rare earth) element oxide (RExOy) and the segregation of the reactive element (RE) ions to the growing alumina grain boundaries (GBs) has been considered as a responsible reason. However, this interpretation remains a controversial issue as to how RE ions are produced by RExOy which is thermodynamically and chemically stable in metals. The question is answered by a model that is based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of a CeO2-dispersed nickel aluminide oxidized in air at 1100 °C. The CeO2 dispersion is incorporated into the alumina scale by the inward growth of inner α-Al2O3, where it partially dissolves producing tetravalent Ce cations which then transform to trivalent cations by trapping electrons. The trivalent cations segregate to the α-Al2O3 GBs and diffuse outward along first the GBs and later the twin boundaries (TBs) in the outer γ-Al2O3 layer, being precipitated as Ce2O3 particles near surface. PMID:27406938

  14. PREPARATION AND TESTING OF CORROSIONAND SPALLATION-RESISTANT COATINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, John

    2014-11-01

    has been entered into a finite element model using ANSYS so that appropriate force-applying structures can be designed for use in joining structures composed of APMT and the nickel alloys. Finite element modeling has been performed to finalize the fabrication geometry for the corrosion-testing phase. The addition of another bolt increases stress uniformity away from the region where the clamping is applied. It appears that a bolt spacing of approximately 25 mm in each jig is appropriate. This will allow the fabrication of 50-mm-wide sections of joints for the corrosion-testing task. Gasifier sampling activities continue to determine what types of trace contaminants may occur in cleaned syngas that could lead to corrosion or deposition in turbines firing coal syngas. The EERC has several pilot-scale gasifiers that are continually used in a variety of test configurations as determined by the needs of the projects that are funding the tests. We are sampling both noncombusted and combusted syngas produced during some of the pilot-scale gasifier tests. This year sampling was performed of both syngas and combusted syngas while the entrained-flow gasifier (EFG) was firing subbituminous coal from the Antelope Mine in Wyoming. Results of scanning electron microscope analyses of the syngas before combustion showed no submicron particles, only flakes of iron oxide that had likely formed on steel surfaces inside the combustor. As shown in the 2013 annual report, soot was also collected from the syngas when the much-lower-temperature fluid-bed gasifier (FBG) was fired, indicating that the much higher temperature of the EFG prevented soot formation. However, particles collected from the combusted syngas consist almost entirely of submicron soot, and little to no vaporized metals made it past the warm-gas filters and scrubbers in the high-temperature EFG system which could then deposit in a turbine system burning a higher hydrogen syngas. These results are consistent with the

  15. Preparation and testing of corrosion and spallation-resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, John

    2012-09-30

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is designed to determine if plating APMT, a specific highly oxidation-resistant oxide dispersion-strengthened FeCrAl alloy made by Kanthal, onto nickel-based superalloy turbine parts is a viable method for substantially improving the lifetimes and maximum use temperatures of the parts. The method for joining the APMT plate to the superalloys is called evaporative metal bonding. It involves placing a thin foil of zinc (Zn) between the plate and the superalloy, clamping them together, and heating in an atmosphere-controlled furnace. Upon heating, the Zn melts and dissolves the oxide skins of the alloys at the bond line, allowing the two alloys to diffuse into each other. The Zn then diffuses through the alloys and evaporates from their surfaces. Laboratory testing has shown that the diffusion rate of Zn through the FeCrAl alloy is much faster than through the nickel superalloys. This means that the FeCrAl will serve as a sink for the Zn bonding alloy during the evaporative metal bonding process. Also, the testing has shown that the Zn diffusion mechanism is bulk diffusion, and not intergranular. This is a surprise. However, it means that quantification of the Zn diffusivities in these samples will be significantly simpler than would have been the case if grain boundary diffusion dominated. In addition to the laboratory testing, gas impinger and particulate samples are being collected from a combustor firing syngas and natural gas to determine what types of microcontaminants may reach a turbine firing syngas. The syngas is created in one of two different pilot-scale pressurized coal gasifiers. The initial analysis of the impinger solutions was for standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 29 determination of hazardous metals and did not include major element analysis. When syngas is fired, the amount of Mn in the combustor gas increases substantially. Halogens (Br2 and Cl2) and hydrogen

