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Sample records for aluminium gallium indium

  1. Toxicity of indium arsenide, gallium arsenide, and aluminium gallium arsenide.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiyo

    2004-08-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium arsenide (InAs), and aluminium gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) are semiconductor applications. Although the increased use of these materials has raised concerns about occupational exposure to them, there is little information regarding the adverse health effects to workers arising from exposure to these particles. However, available data indicate these semiconductor materials can be toxic in animals. Although acute and chronic toxicity of the lung, reproductive organs, and kidney are associated with exposure to these semiconductor materials, in particular, chronic toxicity should pay much attention owing to low solubility of these materials. Between InAs, GaAs, and AlGaAs, InAs was the most toxic material to the lung followed by GaAs and AlGaAs when given intratracheally. This was probably due to difference in the toxicity of the counter-element of arsenic in semiconductor materials, such as indium, gallium, or aluminium, and not arsenic itself. It appeared that indium, gallium, or aluminium was toxic when released from the particles, though the physical character of the particles also contributes to toxic effect. Although there is no evidence of the carcinogenicity of InAs or AlGaAs, GaAs and InP, which are semiconductor materials, showed the clear evidence of carcinogenic potential. It is necessary to pay much greater attention to the human exposure of semiconductor materials.

  2. Multicomponental fluorimetric determination of aluminium, gallium and indium.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Simon; Jancár, Ludek; Sommer, Lumír

    2008-03-01

    For the fast characteristics of mixtures of Aluminium, Gallium and Indium the fluorimetric evaluation in the form of complexes with 8-Hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic acid is described at selected pH. The highly collinear correlated fluorescent spectra and their first derivation were evaluated under various experimental conditions with the Multiple Linear Regression (MLR), Partial Least Squares (PLS) methods and Kalman filtering. When comparing the results, the PLS gives the least relative prediction errors under optimal conditions, 5.6-15.9% for the concentration range of Al 0.025-0.2 microg cm(-3), Ga 0.1-0.8 microgcm(-3) and In 0.1-0.8 microg cm(-3) in the mixture.

  3. Biological monitoring of exposures to aluminium, gallium, indium, arsenic, and antimony in optoelectronic industry workers.

    PubMed

    Liao, Y-H; Yu, H-S; Ho, C-K; Wu, M-T; Yang, C-Y; Chen, J-R; Chang, C-C

    2004-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate aluminum, gallium, indium, arsenic, and antimony exposures on blood and urine levels in the optoelectronic workers. One hundred seventy subjects were enrolled in this cohort study. Whole blood and urine levels were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Blood indium and urine gallium and arsenic levels in the 103 workers were significantly higher than that in 67 controls during the follow-up period. In regression models, the significant risk factors of exposure were job title, preventive equipment, Quetelet's index, sex, and education level. The findings of this study suggest that gallium, indium, and arsenic exposure levels may affect their respective levels in blood and urine. The use of clean, preventive equipment is recommended when prioritizing the administration of safety and hygiene in optoelectronics industries.

  4. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  7. Indium Phosphide Window Layers for Indium Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.

    2005-01-01

    Window layers help in reducing the surface recombination at the emitter surface of the solar cells resulting in significant improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Indium gallium arsenide (In(x)Ga(1-x)As) and related materials based solar cells are quite promising for photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic applications. The flexibility of the change in the bandgap energy and the growth of InGaAs on different substrates make this material very attractive for multi-bandgap energy, multi-junction solar cell approaches. The high efficiency and better radiation performance of the solar cell structures based on InGaAs make them suitable for space power applications. This work investigates the suitability of indium phosphide (InP) window layers for lattice-matched In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As (bandgap energy 0.74 eV) solar cells. We present the first data on the effects of the p-type InP window layer on p-on-n lattice-matched InGaAs solar cells. The modeled quantum efficiency results show a significant improvement in the blue region with the InP window. The bare InGaAs solar cell performance suffers due to high surface recombination velocity (10(exp 7) cm/s). The large band discontinuity at the InP/InGaAs heterojunction offers a great potential barrier to minority carriers. The calculated results demonstrate that the InP window layer effectively passivates the solar cell front surface, hence resulting in reduced surface recombination and therefore, significantly improving the performance of the InGaAs solar cell.

  8. Electroluminescence Studies on Longwavelength Indium Arsenide Quantum Dot Microcavities Grown on Gallium Arsenide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    ELECTROLUMINESCENCE STUDIES ON LONG WAVELENGTH INDIUM ARSENIDE QUANTUM DOT MICROCAVITIES GROWN ON GALLIUM ARSENIDE THESIS John C...11-46 ELECTROLUMINESCENCE STUDIES ON LONGWAVELENGTH INDIUM ARSENIDE QUANTUM DOT MICROCAVITIES GROWN ON GALLIUM ARSENIDE THESIS...58 1 ELECTROLUMINESCENCE STUDIES ON LONGWAVELENGTH INDIUM ARSENIDE QUANTUM DOT MICROCAVITIES GROWN ON GALLIUM ARSENIDE I

  9. Formation of copper-indium-selenide and/or copper-indium-gallium-selenide films from indium selenide and copper selenide precursors

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J [Lakewood, CO; Miedaner, Alexander [Boulder, CO; Van Hest, Maikel [Lakewood, CO; Ginley, David S [Evergreen, CO; Nekuda, Jennifer A [Lakewood, CO

    2011-11-15

    Liquid-based indium selenide and copper selenide precursors, including copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent, are used to form crystalline copper-indium-selenide, and/or copper indium gallium selenide films (66) on substrates (52).

  10. Visible light electroluminescent diodes of indium-gallium phosphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clough, R.; Richman, D.; Tietjen, J.

    1970-01-01

    Vapor deposition and acceptor impurity diffusion techniques are used to prepare indium-gallium phosphide junctions. Certain problems in preparation are overcome by altering gas flow conditions and by increasing the concentration of phosphine in the gas. A general formula is given for the alloy's composition.

  11. Preparation Of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Films For Solar Cells

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Contreras, Miguel A.; Keane, James; Tennant, Andrew L. , Tuttle, John R.; Ramanathan, Kannan; Noufi, Rommel

    1998-08-08

    High quality thin films of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide useful in the production of solar cells are prepared by electrodepositing at least one of the constituent metals onto a glass/Mo substrate, followed by physical vapor deposition of copper and selenium or indium and selenium to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2. Using an AC voltage of 1-100 KHz in combination with a DC voltage for electrodeposition improves the morphology and growth rate of the deposited thin film. An electrodeposition solution comprising at least in part an organic solvent may be used in conjunction with an increased cathodic potential to increase the gallium content of the electrodeposited thin film.

  12. THE INDIUM-GALLIUM RADIATION LOOP OF THE IRT NUCLEAR REACTOR,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    NUCLEAR REACTORS, *ISOTOPES), (*INDIUM, *GALLIUM), GAMMA RAYS, NEUTRONS, INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, ALUMINUM, SHIELDING, GENERATORS, EUTECTICS, ARGON, OXALIC ACID , ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMPS, HALF LIFE, HEAT TRANSFER

  13. Indium Gallium Nitride Multijunction Solar Cell Simulation Using Silvaco Atlas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    possibilities of InGaN tandem PV structures”, Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells, Vol. 87, 595-603, 2004. [6] S. M. Sze, Semiconductor Devices, 2nd edition... ENERGY (EV) TO WAVELENGTH (UM) ..............................................86 D. IV CURVE PLOTS FOR INDIUM GALLIUM NITRIDE QUAD JUNCTION SOLAR... energy on different band gaps (From [15]).....................................19 Figure 13. Simple cubic lattice structure (From [16])......20 Figure

  14. Synthesis and use of (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium and indium

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2000-01-01

    Salts of (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are described. The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions have the formula [ER'R"R'"F].sup..crclbar. wherein E is aluminum, gallium, or indium, wherein F is fluorine, and wherein R', R", and R'" is each a fluorinated phenyl, fluorinated biphenyl, or fluorinated polycyclic group.

  15. Highly ordered horizontal indium gallium arsenide/indium phosphide multi-quantum-well in wire structure on (001) silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yu; Li, Qiang; Lau, Kei May

    2016-12-01

    We report the characteristics of indium gallium arsenide stacked quantum structures inside planar indium phosphide nanowires grown on exact (001) silicon substrates. The morphological evolution of the indium phosphide ridge buffers inside sub-micron trenches has been studied, and the role of inter-facet diffusion in this process is discussed. Inside a single indium phosphide nanowire, we are able to stack quantum structures including indium gallium arsenide flat quantum wells, quasi-quantum wires, quantum wires, and ridge quantum wells. Room temperature photoluminescence measurements reveal a broadband emission spectrum centered at 1550 nm. Power dependent photoluminescence analysis indicates the presence of quasi-continuum states. This work thus provides insights into the design and growth process control of multiple quantum wells in wire structures for high performance nanowire lasers on a silicon substrate with 1550 nm band emission.

  16. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  17. Formation of Flexible and Transparent Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide/Ag/Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide Multilayer Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Kim, Da-Som; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Yoo, Young-Zo; Lee, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Sang-Woo; Seong, Tae-Yeon

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the electrical, optical, and bending characteristics of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO)/Ag/IGZO (39 nm/19 nm/39 nm) multilayer films deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate at room temperature were investigated and compared with those of Sn-doped indium oxide (ITO) (100 nm thick) films. At 500 nm the ITO film transmitted 91.3% and the IGZO/Ag/IGZO multilayer film transmitted 88.8%. The calculated transmittance spectrum of the multilayer film was similar to the experimental result. The ITO film and IGZO/Ag/IGZO multilayer film, respectively, showed carrier concentrations of 1.79 × 1020 and 7.68 × 1021 cm-3 and mobilities of 27.18 cm2/V s and 18.17 cm2/V s. The ITO film had a sheet resistance of 134.9 Ω/sq and the IGZO/Ag/IGZO multilayer film one of 5.09 Ω/sq. Haacke's figure of merit (FOM) was calculated to be 1.94 × 10-3 for the ITO film and 45.02 × 10-3 Ω-1 for the IGZO/Ag/IGZO multilayer film. The resistance change of 100 nm-thick ITO film was unstable even after five cycles, while that of the IGZO/Ag/IGZO film was constant up to 1000 cycles.

  18. Low-threshold indium gallium nitride quantum dot microcavity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Alexander J.

    Gallium nitride (GaN) microcavities with embedded optical emitters have long been sought after as visible light sources as well as platforms for cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) experiments. Specifically, materials containing indium gallium nitride (InGaN) quantum dots (QDs) offer an outstanding platform to study light matter interactions and realize practical devices, such as on-chip light emitting diodes and nanolasers. Inherent advantages of nitride-based microcavities include low surface recombination velocities, enhanced room-temperature performance (due to their high exciton binding energy, as high as 67 meV for InGaN QDs), and emission wavelengths in the blue region of the visible spectrum. In spite of these advantages, several challenges must be overcome in order to capitalize on the potential of this material system. Such diffculties include the processing of GaN into high-quality devices due to the chemical inertness of the material, low material quality as a result of strain-induced defects, reduced carrier recombination effciencies due to internal fields, and a lack of characterization of the InGaN QDs themselves due to the diffculty of their growth and therefore lack of development relative to other semiconductor QDs. In this thesis we seek to understand and address such issues by investigating the interaction of light coupled to InGaN QDs via a GaN microcavity resonator. Such coupling led us to the demonstration of the first InGaN QD microcavity laser, whose performance offers insights into the properties and current limitations of the nitride materials and their emitters. This work is organized into three main sections. Part I outlines the key advantages and challenges regarding indium gallium nitride (InGaN) emitters embedded within gallium nitride (GaN) optical microcavities. Previous work is also discussed which establishes context for the work presented here. Part II includes the fundamentals related to laser operation, including the

  19. Deep Subgap Feature in Amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide. Evidence Against Reduced Indium

    SciTech Connect

    Sallis, Shawn; Quackenbush, Nicholas F.; Williams, Deborah S.; Senger, Mikell; Woicik, Joseph C.; White, Bruce E.; Piper, Louis F.

    2015-01-14

    Amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) is the archetypal transparent amorphous oxide semiconductor. In spite of the gains made with a-IGZO over amorphous silicon in the last decade, the presence of deep subgap states in a-IGZO active layers facilitate instabilities in thin film transistor properties under negative bias illumination stress. Several candidates could contribute to the formation of states within the band gap. We present evidence against In+ lone pair active electrons as the origin of the deep subgap features. No In+ species are observed, only In0 nano-crystallites under certain oxygen deficient growth conditions. Our results further support under coordinated oxygen as the source of the deep subgap states.

  20. (Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2001-01-01

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  1. (Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2002-01-01

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  2. Thermodynamic properties of uranium in liquid gallium, indium and their alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovich, V. A.; Maltsev, D. S.; Yamshchikov, L. F.; Osipenko, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    Activity, activity coefficients and solubility of uranium was determined in gallium, indium and gallium-indium alloys containing 21.8 (eutectic), 40 and 70 wt.% In. Activity was measured at 573-1073 K employing the electromotive force method, and solubility between room temperature (or the alloy melting point) and 1073 K employing direct physical measurements. Activity coefficients were obtained from the difference of experimentally determined temperature dependencies of uranium activity and solubility. Intermetallic compounds formed in the respective alloys were characterized using X-ray diffraction. Partial and excess thermodynamic functions of uranium in the studied alloys were calculated. Liquidus lines in U-Ga and U-In phase diagrams from the side rich in gallium or indium are proposed.

  3. Exposure Potential and Health Impacts of Indium and Gallium, Metals Critical to Emerging Electronics and Energy Technologies.

    PubMed

    White, Sarah Jane O; Shine, James P

    2016-12-01

    The rapid growth of new electronics and energy technologies requires the use of rare elements of the periodic table. For many of these elements, little is known about their environmental behavior or human health impacts. This is true for indium and gallium, two technology critical elements. Increased environmental concentrations of both indium and gallium create the potential for increased environmental exposure, though little is known about the extent of this exposure. Evidence is mounting that indium and gallium can have substantial toxicity, including in occupational settings where indium lung disease has been recognized as a potentially fatal disease caused by the inhalation of indium particles. This paper aims to review the basic chemistry, changing environmental concentrations, potential for human exposure, and known health effects of indium and gallium.

  4. Discordant gallium-67 and indium-111 leukocyte images in a suspected pelvic abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Intenzo, C.; Thakur, M.L.; Park, C.

    1984-11-01

    An Indium-111 labeled white blood cell scan suggested the presence of a pelvic abscess in a woman at four weeks postpartum. This was not identified on a subsequent gallium scan. This discrepancy can be attributed to the normal accumulation of white blood cells within the uterus at one month postpartum.

  5. Precursors for formation of copper selenide, indium selenide, copper indium diselenide, and/or copper indium gallium diselenide films

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S

    2014-11-04

    Liquid-based precursors for formation of Copper Selenide, Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Diselenide, and/or copper Indium Galium Diselenide include copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent. These liquid-based precursors can be deposited in liquid form onto substrates and treated by rapid thermal processing to form crystalline copper selenide and indium selenide films.

  6. Investigation of an Electrochemical Method for Separation of Copper, Indium, and Gallium from Pretreated CIGS Solar Cell Waste Materials.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Anna M K; Björefors, Fredrik; Steenari, Britt-Marie; Ekberg, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of the semiconductor material copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is important to ensure a future supply of indium and gallium, which are relatively rare and therefore expensive elements. As a continuation of our previous work, where we recycled high purity selenium from CIGS waste materials, we now show that copper and indium can be recycled by electrodeposition from hydrochloric acid solutions of dissolved selenium-depleted material. Suitable potentials for the reduction of copper and indium were determined to be -0.5 V and -0.9 V (versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode), respectively, using cyclic voltammetry. Electrodeposition of first copper and then indium from a solution containing the dissolved residue from the selenium separation and ammonium chloride in 1 M HCl gave a copper yield of 100.1 ± 0.5% and an indium yield of 98.1 ± 2.5%. The separated copper and indium fractions contained no significant contamination of the other elements. Gallium remained in solution together with a small amount of indium after the separation of copper and indium and has to be recovered by an alternative method since electrowinning from the chloride-rich acid solution was not effective.

  7. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2001-01-01

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interefere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  8. Stability of Indium Gallium Zinc Aluminum Oxide Thin-Film Transistors with Treatment Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yung-Hao; Lee, Ching-Ting

    2017-02-01

    The indium-gallium-zinc-aluminum-oxide (IGZAO) channel layer of the bottom-gate-type thin-film transistors (TFTs) was deposited on indium tin oxide-coated glass substrates using a magnetron radio frequency co-sputtering system with dual targets of indium gallium zinc oxide and Al. The 3 s orbital of Al cations provided an extra transport pathway and widened the bottom of the conduction band, thus increasing the electron mobility in the IGZAO films. The Al-O bonds could sustain the stability of oxygen of the IGZAO films. The IGZAO TFTs were processed by O2 plasma and post-annealing treatments. Hysteresis analysis was carried out in order to study the stability of the resulting IGZAO TFTs, the positive bias temperature stress (PBTS) performance, and the hot carrier effect were also measured. For the IGZAO TFTs, the threshold voltage shift of the PBTS performance and the hot carrier effect were 0.1 V and 0.06 V, respectively. Overall, the IGZAO TFTs exhibited good stability in this study.

  9. Electron Transport Layer-Free Inverted Organic Solar Cells Fabricated with Highly Transparent Low-Resistance Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide/Ag/Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide Multilayer Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Kwon, Sung-Nam; Na, Seok-In; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Yoo, Young-Zo; Im, Hyeong-Seop; Seong, Tae-Yeon

    2017-04-01

    Inverted organic solar cells (OSCs) have been fabricated with conventional Sn-doped indium oxide (ITO) and amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO)/Ag/a-IGZO (39 nm/19 nm/39 nm) (a-IAI) electrodes and their electrical characteristics characterized. The ITO and optimized a-IAI electrodes showed high transmittance of 96% and 88% at 500 nm, respectively. The carrier concentration and sheet resistance of the ITO and a-IAI films were 8.46 × 1020 cm-3 and 7.96 × 1021 cm-3 and 14.18 Ω/sq and 4.24 Ω/sq, respectively. Electron transport layer (ETL)-free OSCs with the a-IAI electrode exhibited power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.66%, similar to that of ZnO ETL-based OSCs with ITO electrode (3.27%). However, the ETL-free OSCs with the a-IAI electrode showed much higher PCE than the ETL-free OSCs with the ITO electrode (0.84%). Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that the work function of the a-IAI electrode was 4.15 eV. This improved performance was attributed to the various roles of the a-IAI electrode, e.g., as an effective ETL and a hole blocking layer.

  10. Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide visible-light phototransistor with a polymeric light absorption layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zan, Hsiao-Wen; Chen, Wei-Tsung; Hsueh, Hsiu-Wen; Kao, Shih-Chin; Ku, Ming-Che; Tsai, Chuang-Chuang; Meng, Hsin-Fei

    2010-11-01

    This work demonstrates a real-time visible-light phototransistor comprised of a wide-band-gap amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) and a narrow-band-gap polymeric capping layer. The capping layer and the IGZO layer form a p-n junction diode. The p-n junction absorbs visible light and consequently injects electrons into the IGZO layer, which in turn affects the body voltage as well as the threshold voltage of a-IGZO TFT. The hysteresis behavior due to the charges at IGZO back interface is also discussed.

  11. Frequency-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Injecting Eutectic Gallium-Indium (EGaIn) Liquid Metal Alloy.

    PubMed

    Ling, Kenyu; Kim, Hyung Ki; Yoo, Minyeong; Lim, Sungjoon

    2015-11-06

    In this study, we demonstrated a new class of frequency-switchable metamaterial absorber in the X-band. Eutectic gallium-indium (EGaIn), a liquid metal alloy, was injected in a microfluidic channel engraved on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) to achieve frequency switching. Numerical simulation and experimental results are presented for two cases: when the microfluidic channels are empty, and when they are filled with liquid metal. To evaluate the performance of the fabricated absorber prototype, it is tested with a rectangular waveguide. The resonant frequency was successfully switched from 10.96 GHz to 10.61 GHz after injecting liquid metal while maintaining absorptivity higher than 98%.

  12. Frequency-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Injecting Eutectic Gallium-Indium (EGaIn) Liquid Metal Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Kenyu; Kim, Hyung Ki; Yoo, Minyeong; Lim, Sungjoon

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated a new class of frequency-switchable metamaterial absorber in the X-band. Eutectic gallium-indium (EGaIn), a liquid metal alloy, was injected in a microfluidic channel engraved on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) to achieve frequency switching. Numerical simulation and experimental results are presented for two cases: when the microfluidic channels are empty, and when they are filled with liquid metal. To evaluate the performance of the fabricated absorber prototype, it is tested with a rectangular waveguide. The resonant frequency was successfully switched from 10.96 GHz to 10.61 GHz after injecting liquid metal while maintaining absorptivity higher than 98%. PMID:26561815

  13. Paired-pulse facilitation achieved in protonic/electronic hybrid indium gallium zinc oxide synaptic transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Li Qiang Ding, Jian Ning; Huang, Yu Kai; Zhu, Li Qiang

    2015-08-15

    Neuromorphic devices with paired pulse facilitation emulating that of biological synapses are the key to develop artificial neural networks. Here, phosphorus-doped nanogranular SiO{sub 2} electrolyte is used as gate dielectric for protonic/electronic hybrid indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) synaptic transistor. In such synaptic transistors, protons within the SiO{sub 2} electrolyte are deemed as neurotransmitters of biological synapses. Paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) behaviors for the analogous information were mimicked. The temperature dependent PPF behaviors were also investigated systematically. The results indicate that the protonic/electronic hybrid IGZO synaptic transistors would be promising candidates for inorganic synapses in artificial neural network applications.

  14. Highly bendable characteristics of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide transistors embedded in a neutral plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang Bum; Na, HyungIl; Yoo, Soon Sung; Park, Kwon-Shik

    2015-11-01

    The electromechanical response of an amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) fabricated on a polyimide substrate was investigated as a function of the neutral axis location and strain history of the bending system. Here, we demonstrate the pronounced bending characteristics of a-IGZO TFTs and their backplane under extreme mechanical strain when they are embedded in a neutral plane (NP). After being subjected to tensile stress, the devices positioned near the NP were observed to function well against a cyclic bending stress of 2 mm radius with 100,000 times, while TFTs farther from the neutral surface exhibited modified electrical properties.

  15. Controlled VLS Growth of Indium, Gallium and Tin Oxide Nanowiresvia Chemical Vapor Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.C.; Aloni, S.; McCready, D.E.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    2006-03-13

    We utilized a vapor-liquid-solid growth technique to synthesize indium oxide, gallium oxide, and tin oxide nanowires using chemical vapor transport with gold nanoparticles as the catalyst. Using identical growth parameters we were able to synthesize single crystal nanowires typically 40-100 nm diameter and more than 10-100 microns long. The products were characterized by means of XRD, SEM and HRTEM. All the wires were grown under the same growth conditions with growth rates inversely proportional to the source metal vapor pressure. Initial experiments show that different transparent oxide nanowires can be grown simultaneously on a single substrate with potential application for multi-component gas sensors.

  16. Competing weak localization and weak antilocalization in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Hsiang; Lyu, Syue-Ru; Heredia, Elica; Liu, Shu-Hao; Jiang, Pei-hsun; Liao, Po-Yung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Hua-Mao

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the gate-voltage dependence and the temperature dependence of the magnetoconductivity of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors. A weak-localization feature is observed at small magnetic fields on top of an overall negative magnetoconductivity at higher fields. An intriguing controllable competition between weak localization and weak antilocalization is observed by tuning the gate voltage or by varying the temperature. Our findings reflect controllable quantum interference competition in the electron systems in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors.

  17. Range-gated imaging with an indium-gallium-arsenide-based focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brubaker, Robert M.; Ettenberg, Martin H.; O'Grady, Matthew T.; Blessinger, Michael A.; Dries, J. C.

    2004-08-01

    Range-gated imaging using indium gallium arsenide based focal plane arrays enables both depth and intensity imaging with eye-safe lasers while remaining covert to night vision goggles. We report on a focal plane array consisting of an indium gallium arsenide photodiode array hybrid-integrated with a CMOS readout circuit, resulting in an all solid state device. A 5 V supply avoids the complication of high voltage supplies and improves reliability, while also allowing the device to be small and lightweight. The spectral sensitivity of InGaAs extends from 0.9 microns to 1.7 microns, allowing the use of commercially available pulsed lasers with 1.5 micron wavelength, several millijoule pulse energies, and nanosecond scale pulse durations. SUI is developing a 320 x 256 pixel imager with the ability to conduct range gated imaging with sub-100 ns gates, while also allowing a 16 ms integration time for imaging in a staring mode. The pixels are fabricated on a 25 micron pitch for a compact device, and all pixels are gated simultaneously for "snapshot" exposure. High in-pixel gain with nearly noiseless amplification and low dark current enable high sensitivity imaging from ultra-short gates to video rate imaging.

  18. ANALYSIS OF THE WATER-SPLITTING CAPABILITIES OF GALLIUM INDIUM PHOSPHIDE NITRIDE (GaInPN)

    SciTech Connect

    Head, J.; Turner, J.

    2007-01-01

    With increasing demand for oil, the fossil fuels used to power society’s vehicles and homes are becoming harder to obtain, creating pollution problems and posing hazard’s to people’s health. Hydrogen, a clean and effi cient energy carrier, is one alternative to fossil fuels. Certain semiconductors are able to harness the energy of solar photons and direct it into water electrolysis in a process known as photoelectrochemical water-splitting. P-type gallium indium phosphide (p-GaInP2) in tandem with GaAs is a semiconductor system that exhibits water-splitting capabilities with a solar-tohydrogen effi ciency of 12.4%. Although this material is effi cient at producing hydrogen through photoelectrolysis it has been shown to be unstable in solution. By introducing nitrogen into this material, there is great potential for enhanced stability. In this study, gallium indium phosphide nitride Ga1-yInyP1-xNx samples were grown using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition in an atmospheric-pressure vertical reactor. Photocurrent spectroscopy determined these materials to have a direct band gap around 2.0eV. Mott-Schottky analysis indicated p-type behavior with variation in fl atband potentials with varied frequencies and pH’s of solutions. Photocurrent onset and illuminated open circuit potential measurements correlated to fl atband potentials determined from previous studies. Durability analysis suggested improved stability over the GaInP2 system.

  19. Metabolic imaging with gallium-68- and indium-111-labeled low-density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Moerlein, S.M.; Daugherty, A.; Sobel, B.E.; Welch, M.J. )

    1991-02-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) labeled with either gallium-68 ({sup 68}Ga) or indium-111 ({sup 111}In) was evaluated as a potential PET or SPECT radiopharmaceutical for determination of hepatic lipoprotein metabolism in rabbits. Gallium-68 or {sup 111}In was linked to LDL via diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) with a 25-70% radiochemical yield. Studies in vivo that compared {sup 68}Ga- or {sup 111}In-DTPA-LDL with dilactitol-({sup 125}I)-tyramine LDL and 131I-LDL showed that both {sup 68}Ga- and {sup 111}In-labeled LDL behaved as residualizing radiotracers. Localization of radioactivity within the liver of normal rabbits was visualized clearly with ({sup 68}Ga)DTPA-LDL by PET and with ({sup 111}In)DTPA-LDL by gamma scintigraphy. Significant differences were observed in hepatic uptake of normal compared with hypercholesterolemic rabbits in which low-capacity LDL receptor-mediated catabolism was saturated. Gallium-68 and {sup 111}In-DTPA-LDL are attractive radiopharmaceuticals for noninvasive delineation of tissue LDL metabolism under normal and pathophysiologic conditions.

  20. Potential aluminium(III)- and gallium(III)-selective optical sensors based on porphyrazines.

    PubMed

    Goslinski, Tomasz; Tykarska, Ewa; Kryjewski, Michal; Osmalek, Tomasz; Sobiak, Stanislaw; Gdaniec, Maria; Dutkiewicz, Zbigniew; Mielcarek, Jadwiga

    2011-01-01

    Porphyrazines possessing non-coordinating alkyl (propyl) and aralkyl (4-tert-butylphenyl) groups in the periphery were studied as optical sensors for a set of mono-, di- and trivalent cations. Investigated porphyrazines in the UV-Vis monitored titrations revealed significant responses towards aluminium and gallium cations, unlike other metal ions studied. Additionally, porphyrazine possessing 4-tert-butylphenyl peripheral substituents showed sensor property towards ruthenium cation and was chosen for further investigation. The presence of isosbestic points in absorption spectra for its titration with aluminium, gallium and ruthenium cations, accompanied by a linear Benesi-Hildebrand plot, proved complex formation. The continuous variation method was used to determine binding stoichiometry in 1:1 porphyrazine-metal ratio. X-Ray studies and density functional theory calculations were employed to investigate octa(4-tert-butylphenyl)porphyrazine structure. The results helped to explain the observed selectivity towards certain ions. Interaction between ion and porphyrazine meso nitrogen in a Lewis acid-Lewis base manner is proposed.

  1. The comparison between gallium arsenide and indium gallium arsenide as materials for solar cell performance using Silvaco application

    SciTech Connect

    Zahari, Suhaila Mohd; Norizan, Mohd Natashah; Mohamad, Ili Salwani; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat; Taking, Sanna

    2015-05-15

    The work presented in this paper is about the development of single and multilayer solar cells using GaAs and InGaAs in AM1.5 condition. The study includes the modeling structure and simulation of the device using Silvaco applications. The performance in term of efficiency of Indium Gallium Arsenide (InGaAs) and GaAs material was studied by modification of the doping concentration and thickness of material in solar cells. The efficiency of the GaAs solar cell was higher than InGaAs solar cell for single layer solar cell. Single layer GaAs achieved an efficiency about 25% compared to InGaAs which is only 2.65% of efficiency. For multilayer which includes both GaAs and InGaAs, the output power, P{sub max} was 8.91nW/cm² with the efficiency only 8.51%. GaAs is one of the best materials to be used in solar cell as a based compared to InGaAs.

  2. The comparison between gallium arsenide and indium gallium arsenide as materials for solar cell performance using Silvaco application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahari, Suhaila Mohd; Norizan, Mohd Natashah; Mohamad, Ili Salwani; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat; Taking, Sanna

    2015-05-01

    The work presented in this paper is about the development of single and multilayer solar cells using GaAs and InGaAs in AM1.5 condition. The study includes the modeling structure and simulation of the device using Silvaco applications. The performance in term of efficiency of Indium Gallium Arsenide (InGaAs) and GaAs material was studied by modification of the doping concentration and thickness of material in solar cells. The efficiency of the GaAs solar cell was higher than InGaAs solar cell for single layer solar cell. Single layer GaAs achieved an efficiency about 25% compared to InGaAs which is only 2.65% of efficiency. For multilayer which includes both GaAs and InGaAs, the output power, Pmax was 8.91nW/cm² with the efficiency only 8.51%. GaAs is one of the best materials to be used in solar cell as a based compared to InGaAs.

  3. Ohmic contact formation process on low n-type gallium arsenide (GaAs) using indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Seong-Uk; Jung, Woo-Shik; Lee, In-Yeal; Jung, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Gil-Ho; Park, Jin-Hong

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • We propose a method to fabricate non-gold Ohmic contact on low n-type GaAs with IGZO. • 0.15 A/cm{sup 2} on-current and 1.5 on/off-current ratio are achieved in the junction. • InAs and InGaAs formed by this process decrease an electron barrier height. • Traps generated by diffused O atoms also induce a trap-assisted tunneling phenomenon. - Abstract: Here, an excellent non-gold Ohmic contact on low n-type GaAs is demonstrated by using indium gallium zinc oxide and investigating through time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, J–V measurement, and H [enthalpy], S [entropy], Cp [heat capacity] chemistry simulation. In is diffused through GaAs during annealing and reacts with As, forming InAs and InGaAs phases with lower energy bandgap. As a result, it decreases the electron barrier height, eventually increasing the reverse current. In addition, traps generated by diffused O atoms induce a trap-assisted tunneling phenomenon, increasing generation current and subsequently the reverse current. Therefore, an excellent Ohmic contact with 0.15 A/cm{sup 2} on-current density and 1.5 on/off-current ratio is achieved on n-type GaAs.

  4. Molybdenum Disulfide as a Protection Layer and Catalyst for Gallium Indium Phosphide Solar Water Splitting Photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Britto, Reuben J.; Benck, Jesse D.; Young, James L.; Hahn, Christopher; Deutsch, Todd G.; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2016-06-02

    Gallium indium phosphide (GaInP2) is a semiconductor with promising optical and electronic properties for solar water splitting, but its surface stability is problematic as it undergoes significant chemical and electrochemical corrosion in aqueous electrolytes. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanomaterials are promising to both protect GaInP2 and to improve catalysis since MoS2 is resistant to corrosion and also possesses high activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this work, we demonstrate that GaInP2 photocathodes coated with thin MoS2 surface protecting layers exhibit excellent activity and stability for solar hydrogen production, with no loss in performance (photocurrent onset potential, fill factor, and light limited current density) after 60 hours of operation. This represents a five-hundred fold increase in stability compared to bare p-GaInP2 samples tested in identical conditions.

  5. Self-aligned top-gate amorphous gallium indium zinc oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaechul; Song, Ihun; Kim, Sunil; Kim, Sangwook; Kim, Changjung; Lee, Jaecheol; Lee, Hyungik; Lee, Eunha; Yin, Huaxiang; Kim, Kyoung-Kok; Kwon, Kee-Won; Park, Youngsoo

    2008-08-01

    We have demonstrated a self-aligned top-gate amorphous gallium indium zinc oxide thin film transistor (a-GIZO TFT). It had a field effect mobility of 5 cm2/V s, a threshold voltage of 0.2 V, and a subthreshold swing of 0.2 V/decade. Ar plasma was treated on the source/drain region of the a-GIZO active layer to reduce the series resistance. After Ar plasma treatment, the surface of the source/drain region was divided into In-rich and In-deficient regions. The a-GIZO TFT also had a constant sheet resistance of 1 kΩ/◻ for a film thickness of over 40 nm. The interface between the source/drain Mo metal and the Ar plasma-treated a-GIZO indicated a good Ohmic contact and a contact resistivity of 50 μΩ cm2.

  6. Amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide Thin-Film Transistors Fabricated by Direct Transfer Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Susumu; Okamura, Shoichi

    2010-10-01

    This letter describes the fabrication of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) by direct transfer printing. An a-IGZO layer and a silicon dioxide (SiO2) layer were sequentially sputtered on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamp; the stamp was then pressed onto a glass substrate on which a gate metal had been previously deposited. Then, a-IGZO/SiO2 layers were successfully transferred by simply releasing the stamp from the substrate; a bottom-gate TFT was finally constructed. The measured current-voltage characteristics exhibited good field-effect mobility exceeding 10 cm2 V-1 s-1. The on/off current ratio and subthreshold slope were 4×105 and 0.86 V/decade, respectively.

  7. Progress of Aluminum Gallium Indium Phosphide Red Laser Diodes and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Hiroki

    2015-11-01

    High-quality aluminum gallium indium phosphide epitaxial layers for red laser diodes have been grown by the metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. The layers have some issues, such as narrowing of the band gap, low p-carrier concentration, difficulty in epitaxial growth for quantum well structures, and generating of high-density hillocks. The issues have been successfully solved by introducing (100) substrates with misorientaion toward the [011] direction. High performance transverse-mode stabilized lasers are achieved by introducing the substrates, novel strain-compensated multiple-quantum well structures, which can add large strain to the wells, and low-loss optical cavity. This article also describes their applications.

  8. Bowtie nanoantenna integrated with indium gallium arsenide antimonide for uncooled infrared detector with enhanced sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sangjo; Sarabandi, Kamal

    2013-12-10

    A novel high-impedance nanoantenna with an embedded matching network is implemented to realize a highly sensitive infrared detector. A bowtie antenna is operated at its antiparallel resonance and loaded with a small low-bandgap (E(g)=0.52  eV) indium gallium arsenide antimonide (InGaAsSb) p-n junction. The structure is optimized for maximum power transfer and significant field enhancement at its terminals for a desired frequency band where the maximum quantum efficiency of InGaAsSb is observed. The sensitivity improvement of the proposed detector is evaluated against the traditional bulk detector and it is shown that the detectivity is improved by the field enhancement factor, which is approximately 20 for the case considered here.

  9. Water-soluble thin film transistors and circuits based on amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sung Hun; Kang, Seung-Kyun; Cho, In-Tak; Han, Sang Youn; Chung, Ha Uk; Lee, Dong Joon; Shin, Jongmin; Baek, Geun Woo; Kim, Tae-il; Lee, Jong-Ho; Rogers, John A

    2015-04-22

    This paper presents device designs, circuit demonstrations, and dissolution kinetics for amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) comprised completely of water-soluble materials, including SiNx, SiOx, molybdenum, and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). Collections of these types of physically transient a-IGZO TFTs and 5-stage ring oscillators (ROs), constructed with them, show field effect mobilities (∼10 cm2/Vs), on/off ratios (∼2×10(6)), subthreshold slopes (∼220 mV/dec), Ohmic contact properties, and oscillation frequency of 5.67 kHz at supply voltages of 19 V, all comparable to otherwise similar devices constructed in conventional ways with standard, nontransient materials. Studies of dissolution kinetics for a-IGZO films in deionized water, bovine serum, and phosphate buffer saline solution provide data of relevance for the potential use of these materials and this technology in temporary biomedical implants.

  10. Study of breakdown voltage of indium-gallium-zinc-oxide-based Schottky diode

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Qian; Yan, Linlong; Luo, Yi; Song, Aimin

    2015-03-16

    In contrast to the intensive studies on thin-film transistors based on indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO), the research on IGZO-based diodes is still very limited, particularly on their behavior and stability under high bias voltages. Our experiments reveal a sensitive dependence of the breakdown voltage of IGZO Schottky diodes on the anode metal and the IGZO film thickness. Devices with an Au anode are found to breakdown easily at a reverse bias as low as −2.5 V, while the devices with a Pd anode and a 200-nm, fully depleted IGZO layer have survived up to −15 V. All diodes are fabricated by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at room temperature without any thermal treatment, yet showing an ideality factor as low as 1.14, showing the possibility of achieving high-performance Schottky diodes on flexible plastic substrate.

  11. Electrical effect of titanium diffusion on amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seung-Ha; Jung, Woo-Shik; Park, Jin-Hong

    2012-11-19

    In this work, thermal diffusion phenomenon of Ti into amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide ({alpha}-IGZO) was carefully investigated with secondary ion mass spectroscopy, I-V, and R{sub s} measurement systems and HSC chemistry simulation tool. According to the experimental and simulated results, the diffused Ti atoms were easily oxidized due to its lowest oxidation free energy. Since oxygen atoms were decomposed from the {alpha}-IGZO during the oxidation of Ti, the number of oxygen vacancies working as electron-donating sites in {alpha}-IGZO was dramatically increased, contributing to the decrease of resistivity ({rho}) from 1.96 {Omega} cm (as-deposited {alpha}-IGZO) to 1.33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}{Omega} cm (350 Degree-Sign C annealed {alpha}-IGZO).

  12. Molybdenum Disulfide as a Protection Layer and Catalyst for Gallium Indium Phosphide Solar Water Splitting Photocathodes.

    PubMed

    Britto, Reuben J; Benck, Jesse D; Young, James L; Hahn, Christopher; Deutsch, Todd G; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2016-06-02

    Gallium indium phosphide (GaInP2) is a semiconductor with promising optical and electronic properties for solar water splitting, but its surface stability is problematic as it undergoes significant chemical and electrochemical corrosion in aqueous electrolytes. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanomaterials are promising to both protect GaInP2 and to improve catalysis because MoS2 is resistant to corrosion and also possesses high activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this work, we demonstrate that GaInP2 photocathodes coated with thin MoS2 surface protecting layers exhibit excellent activity and stability for solar hydrogen production, with no loss in performance (photocurrent onset potential, fill factor, and light-limited current density) after 60 h of operation. This represents a 500-fold increase in stability compared to bare p-GaInP2 samples tested in identical conditions.

  13. Growth of gallium nitride and indium nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-03-07

    We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices.

  14. An automatic-recovery inertial switch based on a gallium-indium metal droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Teng; Zhang, Dongxing; Huang, Liu; Wang, Jiong

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, an automatic-recovery inertial switch is presented which for the first time adopts gallium-indium (EGaIn) as the switching metal droplet. The device consists of a glass substrate with patterned sensing electrodes, a PDMS microfluidic chip with microchannels and microvalves and a metal droplet. Here, we used EGaIn as the conductive element of the switch because it has several advantages compared with other conductive materials such as water or mercury. Specifically, the proposed device has the ability to automatically recover and can be used repeatedly. In the initial off-state, the droplet is stored in the reservoir. During the working state, the metal droplet passes through the channel and connects the sensing electrodes when the acceleration exceeds the designed threshold level. After that, the EGaIn will return to its original position by a subtle use of its structural characteristics.

  15. Effect of microtextured surface topography on the wetting behavior of eutectic gallium-indium alloys.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Rebecca K; Boley, J William; Stone, Howard A; Weaver, James C; Wood, Robert J

    2014-01-21

    Liquid-embedded elastomer electronics have recently attracted much attention as key elements of highly deformable and "soft" electromechanical systems. Many of these fluid-elastomer composites utilize liquid metal alloys because of their high conductivities and inherent compliance. Understanding how these alloys interface with surfaces of various composition and texture is critical to the development of parallel processing technology, which is needed to create more complex and low-cost systems. In this work, we explore the wetting behaviors between droplets of gallium-indium alloys and thin metal films, with an emphasis on tin and indium substrates. We find that metallic droplets reactively wet thin metal foils, but the wettability of the foils may be tuned by the surface texture (produced by sputtering). The effects of both composition and texture of the substrate on wetting dynamics are quantified by measuring contact angle and droplet contact diameter as a function of time. Finally, we apply the Cassie-Baxter model to the sputtered and native substrates to gain insight into the behavior of liquid metals and the role of the oxide formation during interfacial processes.

  16. Exploiting the Negative Polarization Properties of Indium Gallium Nitride (InGaN)/Gallium Nitride (GaN) Heterostructures to Achieve Frequency Doubled Blue-green Lasers with Deep UV (250 nm) Emission (Year 2)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    100 A/cm 2 , well beyond the current density 10–25 A/cm 2 at which conventional p-up, Ga-polar InGaN /GaN multi-quantum well LEDs exhibit significant...nitride ICP inductively coupled plasma InGaN indium gallium nitride KDP potassium di-hydrogen phosphate LBO lithium triborate LEDs light...Exploiting the Negative Polarization Properties of Indium Gallium Nitride ( InGaN )/Gallium Nitride (GaN) Heterostructures to Achieve Frequency

  17. Preparation of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide precursor films by electrodeposition for fabricating high efficiency solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Hasoon, Falah S.; Wiesner, Holm; Keane, James; Noufi, Rommel; Ramanathan, Kannan

    1999-02-16

    A photovoltaic cell exhibiting an overall conversion efficiency of 13.6% is prepared from a copper-indium-gallium-diselenide precursor thin film. The film is fabricated by first simultaneously electrodepositing copper, indium, gallium, and selenium onto a glass/molybdenum substrate (12/14). The electrodeposition voltage is a high frequency AC voltage superimposed upon a DC voltage to improve the morphology and growth rate of the film. The electrodeposition is followed by physical vapor deposition to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In.sub.1-n Ga.sub.x)Se.sub.2, with the ratio of Ga/(In+Ga) being approximately 0.39.

  18. Reference Data for the Density and Viscosity of Liquid Cadmium, Cobalt, Gallium, Indium, Mercury, Silicon, Thallium, and Zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Assael, Marc J.; Armyra, Ivi J.; Brillo, Juergen; Stankus, Sergei V.; Wu Jiangtao; Wakeham, William A.

    2012-09-15

    The available experimental data for the density and viscosity of liquid cadmium, cobalt, gallium, indium, mercury, silicon, thallium, and zinc have been critically examined with the intention of establishing both a density and a viscosity standard. All experimental data have been categorized into primary and secondary data according to the quality of measurement, the technique employed and the presentation of the data, as specified by a series of criteria. The proposed standard reference correlations for the density of liquid cadmium, cobalt, gallium, indium, silicon, thallium, and zinc are characterized by percent deviations at the 95% confidence level of 0.6, 2.1, 0.4, 0.5, 2.2, 0.9, and 0.7, respectively. In the case of mercury, since density reference values already exist, no further work was carried out. The standard reference correlations for the viscosity of liquid cadmium, cobalt, gallium, indium, mercury, silicon, thallium, and zinc are characterized by percent deviations at the 95% confidence level of 9.4, 14.0, 13.5, 2.1, 7.3, 15.7, 5.1, and 9.3, respectively.

  19. Distinctive signature of indium gallium nitride quantum dot lasing in microdisk cavities.

    PubMed

    Woolf, Alexander; Puchtler, Tim; Aharonovich, Igor; Zhu, Tongtong; Niu, Nan; Wang, Danqing; Oliver, Rachel; Hu, Evelyn L

    2014-09-30

    Low-threshold lasers realized within compact, high-quality optical cavities enable a variety of nanophotonics applications. Gallium nitride materials containing indium gallium nitride (InGaN) quantum dots and quantum wells offer an outstanding platform to study light-matter interactions and realize practical devices such as efficient light-emitting diodes and nanolasers. Despite progress in the growth and characterization of InGaN quantum dots, their advantages as the gain medium in low-threshold lasers have not been clearly demonstrated. This work seeks to better understand the reasons for these limitations by focusing on the simpler, limited-mode microdisk cavities, and by carrying out comparisons of lasing dynamics in those cavities using varying gain media including InGaN quantum wells, fragmented quantum wells, and a combination of fragmented quantum wells with quantum dots. For each gain medium, we use the distinctive, high-quality (Q ∼ 5,500) modes of the cavities, and the change in the highest-intensity mode as a function of pump power to better understand the dominant radiative processes. The variations of threshold power and lasing wavelength as a function of gain medium help us identify the possible limitations to lower-threshold lasing with quantum dot active medium. In addition, we have identified a distinctive lasing signature for quantum dot materials, which consistently lase at wavelengths shorter than the peak of the room temperature gain emission. These findings not only provide better understanding of lasing in nitride-based quantum dot cavity systems but also shed insight into the more fundamental issues of light-matter coupling in such systems.

  20. An Indium Gallium Arsenide Visible/SWIR Focal Plane Array for Low Light Level Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Marshall J.; Ettenberg, Martin H.; Lange, Michael J.; Olsen, Gregory H.

    1999-01-01

    PIN photodiodes fabricated from indium gallium arsenide lattice-matched to indium phosphide substrates (In(.53)Ga(.47)As/InP) exhibit low reverse saturation current densities (JD < 10(exp -8) A/sq cm), and high shunt resistance-area products (RoA > 10(exp 6) omega-sq cm) at T=290K. Backside-illuminated, hybrid-integrated InGaAs FPAs are sensitive from 0.9 micrometers to 1.7 micrometers. 290K detectivities, D(*), greater than 10(exp 14) cm-(square root of Hz/W) are demonstrated. This represents the highest room temperature detectivity of any infrared material. The long wavelength cutoff (1.7 micrometers) makes In(.53)Ga(.47)As an idea match to the available airglow that has major peaks at 1.3 micrometers and 1.6 micrometers. The short wavelength 'cut-on' at 0.9 micrometers is due to absorption in the InP substrate. We will report on new InGaAs FPA epitaxial structures and processing techniques. These have resulted in improved performance in the form of a 10 x increase in detectivity and visible response via removal of the InP substrate. The resulting device features visible and SWIR response with greater than 15% quantum efficiency at 0.5 micrometers while maintaining the long wavelength cutoff. Imaging has been demonstrated under overcast starlight/urban glow conditions with cooling provided by a single stage thermoelectric cooler. Details on the material structure and device fabrication, quantitative characterization of spectral response and detectivity, as well as examples of night vision imagery are presented.

  1. Flexible indium-gallium-zinc-oxide Schottky diode operating beyond 2.45 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Li, Yunpeng; Zhang, Binglei; Wang, Hanbin; Xin, Qian; Song, Aimin

    2015-07-01

    Mechanically flexible mobile phones have been long anticipated due to the rapid development of thin-film electronics in the last couple of decades. However, to date, no such phone has been developed, largely due to a lack of flexible electronic components that are fast enough for the required wireless communications, in particular the speed-demanding front-end rectifiers. Here Schottky diodes based on amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) are fabricated on flexible plastic substrates. Using suitable radio-frequency mesa structures, a range of IGZO thicknesses and diode sizes have been studied. The results have revealed an unexpected dependence of the diode speed on the IGZO thickness. The findings enable the best optimized flexible diodes to reach 6.3 GHz at zero bias, which is beyond the critical benchmark speed of 2.45 GHz to satisfy the principal frequency bands of smart phones such as those for cellular communication, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and global satellite positioning.

  2. Surface cleaning procedures for thin films of indium gallium nitride grown on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, K.; Hunt, S.; Teplyakov, A.; Opila, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    Surface preparation procedures for indium gallium nitride (InGaN) thin films were analyzed for their effectiveness for carbon and oxide removal as well as for the resulting surface roughness. Aqua regia (3:1 mixture of concentrated hydrochloric acid and concentrated nitric acid, AR), hydrofluoric acid (HF), hydrochloric acid (HCl), piranha solution (1:1 mixture of sulfuric acid and 30% H 2O 2) and 1:9 ammonium sulfide:tert-butanol were all used along with high temperature anneals to remove surface contamination. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were utilized to study the extent of surface contamination and surface roughness, respectively. The ammonium sulfide treatment provided the best overall removal of oxygen and carbon. Annealing over 700 °C after a treatment showed an even further improvement in surface contamination removal. The piranha treatment resulted in the lowest residual carbon, while the ammonium sulfide treatment leads to the lowest residual oxygen. AFM data showed that all the treatments decreased the surface roughness (with respect to as-grown specimens) with HCl, HF, (NH 4) 2S and RCA procedures giving the best RMS values (˜0.5-0.8 nm).

  3. Forward-biased current annealing of radiation degraded indium phosphide and gallium arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, Sherif; Cypranowski, Corinne; Anspaugh, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The preliminary results of a novel approach to low-temperature annealing of previously irradiated indium phosphide and gallium arsenide solar cells are reported. The technique is based on forward-biased current annealing. The two types of III-V solar cells were irradiated with 1-MeV electrons to a fluence level of (1-10) x 10 to the 14th electrons/sq cm. Several annealing attempts were made, varying all conditions. Optimum annealing was achieved when cells were injected with minority currents at a constant 90 C. The current density for each type of cell was also determined. Significant recovery of degraded parameters was achieved in both cases. However, the InP cell recovery notably exceeded the recovery in GaAs cells. The recovery is thought to be caused by current-stimulated reordering of the radiator-induced displacement damage. Both types of cell were then subjected to several cycles of irradiation and annealing. The results were also very promising. The significant recovery of degraded cell parameters at low temperature might play a major role in considerably extending the end of life of future spacecraft.

  4. Point contacts at the copper-indium-gallium-selenide interface—A theoretical outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Adrien; Chacko, Binoy; Klenk, Reiner; Lauermann, Iver; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Liero, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that recombination in the space-charge region of copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) is dominant, at least in high efficiency solar cells with low band gap. The recent developments like potassium fluoride post deposition treatment and point-contact junction may call this into question. In this work, a theoretical outlook is made using three-dimensional simulations to investigate the effect of point-contact openings through a passivation layer on CIGS solar cell performance. A large set of solar cells is modeled under different scenarios for the charged defect levels and density, radius of the openings, interface quality, and conduction band offset. The positive surface charge created by the passivation layer induces band bending and this influences the contact (CdS) properties, making it beneficial for the open circuit voltage and efficiency, and the effect is even more pronounced when coverage area is more than 95%, and also makes a positive impact on the device performance, even in the presence of a spike at CIGS/CdS heterojunction.

  5. Electrical instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin film transistors under monochromatic light illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaoming; Wu, Chenfei; Lu, Hai; Ren, Fangfang; Xu, Qingyu; Ou, Huiling; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2012-06-01

    The electrical instability behaviors of a positive-gate-bias-stressed amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistor (TFT) are studied under monochromatic light illumination. It is found that as the wavelength of incident light reduces from 750 nm to 450 nm, the threshold voltage of the illuminated TFT shows a continuous negative shift, which is caused by photo-excitation of trapped electrons at the channel/dielectric interface. Meanwhile, an increase of the sub-threshold swing (SS) is observed when the illumination wavelength is below 625 nm (˜2.0 eV). The SS degradation is accompanied by a simultaneous increase of the field effect mobility (μFE) of the TFT, which then decreases at even shorter wavelength beyond 540 nm (˜2.3 eV). The variation of SS and μFE is explained by a physical model based on generation of singly ionized oxygen vacancies (Vo+) and double ionized oxygen vacancies (Vo2+) within the a-IGZO active layer by high energy photons, which would form trap states near the mid-gap and the conduction band edge, respectively.

  6. Performance of Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide Thin-Film Transistors in Saline Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Lacour, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    Transistors are often envisioned as alternative transducing devices to microelectrodes to communicate with the nervous system. Independently of the selected technology, the transistors should have reliable performance when exposed to physiological conditions (37°C, 5% CO2). Here, we report on the reliable performance of parylene encapsulated indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) based thin-film transistors (TFTs) after prolonged exposure to phosphate buffer saline solution in an incubator. The encapsulated IGZO TFTs (W/L = 500 μm/20 μm) have an ON/OFF current ratio of 107 and field effect mobility of 8.05 ± 0.78 cm2/Vs. The transistors operate within 4 V; their threshold voltages and subthreshold slope are ~1.9 V and 200 mV/decade, respectively. After weeks immersed in saline solution and at 37°C, we did not observe any significant deterioration in the transistors' performance. The long-term stability of IGZO transistors at physiological conditions is a promising result in the direction of metal oxide bioelectronics.

  7. Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide as electron transport layer in organic photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, H.; Malinowski, P. E.; Chasin, A.; Cheyns, D.; Steudel, S.; Schols, S.; Heremans, P.

    2015-04-01

    Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) is demonstrated as an electron transport layer (ETL) in a high-performance organic photodetector (OPD). Dark current in the range of 10 nA/cm2 at a bias voltage of -2 V and a high photoresponse in the visible spectrum were obtained in inverted OPDs with poly(3-hexylthiophene) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester active layer. The best results were obtained for the optimum a-IGZO thickness of 7.5 nm with specific detectivity of 3 × 1012 Jones at the wavelength of 550 nm. The performance of the best OPD devices using a-IGZO was shown to be comparable to state-of-the-art devices based on TiOx as ETL, with higher rectification achieved in reverse bias. Yield and reproducibility were also enhanced with a-IGZO, facilitating fabrication of large area OPDs. Furthermore, easier integration with IGZO-based readout backplanes can be envisioned, where the channel material can be used as photodiode buffer layer after additional treatment.

  8. Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide as electron transport layer in organic photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, H.; Malinowski, P. E. Chasin, A.; Cheyns, D.; Steudel, S.; Schols, S.; Heremans, P.

    2015-04-06

    Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) is demonstrated as an electron transport layer (ETL) in a high-performance organic photodetector (OPD). Dark current in the range of 10 nA/cm{sup 2} at a bias voltage of −2 V and a high photoresponse in the visible spectrum were obtained in inverted OPDs with poly(3-hexylthiophene) and phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester active layer. The best results were obtained for the optimum a-IGZO thickness of 7.5 nm with specific detectivity of 3 × 10{sup 12} Jones at the wavelength of 550 nm. The performance of the best OPD devices using a-IGZO was shown to be comparable to state-of-the-art devices based on TiO{sub x} as ETL, with higher rectification achieved in reverse bias. Yield and reproducibility were also enhanced with a-IGZO, facilitating fabrication of large area OPDs. Furthermore, easier integration with IGZO-based readout backplanes can be envisioned, where the channel material can be used as photodiode buffer layer after additional treatment.

  9. Investigation of copper indium gallium selenide material growth by selenization of metallic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Junfeng; Liao, Cheng; Jiang, Tao; Xie, Huamu; Zhao, Kui; Besland, M.-P.

    2013-11-01

    We report a study of copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) thin film growth in the annealing process at temperature range from 120 °C to 600 °C. Thin films were prepared by sputtering metal precursors and subsequent selenization process. Surface morphologies of thin films were observed by using high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Phases in quaternary systems Cu-In-Ga-Se were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Evolution of crystalline structure in the film surface was studied by Raman spectra. A possible reaction path from metallic precursors to a single CIGS phase was obtained by merging all results of SEM, XRD and Raman. Above 210 °C, selenium reacted with Cu and In to form binary selenide. CuSe crystalline platelets were observed clearly in the film surfaces. When temperature was reaching 380 °C, Cu2-xSe and InSe reacted with excess Se to form CuInSe2 (CIS) and contributed to the grain growth. Above 410 °C, Ga-rich phase was detected in the films. With increased temperature, Ga diffused into CIS crystalline lattices. Finally, at 600 °C, a single phase of Cu-In-Ga-Se quaternary system was formed. A large number of triangular and hexagonal structures were observed in the film due to a re-crystalline process at a high annealing temperature.

  10. Impact of atmospheric species on copper indium gallium selenide solar cell stability: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theelen, Mirjam

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the measurement techniques and results of studies on the stability of copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) solar cells and their individual layers in the presence of atmospheric species is presented: in these studies, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells, their molybdenum back contact, and their ZnO:Al front contact were exposed to liquid water purged with gases from the atmosphere, like carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), and air. The samples were analyzed before, during, and after exposure in order to define their stability under these conditions. The complete CIGS solar cells as well as the ZnO:Al front contact degraded rapidly when exposed to H2O combined with CO2, while they were relatively stable in H2O purged with O2 or N2. This was caused by either degradation of the grain boundaries in the ZnO:Al film or by the dissolution of part of this film. Uncovered molybdenum films, on the other hand, oxidized rapidly in the presence of H2O and O2, while they were more stable in the presence of H2O with N2 and/or CO2.

  11. Unusual strategies for using indium gallium nitride grown on silicon (111) for solid-state lighting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon-sik; Brueckner, Eric; Song, Jizhou; Li, Yuhang; Kim, Seok; Lu, Chaofeng; Sulkin, Joshua; Choquette, Kent; Huang, Yonggang; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Rogers, John A

    2011-06-21

    Properties that can now be achieved with advanced, blue indium gallium nitride light emitting diodes (LEDs) lead to their potential as replacements for existing infrastructure in general illumination, with important implications for efficient use of energy. Further advances in this technology will benefit from reexamination of the modes for incorporating this materials technology into lighting modules that manage light conversion, extraction, and distribution, in ways that minimize adverse thermal effects associated with operation, with packages that exploit the unique aspects of these light sources. We present here ideas in anisotropic etching, microscale device assembly/integration, and module configuration that address these challenges in unconventional ways. Various device demonstrations provide examples of the capabilities, including thin, flexible lighting "tapes" based on patterned phosphors and large collections of small light emitters on plastic substrates. Quantitative modeling and experimental evaluation of heat flow in such structures illustrates one particular, important aspect of their operation: small, distributed LEDs can be passively cooled simply by direct thermal transport through thin-film metallization used for electrical interconnect, providing an enhanced and scalable means to integrate these devices in modules for white light generation.

  12. The influence of random indium alloy fluctuations in indium gallium nitride quantum wells on the device behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tsung-Jui; Wu, Yuh-Renn; Shivaraman, Ravi; Speck, James S.

    2014-09-21

    In this paper, we describe the influence of the intrinsic indium fluctuation in the InGaN quantum wells on the carrier transport, efficiency droop, and emission spectrum in GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). Both real and randomly generated indium fluctuations were used in 3D simulations and compared to quantum wells with a uniform indium distribution. We found that without further hypothesis the simulations of electrical and optical properties in LEDs such as carrier transport, radiative and Auger recombination, and efficiency droop are greatly improved by considering natural nanoscale indium fluctuations.

  13. Further studies of the anodic dissolution in sodium chloride electrolyte of aluminium alloys containing tin and gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestoridi, Maria; Pletcher, Derek; Wharton, Julian A.; Wood, Robert J. K.

    As part of a programme to develop a high power density, Al/air battery with a NaCl brine electrolyte, the high rate dissolution of an aluminium alloy containing tin and gallium was investigated in a small volume cell. The objective was to define the factors that limit aluminium dissolution in condition that mimic a high power density battery. In a cell with a large ratio of aluminium alloy to electrolyte, over a range of current densities the extent of dissolution was limited to ∼1000 C cm -2 of anode surface by a thick layer of loosely bound, crystalline deposit on the Al alloy anode formed by precipitation from solution. This leads to a large increase in impedance and acts as a barrier to transport of ions.

  14. Evaluation of critical materials for five advanced design photovoltaic cells with an assessment of indium and gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, R.L.; Gurwell, W.E.; Jamieson, W.M.; Long, L.W.; Pawlewicz, W.T.; Smith, S.A.; Teeter, R.R.

    1980-05-01

    The objective of this study is to identify potential material supply constraints due to the large-scale deployment of five advanced photovoltaic (PV) cell designs, and to suggest strategies to reduce the impacts of these production capacity limitations and potential future material shortages. This report presents the results of the screening of the five following advanced PV cell designs: polycrystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide frontwall, polycrystalline gallium arsenide MIS, and advanced concentrator-500X. Each of these five cells is screened individually assuming that they first come online in 1991, and that 25 GWe of peak capacity is online by the year 2000. A second computer screening assumes that each cell first comes online in 1991 and that each cell has 5 GWe of peak capacity by the year 2000, so that the total online cpacity for the five cells is 25 GWe. Based on a review of the preliminary basline screening results, suggestions were made for varying such parameters as the layer thickness, cell production processes, etc. The resulting PV cell characterizations were then screened again by the CMAP computer code. Earlier DOE sponsored work on the assessment of critical materials in PV cells conclusively identtified indium and gallium as warranting further investigation as to their availability. Therefore, this report includes a discussion of the future availability of gallium and indium. (WHK)

  15. Synthesis of Two New Group 13 Benzoato-Chloro Complexes: A Structural Study of Gallium and Indium Chelating Carboxylates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duraj, Stan A.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Woloszynek, Robert; Protasiewicz, John D.; Dequeant, Michael; Ren, Tong

    2010-01-01

    Two new heteroleptic chelated-benzoato gallium (III) and indium (III) complexes have been prepared and structurally characterized. The molecular structures of [GaCl2(4-Mepy)2(O2CPh)]4-Mepy (1) and [InCl(4-Mepy)2(O2CPh)2]4-Mepy (2) have been determined by single-crystal x-ray diffraction. The gallium compound (1) is a distorted octahedron with cis-chloride ligands co-planar with the chelating benzoate and the 4-methylpyridines trans to each other. This is the first example of a Ga(III) structure with a chelating benzoate. The indium compound (2) is a distorted pentagonal bipyramid with two chelating benzoates, one 4-methylpyridine in the plane and a chloride trans to the other 4-methylpyridine. The indium bis-benzoate is an unusual example of a seven-coordinate structure with classical ligands. Both complexes, which due to the chelates, could also be described as pseudo-trigonal bipyramidal, include a three-bladed motif with three roughly parallel aromatic rings that along with a solvent of crystallization and electron-withdrawing chloride ligand(s) stabilize the solid-state structures.

  16. Synthesis, Characterization, and Processing of Copper, Indium, and Gallium Dithiocarbamates for Energy Conversion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duraj, S. A.; Duffy, N. V.; Hepp, A. F.; Cowen, J. E.; Hoops, M. D.; Brothrs, S. M.; Baird, M. J.; Fanwick, P. E.; Harris, J. D.; Jin, M. H.-C.

    2009-01-01

    Ten dithiocarbamate complexes of indium(III) and gallium(III) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectra and melting point. Each complex was decomposed thermally and its decomposition products separated and identified with the combination of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Their potential utility as photovoltaic materials precursors was assessed. Bis(dibenzyldithiocarbamato)- and bis(diethyldithiocarbamato)copper(II), Cu(S2CN(CH2C6H5)2)2 and Cu(S2CN(C2H5)2)2 respectively, have also been examined for their suitability as precursors for copper sulfides for the fabrication of photovoltaic materials. Each complex was decomposed thermally and the products analyzed by GC/MS, TGA and FTIR. The dibenzyl derivative complex decomposed at a lower temperature (225-320 C) to yield CuS as the product. The diethyl derivative complex decomposed at a higher temperature (260-325 C) to yield Cu2S. No Cu containing fragments were noted in the mass spectra. Unusual recombination fragments were observed in the mass spectra of the diethyl derivative. Tris(bis(phenylmethyl)carbamodithioato-S,S'), commonly referred to as tris(N,N-dibenzyldithiocarbamato)indium(III), In(S2CNBz2)3, was synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1(bar) with two molecules per unit cell. The material was further characterized using a novel analytical system employing the combined powers of thermogravimetric analysis, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to investigate its potential use as a precursor for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of thin film materials for photovoltaic applications. Upon heating, the material thermally decomposes to release CS2 and benzyl moieties in to the gas phase, resulting in bulk In2S3. Preliminary spray CVD experiments indicate that In(S2CNBz2)3 decomposed on a Cu substrate reacts to produce

  17. Wavelength-multiplexed pumping with 478- and 520-nm indium gallium nitride laser diodes for Ti:sapphire laser.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Ryota; Tanaka, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Naoto; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2017-02-20

    We experimentally reveal the pump-induced loss in a Ti:sapphire laser crystal with 451-nm indium gallium nitride (InGaN) laser diode pumping and show that 478-nm pumping can reduce such loss. The influence of the pump-induced loss at 451-nm pumping is significant even for a crystal that exhibits higher effective figure-of-merit and excellent laser performance at 520-nm pumping. We demonstrate the power scaling of a Ti:sapphire laser by combining 478- and 520-nm InGaN laser diodes and obtain CW output power of 593 mW.

  18. Blade-coated sol-gel indium-gallium-zinc-oxide for inverted polymer solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yan-Huei; Tsai, Pei-Ting; Chang, Chia-Ju; Meng, Hsin-Fei; Horng, Sheng-Fu; Zan, Hsiao-Wen; Lin, Hung-Cheng; Liu, Hung-Chuan; Tseng, Mei-Rurng; Yeh, Han-Cheng

    2016-11-01

    The inverted organic solar cell was fabricated by using sol-gel indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) as the electron-transport layer. The IGZO precursor solution was deposited by blade coating with simultaneous substrate heating at 120 °C from the bottom and hot wind from above. Uniform IGZO film of around 30 nm was formed after annealing at 400 °C. Using the blend of low band-gap polymer poly[(4,8-bis-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-benzo(1,2-b:4,5-b')dithiophene)-2,6-diyl-alt- (4-(2-ethylhexanoyl)-thieno [3,4-b]thiophene-)-2-6-diyl)] (PBDTTT-C-T) and [6,6]-Phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester ([70]PCBM) as the active layer for the inverted organic solar cell, an efficiency of 6.2% was achieved with a blade speed of 180 mm/s for the IGZO. The efficiency of the inverted organic solar cells was found to depend on the coating speed of the IGZO films, which was attributed to the change in the concentration of surface OH groups. Compared to organic solar cells of conventional structure using PBDTTT-C-T: [70]PCBM as active layer, the inverted organic solar cells showed significant improvement in thermal stability. In addition, the chemical composition, as well as the work function of the IGZO film at the surface and inside can be tuned by the blade speed, which may find applications in other areas like thin-film transistors.

  19. Low-frequency noise properties in Pt-indium gallium zinc oxide Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiawei; Zhang, Linqing; Ma, Xiaochen; Wilson, Joshua; Jin, Jidong; Du, Lulu; Xin, Qian; Song, Aimin

    2015-08-31

    The low-frequency noise properties of Pt-indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) Schottky diodes at different forward biases are investigated. The IGZO layer and Pt contact were deposited by RF sputtering at room temperature. The diode showed an ideality factor of 1.2 and a barrier height of 0.94 eV. The current noise spectral density exhibited 1/f behavior at low frequencies. The analysis of the current dependency of the noise spectral density revealed that for the as-deposited diode, the noise followed Luo's mobility and diffusivity fluctuation model in the thermionic-emission-limited region and Hooge's empirical theory in the series-resistance-limited region. A low Hooge's constant of 1.4 × 10{sup −9} was found in the space-charge region. In the series-resistance-limited region, the Hooge's constant was 2.2 × 10{sup −5}. After annealing, the diode showed degradation in the electrical performance. The interface-trap-induced noise dominated the noise spectrum. By using the random walk model, the interface-trap density was obtained to be 3.6 × 10{sup 15 }eV{sup −1 }cm{sup −2}. This work provides a quantitative approach to analyze the properties of Pt-IGZO interfacial layers. These low noise properties are a prerequisite to the use of IGZO Schottky diodes in switch elements in memory devices, photosensors, and mixer diodes.

  20. Gallium

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Discovered in 1875 through a study of its spectral properties, gallium was the first element to be uncovered following the publication of Mendeleev`s Periodic Table. French chemist, P.E. Lecoq de Boisbaudran, named his element discovery in honor of his native country; gallium is derived from the Latin word for France-{open_quotes}Gallia.{close_quotes}. This paper describes the properties, sources, and market for gallium.

  1. Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of the surface chemistry and treatments of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Craig; Nordlund, Dennis; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Contreras, Miguel; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Mansfield, Lorelle; Hurst, Katherine E.; Dameron, Arrelaine; Ramanathan, Kannan; Prendergast, David; Christensen, Steven T.

    2016-11-10

    The surface and near surface structure of the copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) absorber layer is integral to producing of a high-quality photovoltaic junction. By using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and monitoring multiple elemental absorption edges with both theory and experiment, we are able to identify several features of the surface of CIGS as a function of composition and surface treatments. The XAS data shows trends in the near surface region of oxygen, copper, indium and gallium species as the copper content is varied in the films. The oxygen surface species are also monitored through a series of experiments that systematically investigate the effects of water and various solutions of: ammonium hydroxide, cadmium sulfate, and thiourea. These being components of cadmium sulfide chemical bath deposition (CBD). Characteristics of the CBD are correlated with a restorative effect that produces a normalized, uniform surface chemistry as measured by XAS. This surface chemistry is found in CIGS solar cells with excellent power conversion efficiency (~19%). Finally, the results provide new insight for CIGS processing strategies that seek to replace CBD and/or cadmium sulfide.

  2. Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of the surface chemistry and treatments of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS)

    DOE PAGES

    Schwartz, Craig; Nordlund, Dennis; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; ...

    2016-11-10

    The surface and near surface structure of the copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) absorber layer is integral to producing of a high-quality photovoltaic junction. By using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and monitoring multiple elemental absorption edges with both theory and experiment, we are able to identify several features of the surface of CIGS as a function of composition and surface treatments. The XAS data shows trends in the near surface region of oxygen, copper, indium and gallium species as the copper content is varied in the films. The oxygen surface species are also monitored through a series of experiments that systematically investigate themore » effects of water and various solutions of: ammonium hydroxide, cadmium sulfate, and thiourea. These being components of cadmium sulfide chemical bath deposition (CBD). Characteristics of the CBD are correlated with a restorative effect that produces a normalized, uniform surface chemistry as measured by XAS. This surface chemistry is found in CIGS solar cells with excellent power conversion efficiency (~19%). Finally, the results provide new insight for CIGS processing strategies that seek to replace CBD and/or cadmium sulfide.« less

  3. High stability mechanisms of quinary indium gallium zinc aluminum oxide multicomponent oxide films and thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Ting Lin, Yung-Hao; Lin, Jhong-Ham

    2015-01-28

    Quinary indium gallium zinc aluminum oxide (IGZAO) multicomponent oxide films were deposited using indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) target and Al target by radio frequency magnetron cosputtering system. An extra carrier transport pathway could be provided by the 3 s orbitals of Al cations to improve the electrical properties of the IGZO films, and the oxygen instability could be stabilized by the strong Al-O bonds in the IGZAO films. The electron concentration change and the electron mobility change of the IGZAO films for aging time of 10 days under an air environment at 40 °C and 75% humidity were 20.1% and 2.4%, respectively. The experimental results verified the performance stability of the IGZAO films. Compared with the thin film transistors (TFTs) using conventional IGZO channel layer, in conducting the stability of TFTs with IGZAO channel layer, the transconductance g{sub m} change, threshold voltage V{sub T} change, and the subthreshold swing S value change under the same aging condition were improved to 7.9%, 10.5%, and 14.8%, respectively. Furthermore, the stable performances of the IGZAO TFTs were also verified by the positive gate bias stress. In this research, the quinary IGZAO multicomponent oxide films and that applied in TFTs were the first studied in the literature.

  4. Aluminium, gallium, and molybdenum toxicity to the tropical marine microalga Isochrysis galbana.

    PubMed

    Trenfield, Melanie A; van Dam, Joost W; Harford, Andrew J; Parry, David; Streten, Claire; Gibb, Karen; van Dam, Rick A

    2015-08-01

    There is a shortage of established chronic toxicity test methods for assessing the toxicity of contaminants to tropical marine organisms. The authors tested the suitability of the tropical microalga Isochrysis galbana for use in routine ecotoxicology and assessed the effects of 72-h exposures to copper (Cu, a reference toxicant), aluminium (Al), gallium (Ga), and molybdenum (Mo), key metals of alumina refinery discharge, on the growth of I. galbana at 3 temperatures: 24 °C, 28 °C, and 31 °C. The sensitivity of both I. galbana and the test method was validated by the response to Cu exposure, with 10% and 50% effect concentrations (EC10 and EC50) of 2.5 μg/L and 18 μg/L, respectively. The EC10 and EC50 values for total Al at 28 °C were 640 μg/L and 3045 μg/L, respectively. The toxicity of both Cu and Al at 24 °C and 31 °C was similar to that at 28 °C. There was no measurable toxicity from dissolved Ga exposures of up to 6000 μg/L or exposures to dissolved Mo of up to 9500 μg/L. Solubility limits at 28 °C for the dissolved fractions (<10 kDa) of Al, Ga, and Mo were approximately 650 μg/L Al, >7000 μg/L Ga, and >6000 μg/L Mo. In test solutions containing >650 μg/L total Al, dissolved and precipitated forms of Al were present, with precipitated Al becoming more dominant as total Al increased. The test method proved suitable for routine ecotoxicology, with I. galbana showing sensitivity to Cu but Al, Ga, and Mo exhibiting little to no toxicity to this species.

  5. Gallium and indium complexes containing the bis(imino)phenoxide ligand: synthesis, structural characterization and polymerization studies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Swarup; Gowda, Ravikumar R; Jagan, Rajamony; Chakraborty, Debashis

    2015-06-14

    A series of gallium and indium complexes containing a bis(imino)phenolate ligand framework were synthesized and completely characterized with different spectroscopic techniques. The molecular structures of a few complexes were determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. These compounds were found to be extremely active towards the bulk ring opening polymerization (ROP) of lactides yielding polymers with high number average molecular weight (Mn) and controlled molecular weight distributions (MWDs). The neutral complexes produce isotactic enriched poly(lactic acid) (PLA) from rac-lactide (rac-LA) under melt conditions, whereas the ionic complex produces atactic PLA. The polymerizations are controlled, as evidenced by the narrow molecular distribution (MWDs) of the isolated polymers in addition to the linear nature of number average molecular weight (Mn) versus conversion plots with variations in monomer to catalyst ratios. The kinetic and mechanistic studies associated with these polymerizations have been performed.

  6. One-pot electrodeposition, characterization and photoactivity of stoichiometric copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin films for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Harati, Mohammad; Jia, Jia; Giffard, Kévin; Pellarin, Kyle; Hewson, Carly; Love, David A; Lau, Woon Ming; Ding, Zhifeng

    2010-12-14

    Herein we report the one-pot electrodeposition of copper indium gallium diselenide, CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se(2) (CIGS), thin films as the p-type semiconductor in an ionic liquid medium consisting of choline chloride/urea eutectic mixture known as Reline. The thin films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman microspectroscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy. Based on the results of the characterizations, the electrochemical bath recipe was optimized to obtain stoichiometric CIGS films with x between 0.2 and 0.4. The chemical activity and photoreactivity of the optimized CIGS films were found to be uniform using scanning electrochemical microscopy and scanning photoelectrochemical microscopy. Low-cost stoichiometric CIGS thin films in one-pot were successfully fabricated.

  7. Room-temperature-operated sensitive hybrid gas sensor based on amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zan, Hsiao-Wen; Li, Chang-Hung; Yeh, Chun-Cheng; Dai, Ming-Zhi; Meng, Hsin-Fei; Tsai, Chuang-Chuang

    2011-06-01

    An organic sensing layer is capped onto an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) to form a hybrid sensor. The organic layer, served as a second gate, forms a p-n junction with the a-IGZO film. Oxidizing or reducing vapor molecules act like electron acceptors or electron donors to change the potential of the organic layer and the current of a-IGZO TFT. A sensitive and reversible response to 100 ppb ammonia and 100 ppb acetone is obtained at room temperature. This letter opens a route to develop low-cost large-area bio/chemical sensor arrays based on the emerging a-IGZO TFT technology.

  8. High-performance amorphous gallium indium zinc oxide thin-film transistors through N2O plasma passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaechul; Kim, Sangwook; Kim, Changjung; Kim, Sunil; Song, Ihun; Yin, Huaxiang; Kim, Kyoung-Kok; Lee, Sunghoon; Hong, Kiha; Lee, Jaecheol; Jung, Jaekwan; Lee, Eunha; Kwon, Kee-Won; Park, Youngsoo

    2008-08-01

    Amorphous-gallium-indium-zinc-oxide (a-GIZO) thin filmtransistors (TFTs) are fabricated without annealing, using processes and equipment for conventional a-Si :H TFTs. It has been very difficult to obtain sound TFT characteristics, because the a-GIZO active layer becomes conductive after dry etching the Mo source/drain electrode and depositing the a-SiO2 passivation layer. To prevent such damages, N2O plasma is applied to the back surface of the a-GIZO channel layer before a-SiO2 deposition. N2O plasma-treated a-GIZO TFTs exhibit excellent electrical properties: a field effect mobility of 37cm2/Vs, a threshold voltage of 0.1V, a subthreshold swing of 0.25V/decade, and an Ion/off ratio of 7.

  9. High-performance amorphous gallium indium zinc oxide thin-film transistors through N{sub 2}O plasma passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jaechul; Kim, Sangwook; Kim, Changjung; Kim, Sunil; Song, Ihun; Yin, Huaxiang; Kim, Kyoung-Kok; Lee, Sunghoon; Hong, Kiha; Park, Youngsoo; Lee, Jaecheol; Jung, Jaekwan; Lee, Eunha; Kwon, Kee-Won

    2008-08-04

    Amorphous-gallium-indium-zinc-oxide (a-GIZO) thin filmtransistors (TFTs) are fabricated without annealing, using processes and equipment for conventional a-Si:H TFTs. It has been very difficult to obtain sound TFT characteristics, because the a-GIZO active layer becomes conductive after dry etching the Mo source/drain electrode and depositing the a-SiO{sub 2} passivation layer. To prevent such damages, N{sub 2}O plasma is applied to the back surface of the a-GIZO channel layer before a-SiO{sub 2} deposition. N{sub 2}O plasma-treated a-GIZO TFTs exhibit excellent electrical properties: a field effect mobility of 37 cm{sup 2}/V s, a threshold voltage of 0.1 V, a subthreshold swing of 0.25 V/decade, and an I{sub on/off} ratio of 7.

  10. Effect of organic buffer layer in the electrical properties of amorphous-indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Hyung, Gun Woo; Li, Zhao-Hui; Son, Sung-Yong; Kwon, Sang Jik; Kim, Young Kwan; Cho, Eou Sik

    2012-07-01

    In this research, we reported on the fabrication of top-contact amorphous-indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) with an organic buffer layer between inorganic gate dielectric and active layer in order to improve the electrical properties of devices. By inserting an organic buffer layer, it was possible to make an affirmation of the improvements in the electrical characteristics of a-IGZO TFTs such as subthreshold slope (SS), on/off current ratio (I(ON/OFF)), off-state current, and saturation field-effect mobility (muFE). The a-IGZO TFTs with the cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol (c-PVA) buffer layer exhibited the pronounced improvements of the muFE (17.4 cm2/Vs), SS (0.9 V/decade), and I(ON/OFF) (8.9 x 10(6)).

  11. Short-Term Synaptic Plasticity Regulation in Solution-Gated Indium-Gallium-Zinc-Oxide Electric-Double-Layer Transistors.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chang Jin; Liu, Yang Hui; Zhu, Li Qiang; Feng, Ping; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2016-04-20

    In the biological nervous system, synaptic plasticity regulation is based on the modulation of ionic fluxes, and such regulation was regarded as the fundamental mechanism underlying memory and learning. Inspired by such biological strategies, indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) electric-double-layer (EDL) transistors gated by aqueous solutions were proposed for synaptic behavior emulations. Short-term synaptic plasticity, such as paired-pulse facilitation, high-pass filtering, and orientation tuning, was experimentally emulated in these EDL transistors. Most importantly, we found that such short-term synaptic plasticity can be effectively regulated by alcohol (ethyl alcohol) and salt (potassium chloride) additives. Our results suggest that solution gated oxide-based EDL transistors could act as the platforms for short-term synaptic plasticity emulation.

  12. Improved characteristics of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide-based resistive random access memory using hydrogen post-annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dae Yun; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Tae Geun

    2016-08-01

    The authors report an improvement in resistive switching (RS) characteristics of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO)-based resistive random access memory devices using hydrogen post-annealing. Because this a-IGZO thin film has oxygen off-stoichiometry in the form of deficient and excessive oxygen sites, the film properties can be improved by introducing hydrogen atoms through the annealing process. After hydrogen post-annealing, the device exhibited a stable bipolar RS, low-voltage set and reset operation, long retention (>105 s), good endurance (>106 cycles), and a narrow distribution in each current state. The effect of hydrogen post-annealing is also investigated by analyzing the sample surface using X-ray photon spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

  13. Recovery from ultraviolet-induced threshold voltage shift in indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors by positive gate bias

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P.; Chen, T. P.; Li, X. D.; Wong, J. I.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Y.; Leong, K. C.

    2013-11-11

    The effect of short-duration ultraviolet (UV) exposure on the threshold voltage (V{sub th}) of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors (TFTs) and its recovery characteristics were investigated. The V{sub th} exhibited a significant negative shift after UV exposure. The V{sub th} instability caused by UV illumination is attributed to the positive charge trapping in the dielectric layer and/or at the channel/dielectric interface. The illuminated devices showed a slow recovery in threshold voltage without external bias. However, an instant recovery can be achieved by the application of positive gate pulses, which is due to the elimination of the positive trapped charges as a result of the presence of a large amount of field-induced electrons in the interface region.

  14. A compact model and direct parameters extraction techniques For amorphous gallium-indium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, Oana; Castro-Carranza, Alejandra; Cerdeira, Antonio; Estrada, Magali; Barquinha, Pedro; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira; Miljakovic, Slobodan; Iñiguez, Benjamin

    2016-12-01

    An advanced compact and analytical drain current model for the amorphous gallium indium zinc oxide (GIZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) is proposed. Its output saturation behavior is improved by introducing a new asymptotic function. All model parameters were extracted using an adapted version of the Universal Method and Extraction Procedure (UMEM) applied for the first time for GIZO devices in a simple and direct form. We demonstrate the correct behavior of the model for negative VDS, a necessity for a complete compact model. In this way we prove the symmetry of source and drain electrodes and extend the range of applications to both signs of VDS. The model, in Verilog-A code, is implemented in Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools, such as Smart Spice, and compared with measurements of TFTs. It describes accurately the experimental characteristics in the whole range of GIZO TFTs operation, making the model suitable for the design of circuits using these types of devices.

  15. Defect generation in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by positive bias stress at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Jae Gwang; Mativenga, Mallory; Jang, Jin; Migliorato, Piero

    2014-04-07

    We report on the generation and characterization of a hump in the transfer characteristics of amorphous indium gallium zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by positive bias temperature stress. The hump depends strongly on the gate bias stress at 100 °C. Due to the hump, the positive shift of the transfer characteristic in deep depletion is always smaller that in accumulation. Since, the latter shift is twice the former, with very good correlation, we conclude that the effect is due to creation of a double acceptor, likely to be a cation vacancy. Our results indicate that these defects are located near the gate insulator/active layer interface, rather than in the bulk. Migration of donor defects from the interface towards the bulk may also occur under PBST at 100 °C.

  16. Fabrication of Amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide Thin Film Transistor by using Focused Ion Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wencong

    Compared with other transparent semiconductors, amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) has both good uniformity and high electron mobility, which make it as a good candidate for displays or large-scale transparent circuit. The goal of this research is to fabricate alpha-IGZO thin film transistor (TFT) with channel milled by focused ion beam (FIB). TFTs with different channel geometries can be achieved by applying different milling strategies, which facilitate modifying complex circuit. Technology Computer-Aided Design (TCAD) was also introduced to understand the effect of trapped charges on the device performance. The investigation of the trapped charge at IGZO/SiO2 interface was performed on the IGZO TFT on p-Silicon substrate with thermally grown SiO2 as dielectric. The subgap density-of-state model was used for the simulation, which includes conduction band-tail trap states and donor-like state in the subgap. The result shows that the de-trapping and donor-state ionization determine the interface trapped charge density at various gate biases. Simulation of IGZO TFT with FIB defined channel on the same substrate was also applied. The drain and source were connected intentionally during metal deposition and separated by FIB milling. Based on the simulation, the Ga ions in SiO2 introduced by the ion beam was drifted by gate bias and affects the saturation drain current. Both side channel and direct channel transparent IGZO TFTs were fabricated on the glass substrate with coated ITO. Higher ion energy (30 keV) was used to etch through the substrate between drain and source and form side channels at the corner of milled trench. Lower ion energy (16 keV) was applied to stop the milling inside IGZO thin film and direct channel between drain and source was created. Annealing after FIB milling removed the residual Ga ions and the devices show switch feature. Direct channel shows higher saturation drain current (~10-6 A) compared with side channel (~10-7 A) because

  17. Extraction of gallium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions by trioctylammonium-based mixed ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Katsuta, Shoichi; Okai, Miho; Yoshimoto, Yuki; Kudo, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    The extractabilities of aluminium(III), gallium(III), and indium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions were investigated using a mixture of two protic ionic liquids, trioctylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([TOAH][NTf(2)]) and trioctylammonium nitrate ([TOAH][NO(3)]). At a HCl concentration of 4 mol L(-1) or more, gallium(III) was nearly quantitatively extracted and the extractability order was Ga > Al > In. The extractability of gallium(III) increased with increasing [TOAH][NO(3)] content in the mixed ionic liquid. The extracted gallium(III) was quantitatively stripped with aqueous nitric acid solutions. The separation and recovery of gallium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions containing excess indium(III) was demonstrated using the mixed ionic liquid.

  18. Analysis of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistor contact metal using Pilling-Bedworth theory and a variable capacitance diode model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Ahmed; Hasko, David G.; Milne, William I.; Flewitt, Andrew J.