  16. Structure of δ-Alumina: Toward the Atomic Level Understanding of Transition Alumina Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Kovarik, Libor; Bowden, Mark; Genc, Arda; Szanyi, János; Peden, Charles H. F.; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2014-08-07

    Transition Al2O3 derived from thermal decomposition of AlOOH Boehmite have complex structures and to a large extent remain poorly understood. Here, we report a detailed atomic level analysis of δ-Al2O3 for the first time using a combination of high-angle annular dark field electron microscopy imaging, X-ray diffraction refinement, and density functional theory calculations. We show that the structure of δ-Al2O3 represents a complex structural intergrowth from two main crystallographic variants, which are identified as δ1-Al2O3 and δ2-Al2O3. The two main variants are fully structurally described, and in addition, we also derive their energy of formation. On the basis of comparison with other relevant transition Al2O3 phases, it is shown how energetic degeneracy leads to the structural disorder and complex intergrowths among several transition Al2O3. Finally, the results of the work have important implications for understanding thermodynamic stability and transformation processes in transition alumina.

  17. Unoxidized Graphene/Alumina Nanocomposite: Fracture- and Wear-Resistance Effects of Graphene on Alumina Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Sung-Min; Oh, Yoon-Suk; Yang, Young-Hwan; Lim, Young Soo; Yoon, Dae Ho; Lee, Changgu; Kim, Jong-Young; Ruoff, Rodney S.

    2014-01-01

    It is of critical importance to improve toughness, strength, and wear-resistance together for the development of advanced structural materials. Herein, we report on the synthesis of unoxidized graphene/alumina composite materials having enhanced toughness, strength, and wear-resistance by a low-cost and environmentally benign pressure-less-sintering process. The wear resistance of the composites was increased by one order of magnitude even under high normal load condition (25 N) as a result of a tribological effect of graphene along with enhanced fracture toughness (KIC) and flexural strength (σf) of the composites by ~75% (5.60 MPa·m1/2) and ~25% (430 MPa), respectively, compared with those of pure Al2O3. Furthermore, we found that only a small fraction of ultra-thin graphene (0.25–0.5 vol%, platelet thickness of 2–5 nm) was enough to reinforce the composite. In contrast to unoxidized graphene, graphene oxide (G-O) and reduced graphene oxide (rG-O) showed little or less enhancement of fracture toughness due to the degraded mechanical strength of rG-O and the structural defects of the G-O composites. PMID:24898792

  18. Aqueous-Phase Preparation of Model HDS Catalysts on Planar Alumina Substrates: Support Effect on Mo Adsorption and Sulfidation.

    PubMed

    Bara, Cédric; Plais, Lucie; Larmier, Kim; Devers, Elodie; Digne, Mathieu; Lamic-Humblot, Anne-Félicie; Pirngruber, Gerhard D; Carrier, Xavier

    2015-12-23

    The role of the oxide support on the structure of the MoS2 active phase (size, morphology, orientation, sulfidation ratio, etc.) remains an open question in hydrotreating catalysis and biomass processing with important industrial implications for the design of improved catalytic formulations. The present work builds on an aqueous-phase surface-science approach using four well-defined α-alumina single crystal surfaces (C (0001), A (112̅0), M (101̅0), and R (11̅02) planes) as surrogates for γ-alumina (the industrial support) in order to discriminate the specific role of individual support facets. The reactivity of the various surface orientations toward molybdenum adsorption is controlled by the speciation of surface hydroxyls that determines the surface charge at the oxide/water interface. The C (0001) plane is inert, and the R (11̅02) plane has a limited Mo adsorption capacity while the A (112̅0) and M (101̅0) surfaces are highly reactive. Sulfidation of model catalysts reveals the highest sulfidation degree for the A (112̅0) and M (101̅0) planes suggesting weak metal/support interactions. Conversely, a low sulfidation rate and shorter MoS2 slabs are found for the R (11̅02) plane implying stronger Mo-O-Al bonds. These limiting cases are reminiscent of type I/type II MoS2 nanostructures. Structural analogies between α- and γ- alumina surfaces allow us to bridge the material gap with real Al2O3-supported catalysts. Hence, it can be proposed that Mo distribution and sulfidation rate are heterogeneous and surface-dependent on industrial γ-Al2O3-supported high-surface-area catalysts. These results demonstrate that a proper control of the γ-alumina morphology is a strategic lever for a molecular-scale design of hydrotreating catalysts.