    2013-04-01

    It is widely reported that threshold voltage and on-state current of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide bottom-gate thin-film transistors are strongly influenced by the choice of source/drain contact metal. Electrical characterisation of thin-film transistors indicates that the electrical properties depend on the type and thickness of the metal(s) used. Electron transport mechanisms and possibilities for control of the defect state density are discussed. Pilling-Bedworth theory for metal oxidation explains the interaction between contact metal and amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide, which leads to significant trap formation. Charge trapping within these states leads to variable capacitance diode-like behavior and is shown to explain the thin-film transistor operation.

  19. Strategies to indium nitride and gallium nitride nanoparticles: Low-temperature, solution-phase and precursor routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingman, Sean Douglas

    I present new strategies to low-temperature solution-phase synthesis of indium and gallium nitride (InN and GaN) ceramic materials. The strategies include: direct conversion of precursor molecules to InN by pyrolysis, solution-phase synthesis of nanostructured InN fibers via molecular precursors and co-reactants, and synthesis of powders through reactions derived from molten-salt chemistry. Indium nitride powders are prepared by pyrolysis of the precursors R 2InN3 (R = t-Bu (1), i-Amyl(2), Et(3), i-Pr( 4)). The precursors are synthesized via azide-alkoxide exchange of R2InOMe with Me3SiN3. The precursors are coordination polymers containing five-coordinate indium centers. Pyrolysis of 1 and 2 under N2 at 400°C yields powders consisting primarily of InN with average crystal sizes of 15--35 nm. 1 yields nanocrystalline InN with average particle sizes of 7 nm at 250°C. 3 and 4 yield primarily In metal from pyrolysis. Refluxing 1 in diisopropylbenzene (203°C) in the presence of primary amines yields InN nanofibers 10--100 nm in length. InN nanofibers of up to 1 mum can be synthesized by treating 1 with 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (DMHy) The DMHy appears to control the fiber length by acting as a secondary source of active nitrogen in order to sustain fiber growth. The resulting fibers are attached to droplets of indium metal implying a solution-liquid-solid growth mechanism. Precursor 4 yields crystalline InN whiskers when reacted with DMHy. Reactions of 4 with reducing agents such as HSnBu3, yield InN nanoparticles with an average crystallite size of 16 nm. Gallium precursors R2GaN3 (R = t-Bu( 5), Me3SiCH2(6) and i-Pr( 7)), synthesized by azide-alkoxide exchange, are found to be inert toward solution decomposition and do not yield GaN. These compounds are molecular dimers and trimers unlike the indium analogs. Compound 6 displays a monomer-dimer equilibrium in benzene solution, but exists as a solid-state trimer. InN powders are also synthesized by reactions of InCl3 and

  20. High efficiency copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajanikant, Ray Jayminkumar

    The generation of electrical current from the solar radiation is known as the photovoltaic effect. Solar cell, also known as photovoltaic (PV) cell, is a device that works on the principle of photovoltaic effect, and is widely used for the generation of electricity. Thin film polycrystalline solar cells based on copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) are admirable candidates for clean energy production with competitive prices in the near future. CIGS based polycrystalline thin film solar cells with efficiencies of 20.3 % and excellent temperature stability have already been reported at the laboratory level. The present study discusses about the fabrication of CIGS solar cell. Before the fabrication part of CIGS solar cell, a numerical simulation is carried out using One-Dimensional Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic Structures (AMPS-ID) for understanding the physics of a solar cell device, so that an optimal structure is analyzed. In the fabrication part of CIGS solar cell, Molybdenum (Mo) thin film, which acts as a 'low' resistance metallic back contact, is deposited by RF magnetron sputtering on organically cleaned soda lime glass substrate. The major advantages for using Mo are high temperature, (greater than 600 °C), stability and inertness to CIGS layer (i.e., no diffusion of CIGS into Mo). Mo thin film is deposited at room temperature (RT) by varying the RF power and the working pressure. The Mo thin films deposited with 100 W RF power and 1 mTorr working pressure show a reflectivity of above average 50 % and the low sheet resistance of about 1 O/□. The p-type CIGS layer is deposited on Mo. Before making thin films of CIGS, a powder of CIGS material is synthesized using melt-quenching method. Thin films of CIGS are prepared by a single-stage flash evaporation process on glass substrates, initially, for optimization of deposition parameters and than on Mo coated glass substrates for device fabrication. CIGS thin film is deposited at 250 °C at a

  1. A novel bioassay using the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite to evaluate chronic effects of aluminium, gallium and molybdenum in tropical marine receiving environments.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Joost W; Trenfield, Melanie A; Harries, Simon J; Streten, Claire; Harford, Andrew J; Parry, David; van Dam, Rick A

    2016-11-15

    A need exists for appropriate tools to evaluate risk and monitor potential effects of contaminants in tropical marine environments, as currently impact assessments are conducted by non-representative approaches. Here, a novel bioassay is presented that allows for the estimation of the chronic toxicity of contaminants in receiving tropical marine environments. The bioassay is conducted using planktonic larvae of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite and is targeted at generating environmentally relevant, chronic toxicity data for water quality guideline derivation or compliance testing. The developmental endpoint demonstrated a consistently high control performance, validated through the use of copper as a reference toxicant. In addition, the biological effects of aluminium, gallium and molybdenum were assessed. The endpoint expressed high sensitivity to copper and moderate sensitivity to aluminium, whereas gallium and molybdenum exhibited no discernible effects, even at high concentrations, providing valuable information on the toxicity of these elements in tropical marine waters.

  2. Indium gallium nitride-based ultraviolet, blue, and green light-emitting diodes functionalized with shallow periodic hole patterns

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyun; Salas-Montiel, Rafael; Lerondel, Gilles; Jeong, Mun Seok

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the improvement in the light output power of indium gallium nitride (InGaN)-based ultraviolet (UV), blue, and green light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by fabricating shallow periodic hole patterns (PHPs) on the LED surface through laser interference lithography and inductively coupled plasma etching. Noticeably, different enhancements were observed in the light output powers of the UV, blue, and green LEDs with negligible changes in the electrical properties in the light output power versus current and current versus voltage curves. In addition, confocal scanning electroluminescence microscopy is employed to verify the correlation between the enhancement in the light output power of the LEDs with PHPs and carrier localization of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells. Light propagation through the PHPs on the UV, blue, and green LEDs is simulated using a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method to confirm the experimental results. Finally, we suggest optimal conditions of PHPs for improving the light output power of InGaN LEDs based on the experimental and theoretical results. PMID:28374856

  3. Crystallization behavior of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide films and its effects on thin-film transistor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suko, Ayaka; Jia, JunJun; Nakamura, Shin-ichi; Kawashima, Emi; Utsuno, Futoshi; Yano, Koki; Shigesato, Yuzo

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering and post-annealed in air at 300-1000 °C for 1 h to investigate the crystallization behavior in detail. X-ray diffraction, electron beam diffraction, and high-resolution electron microscopy revealed that the IGZO films showed an amorphous structure after post-annealing at 300 °C. At 600 °C, the films started to crystallize from the surface with c-axis preferred orientation. At 700-1000 °C, the films totally crystallized into polycrystalline structures, wherein the grains showed c-axis preferred orientation close to the surface and random orientation inside the films. The current-gate voltage (Id-Vg) characteristics of the IGZO thin-film transistor (TFT) showed that the threshold voltage (Vth) and subthreshold swing decreased markedly after the post-annealing at 300 °C. The TFT using the totally crystallized films also showed the decrease in Vth, whereas the field-effect mobility decreased considerably.

  4. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics.

  5. Saddle-like deformation in a dielectric elastomer actuator embedded with liquid-phase gallium-indium electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wissman, J.; Finkenauer, L.; Deseri, L.; Majidi, C.

    2014-10-14

    We introduce a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) composed of liquid-phase Gallium-Indium (GaIn) alloy electrodes embedded between layers of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and examine its mechanics using a specialized elastic shell theory. Residual stresses in the dielectric and sealing layers of PDMS cause the DEA to deform into a saddle-like geometry (Gaussian curvature K<0). Applying voltage Φ to the liquid metal electrodes induces electrostatic pressure (Maxwell stress) on the dielectric and relieves some of the residual stress. This reduces the longitudinal bending curvature and corresponding angle of deflection ϑ. Treating the elastomer as an incompressible, isotropic, NeoHookean solid, we develop a theory based on the principle of minimum potential energy to predict the principal curvatures as a function of Φ. Based on this theory, we predict a dependency of ϑ on Φ that is in strong agreement with experimental measurements performed on a GaIn-PDMS composite. By accurately modeling electromechanical coupling in a soft-matter DEA, this theory can inform improvements in design and fabrication.

  6. Thin-film copper indium gallium selenide solar cell based on low-temperature all-printing process.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjeet; Jiu, Jinting; Sugahara, Tohru; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2014-09-24

    In the solar cell field, development of simple, low-cost, and low-temperature fabrication processes has become an important trend for energy-saving and environmental issues. Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) solar cells have attracted much attention due to the high absorption coefficient, tunable band gap energy, and high efficiency. However, vacuum and high-temperature processing in fabrication of solar cells have limited the applications. There is a strong need to develop simple and scalable methods. In this work, a CIGS solar cell based on all printing steps and low-temperature annealing is developed. CIGS absorber thin film is deposited by using dodecylamine-stabilized CIGS nanoparticle ink followed by printing buffer layer. Silver nanowire (AgNW) ink and sol-gel-derived ZnO precursor solution are used to prepare a highly conductive window layer ZnO/[AgNW/ZnO] electrode with a printing method that achieves 16 Ω/sq sheet resistance and 94% transparency. A CIGS solar cell based on all printing processes exhibits efficiency of 1.6% with open circuit voltage of 0.48 V, short circuit current density of 9.7 mA/cm(2), and fill factor of 0.34 for 200 nm thick CIGS film, fabricated under ambient conditions and annealed at 250 °C.

  7. Development of a unique laboratory standard: Indium gallium arsenide detector for the 500-1700 nm spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A planar (5 mm diameter) indium gallium arsenide detector having a high (greater than 50 pct) quantum efficiency from the visible into the infrared spectrum (500 to 1700 nm) was fabricated. Quantum efficiencies as high as 37 pct at 510 nm, 58 pct at 820 nm and 62 pct at 1300 nm and 1550 nm were measured. A planar InP/InGaAs detector structure was also fabricated using vapor phase epitaxy to grow device structures with 0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 micrometer thick InP caps. Quantum efficiency was studied as a function of cap thickness. Conventional detector structures were also used by completely etching off the InP cap after zinc diffusion. Calibrated quantum efficiencies were measured. Best results were obtained with devices whose caps were completely removed by etching. Certain problems still remain with these detectors including non-uniform shunt resistance, reproducibility, contact resistance and narrow band anti-reflection coatings.

  8. Indium gallium nitride-based ultraviolet, blue, and green light-emitting diodes functionalized with shallow periodic hole patterns.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyun; Salas-Montiel, Rafael; Lerondel, Gilles; Jeong, Mun Seok

    2017-04-04

    In this study, we investigated the improvement in the light output power of indium gallium nitride (InGaN)-based ultraviolet (UV), blue, and green light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by fabricating shallow periodic hole patterns (PHPs) on the LED surface through laser interference lithography and inductively coupled plasma etching. Noticeably, different enhancements were observed in the light output powers of the UV, blue, and green LEDs with negligible changes in the electrical properties in the light output power versus current and current versus voltage curves. In addition, confocal scanning electroluminescence microscopy is employed to verify the correlation between the enhancement in the light output power of the LEDs with PHPs and carrier localization of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells. Light propagation through the PHPs on the UV, blue, and green LEDs is simulated using a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method to confirm the experimental results. Finally, we suggest optimal conditions of PHPs for improving the light output power of InGaN LEDs based on the experimental and theoretical results.

  9. Impact of severe cracked germanium (111) substrate on aluminum indium gallium phosphate light-emitting-diode's electro-optical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annaniah, Luruthudass; Devarajan, Mutharasu

    2016-01-01

    Cracked die is a serious failure mode in the Light Emitting Diode (LED) industry - affecting LED quality and long-term reliability performance. In this paper an investigation has been carried out to find the correlation between severe cracked germanium (Ge) substrate of an aluminum indium gallium phosphate (AlInGaP) LED and its electro-optical performance after the Temperature Cycle (TC) test. The LED dice were indented at several bond forces using a die bonder. The indented dice were analysed using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The result showed that severe cracks were observed at 180 gF onward. As the force of indentation increases, crack formation also becomes more severe thus resulting in the chipping of the substrate. The cracked dies were packaged and the TC test was performed. The results did not show any electro-optical failure or degradation, even after a 1000 cycle TC test. Several mechanically cross-sectioned cracked die LEDs, were analysed using SEM and found that no crack reached the active layer. This shows that severely cracked Ge substrate are able to withstand a -40°C/+100°C TC test up to 1000 cycles and LED optical performance is not affected. A small leakage current was observed in all of the cracked die LEDs in comparison to the reference unit. However, this value is smaller than the product specification and is of no concern.

  10. Semiconductor to metallic transition in bulk accumulated amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide dual gate thin-film transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Minkyu; Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Jang, Jin

    2015-05-15

    We investigated the effects of top gate voltage (V{sub TG}) and temperature (in the range of 25 to 70 {sup o}C) on dual-gate (DG) back-channel-etched (BCE) amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) characteristics. The increment of V{sub TG} from -20V to +20V, decreases the threshold voltage (V{sub TH}) from 19.6V to 3.8V and increases the electron density to 8.8 x 10{sup 18}cm{sup −3}. Temperature dependent field-effect mobility in saturation regime, extracted from bottom gate sweep, show a critical dependency on V{sub TG}. At V{sub TG} of 20V, the mobility decreases from 19.1 to 15.4 cm{sup 2}/V ⋅ s with increasing temperature, showing a metallic conduction. On the other hand, at V{sub TG} of - 20V, the mobility increases from 6.4 to 7.5cm{sup 2}/V ⋅ s with increasing temperature. Since the top gate bias controls the position of Fermi level, the temperature dependent mobility shows metallic conduction when the Fermi level is above the conduction band edge, by applying high positive bias to the top gate.

  11. Ecotoxicological assessment of solar cell leachates: Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) cells show higher activity than organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells.

    PubMed

    Brun, Nadja Rebecca; Wehrli, Bernhard; Fent, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Despite the increasing use of photovoltaics their potential environmental risks are poorly understood. Here, we compared ecotoxicological effects of two thin-film photovoltaics: established copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Leachates were produced by exposing photovoltaics to UV light, physical damage, and exposure to environmentally relevant model waters, representing mesotrophic lake water, acidic rain, and seawater. CIGS cell leachates contained 583 μg L(-1) molybdenum at lake water, whereas at acidic rain and seawater conditions, iron, copper, zinc, molybdenum, cadmium, silver, and tin were present up to 7219 μg L(-1). From OPV, copper (14 μg L(-1)), zinc (87 μg L(-1)) and silver (78 μg L(-1)) leached. Zebrafish embryos were exposed until 120 h post-fertilization to these extracts. CIGS leachates produced under acidic rain, as well as CIGS and OPV leachates produced under seawater conditions resulted in a marked hatching delay and increase in heart edema. Depending on model water and solar cell, transcriptional alterations occurred in genes involved in oxidative stress (cat), hormonal activity (vtg1, ar), metallothionein (mt2), ER stress (bip, chop), and apoptosis (casp9). The effects were dependent on the concentrations of cationic metals in leachates. Addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid protected zebrafish embryos from morphological and molecular effects. Our study suggests that metals leaching from damaged CIGS cells, may pose a potential environmental risk.

  12. Improvement in gate bias stress instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors using microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Kwang-Won; Cho, Won-Ju

    2014-11-24

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of microwave irradiation (MWI) post-deposition-annealing (PDA) treatment on the gate bias stress instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors (a-IGZO TFTs) and compared the results with a conventional thermal annealing PDA treatment. The MWI-PDA-treated a-IGZO TFTs exhibited enhanced electrical performance as well as improved long-term stability with increasing microwave power. The positive turn-on voltage shift (ΔV{sub ON}) as a function of stress time with positive bias and varying temperature was precisely modeled on a stretched-exponential equation, suggesting that charge trapping is a dominant mechanism in the instability of MWI-PDA-treated a-IGZO TFTs. The characteristic trapping time and average effective barrier height for electron transport indicate that the MWI-PDA treatment effectively reduces the defects in a-IGZO TFTs, resulting in a superior resistance against gate bias stress.

  13. Channel length dependence of negative-bias-illumination-stress in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Jae Gwang; Mativenga, Mallory; Jang, Jin; Migliorato, Piero

    2015-06-21

    We have investigated the dependence of Negative-Bias-illumination-Stress (NBIS) upon channel length, in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). The negative shift of the transfer characteristic associated with NBIS decreases for increasing channel length and is practically suppressed in devices with L = 100-μm. The effect is consistent with creation of donor defects, mainly in the channel regions adjacent to source and drain contacts. Excellent agreement with experiment has been obtained by an analytical treatment, approximating the distribution of donors in the active layer by a double exponential with characteristic length L{sub D} ∼ L{sub n} ∼ 10-μm, the latter being the electron diffusion length. The model also shows that a device with a non-uniform doping distribution along the active layer is in all equivalent, at low drain voltages, to a device with the same doping averaged over the active layer length. These results highlight a new aspect of the NBIS mechanism, that is, the dependence of the effect upon the relative magnitude of photogenerated holes and electrons, which is controlled by the device potential/band profile. They may also provide the basis for device design solutions to minimize NBIS.

  14. Temperature-dependent bias-stress-induced electrical instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hui-Min; Yu, Guang; Lu, Hai; Wu, Chen-Fei; Tang, Lan-Feng; Zhou, Dong; Ren, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, You-Liao; Huang, Xiao-Ming

    2015-07-01

    The time and temperature dependence of threshold voltage shift under positive-bias stress (PBS) and the following recovery process are investigated in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. It is found that the time dependence of threshold voltage shift can be well described by a stretched exponential equation in which the time constant τ is found to be temperature dependent. Based on Arrhenius plots, an average effective energy barrier Eτstress = 0.72 eV for the PBS process and an average effective energy barrier Eτrecovery = 0.58 eV for the recovery process are extracted respectively. A charge trapping/detrapping model is used to explain the threshold voltage shift in both the PBS and the recovery process. The influence of gate bias stress on transistor performance is one of the most critical issues for practical device development. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB301900 and 2011CB922100) and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China

  15. Derived reference doses for three compounds used in the photovoltaics industry: Copper indium diselenide, copper gallium diselenide, and cadmium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Bernholc, N.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.

    1995-07-06

    Polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic modules made from copper indium diselenide (CIS), copper gallium diselenide (CGS), and cadmium telluride (CdTe) arc nearing commercial development. A wide range of issues are being examined as these materials move from the laboratory to large-scale production facilities to ensure their commercial success. Issues of traditional interest include module efficiency, stability and cost. More recently, there is increased focus given to environmental, health and safety issues surrounding the commercialization of these same devices. An examination of the toxicological properties of these materials, and their chemical parents is fundamental to this discussion. Chemicals that can present large hazards to human health or the environment are regulated often more strictly than those that are less hazardous. Stricter control over how these materials are handled and disposed can increase the costs associated with the production and use of these modules dramatically. Similarly, public perception can be strongly influenced by the inherent biological hazard that these materials possess. Thus, this report: presents a brief background tutorial on how toxicological data are developed and used; overviews the toxicological data available for CIS, CGS and CdTe; develops ``reference doses`` for each of these compounds; compares the reference doses for these compounds with those of their parents; discusses the implications of these findings to photovoltaics industry.

  16. Electrical Bias as an Alternate Method for Reproducible Measurement of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (CIGS) Photovoltaic Modules: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.; Stokes, A.; Silverman, T. J.; Rummel, S.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-08-01

    Light-to-dark metastable changes in thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules can introduce uncertainty when measuring module performance on indoor flash testing equipment. This study describes a method to stabilize module performance through forward-bias current injection rather than light exposure. Measurements of five pairs of thin-film copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) PV modules indicate that forward-bias exposure maintained the PV modules at a stable condition (within 1%) while the unbiased modules degraded in performance by up to 12%. It was additionally found that modules exposed to forward bias exhibited stable performance within about 3% of their long-term outdoor exposed performance. This carrier-injection method provides a way to reduce uncertainty arising from fast transients in thin-film module performance between the time a module is removed from light exposure and when it is measured indoors, effectively simulating continuous light exposure by injecting minority carriers that behave much as photocarriers do. This investigation also provides insight into the initial light-induced transients of thin-film modules upon outdoor deployment.

  17. Contact resistance asymmetry of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by scanning Kelvin probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen-Fei, Wu; Yun-Feng, Chen; Hai, Lu; Xiao-Ming, Huang; Fang-Fang, Ren; Dun-Jun, Chen; Rong, Zhang; You-Dou, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a method based on scanning Kelvin probe microscopy is proposed to separately extract source/drain (S/D) series resistance in operating amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. The asymmetry behavior of S/D contact resistance is deduced and the underlying physics is discussed. The present results suggest that the asymmetry of S/D contact resistance is caused by the difference in bias conditions of the Schottky-like junction at the contact interface induced by the parasitic reaction between contact metal and a-IGZO. The overall contact resistance should be determined by both the bulk channel resistance of the contact region and the interface properties of the metal-semiconductor junction. Project supported by the Key Industrial R&D Program of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BE2015155), the Priority Academic Program Development of Higher Education Institutions of Jiangsu Province, China, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 021014380033).

  18. Comparison of indium-labeled-leukocyte imaging with sequential technetium-gallium scanning in the diagnosis of low-grade musculoskeletal sepsis. A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, K.D.; Brown, M.L.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Fitzgerald, R.H. Jr.

    1985-03-01

    We prospectively compared sequential technetium-gallium imaging with indium-labeled-leukocyte imaging in fifty patients with suspected low-grade musculoskeletal sepsis. Adequate images and follow-up examinations were obtained for forty-two patients. The presence or absence of low-grade sepsis was confirmed by histological and bacteriological examinations of tissue specimens taken at surgery in thirty of the forty-two patients. In these thirty patients, the sensitivity of sequential Tc-Ga imaging was 48 per cent, the specificity was 86 per cent, and the accuracy was 57 per cent, whereas the sensitivity of the indium-labeled-leukocyte technique was 83 per cent, the specificity was 86 per cent, and the accuracy was 83 per cent. When the additional twelve patients for whom surgery was deemed unnecessary were considered, the sensitivity of sequential Tc-Ga imaging was 50 per cent, the specificity was 78 per cent, and the accuracy was 62 per cent, as compared with a sensitivity of 83 per cent, a specificity of 94 per cent, and an accuracy of 88 per cent with the indium-labeled-leukocyte method. In patients with a prosthesis the indium-labeled-leukocyte image was 94 per cent accurate, compared with 75 per cent accuracy for sequential Tc-Ga imaging. Statistical analysis of these data demonstrated that the indium-labeled-leukocyte technique was superior to sequential Tc-Ga imaging in detecting areas of low-grade musculoskeletal sepsis.

  19. The 3-5 semiconductor solid solution single crystal growth. [low gravity float zone growth experiments using gallium indium antimonides and cadmium tellurides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertner, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques used for liquid and vapor phase epitaxy of gallium indium arsenide are described and the difficulties encountered are examined. Results show that the growth of bulk III-V solid solution single crystals in a low gravity environment will not have a major technological impact. The float zone technique in a low gravity environment is demonstrated using cadmium telluride. It is shown that this approach can result in the synthesis of a class of semiconductors that can not be grown in normal gravity because of growth problems rooted in the nature of their phase diagrams.

  20. Thin film metallic glass as a diffusion barrier for copper indium gallium selenide solar cell on stainless steel substrate: A feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diyatmika, Wahyu; Xue, Lingjun; Lin, Tai-Nan; Chang, Chia-wen; Chu, Jinn P.

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of using Zr53.5Cu29.1Al6.5Ni10.9 thin-film metallic glass (TFMG) as a diffusion barrier for copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) solar cells on stainless steel (SS) is investigated. The detrimental Fe diffusion from SS into CIGS is found to be effectively hindered by the introduction of a 70-nm-thick TFMG barrier; the cell performance is thus improved. Compared with the 2.73% of CIGS on bare SS, a higher efficiency of 5.25% is obtained for the cell with the Zr52Cu32Al9Ni7 TFMG barrier.

  1. Dual gate indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistor with an unisolated floating metal gate for threshold voltage modulation and mobility enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zan, Hsiao-Wen; Chen, Wei-Tsung; Yeh, Chung-Cheng; Hsueh, Hsiu-Wen; Tsai, Chuang-Chuang; Meng, Hsin-Fei

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we propose a floating dual gate (FDG) indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) thin film transistor (TFT) with a floating metal back gate that is directly contact with IGZO without a dielectric layer. The floating back gate effect is investigated by changing the work function (ϕ) of the back gate. The FDG IGZO TFT exhibits an improved field-effect mobility (μ), unchanged subthreshold swing (SS), high on/off current ratio, and a tunable threshold voltage ranged (Vth) from -5.0 to +7.9 V without an additional back gate power supply.

  2. Low-temperature processed Schottky-gated field-effect transistors based on amorphous gallium-indium-zinc-oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, M.; Lajn, A.; Frenzel, H.; v. Wenckstern, H.; Grundmann, M.; Barquinha, P.; Martins, R.; Fortunato, E.

    2010-12-01

    We have investigated the electrical properties of metal-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFET) based on amorphous oxide semiconductor channels. All functional parts of the devices were sputter-deposited at room temperature. The influence on the electrical properties of a 150 °C annealing step of the gallium-indium-zinc-oxide channel is investigated. The MESFET technology offers a simple route for processing of the transistors with excellent electrical properties such as low subthreshold swing of 112 mV/decade, gate sweep voltages of 2.5 V, and channel mobilities up to 15 cm2/V s.

  3. The effect of annealing ambient on the characteristics of an indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin film transistor.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyeon; Bang, Seokhwan; Lee, Seungjun; Park, Joohyun; Ko, Youngbin; Jeon, Hyeongtag

    2011-07-01

    In this study, the effects of different annealing conditions (air, O2, N2, vacuum) on the chemical and electrical characteristics of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFT) were investigated. The contact resistance and interface properties between the IGZO film and the gate dielectric improved after an annealing treatment. However, the chemical bonds in the IGZO bulk changed under various annealing atmospheres, which, in turn, altered the characteristics of the TFTs. The TFTs annealed in vacuum and N2 ambients exhibited undesired switching properties due to the high carrier concentration (>10(17) cm(-3)) of the IGZO active layer. In contrast, the IGZO TFTs annealed in air and oxygen ambients displayed clear transfer characteristics due to an adequately adjusted carrier concentration in the operating range of the TFT. Such an optimal carrier concentration arose through the stabilization of unstable chemical bonds in the IGZO film. With regard to device performance, the TFTs annealed in O2 and air exhibited saturation mobility values of 8.29 and 7.54 cm2/Vs, on-off ratios of 7.34 x 10(8) and 3.95 x 10(8), and subthreshold swing (SS) values of 0.23 and 0.19 V/decade, respectively. Therefore, proper annealing ambients contributed to internal modifications in the IGZO structure and led to an enhancement in the oxidation state of the metal. As a result, defects such as oxygen vacancies were eliminated. Oxygen annealing is thus effective for controlling the carrier concentration of the active layer, decreasing electron traps, and enhancing TFT performance.

  4. Microscopic structure and electrical transport property of sputter-deposited amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide semiconductor films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuta, H.; Kaji, N.; Shimada, M.; Aiba, T.; Takada, K.; Omura, H.; Mukaide, T.; Hirosawa, I.; Koganezawa, T.; Kumomi, H.

    2014-06-01

    We report on microscopic structures and electrical and optical properties of sputter-deposited amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) films. From electron microscopy observations and an x-ray small angle scattering analysis, it has been confirmed that the sputtered a-IGZO films consist of a columnar structure. However, krypton gas adsorption measurement revealed that boundaries of the columnar grains are not open-pores. The conductivity of the sputter-deposited a-IGZO films shows a change as large as seven orders of magnitude depending on post-annealing atmosphere; it is increased by N2-annealing and decreased by O2-annealing reversibly, at a temperature as low as 300°C. This large variation in conductivity is attributed to thermionic emission of carrier electrons through potential barriers at the grain boundaries, because temperature dependences of the carrier density and the Hall mobility exhibit thermal activation behaviours. The optical band-gap energy of the a-IGZO films changes between before and after annealing, but is independent of the annealing atmosphere, in contrast to the noticeable dependence of conductivity described above. For exploring other possibilities of a-IGZO, we formed multilayer films with an artificial periodic lattice structure consisting of amorphous InO, GaO, and ZnO layers, as an imitation of the layer-structured InGaZnO4 homologous phase. The hall mobility of the multilayer films was almost constant for thicknesses of the constituent layer between 1 and 6 Å, suggesting rather small contribution of lateral two-dimensional conduction It increased with increasing the thickness in the range from 6 to 15 Å, perhaps owing to an enhancement of two-dimensional conduction in InO layers.

  5. Thermodynamics of reaction of praseodymium with gallium-indium eutectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchakov, S. Yu.; Ivanov, V. A.; Yamshchikov, L. F.; Volkovich, V. A.; Osipenko, A. G.; Kormilitsyn, M. V.

    2013-06-01

    Thermodynamic properties of Ga-In eutectic alloys saturated with praseodymium were determined for the first time employing the electromotive force method. The equilibrium potentials of the Pr-In alloys saturated with praseodymium (8.7-12.1 mol.% Pr) and Pr-Ga-In alloys (containing 0.0012-6.71 mol.% Pr) were measured between 573-1073 K. Pr-In alloy containing solid PrIn3 with known thermodynamic properties was used as the reference electrode when measuring the potentials of ternary Pr-In-Ga alloys. Activity, partial and excessive thermodynamic functions of praseodymium in alloys with indium and Ga-In eutectic were calculated. Activity (a), activity coefficients (γ) and solubility (X) of praseodymium in the studied temperature range can be expressed by the following equations: lgaα-Pr(In) = 4.425 - 11965/T ± 0.026. lgаα-Pr(Ga-In) = 5.866 - 14766/T ± 0.190. lgγα-Pr(Ga-In) = 2.351 - 9996/T ± 0.39. lgХPr(Ga-In) = 3.515 - 4770/T ± 0.20.

  6. A Theoretical Study of NO2 Complexes with Aluminium and Gallium Based on Topological Analysis of Electron Density and Electron Localization Function

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, Jaroslaw; Latajaka, Zdzislaw

    2000-12-26

    Results of DFT and MP4 calculations on AlNO2 and GaNO2 molecules are presented. One Cs and two C2v structures (two minima and one TS) are found and their energies and vibrational frequencies are reported and discussed. The minima are close in energy and lie ca. 70 kcal mol-1 below reactants (M+NO2). More insight is obtained via topological analysis of electron density and electron localization function (ELF). It is shown that the molecules are bound mainly via electrostatic interactions, and there is a significant charge transfer from metal atom to the NO2 moiety. Detailed analysis of the ELF shows that the loss of stability of gallium complexes with respect to aluminium structures is best explained by (antibonding) influence of gallium semi-cored electrons.

  7. I. Synthesis of group 13 fluoroalkoxide complexes and the chemical vapor deposition of indium oxide films. II. Synthesis of gallium hydrido-thiolate complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miinea, Liliana Angela

    A synthetic route to indium fluoroalkoxide complexes was developed and fluorine-doped indium oxide films were prepared from one of the new complexes by chemical vapor deposition. The reaction of indium amide complexes with fluorinated alcohols was found to be a convenient synthetic route to indium fluoroalkoxide complexes. In[N-t-Bu(SiMe3)]3 reacted with (CF3)Me2COH to give the dimer [In{mu-OCMe 2(CF3)}{OCMe2(CF3)}2] 2. In contrast, reactions involving the more acidic alcohols (CF 3)2MeCOH and (CF3)2CHOH yielded products containing t-BuNH2, which was derived from the amide ligands of the starting material. Reactions of (CF3) 2MeCOH and (CF3)2CHOH with In(tmp)3 (tmp = the anion derived from 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine) and In(NEt 2)3 gave In[OCH(CF3)2]3(Htmp), [H2tmp][In{OCR(CF3)2}4] (R = H or Me), and mer-In[OCMe(CF3)2]3(py) 3. Polycrystalline indium oxide films were deposited at 400-550°C in a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition process from In[OCMe(CF3 )2]3(H2N-t-Bu) and O2 precursors. The films deposited at ≤500°C contained 2-3 atom % fluorine while the film deposited at 550°C had no detectable fluorine incorporation. Films deposited on quartz (˜3600-A thickness) showed >85% transmittance in the 400-800 nm region, and resistivities of 2.56 x 10 -1-2.02 x 10-2 O cm were measured for the as-deposited films. The observed transmittance is in the range reported previously for doped and undoped In2O3, while the resistivity values are higher than those reported for tin, fluorine or sulfur-doped indium oxide. The work on the synthesis of indium fluoroalkoxide complexes prompted an examination of the synthesis of related aluminum and gallium fluoroalkoxide complexes. Aluminum and gallium fluoroalkoxide complexes of formula M(ORf) 3(HNMe2) [M = Al, Rf = CH(CF3)2, CMe 2(CF3) or CMe(CF3)2; M = Ga, Rf = CMe 2(CF3) or CMe(CF3)2] were prepared by reacting the corresponding metal dimethylamide complexes with fluorinated alcohols. An attempt was made to prepare

  8. Liquid gallium and the eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn) alloy: Dielectric functions from 1.24 to 3.1 eV by electrochemical reduction of surface oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Daniel; Stoute, Nicholas A.; Yu, Zhiyuan; Aspnes, David E.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2016-08-01

    Liquid metals based on gallium are promising materials for soft, stretchable, and shape reconfigurable electromagnetic devices. The behavior of these metals relates directly to the thicknesses of their surface oxide layers, which can be determined nondestructively by ellipsometry if their dielectric functions ɛ are known. This paper reports on the dielectric functions of liquid gallium and the eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn) alloy from 1.24 to 3.1 eV at room temperature, measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Overlayer-induced artifacts, a continuing problem in optical measurements of these highly reactive metals, are eliminated by applying an electrochemically reductive potential to the surface of the metal immersed in an electrolyte. This technique enables measurements at ambient conditions while avoiding the complications associated with removing overlayers in a vacuum environment. The dielectric responses of both metals are closely represented by the Drude model. The EGaIn data suggest that in the absence of an oxide the surface is In-enriched, consistent with the previous vacuum-based studies. Possible reasons for discrepancies with previous measurements are discussed.

  9. Development of wide-band gap indium gallium nitride solar cells for high-efficiency photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jani, Omkar K.

    Main objective of the present work is to develop wide-band gap InGaN solar cells in the 2.4--2.9 eV range that can be an integral component of photovoltaic devices to achieve efficiencies greater than 50%. The III-nitride semiconductor material system, which consists of InN, GaN, AlN and their alloys, offers a substantial potential in developing ultra-high efficiency photovoltaics mainly due to its wide range of direct-band gap, and other electronic, optical and mechanical properties. However, this novel InGaN material system poses challenges from theoretical, as well as technological standpoints, which are further extended into the performance of InGaN devices. In the present work, these challenges are identified and overcome individually to build basic design blocks, and later, optimized comprehensively to develop high-performance InGaN solar cells. One of the major challenges from the theoretical aspect arises due to unavailability of a suitable modeling program for InGaN solar cells. As spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization can substantially influence transport of carriers in the III-nitrides, these phenomena are studied and incorporated at a source-code level in the PC1D simulation program to accurately model InGaN solar cells. On the technological front, InGaN with indium compositions up to 30% (2.5 eV band gap) are developed for photovoltaic applications by controlling defects and phase separation using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. InGaN with band gap of 2.5 eV is also successfully doped to achieve acceptor carrier concentration of 1018 cm-3. A robust fabrication scheme for III-nitride solar cells is established to increase reliability and yield; various schemes including interdigitated grid contact and current spreading contacts are developed to yield low-resistance Ohmic contacts for InGaN solar cells. Preliminary solar cells are developed using a standard design to optimize the InGaN material, where the band gap of InGaN is progressively

  10. Arsenic (III, V), indium (III), and gallium (III) toxicity to zebrafish embryos using a high-throughput multi-endpoint in vivo developmental and behavioral assay.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Christopher I; Field, Jim A; Simonich, Michael; Tanguay, Robert L; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-04-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other III/V materials are finding increasing application in microelectronic components. The rising demand for III/V-based products is leading to increasing generation of effluents containing ionic species of gallium, indium, and arsenic. The ecotoxicological hazard potential of these streams is unknown. While the toxicology of arsenic is comprehensive, much less is known about the effects of In(III) and Ga(III). The embryonic zebrafish was evaluated for mortality, developmental abnormalities, and photomotor response (PMR) behavior changes associated with exposure to As(III), As(V), Ga(III), and In(III). The As(III) lowest observable effect level (LOEL) for mortality was 500 μM at 24 and 120 h post fertilization (hpf). As(V) exposure was associated with significant mortality at 63 μM. The Ga(III)-citrate LOEL was 113 μM at 24 and 120 hpf. There was no association of significant mortality over the tested range of In(III)-citrate (56-900 μM) or sodium citrate (213-3400 μM) exposures. Only As(V) resulted in significant developmental abnormalities with LOEL of 500 μM. Removal of the chorion prior to As(III) and As(V) exposure was associated with increased incidence of mortality and developmental abnormality suggesting that the chorion may normally attenuate mass uptake of these metals by the embryo. Finally, As(III), As(V), and In(III) caused PMR hypoactivity (49-69% of control PMR) at 900-1000 μM. Overall, our results represent the first characterization of multidimensional toxicity effects of III/V ions in zebrafish embryos helping to fill a significant knowledge gap, particularly in Ga(III) and In(III) toxicology.

  11. The in vitro photodynamic effect of laser activated gallium, indium and iron phthalocyanine chlorides on human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Maduray, K; Odhav, B

    2013-11-05

    Metal-based phthalocyanines currently are utilized as a colorant for industrial applications but their unique properties also make them prospective photosensitizers. Photosensitizers are non-toxic drugs, which are commonly used in photodynamic therapy (PDT), for the treatment of various cancers. PDT is based on the principle that, exposure to light shortly after photosensitizer administration predominately leads to the production of reactive oxygen species for the eradication of cancerous cells and tissue. This in vitro study investigated the photodynamic effect of gallium (GaPcCl), indium (InPcCl) and iron (FePcCl) phthalocyanine chlorides on human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549). Experimentally, 2 × 10(4)cells/ml were seeded in 24-well tissue culture plates and allowed to attach overnight, after which cells were treated with different concentrations of GaPcCl, InPcCl and FePcCl ranging from 2 μg/ml to 100 μg/ml. After 2h, cells were irradiated with constant light doses of 2.5 J/cm(2), 4.5 J/cm(2) and 8.5 J/cm(2) delivered from a diode laser (λ = 661 nm). Post-irradiated cells were incubated for 24h before cell viability was measured using the MTT Assay. At 24h after PDT, irradiation with a light dose of 2.5 J/cm(2) for each photosensitizing concentration of GaPcCl, InPcCl and FePcCl produced a significant decrease in cell viability, but when the treatment light dose was further increased to 4.5 J/cm(2) and 8.5 J/cm(2) the cell survival was less than 40%. Results also showed that photoactivated FePcCl decreased cell survival of A549 cells to 0% with photosensitizing concentrations of 40 μg/ml and treatment light dose of 2.5 J/cm(2). A 20 μg/ml photosensitizing concentration of FePcCl in combination with an increased treatment light dose of either 4.5 J/cm(2) or 8.5 J/cm(2) also resulted in 0% cell survival. This PDT study concludes that low concentrations on GaPcCl, InPcCl and FePcCl activated with low level light doses can be used for the effective in

  12. Study on interface characteristics in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors by using low-frequency noise and temperature dependent mobility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chenfei; Huang, Xiaoming; Lu, Hai; Yu, Guang; Ren, Fangfang; Chen, Dunjun; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the interface properties of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin film transistors annealed at different temperatures ranging from 150 to 250 °C are studied by temperature dependent mobility and low-frequency noise (LFN) characterizations. The dominant scattering mechanism for carrier transport is found to be Coulomb scattering based on gate bias and temperature dependent mobility measurement. Meanwhile, as the annealing temperature increases, the dominant mechanism of LFN within the device channel varies from carrier number fluctuation to carrier mobility fluctuation. The border trap density as well as the distribution properties of charged border traps is deduced. The present results suggest that annealing at higher temperature has a more remarkable effect on removing deeper border traps than traps closer to the channel/dielectric interface.

  13. Scaling characteristics of depletion type, fully transparent amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors and inverters following Ar plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joonwoo; Jeong, Soon Moon; Jeong, Jaewook

    2015-11-01

    We fabricated depletion type, transparent amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) and inverters with an Ar plasma treatment and analyzed their scaling characteristics with channel lengths ranging from 2 to 100 µm. The improvement of the field-effect mobility of a-IGZO TFTs is apparent only for short channel lengths. There is also an unexpected side effect of the Ar plasma treatment, which introduces back-channel interfacial states and induces a positive shift in the threshold voltage of a-IGZO TFTs. The resulting increase in the field-effect mobility and the positive shift in the threshold voltage of each TFT increase the differential gain up to 3 times and the positive shift in the transient point of the transparent inverters.

  14. Effects of low-temperature (120 °C) annealing on the carrier concentration and trap density in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-sung; Piao, Mingxing; Jang, Ho-Kyun; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Oh, Byung Su; Joo, Min-Kyu; Ahn, Seung-Eon

    2014-12-28

    We report an investigation of the effects of low-temperature annealing on the electrical properties of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the charge carrier concentration, which is related to the density of oxygen vacancies. The field-effect mobility was found to decrease as a function of the charge carrier concentration, owing to the presence of band-tail states. By employing the transmission line method, we show that the contact resistance did not significantly contribute to the changes in device performance after annealing. In addition, using low-frequency noise analyses, we found that the trap density decreased by a factor of 10 following annealing at 120 °C. The switching operation and on/off ratio of the a-IGZO TFTs improved considerably after low-temperature annealing.

  15. A study on the optics of copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) solar cells with ultra-thin absorber layers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Man; Wachters, Arthur J H; van Deelen, Joop; Mourad, Maurice C D; Buskens, Pascal J P

    2014-03-10

    We present a systematic study of the effect of variation of the zinc oxide (ZnO) and copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) layer thickness on the absorption characteristics of CIGS solar cells using a simulation program based on finite element method (FEM). We show that the absorption in the CIGS layer does not decrease monotonically with its layer thickness due to interference effects. Ergo, high precision is required in the CIGS production process, especially when using ultra-thin absorber layers, to accurately realize the required thickness of the ZnO, cadmium sulfide (CdS) and CIGS layer. We show that patterning the ZnO window layer can strongly suppress these interference effects allowing a higher tolerance in the production process.

  16. Increase of interface and bulk density of states in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors with negative-bias-under-illumination-stress time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwang Um, Jae; Mativenga, Mallory; Migliorato, Piero; Jang, Jin

    2012-09-01

    The evolution with time of interface trap density and bulk density of states in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs), for negative-bias-under-illumination-stress (NBIS), is traced. Based on the combined analysis of TFT current-voltage and capacitance-voltage characteristics, position of Fermi energy, flat band voltage, interface trap density, and gap state density per unit energy are investigated as function of NBIS time and applied gate voltage. These key parameters help to identify the degradation phenomena responsible for the negative threshold voltage shift caused by NBIS. In particular, the interface trap density becomes more positive; from 0.03 × 1011/cm2 to 0.65 × 1011/cm2, while the gap trap density per unit energy also increases after NBIS, supporting defect creation in the bulk and build-up of positive charge at the gate insulator/active-layer interface as the mechanism responsible for NBIS instability.

  17. Flexible full color organic light-emitting diode display on polyimide plastic substrate driven by amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Seong; Kim, Tae-Woong; Stryakhilev, Denis; Lee, Jae-Sup; An, Sung-Guk; Pyo, Yong-Shin; Lee, Dong-Bum; Mo, Yeon Gon; Jin, Dong-Un; Chung, Ho Kyoon

    2009-07-01

    We have fabricated 6.5 in. flexible full-color top-emission active matrix organic light-emitting diode display on a polyimide (PI) substrate driven amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin-film transistors (a-IGZO TFTs). The a-IGZO TFTs exhibited field-effect mobility (μFE) of 15.1 cm2/V s, subthreshold slope of 0.25 V/dec, threshold voltage (VTH) of 0.9 V. The electrical characteristics of TFTs on PI substrate, including a bias-stress instability after 1 h long gate bias at 15 V, were indistinguishable from those on glass substrate and showed high degree of spatial uniformity. TFT samples on 10 μm thick PI substrate withstood bending down to R =3 mm under tension and compression without any performance degradation.

  18. Electrical features of an amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide film transistor using a double active matrix with different oxygen contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Ja Hyun; Kang, Tae Sung; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2012-05-01

    The electrical characteristics of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) are systematically studied using a double a-IGZO active layer that is composed of a-IGZO x (oxygen-ion-poor region) and a-IGZO y (oxygen-ion-rich-region). An active layer is designed to have a serially-stacked bi-layer matrix with different oxygen contents, providing the formation of different electron conduction channels. Two different oxygen contents in the active layer are obtained by varying the O2 partial pressure during sputtering. The a-IGZO TFT based on a double active layer exhibits a high mobility of 9.1 cm2/Vsec, a threshold voltage (V T ) of 16.5 V, and ΔV T shifts of less than 1.5 V under gate voltage stress. A possible electrical sketch for the double active layer channel is also discussed.

  19. Alumina nanoparticle/polymer nanocomposite dielectric for flexible amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin film transistors on plastic substrate with superior stability

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Hsin-Cheng; Pei, Zingway; Jian, Jyun-Ruri; Tzeng, Bo-Jie

    2014-07-21

    In this study, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were incorporated into polymer as a nono-composite dielectric for used in a flexible amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) on a polyethylene naphthalate substrate by solution process. The process temperature was well below 100 °C. The a-IGZO TFT exhibit a mobility of 5.13 cm{sup 2}/V s on the flexible substrate. After bending at a radius of 4 mm (strain = 1.56%) for more than 100 times, the performance of this a-IGZO TFT was nearly unchanged. In addition, the electrical characteristics are less altered after positive gate bias stress at 10 V for 1500 s. Thus, this technology is suitable for use in flexible displays.

  20. Alumina nanoparticle/polymer nanocomposite dielectric for flexible amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin film transistors on plastic substrate with superior stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hsin-Cheng; Pei, Zingway; Jian, Jyun-Ruri; Tzeng, Bo-Jie

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the Al2O3 nanoparticles were incorporated into polymer as a nono-composite dielectric for used in a flexible amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) on a polyethylene naphthalate substrate by solution process. The process temperature was well below 100 °C. The a-IGZO TFT exhibit a mobility of 5.13 cm2/V s on the flexible substrate. After bending at a radius of 4 mm (strain = 1.56%) for more than 100 times, the performance of this a-IGZO TFT was nearly unchanged. In addition, the electrical characteristics are less altered after positive gate bias stress at 10 V for 1500 s. Thus, this technology is suitable for use in flexible displays.

  1. Back-channel-etch amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors: The impact of source/drain metal etch and final passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Manoj; Bhoolokam, Ajay; Steudel, Soeren; Chasin, Adrian; Myny, Kris; Maas, Joris; Groeseneken, Guido; Heremans, Paul

    2014-11-01

    We report on the impact of source/drain (S/D) metal (molybdenum) etch and the final passivation (SiO2) layer on the bias-stress stability of back-channel-etch (BCE) configuration based amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). It is observed that the BCE configurations TFTs suffer poor bias-stability in comparison to etch-stop-layer (ESL) TFTs. By analysis with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), as well as by a comparative analysis of contacts formed by other metals, we infer that this poor bias-stability for BCE transistors having Mo S/D contacts is associated with contamination of the back channel interface, which occurs by Mo-containing deposits on the back channel during the final plasma process of the physical vapor deposited SiO2 passivation.

  2. Amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide Thin-Film Transistors, Non-volatile Memory and Circuits for Transparent Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Arun

    The ability to make electronic devices, that are transparent to visible and near infrared wavelength, is a relatively new field of research in the development of the next generation of optoelectronic devices. A new class of inorganic thin-film transistor (TFT) channel material based on amorphous oxide semiconductors, that show high carrier mobility and high visual transparency, is being researched actively. The purpose of this dissertation is to develop amorphous oxide semiconductors by pulsed laser deposition, show their suitability for TFT applications and demonstrate other classes of devices such as non-volatile memory elements and integrated circuits such as ring oscillators and active matrix pixel elements. Indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) is discussed extensively in this dissertation. The influence of several deposition parameters is explored and oxygen partial pressure during deposition is found to have a profound effect on the electrical and optical characteristics of the IGZO films. By optimizing the deposition conditions, IGZO TFTs exhibit excellent electrical properties, even without any intentional annealing. This attribute along with the amorphous nature of the material also makes IGZO TFTs compatible with flexible substrates opening up various applications. IGZO TFTs with saturation field effect mobility of 12--16 cm 2 V-1 s-1 and subthreshold voltage swing of <200 mV decade-1 have been fabricated. By varying the oxygen partial pressure during deposition the conductivity of the channel was controlled to give a low off-state current ˜10 pA and a drain current on/off ratio of >1 x 108. Additionally, the effects of the oxygen partial pressure and the thickness of the semiconductor layer, the choice of the gate dielectric material and the device channel length on the electrical characteristics of the TFTs are explored. To evaluate IGZO TFT electrical stability, constant voltage bias stress measurements were carried out. The observed logarithmic

  3. A transparent diode with high rectifying ratio using amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide/SiN{sub x} coupled junction

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Myung-Jea; Kim, Myeong-Ho; Choi, Duck-Kyun

    2015-08-03

    We introduce a transparent diode that shows both high rectifying ratio and low leakage current at process temperature below 250 °C. This device is clearly distinguished from all previous transparent diodes in that the rectifying behavior results from the junction between a semiconductor (amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO)) and insulator (SiN{sub x}). We systematically study the properties of each junction within the device structure and demonstrate that the a-IGZO/SiN{sub x} junction is the source of the outstanding rectification. The electrical characteristics of this transparent diode are: 2.8 A/cm{sup 2} on-current density measured at −7 V; lower than 7.3 × 10{sup −9} A/cm{sup 2} off-current density; 2.53 ideality factor; and high rectifying ratio of 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9}. Furthermore, the diode structure has a transmittance of over 80% across the visible light range. The operating principle of the indium-tin oxide (ITO)/a-IGZO/SiN{sub x}/ITO device was examined with an aid of the energy band diagram and we propose a preliminary model for the rectifying behavior. Finally, we suggest further directions for research on this transparent diode.

  4. a Study of the Nature of the Schottky Barrier during Ultralow Coverage Stages of GALLIUM-ARSENIDE(110)/ALUMINUM and GALLIUM-ARSENIDE(110)/INDIUM Interface Formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Robert Richard

    We present a study of the GaAs(110)/Al and GaAs(110)/In interface formation from submonolayer to bulk metallic coverages using synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy. The experiments monitored changes in the surface and bulk core level binding energies and valence electronic state densities resulting from the deposition of aluminum or indium. These spectroscopic changes indicate the occurrence of specific chemical processes during the formation of the interface. This represents the first study of ultralow metal coverages (< 1/20 monolayer) on a semiconductor using this approach. Our results emphasize the critical importance of characterizing this regime in order to understand the metal-semiconductor interface. Extreme differences in the electronic properties are observed between these two interfaces and can be understood in terms of the different chemical processes. In particular, our results indicate the predominance of the aluminum or indium adatom-adatom bonding (cluster formation) over the metal-semiconductor bonding at the interface; we demonstrate that this is the key factor in determining such properties as the Schottky barrier height and coverage stabilization of the barrier. The relevance of current models of metal -semiconductor interfaces to GaAs(110)/Al and GaAs(110)/In is discussed in terms of metallic cluster formation. In particular, the influence of semiconductor surface defect states and metal induced gap states is examined.

  5. Indium and gallium diffusion through zirconia in the TiN/ZrO{sub 2}/InGaAs stack

    SciTech Connect

    Ceballos-Sanchez, O.; Martinez, E.; Guedj, C.; Veillerot, M.; Herrera-Gomez, A.

    2015-06-01

    Angle-resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS) was applied to the TiN/ZrO{sub 2}/InGaAs stack to assess its thermal stability. Through a robust ARXPS analysis, it was possible to observe subtle effects such as the thermally induced diffusion of substrate atomic species (In and Ga) through the dielectric layer. The detailed characterization of the film structure allowed for assessing the depth profiles of the diffused atomic species by means of the scenarios-method. Since the quantification for the amount of diffused material was done at different temperatures, it was possible to obtain an approximate value of the activation energy for the diffusion of indium through zirconia. The result is very similar to the previously reported values for indium diffusion through alumina and through hafnia.

  6. Growth of Optoelectronic Device-Quality INDIUM(0.4) GALLIUM(0.6)ARSENIDE on Gallium Arsenide by Molecular Beamepitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas, Paulo Roberto Fogaca

    The present investigation develops a novel approach to growing optoelectronic device-quality In_{0.4}Ga_{0.6}As epitaxial layers on GaAs substrates employing the molecular beam epitaxy technique. Experimental work was performed in a Varian GEN II MBE system configured with sources for Ga, Al, In, Be (p-type dopant), Si (n-type dopant), and As_2. Growth and characterization of In_ xGa_{1-x}As layers of various compositions was carried out to investigate the strain relief processes in the In _ xGa_{1-x}As/GaAs material system. These materials were characterized via transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, photoluminescence, absorption, and Hall-effect analyses. A multi-stage strain-relief buffer system was developed to prevent threading dislocations from reaching high indium content (x > 0.3) In_ xGa_{1-x}As epitaxial layers. Cross-sectional and planar transmission electron microscopy studies revealed high indium content In_ xGa_{1-x}As epitaxial layers grown on such a buffer system to have a dramatic reduction in dislocation density, with best values being in the 10^6 cm ^{-2} range, in sharp contrast to layers grown directly in GaAs substrates. These In_ xGa_{1-x}As epilayers also exhibited excellent electronic properties. For example, Hall-effect measurements on buffered In_{0.4}Ga_{0.6}As layers indicated the room-temperature electron concentrations to be around 5 times 10^{15} cm^ {-3} while electron mobilities were around 4,500 cm^2 V^{ -1} s^{-1}. Strong band-edge photoluminescence was recorded from such buffered epilayers, the luminescence peak occurring at 1.4 μm at room temperature and having a linewidth around 7 meV at 13K. The efficacy of the designed buffer system is evidenced by the fabrication for the first time of a high sensitivity, planar In_{0.4 }Ga_{0.6}As/GaAs p-i-n photodetector presenting a quantum efficiency of 42%, a responsivity of 0.45 A/W at 1.3 mum, and dark current of 3 times 10^ {-7} A at -2.5 V, for an

  7. High-pressure Gas Activation for Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors at 100 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won-Gi; Tak, Young Jun; Du Ahn, Byung; Jung, Tae Soo; Chung, Kwun-Bum; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the use of high-pressure gases as an activation energy source for amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs). High-pressure annealing (HPA) in nitrogen (N2) and oxygen (O2) gases was applied to activate a-IGZO TFTs at 100 °C at pressures in the range from 0.5 to 4 MPa. Activation of the a-IGZO TFTs during HPA is attributed to the effect of the high-pressure environment, so that the activation energy is supplied from the kinetic energy of the gas molecules. We reduced the activation temperature from 300 °C to 100 °C via the use of HPA. The electrical characteristics of a-IGZO TFTs annealed in O2 at 2 MPa were superior to those annealed in N2 at 4 MPa, despite the lower pressure. For O2 HPA under 2 MPa at 100 °C, the field effect mobility and the threshold voltage shift under positive bias stress were improved by 9.00 to 10.58 cm2/V.s and 3.89 to 2.64 V, respectively. This is attributed to not only the effects of the pressurizing effect but also the metal-oxide construction effect which assists to facilitate the formation of channel layer and reduces oxygen vacancies, served as electron trap sites.

  8. Reduction of defect formation in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors by N{sub 2}O plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Jhu, Jhe-Ciou; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Geng-Wei; Tai, Ya-Hsiang; Tsai, Wu-Wei; Chiang, Wen-Jen; Yan, Jing-Yi

    2013-11-28

    An abnormal sub-threshold leakage current is observed at high temperature in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors (a-IGZO TFTs). This phenomenon occurs due to a reduced number of defects in the device's a-IGZO active layer after the device has undergone N{sub 2}O plasma treatment. Experimental verification shows that the N{sub 2}O plasma treatment enhances the thin film bonding strength, thereby suppressing the formation of temperature-dependent holes, which are generated above 400 K by oxygen atoms leaving their original sites. The N{sub 2}O plasma treatment devices have better stability performance than as-fabricated devices. The results suggest that the density of defects for a-IGZO TFTs with N{sub 2}O plasma treatment is much lower than that in as-fabricated devices. The N{sub 2}O plasma treatment repairs the defects and suppresses temperature-dependent sub-threshold leakage current.

  9. Fabrication Process Assessment and Negative Bias Illumination Stress Study of Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide and Zinc-Tin Oxide Thin-Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Ken

    Indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) and zinc-tin oxide (ZTO) are investigated for thin-film transistor (TFT) applications. Negative bias illumination stress (NBIS) is employed for electrical stability assessment. Unpassivated IGZO and ZTO TFTs suffer from severe NBIS instabilities. Zinc-tin-silicon oxide is found to be an effective passivation layer for IGZO and ZTO TFTs, significantly improving the NBIS stability. NBIS instabilities in unpassivated TFTs are attributed to an NBIS-induced desorption of chemisorbed oxygen from the channel layer top surface, exposing surface oxygen vacancies. A ZTSO layer protects the channel layer top surface from adsorbed gas interactions and also appears to reduce the density of oxygen vacancies. The best device architectures investigated with respect to TFT electrical performance are found to be staggered with aluminum electrodes for unpassivated TFTs and coplanar with ITO electrodes for ZTSO-passivated TFTs. Annealing in wet-O2 is not found to be effective for improving the performance of IGZO or ZTO TFTs or for reducing the post-deposition annealing temperature.

  10. Indium gallium zinc oxide layer used to decrease optical reflection loss at intermediate adhesive region for fabricating mechanical stacked multijunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameshima, Toshiyuki; Nimura, Takeshi; Sugawara, Takashi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Yoshidomi, Shinya; Kimura, Shunsuke; Hasumi, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    Reduction of optical reflection loss is discussed in three mechanical stacked samples: top crystalline silicon and bottom crystalline germanium substrates, top crystalline GaAs and bottom crystalline silicon substrates, and top crystalline GaP and bottom crystalline silicon substrates using an epoxy-type adhesive with a reflective index of 1.47. Transparent conductive Indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) layers with a refractive index of 1.85 were used as antireflection layers. IGZO layers were formed on the bottom surface of the top substrate and the top surface of the bottom substrate of the three stacked samples with thicknesses of 188, 130, and 102 nm. The insertion of IGZO layers decreased the optical reflectivity of the stacked samples. The IGZO layers provided high effective optical absorbency of bottom substrates of 0.925, 0.943, and 0.931, respectively, for light wavelength regions for light in which the top substrates were transparent and the bottom substrates were opaque.

  11. Synergistic effect of Indium and Gallium co-doping on growth behavior and physical properties of hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jun Hyung; Lee, Seung Muk; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Hyun You; Park, Jozeph; Jung, Seung-Boo; Park, Geun Chul; Kim, Jungho; Joo, Jinho

    2017-02-01

    We synthesized ZnO nanorods (NRs) using simple hydrothermal method, with the simultaneous incorporation of gallium (Ga) and indium (In), in addition, investigated the co-doping effect on the morphology, microstructure, electronic structure, and electrical/optical properties. The growth behavior of the doped NRs was affected by the nuclei density and polarity of the (001) plane. The c-axis parameter of the co-doped NRs was similar to that of undoped NRs due to the compensated lattice distortion caused by the presence of dopants that are both larger (In3+) and smaller (Ga3+) than the host Zn2+ cations. Red shifts in the ultraviolet emission peaks were observed in all doped NRs, owing to the combined effects of NR size, band gap renormalization, and the presence of stacking faults created by the dopant-induced lattice distortions. In addition, the NR/p-GaN diodes using co-doped NRs exhibited superior electrical conductivity compared to the other specimens due to the increase in the charge carrier density of NRs and the relatively large effective contact area of (001) planes. The simultaneous doping of In and Ga is therefore anticipated to provide a broader range of optical, physical, and electrical properties of ZnO NRs for a variety of opto-electronic applications.

  12. Effect of top gate bias on photocurrent and negative bias illumination stress instability in dual gate amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunji; Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Park, Min Sang; Jang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the effect of top gate bias (VTG) on the generation of photocurrent and the decay of photocurrent for back channel etched inverted staggered dual gate structure amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film-transistors. Upon 5 min of exposure of 365 nm wavelength and 0.7 mW/cm2 intensity light with negative bottom gate bias, the maximum photocurrent increases from 3.29 to 322 pA with increasing the VTG from -15 to +15 V. By changing VTG from negative to positive, the Fermi level (EF) shifts toward conduction band edge (EC), which substantially controls the conversion of neutral vacancy to charged one (VO → VO+/VO2+ + e-/2e-), peroxide (O22-) formation or conversion of ionized interstitial (Oi2-) to neutral interstitial (Oi), thus electron concentration at conduction band. With increasing the exposure time, more carriers are generated, and thus, maximum photocurrent increases until being saturated. After negative bias illumination stress, the transfer curve shows -2.7 V shift at VTG = -15 V, which gradually decreases to -0.42 V shift at VTG = +15 V. It clearly reveals that the position of electron quasi-Fermi level controls the formation of donor defects (VO+/VO2+/O22-/Oi) and/or hole trapping in the a-IGZO /interfaces.

  13. Effect of nitrogen doping on the structural, optical and electrical properties of indium tin oxide films prepared by magnetron sputtering for gallium nitride light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lifei; Cheng, Guoan; Wang, Hougong; Wu, Yulong; Zheng, Ruiting; Ding, Peijun

    2017-01-01

    The indium tin oxide (ITO) films are prepared by the direct current magnetron sputtering technology with an ITO target in a mixture of argon and nitrogen gas at room temperature. The blue transmittance at 455 nm rises from 63% to 83% after nitrogen doping. The resistivity of the ITO film reduces from 4.6 × 10-3 (undoped film) to 5.7 × 10-4 Ω cm (N-doped film). The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data imply that the binding energy of the In3d5/2 peak is declined 0.05 eV after nitrogen doping. The high resolution transmission electron microscope images show that the nitrogen loss density of the GaN/ITO interface with N-doped ITO film is smaller than that of the GaN/ITO interface with undoped ITO film. The forward turn-on voltage of gallium nitride light emitting diode reduces by 0.5 V after nitrogen doping. The fabrication of the N-doped ITO film is conducive to modify the N component of the interface between GaN and ITO layer.

  14. Indium-chlorine and gallium-chlorine tetrasubstituted phthalocyanines in a bulk system, Langmuir monolayers and Langmuir-Blodgett nanolayers--spectroscopic investigations.

    PubMed

    Bursa, B; Wróbel, D; Biadasz, A; Kędzierski, K; Lewandowska, K; Graja, A; Szybowicz, M; Durmuş, M

    2014-07-15

    The paper deals with spectroscopic characterization of metallic phthalocyanines (Pc's) (indium and gallium) complexed with chlorine and substituted with four benzyloxyphenoxy peripheral groups in bulk systems, 2D Langmuir monolayers and Langmuir-Blodgett nanolayers. An influence of the molecular structure of dyes (the presence of metal and of substitutes attached to the phthalocyanine macroring) on the in situ measurements of light absorption is reported. Molecular arrangement of the phthalocyanine molecular skeleton in the Langmuir monolayers on water substrate and in the Langmuir-Blodgett nanolayers is evaluated. A comparison of the light absorption spectra of the phthalocyanine monolayers with the spectra of the dyes in solution supports the existence of dye aggregates in the monolayer. It was shown that the type of dye aggregates (oblique and H types) depends markedly on the dye molecular structures. The NIR-IR, IR reflection-absorption and Raman spectra are also monitored for Langmuir-Blodgett nanolayers in non-polarized and polarized light. It was shown that the dye molecules in the Langmuir-Blodgett layers are oriented nearly vertically with respect to a gold substrate.

  15. Synergistic effect of Indium and Gallium co-doping on growth behavior and physical properties of hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jun Hyung; Lee, Seung Muk; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Hyun You; Park, Jozeph; Jung, Seung-Boo; Park, Geun Chul; Kim, Jungho; Joo, Jinho

    2017-01-01

    We synthesized ZnO nanorods (NRs) using simple hydrothermal method, with the simultaneous incorporation of gallium (Ga) and indium (In), in addition, investigated the co-doping effect on the morphology, microstructure, electronic structure, and electrical/optical properties. The growth behavior of the doped NRs was affected by the nuclei density and polarity of the (001) plane. The c-axis parameter of the co-doped NRs was similar to that of undoped NRs due to the compensated lattice distortion caused by the presence of dopants that are both larger (In3+) and smaller (Ga3+) than the host Zn2+ cations. Red shifts in the ultraviolet emission peaks were observed in all doped NRs, owing to the combined effects of NR size, band gap renormalization, and the presence of stacking faults created by the dopant-induced lattice distortions. In addition, the NR/p-GaN diodes using co-doped NRs exhibited superior electrical conductivity compared to the other specimens due to the increase in the charge carrier density of NRs and the relatively large effective contact area of (001) planes. The simultaneous doping of In and Ga is therefore anticipated to provide a broader range of optical, physical, and electrical properties of ZnO NRs for a variety of opto-electronic applications. PMID:28155879

  16. Fabrication of conducting-filament-embedded indium tin oxide electrodes: application to lateral-type gallium nitride light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Dong; Kim, Kyeong Heon; Kim, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Geun

    2015-11-02

    A novel conducting filament (CF)-embedded indium tin oxide (ITO) film is fabricated using an electrical breakdown method. To assess the performance of this layer as an ohmic contact, it is applied to GaN (gallium nitride) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as a p-type electrode for comparison with typical GaN LEDs using metallic ITO. The operating voltage and output power of the LED with the CF embedded ITO are 3.93 V and 8.49 mW, respectively, at an injection current of 100 mA. This is comparable to the operating voltage and output power of the conventionally fabricated LEDs using metallic ITO (3.93 V and 8.43 mW). Moreover, the CF-ITO LED displays uniform and bright light emission indicating excellent current injection and spreading. These results suggest that the proposed method of forming ohmic contacts is at least as effective as the conventional method.

  17. Acoustic and NMR investigations of melting and crystallization of indium-gallium alloys in pores of synthetic opal matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirozerskii, A. L.; Charnaya, E. V.; Lee, M. K.; Chang, L. J.; Nedbai, A. I.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.; Fokin, A. V.; Samoilovich, M. I.; Lebedeva, E. L.; Bugaev, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents the results of studying the crystallization and melting processes of Ga-In eutectic alloys, which are embedded in opal matrices, using acoustic and NMR methods. The indium concentrations in the alloys were 4, 6, 9, and 15 at %. Measurements were performed upon cooling from room temperature to complete crystallization of the alloys and subsequent heating. It is revealed how the size effects and alloy composition influence the formation of phases with α- and β-Ga structures and on changes in the melting-temperature ranges. A difference was observed between the results obtained using acoustic and NMR methods, which was attributed to different temperature measurement conditions.

  18. Experimental and Theoretical Analysis of Strain Engineered Aluminium Nitride on Silicon for High Quality Aluminium(x)Indium(y)Gallium(1-x-y)Nitride Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tungare, Mihir

    III-Nitrides on Si are of great technological importance due to the availability of large area, epi ready Si substrates and the ability to heterointegrate with mature silicon micro and nanoelectronics. The major roadblock with realizing this is the large difference in thermal expansion coefficients and lattice constants between the two material systems. A novel technique developed in our research lab shows the potential of simultaneous and substantial reduction in dislocation and crack density in GaN on Si (111). Research undertaken in the current doctoral dissertation, validates the superior GaN quality on Si obtained using our technique and determines the factors responsible for its successful implementation. Detailed study of the stress evolution and dislocation reduction mechanism within overgrown GaN on as-grown and engineered AlN/Si substrates is carried out. Based on the conclusions obtained in this study, a pulsed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique for the growth of AlN on Si (111) is developed to achieve a smoother AlN buffer with larger islands. A 14× reduction in surface pit density for overgrown GaN is attained on these AlN/Si substrates after substrate engineering. Deep green emission at 560 nm from InGaN/GaN MQWs with 10× increase in photoluminescence (PL) intensity is obtained on these templates. Molecular dynamics (MD) is used with an ultimate goal to theoretically understand the stress dilution mechanism and assist in improving the technique experimentally. Plausible models to accurately simulate wurtzite AlN (w-AlN) and AlN on Si (111) are developed. Motion of Si islands on Si (111) bulk substrate is examined to assess the required simulation conditions, their compliance with experimental set-up, and the limitations. Homoepitaxial growth of w-AlN is carried out to simulate epitaxial deposition as a starting point for heteroepitaxy of AlN on Si (111) and also to eventually build the entire complex film stack that closely resembles the experimental substrate engineering process. Finally, crack-free III-N device structures, greater than 3.5 µm in thickness, across an entire 2" Si wafer are developed. The impact of combining our stress dilution technique with conventional strain management techniques on the performance of high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) devices is assessed.

  19. Low temperature synthesis of radio frequency magnetron sputtered gallium and aluminium co-doped zinc oxide thin films for transparent electrode fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchuweni, E.; Sathiaraj, T. S.; Nyakotyo, H.

    2016-12-01

    Gallium and aluminium co-doped zinc oxide (GAZO) thin films were prepared on glass substrates at low temperatures by radio frequency (rf) magnetron sputtering and their physical properties were investigated. All films possessed a hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure with a strong growth orientation along the (0 0 2) c-axis. The (0 0 2) peak intensity and mean crystallite size increased with substrate temperature from room temperature (RT) to 75 °C and then decreased at 100 °C, indicating an improvement in crystallinity up to 75 °C and its deterioration at 100 °C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs revealed the strong dependency of surface morphology on substrate temperature and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) confirmed the incorporation of Ga and Al into the ZnO films. All films exhibited excellent transmittances between 85 and 90% in the visible region and their optical band gap increased from 3.22 eV to 3.28 eV with substrate temperature. The Urbach energy decreased from 194 meV to 168 meV with increasing substrate temperature, indicating a decrease in structural disorders which was consistent with X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. Films deposited at 75 °C exhibited the lowest electrical resistivity (2.4 Ωcm) and highest figure of merit (7.5 × 10-5 Ω-1), proving their potential as candidates for transparent electrode fabrication.

  20. C(sp₃)-H bond activation with triel metals: indium and gallium zwitterions through internal hydride abstraction in rigid salan ligands.

    PubMed

    Maudoux, Nicolas; Fang, Jian; Roisnel, Thierry; Dorcet, Vincent; Maron, Laurent; Carpentier, Jean-François; Sarazin, Yann

    2014-06-16

    The hydropyrimidine salan (salan=N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis[(2-hydroxyphenyl)methylene]-1,2-diaminoethane) proteo-ligands with a rigid backbone {ON^(CH2)^NO}H2 react with M(CH2SiMe3)3 (M=Ga, In) to yield the zwitterions {ON^(CH(+))^NO}M(-)(CH2SiMe3)2 (M=Ga, 2; In, 3) by abstraction of a hydride from the ligand backbone followed by elimination of dihydrogen. By contrast, with Al2Me6, the neutral-at-metal bimetallic complex [{ON^(CH2)^NO}AlMe]2 ([1]2) is obtained quantitatively. The formation of indium zwitterions is also observed with sterically more encumbered ligands containing o-Me substituents on the phenolic rings, or an N (CHPh) N moiety in the heterocyclic core. Overall, the ease of C(sp3)-H bond activation follows the order Al≪Gagallium and indium, and the formation of these zwitterions obeys a strict kinetic control; the computations suggest that, as inferred from the experimental data, the reaction proceeds through an instable metal-hydride species, which could not be isolated synthetically.

  1. Evaluation of the indium gallium nitride/silicon broken-gap heterojunction and its potential application for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan

    InGaN (especially In-rich alloy) has been actively studied for decades since the band gap of InN was revised downward from ˜2.0 eV to 0.64 eV. The potential applications for alloys of In-rich InGaN hence became apparent. Despite the promising potential, photovoltaic devices based on InGaN have struggled due to a number of key limitations and fundamental physical problems. Firstly, due to the deep excursion of the InN conduction band at the gamma point, defects in InN are almost universally n-type leading to unintentional degenerate doping. This also leads to the problem of electron accumulation at all surfaces and interfaces of InN. Secondly, p-type doping is problematic, partially due to the degenerate doping effect of defects, but it has also been observed that Mg-doping, while leading to a p-type layer, dramatically reduces the quantum efficiency. This thesis explores an alternative approach using n-type InGaN to form a heterojunction with a p-type Si substrate. One potential benefit to using p-type Si as a substrate material for InGaN is that the valence band of Si possibly lines up with the conduction band of InGaN for a specific mole fraction of indium. Such a band alignment is known as a broken gap heterojunction, an example of which is the interface between InAs and AlxGa 1--xSb. The benefits of this broken-gap junction include a low series resistance, high electron mobility, and mobility only weakly dependent on temperature. These properties enable new approach to photovoltaic devices. The InGaN/Si heterojunctions were fabricated by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under stoichiometric flux conditions. An ultra-thin SiN interface layer was introduced, by Si nitridation process, to passivate the substrate surface and prevent In-Si and Ga-Si eutectic problems. InGaN films with a variety of indium mole fractions were grown by calibrating the In/Ga flux ratio during the deposition. The chemical composition of as-grown films was characterized by x

  2. Effect of direct current sputtering power on the behavior of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors under negative bias illumination stress: A combination of experimental analyses and device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Jun Tae; Kim, Dong Myong; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dae Hwan E-mail: drlife@kookmin.ac.kr; Park, Jozeph; Ahn, Byung Du; Kim, Hyun-Suk E-mail: drlife@kookmin.ac.kr

    2015-03-23

    The effect of direct current sputtering power of indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) on the performance and stability of the corresponding thin-film transistor devices was studied. The field effect mobility increases as the IGZO sputter power increases, at the expense of device reliability under negative bias illumination stress (NBIS). Device simulation based on the extracted sub-gap density of states indicates that the field effect mobility is improved as a result of the number of acceptor-like states decreasing. The degradation by NBIS is suggested to be induced by the formation of peroxides in IGZO rather than charge trapping.

  3. Cadmium-free copper indium gallium diselenide hybrid solar cells comprising a 2-(4-biphenylyl)-5-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, Manuel; Simon, Christoph; Kuhn, Johannes; Bürkert, Linda; Cemernjak, Marco; Dimmler, Bernhard; Lemmer, Uli; Colsmann, Alexander

    2013-02-01

    Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) solar cells are the most efficient thin film photovoltaic devices today. In this work, we investigate CIGS/organic hybrid solar cells comprising a semi-transparent metal top electrode and a wide band gap organic semiconductor as buffer layer. Depositing the organic semiconductor from solution, we fabricate Cd-free solar cells exhibiting about the same efficiency as their counterparts comprising CdS and significantly higher open-circuit voltages as compared to buffer-free devices. Although the organic molecules do not cover the CIGS surface homogeneously, their use enables prolonged charge carrier lifetimes according to impedance spectroscopy measurements.

  4. Effect of top gate bias on photocurrent and negative bias illumination stress instability in dual gate amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eunji; Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Park, Min Sang; Jang, Jin

    2015-12-07

    We have studied the effect of top gate bias (V{sub TG}) on the generation of photocurrent and the decay of photocurrent for back channel etched inverted staggered dual gate structure amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film-transistors. Upon 5 min of exposure of 365 nm wavelength and 0.7 mW/cm{sup 2} intensity light with negative bottom gate bias, the maximum photocurrent increases from 3.29 to 322 pA with increasing the V{sub TG} from −15 to +15 V. By changing V{sub TG} from negative to positive, the Fermi level (E{sub F}) shifts toward conduction band edge (E{sub C}), which substantially controls the conversion of neutral vacancy to charged one (V{sub O} → V{sub O}{sup +}/V{sub O}{sup 2+} + e{sup −}/2e{sup −}), peroxide (O{sub 2}{sup 2−}) formation or conversion of ionized interstitial (O{sub i}{sup 2−}) to neutral interstitial (O{sub i}), thus electron concentration at conduction band. With increasing the exposure time, more carriers are generated, and thus, maximum photocurrent increases until being saturated. After negative bias illumination stress, the transfer curve shows −2.7 V shift at V{sub TG} = −15 V, which gradually decreases to −0.42 V shift at V{sub TG} = +15 V. It clearly reveals that the position of electron quasi-Fermi level controls the formation of donor defects (V{sub O}{sup +}/V{sub O}{sup 2+}/O{sub 2}{sup 2−}/O{sub i}) and/or hole trapping in the a-IGZO /interfaces.

  5. High-pressure Gas Activation for Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors at 100 °C

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Gi; Tak, Young Jun; Du Ahn, Byung; Jung, Tae Soo; Chung, Kwun-Bum; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the use of high-pressure gases as an activation energy source for amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs). High-pressure annealing (HPA) in nitrogen (N2) and oxygen (O2) gases was applied to activate a-IGZO TFTs at 100 °C at pressures in the range from 0.5 to 4 MPa. Activation of the a-IGZO TFTs during HPA is attributed to the effect of the high-pressure environment, so that the activation energy is supplied from the kinetic energy of the gas molecules. We reduced the activation temperature from 300 °C to 100 °C via the use of HPA. The electrical characteristics of a-IGZO TFTs annealed in O2 at 2 MPa were superior to those annealed in N2 at 4 MPa, despite the lower pressure. For O2 HPA under 2 MPa at 100 °C, the field effect mobility and the threshold voltage shift under positive bias stress were improved by 9.00 to 10.58 cm2/V.s and 3.89 to 2.64 V, respectively. This is attributed to not only the effects of the pressurizing effect but also the metal-oxide construction effect which assists to facilitate the formation of channel layer and reduces oxygen vacancies, served as electron trap sites. PMID:26972476

  6. Comparative study of the toxic effects of gallium arsenide, indium arsenide and arsenic trioxide following intratracheal instillations to the lung of Syrian golden hamsters.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, A; Hirata, M; Omura, M; Zhao, M; Makita, Y; Yamazaki, K; Inoue, N; Gotoh, K

    2000-01-01

    Toxic effects of gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium arsenide (InAs) and arsenic trioxide (As2O3) were studied in male Syrian golden hamsters. GaAs (7.7 mg/kg) and As2O3 (1.3 mg/kg) particles were instilled intratracheally twice a week a total of 16 times, while InAs (7.7 mg/kg) was instilled a total of 14 times. As a control, hamsters were treated with the vehicle, phosphate buffer solution. During the instillation period, the cumulative body weight gain of the InAs-, but not the GaAs- or As2O3-treated hamsters was suppressed significantly, when compared with the control group. Slight to severe inflammatory responses were observed in the lung for all treatment groups. The most severe inflammatory change, characterized by an accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages, exudation, thickness of the pleura and fibrotic proliferation was found in the InAs-treated hamsters. Extensive alveolar or bronchiolar cell hyperplasia with or without keratinizing squamous cell metaplasia was observed in almost all the InAs-treated hamsters. Furthermore, squamous cell metaplasia or squamous cell hyperplasia developed in some of the InAs-treated hamsters, but not in the GaAs- or As2O3-treated hamsters. Slight to mild lesions were found in the convoluted tubules of the kidney in both the GaAs and InAs groups. From the present study, the toxic potency of these particles was provisionally estimated to be in the following order: InAs > GaAs > As2O3, at the dosage level used in this study. Furthermore, there was evidence that InAs particles could induce pulmonary, renal or systemic toxicity, and as such, InAs particles may produce pulmonary precancerous change when instilled intratracheally into hamsters.

  7. A thermalization energy analysis of the threshold voltage shift in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors under simultaneous negative gate bias and illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewitt, A. J.; Powell, M. J.

    2014-04-01

    It has been previously observed that thin film transistors (TFTs) utilizing an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) semiconducting channel suffer from a threshold voltage shift when subjected to a negative gate bias and light illumination simultaneously. In this work, a thermalization energy analysis has been applied to previously published data on negative bias under illumination stress (NBIS) in a-IGZO TFTs. A barrier to defect conversion of 0.65-0.75 eV is extracted, which is consistent with reported energies of oxygen vacancy migration. The attempt-to-escape frequency is extracted to be 106-107 s-1, which suggests a weak localization of carriers in band tail states over a 20-40 nm distance. Models for the NBIS mechanism based on charge trapping are reviewed and a defect pool model is proposed in which two distinct distributions of defect states exist in the a-IGZO band gap: these are associated with states that are formed as neutrally charged and 2+ charged oxygen vacancies at the time of film formation. In this model, threshold voltage shift is not due to a defect creation process, but to a change in the energy distribution of states in the band gap upon defect migration as this allows a state formed as a neutrally charged vacancy to be converted into one formed as a 2+ charged vacancy and vice versa. Carrier localization close to the defect migration site is necessary for the conversion process to take place, and such defect migration sites are associated with conduction and valence band tail states. Under negative gate bias stressing, the conduction band tail is depleted of carriers, but the bias is insufficient to accumulate holes in the valence band tail states, and so no threshold voltage shift results. It is only under illumination that the quasi Fermi level for holes is sufficiently lowered to allow occupation of valence band tail states. The resulting charge localization then allows a negative threshold voltage shift, but only under conditions

  8. Tetrabutylammonium Salts of Aluminum(III) and Gallium(III) Phthalocyanine Radical Anions Bonded with Fluoren-9-olato(-) Anions and Indium(III) Phthalocyanine Bromide Radical Anions.

    PubMed

    Konarev, Dmitri V; Khasanov, Salavat S; Ishikawa, Manabu; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Otsuka, Akihiro; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Lyubovskaya, Rimma N

    2017-02-15

    Reduction of aluminum(III), gallium(III), and indium(III) phthalocyanine chlorides by sodium fluorenone ketyl in the presence of tetrabutylammonium cations yielded crystalline salts of the type (Bu4 N(+) )2 [M(III) (HFl-O(-) )(Pc(.3-) )](.-) (Br(-) )⋅1.5 C6 H4 Cl2 [M=Al (1), Ga (2); HFl-O(-) =fluoren-9-olato(-) anion; Pc=phthalocyanine] and (Bu4 N(+) ) [In(III) Br(Pc(.3-) )](.-) ⋅0.875 C6 H4 Cl2 ⋅0.125 C6 H14 (3). The salts were found to contain Pc(.3-) radical anions with negatively charged phthalocyanine macrocycles, as evidenced by the presence of intense bands of Pc(.3-) in the near-IR region and a noticeable blueshift in both the Q and Soret bands of phthalocyanine. The metal(III) atoms coordinate HFl-O(-) anions in 1 and 2 with short Al-O and Ga-O bond lengths of 1.749(2) and 1.836(6) Å, respectively. The C-O bonds [1.402(3) and 1.391(11) Å in 1 and 2, respectively] in the HFl-O(-) anions are longer than the same bond in the fluorenone ketyl (1.27-1.31 Å). Salts 1-3 show effective magnetic moments of 1.72, 1.66, and 1.79 μB at 300 K, respectively, owing to the presence of unpaired S=1/2 spins on Pc(.3-) . These spins are coupled antiferromagnetically with Weiss temperatures of -22, -14, and -30 K for 1-3, respectively. Coupling can occur in the corrugated two-dimensional phthalocyanine layers of 1 and 2 with an exchange interaction of J/kB =-0.9 and -1.1 K, respectively, and in the π-stacking {[In(III) Br(Pc(.3-) )](.-) }2 dimers of 3 with an exchange interaction of J/kB =-10.8 K. The salts show intense electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals attributed to Pc(.3-) . It was found that increasing the size of the central metal atom strongly broadened these EPR signals.

  9. Ambient temperature deposition of gallium nitride/gallium oxynitride from a deep eutectic electrolyte, under potential control.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sujoy; Sampath, S

    2016-05-11

    A ternary, ionically conducting, deep eutectic solvent based on acetamide, urea and gallium nitrate is reported for the electrodeposition of gallium nitride/gallium indium nitride under ambient conditions; blue and white light emitting photoluminescent deposits are obtained under potential control.

  10. Gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... material called gallium and is a type of nuclear medicine exam. A related test is gallium scan ... Brown ML, Forstrom LA, et al. Society of nuclear medicine procedure guideline for gallium scintigraphy in inflammation. ...

  11. The effect of a zinc-tin-oxide layer used as an etch-stopper layer on the bias stress stability of solution-processed indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chul Ho; Rim, You Seung; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the bias stress stability of solution-processed indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors (IGZO TFTs) using zinc-tin-oxide (ZTO) as the etch-stopper layer, the so-called dual-active-layered ZTO/IGZO TFT (DALZI TFT). The DALZI TFT can use a low-cost back-channel-etch structure because of the high chemical stability of the upper ZTO layer. The DALZI TFT exhibited only a threshold voltage shift of -1.86 V under negative bias illumination stress (NBIS) conditions (stress time = 1000 s), while the unpassivated IGZO TFT suffered from a threshold voltage shift of -19.59 V under NBIS conditions (stress time = 1000 s). The superior bias stress stability of the DALZI TFT is attributed not only to the densification effect by the multi-stacking process but also to the lower sensitivity to ambient gases (e.g., oxygen and water vapour) due to the low oxygen vacancy in the upper ZTO layer.

  12. Ultrasound-assisted ionic liquid-based microextraction combined with least squares support vector machines regression for the simultaneous determination of aluminum, gallium, and indium in water and coal samples.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Jahan B; Zolfonoun, Ehsan

    2012-06-01

    A new simple and rapid ultrasound-assisted ionic liquid-based microextraction method was applied to preconcentrate aluminum(III), gallium(III), and indium(III) ions from water samples as a prior step to their simultaneous spectrophotometric determination using least squares support vector machines regression. In the novel procedure, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C(6)MIM][PF(6)] was dispersed into the aqueous sample solution as fine droplets by ultrasonication, and the analytes were extracted into the ionic liquid phase after complexation with 1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxy anthraquinone (quinalizarine). After centrifuging, the fine droplets of extractant phase were settled to the bottom of the conical-bottom glass centrifuge tube. The detection limits for Al(III), Ga(III), and In(III) were 1.70, 2.02, and 2.06 ng mL(-1), respectively. The precision of the method, evaluated as the relative standard deviation obtained by analyzing a series of ten replicates, was below 3.2% for all elements. The method was successfully applied for the determination of Al(III), Ga(III), and In(III) in real samples.