  19. Proceedings of the workshop on ion source issues relevant to a pulsed spallation neutron source: Part 2 workshop presentations

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, L.; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Alonso, J.

    1994-10-01

    As part of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Pulsed Spallation Source study, this Workshop was convened to address ion-source technology`s present status with respect to the next-generation Pulsed Spallation Source in the 1-5 MW range for the neutron scattering community. Considerations of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) parameters and designs were included in the discussions throughout the Workshop. Ion-source requirements and actually-achieved performances were assessed, resulting in a determination of research and development requirements to bridge the gap. Part 1 of these Proceedings summarizes the Workshop; Part 2 contains viewgraphs of Workshop presentations.

  20. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Mauro, N A; Vogt, A J; Derendorf, K S; Johnson, M L; Rustan, G E; Quirinale, D G; Kreyssig, A; Lokshin, K A; Neuefeind, J C; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A I; Egami, T; Kelton, K F

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg).

  1. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).

  2. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Mauro, N A; Vogt, A J; Derendorf, K S; Johnson, M L; Rustan, G E; Quirinale, D G; Kreyssig, A; Lokshin, K A; Neuefeind, J C; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A I; Egami, T; Kelton, K F

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg). PMID:26827330

  3. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (˜100 mg).

  4. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    DOE PAGES

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; et al

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elasticmore » and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).« less

  5. Computational Benchmark Calculations Relevant to the Neutronic Design of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Johnson, J.O.; Yugo, J.J.

    1999-11-14

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will provide an intense source of low-energy neutrons for experimental use. The low-energy neutrons are produced by the interaction of a high-energy (1.0 GeV) proton beam on a mercury (Hg) target and slowed down in liquid hydrogen or light water moderators. Computer codes and computational techniques are being benchmarked against relevant experimental data to validate and verify the tools being used to predict the performance of the SNS. The LAHET Code System (LCS), which includes LAHET, HTAPE ad HMCNP (a modified version of MCNP version 3b), have been applied to the analysis of experiments that were conducted in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In the AGS experiments, foils of various materials were placed around a mercury-filled stainless steel cylinder, which was bombarded with protons at 1.6 GeV. Neutrons created in the mercury target, activated the foils. Activities of the relevant isotopes were accurately measured and compared with calculated predictions. Measurements at BNL were provided in part by collaborating scientists from JAERI as part of the AGS Spallation Target Experiment (ASTE) collaboration. To date, calculations have shown good agreement with measurements.

  6. Spallation reactions in shock waves at supernova explosions and related problems

    SciTech Connect

    Ustinova, G. K.

    2013-05-15

    The isotopic anomalies of some extinct radionuclides testify to the outburst of a nearby supernova just before the collapse of the protosolar nebula, and to the fact that the supernova was Sn Ia, i.e. the carbon-detonation supernova. A key role of spallation reactions in the formation of isotopic anomalies in the primordial matter of the Solar System is revealed. It is conditioned by the diffusive acceleration of particles in the explosive shock waves, which leads to the amplification of rigidity of the energy spectrum of particles and its enrichment with heavier ions. The quantitative calculations of such isotopic anomalies of many elements are presented. It is well-grounded that the anomalous Xe-HL in meteoritic nanodiamonds was formed simultaneously with nanodiamonds themselves during the shock wave propagation at the Sn Ia explosion. The possible effects of shock wave fractionation of noble gases in the atmosphere of planets are considered. The origin of light elements Li, Be and B in spallation reactions, predicted by Fowler in the middle of the last century, is argued. All the investigated isotopic anomalies give the evidence for the extremely high magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) conditions at the initial stage of free expansion of the explosive shock wave from Sn Ia, which can be essential in solution of the problem of origin of cosmic rays. The specific iron-enriched matter of Sn Ia and its MHD-separation in turbulent processes must be taking into account in the models of origin of the Solar System.