  13. Remarkable changes in interface O vacancy and metal-oxide bonds in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by long time annealing at 250 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Um, Jae Gwang; Jang, Jin

    2014-12-08

    We have studied the effect of long time post-fabrication annealing on negative bias illumination stress (NBIS) of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film-transistors. Annealing for 100 h at 250 °C increased the field effect mobility from 14.7 cm{sup 2}/V s to 17.9 cm{sup 2}/V s and reduced the NBIS instability remarkably. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the oxygen vacancy and OH were found to exist at the interfaces of a-IGZO with top and bottom SiO{sub 2}. Long time annealing helps to decrease the vacancy concentration and increase the metal-oxygen bonds at the interfaces; this leads to increase in the free carrier concentrations in a-IGZO and field-effect mobility. X-ray reflectivity measurement indicated the increment of a-IGZO film density of 5.63 g cm{sup −3} to 5.83 g cm{sup −3} (3.4% increase) by 100 h annealing at 250 °C. The increase in film density reveals the decrease of O vacancy concentration and reduction of weak metal-oxygen bonds in a-IGZO, which substantially helps to improve the NBIS stability.

  14. A room temperature process for the fabrication of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin-film transistors with co-sputtered Zr x Si1‑ x O2 Gate dielectric and improved electrical and hysteresis performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chien-Hsiung; Wang, Shui-Jinn; Liu, Pang-Yi; Wu, Chien-Hung; Wu, Nai-Sheng; Yan, Hao-Ping; Lin, Tseng-Hsing

    2017-04-01

    The use of co-sputtered zirconium silicon oxide (Zr x Si1‑ x O2) gate dielectrics to improve the gate controllability of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (α-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) through a room-temperature fabrication process is proposed and demonstrated. With the sputtering power of the SiO2 target in the range of 0–150 W and with that of the ZrO2 target kept at 100 W, a dielectric constant ranging from approximately 28.1 to 7.8 is obtained. The poly-structure formation immunity of the Zr x Si1‑ x O2 dielectrics, reduction of the interface trap density suppression, and gate leakage current are examined. Our experimental results reveal that the Zr0.85Si0.15O2 gate dielectric can lead to significantly improved TFT subthreshold swing performance (103 mV/dec) and field effect mobility (33.76 cm2 V‑1 s‑1).

  15. Improvement of bias-stability in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by using solution-processed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation

    SciTech Connect

    An, Sungjin; Mativenga, Mallory; Kim, Youngoo; Jang, Jin

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate back channel improvement of back-channel-etch amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors by using solution-processed yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) passivation. Two different solvents, which are acetonitrile (35%) + ethylene glycol (65%), solvent A and deionized water, solvent B are investigated for the spin-on process of the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation—performed after patterning source/drain (S/D) Mo electrodes by a conventional HNO{sub 3}-based wet-etch process. Both solvents yield devices with good performance but those passivated by using solvent B exhibit better light and bias stability. Presence of yttrium at the a-IGZO back interface, where it occupies metal vacancy sites, is confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The passivation effect of yttrium is more significant when solvent A is used because of the existence of more metal vacancies, given that the alcohol (65% ethylene glycol) in solvent A may dissolve the metal oxide (a-IGZO) through the formation of alkoxides and water.

  16. Influence of the charge trap density distribution in a gate insulator on the positive-bias stress instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eungtaek; Kim, Choong-Ki; Lee, Myung Keun; Bang, Tewook; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Park, Sang-Hee Ko; Choi, Kyung Cheol

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the positive-bias stress (PBS) instability of thin film transistors (TFTs) composed of different types of first-gate insulators, which serve as a protection layer of the active surface. Two different deposition methods, i.e., the thermal atomic layer deposition (THALD) and plasma-enhanced ALD (PEALD) of Al2O3, were applied for the deposition of the first GI. When THALD was used to deposit the GI, amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) TFTs showed superior stability characteristics under PBS. For example, the threshold voltage shift (ΔVth) was 0 V even after a PBS time (tstress) of 3000 s under a gate voltage (VG) condition of 5 V (with an electrical field of 1.25 MV/cm). On the other hand, when the first GI was deposited by PEALD, the ΔVth value of a-IGZO TFTs was 0.82 V after undergoing an identical amount of PBS. In order to interpret the disparate ΔVth values resulting from PBS quantitatively, the average oxide charge trap density (NT) in the GI and its spatial distribution were investigated through low-frequency noise characterizations. A higher NT resulted during in the PEALD type GI than in the THALD case. Specifically, the PEALD process on a-IGZO layer surface led to an increasing trend of NT near the GI/a-IGZO interface compared to bulk GI owing to oxygen plasma damage on the a-IGZO surface.

  17. Improving the efficiency of copper indium gallium (Di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells through integration of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index similar to aluminum doped zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Burghoorn, M.; Kniknie, B.; Deelen, J. van; Ee, R. van; Xu, M.; Vroon, Z.; Belt, R. van de; Buskens, P. E-mail: buskens@dwi.rwth-aachen.de

    2014-12-15

    Textured transparent conductors are widely used in thin-film silicon solar cells. They lower the reflectivity at interfaces between different layers in the cell and/or cause an increase in the path length of photons in the Si absorber layer, which both result in an increase in the number of absorbed photons and, consequently, an increase in short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}) and cell efficiency. Through optical simulations, we recently obtained strong indications that texturing of the transparent conductor in copper indium gallium (di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells is also optically advantageous. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the J{sub sc} and efficiency of CIGS solar cells with an absorber layer thickness (d{sub CIGS}) of 0.85 μm, 1.00 μm and 2.00 μm increase through application of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index that is sufficiently similar to AZO (n{sub resist} = 1.792 vs. n{sub AZO} = 1.913 at 633 nm) to avoid large optical losses at the resist-AZO interface. On average, J{sub sc} increases by 7.2%, which matches the average reduction in reflection of 7.0%. The average relative increase in efficiency is slightly lower (6.0%). No trend towards a larger relative increase in J{sub sc} with decreasing d{sub CIGS} was observed. Ergo, the increase in J{sub sc} can be fully explained by the reduction in reflection, and we did not observe any increase in J{sub sc} based on an increased photon path length.

  18. Improving the efficiency of copper indium gallium (Di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells through integration of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index similar to aluminum doped zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghoorn, M.; Kniknie, B.; van Deelen, J.; Xu, M.; Vroon, Z.; van Ee, R.; van de Belt, R.; Buskens, P.

    2014-12-01

    Textured transparent conductors are widely used in thin-film silicon solar cells. They lower the reflectivity at interfaces between different layers in the cell and/or cause an increase in the path length of photons in the Si absorber layer, which both result in an increase in the number of absorbed photons and, consequently, an increase in short-circuit current density (Jsc) and cell efficiency. Through optical simulations, we recently obtained strong indications that texturing of the transparent conductor in copper indium gallium (di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells is also optically advantageous. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the Jsc and efficiency of CIGS solar cells with an absorber layer thickness (dCIGS) of 0.85 μm, 1.00 μm and 2.00 μm increase through application of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index that is sufficiently similar to AZO (nresist = 1.792 vs. nAZO = 1.913 at 633 nm) to avoid large optical losses at the resist-AZO interface. On average, Jsc increases by 7.2%, which matches the average reduction in reflection of 7.0%. The average relative increase in efficiency is slightly lower (6.0%). No trend towards a larger relative increase in Jsc with decreasing dCIGS was observed. Ergo, the increase in Jsc can be fully explained by the reduction in reflection, and we did not observe any increase in Jsc based on an increased photon path length.

  19. The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term

    SciTech Connect

    Lokanc, Martin; Eggert, Roderick; Redlinger, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Demand for indium is likely to increase if the growth in deployment of the copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) and III-V thin-film photovoltaic technologies accelerates. There are concerns about indium supply constraints since it is relatively rare element in the earth's crust and because it is produced exclusively as a byproduct.

  20. Strained INDIUM(0.52)ALUMINUM(0.48)ARSENIDE/ INDIUM(X)GALLIUM(1-X)ARSENIDE (x > 0.53) High Electron Mobility Transistors (hemt's) for Millimeter-Wave Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Geok Ing

    This thesis presents the design, fabrication and detailed characterization of strained In_{0.52}Al_{0.48}As/In _{x}Ga_{1-x}As (x > 0.53) HEMT's for microwave/millimeter-wave applications. A set of theoretical criteria have been developed to allow the design of heterostructures for optimum device performance. Transport studies on these heterostructures show enhanced Hall mobilities and velocities when the channel Indium composition (x) increases from 0.53 to 0.65. A higher transconductance (g_{m}) and current gain cutoff frequency (f_ {T}) is also obtained. 1mu m long gate single-heterojunction HEMT's (SHHEMT's) with x = 0.65 have shown state-of-the-art extrinsic g _{m} of 590mS/mm and f _{T} of 45GHz. The device performance however degrades for x >=q 0.7 and the output conductance (G_{ds} ) increases considerably. To overcome this, 1 μm double-heterojunction HEMT's (DHHEMT's) were investigated and showed low G_{ds } of ~13mS/mm and high maximum oscillation frequency (f_{max }) of 65GHz. In addition to the theoretical, DC and microwave study of SHHEMT's and DHHEMT's, the devices were also characterized at low frequencies (LF) in order to investigate their 1/f noise, g_{m} and output -resistance (R_{ds}) dispersion properties. LF noise characteristics reveal shallow traps and high noise transition frequencies of ~ 200-300 MHz. Dispersion in InAlAs/InGaAs HEMT's is attributed to the interface states of the heterointerfaces underneath the gate rather than the surface states of the ungated regions. The g_{m} and R_{ds} dispersion is small compared to GaAs MESFET's. Submicron (0.9 to 0.2 μm) HEMT's were also fabricated and characterized. As in the 1mum gate case, low G_ {ds} values were found for the DHHEMT's even down to 0.25 mum; cutoff frequencies of these devices were f_{T} = 82GHz and f_{max} = 148GHz. Further device performance enhancement in the SHHEMT's was obtained by optimizing the submicron technology. Best results were obtained with 0.2mum mushroom-gate 65

  1. Aluminium plasmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Gerard, Davy; Gray, Stephen K.

    2014-12-15

    In this study, we present an overview of 'aluminium plasmonics', i.e. the study of both fundamental and practical aspects of surface plasmon excitations in aluminium structures, in particular thin films and metal nanoparticles. After a brief introduction noting both some recent and historical contributions to aluminium plasmonics, we discuss the optical properties of aluminium and aluminium nanostructures and highlight a few selected studies in a host of areas ranging from fluorescence to data storage.

  2. Aluminium plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Davy; Gray, Stephen K.

    2015-05-01

    We present an overview of ‘aluminium plasmonics’, i.e. the study of both fundamental and practical aspects of surface plasmon excitations in aluminium structures, in particular thin films and metal nanoparticles. After a brief introduction noting both some recent and historical contributions to aluminium plasmonics, we discuss the optical properties of aluminium and aluminium nanostructures and highlight a few selected studies in a host of areas ranging from fluorescence to data storage.

  3. Characterisation of Ga-coated and Ga-brazed aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Ferchaud, E.; Christien, F.; Barnier, V.; Paillard, P.

    2012-05-15

    This work is devoted to the brazing of aluminium using liquid gallium. Gallium was deposited on aluminium samples at {approx} 50 Degree-Sign C using a liquid gallium 'polishing' technique. Brazing was undertaken for 30 min at 500 Degree-Sign C in air. EDS (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) and AES (Auger Electron Spectroscopy) characterisation of Ga-coated samples has shown that the Ga surface layer thickness is of ten (or a few tens of) nanometres. Furthermore, aluminium oxide layer (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was shown to be 'descaled' during Ga deposition, which ensures good conditions for further brazing. Cross-section examination of Ga-coated samples shows that liquid gallium penetrates into the aluminium grain boundaries during deposition. The thickness of the grain boundary gallium film was measured using an original EDS technique and is found to be of a few tens of nanometres. The depth of gallium grain boundary penetration is about 300 {mu}m at the deposition temperature. The fracture stress of the brazed joints was measured from tensile tests and was determined to be 33 MPa. Cross-section examination of brazed joints shows that gallium has fully dissolved into the bulk and that the joint is really autogenous. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminium can be brazed using liquid gallium deposited by a 'polishing' technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aluminium oxide layer is 'descaled' during liquid Ga 'polishing' deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EDS can be used for determination of surface and grain boundary Ga film thickness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface and grain boundary Ga film thickness is of a few tens of nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface and grain boundary gallium dissolves in the bulk during brazing.

  4. Unintentional gallium incorporation in InGaN layers during epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kun; Ren, Huaijin; Ikeda, Masao; Liu, Jianping; Ma, Yi; Gao, Songxin; Tang, Chun; Li, Deyao; Zhang, Liquan; Yang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Unintentional gallium incorporation was observed and investigated in the epitaxial growth of InGaN by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. InGaN was grown without intentional gallium precursor and the gallium incorporation rate was found not dependent on TEGa source but was significantly influenced by temperature and TMIn source flow. The source of the unintentional gallium incorporation is confirmed to be from the flow distributor of the reactor. The incorporation mechanism was analyzed to be the diffusion of resultant of transmetalation reaction between TMIn or its decomposed products (for example DMIn) and residual gallium. Due to the unintentional gallium incorporation, the growth rate and indium content of InGaN layer are determined by indium source, gallium source and the growth temperature.

  5. Indium gallium arsenide microwave power transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Gregory A.; Kapoor, Vik J.; Shokrani, Mohsen; Messick, Louis J.; Nguyen, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Depletion-mode InGaAs microwave power MISFETs with 1-micron gate lengths and up to 1-mm gate widths have been fabricated using an ion-implantation process. The devices employed a plasma-deposited silicon/silicon dioxide gate insulator. The dc I-V characteristics and RF power performance at 9.7 GHz are presented. The output power, power-added efficiency, and power gain as a function of input power are reported. An output power of 1.07 W with a corresponding power gain and power-added efficiency of 4.3 dB and 38 percent, respectively, was obtained. The large-gate-width devices provided over twice the previously reported output power for InGaAs MISFETs at X-band. In addition, output power stability within 1.2 percent over 24 h of continuous operation was achieved. In addition, a drain current drift of 4 percent over 10,000 sec was obtained.

  6. Running droplets of gallium from evaporation of gallium arsenide.

    PubMed

    Tersoff, J; Jesson, D E; Tang, W X

    2009-04-10

    High-temperature annealing of gallium arsenide in vacuum causes excess evaporation of arsenic, with accumulation of gallium as liquid droplets on the surface. Using real-time in situ surface electron microscopy, we found that these droplets spontaneously run across the crystal surface. Running droplets have been seen in many systems, but they typically require special surface preparation or gradient forces. In contrast, we show that noncongruent evaporation automatically provides a driving force for running droplets. The motion is predicted and observed to slow and stop near a characteristic temperature, with the speed increasing both below and above this temperature. The same behavior is expected to occur during the evaporation of similar III-V semiconductors such as indium arsenide.

  7. Growth of Gallium Nitride Nanorods and Their Coalescence Overgrowth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-07

    absorption enhancements of amorphous silicon solar cells with periodical metal nanowall and nanopillar structures,” Optics Express, Vol. 20, No. S1, p...constituent atoms ( gallium , indium , which are formed through the decomposition of metalorganic precursors TEGa and TMIn, and nitrogen) projected onto the...found that the QW widths are narrower and the indium contents are higher in the sidewall m-plane QWs, when compared with the top-face c-plane QWs. Also

  8. [Mechanism of renal elimination of 2 elements of group IIIA of the periodic table : aluminum and indium].

    PubMed

    Galle, P

    1981-01-05

    Aluminium and indium, two elements of group IIIA of the periodic table, are concentrated by the kidney inside lysosomes of proximal tubule cell. In these lysosomes, aluminium and indium are precipitated as non-soluble phosphate salts and these precipitates are then expelled in the tubular lumen and eliminated with the urinary flow. These data have been visualized by analytical microscopy (ion microscopy and X ray microanalysis). Local acid phosphatases are assumed to permit the concentration of aluminium and indium salts inside the lysosomes.

  9. Phase Separation in Indium Gallium Arsenide and Indium Gallium Arsenic Phosphide Epitaxial Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDevitt, Thomas L.

    1990-01-01

    Microstructures of InGaAs and InGaAsP epitaxial layers have been investigated to study the phase separation reaction that occurs in these materials. InGaAsP layers have been grown by liquid phase epitaxy on (001), (110), (111), and (123) oriented InP substrates and have been characterized by plan view and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy. Results indicate that the fine scale contrast modulations are two dimensional and lie in the plane of the substrate surface. The crystallographic alignment of these modulations has been shown to be determined by the elastic anisotropy of the substrate crystal in the growth plane. The coarse modulations that are commonly observed in (001) samples are not found in layers grown on the other orientations. It is proposed that the coarse modulations are the result of a buckling reaction which occurs as a result of the fine scale modulations. Representative molecular beam epitaxy and metallorganic chemical vapor deposition grown samples have also been examined and confirm that the LPE results are generic in nature. Annealing studies have also been carried out on phase separated InGaAsP layers to study the reversion phenomenon. The conditions that are required to accomplish homogenization reflect the very slow interdiffusion rates in these materials. Consideration of the annealing results establishes that the rates of mass transfer by bulk diffusion are too low to allow the phase separation reaction to occur by this mechanism. Hall effect measurements show that the carrier mobility increases on annealing and that a concurrent increase in carrier concentration is also observed. Photoluminescence measurements reveal a broadening of the band to band transition peak following the anneal. Finally, the effects of zinc diffusion on phase separated microstructures in InGaAs and InGaAsP layers have also been analyzed. It is shown that the diffusion of zinc into these materials can also homogenize the modulations. For the InGaAs layers it was possible to completely homogenize the microstructure by zinc diffusion, however, for InGaAsP layers only a partial homogenization was accomplished. This model suggests that zinc primarily effects the diffusion of the group III atoms and has very little effect on the diffusivity of the group V constituents. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.).

  10. Examples of liquiq metal embrittlement in industrial aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchet, Y.; Rodine, A.; Véron, M.; Péron, S.; Deschamps, A.

    2002-09-01

    Liquid metal embrittlement (LME) phenomena were investigated in two industrial aluminium alloys. Gallium penetration in 7010 alloys was systematically investigated to shed light on the effect of microstructure and plasticity ahead of the crack tip. Hot temperature shortness in 5083 alloy is given as an example of cleavage induced by LME.

  11. Indium arsenide/gallium arsenide and gallium antimonide/gallium arsenide quantum dot solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laghumavarapu, Ramesh B.

    Solar cells are gaining increasing attention as alternative energy sources. For the last decade, many attempts have been made to increase the conversion efficiency and reduce the manufacturing cost of the solar cells. Many material systems and cell designs have been studied towards achieving these goals. This has resulted in systems that are either less efficient with low cost or more efficient with high cost. As there is a minimum amount by which the cost of the cell can be reduced, the majority of the research work in solar cell community has been focused on increasing the efficiency of single junction solar cells without substantial increase in the manufacturing cost. In this work the concept of "Intermediate band quantum dot solar cells" (proposed by Luque et al.) has been investigated using InAs/GaAs and GaSb/GaAs quantum dots (QDs). This scheme has the potential to increase the conversion efficiency over 63%, which is more than that of any single junction solar cell, by generation of additional current via sub-bandgap photon absorption. In QD solar cells multiple stacks of QD layers have been employed in the i-region of p-i-n solar cells. I-V characteristics of the QD solar cells have been studied and compared with that of GaAs control cells. The results from I-V measurements on InAs QD solar cells indicate that the strain compensation in QD solar cells has improved fill factor by 17%. It is also observed that the open circuit voltage, short circuit current and fill factor of both InAs and GaSb QD solar cells are reduced when compared to the respective values of the GaAs control cell. Both InAs and GaSb QD solar cells show an extended photo response compared to control cell indicating the contribution from QD absorption. This holds promise to increase the efficiency with proper device optimization and selection of the appropriate QD material system. Finally, the possibilities of carrier multiplication (CM) to increase the conversion efficiency in these dots are discussed.

  12. Aluminium in human sweat.

    PubMed

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans.

  13. MBE growth and processing of III/V-nitride semiconductor thin film structures: Growth of gallium indium arsenic nitride and nano-machining with focused ion beam and electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yeonjoon

    The advanced semiconductor material InGaAsN was grown with nitrogen plasma assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). The InGaAsN layers were characterized with High Resolution X-ray Diffraction (HRXDF), Atomic Fore Microscope (AFM), X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS) and Photo-Luminescence (PL). The reduction of the band gap energy was observed with the incorporation of nitrogen and the lattice matched condition to the GaAs substrate was achieved with the additional incorporation of indium. A detailed investigation was made for the growth mode changes from planar layer-by-layer growth to 3D faceted growth with a higher concentration of nitrogen. A new X-ray diffraction analysis was developed and applied to the MBE growth on GaAs(111)B, which is one of the facet planes of InGaAsN. As an effort to enhance the processing tools for advanced semiconductor materials, gas assisted Focused Ion Beam (FIB) vertical milling was performed on GaN. The FIB processed area shows an atomically flat surface, which is good enough for the fabrication of Double Bragg Reflector (DBR) mirrors for the Blue GaN Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) Diodes. An in-situ electron beam system was developed to combine the enhanced lithographic processing capability with the atomic layer growth capability by MBE. The electron beam system has a compensation capability against substrate vibration and thermal drift. In-situ electron beam lithography was performed with the low pressure assisting gas. The advanced processing and characterization methods developed in this thesis will assist the development of superior semiconductor materials for the future.

  14. Gallium nitride optoelectronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    The growth of bulk gallium nitride crystals was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride. Gallium nitride single crystals up to 2.5 x 0.5 cm in size were produced. The crystals are suitable as substrates for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride. The epitaxial growth of gallium nitride on sapphire substrates with main faces of (0001) and (1T02) orientations was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride in a gas flow system. The grown layers had electron concentrations in the range of 1 to 3 x 10 to the 19th power/cu cm and Hall mobilities in the range of 50 to 100 sq cm/v/sec at room temperature.

  15. Investigations in gallium removal

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, C.V.; Pitt, W.W.; Beard, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    Gallium present in weapons plutonium must be removed before it can be used for the production of mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear reactor fuel. The main goal of the preliminary studies conducted at Texas A and M University was to assist in the development of a thermal process to remove gallium from a gallium oxide/plutonium oxide matrix. This effort is being conducted in close consultation with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) personnel involved in the development of this process for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Simple experiments were performed on gallium oxide, and cerium-oxide/gallium-oxide mixtures, heated to temperatures ranging from 700--900 C in a reducing environment, and a method for collecting the gallium vapors under these conditions was demonstrated.

  16. Sequential technetium-99m HMDP-gallium-67 citrate imaging for the evaluation of infection in the painful prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, K.D.; Brown, M.L.; Fitzgerald, R.H. Jr.

    1986-09-01

    In order to evaluate the clinical utility of sequential technetium-99m HMDP-gallium-67 scanning in patients with painful orthopedic prosthesis, a retrospective review was made of 154 sequential scans performed in 130 patients. Criteria for a positive study included spatially incongruent gallium-technetium uptake or gallium uptake that was congruent but more intense than technetium. Images were interpreted as negative if gallium was congruent and less intense than technetium. Sixty-six patients underwent surgery (31 infected, 35 aseptic), and 64 were evaluated clinically (3 infected, 61 aseptic). The combined results of the surgical and nonsurgical patients yielded a sensitivity of 66%, a specificity of 81%, and an accuracy of 77%. In this series, the technetium-gallium scan combination has proven to be helpful but more recent techniques such as indium-111-labeled leukocytes may prove to be superior to sequential technetium-gallium imaging.

  17. Human exposure to aluminium.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  18. Design and characterization of indium gallium arsenic phosphide/indium phosphide and indium(aluminum) gallium arsenic antimonide/gallium antimonide laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourevitch, Alexandre

    2006-12-01

    Semiconductor laser diodes and laser diode arrays are efficient electrical to optical power converters providing their output energy in relatively narrow emission spectra. The different wavelength ranges are well covered by different semiconductor materials. InP-based laser diodes cover the wavelength range from 1-mum to 2-mum. The region between 2 and 3-mum is well handled by type-I devices based on the GaSb material system. We designed, fabricated and characterized InP-based and GaSb-based laser arrays with record high continuous wave output power emitting at 1.5-mum and 2.3-mum, correspondingly. A laser array based on the InGaAsP/InP material system was developed for optical pumping of erbium doped solid state lasers emitting eye-safe light around 1.6-mum. The 2.3-mum laser arrays can be used for optical pumping of recently developed type-II semiconductor lasers operating in the mid-infrared atmospheric transparency window between 3.5-mum and 5-mum. Optical pumping requires pump sources that reliably provide output energy in a relatively narrow spectral range matching with absorption bands of illuminated materials. Also the compact size of laser diodes and laser arrays is preferable and convenient in different implementations, but it leads to significant overheating in high power operations. The inherent properties of semiconductor materials result in a red-shift of the laser emission spectrum with increased temperature. This thermal drift of the laser emission spectrum can lead to misalignment with the narrow absorption bands of illuminated material. We have developed an experimental technique to measure the time-resolved evolution of the laser emission spectrum. The data obtained from the emission spectrum measurements have been used to optimize the laser device design. In this dissertation the progress in the development of high-power infrared laser arrays have been discussed. The different aspects of laser array design, thermal analysis and laser bar optimization have been studied analytically and experimentally.

  19. NREL preprints for the 23rd IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, M.

    1993-05-01

    Topics covered include various aspects of solar cell fabrication and performance. Aluminium-gallium arsenides, cadmium telluride, amorphous silicon, and copper-indium-gallium selenides are all characterized in their applicability in solar cells.

  20. Preventing Supercooling Of Gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massucco, Arthur A.; Wenghoefer, Hans M.; Wilkins, Ronnie

    1994-01-01

    Principle of heterogeneous nucleation exploited to prevent gallium from supercooling, enabling its use as heat-storage material that crystallizes reproducibly at its freezing or melting temperature of 29 to 30 degrees C. In original intended application, gallium used as heat-storage material in gloves of space suits. Terrestrial application lies in preparation of freezing-temperature reference samples for laboratories. Principle of heterogeneous nucleation also exploited similarly in heat pipes filled with sodium.

  1. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-μm-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100–270 nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500 nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600 nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies. PMID:26568414

  2. GALLIUM INDIUM ARSENIDE (GaxIn1-xAs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Yu. A.; Shmidt, Natalya M.

    The following sections are included: * Basic Parameters at 300 K * Band Structure and Carrier Concentration * Temperature Dependences * Dependences on Hydrostatic Pressure * Energy Gap Narrowing at High Doping Levels * Band Discontinuities at Heterointerfaces * Effective Masses * Donors and Acceptors * Electrical Properties * Mobility and Hall Effect * Two-Dimensional Electron and Hole Gas Mobility in Heterostructures * Transport Properties in High Electric Field * Impact Ionization * Recombination Parameters * Optical Properties * Thermal Properties * Mechanical Properties, Elastic Constants, Lattice Vibrations, Other Properties * References

  3. Optical characterization of copper indium gallium diselenide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, Damon

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) and its alloys are the leading choice for thin film photovoltaic absorber layers due to their high performance in devices, low degradation, high optical absorption coefficient and high tolerance to off-stoichiometry and intrinsic defects. Film conductivity and recombination losses are controlled by intrinsic point defect concentrations, especially in the near-surface space-charge region of the heterojunction. Despite the amount of research already performed on CIGS alloys, their optoelectronic properties, defect chemistry and recombination mechanisms are still poorly understood. The focus of this dissertation is to optically characterize a selection of CIGS absorber layers fabricated by various techniques in order to better understand the radiative emission and defect physics. This work aims to identify the defects responsible for recombination and their relation to grain boundaries and band edge fluctuations, which limit device performance. This study used photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy, and cathodoluminescence (CL) to study radiative emissions from a variety of Cu-poor CIGS thin films. Three general types of CIGS films were analyzed. Polycrystalline layers deposited on Mo-coated soda lime glass, polycrystalline layers deposited on metal foil, and epitaxial films grown on (100) and (111) GaAs were analyzed in this work. This work concludes that the donor-acceptor pair recombination model used in most interpretations of CIGS emission should be replaced with a model that accounts for high compensation and band edge fluctuations, which is shown to be undoubtedly the case in Cu-poor CIGS. Within this model, the most commonly observed emissions were explained as free-to-bound types, specifically iii band-to-impurity (BI) and tail-to-impurity (TI) types. Band tail width was measured by PLE. A correlation was established between band tail width and device efficiency. CIGS absorber layers that produced devices of higher performance showed narrower band tails. CL and PL showed an additional deep emission in Na-free films, not present in Na-containing films grown in parallel. It is concluded that most grain boundaries in CIGS act as collection areas for point defects and point defect clusters but also are more or less inactive with respect to recombination due to their built-in electrostatic hole barrier. Spectral and spatial emission characteristics were studied on plan-view CIGS surfaces that were covered with a ˜50 nm thick CdS film by chemical bath deposition (CBD). It is concluded that spectral changes that others have observed in the emission of CdS-treated films is a result of the CBD process itself and not the resulting film or the formation of the heterojunction. The effect of low temperature (˜180°C) air annealing on the emission characteristics of CdS/CIGS thin films was studied by cryogenic infrared and visible PL. Spectral shape was not significantly affected by annealing for either film, but PL intensity did show some dependence on anneal time for both films, which led to an estimate of an optimal time window of 3-10 hours for low temperature annealing.

  4. Properties of Copper in Gallium Arsenide and Indium Phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Rosa

    This dissertation describes a comprehensive investigation of the properties of Cu as an impurity in the III-V semiconductors InP and GaAs. This study involves structural, ion-beam/channeling, magnetic, and electrical measurements that were made after a systematic set of Cu diffusions in both semiconductors. It was found that in both materials, most of the Cu precipitates even after rapid quenching, forming Cu -In and Cu-Ga precipitates in InP and GaAs respectively. Atomic resolution microscopy was used to determine the structure of these precipitates in InP, while conventional Selected Area Diffraction analysis gave this information in GaAs. The high diffusivity of Cu suggesting an interstitial diffusion mechanism in both these materials and its precipitating behavior are similar than in Si:Cu. It is shown that in InP, the introduction of Cu makes this semiconductor semi-insulating after relatively low diffusion temperatures, that both originally n- and p-type InP become semi-insulating upon Cu diffusion, and that there is a negligible concentration of deep-level defects introduced by Cu. Further observations include an abnormal reduction in both electron and hole mobilities resulting from the introduction of Cu, and the occurrence of isolated pockets of conductive InP in otherwise semi -insulating material. The concurrence of these experimental observations can best be explained using the buried Schottky -barrier model instead of the commonly observed compensation by deep levels. The concentration of Cu-In precipitates was found to be comparable with what preliminary calculations show would achieve intrinsic behavior by the effect of the metallic inclusions. In GaAs, the substitutional portion of Cu, presumably Cu_{rm Ga}, dominates the electrical properties in this material, introducing two acceptor levels, one at 0.15eV and the other at 0.49eV above the valence band. In GaAs, the ratio of electrically active Cu/total Cu depends on cooling speed. When quenched, a greater portion of the Cu is electrically active than when the samples are slowly cooled.

  5. Auger Recombination in Indium Gallium Nitride: Experimental Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krames, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Progress in InGaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) technology has resulted in white-light emitters with efficiencies far exceeding those of conventional light sources such as tungsten-filament-based incandescence and mercury-vapor based fluorescence. Indeed, by now efficacies exceeding 150 lumens per Watt for InGaN-based phosphor-converted white LEDs are claimed, which represent a 90% energy savings compared to the conventional incandescent (i.e., ``light bulb'') solution. However, these high performance levels are obtained under conditions of very low forward current-density for the InGaN LED and do not represent true operating conditions (nor cost-effective utilization) for the device. In order to reduce the cost (and thus increase market penetration of) solid-state lighting, more lumens per unit of semiconductor area are required which in practice necessitates higher drive current densities. Unfortunately, at these higher driver current densities, the internal quantum efficiency of InGaN-based LEDs is observed to decrease significantly. In the fall of 2007, researchers at the Advanced Laboratories of Philips Lumileds were the first to propose Auger recombination as the root-cause mechanism in InGaN which was behind this ``efficiency droop'' [1]. They further proposed to circumvent the problem by employing InGaN-based active region designs that maintain low carrier density, and demonstrated an LED device design that reaches a maximum quantum efficiency above 200 A/cm2, compared to ˜1-10 A/cm^2 for typical multiple-quantum-well heterostructures [2]. In this talk we will review the experimental evidence for Auger recombination in InGaN, beginning with the early work from 2007 and then considering additional work from more recent efforts to better understand the details behind this loss mechanism. [4pt] [1] Y. C. Shen, G. O. M"uller, S. Watanabe, N. F. Gardner, A. Munkholm, and M. R. Krames, ``Auger recombination in InGaN measured by photoluminescence'', Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 141101 (2007). [0pt] [2] N. F. Gardner, G. O. M"uller, Y. C. Shen, G. Chen, S. Watanabe, W. G"otz, and M. R. Krames, ``Blue-emitting InGaN--GaN double-heterostructure light-emitting diodes reaching maximum quantum efficiency above 200 A/cm^2'', Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 243506 (2007).

  6. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-11-16

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-μm-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100-270 nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500 nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600 nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies.

  7. High-performance fused indium gallium arsenide/silicon photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yimin

    Modern long haul, high bit rate fiber-optic communication systems demand photodetectors with high sensitivity. Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) exhibit superior sensitivity performance than other types of photodetectors by virtual of its internal gain mechanism. This dissertation work further advances the APD performance by applying a novel materials integration technique. It is the first successful demonstration of wafer fused InGaAs/Si APDs with low dark current and low noise. APDs generally adopt separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) structure, which allows independent optimization of materials properties in two distinct regions. While the absorption material needs to have high absorption coefficient in the target wavelength range to achieve high quantum efficiency, it is desirable for the multiplication material to have large discrepancy between its electron and hole ionization coefficients to reduce noise. According to these criteria, InGaAs and Si are the ideal materials combination. Wafer fusion is the enabling technique that makes this theoretical ideal an experimental possibility. APDs fabricated on the fused InGaAs/Si wafer with mesa structure exhibit low dark current and low noise. Special device fabrication techniques and high quality wafer fusion reduce dark current to nano ampere level at unity gain, comparable to state-of-the-art commercial III/V APDs. The small excess noise is attributed to the large difference in ionization coefficients between electrons and holes in silicon. Detailed layer structure designs are developed specifically for fused InGaAs/Si APDs based on principles similar to those used in traditional InGaAs/InP APDs. An accurate yet straightforward technique for device structural parameters extraction is also proposed. The extracted results from the fabricated APDs agree with device design parameters. This agreement also confirms that the fusion interface has negligible effect on electric field distributions for devices fabricated from high quality fusion materials. The feasibility of fused InGaAs/Si APD for analog systems is also explored. Preliminary two-tone measurement shows that a moderately high dynamic range of 70 dBc/Hz1/2 for broadband Spur Free Dynamic Range (SFDR) or 82 dBc/Hz2/3 suboctave SFDR, up to 50 muA of optical current, can be achieved. The theoretical analyses of SNR show that fused InGaAs/Si APD receivers can provide larger Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) than their III/V counterparts.

  8. Electrodeposition of gallium for photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.

    2016-08-09

    An electroplating solution and method for producing an electroplating solution containing a gallium salt, an ionic compound and a solvent that results in a gallium thin film that can be deposited on a substrate.

  9. [Indium lung disease].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Makiko; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2014-02-01

    "Indium lung" is a new occupational lung disease. The global demand for indium, the major material used in manufacturing flat-screen display panels, has skyrocketed since the 1990s (Japan comprises 85% of the worldwide demand). The first case was reported in Japan in 2003, followed by seven cases (interstitial pneumonia and emphysema) in Japan. Two pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) cases in the USA followed in 2011. Indium lung has been described as interstitial pneumonia, pneumothorax, emphysema, and PAP. In 2013, The Japan Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare issued an "Ordinance on the Prevention of Hazards Due to Specified Chemical Substances" requiring employers to provide regular health checks for employees and measurements of work environment concentrations of respirable indium dust.

  10. Indium fluoride glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Mohammed

    2012-03-01

    Fluoride glasses are the only material that transmit light from ultraviolet to mid-infrared and can be drawn into industrial optical fibers. The mechanical and optical properties of new indium fluoride glass fibers have been investigated. Multimode fiber 190 microns, has very high mechanical strength greater than 100 kpsi and optical loss as low as 45 dB/km between 2 and 4 microns. Unlike chalcogenide glass fibers, indium fluoride fiber has a wide transmission window from 0.3 to 5.5 microns without any absorption peak. Indium fluoride glass fibers are the technology of choice for all application requiring transmission up to 5 micron such as infrared contour measure (IRCM) and chemical sensing. Furthermore, Indium fluoride glasses have low phonon energy and can be heavily doped and co-doped whit rare-earth elements. Therefore they are very promising candidates for infrared fiber lasers.

  11. Fabrication of Aluminum Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride MESFET And It's Applications in Biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alur, Siddharth

    Gallium Nitride has been researched extensively for the past three decades for its application in Light Emitting Diodes (LED's), power devices and UV photodetectors. With the recent developments in crystal growth technology and the ability to control the doping there has been an increased interest in heterostructures formed between Gallium nitride and it's alloy Aluminium Gallium Nitride. These heterostructures due to the combined effect of spontaneous and piezoelectric effect can form a high density and a high mobility electron gas channel without any intentional doping. This high density electron gas makes these heterostructures ideal to be used as sensors. Gallium Nitride is also chemically very stable. Detection of biomolecules in a fast and reliable manner is very important in the areas of food safety and medical research. For biomolecular detection it is paramount to have a robust binding of the probes on the sensor surface. Therefore, in this dissertation, the fabrication and application of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors for the detection of DNA and Organophosphate hydrolase enzyme is discussed. In order to use these AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors capable of working in a liquid environment photodefinable polydimethyl-siloxane is used as an encapsulant. The immobilization conditions for a robust binding of thiolated DNA and the catalytic receptor enzyme organophosphate hydrolase on gold surfaces is developed with the help of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. DNA and OPH are detected by measuring the change in the drain current of the device as a function of time.

  12. Chemical mechanical polishing of Indium phosphide, Gallium arsenide and Indium gallium arsenide films and related environment and safety aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matovu, John Bogere

    As scaling continues with advanced technology nodes in the microelectronic industry to enhance device performance, the performance limits of the conventional substrate materials such as silicon as a channel material in the front-end-of-the-line of the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) need to be surmounted. These challenges have invigorated research into new materials such as III-V materials consisting of InP, GaAs, InGaAs for n-channel CMOS and Ge for p-channels CMOS to enhance device performance. These III-V materials have higher electron mobility that is required for the n-channel while Ge has high hole mobility that is required for the p-channel. Integration of these materials in future devices requires chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) to achieve a smooth and planar surface to enable further processing. The CMP process of these materials has been associated with environment, health and safety (EH&S) issues due to the presence of P and As that can lead to the formation of toxic gaseous hydrides. The safe handling of As contaminated consumables and post-CMP slurry waste is essential. In this work, the chemical mechanical polishing of InP, GaAs and InGaAs films and the associated environment, health and safety (EH&S) issues are discussed. InP removal rates (RRs) and phosphine generation during the CMP of blanket InP films in hydrogen peroxide-based silica particle dispersions in the presence and absence of three different multifunctional chelating carboxylic acids, namely oxalic acid, tartaric acid, and citric acid are reported. The presence of these acids in the polishing slurry resulted in good InP removal rates (about 400 nm min-1) and very low phosphine generation (< 15 ppb) with very smooth post-polish surfaces (0.1 nm RMS surface roughness). The optimized slurry compositions consisting of 3 wt % silica, 1 wt % hydrogen peroxide and 0.08 M oxalic acid or citric acid that provided the best results on blanket InP films were used to evaluate their planarization capability of patterned InP-STI structures of 200 mm diameter wafers. Cross sectional scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed that InP in the shallow trench isolation structures was planarized and scratches, slurry particles and smearing of InP were absent. Additionally, wafers polished at pH 6 showed very low dishing values of about 12-15 nm, determined by cross sectional SEM. During the polishing of blanket GaAs, GaAs RRs were negligible with deionized water or with silica slurries alone. They were relatively high in aq. solutions of H2O2 alone and showed a strong pH dependence, with significantly higher RRs in the alkaline region. The addition of silica particles to aq. H2O2 did not increase the GaAs RRs significantly. The evolution of arsenic trihydride (AsH3) during the dissolution of GaAs in aq. H2O2 solution was similarly higher in the basic pH range than in neutral pH or in the acidic pH range. However, no AsH3 was measured during polishing, evidently because of the relatively high water solubility of AsH3. The work done on InGaAs polishing shows that InGaAs RR trends are different from those observed for InP or GaAs. InGaAs RRs at pH 2 are higher than those at pH 10 and highest at pH 4. Dissolution rates (DRs), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), contact angles, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XRF), zeta potential measurements and calculated Gibbs free energy changes of the reactions involved during polishing and gas formation were used to discuss the observed RRs and hydride gas generation trends and to propose the reaction pathways involved in the material removal and in hydride gas generation mechanisms.

  13. Theoretical Studies of High Energy Transport of Electrons and Holes in Gallium Arsenide, Indium Phosphide, Indium Arsenide, and Gallium Antimonide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    interest and support in many aspects of this work. The author would also like to thank Professors N. Holonyak Jr., G. * Stillman, and B. Wheeler for...York, 1958. [321 R. P. Feynman , Statistical Mechanics, A Set of Lectures, W. A. * -. Benjamin, Reading Ma., 1972. [33] G. 3. lafrate, "Quantum transport

  14. Characterization and Modeling of Indium Gallium Antimonide Avalanche Photodiode and of Indium Gallium Arsenide Two-band Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    A model of the optical properties of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As(y)Sb(1-y) and In(x)Ga(1-x)As(y)Sb(1-y) is presented, including the refractive, extinction, absorption and reflection coefficients in terms of the optical dielectric function of the materials. Energy levels and model parameters for each binary compound are interpolated to obtain the needed ternaries and quaternaries for various compositions. Bowing parameters are considered in the interpolation scheme to take into account the deviation of the calculated ternary and quaternary values from experimental data due to lattice disorders. The inclusion of temperature effects is currently being considered.

  15. Gallium nitride nanowires by maskless hot phosphoric wet etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharrat, D.; Hosalli, A. M.; Van Den Broeck, D. M.; Samberg, J. P.; Bedair, S. M.; El-Masry, N. A.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires formation by controlling the selective and anisotropic etching of N-polar GaN in hot phosphoric acid. Nanowires of ˜109/cm,2 total height of ˜400 nm, and diameters of 170-200 nm were obtained. These nanowires have both non-polar {11¯00}/ {112¯0} and semi-polar {1011¯} facets. X-Ray Diffraction characterization shows that screw dislocations are primarily responsible for preferential etching to create nanowires. Indium gallium nitride multi-quantum wells (MQWs) grown on these GaN nanowires showed a blue shift in peak emission wavelength of photoluminescence spectra, and full width at half maximum decreased relative to MQWs grown on planar N-polar GaN, respectively.

  16. Ultra-low threshold gallium nitride photonic crystal nanobeam laser

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Nan Woolf, Alexander; Wang, Danqing; Hu, Evelyn L.; Zhu, Tongtong; Oliver, Rachel A.; Quan, Qimin

    2015-06-08

    We report exceptionally low thresholds (9.1 μJ/cm{sup 2}) for room temperature lasing at ∼450 nm in optically pumped Gallium Nitride (GaN) nanobeam cavity structures. The nanobeam cavity geometry provides high theoretical Q (>100 000) with small modal volume, leading to a high spontaneous emission factor, β = 0.94. The active layer materials are Indium Gallium Nitride (InGaN) fragmented quantum wells (fQWs), a critical factor in achieving the low thresholds, which are an order-of-magnitude lower than obtainable with continuous QW active layers. We suggest that the extra confinement of photo-generated carriers for fQWs (compared to QWs) is responsible for the excellent performance.

  17. ALUMINIUM GALLIUM ARSENIDE (AlxGa1-xAs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Yu. A.

    The following sections are included: * Basic Parameters at 300 K * Band Structure and Carrier Concentration * Temperature Dependences * Dependences on Hydrostatic Pressure * Energy Gap Narrowing at High Doping Levels * Band Discontinuities at AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs Heterointerface * Effective Masses * Donors and Acceptors * Electrical Properties * Mobility and Hall Effect * Two-Dimensional Electron and Hole Gas Mobility at AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs Interface * Transport Properties in High Electric Field * Transport Properties of Electron and Hole Two-Dimensional Gas in High Electric Field * Impact Ionization * Recombination Parameters * Optical Properties * Thermal Properties * Mechanical Properties, Elastic Constants, Lattice Vibrations, Other Properties * References

  18. Effect of barrier height on friction behavior of the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishina, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Friction experiments were conducted for the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals. Polycrystalline titanium, tantalum, nickel, palladium, and platinum were made to contact a single crystal silicon (111) surface. Indium, nickel, copper, and silver were made to contact a single crystal gallium arsenide (100) surface. Sliding was conducted both in room air and in a vacuum of 10 to the minus 9th power torr. The friction of semiconductors in contact with metals depended on a Schottky barrier height formed at the metal semiconductor interface. Metals with a higher barrier height on semiconductors gave lower friction. The effect of the barrier height on friction behavior for argon sputtered cleaned surfaces in vacuum was more specific than that for the surfaces containing films in room air. With a silicon surface sliding on titanium, many silicon particles back transferred. In contrast, a large quantity of indium transferred to the gallium arsenide surface.

  19. Fabrication of GaN nanotubular material using MOCVD with an aluminium oxide membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Woo-Gwang; Jung, Se-Hyuck; Kung, Patrick; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2006-01-01

    GaN nanotubular material is fabricated with an aluminium oxide membrane in MOCVD. SEM, XRD, TEM and PL are employed to characterize the fabricated GaN nanotubular material. An aluminium oxide membrane with ordered nanoholes is used as a template. Gallium nitride is deposited at the inner wall of the nanoholes in the aluminium oxide template, and the nanotubular material with high aspect ratio is synthesized using the precursors of TMG and ammonia gas. Optimal synthesis conditions in MOCVD are obtained successfully for the gallium nitride nanotubular material in this research. The diameter of the GaN nanotube fabricated is approximately 200-250 nm and the wall thickness is about 40-50 nm. GaN nanotubular material consists of numerous fine GaN particulates with size range 15-30 nm. The composition of gallium nitride is confirmed to be stoichiometrically 1:1 for Ga and N by EDS. XRD and TEM analyses indicate that the grains in GaN nanotubular material have a nano-crystalline structure. No blue shift is found in the PL spectrum on the GaN nanotubular material fabricated in an aluminium oxide template.

  20. [Health effects of solar cell component material. Toxicity of indium compounds to laboratory animals determined by intratracheal instillations].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiyo; Hirata, Miyuki

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the increasing interest being paid to the issue of the global environment, the production of solar cells has increased rapidly in recent years. Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is a new efficient thin film used in some types of solar cell. Indium is a constitutive element of CIGS thin-film solar cells. It was thought that indium compounds were not harmful until the beginning of the 1990s because there was little information regarding the adverse health effects on humans or animals arising from exposure to indium compounds. After the mid-1990s, data became available indicating that indium compounds can be toxic to animals. In animal studies, it has been clearly demonstrated that indium compounds cause pulmonary toxicity and that the dissolution of indium compounds in the lungs is considerably slow, as shown by repeated intratracheal instillations in experimental animals. Thus, it is necessary to pay much greater attention to human exposure to indium compounds, and precautions against possible exposure to indium compounds are paramount with regard to health management.

  1. Indium Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride (InGaN/GaN) Nanorods Superlattice (SL)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-29

    distinct dislocation network and side wall damage are observed as shown in the upper inset of Fig. 10 which indicates an image of transmission electron...Phys. 76, 304 (1994). [42] W. I. Lee, T. C. Huang, J. Guo, and M. S. Feng, Appl. Phys. Lett. 67, 1721 (1995). [43] D. G. Thomas, J. J. Hopfield , and W

  2. Indium Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride (InGaN/GaN) Nanorods Superlattice (SL)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-10

    of high-brightness and high-efficiency LEDs using dislocation-free InGaN /GaN SL NRAs by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The benefits of the... InGaN /GaN SL NRA LEDs are examined in this work, and their characteristics are compared to those of conventional broad area(BA) LEDs . The NRs SL were...demonstrates realization of high-brightness and high-efficiency LEDs using dislocation-free InGaN /GaN SL Nano rods arrays (NRAs) by hydride vapor

  3. Long wavelength luminescence from gallium-indium-nitrogen-arsenic-antimony on gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambin, Vincent F.

    GaInNAs grown on GaAs has recently been found to optically emit at wavelengths longer than previously thought possible with material grown epitaxially on GaAs substrates. Dilute-nitride GaInNAs alloys have quickly become an excellent candidate for low cost 1.3--1.55 mum vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) and high power edge emitting lasers in the past few years. Nitride-arsenide alloys were grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a N radio frequency (RF) plasma cell. The nitride-arsenide based crystal is grown under metastable conditions with low substrate temperatures and a highly reactive N radical plasma source. However, defects generated during this non-equilibrium growth are a source for non-radiative recombination and diminished photoluminescence (PL). By rapid thermal annealing (RTA) the material after growth, defects are removed from the crystal and the material quality of the GaInNAs films improves significantly. By measuring structural changes that occur during anneal, new insight has been made into the mechanisms which cause the optoelectronic properties to improve. In an effort to further enhance crystal quality, Sb present during GaInNAs growth is thought to act as a surfactant to maintain surface planarity, and phase coherence, resulting in increased PL efficiency. With the addition of Sb, we have observed both a sharp intensity increase in samples with a high In concentration and a bandgap past 1.3 mum. Increasing the In or N content in materials with PL over 1.3 mum normally drops optical intensity; however, using Sb, we can maintain high PL efficiency out to 1.6 mum. Since both In and Sb in GaAs add compressive stress and the solubility of N in GaAs is limited, there is a need for GaNAs tensile strain compensating barriers for applications in multiple quantum well, high-intensity devices. With the development of GaInNAsSb alloys and strain compensated barriers, even longer wavelengths are possible on GaAs, greatly strengthening the dilute-nitride system as the technology of the future for long wavelength optoelectronic devices.

  4. Nanoscale optical properties of indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride nanodisk-in-rod heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Lu, Ming-Yen; Lu, Yu-Jung; Jones, Eric J; Gwo, Shangjr; Gradečak, Silvija

    2015-03-24

    III-nitride based nanorods and nanowires offer great potential for optoelectronic applications such as light emitting diodes or nanolasers. We report nanoscale optical studies of InGaN/GaN nanodisk-in-rod heterostructures to quantify uniformity of light emission on the ensemble level, as well as the emission characteristics from individual InGaN nanodisks. Despite the high overall luminescence efficiency, spectral and intensity inhomogeneities were observed and directly correlated to the compositional variations among nanodisks and to the presence of structural defect, respectively. Observed light quenching is correlated to type I1 stacking faults in InGaN nanodisks, and the mechanisms for stacking fault induced nonradiative recombinations are discussed in the context of band structure around stacking faults and Fermi level pinning at nanorod surfaces. Our results highlight the importance of controlling III-nitride nanostructure growths to further reduce defect formation and ensure compositional homogeneity for optoelectronic devices with high efficiencies and desirable spectrum response.

  5. Indium Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Makiko; Omae, Kazuyuki; Takeuchi, Koichiro; Chonan, Tatsuya; Xiao, Yong-long; Harley, Russell A.; Roggli, Victor L.; Hebisawa, Akira; Tallaksen, Robert J.; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Day, Gregory A.; Saito, Rena; Stanton, Marcia L.; Suarthana, Eva; Kreiss, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reports of pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema, and, more recently, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) in indium workers suggested that workplace exposure to indium compounds caused several different lung diseases. Methods: To better understand the pathogenesis and natural history of indium lung disease, a detailed, systematic, multidisciplinary analysis of clinical, histopathologic, radiologic, and epidemiologic data for all reported cases and workplaces was undertaken. Results: Ten men (median age, 35 years) who produced, used, or reclaimed indium compounds were diagnosed with interstitial lung disease 4-13 years after first exposure (n = 7) or PAP 1-2 years after first exposure (n = 3). Common pulmonary histopathologic features in these patients included intraalveolar exudate typical of alveolar proteinosis (n = 9), cholesterol clefts and granulomas (n = 10), and fibrosis (n = 9). Two patients with interstitial lung disease had pneumothoraces. Lung disease progressed following cessation of exposure in most patients and was fatal in two. Radiographic data revealed that two patients with PAP subsequently developed fibrosis and one also developed emphysematous changes. Epidemiologic investigations demonstrated the potential for exposure to respirable particles and an excess of lung abnormalities among coworkers. Conclusions: Occupational exposure to indium compounds was associated with PAP, cholesterol ester crystals and granulomas, pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema, and pneumothoraces. The available evidence suggests exposure to indium compounds causes a novel lung disease that may begin with PAP and progress to include fibrosis and emphysema, and, in some cases, premature death. Prospective studies are needed to better define the natural history and prognosis of this emerging lung disease and identify effective prevention strategies. PMID:22207675

  6. Indium droplet formation in InGaN thin films with single and double heterojunctions prepared by MOCVD

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Indium gallium nitride (InGaN) samples with single heterojunction (SH) and double heterojunction (DH) were prepared using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. SH has a layer of InGaN thin film (thicknesses, 25, 50, 100, and 200 nm) grown on an uGaN film (thickness, 2 μm). The DH samples are distinguished by DH uGaN film (thickness, 120 nm) grown on the InGaN layer. Reciprocal space mapping measurements reveal that the DH samples are fully strained with different thicknesses, whereas the strain in the SH samples are significantly relaxed with the increasing thickness of the InGaN film. Scanning electron microscopy results show that the surface roughness of the sample increases when the sample is relaxed. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of the structure of indium droplets in the DH sample indicate that the thickness of the InGaN layer decreases with the density of indium droplets. The formation of these droplets is attributed to the insufficient kinetic energy of indium atom to react with the elements of group V, resulting to aggregation. The gallium atoms in the GaN thin film will not be uniformly replaced by indium atoms; the InGaN thin film has an uneven distribution of indium atoms and the quality of the epitaxial layer is degraded. PMID:25024692

  7. Recycling process for recovery of gallium from GaN an e-waste of LED industry through ball milling, annealing and leaching.

    PubMed

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Kang, Leeseung; Park, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Chan Gi; Hong, Hyun Seon

    2015-04-01

    Waste dust generated during manufacturing of LED contains significant amounts of gallium and indium, needs suitable treatment and can be an important resource for recovery. The LED industry waste dust contains primarily gallium as GaN. Leaching followed by purification technology is the green and clean technology. To develop treatment and recycling technology of these GaN bearing e-waste, leaching is the primary stage. In our current investigation possible process for treatment and quantitative leaching of gallium and indium from the GaN bearing e-waste or waste of LED industry dust has been developed. To recycle the waste and quantitative leaching of gallium, two different process flow sheets have been proposed. In one, process first the GaN of the waste the LED industry dust was leached at the optimum condition. Subsequently, the leach residue was mixed with Na2CO3, ball milled followed by annealing, again leached to recover gallium. In the second process, the waste LED industry dust was mixed with Na2CO3, after ball milling and annealing, followed acidic leaching. Without pretreatment, the gallium leaching was only 4.91 w/w % using 4M HCl, 100°C and pulp density of 20g/L. After mechano-chemical processing, both these processes achieved 73.68 w/w % of gallium leaching at their optimum condition. The developed process can treat and recycle any e-waste containing GaN through ball milling, annealing and leaching.

  8. Gallium-containing anticancer compounds.

    PubMed

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2012-06-01

    There is an ever pressing need to develop new drugs for the treatment of cancer. Gallium nitrate, a group IIIa metal salt, inhibits the proliferation of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo and has shown activity against non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and bladder cancer in clinical trials. Gallium can function as an iron mimetic and perturb iron-dependent proliferation and other iron-related processes in tumor cells. Gallium nitrate lacks crossresistance with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs and is not myelosuppressive; it can be used when other drugs have failed or when the blood count is low. Given the therapeutic potential of gallium, newer generations of gallium compounds are now in various phases of preclinical and clinical development. These compounds hold the promise of greater anti-tumor activity against a broader spectrum of cancers. The development of gallium compounds for cancer treatment and their mechanisms of action will be discussed.

  9. Fabrication methods and applications of microstructured gallium based liquid metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khondoker, M. A. H.; Sameoto, D.

    2016-09-01

    This review contains a comparative study of reported fabrication techniques of gallium based liquid metal alloys embedded in elastomers such as polydimethylsiloxane or other rubbers as well as the primary challenges associated with their use. The eutectic gallium-indium binary alloy (EGaIn) and gallium-indium-tin ternary alloy (galinstan) are the most common non-toxic liquid metals in use today. Due to their deformability, non-toxicity and superior electrical conductivity, these alloys have become very popular among researchers for flexible and reconfigurable electronics applications. All the available manufacturing techniques have been grouped into four major classes. Among them, casting by needle injection is the most widely used technique as it is capable of producing features as small as 150 nm width by high-pressure infiltration. One particular fabrication challenge with gallium based liquid metals is that an oxide skin is rapidly formed on the entire exposed surface. This oxide skin increases wettability on many surfaces, which is excellent for keeping patterned metal in position, but is a drawback in applications like reconfigurable circuits, where the position of liquid metal needs to be altered and controlled accurately. The major challenges involved in many applications of liquid metal alloys have also been discussed thoroughly in this article.

  10. A gallium nitride single-photon source operating at 200 K.

    PubMed

    Kako, Satoshi; Santori, Charles; Hoshino, Katsuyuki; Götzinger, Stephan; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2006-11-01

    Fundamentally secure quantum cryptography has still not seen widespread application owing to the difficulty of generating single photons on demand. Semiconductor quantum-dot structures have recently shown great promise as practical single-photon sources, and devices with integrated optical cavities and electrical-carrier injection have already been demonstrated. However, a significant obstacle for the application of commonly used III-V quantum dots to quantum-information-processing schemes is the requirement of liquid-helium cryogenic temperatures. Epitaxially grown gallium nitride quantum dots embedded in aluminium nitride have the potential for operation at much higher temperatures. Here, we report triggered single-photon emission from gallium nitride quantum dots at temperatures up to 200 K, a temperature easily reachable with thermo-electric cooling. Gallium nitride quantum dots also open a new wavelength region in the blue and near-ultraviolet portions of the spectrum for single-photon sources.

  11. Towards mid-infrared fiber-lasers: rare earth ion doped, indium-containing, selenide bulk glasses and fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, H.; Tang, Z.; Furniss, D.; Sojka, L.; Moneim, N. A.; Barney, E.; Sujecki, S.; Benson, T. M.; Seddon, A. B.

    2014-02-01

    Chalcogenide glasses are promising materials for mid-infrared (IR) fiber lasers (i.e. 3 - 25 μm wavelength range). These glasses exhibit low phonon energies, together with large refractive indices, rare earth (RE-) ion solubility and sufficient mechanical and chemical robustness. Optical quality of the fiber is key. Gallium is known to promote RE-ion solubility in chalcogenide glasses, probably forming a [Pr(III)] - Se - [Ga(III)] associated type complex. Here, indium is investigated as an alternative additive to gallium in Pr3+-doped Ge-As-Se chalcogenide glasses. Indium has the same outer electronic structure as gallium. Moreover, indium has the advantage of being heavier than gallium, potentially promoting a lower phonon-energy, local environment of the RE-dopant. Zero to ~2000 ppmw (nominal parts per million by weight) Pr3+- doped Ge-As-In-Se bulk glasses are prepared using the melt-quench method. ~500 ppmw Pr3+- doped Ge-As-In-Se, optically-clad fiber is realized via fiber-drawing of extruded fiberoptic preforms. Fiber absorption and emission spectra are collected and compared with those of the bulk glasses.

  12. Bulk Cubic Gallium Nitride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-09

    microcrysta. form at bottom of «he reaction vessel. The objective of the second step is the solvothermal transport of the gallium nitride residing in the...system using pressure pumps can be used to gain precise control of the pressure. High pressure is typically used for the solvothermal transport. The...takes place in the reaction vessel during heating is a solvothermal reaction that is conducted at or above the critical point of the solvent The

  13. Respirable Indium Exposures, Plasma Indium, and Respiratory Health Among Indium-Tin Oxide (ITO) Workers

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Kristin J.; Virji, M. Abbas; Park, Ji Young; Stanton, Marcia L.; Edwards, Nicole T.; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Carey, Brenna; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B.; Kreiss, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Background Workers manufacturing indium-tin oxide (ITO) are at risk of elevated indium concentration in blood and indium lung disease, but relationships between respirable indium exposures and biomarkers of exposure and disease are unknown. Methods For 87 (93%) current ITO workers, we determined correlations between respirable and plasma indium and evaluated associations between exposures and health outcomes. Results Current respirable indium exposure ranged from 0.4 to 108 μg/m3 and cumulative respirable indium exposure from 0.4 to 923 μg-yr/m3. Plasma indium better correlated with cumulative (rs = 0.77) than current exposure (rs = 0.54) overall and with tenure ≥1.9 years. Higher cumulative respirable indium exposures were associated with more dyspnea, lower spirometric parameters, and higher serum biomarkers of lung disease (KL-6 and SP-D), with significant effects starting at 22 μg-yr/m3, reached by 46% of participants. Conclusions Plasma indium concentration reflected cumulative respirable indium exposure, which was associated with clinical, functional, and serum biomarkers of lung disease. PMID:27219296

  14. Gallium interactions with Zircaloy

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, A.L.; West, M.K.

    1999-01-01

    This study focuses on the effects of gallium ion implantation into zircaloy cladding material to investigate the effects that gallium may have in a reactor. High fluence ion implantation of Ga ions was conducted on heated Zircaloy-4 in the range of 10{sup 16}--10{sup 18} Ga ions/cm2. Surface effects were studied using SEM and electron microprobe analysis. The depth profile of Ga in the Zircaloy was characterized with Rutherford backscattering and SIMS techniques. Results indicate that the Zirc-4 is little affected up to a fluence of 10{sup 17} Ga ions/cm{sup 2}. After implantation of 10{sup 18} Ga ions/cm{sup 2}, sub-grain features on the order of 2 {micro}m were observed which may be due to intermetallic compound formation between Ga and Zr. For the highest fluence implant, Ga content in the Zirc-4 reached a saturation value of between 30 and 40 atomic %; significant enhanced diffusion was observed but gallium was not seen to concentrate at grain boundaries.

  15. Development of gallium compounds for treatment of lymphoma: gallium maltolate, a novel hydroxypyrone gallium compound, induces apoptosis and circumvents lymphoma cell resistance to gallium nitrate.

    PubMed

    Chitambar, Christopher R; Purpi, David P; Woodliff, Jeffrey; Yang, Meiying; Wereley, Janine P

    2007-09-01

    Clinical studies have shown gallium nitrate to have significant antitumor activity against non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and bladder cancer, thus indicating that gallium-based drugs have potential for further development as antineoplastic agents. In this study, we compared the cytotoxicity of gallium maltolate, a novel gallium compound, with gallium nitrate in lymphoma cell lines, including p53 variant and unique gallium nitrate-resistant cells. We found that gallium maltolate inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway at lower concentrations and more rapidly than gallium nitrate. Gallium maltolate produced an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) within 2 h of incubation with cells; this effect could be blocked by mitoquinone, a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. The role of the transferrin receptor (TfR) in gallium maltolate's action was examined using monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 42/6 to block TfR function. However, although MoAb 42/6 reduced gallium maltolate-induced caspase-3 activity, it had only a minor effect on cell growth inhibition. Importantly, gallium maltolate induced apoptosis in cells resistant to gallium nitrate, and, unlike gallium nitrate, its cytotoxicity was not affected by cellular p53 status. Cellular gallium uptake was greater with gallium maltolate than with gallium nitrate. We conclude that gallium maltolate inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis more efficiently than gallium nitrate. Gallium maltolate is incorporated into lymphoma cells to a greater extent than gallium nitrate via both TfR-independent and -dependent pathways; it has significant activity against gallium nitrate-resistant cells and acts independently of p53. Further studies to evaluate its antineoplastic activity in vivo are warranted.

  16. Indium Sorption to Iron Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. J.; Sacco, S. A.; Hemond, H.; Hussain, F. A.; Runkel, R. L.; Walton-Day, K. E.; Kimball, B. A.; Shine, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Indium is an increasingly important metal in semiconductors and electronics, and its use is growing rapidly as a semiconductive coating (as indium tin oxide) for liquid crystal displays (LCDs) and flat panel displays. It also has uses in important energy technologies such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) and photovoltaic cells. Despite its rapid increase in use, very little is known about the environmental behavior of indium, and concerns are being raised over the potential health effects of this emerging metal contaminant. One source of indium to the environment is acid mine drainage from the mining of lead, zinc, and copper sulfides. In our previous studies of a stream in Colorado influenced by acid mine drainage from lead and zinc mining activities, indium concentrations were found to be 10,000 times those found in uncontaminated rivers. However, the speciation and mobility of indium could not be reliably modeled because sorption constants to environmental sorbents have not been determined. In this study, we generate sorption constants for indium to ferrihydrite in the laboratory over a range of pHs, sorbent to sorbate ratios, and ionic strengths. Ferrihydrite is one of the most important sorbents in natural systems, and sorption to amorphous iron oxides such as ferrihydrite is thought to be one of the main removal mechanisms of metals from the dissolved phase in aqueous environments. Because of its relatively low solubility, we also find that indium hydroxide precipitation can dominate indium's partitioning at micromolar concentrations of indium. This precipitation may be important in describing indium's behavior in our study stream in Colorado, where modeling sorption to iron-oxides does not explain the complete removal of indium from the dissolved phase when the pH of the system is artificially raised to above 8. This study contributes much-needed data about indium's aqueous behavior, in order to better understand its fate, transport, and impacts in the

  17. Oxidative dissolution of gallium arsenide and separation of gallium from arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.P.; Monzyk, B.F.

    1988-07-26

    The method of dissociating gallium arsenide into a gallium-containing component and an arsenic-containing component, is described which comprises contacting the gallium arsenide with an oxidizing agent and a liquid comprising hydroxamic acid to convert the gallium to a gallium-hydroxamic acid complex and to oxidize the arsenic to a positive valence state.

  18. Gallium--A smart metal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Nora; Jaskula, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Gallium is a soft, silvery metallic element with an atomic number of 31 and the chemical symbol Ga. The French chemist Paul-Emile Lecoq de Boisbaudran discovered gallium in sphalerite (a zinc-sulfide mineral) in 1875 using spectroscopy. He named the element "gallia" after his native land of France (formerly Gaul; in Latin, Gallia). The existence of gallium had been predicted in 1871 by Dmitri Mendeleev, the Russian chemist who published the first periodic table of the elements. Mendeleev noted a gap in his table and named the missing element "eka-aluminum" because he determined that its location was one place away from aluminum in the table. Mendeleev thought that the missing element (gallium) would be very much like aluminum in its chemical properties, and he was right. Solid gallium has a low melting temperature (~29 degrees Celsius, or °C) and an unusually high boiling point (~2,204 °C). Because of these properties, the earliest uses of gallium were in high-temperature thermometers and in designing metal alloys that melt easily. The development of a gallium-based direct band-gap semiconductor in the 1960s led to what is now one of the most well-known applications for gallium-based products--the manufacture of smartphones and data-centric networks.

  19. Fatal aluminium phosphide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Sachin; Rani, Yashoda

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium phosphide (AlP) is a cheap solid fumigant and a highly toxic pesticide which is commonly used for grain preservation. AlP has currently aroused interest with a rising number of cases in the past four decades due to increased use for agricultural and non-agricultural purposes. Its easy availability in the markets has increased also its misuse for committing suicide. Phosphine inhibits cellular oxygen utilization and can induce lipid peroxidation. Poisoning with AlP has often occurred in attempts to commit suicide, and that more often in adults than in teenagers. This is a case of suicidal consumption of aluminium phosphide by a 32-year-old young medical anesthetist. Toxicological analyses detected aluminium phosphide. We believe that free access of celphos tablets in grain markets should be prohibited by law. PMID:27486362

  20. Growth by MOCVD of In(Ga)AlN alloys, and a study of gallium contamination in these layers under nitrogen and hydrogen carrier gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouveyron, R.; Charles, M. B.

    2017-04-01

    We have studied the growth of In(Ga)AlN under nitrogen and hydrogen, changing the precursor flows, temperature and growth rate to examine the effect of these parameters on the indium incorporation and layer morphology. Under hydrogen carrier gas, we successfully incorporated indium into the layers by reducing the temperature below 620 °C. We have also studied the gallium contamination in In(Ga)AlN layers, finding a linear correlation between tri-methyl indium (TMIn) flow and tri-methyl gallium (TMGa) effective flow coming from the pollution source, thought to be due to desorption from the chamber. By performing a chamber cleaning process between the GaN pseudo-substrate and the InAlN layer, we have both eliminated the gallium contamination and increased the indium content in our layers, reaching indium levels of up to 11% under hydrogen. Finally, we achieved a sheet resistance of 250 Ω/sq on wafers with a clean between the GaN and the InAlN layers, showing the potential for using this technique to produce high performance devices.

  1. Gallium Arsenide Domino Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Long; Long, Stephen I.

    1990-01-01

    Advantages include reduced power and high speed. Experimental gallium arsenide field-effect-transistor (FET) domino circuit replicated in large numbers for use in dynamic-logic systems. Name of circuit denotes mode of operation, which logic signals propagate from each stage to next when successive stages operated at slightly staggered clock cycles, in manner reminiscent of dominoes falling in a row. Building block of domino circuit includes input, inverter, and level-shifting substages. Combinational logic executed in input substage. During low half of clock cycle, result of logic operation transmitted to following stage.

  2. Gallium phosphide energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, P. E.; DiNetta, Louis C.; DuganCavanagh, K.; Goetz, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Betavoltaic power supplies based on gallium phosphide can supply long term low-level power with high reliability. Results are presented for GaP devices powered by Ni-63 and tritiarated phosphors. Leakage currents as low as 1.2 x 10(exp -17) A/cm(exp 2) have been measured and the temperature dependence of the reverse saturation current is found to have ideal behavior. A small demonstration system has been assembled that generates and stores enough electricity to light up an LED.

  3. Gallium nitride nanotube lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Hurtado, Antonio; ...

    2015-01-01

    Lasing is demonstrated from gallium nitride nanotubes fabricated using a two-step top-down technique. By optically pumping, we observed characteristics of lasing: a clear threshold, a narrow spectral, and guided emission from the nanotubes. In addition, annular lasing emission from the GaN nanotube is also observed, indicating that cross-sectional shape control can be employed to manipulate the properties of nanolasers. The nanotube lasers could be of interest for optical nanofluidic applications or application benefitting from a hollow beam shape.

  4. Mineral of the month: indium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Micheal W.

    2004-01-01

    Indium was discovered in Germany in 1863. Although it is a lustrous silver-white color, the finders named the new material for the “indigo” spectral lines the mineral created on the spectrograph. Indium ranks 61st in abundance in Earth’s crust and is about three times more abundant than silver or mercury.

  5. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    2003-05-07

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

  6. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2003-06-01

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

  7. Aluminium and human breast diseases.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D; Pugazhendhi, D; Mannello, F

    2011-11-01

    The human breast is exposed to aluminium from many sources including diet and personal care products, but dermal application of aluminium-based antiperspirant salts provides a local long-term source of exposure. Recent measurements have shown that aluminium is present in both tissue and fat of the human breast but at levels which vary both between breasts and between tissue samples from the same breast. We have recently found increased levels of aluminium in noninvasively collected nipple aspirate fluids taken from breast cancer patients (mean 268 ± 28 μg/l) compared with control healthy subjects (mean 131 ± 10 μg/l) providing evidence of raised aluminium levels in the breast microenvironment when cancer is present. The measurement of higher levels of aluminium in type I human breast cyst fluids (median 150 μg/l) compared with human serum (median 6 μg/l) or human milk (median 25 μg/l) warrants further investigation into any possible role of aluminium in development of this benign breast disease. Emerging evidence for aluminium in several breast structures now requires biomarkers of aluminium action in order to ascertain whether the presence of aluminium has any biological impact. To this end, we report raised levels of proteins that modulate iron homeostasis (ferritin, transferrin) in parallel with raised aluminium in nipple aspirate fluids in vivo, and we report overexpression of mRNA for several S100 calcium binding proteins following long-term exposure of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro to aluminium chlorhydrate.

  8. GALLIUM ARSENIDE DENDRITE SINGLE CRYSTAL PROGRAM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARSENIDES, *GALLIUM COMPOUNDS, *LABORATORY FURNACES, * SOLAR CELLS , CRUCIBLES, DESIGN, DIFFUSION, EXPLOSIONS, INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, MATERIALS, PHOSPHORUS, SINGLE CRYSTALS, TEMPERATURE CONTROL, ZINC

  9. Recycling of indium from CIGS photovoltaic cells: potential of combining acid-resistant nanofiltration with liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Yannick-Serge; Niewersch, Claudia; Lenz, Markus; Kül, Zöhre Zohra; Corvini, Philippe F-X; Schäffer, Andreas; Wintgens, Thomas

    2014-11-18

    Electronic consumer products such as smartphones, TV, computers, light-emitting diodes, and photovoltaic cells crucially depend on metals and metalloids. So-called "urban mining" considers them as secondary resources since they may contain precious elements at concentrations many times higher than their primary ores. Indium is of foremost interest being widely used, expensive, scarce and prone to supply risk. This study first investigated the capability of different nanofiltration membranes of extracting indium from copper-indium-gallium- selenide photovoltaic cell (CIGS) leachates under low pH conditions and low transmembrane pressure differences (<3 bar). Retentates were then subjected to a further selective liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Even at very acidic pH indium was retained to >98% by nanofiltration, separating it from parts of the Ag, Sb, Se, and Zn present. LLE using di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) extracted 97% of the indium from the retentates, separating it from all other elements except for Mo, Al, and Sn. Overall, 95% (2.4 g m(-2) CIGS) of the indium could be extracted to the D2EHPA phase. Simultaneously, by nanofiltration the consumption of D2EHPA was reduced by >60% due to the metal concentration in the reduced retentate volume. These results show clearly the potential for efficient scarce metal recovery from secondary resources. Furthermore, since nanofiltration was applicable at very low pH (≥ 0.6), it may be applied in hydrometallurgy typically using acidic conditions.

  10. 49 CFR 173.162 - Gallium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gallium. 173.162 Section 173.162 Transportation... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.162 Gallium. (a) Except when packaged in cylinders or steel flasks, gallium must be packaged in packagings which meet...

  11. 49 CFR 173.162 - Gallium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gallium. 173.162 Section 173.162 Transportation... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.162 Gallium. (a) Except when packaged in cylinders or steel flasks, gallium must be packaged in packagings which meet...

  12. 49 CFR 173.162 - Gallium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gallium. 173.162 Section 173.162 Transportation... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.162 Gallium. (a) Except when packaged in cylinders or steel flasks, gallium must be packaged in packagings which meet...

  13. 49 CFR 173.162 - Gallium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gallium. 173.162 Section 173.162 Transportation... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.162 Gallium. (a) Except when packaged in cylinders or steel flasks, gallium must be packaged in packagings which meet...

  14. Progress in gallium arsenide semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, M.H. )

    1990-02-01

    After almost 30 years as the technology of the future, gallium arsenide has begun to make a place for itself, not by supplanting silicon but by complementing it in new applications. The inherent advantages of the material lie in the speed with which electrons move through it, in weak-signal operations and in the generation and detection of light. These advantages suit it for roles in computing, television reception and the optoelectronic transmission of data through optical-fiber networks. Gallium arsenide light-emitting diodes and lasers used in visual-display technologies and audio-disk players already account for more than $1 billion in sales annually. Hundreds of thousands of satellite-receiving dishes that use gallium arsenide detectors are sold every year, and high-speed circuits using gallium arsenide transistors are projected to reach a similar turnover in a few years. In an economy and society that depend on the rapid exchange of information as well as on the processing of it, many silicon-dominated processors will require a considerable admixture of gallium arsenide components in order to do their jobs.

  15. Gallium phosphide energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, P. E.; Dinetta, L. C.; Goetz, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) energy converters may be successfully deployed to provide new mission capabilities for spacecraft. Betavoltaic power supplies based on the conversion of tritium beta decay to electricity using GaP energy converters can supply long term low-level power with high reliability. High temperature solar cells, also based on GaP, can be used in inward-bound missions greatly reducing the need for thermal dissipation. Results are presented for GaP direct conversion devices powered by Ni-63 and compared to the conversion of light emitted by tritiarated phosphors. Leakage currents as low as 1.2 x 10(exp -17) A/sq cm have been measured and the temperature dependence of the reverse saturation current is found to have ideal behavior. Temperature dependent IV, QE, R(sub sh), and V(sub oc) results are also presented. These data are used to predict the high-temperature solar cell and betacell performance of GaP devices and suggest appropriate applications for the deployment of this technology.

  16. Medical applications and toxicities of gallium compounds.

    PubMed

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2010-05-01

    Over the past two to three decades, gallium compounds have gained importance in the fields of medicine and electronics. In clinical medicine, radioactive gallium and stable gallium nitrate are used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in cancer and disorders of calcium and bone metabolism. In addition, gallium compounds have displayed anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activity in animal models of human disease while more recent studies have shown that gallium compounds may function as antimicrobial agents against certain pathogens. In a totally different realm, the chemical properties of gallium arsenide have led to its use in the semiconductor industry. Gallium compounds, whether used medically or in the electronics field, have toxicities. Patients receiving gallium nitrate for the treatment of various diseases may benefit from such therapy, but knowledge of the therapeutic index of this drug is necessary to avoid clinical toxicities. Animals exposed to gallium arsenide display toxicities in certain organ systems suggesting that environmental risks may exist for individuals exposed to this compound in the workplace. Although the arsenic moiety of gallium arsenide appears to be mainly responsible for its pulmonary toxicity, gallium may contribute to some of the detrimental effects in other organs. The use of older and newer gallium compounds in clinical medicine may be advanced by a better understanding of their mechanisms of action, drug resistance, pharmacology, and side-effects. This review will discuss the medical applications of gallium and its mechanisms of action, the newer gallium compounds and future directions for development, and the toxicities of gallium compounds in current use.

  17. Gallium and Reactor Neutrino Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, M. A.; Giunti, C.; Laveder, M.

    2009-03-01

    The observed deficit in the Gallium radioactive source experiments may be interpreted as a possible indication of active-sterile ν mixing. In the effective framework of two-neutrino mixing we obtain sin2ϑ≳0.03 and Δm≳0.1 eV. The compatibility of this result with the data of the Bugey reactor ν disappearance experiments is studied. It is found that the Bugey data present a hint of neutrino oscillations with 0.02≲sin2ϑ≲0.08 and Δm≈1.8 eV, which is compatible with the Gallium allowed region of the mixing parameters. This hint persists in the combined analysis of Gallium, Bugey, and Chooz data.

  18. Structure and physical properties of gallium selenide laser-intercalated with nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokladok, N. T.; Grygorchak, I. I.; Lukiyanets, B. A.; Popovich, D. I.

    2007-04-01

    Intercalated crystals of indium and gallium selenide are prepared. It is shown that laser intercalation of nickel into GaSe samples leads to a giant magnetoresistive effect whose magnitude and sign depend on the concentration of the guest component. The giant magnetoresistive effect in the InSe intercalation compounds is considerably weaker and does not exceed 5%. The experimental data obtained are explained in terms of magnetic delocalization (localization) of charge carriers with the participation of states of intercalated magnetically active atoms in the vicinity of the Fermi level.

  19. Mineral resource of the month: gallium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, Brian W.

    2009-01-01

    The metal element gallium occurs in very small concentrations in rocks and ores of other metals — native gallium is not known. As society gets more and more high-tech, gallium becomes more useful. Gallium is one of only five metals that are liquid at or close to room temperature. It has one of the longest liquid ranges of any metal (29.8 degrees Celsius to 2204 degrees Celsius) and has a low vapor pressure even at high temperatures. Ultra-pure gallium has a brilliant silvery appearance, and the solid metal exhibits conchoidal fracture similar to glass.

  20. Comparative radiation resistance, temperature dependence and performance of diffused junction indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells whose p-n junctions were processed by the open tube capped diffusion and by the closed tube uncapped diffusion of sulfur into Czochralski-grown p-type substrates are compared. Differences found in radiation resistance were attributed to the effects of increased base dopant concentration. Both sets of cells showed superior radiation resistance to that of gallium arsenide cells, in agreement with previous results. No correlation was, however, found between the open-circuit voltage and the temperature dependence of the maximum power.

  1. Renal amyloidosis. Evaluation by gallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Skinner, M.; Cohen, A.S.; Ngai, S.; Peng, T.T.

    1986-09-01

    A study has been performed to evaluate the efficacy of gallium imaging in the detection of renal amyloidosis. Ten of the 11 patients who had biopsy-proven renal amyloidosis demonstrated marked uptake in both kidneys. One patient revealed moderate gallium uptake in his kidneys. None of the patients had underlying renal or extrarenal pathology other than amyloidosis, which could account for renal gallium uptake (renal infection, neoplasm, hepatic failure or frequent blood transfusions). Four patients also had extrarenal foci of abnormal gallium uptake, suggesting other sites of amyloid deposits. Our data strongly suggest that gallium imaging has a high sensitivity for detection of renal amyloidosis. Its specificity is enhanced significantly by careful review of the clinical history to exclude other known causes of renal gallium uptake. Potentially, gallium imaging may be used to monitor the progress of patients under experimental therapy.

  2. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented.

  3. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer.

  4. The toxicity of aluminium in humans.

    PubMed

    Exley, C

    2016-06-01

    We are living in the 'aluminium age'. Human exposure to aluminium is inevitable and, perhaps, inestimable. Aluminium's free metal cation, Alaq(3+), is highly biologically reactive and biologically available aluminium is non-essential and essentially toxic. Biologically reactive aluminium is present throughout the human body and while, rarely, it can be acutely toxic, much less is understood about chronic aluminium intoxication. Herein the question is asked as to how to diagnose aluminium toxicity in an individual. While there are as yet, no unequivocal answers to this problem, there are procedures to follow to ascertain the nature of human exposure to aluminium. It is also important to recognise critical factors in exposure regimes and specifically that not all forms of aluminium are toxicologically equivalent and not all routes of exposure are equivalent in their delivery of aluminium to target sites. To ascertain if Alzheimer's disease is a symptom of chronic aluminium intoxication over decades or breast cancer is aggravated by the topical application of an aluminium salt or if autism could result from an immune cascade initiated by an aluminium adjuvant requires that each of these is considered independently and in the light of the most up to date scientific evidence. The aluminium age has taught us that there are no inevitabilities where chronic aluminium toxicity is concerned though there are clear possibilities and these require proving or discounting but not simply ignored.

  5. Oligonuclear gallium nitrogen cage compounds: molecular intermediates on the way from gallium hydrazides to gallium nitride.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Werner; Abel, Thomas; Hagemeier, Elke; Hepp, Alexander; Layh, Marcus; Rezaeirad, Babak; Luftmann, Heinrich

    2011-01-03

    Gallium hydrazides are potentially applicable as facile starting compounds for the generation of GaN by thermolysis. The decomposition pathways are, however, complicated and depend strongly on the substituents attached to the gallium atoms and the hydrazido groups. This paper describes some systematic investigations into the thermolysis of the gallium hydrazine adduct Bu(t)(3)Ga←NH(2)-NHMe (1a) and the dimeric gallium hydrazides [R(2)Ga(N(2)H(2)R')](2) (2b, R = Bu(t), R' = Bu(t); 2c, R = Pr(i), R' = Ph; 2d, R = Me, R' = Bu(t)) which have four- or five-membered heterocycles in their molecular cores. Heating of the adduct 1a to 170 °C gave the heterocyclic compound Bu(t)(2)Ga(μ-NH(2))[μ-N(Me)-N(=CH(2))]GaBu(t)(2) (3) by cleavage of N-N bonds and rearrangement. 3 was further converted at 400 °C into the tetrameric gallium cyanide (Bu(t)(2)GaCN)(4) (4). The thermolysis of the hydrazide (Bu(t)(2)Ga)(2)(NH-NHBu(t))(2) (2b) at temperatures between 270 and 420 °C resulted in cleavage of all N-N bonds and the formation of an octanuclear gallium imide, (Bu(t)GaNH)(8) (6). The trimeric dialkylgallium amide (Bu(t)(2)GaNH(2))(3) (5) was isolated as an intermediate. Thermolysis of the hydrazides (Pr(i)(2)Ga)(2)(NH-NHPh)(NH(2)-NPh) (2c) and (Me(2)Ga)(2)(NH-NHBu(t))(2) (2d) proceeded in contrast with retention of the N-N bonds and afforded a variety of novel gallium hydrazido cage compounds with four gallium atoms and up to four hydrazido groups in a single molecule: (Pr(i)Ga)(4)(NH-NPh)(3)NH (7), (MeGa)(4)(NH-NBu(t))(4) (8), (MeGa)(4)(NH-NBu(t))(3)NBu(t) (9), and (MeGa)(4)(NHNBu(t))(3)NH (10). Partial hydrolysis gave reproducibly the unique octanuclear mixed hydrazido oxo compound (MeGa)(8)(NHNBu(t))(4)O(4) (11).

  6. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

    1997-08-12

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

  7. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan; Fu, Tracy; Ross, Jennifer; Chan, James

    1997-01-01

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

  8. Gallium scan in intracerebral sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Makhija, M.C.; Anayiotos, C.P.

    1981-07-01

    Sarcoidosis involving the nervous system probably occurs in about 4% of patients. The usefulness of brain scintigraphy in these cases has been suggested. In this case of cerebral sarcoid granuloma, gallium imaging demonstrated the lesion before treatment and showed disappearance of the lesion after corticosteroid treatment, which correlated with the patient's clinical improvement.

  9. Liquid gallium rotary electric contract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przybyszewski, J. S.

    1969-01-01

    Due to its low vapor pressure, gallium, when substituted for mercury in a liquid slip ring system, transmits substantial amounts of electrical current to rotating components in an ultrahigh vacuum. It features low electrical loss, little or no wear, and long maintenance-free life.

  10. Indium Foil Serves As Thermally Conductive Gasket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, G. Yale; Dussinger, Peter M.