  7. Study of the Production of Radioactive Isotopes through Cosmic Muon Spallation in KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    KamLAND Collaboration; Abe, S.; Enomoto, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Terashima, A.; Watanabe, H.; Yonezawa, E.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Busenitz, J.; Classen, T.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Leonard, D. S.; McKee, D.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Gray, F.; Guardincerri, E.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Kadel, R.; Lendvai, C.; Luk, K.-B.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Winslow, L. A.; Dwyer, D. A.; Jillings, C.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Vogel, P.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Foster, J.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Tang, A.; Dazeley, S.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Bugg, W.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K. M.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Decowski, M. P.

    2009-06-30

    Radioactive isotopes produced through cosmic muon spallation are a background for rare event detection in {nu} detectors, double-beta-decay experiments, and dark-matter searches. Understanding the nature of cosmogenic backgrounds is particularly important for future experiments aiming to determine the pep and CNO solar neutrino fluxes, for which the background is dominated by the spallation production of {sup 11}C. Data from the Kamioka Liquid scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) provides valuable information for better understanding these backgrounds, especially in liquid scintillator, and for checking estimates from current simulations based upon MUSIC, FLUKA, and Geant4. Using the time correlation between detected muons and neutron captures, the neutron production yield in the KamLAND liquid scintillator is measured to be (2.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -4} n/({mu} {center_dot} (g/cm{sup 2})). For other isotopes, the production yield is determined from the observed time correlation related to known isotope lifetimes. We find some yields are inconsistent with extrapolations based on an accelerator muon beam experiment.

  8. Production of radioactive isotopes through cosmic muon spallation in KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, M.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Terashima, A.; Watanabe, H.

    2010-02-15

    Radioactive isotopes produced through cosmic muon spallation are a background for rare-event detection in nu detectors, double-beta-decay experiments, and dark-matter searches. Understanding the nature of cosmogenic backgrounds is particularly important for future experiments aiming to determine the pep and CNO solar neutrino fluxes, for which the background is dominated by the spallation production of {sup 11}C. Data from the Kamioka liquid-scintillator antineutrino detector (KamLAND) provides valuable information for better understanding these backgrounds, especially in liquid scintillators, and for checking estimates from current simulations based upon MUSIC, FLUKA, and GEANT4. Using the time correlation between detected muons and neutron captures, the neutron production yield in the KamLAND liquid scintillator is measured to be Y{sub n}=(2.8+-0.3)x10{sup -4} mu{sup -1} g{sup -1} cm{sup 2}. For other isotopes, the production yield is determined from the observed time correlation related to known isotope lifetimes. We find some yields are inconsistent with extrapolations based on an accelerator muon beam experiment.

  9. Waste heat recovery from the European Spallation Source cryogenic helium plants - implications for system design

    SciTech Connect

    Jurns, John M.; Bäck, Harald; Gierow, Martin

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) neutron spallation project currently being designed will be built outside of Lund, Sweden. The ESS design includes three helium cryoplants, providing cryogenic cooling for the proton accelerator superconducting cavities, the target neutron source, and for the ESS instrument suite. In total, the cryoplants consume approximately 7 MW of electrical power, and will produce approximately 36 kW of refrigeration at temperatures ranging from 2-16 K. Most of the power consumed by the cryoplants ends up as waste heat, which must be rejected. One hallmark of the ESS design is the goal to recycle waste heat from ESS to the city of Lund district heating system. The design of the cooling system must optimize the delivery of waste heat from ESS to the district heating system and also assure the efficient operation of ESS systems. This report outlines the cooling scheme for the ESS cryoplants, and examines the effect of the cooling system design on cryoplant design, availability and operation.