    1993-01-01

    Indium foil found useful as gasket to increase thermal conductance between bodies clamped together. Deforms to fill imperfections on mating surfaces. Used where maximum temperature in joint less than melting temperature of indium. Because of low melting temperature of indium, most useful in cryogenic applications.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of indium substituted nanocrystalline Mobil Five (MFI) zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Kishor Kr.; Nandi, Mithun; Talukdar, Anup K.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • In situ modification of the MFI zeolite by incorporation of indium. • The samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA, UV–vis (DRS), SAA, EDX and SEM. • The incorporation of indium was confirmed by XRD, FT-IR, UV–vis (DRS), EDX and TGA. • Hydroxylation of phenol reaction was studied on the synthesized catalysts. - Abstract: A series of indium doped Mobil Five (MFI) zeolite were synthesized hydrothermally with silicon to aluminium and indium molar ratio of 100 and with aluminium to indium molar ratios of 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1. The MFI zeolite phase was identified by XRD and FT-IR analysis. In XRD analysis the prominent peaks were observed at 2θ values of around 6.5° and 23° with a few additional shoulder peaks in case of all the indium incorporated samples suggesting formation of pure phase of the MFI zeolite. All the samples under the present investigation were found to exhibit high crystallinity (∼92%). The crystallite sizes of the samples were found to vary from about 49 to 55 nm. IR results confirmed the formation of MFI zeolite in all cases showing distinct absorbance bands near 1080, 790, 540, 450 and 990 cm{sup −1}. TG analysis of In-MFI zeolites showed mass losses in three different steps which are attributed to the loss due to adsorbed water molecules and the two types TPA{sup +} cations. Further, the UV–vis (DRS) studies reflected the position of the indium metal in the zeolite framework. Surface area analysis of the synthesized samples was carried out to characterize the synthesized samples The analysis showed that the specific surface area ranged from ∼357 to ∼361 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and the pore volume of the synthesized samples ranged from 0.177 to 0.182 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}. The scanning electron microscopy studies showed the structure of the samples to be rectangular and twinned rectangular shaped. The EDX analysis was carried out for confirmation of Si, Al and In in zeolite frame work. The catalytic activities of

  12. Gallium nitride electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Siddharth; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-07-01

    In the past two decades, there has been increasing research and industrial activity in the area of gallium nitride (GaN) electronics, stimulated first by the successful demonstration of GaN LEDs. While the promise of wide band gap semiconductors for power electronics was recognized many years before this by one of the contributors to this issue (J Baliga), the success in the area of LEDs acted as a catalyst. It set the field of GaN electronics in motion, and today the technology is improving the performance of several applications including RF cell phone base stations and military radar. GaN could also play a very important role in reducing worldwide energy consumption by enabling high efficiency compact power converters operating at high voltages and lower frequencies. While GaN electronics is a rapidly evolving area with active research worldwide, this special issue provides an opportunity to capture some of the great advances that have been made in the last 15 years. The issue begins with a section on epitaxy and processing, followed by an overview of high-frequency HEMTs, which have been the most commercially successful application of III-nitride electronics to date. This is followed by review and research articles on power-switching transistors, which are currently of great interest to the III-nitride community. A section of this issue is devoted to the reliability of III-nitride devices, an area that is of increasing significance as the research focus has moved from not just high performance but also production-worthiness and long-term usage of these devices. Finally, a group of papers on new and relatively less studied ideas for III-nitride electronics, such as interband tunneling, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and high-temperature electronics is included. These areas point to new areas of research and technological innovation going beyond the state of the art into the future. We hope that the breadth and quality of articles in this issue will make it

  13. Indium-Mediated Stereoselective Allylation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Vemula, Sandeep R; Balasubramanian, Narayanaganesh; Cook, Gregory R

    2016-10-04

    Stereoselective indium-mediated organic reactions have enjoyed tremendous growth in the last 25 years. This is in part due to the insensitivity of allylindium to moisture, affording facile and practical reaction conditions coupled with outstanding functional group tolerance and minimal side reactions. Despite the plethora of articles about allylindium, there is much yet to be discovered and exploited for efficient and sustainable synthesis. In this Account, we describe indium-mediated synthetic methods for the preparation of chiral amines with the aim to present a balance of practical method development, novel asymmetric chemistry, and mechanistic understanding that impact multiple chemical and materials science disciplines. In 2005, we demonstrated the indium-mediated allylation of chiral hydrazones with complete diastereoselectivity (>99:1) and quantitative yields. Further, we revealed the first example of enantioselective indium-mediated allylation of hydrazones using catalytic (R)-3,3'-bis(trifluoromethyl)-BINOL ligands to afford homoallylic amines with high enantioselectivity. The use of enantiopure perfluoroalkylsulfonate BINOLs greatly improved the indium-mediated allylation of N-acylhydrazones with exquisite enantiocontrol (99% yield, 99% ee). This laboratory has also investigated indium-mediated asymmetric intramolecular cyclization in the presence of amino acid additives to deliver biologically relevant chromanes with excellent diastereoselectivity (dr >99:1). The effect of amino acid additives (N-Boc-glycine) was further investigated during the indium-mediated allylation of isatins with allyl bromide to yield homoallylic alcohols in excellent yields in a short time with a wide range of functional group tolerance. Critical mechanistic insight was gained, and evidence suggests that the additive plays two roles: (1) to increase the rate of formation of allylindium from allyl bromide and In(0) and (2) to increase the nucleophilicity of the allylindium

  14. Dependence in Classification of Aluminium Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resti, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Based on the dependence between edge and colour intensity of aluminium waste image, the aim of this paper is to classify the aluminium waste into three types; pure aluminium, not pure aluminium type-1 (mixed iron/lead) and not pure aluminium type 2 (unrecycle). Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was employed to reduction the dimension of image data, while Bayes’ theorem with the Gaussian copula was applied to classification. The copula was employed to handle dependence between edge and colour intensity of aluminium waste image. The results showed that the classifier has been correctly classifiable by 88.33%.

  15. Far-Infrared and Optical Studies of Gallium Arsenide and Aluminum Gallium Arsenide Semiconductor Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanaway, Mark Brian

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis reports far-infrared (FIR) and photoluminescence studies, performed at low temperatures (4.2K) and at magnetic fields up to 25T, of selectively and inadvertently doped bulk and low dimensional gallium arsenide (GaAs) and aluminium gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) semiconductor structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. High-resolution FIR magnetospectroscopy of ultra -high mobility n-GaAs reveals a variety of shallow donor intra-impurity transitions plus spin-split higher Landau level transitions in the photoconductive response. The first observation of polarons bound to D^ - ions in bulk n-GaAs is reported. The excited state spectrum of the confined silicon donor in GaAs/AlGaAs multi-quantum wells (MQWs) has been examined. Narrower linewidths and more higher excited state donor transitions are noted in the present photoconductive investigation compared with previous reports. The electron recombination dynamics has been examined in silicon-doped GaAs/AlGaAs MQWs and homogeneous and sheet -doped bulk n-GaAs samples using time-resolved FIR photoconductivity. The extrinsic response of doped MQW structures suggests a potential use as a fast, sensitive detectors of FIR. FIR transmission measurements are reported for GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells (QWs) of various widths in magnetic fields of up to 20T, tilted away from the normal to the QW plane by angles up to theta = 50^circ. Deviation of the cyclotron resonance field from a costheta law are interpreted using theoretical models describing Landau level/electric subband coupling. The in-plane magnetic field and excitation power dependence of the photoluminescence intensity of a GaAs/AlGaAs QW spectral feature is interpreted in terms of charge transfer in the QW, using a coupled oscillator model, and the efficiency of nonradiative electronic traps. In-plane magnetic field studies of the photoluminescence from a superlattice structure

  16. Construction of Gallium Point at NMIJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiatmo, J. V.; Saito, I.; Yamazawa, K.

    2017-03-01

    Two open-type gallium point cells were fabricated using ingots whose nominal purities are 7N. Measurement systems for the realization of the melting point of gallium using these cells were built. The melting point of gallium is repeatedly realized by means of the measurement systems for evaluating the repeatability. Measurements for evaluating the effect of hydrostatic pressure coming from the molten gallium existing during the melting process and the effect of gas pressure that fills the cell were also performed. Direct cell comparisons between those cells were conducted. This comparison was aimed to evaluate the consistency of each cell, especially related to the nominal purity. Direct cell comparison between the open-type and the sealed-type gallium point cell was also conducted. Chemical analysis was conducted using samples extracted from ingots used in both the newly built open-type gallium point cells, from which the effect of impurities in the ingot was evaluated.

  17. Epitaxial Deposition Of Germanium Doped With Gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Epitaxial layers of germanium doped with gallium made by chemical vapor deposition. Method involves combination of techniques and materials used in chemical vapor deposition with GeH4 or GeCl4 as source of germanium and GaCl3 as source of gallium. Resulting epitaxial layers of germanium doped with gallium expected to be highly pure, with high crystalline quality. High-quality material useful in infrared sensors.

  18. Studies of the spintronic systems of ferromagnetic gallium manganese arsenide and non-magnetic indium gallium arsenide/indium aluminum arsenide two dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chunlei

    This thesis focuses on the two important parts in the spintronic devices based on the spin field effect transistor: (1) the ferromagnetic GaMnAs thin films which is the source-drain material and (2) the Rashba spin-orbit coupling in a two-dimensional electron gas in which the spin can be transported and its polarization can be tuned by external gates. We have grown GaMnAs samples using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with Mn composition up to 8%. The intrinsic and extrinsic contribution to the lattice parameter of the low temperature grown GaMnAs is discussed. The influence of the defects on the electrical and magnetic properties of GaMnAs thin films is presented. We have also studied optical properties of GaMnAs thin films and quantum wells using absorption spectrum. The magnetic circular dichroism is employed to study the p-d exchange interaction induced spin splitting. The Rashba spin-orbit coupling in a InGaAs/InAlAs two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is demonstrated by the beating patterns in the Shubnikov de Hass oscillation. Based on the coupling between the spin and orbit momentum, we demonstrate the ways to use spin to drive current by the circular photo galvanic effect (CPGE) and the spin galvanic effect (SGE) with interband excitation. And conversely we show, for the first time, that an electric current can induce spin polarization in a 2DEG, which provides us the opportunity to manipulate spin using electric field instead of magnetic field for the future spintronic devices.

  19. Effect of Growth Pause on Indium Gallium Phosphorus/gallium Arsenic Heterointerfaces during Gas-Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyong Yong

    Molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of InGaP/GaAs quantum-well structures requires switching of the arsenic and phosphorus beams at each heterointerface. Using in -situ reflection high energy electron diffraction, double crystal X-ray (DCXR) diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy, the effects of a growth pause on the interfacial structure and composition of lattice-matched InGaP/GaAs multiple quantum well structures were studied. For the purpose of this study growth pause at each interface was divided into two time periods: the interval (denoted by t_1) after stopping growth by closing the group-III shutters but before switching the group-V beams, and the interval (t_2) after switching the group-V beams but before recommencing growth. The effect of the As_2 beam on the GaAs growth front and the P_2 beam on the InGaP growth front was first studied. An atomically smooth GaAs surface was obtained with about 30 sec of pause in an As_2 beam. With the experimental methods used, the InGaP growth front did not show any major structural changes with increasing growth pause time. The GaAs-to-InGaP interface is found to be composed of one to two monolayers of GaAs_ {y}P_{1-y} (0 < y < 0.05) and the InGaP-to-GaAs interface is composed of one to two monolayers of In_{.5}Ga_ {.5}As_{y}P _{1-y} (0 < y < 0.05). This requires an exchange of As and P in the uppermost group-V atoms. The effect of an As_2 beam on the InGaP surface and an P_2 beam on the GaAs surface was next studied. For t _2 < 20 sec, atomically flat heterointerfaces were obtained and both the GaAs-to-InGaP and the InGaP -to-GaAs interfaces were found to be composed of group-V exchange strained layers. For t_2 >=q 60 sec a wavy interface was obtained. The irregularities of the interface may be the result of the As and P exchange mechanism. The experimental results show that a combination of an As_2 beam on the InGaP surface and a P_2 beam on the GaAs surface lasting 2 min produces rougher growth fronts and interfaces than pausing on only one surface. The InGaP surface was found to undergo larger group-V exchange and roughening than the GaAs surface. InGaP/GaAs interface roughness was examined as a function of the growth temperature. The result of the investigation shows that the waviness observed with t _2 = 2 min evolves into (311) facets and the evolution of the (311) facets is enhanced with an increase in the growth temperature. The {311 } facet is the result of the change in the growth orientation from < 100> to < 311> direction. The InGaP surface is found to be less stable than the GaAs surface and roughens faster and at a lower temperature than the GaAs growth front.

  20. Optical and Electrical Characterization of Melt-Grown Bulk Indium Gallium Arsenide and Indium Arsenic Phosphide Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    nqr I v . (3.4) The Hall factor is represented by Hr and denotes the Hall to drift mobility ratio, which is usually...applied current density, Jx, and applied magnetic field, Bz. That is, it is given by zxH H zx y BJR nqr BI E . (3.5) The

  1. Optical, structural, and transport properties of indium nitride, indium gallium nitride alloys grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Neelam

    InGaN based, blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been successfully produced over the past decade. But the progress of these LEDs is often limited by the fundamental problems of InGaN such as differences in lattice constants, thermal expansion coefficients and physical properties between InN and GaN. This difficulty could be addressed by studying pure InN and InxGa 1-xN alloys. In this context Ga-rich InxGa1-xN (x ≤ 0.4) epilayers were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements showed InxGa1-xN films with x= 0.37 had single phase. Phase separation occurred for x ˜ 0.4. To understand the issue of phase separation in Ga-rich InxGa 1-xN, studies on growth of pure InN and In-rich InxGa 1-xN alloys were carried out. InN and In-rich InxGa1-xN (x ˜ 0.97-0.40) epilayers were grown on AlN/Al2O3 templates. A Hall mobility of 1400 cm2/Vs with a carrier concentration of 7x1018cm -3 was observed for InN epilayers grown on AlN templates. Photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra revealed a band to band emission peak at ˜0.75 eV for InN. This peak shifted to 1.15 eV when In content was varied from 1.0 to 0.63 in In-rich InxGa1-xN epilayers. After growth parameter optimization of In-rich InxGa1-xN alloys with (x = 0.97-0.40) were successfully grown without phase separation. Effects of Mg doping on the PL properties of InN epilayers grown on GaN/Al 2O3 templates were investigated. An emission line at ˜ 0.76 eV, which was absent in undoped InN epilayers and was about 60 meV below the band edge emission peak at ˜ 0.82 eV, was observed to be the dominant emission in Mg-doped InN epilayers. PL peak position and the temperature dependent emission intensity corroborated each other and suggested that Mg acceptor level in InN is about 60 meV above the valance band maximum. Strain effects on the emission properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) were studied using a single blue LED wafer possessing a continuous variation in compressive strain. EL emission peak position of LEDs varies linearly with the biaxial strain; a coefficient of 19 meV/GPa, characterizes the relationship between the band gap energy and biaxial stress of In 0.2Ga0.8N/GaN MQWs.

  2. Intermediate band solar cells based on indium arsenide quantum dots embedded in indium gallium arsenide quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasan, Ramesh

    Intermediate band solar cells based on quantum dots and quantum wells with anti-reflection coating are investigated in this thesis. The demand for high efficient solar cells as an alternate source of energy is the main motivation for this research project. Intermediate band solar cells based on quantum dots were the subject of intensive research in recent years. High power conversion efficiency was predicted from InAs/GaAs intermediate band solar cells as the presence of InAs quantum dots increased the absorption below the band gap of the host material. In this thesis, an attempt has been made to further increase the absorption of GaAs solar cells by embedding InAs quantum dots in InxGa 1-xAs quantum wells. The quantum efficiency and spectral response measurements of quantum dots embedded in quantum well devices exhibit an extended response till 1280 nm in the near infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The interband transition peaks associated with the InxGa 1-xAs quantum well exhibit a red shift as In mole fraction (x) in In xGa1-xAs quantum well is increased above 0%. The short circuit current density increased, while open circuit voltage decreased, as x is increased. In addition, the use of inexpensive anti-reflection coating (ARC) on these intermediate band solar cells has been studied. Anti-reflection coating based on Zinc oxide (ZnO) has significantly improved the power conversion efficiency of the solar cells. The ZnO synthesized using sol-gel technique was spin coated on the solar cells and subsequently annealed. The short circuit current density was significantly increased after the deposition of the ARC. Enhancement of the order of 42 % in the power conversion efficiency was obtained. Around 43% enhancement in quantum efficiency and 44% enhancement in spectral response measurements were also observed.

  3. Hepatocellular carcinoma detection by gallium scan and subsequent treatment by gallium maltolate: rationale and case study.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Lawrence R; van der Hoeven, Jacobus J M; Boer, Robbert O

    2011-07-01

    Gallium is antiproliferative to many types of cancer, due primarily to its ability to act as a non-functional mimic of ferric iron (Fe(3+)). Because Fe(3+) is needed for ribonucleotide reductase activity--and thus DNA synthesis--gallium can inhibit DNA production and cell division. Diagnostic gallium scans have shown that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is commonly avid for gallium. Furthermore, in vitro studies have found that gallium nitrate, and particularly gallium maltolate (GaM), have dose-dependent antiproliferative activity against HCC cell lines. Rationale thus exists to use GaM, an orally active compound that has been well tolerated in Phase I clinical trials, to treat patients whose HCC is gallium-avid in a gallium scan. Because gallium absorbed from orally administered GaM is bound predominately to serum transferrin, which travels to all tissues in the body, GaM has the potential to treat even distant metastases. A patient with advanced HCC (20 × 10 cm primary tumor, ascites around liver and spleen, resistant to Nexavar(®) (sorafenib)), whose cancer was highly gallium-avid in a (67)Ga-scan, was treated with oral gallium maltolate at 1500 mg/day q.d. After four weeks of treatment, the patient had a large reduction in pain, with greatly increased mobility and quality of life, and significantly lowered serum bilirubin and inflammation-related liver enzymes. At eight weeks, CT scans showed apparent necrosis of the tumor.

  4. Phase change cells and the verification of gallium as a thermal calibration reference in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latvikoski, Harri; Bingham, Gail E.; Topham, T. S.; Podolski, Igor

    2015-09-01

    The validation of models of global climate change and accurate measurement of the atmosphere and surface temperatures require that orbital sensors have low drift rates, and are monitored or regularly recalibrated by accepted standards. Phase change materials (PCM), such as those that make up the ITS-90 standard, are the basis for international commerce and have been suggested for monitoring and recalibration of orbital temperature sensors. Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) and its partners have been developing miniaturized phase change reference technologies that could be deployed on an orbital blackbody for nearly a decade. A significant part of this effort has been the exploration of the behavior of gallium (Ga) and its eutectics, gallium-tin (GaSn) and gallium-indium (GaIn) in conditions expected to be encountered in this application. In this paper, these behaviors are detailed and an example of a hardware design that could be used as an infrared blackbody calibration monitor is presented. To determine if and how microgravity will affect the behavior of Ga, the authors conducted an experiment on the International Space Station (ISS) and compared the observed phase change temperature with earth-based measurements. This paper also provides a brief description of the experiment hardware, microgravity considerations, and the pre-flight, flight and post-flight data analysis.

  5. The study of aluminium anodes for high power density Al/air batteries with brine electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestoridi, Maria; Pletcher, Derek; Wood, Robert J. K.; Wang, Shuncai; Jones, Richard L.; Stokes, Keith R.; Wilcock, Ian

    Aluminium alloys containing small additions of both tin (∼0.1 wt%) and gallium (∼0.05 wt%) are shown to dissolve anodically at high rates in sodium chloride media at room temperatures; current densities >0.2 A cm -2 can be obtained at potentials close to the open circuit potential, ∼-1500 mV versus SCE. The tin exists in the alloys as a second phase, typically as ∼1 μm inclusions (precipitates) distributed throughout the aluminium structure, and anodic dissolution occurs to form pits around the tin inclusions. Although the distribution of the gallium in the alloy could not be established, it is also shown to be critical in the formation of these pits as well as maintaining their activity. The stability of the alloys to open circuit corrosion and the overpotential for high rate dissolution, both critical to battery performance, are shown to depend on factors in addition to elemental composition; both heat treatment and mechanical working influence the performance of the alloy. The correlation between alloy performance and their microstructure has been investigated.

  6. Aluminium phosphide-induced leukopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ntelios, Dimitrios; Mandros, Charalampos; Potolidis, Evangelos; Fanourgiakis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Acute intoxication from the pesticide aluminium phosphide is a relatively rare, life-threatening condition in which cardiovascular decompensation is the most feared problem. We report the case of a patient exposed to aluminium phosphide-liberated phosphine gas. It resulted in the development of a gastroenteritis-like syndrome accompanied by severe reduction in white blood cell numbers as an early and prominent manifestation. By affecting important physiological processes such as mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species homeostasis, phosphine could cause severe toxicity. After presenting the characteristics of certain leucocyte subpopulations we provide the current molecular understanding of the observed leukopenia which in part seems paradoxical. PMID:24172776

  7. Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thrustor Concept and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the design of a new type of two-stage pulsed electromagnetic accelerator, the gallium electromagnetic (GEM) thruster. A schematic illustration of the GEM thruster concept is given in Fig. 1. In this concept, liquid gallium propellant is pumped into the first stage through a porous metal electrode using an electromagneticpump[l]. At a designated time, a pulsed discharge (approx.10-50 J) is initiated in the first stage, ablating the liquid gallium from the porous electrode surface and ejecting a dense thermal gallium plasma into the second state. The presence of the gallium plasma in the second stage serves to trigger the high-energy (approx.500 I), send-stage puke which provides the primary electromagnetic (j x B) acceleration.

  8. Diffusion length variation in 0.5- and 3-MeV-proton-irradiated, heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Weinberg, Irving; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide (GaAs) and silicon (Si) solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of light weight, mechanically strong, and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5- and 3-MeV proton irradiations have been explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence was calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient, K(sub L), was also plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  9. The prophylactic reduction of aluminium intake.

    PubMed

    Lione, A

    1983-02-01

    The use of modern analytical methods has demonstrated that aluminium salts can be absorbed from the gut and concentrated in various human tissues, including bone, the parathyroids and brain. The neurotoxicity of aluminium has been extensively characterized in rabbits and cats, and high concentrations of aluminium have been detected in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Various reports have suggested that high aluminium intakes may be harmful to some patients with bone disease or renal impairment. Fatal aluminium-induced neuropathies have been reported in patients on renal dialysis. Since there are no demonstrable consequences of aluminium deprivation, the prophylactic reduction of aluminium intake by many patients would appear prudent. In this report, the major sources of aluminium in foods and non-prescription drugs are summarized and alternative products are described. The most common foods that contain substantial amounts of aluminium-containing additives include some processed cheeses, baking powders, cake mixes, frozen doughs, pancake mixes, self-raising flours and pickled vegetables. The aluminium-containing non-prescription drugs include some antacids, buffered aspirins, antidiarrhoeal products, douches and haemorrhoidal medications. The advisability of recommending a low aluminium diet for geriatric patients is discussed in detail.

  10. Occupational asthma caused by aluminium welding.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, O; Delwiche, J P; Vanbilsen, M L; Joly, J; Roosels, D

    1998-05-01

    Work-related asthma has been documented in workers employed in the primary aluminium industry and in the production of aluminium salts. The role of aluminium in the development of occupational asthma has, however, never been convincingly substantiated. We investigated a subject who experienced asthmatic reactions related to manual metal arc welding on aluminium. Challenge exposure to aluminium welding with flux-coated electrodes, as well as with electrodes without flux, elicited marked asthmatic reactions. Manual metal arc welding on mild steel did not cause significant bronchial response. The results of inhalation challenges combined with exposure assessments provided evidence that aluminium can cause asthmatic reactions in the absence of fluorides. Awareness of this possibility may be relevant to the investigation of asthma in workers exposed to aluminium.

  11. Gallium arsenide deep-level optical emitter for fibre optics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Janet L; McManis, Joseph E; Osadchy, Thomas; Grober, Louise; Woodall, Jerry M; Kindlmann, Peter J

    2003-06-01

    Fibre-optic components fabricated on the same substrate as integrated circuits are important for future high-speed communications. One industry response has been the costly push to develop indium phosphide (InP) electronics. However, for fabrication simplicity, reliability and cost, gallium arsenide (GaAs) remains the established technology for integrated optoelectronics. Unfortunately, the GaAs bandgap wavelength (0.85 microm) is far too short for fibre optics at 1.3-1.5 microm. This has led to work on materials that have a large lattice mismatch on GaAs. Here we demonstrate the first light-emitting diode (LED) that emits at 1.5 microm fibre-optic wavelengths in GaAs using optical transitions from arsenic antisite (As(Ga)) deep levels. This is an enabling technology for fibre-optic components that are lattice-matched to GaAs integrated circuits. We present experimental results showing significant internal optical power (24 mW) and speed (in terahertz) from GaAs optical emitters using deep-level transitions. Finally, we present theory showing the ultimate limit to the efficiency-bandwidth product of semiconductor deep-level optical emitters.

  12. Comparative performance of diffused junction indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.; Parat, K. K.

    1987-01-01

    A comparison is made between indium phosphide solar cells whose p-n junctions were processed by open tube capped diffusion, and closed tube uncapped diffusion, of sulfur into Czochralski grown p-type substrates. Air mass zero, total area, efficiencies ranged from 10 to 14.2 percent, the latter value attributed to cells processed by capped diffusion. The radiation resistance of these latter cells was slightly better, under 1 MeV electron irradiation. However, rather than being process dependent, the difference in radiation resistance could be attributed to the effects of increased base dopant concentration. In agreement with previous results, both cells exhibited radiation resistance superior to that of gallium arsenide. The lowest temperature dependency of maximum power was exhibited by the cells prepared by open tube capped diffusion. Contrary to previous results, no correlation was found between open circuit voltage and the temperature dependency of Pmax. It was concluded that additional process optimization was necessary before concluding that one process was better than another.

  13. Growth, Fabrication, and Characterization of Continuous-Wave Aluminum Gallium Nitride -Cladding-Free m-plane Indium Gallium Nitride / Gallium Nitride Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Robert Michael

    Many applications exist for InGaN/GaN laser diodes (LDs), including high-density optical data storage, laser-based projection displays, high-resolution laser printing, solid-state lighting, medical diagnostics, and chemical sensing. Although device performance continues to improve, current commercially-available InGaN/GaN LDs are still grown on the (0001) c-plane of the wurtzite crystal structure and their performance is nonetheless affected by the presence of polarization-related electric fields. As an alternative to conventional c-plane technologies, growth of InGaN/GaN LDs on nonpolar or semipolar orientations presents a viable approach to reducing or eliminating the issues associated with polarization-related electric fields. Despite these potential advantages, though, the lowest reported threshold current densities for nonpolar and semipolar LDs are still about 2 to 3 times higher than those reported for c-plane LDs. In this thesis, we discuss the growth, fabrication, and characterization of continuous-wave AlGaN-cladding-free (ACF) m-plane LDs with performance that is comparable to the best state-of-the-art c-plane LDs. In the first part of this thesis, the characterization of low-defect-density m-plane thin films and devices grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is presented. The physical origin of the four-sided pyramidal hillocks commonly observed on m-plane thin films is identified and an understanding of these mechanisms is used to explain the impact of carrier gas and substrate misorientation on the morphological, structural, and optical properties of m-plane thin films and devices. In the second part of this thesis, several aspects of the development of a quick, self-aligned LD fabrication process are discussed. These include the implementation of relatively conventional fabrication technologies for routine device processing as well as the development of innovative approaches for improving the accuracy and reproducibility of facet cleaving and ridge waveguide etching processes. Finally, in the third and last part of this thesis, the performance of ACF m-plane LDs with threshold current densities of 1.54 kA/cm2 and peak output powers of 1.6 W is discussed. The transparency carrier density of these devices is estimated to be 4.9 x 10 18 cm-3, which is lower than typical transparency carrier densities reported or even calculated for c-plane GaN-based LDs and comparable to typical transparency carrier densities reported for GaAs- and InP-based LDs.

  14. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez, Anamaris; Morales, Kristle; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge J.

    2009-04-01

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH3 flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  15. Clinical applications of Gallium-68.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Pomper, Martin G

    2013-06-01

    Gallium-68 is a positron-emitting radioisotope that is produced from a (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator. As such it is conveniently used, decoupling radiopharmacies from the need for a cyclotron on site. Gallium-68-labeled peptides have been recognized as a new class of radiopharmaceuticals showing fast target localization and blood clearance. (68)Ga-DOTATOC, (8)Ga-DOTATATE, (68)Ga-DOTANOC, are the most prominent radiopharmaceuticals currently in use for imaging and differentiating lesions of various somatostatin receptor subtypes, overexpressed in many neuroendocrine tumors. There has been a tremendous increase in the number of clinical studies with (68)Ga over the past few years around the world, including within the United States. An estimated ∼10,000 scans are being performed yearly in Europe at about 100 centers utilizing (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs within clinical trials. Two academic sites within the US have also begun to undertake human studies. This review will focus on the clinical experience of selected, well-established and recently applied (68)Ga-labeled imaging agents used in nuclear medicine.

  16. Influence of Metallic Indium Concentration on the Properties of Indium Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkan, N.

    2016-10-01

    Current-voltage characteristics of indium-embedded indium oxide thin films (600-850 Å), with Ag electrodes approximately 1000 Å thick, prepared by reactive evaporation of pure metallic indium in partial air pressure have been studied for substrate temperatures between 50 and 125°C. The optical properties of these films have also been investigated as a function of metallic indium concentration and substrate temperature. I-V characteristics of all the samples are non-ohmic, independent of metallic indium concentration. The conductivity of the films increases but the optical transmission decreases with increasing metallic indium concentration. Metallic indium concentration was found to be an important parameter affecting the film properties. Furthermore, two possible conduction mechanisms are proposed.

  17. Bumblebee Pupae Contain High Levels of Aluminium

    PubMed Central

    Exley, Christopher; Rotheray, Ellen; Goulson, David

    2015-01-01

    The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD) value of 51.0 (33.0) μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer’s disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline. PMID:26042788

  18. Bumblebee pupae contain high levels of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Rotheray, Ellen; Goulson, David

    2015-01-01

    The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD) value of 51.0 (33.0) μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer's disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline.

  19. The surface tension of liquid gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The surface tension of liquid gallium has been measured using the sessile drop technique in an Auger spectrometer. The experimental method is described. The surface tension in mJ/sq m is found to decrease linearly with increasing temperature and may be represented as 708-0.66(T-29.8), where T is the temperature in centigrade. This result is of interest because gallium has been suggested as a model fluid for Marangoni flow experiments. In addition, the surface tension is of technological significance in the processing of compound semiconductors involving gallium.

  20. Status of gallium-67 in tumor detector

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, P.

    1980-04-01

    The efficacy of gallium-67 citrate in detecting specific tumors is discussed. Tumors in which gallium-67 imaging is useful as a diagnostic tool include Hodgkin's disease, histiocystic lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, hepatoma melanoma, and leukemia. It has not been found to be effective in diagnosing head and neck tumors, gastrointestinal tumors, genitourinary tract tumors, breast tumors, and pediatric tumors. Gallium may be useful in the evaluation of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, testicular carcinoma, mesothelioma, and carcinoma of the lung. It may also be useful for determining response to treatment and prognosis in some neoplasms.

  1. Recycling process for recovery of gallium from GaN an e-waste of LED industry through ball milling, annealing and leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, Basudev Mishra, Chinmayee; Kang, Leeseung; Park, Kyung-Soo Lee, Chan Gi; Hong, Hyun Seon

    2015-04-15

    Waste dust generated during manufacturing of LED contains significant amounts of gallium and indium, needs suitable treatment and can be an important resource for recovery. The LED industry waste dust contains primarily gallium as GaN. Leaching followed by purification technology is the green and clean technology. To develop treatment and recycling technology of these GaN bearing e-waste, leaching is the primary stage. In our current investigation possible process for treatment and quantitative leaching of gallium and indium from the GaN bearing e-waste or waste of LED industry dust has been developed. To recycle the waste and quantitative leaching of gallium, two different process flow sheets have been proposed. In one, process first the GaN of the waste the LED industry dust was leached at the optimum condition. Subsequently, the leach residue was mixed with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, ball milled followed by annealing, again leached to recover gallium. In the second process, the waste LED industry dust was mixed with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, after ball milling and annealing, followed acidic leaching. Without pretreatment, the gallium leaching was only 4.91 w/w % using 4 M HCl, 100 °C and pulp density of 20 g/L. After mechano-chemical processing, both these processes achieved 73.68 w/w % of gallium leaching at their optimum condition. The developed process can treat and recycle any e-waste containing GaN through ball milling, annealing and leaching. - Highlights: • Simplest process for treatment of GaN an LED industry waste developed. • The process developed recovers gallium from waste LED waste dust. • Thermal analysis and phase properties of GaN to Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and GaN to NaGaO{sub 2} revealed. • Solid-state chemistry involved in this process reported. • Quantitative leaching of the GaN was achieved.

  2. Process for Patterning Indium for Bump Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denis, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    An innovation was created for the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor for integration of low-temperature detector chips with a silicon backshort and a silicon photonic choke through flipchip bonding. Indium bumps are typically patterned using liftoff processes, which require thick resist. In some applications, it is necessary to locate the bumps close to high-aspect-ratio structures such as wafer through-holes. In those cases, liftoff processes are challenging, and require complicated and time-consuming spray coating technology if the high-aspect-ratio structures are delineated prior to the indium bump process. Alternatively, processing the indium bumps first is limited by compatibility of the indium with subsequent processing. The present invention allows for locating bumps arbitrarily close to multiple-level high-aspect-ratio structures, and for indium bumps to be formed without liftoff resist. The process uses the poor step coverage of indium deposited on a silicon wafer that has been previously etched to delineate the location of the indium bumps. The silicon pattern can be processed through standard lithography prior to adding the high-aspect-ratio structures. Typically, high-aspectratio structures require a thick resist layer so this layer can easily cover the silicon topography. For multiple levels of topography, the silicon can be easily conformally coated through standard processes. A blanket layer of indium is then deposited onto the full wafer; bump bonding only occurs at the high points of the topography.

  3. Occupational Exposure to Indium of Indium Smelter Workers.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun Guang; Wang, Huan Qiang; Song, Han Bo; Li, Zhi Hui; Li, Xiao Ping; Ye, Shao Se; Zhang, Fu Gang; Cui, Shi Wei; Yan, Hui Fang; Li, Tao

    2016-05-01

    Case reports of indium-related lung disease in workers have raised public concern to the human toxicity of indium (In) and its compounds. However, studies evaluating the exposure or health of workers in In smelting plants are rare. Therefore, in this study, we focused on four In smelting plants, with the main objective of characterizing In in smelter plants in China and discussing the potential exposure biomarkers of In exposure. We recruited 494 subjectsat four In smelting plants in China. Personal air samples, first morning urine and spot blood samples were collected. In concentrations in samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In concentrations in air samples did not exceed the permissible concentration-time weighed average, but the smelter workers had a higher internal exposure to In. Positive correlations were observed between the air In and urine In concentrations, and between the air In and blood In concentrations. This study provides basic data for the following In exposure and health risk assessment.

  4. Survey of the market, supply, and availability of gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Rosi, F.D.

    1980-01-01

    The present and potential availability of gallium metal in connection with materials evaluation recommendations for satellite power systems is examined in the following areas: (1) market considerations - the present and emerging uses of gallium, as well as the consumption and price of gallium; (2) supply considerations - present sources of gallium, commercial and new methods for extracting gallium from bauxite, and summary comments; (3) methods for purifying gallium to satisfy market demands; (4) principal suppliers of gallium; and (5) gallium availability from bauxite on the basis of primary aluminum production; and bauxite production, reserves and resources. The study was based on published information as well as information derived from private communications with both major and potential suppliers and users of gallium, and with staff members at the Bureau of Mines. 16 references, 3 figures, 6 tables.

  5. Radiochemical separation of gallium by amalgam exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruch, R.R.

    1969-01-01

    An amalgam-exchange separation of radioactive gallium from a number of interfering radioisotopes has been developed. A dilute (ca. 0.3%) gallium amalgam is agitated with a slightly acidic solution of 72Ga3+ containing concentrations of sodium thiocyanate and either perchlorate or chloride. The amalgam is then removed and the radioactive gallium stripped by agitation with dilute nitric acid. The combined exchange yield of the perchlorate-thiocyanate system is 90??4% and that of the chloride-thiocyanate system is 75??4%. Decontamination yields of most of the 11 interfering isotopes studied were less than 0.02%. The technique is applicable for use with activation analysis for the determination of trace amounts of gallium. ?? 1969.

  6. Materials synthesis: Two-dimensional gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koratkar, Nikhil A.

    2016-11-01

    Graphene is used as a capping sheet to synthesize 2D gallium nitride by means of migration-enhanced encapsulation growth. This technique may allow the stabilization of 2D materials that are not amenable to synthesis by traditional methods.

  7. Generator for gallium-68 and compositions obtained therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Neirinckx, Rudi D.; Davis, Michael A.

    1981-01-01

    A generator for obtaining radioactive gallium-68 from germanium-68 bound in a resin containing unsubstituted phenolic hydroxyl groups. The germanium-68 is loaded into the resin from an aqueous solution of the germanium-68. A physiologically acceptable solution of gallium-68 having an activity of 0.1 to 50 millicuries per milliliter of gallium-68 solution is obtained. The solution is obtained from the bound germanium-68 which forms gallium-68 in situ by eluting the column with a hydrochloric acid solution to form an acidic solution of gallium-68. The acidic solution of gallium-68 can be neutralized.

  8. Metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy of indium phosphide and related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gangyi

    The surface chemistry of indium phosphide and related compound semiconductors during metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) has been investigated. In particular, the group V precursor chemistry, indium phosphide (001) atomic structure and the InP oxidation process have been examined. The properties of the semiconductors were studied using infrared spectroscopy, molecular cluster calculations, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflectance difference spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Indium phosphide, gallium arsenide phosphide, and aluminum indium phosphide have been deposited by MOVPE using tertiarybutylphosphine and tertiarybutylarsine. Minimum incorporation in InP was observed at 565°C and a V/III ratio of 32. In this case, the material contained a background carrier concentration of 2.7 x 1014 cm-3, and the Hall mobilities were 4,970 and 135,000 cm2/V·s at 300 and 77 K. The oxygen contamination in AlInP was found to be only 9.0 x 10 15 cm-3 for deposition at 650°C and a V/III ratio of 35. The relative distribution of arsenic to phosphorus in GaAs yP1-y was determined at temperatures between 525 and 575°C. The distribution coefficient [(NAs/ NP)film/(PTBAs /PTBP)gas] ranged from 25.4 to 8.4, and exhibited an Arrhenius relationship with an apparent activation energy of 1.2 eV. The surface structure of the indium phosphide (001)-(2 x 1) reconstruction has been clarified in this thesis. Infrared spectra collected during atomic deuterium titration of the (2 x 1) surface revealed a sharp P-H stretching mode at 2308 cm-1. Based on theoretical cluster calculations using density functional theory, this mode was due to a single hydrogen atom bonded to one end of a buckled phosphorus dimer. These results confirmed that the (2 x 1) structure was stabilized by hydrogen. Indium phosphide oxidation has been found to be an activated process and strongly structure sensitive. The In-rich (2 x 4) surface reacted with oxygen at 300 K and

  9. Aluminium in foodstuffs and diets in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Jorhem, L; Haegglund, G

    1992-01-01

    The levels of aluminium have been determined in a number of individual foodstuffs on the Swedish market and in 24 h duplicate diets collected by women living in the Stockholm area. The results show that the levels in most foods are very low and that the level in vegetables can vary by a factor 10. Beverages from aluminium cans were found to have aluminium levels not markedly different from those in glass bottles. Based on the results of the analysis of individual foods, the average Swedish daily diet was calculated to contain about 0.6 mg aluminium, whereas the mean content of the collected duplicate diets was 13 mg. A cake made from a mix containing aluminium phosphate in the baking soda was identified as the most important contributor of aluminium to the duplicate diets. Tea and aluminium utensils were estimated to increase the aluminium content of the diets by approximately 4 and 2 mg/day, respectively. The results also indicate that a considerable amount of aluminium must be introduced from other sources.

  10. Gallium poisoning: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Ivanoff, Chris S; Ivanoff, Athena E; Hottel, Timothy L

    2012-02-01

    The authors present a case of a college student who suffered acute gallium poisoning as a result of accidental exposure to gallium halide complexes. This is extremely rare and has never been reported in the literature. Acute symptoms after the incident, which initially presented as dermatitis and appeared relatively not life-threatening, rapidly progressed to dangerous episodes of tachycardia, tremors, dyspnea, vertigo, and unexpected black-outs. Had there been effective emergency medical care protocols, diagnostic testing, treatment and antidotes, the latent manifestations of irreversible cardiomyopathy may have been prevented. Given how quickly exposure led to morbidity, this article aims to raise an awareness of the toxic potential of gallium. This has particular relevance for workers involved in the production of semiconductors where there is a potential for accidental exposure to gallium by-products during device processing. It may also have implications for dentists who use gallium alloys to replace mercury containing amalgam. In the absence of threshold limit values and exposure limits for humans, as well as emergency medical guidelines for treatment of poisoning, the case calls on the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to establish guidelines and medical management protocols specific for gallium.

  11. Gallium Arsenide wafer scale integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, J. F.; Taylor, G.; Steinvorth, R.; Donlan, B.; Bergendahl, A. S.

    1985-08-01

    Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) digital MESFET technology has recently begun to appear in the semiconductor marketplace. The initial commercial offerings are at the small to medium scale integration levels. The high speed of these parts would seem to be very attractive for designers of high performance signal processing equipment. Persistent yield problems, however, have prevented the appearance of large scale integrated circuits. As a result, intrapackage and interpackage signal propagation problems such as coupling, parasitics and delay are likely to negate much of the benefits of the fast MESFET logic devices for large systems constructed with such small scale building blocks. An early packaging concept, Wafer Scale Integration (WSI), which could possibly be used to address some of these limitations is reexamined.

  12. Gallium arsenide quantum well-based far infrared array radiometric imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, Kathrine A.; Jhabvala, Murzy D.

    1991-01-01

    We have built an array-based camera (FIRARI) for thermal imaging (lambda = 8 to 12 microns). FIRARI uses a square format 128 by 128 element array of aluminum gallium arsenide quantum well detectors that are indium bump bonded to a high capacity silicon multiplexer. The quantum well detectors offer good responsivity along with high response and noise uniformity, resulting in excellent thermal images without compensation for variation in pixel response. A noise equivalent temperature difference of 0.02 K at a scene temperature of 290 K was achieved with the array operating at 60 K. FIRARI demonstrated that AlGaAS quantum well detector technology can provide large format arrays with performance superior to mercury cadmium telluride at far less cost.

  13. Gallium Nitride Nanowires and Heterostructures: Toward Color-Tunable and White-Light Sources.

    PubMed

    Kuykendall, Tevye R; Schwartzberg, Adam M; Aloni, Shaul

    2015-10-14

    Gallium-nitride-based light-emitting diodes have enabled the commercialization of efficient solid-state lighting devices. Nonplanar nanomaterial architectures, such as nanowires and nanowire-based heterostructures, have the potential to significantly improve the performance of light-emitting devices through defect reduction, strain relaxation, and increased junction area. In addition, relaxation of internal strain caused by indium incorporation will facilitate pushing the emission wavelength into the red. This could eliminate inefficient phosphor conversion and enable color-tunable emission or white-light emission by combining blue, green, and red sources. Utilizing the waveguiding modes of the individual nanowires will further enhance light emission, and the properties of photonic structures formed by nanowire arrays can be implemented to improve light extraction. Recent advances in synthetic methods leading to better control over GaN and InGaN nanowire synthesis are described along with new concept devices leading to efficient white-light emission.

  14. Indium-111 chloride imaging in patients with suspected abscesses: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Sayle, B.A.; Balachandran, S.; Rogers, C.A.