  10. Coupled Ablation, Heat Conduction, Pyrolysis, Shape Change and Spallation of the Galileo Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Y.-K.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Galileo probe enters the atmosphere of Jupiter in December 1995. This paper presents numerical methodology and detailed results of our final pre-impact calculations for the heat shield response. The calculations are performed using a highly modified version of a viscous shock layer code with massive radiation coupled with a surface thermochemical ablation and spallation model and with the transient in-depth thermal response of the charring and ablating heat shield. The flowfield is quasi-steady along the trajectory, but the heat shield thermal response is dynamic. Each surface node of the VSL grid is coupled with a one-dimensional thermal response calculation. The thermal solver includes heat conduction, pyrolysis, and grid movement owing to surface recession. Initial conditions for the heat shield temperature and density were obtained from the high altitude rarefied-flow calculations of Haas and Milos. Galileo probe surface temperature, shape, mass flux, and element flux are all determined as functions of time along the trajectory with spallation varied parametrically. The calculations also estimate the in-depth density and temperature profiles for the heat shield. All this information is required to determine the time-dependent vehicle mass and drag coefficient which are necessary inputs for the atmospheric reconstruction experiment on board the probe.

  11. Spallation neutron production and the current intra-nuclear cascade and transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filges, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Enke, M.; Galin, J.; Herbach, C.-M.; Hilscher, D.; Jahnke, U.; Letourneau, A.; Lott, B.; Neef, R.-D.; Nünighoff, K.; Paul, N.; Péghaire, A.; Pienkowski, L.; Schaal, H.; Schröder, U.; Sterzenbach, G.; Tietze, A.; Tishchenko, V.; Toke, J.; Wohlmuther, M.

    A recent renascent interest in energetic proton-induced production of neutrons originates largely from the inception of projects for target stations of intense spallation neutron sources, like the planned European Spallation Source (ESS), accelerator-driven nuclear reactors, nuclear waste transmutation, and also from the application for radioactive beams. In the framework of such a neutron production, of major importance is the search for ways for the most efficient conversion of the primary beam energy into neutron production. Although the issue has been quite successfully addressed experimentally by varying the incident proton energy for various target materials and by covering a huge collection of different target geometries --providing an exhaustive matrix of benchmark data-- the ultimate challenge is to increase the predictive power of transport codes currently on the market. To scrutinize these codes, calculations of reaction cross-sections, hadronic interaction lengths, average neutron multiplicities, neutron multiplicity and energy distributions, and the development of hadronic showers are confronted with recent experimental data of the NESSI collaboration. Program packages like HERMES, LCS or MCNPX master the prevision of reaction cross-sections, hadronic interaction lengths, averaged neutron multiplicities and neutron multiplicity distributions in thick and thin targets for a wide spectrum of incident proton energies, geometrical shapes and materials of the target generally within less than 10% deviation, while production cross-section measurements for light charged particles on thin targets point out that appreciable distinctions exist within these models.

  12. Waste heat recovery from the European Spallation Source cryogenic helium plants - implications for system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurns, John M.; Bäck, Harald; Gierow, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) neutron spallation project currently being designed will be built outside of Lund, Sweden. The ESS design includes three helium cryoplants, providing cryogenic cooling for the proton accelerator superconducting cavities, the target neutron source, and for the ESS instrument suite. In total, the cryoplants consume approximately 7 MW of electrical power, and will produce approximately 36 kW of refrigeration at temperatures ranging from 2-16 K. Most of the power consumed by the cryoplants ends up as waste heat, which must be rejected. One hallmark of the ESS design is the goal to recycle waste heat from ESS to the city of Lund district heating system. The design of the cooling system must optimize the delivery of waste heat from ESS to the district heating system and also assure the efficient operation of ESS systems. This report outlines the cooling scheme for the ESS cryoplants, and examines the effect of the cooling system design on cryoplant design, availability and operation.

  13. Heat generation and neutron beam characteristics in a high power pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jerng, D.W.; Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-11-01

    In the course of conceptual design of a high power pulsed spallation source, a Monte Carlo model was developed for heat generation and neutronics studies. In this paper, we present two sets of results. The first set of calculations was performed with a simple target model to investigate general characteristics of power distribution and neutron production with various proton energies ranging from 0.8 to 12 GeV. The second set was performed with a realistic target model including major components of the target system to provide basic parameters for engineering design of a high power pulsed spallation source. Calculated results generally confirm that higher proton energy provides and advantage in target cooling system requirements and yet somewhat lower neutron beam intensity as a counter effect. The heat generation in the systems surrounding the target was investigated in detail and found to have important variation with position and according to proton beam energy. Calculations of the neutron currents from the moderators showed that the neutron beam intensity from moderators in the front region of the target decreased fro higher proton energy while that from moderators in the back region of the target remained almost unchanged.

  14. Production of radioactive isotopes through cosmic muon spallation in KamLAND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Enomoto, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Terashima, A.; Watanabe, H.; Yonezawa, E.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Busenitz, J.; Classen, T.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Leonard, D. S.; McKee, D.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Gray, F.; Guardincerri, E.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Kadel, R.; Lendvai, C.; Luk, K.-B.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Winslow, L. A.; Dwyer, D. A.; Jillings, C.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Vogel, P.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Foster, J.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Tang, A.; Dazeley, S.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Bugg, W.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K. M.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Decowski, M. P.; KamLAND Collaboration

    2010-02-01

    Radioactive isotopes produced through cosmic muon spallation are a background for rare-event detection in ν detectors, double-β-decay experiments, and dark-matter searches. Understanding the nature of cosmogenic backgrounds is particularly important for future experiments aiming to determine the pep and CNO solar neutrino fluxes, for which the background is dominated by the spallation production of C11. Data from the Kamioka liquid-scintillator antineutrino detector (KamLAND) provides valuable information for better understanding these backgrounds, especially in liquid scintillators, and for checking estimates from current simulations based upon MUSIC, FLUKA, and GEANT4. Using the time correlation between detected muons and neutron captures, the neutron production yield in the KamLAND liquid scintillator is measured to be Yn=(2.8±0.3)×10-4μ-1g-1cm2. For other isotopes, the production yield is determined from the observed time correlation related to known isotope lifetimes. We find some yields are inconsistent with extrapolations based on an accelerator muon beam experiment.

  15. Assessment of the neutron cross section database for mercury for the ORNL spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.; Spencer, R.R.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1996-06-01

    Neutron source generation based on a high energy particle accelerator has been considered as an alternative to the canceled Advanced Neutron Source project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The proposed technique consists of a spallation neutron source in which neutrons are produced via the interaction of high-energy charged particles in a heavy metal target. Preliminary studies indicate that liquid mercury bombarded with GeV protons provides an excellent neutron source. Accordingly, a survey has been made of the available neutron cross-section data. Since it is expected that spectral modifiers, specifically moderators, will also be incorporated into the source design, the survey included thermal energy, resonance region, and high energy data. It was found that data of individual isotopes were almost non-existent and that the only evaluation found for the natural element had regions of missing data or discrepant data. Therefore, it appears that to achieve the desired degree of accuracy in the spallation source design it is necessary to re-evaluate the mercury database including making new measurements. During the presentation the currently available data will be presented and experiments proposed which can lead to design quality cross sections.

  16. Spallation reactions in shock waves at supernova explosions and related problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinova, G. K.

    2013-05-01

    The isotopic anomalies of some extinct radionuclides testify to the outburst of a nearby supernova just before the collapse of the protosolar nebula, and to the fact that the supernova was Sn Ia, i.e. the carbon-detonation supernova. A key role of spallation reactions in the formation of isotopic anomalies in the primordial matter of the Solar System is revealed. It is conditioned by the diffusive acceleration of particles in the explosive shock waves, which leads to the amplification of rigidity of the energy spectrum of particles and its enrichment with heavier ions. The quantitative calculations of such isotopic anomalies of many elements are presented. It is well-grounded that the anomalous Xe- HL in meteoritic nanodiamonds was formed simultaneously with nanodiamonds themselves during the shock wave propagation at the Sn Ia explosion. The possible effects of shock wave fractionation of noble gases in the atmosphere of planets are considered. The origin of light elements Li, Be and B in spallation reactions, predicted by Fowler in the middle of the last century, is argued. All the investigated isotopic anomalies give the evidence for the extremely high magneto- hydrodynamics (MHD) conditions at the initial stage of free expansion of the explosive shock wave from Sn Ia, which can be essential in solution of the problem of origin of cosmic rays. The specific iron-enriched matter of Sn Ia and its MHD-separation in turbulent processes must be taking into account in the models of origin of the Solar System.

  17. Cavitation damage prediction for spallation target vessels by assessment of acoustic vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Ikeda, Dr. Yujiro; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Haines, John R; Bauer, Guenter; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Okita, Dr. Kohei; Fujiwara, Dr. Akiko; Matsumoto, Dr. Yoichiro; Tanaka, Dr. Nobuatsu

    2008-01-01

    Liquid-mercury target systems for MW-class spallation neutron sources are being developed around the world. Proton beams are used to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. In order to estimate the cavitation erosion, i.e. the pitting damage formed by the collapse of cavitation bubbles, off-beam tests were performed by using an electric magnetic impact testing machine (MIMTM), which can impose equivalent pressure pulses in mercury. The damage potential was defined based on the relationship between the pitting damage and the time-integrated acoustic vibration induced by impact due to the bubble collapses. Additionally, the damage potential was measured in on-beam tests carried out by using the proton beam at WNR (Weapons Neutron Research) facility in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). In this paper, the concept of the damage potential, the relationship between the pitting damage formation and the damage potential both in off-beam and on-beam tests is shown.

  18. Plans for a Collaboratively Developed Distributed Control System for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, W.R.; Gurd, D.P.; Hammonds, J.; Lewis, S.A.; Smith, J.D.

    1999-03-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source to be built in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The facility has five major sections - a ''front end'' consisting of a 65 keV H{sup -} ion source followed by a 2.5 MeV RFQ; a 1 GeV linac; a storage ring; a 1MW spallation neutron target (upgradeable to 2 MW); the conventional facilities to support these machines and a suite of neutron scattering instruments to exploit them. These components will be designed and implemented by five collaborating institutions: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Front End), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Linac); Brookhaven National Laboratory (Storage Ring); Argonne National Laboratory (Instruments); and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Neutron Source and Conventional Facilities). It is proposed to implement a fully integrated control system for all aspects of this complex. The system will be developed collaboratively, with some degree of local autonomy for distributed systems, but centralized accountability. Technical integration will be based upon the widely-used EPICS control system toolkit, and a complete set of hardware and software standards. The scope of the integrated control system includes site-wide timing and synchronization, networking and machine protection. This paper discusses the technical and organizational issues of planning a large control system to be developed collaboratively at five different institutions, the approaches being taken to address those issues, as well as some of the particular technical challenges for the SNS control system.

  19. Strain-Induced Deformation in Magnesia-Alumina Layered Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang Soo; Lombardo, Stephen J; Winholtz, Robert A

    2008-06-18

    Ceramic beams are induced in situ to form complex shapes at elevated temperature without the application of an external stress. This process has been demonstrated for thin alumina substrates coated with a layer of magnesia. The internal strain causing the substrates to deform at elevated temperature arises as a consequence of strain mismatch accompanying the penetration of the coating into the substrate. The magnitude of the deformation depends on the amount of coating applied, on the thickness of the substrate, on the density of the substrate, and on the temperature. During exposure of the beams to elevated temperature, the magnesia coating reacts with the alumina substrate to form the spinel phase; the resulting volume change accompanying the phase transformation is likely the predominant driving force for deformation.

  20. Adsorption of copper on a γ-alumina support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papas, Brian N.; Whitten, Jerry L.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of a Cu atom with two model γ-alumina surfaces was examined using configuration interaction theory. These two surfaces are centered on Td and Oh coordinated Al atoms near the surface, with both surfaces fully hydroxylated. Copper was found to bind to non-hydrogenated oxygen atoms in the surface by 25 kcal/mol, with the possibility that an under coordinated aluminum site may bind copper much more strongly. Vacancies formed by the removal of hydrogen atoms, or by removal of OH groups, were found to bind Cu by values ranging from 40 to 98 kcal/mol. The interaction of a planar Cu7 particle with an exposed Td coordinated Al atom at an OH vacancy site was found to lead to decomposition of the particle and partial absorption of the Cu into the alumina surface.