    1983-12-01

    Two hundred and fifty-eight patients with clinically suspected inflammatory processes were studied. Seventy-two images were categorized as true positive; 211 as true negative. There were nine false-positive studies, four of which were due to activity in beds of excised organs. There were six false-negative studies, four of which were due to walled-off abscesses found either at surgery or biopsy. The sensitivity was 92%, the specificity 95%, and the accuracy 94%. This study shows that indium-111 chloride imaging provides a reliable way to locate inflammatory processes and overcomes the disadvantages of other imaging agents, for example gastrointestinal activity or the demonstration of healing surgical wounds with gallium-67, and the false-positive images due to cystic fibrosis and other respiratory diseases, or accessory spleens as seen with In-111-labeled white cells.

  15. A customizable commercial miniaturized 320×256 indium gallium arsenide shortwave infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Che; O'Grady, Matthew; Groppe, Joseph V.; Ettenberg, Martin H.; Brubaker, Robert M.

    2004-10-01

    The design and performance of a commercial short-wave-infrared (SWIR) InGaAs microcamera engine is presented. The 0.9-to-1.7 micron SWIR imaging system consists of a room-temperature-TEC-stabilized, 320x256 (25 μm pitch) InGaAs focal plane array (FPA) and a high-performance, highly customizable image-processing set of electronics. The detectivity, D*, of the system is greater than 1013 cm-√Hz/W at 1.55 μm, and this sensitivity may be adjusted in real-time over 100 dB. It features snapshot-mode integration with a minimum exposure time of 130 μs. The digital video processor provides real time pixel-to-pixel, 2-point dark-current subtraction and non-uniformity compensation along with defective-pixel substitution. Other features include automatic gain control (AGC), gamma correction, 7 preset configurations, adjustable exposure time, external triggering, and windowing. The windowing feature is highly flexible; the region of interest (ROI) may be placed anywhere on the imager and can be varied at will. Windowing allows for high-speed readout enabling such applications as target acquisition and tracking; for example, a 32x32 ROI window may be read out at over 3500 frames per second (fps). Output video is provided as EIA170-compatible analog, or as 12-bit CameraLink-compatible digital. All the above features are accomplished in a small volume < 28 cm3, weight < 70 g, and with low power consumption < 1.3 W at room temperature using this new microcamera engine. Video processing is based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) platform with a soft-embedded processor that allows for ease of integration/addition of customer-specific algorithms, processes, or design requirements. The camera was developed with the high-performance, space-restricted, power-conscious application in mind, such as robotic or UAV deployment.

  16. Design and Optimization of Copper Indium Gallium Selenide Thin Film Solar Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    7 1. Solar Spectrum and Wavelength Energy ....................................7 2. Photogeneration of Electron Hole Pairs...Expeditionary Energy Office GREENS Ground Renewable Expeditionary Energy System NPS Naval Postgraduate School SPACES Solar Portable Alternative...choice for an alternate energy source, as illustrated by the map in Figure 1. Figure 1. Global resource map showing solar intensity, from [4

  17. The application of the photoacoustic transmittance oscillations for determining elastic constants in gallium and indium selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Ch.; Segura, A.; Andrés, M. V.; Muñoz, V.; Pellicer, J.

    1996-03-01

    Transmittance periodic oscillations are observed in GaSe and InSe on excitation with optical pulses. Such oscillations are explained in terms of photoacoustic generation of dilatational waves, which become resonant within the crystal. Spectral analysis of those oscillations in samples of different thickness has led to an accurate determination of the longitudinal acoustic-wave velocity along the crystallographic axis c.

  18. Studies of High Performance Indium Gallium Arsenide Metal-Semiconductor Photodiodes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to achieve high speed and high responsivity metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodiodes, which includes material growth, device design, fabrication, and testing. Liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth were used to grow high purity InGaAs layers. To obtain high purity InGaAs layers, rare-earth elements (Yb, Ga, and Er) were used during LPE growth. The rare-earth elements react strongly with donor impurities to purify the epitaxial layers, resulting in higher mobility, lower carrier concentration, and higher photoluminescence efficiency in the rare-earth doped melt grown InGaAs layer. Unfortunately, rare-earth elements have high impurity levels and hardly interact with acceptor impurities; thus, causing undesired deep levels. Both abrupt and digital superlattice InAlAs barrier enhancement InGaAs MSM photodiodes were grown by MBE. To improve the photoresponsivity, a transparent conductive material, cadmium tin oxide (CTO) was used as the MSM contacts. The CTO functions as a Schottky contact, an optical window and an anti-reflection coating. The Schottky barrier height, which is vitally important for MSM photodiodes, was studied with CTO, ITO, Au, Ti, and Pt on InAlAs using the Norde method. The CTO MSM photodiodes showed a factor of almost two improvement in responsivity over conventional Ti/Au MSM photodiodes. Abrupt barrier enhancement MSM photodiodes using CTO and Ti/Au electrodes demonstrated 3-dB bandwidths of 0.3 and 0.8 GHz, respectively. However, digital grading of the heterojunction facilitated better carrier extraction resulting in increased bandwidths of 1.3 and 7.1 GHz, respectively, for CTO and Ti/Au. It was demonstrated that CTO possesses a low resistivity, high transparency, and good Schottky barrier height, which makes CTO a very attractive transparent conductor suitable for optoelectronic applications. Lastly, four novel structures were proposed to improve the responsivity and the bandwidth of conventional MSM photodiodes.

  19. Temperature and baric dependence of nuclear quadruple resonance spectra in indium and gallium monoselenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandozhko, Victor; Raranskii, Nikolai; Balazjuk, Vitaly; Samila, Andriy; Kovalyuk, Zahar

    2013-12-01

    Pulsed radiospectroscopy method has been used to study nuclear quadruple resonance (NQR) spectra of 69Ga and 115In isotopes in the layered semiconductors GaSe and InSe. It has been found that in GaSe and InSe there is a considerable temperature dependence of NQR frequency which in the temperature range of 250 to 390 K is practically linear with conversion slope 1.54 kHz/degree for 69Ga and 2.35 kHz/degree for 115In. In the same crystals the effect of uniaxial pressure on NQR spectra applied along the optical axis с up to the values of 500 kg/сm2 has been studied. A strong attenuation of NQR spectra intensity with increase in pressure on layered crystal package has been established. The unvaried multiplicity of resonance spectra indicates the absence of structural transformations in these layered crystals over the investigated range of temperatures and pressures.

  20. Synthesis of colloidal nanoscaled copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) particles for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, S H; Müller, T S; de Oliveira, P W

    2012-09-15

    In this work, Cu(In,Ga)Se(2) (CIGS) nanoparticles were synthesized using a wet chemical method. The method is based on a non-vacuum thermal process that does not use selenization. The effects of temperature, source materials, and growth conditions on the phase and particle size were investigated. X-ray diffraction results confirm the formation of a tetragonal CIGS structure as the main phase with the purity more than 99% obtained by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The morphology and size of the samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Using these methods, 20-80nm particles were obtained. Through measurements of the absorption spectra of CIGS nanoparticles, the band gap of the synthesized material was determined to be about 1.44eV, which corresponds to an acceptable wavelength region for absorber layers in solar cells.

  1. Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) photovoltaic devices made using multistep selenization of nanocrystal films.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Taylor B; Mori, Isao; Stolle, C Jackson; Bogart, Timothy D; Ostrowski, David P; Glaz, Micah S; Du, Jiang; Pernik, Douglas R; Akhavan, Vahid A; Kesrouani, Hady; Vanden Bout, David A; Korgel, Brian A

    2013-09-25

    The power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic devices made with ink-deposited Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2 (CIGS) nanocrystal layers can be enhanced by sintering the nanocrystals with a high temperature selenization process. This process, however, can be challenging to control. Here, we report that ink deposition followed by annealing under inert gas and then selenization can provide better control over CIGS nanocrystal sintering and yield generally improved device efficiency. Annealing under argon at 525 °C removes organic ligands and diffuses sodium from the underlying soda lime glass into the Mo back contact to improve the rate and quality of nanocrystal sintering during selenization at 500 °C. Shorter selenization time alleviates excessive MoSe2 formation at the Mo back contact that leads to film delamination, which in turn enables multiple cycles of nanocrystal deposition and selenization to create thicker, more uniform absorber films. Devices with power conversion efficiency greater than 7% are fabricated using the multiple step nanocrystal deposition and sintering process.

  2. First-principles study of native point defects in crystalline indium gallium zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omura, Hideyuki; Kumomi, Hideya; Nomura, Kenji; Kamiya, Toshio; Hirano, Masahiro; Hosono, Hideo

    2009-05-01

    Materials in In-Ga-Zn-O system are promising candidates for channel layers of high-performance thin-film transistors (TFTs). We investigated the atomic arrangements and the electronic structures of crystalline InGaZnO4 containing point defects such as oxygen vacancy (VO), interstitial hydrogen (Hi), and interstitial oxygen (Oi) by density functional theory (DFT) using a plane-wave pseudopotential method. The calculations for the atomic structure relaxation suggest that Hi bonds to a lattice oxygen (OO), and Oi occupies a split interstitial site [Oi(split)] forming a chemical bond with OO which is similar to O2 molecule, or Oi occupies an octahedral interstitial site [Oi(oct)]. The electronic structure calculations reveal that VO forms fully occupied states around the middle of the DFT band gap, while Hi does not form a defect level in the band gap but raises the Fermi level above the conduction band minimum. Oi(split) forms fully occupied states above the valence band maximum of the defect-free model (VBM0), while Oi(oct) forms both occupied and unoccupied states above the VBM0. It is thus suggested that VO and Oi(split) are electrically inactive for electrons but work as hole traps, Hi acts as a donor, and Oi(oct) is electrically active, trapping both electrons and holes. These observations imply that VO and Oi(split) do not but Hi and Oi(oct) influence electrical properties of the n-channel TFTs based on the In-Ga-Zn-O semiconductor materials.

  3. Power Recovery of Radiation-Damaged Gallium Arsenide and Indium Phosphide Solar Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    maximum power. Annealing with heat at 90 C and a forward bias current of 0.25 A/cm 2 in darkness for 16.5 hours was applied to cells numbered 1073 -1074...1053, 1073 and 1074 were irradiated at 1E15 electrons/cm2 and annealed for 15, 30, 60, 75 and 120 minutes. The results are illustrated in Figures C.4...confirmed when cells numbered 1051, 1053, 1073 and 1074 were irradiated under AMO conditions. The results are illustrated in Figures C.6, C.14, C.30

  4. Characterization of Thermal and Photo-Enhanced Remote Plasma Etching of Gallium Arsenide and Indium Phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lishan, David George

    The desire to shrink dimensions and improve performance of devices has focused attention on fabrication processes that induce a minimum of material damage. A technique which accomplishes this goal involves the utilization of remote plasma etching. In this work, the design of a flexible, high vacuum, remote plasma dry etch processing chamber with multiple in situ analytical capabilities is described. With this new chamber, a systematic study of temperature and flux dependence using hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine (Cl_2) to etch GaAs and InP is performed. Reactant flux limited etching was observed using HCl. These results agree qualitatively with thermodynamic predictions and provide a more complete understanding of reactant flux and product desorption dynamics. Along with the insight into the mechanisms associated with halogen etching of III-V materials, the control, low damage, and material selectivity aspects of remote plasma etching are discussed using as examples, photochemical enhanced etching, fabrication of quantum wires, and in situ real time current monitoring.

  5. Gate Last Indium-Gallium-Arsenide MOSFETs with Regrown Source-Drain Regions and ALD Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Andrew Daniel

    III-V-based MOSFETs have the potential to exceed the performance of silicon-based MOSFETs due to the semiconductor's small electron effective mass. Modern silicon-based MOSFETs with 22 nm gate lengths utilize high-k gate insulators and non-planar device geometries to optimize device performance. III-V HEMT technology has achieved similar gate lengths, but large source-drain access resistances and the lack of high-quality gate insulators prevent further device performance scaling. Sub-22 nm gate length III-V MOSFETs require metal-semiconductor contact resistivity to be less than 1 ohm-micron squared, gate insulators with less than 1 nm effective oxide thickness, and semiconductor-insulator interface trap densities less than 2E12 per square centimeter per electron volt. This dissertation presents InGaAs-based III-V MOSFET process flows and device results to assess their use in VLSI circuits. Previous III-V MOSFET results focused on long (>100 nm) gate lengths and ion implantation for source-drain region formation. Scaling III-V MOSFETs to shorter gate lengths requires source-drain regions that have low sheet resistance, high mobile charge densities, and low metal-semiconductor contact resistance. MBE- and MOCVD-based raised epitaxial source-drain regrowth meet these requirements. MBE InAs source-drain regrowth samples have shown 0.5 to 2 ohm-micron squared metal semiconductor contact resistivities. MOCVD InGaAs source-drain regrowth samples have shown < 100 ohm-micron single-sided access resistance to InGaAs MOSFETs. Gate insulators on III-V materials require large conduction band offsets to the channel, high dielectric permittivities, and low semiconductor-insulator interface trap densities. An in-situ hydrogen plasma / trimethylaluminum treatment has been developed to lower the gate semiconductor-insulator interface trap density. This treatment, done immediately before gate insulator deposition, has been shown to lower MOS capacitor interface trap densities by more than a factor of two. Devices using gate-first MBE regrowth, gate-last MBE regrowth, and gate-last MOCVD regrowth were fabricated and resulting devices characterized. 65 nm gate length gate-first MBE regrowth devices employing a 2.2 nm EOT Al 2O3 gate insulator show peak transconductances of 0.3 mS/micron at 1 V Vds. Gate-first FET performance scaling is limited by processed-induced damage and ungated access regions. 64 nm gate length gate-last MBE regrowth devices employing a 1.21 nm EOT Al2O 3 / HfO2 bi-layer gate insulator show peak transconductances of 1.4 mS/micron at 0.5 V Vds. Other gate-last MBE samples had long channel subthreshold swings as low as 117 mV/dec. 48 nm gate length gate-last MOCVD MOSFETs employing a 0.8 nm EOT HfO2 gate insulator and digital channel etching show peak transconductances of 2 mS/micron at 0.5 V Vds, with long channel devices having 97 mV/dec subthreshold swing.

  6. Electric Field-aided Selective Activation for Indium-Gallium-Zinc-Oxide Thin Film Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heesoo; Chang, Ki Soo; Tak, Young Jun; Jung, Tae Soo; Park, Jeong Woo; Kim, Won-Gi; Chung, Jusung; Jeong, Chan Bae; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2016-01-01

    A new technique is proposed for the activation of low temperature amorphous InGaZnO thin film transistor (a-IGZO TFT) backplanes through application of a bias voltage and annealing at 130 °C simultaneously. In this ‘electrical activation’, the effects of annealing under bias are selectively focused in the channel region. Therefore, electrical activation can be an effective method for lower backplane processing temperatures from 280 °C to 130 °C. Devices fabricated with this method exhibit equivalent electrical properties to those of conventionally-fabricated samples. These results are analyzed electrically and thermodynamically using infrared microthermography. Various bias voltages are applied to the gate, source, and drain electrodes while samples are annealed at 130 °C for 1 hour. Without conventional high temperature annealing or electrical activation, current-voltage curves do not show transfer characteristics. However, electrically activated a-IGZO TFTs show superior electrical characteristics, comparable to the reference TFTs annealed at 280 °C for 1 hour. This effect is a result of the lower activation energy, and efficient transfer of electrical and thermal energy to a-IGZO TFTs. With this approach, superior low-temperature a-IGZO TFTs are fabricated successfully. PMID:27725695

  7. Optical and Electrical Characterization of Bulk Grown Indium-Gallium-Arsenide Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    expression y x zE v B , where yE , referred to as the Hall field, balances the Lorentz force once the system reaches equilibrium. This equation can be...samples emitted radiation in infrared spectral bands subject to atmospheric absorption. To overcome this absorption, the path from the sample to...laser lines while others were non- lasing infrared plasma lines from the argon ion laser. In most cases these emissions were easily distinguishable

  8. GALLIUM INDIUM ARSENIDE PHOSPHIDE (GaxIn1-xASyP1-y)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Yu. A.; Shmidt, Natalya M.

    The following sections are included: * Basic Parameters at 300 K * Basic Properties of GaxIn1-xASyP1-y Compositions Lattice-Matched to InP at 300 K(x≅0.47y) * Band Structure and Carrier Concentration * Temperature Dependences * Dependence on Hydrostatic Pressure * Band Discontinuities at GaInAsP/InP Heterostructure * Effective Masses * Donors and Acceptors * Electrical Properties * Mobility and Hall Effect * Transport Properties in High Electric Field * Impact Ionization * Recombination Parameters * Optical Properties * Thermal Properties * Mechanical Properties, Elastic Constants, Lattice Vibrations, Other Properties * References

  9. Radiation Effects in ALUMINUM(X)GALLIUM(1-X)ARSENIDE and Indium-Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, T. A.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Radiation effects in Al_{ rm x}Ga_{rm 1-x}As and InP produced by hydrogen ion bombardment have been studied using mainly electrical resistivity measurements and thermal annealing techniques. Multiple energy ion bombardments at 400 keV to 100 keV were used in most experiments at beam power densities of below 100 mW cm^{-2}. Two terminal, through layer, resistivity measurements were made on Al_{rm x}Ga _{rm 1-x}As:Se with Al mole fraction, x, from 0 (GaAs) to 0.82. In all cases, a maximum resistivity of 1E8 to 1E10 ohm cm was achieved with proton or deuteron bombardment. As x is increased from 0 the resistivity maximum rises gradually from 1E8 to 1E10 ohm cm at x = 0.45 and then gently falls. This behaviour has been explained by considering a single deep level with an activation energy which varies with x in a similar manner to that of the shallow donor levels in Al_{rm x}Ga _{rm 1-x}As. Using an interdigital contact geometry, the first in-situ measurements of the change in Al_ {rm x}Ga_{rm 1-x}As resistivity with ion dose have been made. This has enabled repeated irradiation-measurement cycles, resulting in a rapid determination of the resistivity behaviour and a more accurate measurement of the optimum ion dose for maximum resistivity. The observed anomalously efficient carrier removal of deuterons in GaAs:Si has not been observed in any GaAs:Se or Al_{rm x}Ga _{rm 1-x}As:Se. Proton bombardment is less efficient in GaAs:Si than in GaAs:Se, perhaps due to a parasitic interaction of the protons with the silicon donor species. The thermal stability of the isolation in Al _{rm x}Ga_ {rm 1-x}As:Se, over the whole composition range, appears to be suitable for device applications if post-implant process steps are kept below 400^ circC. Whilst the isolation in InP was observed to be stable to up to 300^circC, some indications of room temperature annealing were noted. The electrical properties of proton and deuteron bombarded material appear to be closely similar. However, preliminary Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) and optical absorption measurements on Al_{rm x}Ga_{rm 1-x} As samples have indicated differences. RBS has shown the level of disorder introduced by deuteron bombardments to be slightly higher than expected compared with proton bombardments. Optical absorption has shown the optical activity of the deuteron induced damage to be more intense. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  10. GALLIUM INDIUM ARSENIDE ANTIMONIDE (GaxIn1-xASySb1-y)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailova, Maya P.

    The following sections are included: * Basic Parameters at 300 K * Basic Properties of GaxIn1-xASySb1-y Compositions Lattice-Matched to GaSb * Basic Properties of GaxIn1-xASySb1-y Compositions Lattice-Matched to InAs * Band Structure and Carrier Concentration * Temperature Dependences * Band Discontinuities at GaInAsSb/GaSb and GaInAsSb/InAs Heterojunctions * Effective Masses * Donors and Acceptors * Electrical Properties * Mobility and Hall Effect * Impact Ionization * Optical Properties * Thermal Properties * Mechanical Properties, Elastic Constants, Lattice Vibrations, Other Properties * References

  11. Thermoelectric Properties of Indium and Gallium Dually Doped ZnO Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Tran Nguyen, Nhat Hong; Nguyen, Truong Huu; Liu, Yi-Ren; Aminzare, Masoud; Pham, Anh Tuan Thanh; Cho, Sunglae; Wong, Deniz P; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Seetawan, Tosawat; Pham, Ngoc Kim; Ta, Hanh Kieu Thi; Tran, Vinh Cao; Phan, Thang Bach

    2016-12-14

    We investigated the effect of single and multidopants on the thermoelectrical properties of host ZnO films. Incorporation of the single dopant Ga in the ZnO films improved the conductivity and mobility but lowered the Seebeck coefficient. Dual Ga- and In-doped ZnO thin films show slightly decreased electrical conductivity but improved Seebeck coefficient. The variation of thermoelectric properties is discussed in terms of film crystallinity, which is subject to the dopants' radius. Small amounts of In dopants with a large radius may introduce localized regions in the host film, affecting the thermoelectric properties. Consequently, a 1.5 times increase in power factor, three times reduction in thermal conductivity, and 5-fold enhancement in the figure of merit ZT have been achieved at 110 °C. The results also indicate that the balanced control of both electron and lattice thermal conductivities through dopant selection are necessary to attain low total thermal conductivity.

  12. Efficiency droop in indium gallium nitride light emitters: An introduction to photon quenching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkissian, Raymond

    This thesis contains work from two separate projects, a study of the efficiency of light emitting diodes, and a tapered-fiber approach to photonic crystal integrated photonics. The first part of this thesis describes an experimental investigation of the quantum efficiency of InGaN-based light emitters. Blue and Green LEDs that utilize InGaN quantum wells for their active medium suffer from a reduction in efficiency with increasing bias. This phenomenon is called efficiency droop. In this thesis experimental evidence for significant quenching of photon population in InGaN is presented and its relevance to the efficiency droop problem in InGaN-based light emitting structures is discussed. An equilibrium rate equation model is set up to demonstrate that radiative efficiency for this loss mechanism not only has a similar dependence on carrier density as Auger recombination process, but it also possesses the right order of magnitude making it difficult to distinguish between the two and possibly leading to errors in interpretation. The impact of photon quenching processes on device performance is emphasized by demonstrating loss of efficiency for spectral regions where there is experimental evidence for photon quenching. We have observed this phenomenon for both c-plane and m-plane light emitting structures. Both structures exhibit droop-like behavior for spectral regions where there is evidence for photon quenching. We have also observed and characterized the dynamical Stark effect for an m-plane light emitter considered in this manuscript. Our results revealed localization centers with a corresponding band-edge energy of 388nm and an excitonic binding energy of 17.81mev. Furthermore, fabrication of a photonic crystal waveguide fiber taper coupler is demonstrated with a peak coupling efficiency of 97 %. All four ports of the device are accessible providing an opportunity for investigation of simultaneous interaction of different light sources inside the photonic crystal cavity. A numerical model is set forth to analyze such devices with an excellent agreement with the experimental data. One important result of that theory is the ability to experimentally extract the phase contribution of optical resonators that employ periodic structures such as photonic crystal cavities. This device has also been used to demonstrate all-optical nonlinear shift and bleaching of cavity resonances via non-degenerate two photon absorption, non-degenerate Kerr mechanism, free carrier absorption, and free carrier plasma effects. As the response time of two photon processes are very fast, about 10 fs, this device can be used in ultrafast low energy all optical switching applications.

  13. Type-II indium arsenide/gallium antimonide superlattices for infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, Hooman

    In this work, the unique properties of type-II InAs/GaSb heterojunctions were utilized for the realization of novel infrared photodetectors with higher operating temperature, detectivity and uniformity than the commonly available infrared detectors. This effort was concentrated on two major devices: uncooled infrared detectors in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) range, and cooled devices in the very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) range. Uncooled infrared (IR) detectors are required for low-cost, lightweight sensor systems that have many industrial and medical applications. Commercially available uncooled IR sensors use ferroelectric or microbolometer detectors. These sensors are inherently slow and cannot detect rapid signal changes needed for high-speed infrared systems. Some of the applications which require a fast detector (tau < 30 msec) are: freespace communication, active infrared countermeasure, non-invasive medical monitoring, and LIDARs. Although photon detectors have frequency responses in the megahertz range, their high temperature detectivity is severely degraded due to high Auger recombination rates. Bandgap engineering was used in order to suppress Auger recombination at room temperature in type-II superlattices. Our experimental results demonstrated nearly one order of magnitude lower Auger recombination rate at room temperature in these type-II superlattices compared to typical intrinsic detectors, such as HgCdTe, with similar bandgap. Uncooled detectors based on the engineered superlattices showed a detectivity of 1.3 x 108g cmHz 1/2/W at 11 Et m, which is comparable to microbolometers. However, the measured response time of the detectors was more than five orders of magnitude faster than microbolometers. In parallel, devices for operation in the VLWIR were developed. High-performance infrared detectors with cutoff wavelength above 14 mum are highly needed for many space-based applications. Commonly used detectors are extrinsic silicon and HgCdTe. However, the former has to be cooled below 10K, and the latter do not have good uniformity in the VLWIR range. We demonstrated high-performance type-II superlattice photodiodes with cutoff wavelength up to 25 mum and excellent bandgap uniformity over a three-inch wafer area. Devices with a 50% cutoff wavelength of 16 mum showed a nearly 50% internal quantum efficiency and background limited infrared photodetector (BLIP) performance at T = 60 K for the first time.

  14. Development of a Free Carrier Absorption Measurement Instrument for Indium Phosphide and Gallium Arsenide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-27

    precision pinholes. Any crystalline attenuators tried (Ge and Si and CdTe and CdS ) were extremely sensitive to temperature, mechanical vibrations, and...LI TY DATE- 10/22/86 TIME- 12s32PM ..MATERIAL- CdS -j DE86016-03-20 LOT*- DE86016-03-20 THICKNESS .055 cm Contacts - In Temp- 296 K I I.O000E-03 Amps cD ...MOBILITY DATE- 10/22/86 TIME- 12s41PM i .. MATERIAL- CdS -D Us.- LOT#- DM86197-23-09 .: THICKNESS- .055 cm Contacts - In Temp- 296 K ii I- 1.OOOE-04

  15. Defect States in Copper Indium Gallium Selenide Solar Cells from Two-Wavelength Excitation Photoluminescence Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Soren A.; Dippo, Patricia; Mansfield, Lorelle M.; Glynn, Stephen; Kuciauskas, Darius

    2016-11-21

    We use two-wavelength excitation photoluminescence spectroscopy to probe defect states in CIGS thin films. Above-Eg excitation is combined with a tunable IR bias light that modulates the population of the defect states. We find that IR illumination in the range of 1400-2000 nm (0.62-0.89 eV) causes a reduction of the PL intensity, the magnitude of which scales linearly with IR power. Further, KF post deposition treatment has only a modest influence on the effect of the IR excitation. Initial data suggest that we have developed an optical characterization tool for band-gap defect states.

  16. Copper indium gallium (di)selenide: Electronic activities of grain boundaries and solar cell fabrication studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkan, Mehmet Eray

    This dissertation is composed of three studies related to chalcopyrite solar cells. The first study is on electronic activities of grain boundaries (GBs) in CuInSe2 (CIS). Despite being polycrystalline, chalcopyrite thin film solar cells have reached record power conversion efficiencies. This is against the classical understanding on the effect of GBs in semiconductor materials. Because GBs are expected to be recombination centers and barriers against the carrier flow, reducing the device efficiency. Therefore, a complete understanding on the electronic behavior of chalcopyrite GBs is missing. Moreover, the high efficiency chalcopyrite solar cells are grown with Na impurities which positively affect the performance of the solar cell, so-called sodium effect. Research on chalcopyrite GBs has been coupled with the effect of Na impurities, because Na has been found segregated at the GBs. The study presented in this dissertation was performed on GBs in a Na-free CIS. It is important to study the GBs in a Na-free chalcopyrite to avoid any uncontrolled effects of Na segregation at the GBs, for instance a possible Na-related secondary phase formation which would affect the conclusions drawn on the natural behavior of chalcopyrite GBs. In addition, it is known that Sigma3 GBs in chalcopyrite solar cells are abundant; therefore, it is meaningful to investigate the differences between Sigma3 and non-Sigma3 GBs. For this purpose, Sigma3, close to Sigma3 and Sigma9 GBs in a Bridgman-grown multicrystalline Na-free CIS wafer were identified by electron backscatter diffraction and their electronic properties were investigated by Kelvin probe force microscope and cathodoluminescence in scanning electron microscope. It is shown that the Sigma3 GB is neutral and it does not behave as a recombination center, whereas once the geometry of a GB deviates from the Sigma3 geometry, such as close to Sigma3 and Sigma9 GBs, the GB becomes charged and behaves as a recombination center. This result was concluded to be due to the increase in the amount of defects at the GB that introduce midgap states as the Sigma value increases. Our results indicate that the surprising high performance seen in the polycrystalline chalcopyrite solar cells is possibly due to the abundance of electrically inactive Sigma3 GBs in this material. To investigate the effect of Na on CIS GBs, projected work includes the characterization of Sigma3 and non-Sigma3 GBs in CIS wafers grown with increasing Na concentration. Consequently, it will be possible to answer the following questions on the impact of sodium-effect on GBs: Is there a certain Na concentration for Na to affect the GB electrical properties and how does it affect both Sigma3 and non-Sigma3 GBs? In the second study, the use of selenoamide instead of direct use of H2Se for atmospheric pressure selenization reaction is proposed and its feasibility is shown by fabricating CIS solar cells with up to 1.6% power conversion efficiency. In addition, observed In and Ga segregation towards the bottom of the CIS and CIGS thin films, respectively, are investigated through phase transformations occurring during the selenization and systematically designed annealing processes. The third study is on the effect of flow type on the growth kinetics of CdS thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition. CdS thin films are deposited on glass substrates under turbulent and laminar flow conditions only by changing the substrate's alignment with respect to the bottom of the beaker in unstirred bath. It is shown that the flow condition of the bath does not change the optical and structural properties of CdS; however, deposition under laminar flow is explained to be diffusion-limited, whereas it is feed-limited under turbulent flow.

  17. Gallium-doped indium oxide nanoleaves: Structural characterization, growth mechanism and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lizhu; Chen, Yiqing; Guo, Linliang; Guo, Taibo; Zhu, Yunqing; Su, Yong; Jia, Chong; Wei, Meiqin; Cheng, Yinfen

    2011-11-01

    The novel two-dimensional (2-D) Ga-doped In2O3 nanoleaves are synthesized by a simple one-step carbonthermal evaporation method using Cu-Sn alloy as the substrates. Two basic parts construct this leaf-like nanostructure: a long central trunk and two tapered nanoribbons in symmetric distribution in relation to the trunk. The Ga-In-O alloy particles are located at or close to the tips of the central trunks and serve as catalysts for the central trunk growth by the self-catalytic vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. And the homoepitaxial growth of tapered nanoribbon on the surface of the central trunk can be explained by vapor-solid (VS) mechanism. The room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurement of this nanoscaled Ga-doped In2O3 transparent conducting oxide (TCO) detected two blue peaks located at 432 nm and 481 nm, respectively, which can be used by Ru-based dye and indicates potential application in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The successful preparation of this novel 2-D Ga-doped In2O3 nanoleaves not only enriches the synthesis of TCO materials, but also provides new blocks in future architecture of functional nano-devices.

  18. Electric Field-aided Selective Activation for Indium-Gallium-Zinc-Oxide Thin Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Heesoo; Chang, Ki Soo; Tak, Young Jun; Jung, Tae Soo; Park, Jeong Woo; Kim, Won-Gi; Chung, Jusung; Jeong, Chan Bae; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2016-10-01

    A new technique is proposed for the activation of low temperature amorphous InGaZnO thin film transistor (a-IGZO TFT) backplanes through application of a bias voltage and annealing at 130 °C simultaneously. In this ‘electrical activation’, the effects of annealing under bias are selectively focused in the channel region. Therefore, electrical activation can be an effective method for lower backplane processing temperatures from 280 °C to 130 °C. Devices fabricated with this method exhibit equivalent electrical properties to those of conventionally-fabricated samples. These results are analyzed electrically and thermodynamically using infrared microthermography. Various bias voltages are applied to the gate, source, and drain electrodes while samples are annealed at 130 °C for 1 hour. Without conventional high temperature annealing or electrical activation, current-voltage curves do not show transfer characteristics. However, electrically activated a-IGZO TFTs show superior electrical characteristics, comparable to the reference TFTs annealed at 280 °C for 1 hour. This effect is a result of the lower activation energy, and efficient transfer of electrical and thermal energy to a-IGZO TFTs. With this approach, superior low-temperature a-IGZO TFTs are fabricated successfully.

  19. Radiation and temperature effects in gallium arsenide, indium phosphide and silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Statler, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of radiation on performance are determined for both n(+)p and p(+)n GaAs and InP cells and for silicon n(+)p cells. It is found that the radiation resistance of InP is greater than that of both GaAs and Si under 1 MeV electron irradiation. For silicon, the observed decreased radiation resistance with decreased resistivity is attributed to the presence of a radiation induced boron-oxygen defect. Comparison of radiation damage in both p(+)n and n(+)p GaAs cells yields a decreased radiation resistance for the n(+)p cell attributable to increased series resistance, decreased shunt resistance, and relatively greater losses in the cell's p-region. For InP, the n(+)p configuration is found to have greater radiation resistance than the p(+)n cell. The increased loss in this latter cell is attributed to losses in the cell's emitter region. Temperature dependency results are interpreted using a theoretical relation for dVoc/cT which predicts that increased Voc should results in decreased numerical values for dPm/dT. The predicted correlation is observed for GaAs but not for InP a result which is attributed to variations in cell processing.

  20. Radiation and temperature effects in gallium arsenide, indium phosphide, and silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Statler, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of radiation on performance are determined for both n+p and p+n GaAs and InP cells and for silicon n+p cells. It is found that the radiation resistance of InP is greater than that of both GaAs and Si under 1-MeV electron irradiation. For silicon, the observed decreased radiation resistance with decreased resistivity is attributed to the presence of a radiation-induced boron-oxygen defect. Comparison of radiation damage in both p+n and n+p GaAs cells yields a decreased radiation resistance for the n+p cell attributable to increased series resistance, decreased shunt resistance, and relatively greater losses in the cell's p-region. For InP, the n+p configuration is found to have greater radiation resistance than the p+n cell. The increased loss in this latter cell is attributed to losses in the cell's emitter region. Temperature dependency results are interpreted using a theoretical relation for dVoc/dT, which predicts that increased Voc should result in decreased numerical values for dPm/dT. The predicted correlation is observed for GaAs but not for InP, a result which is attributed to variations in cell processing.

  1. Surface reconstructions and morphology of indium gallium arsenide compound semiconductor alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riposan, Alexandru

    Lattice-matched In0.53Ga0.47As/InP(001) and compressively strained In0.27Ga0.73As/GaAs(001) and In0.81Ga 0.19As/InP(001) compound semiconductor layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and analyzed by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and ex-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Regular (4x3) and irregular (nx3) alloy reconstructions were observed at all compositions. In addition, the strained surfaces contain alpha2(2x4) and beta2(2x4) reconstructions at the lower and higher In compositions, respectively. New models were proposed for the (4x3) reconstruction, which are consistent with the experimental results and obey the electron counting rule. In these models, the (4x3) reconstruction is As-rich, but contains As-metal heterodimers, in addition to As dimers and metal dimers. These models can also be used to compose disordered (nx3) surfaces while still obeying the electron counting rule. The experiments suggest that the (2x4) reconstructions are favored by compressive misfit strain and are enriched in In compared with the (4x3)/(nx3) reconstructions. At moderate misfit strains and temperatures, the critical film thickness for three-dimensional (3D) growth is increased by increasing the As overpressure during film deposition. This effect provides an additional method to control the transition to 3D growth and has applications in device fabrication. Large 3D islands form during the annealing of planar pseudomorphic In 0.27Ga0.73As/GaAs films, and later disappear with continuing annealing. These islands are different from those formed during film deposition. The formation of these features is strain-driven, while their dissolution is triggered by In desorption. A step instability was also observed during annealing at this composition, consisting in the cusping of step edges and the formation of surface pits and step bunches. The driving force for this instability is likely the creation of new step line due to the compressive strain, through step undulation due to the large step separation. The nucleation of 3D pits during the growth of In0.27Ga 0.73As/GaAs compressively strained films is a localized phenomenon, occurring only in the proximity of 3D islands and at small island separation. The nucleation of pits in these regions was attributed to a reduced critical pit size, as a result of the overlapping strain fields of 3D islands and a reduced adatom density between islands.

  2. Investigations of surface reconstructions and inverse Stranski Krastanov growth in indium gallium arsenide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Lee E.

    Understanding surface reconstructions is an important aspect of controlling the structure of epitaxially grown III-V compound semiconductors. Ternary alloys such as InxGa1-xAs are important components of many electronic and optical devices and a parameter that is critical to the growth of these high quality devices is the presence of abrupt heterointerfaces. As the final microstructures impact the performance of optoelectronic devices, it is important to understand why and under what conditions the reconstructions that initiate these structures form. Understanding the conditions under which these reconstruction domains form, and controlling their shape and size could provide another reliable method of forming spontaneous nanoscale assemblies. The ultimate goal of my research is to develop a quantitative understanding of the connection between surface reconstructions on In0.81Ga 0.19As/InP and film thickness, surface energy, growth conditions, and surface morphology. The individual objectives of this work are to: (1) Understand under which conditions multiple surface reconstructions coexist and the role of thermodynamics. (2) Examine how growth conditions and material properties influence the surface reconstructions that appear for In0.81Ga 0.19As ternary alloys. (3) Look at the relationship between surface reconstructions and film morphology. The combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth is a necessary component of this research because the experimentation tools available on the MBE system allows for the examination of the surface structure during and after growth via reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The availability of an in vacuo STM allows the observation of the surface reconstructions prior to the formation of an oxide layer. Combining these two techniques allows for a better understanding between the growth procedure of the sample and the presence of surface reconstructions.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of 8-(dimethylamino)-1-naphthyl derivatives of aluminum, gallium, and indium.

    PubMed

    Hair, G S; Battle, S L; Decken, A; Cowley, A H; Jones, R A

    2000-01-10

    The group 13 dichlorides of formula Ar'MCl2 [Ar' = 8-(dimethylamino)-1-naphthyl (8-(Me2N)C10H6)], M = Al (1), Ga (2), and In (3), have been prepared via the salt elimination reaction of 1 equiv of Ar'Li with MCl3 in toluene solution at -78 degrees C. The reaction of 1 with LiAlH4 in diethyl ether solution at -78 degrees C produced the dihydride [Ar'AlH2]2 (4). The X-ray crystal structures of 1-4 have been determined and show that 1 and 2 are monomeric while 3 and 4 are dimeric in the solid state. The reaction of 1 with RLi in toluene solution at -78 degrees C results in ligand redistribution and formation of Ar'2AlR (R = Me (5), t-Bu (6)). The chloride analogue of 5 and 6, Ar'2AlCl (7), can be prepared directly from the reaction of 2 equiv of Ar'Li with AlCl3 in toluene solution at -78 degrees C. The homoleptic derivative Ar'3Al (8) was obtained when 3 equiv of Ar'Li was employed. Crystal data for 1: monoclinic, space group P2(1), a = 6.534(1) A, b = 10.801(1) A, c = 9.631(2) A, beta = 105.57(2) degrees, V = 654.8(2) A3, Z = 2, R = 0.0453. Crystal data for 2: monoclinic, space group P2(1), a = 6.552(2) A, b = 10.833(2) A, c = 9.601(2) A, beta = 106.05(2) degrees, V = 654.9(3) A3, Z = 2, R = 0.0609. Crystal data for 3: monoclinic, space group P2(1)/c, a = 7.401(2) A, b = 15.746 A, c = 10.801(4) A, beta = 92.37(3) degrees, V = 1257.6(7) A3, Z = 2, R = 0.0712. Crystal data for 4: monoclinic, space group P2(1)/c, a = 13.343(2) A, b = 11.228(2) A, c = 7.505(1) A, beta = 100.64(1) degrees, V = 1105.0(4) A3, Z = 4, R = 0.0560.

  4. Design and Optimization of Copper Indium Gallium Selenide Solar Cells for Lightweight Battlefield Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. IRB Protocol number ____N...Matrix Flatpanel Displays and Devices, Kyoto , Japan, 2012, pp. 67–70. [23] R. Yang, Z. Bai, D. Wang, and D. Wang, “High efficient thin film CdTe solar

  5. Anticipated performance of copper(indium,gallium)diselenide solar cells in the thin-film limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevce, Ana

    Thin-film solar cells are an excellent candidate for clean energy production, but the knowledge of device physics is still incomplete, especially in the low thickness limit. The goal of this work is to enhance the understanding of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells with submicron absorbers, which would lead to significantly lower production cost. The material usage and the deposition time can be significantly decreased, if the thickness could be reduced without significant efficiency loss. The main focus of this work is on GIGS cells with thin absorbers; (1) influence of parameter variation on device performance; (2) sensitivity to nonuniformities in key parameters, (3) potential of illumination from both sides of the cell, and (4) role of the buffer layer. As the cells become thinner, the distance between the back contact and the electric-field region narrows, or completely disappears. One of the main differences between thick and thin cells is the significance of back-contact recombination in thinner cells. A choice of the back-contact material or increased Ga towards the back are needed to avoid losses. In thin cells, there is a concern of increased sensitivity to nonuniformities. Fluctuations in defect density, band gap, thickness or doping affect the voltage. The low voltage area then influences the nonuniform cell performance. Thinner cells are more sensitive to thickness nonuniformities and therefore deposition methods that produce smooth absorbers are desirable for thin devices. In ultra-thin cells illumination from the back side can yield a significant output performance. If certain optimization steps are taken, the back side performance can approach that of the front side. In the case of a back-illuminated cell, the carrier generation occurs in the bulk, making it critical to lower back-contact recombination, as well as to provide good collection. Illumination with only low energy photons in cells with the commonly used CdS buffer layer causes distortion in the current-voltage curves. The difference in distortion for thin and thick devices is studied, as well as some CdS alternatives, such as CdZnS, that has a potential for efficiencies higher than 20%.

  6. Thermochemistry and phase diagram studies in the copper(indium,gallium)selenium system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ider, Muhsin

    Polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and related semiconductors show great potential as alternative materials in production of high efficiency solar cells. This dissertation reports the experimental determination of Gibbs energy changes and phase diagram calculations for selected sections of the Cu-Ga-In-Se system. The Gibbs energy changes were measured with solid-state electrochemical cells and this data along with selected literature data were assessed and model parameters suggested. The homogeneity range of beta-Cu2-xSe was measured by coulometric titration and the thermodynamic properties for defect species estimated. The composition difference between the Se-rich and the Cu-rich boundaries was measured at 900K. A defect model was developed based on vacancy formation on the Cu sublattice. The gas phase equilibrium data for Cu-Se system and the results of a recent assessment of selenium unary system were used to predict defect concentrations. A thermodynamic description of the Cu2Se-In2Se 3 was obtained by optimization of the available phase equilibrium and thermodynamic information along with the direct results of EMF experiments. The Gibbs energy of formation of alpha-CuInSe2 was directly measured by a solid oxide galvanic cell experiment. The transformation enthalpy and Gibbs energy data for CuIn3Se5 and CuIn5Se 8 were estimated. The Redlich-Kister model with a 3-coefficient expression was employed to define the Gibbs energy of the liquid phase. The intermediate beta-CuIn 3Se5 and gamma-CuIn5Se8 phases were modeled with a 2-coefficient expansion of the Redlich-Kister model. The alpha and delta modifications of CuInSe2 phases were modeled with a specific sublattice model. A reasonable agreement between the model calculated values and the thermodynamic phase equilibrium data was achieved. The thermochemistry and phase diagram of GaSe system was critically studied. The activity of Ga was measured along the liquidus between 800--1000K. Selected invariant phase transition temperatures were measured and transition enthalpies were calculated from the EMF measurements. A self-consistent thermodynamic data was obtained. The associated and sublattice models were used to represent the Gibbs energy of the liquid and alpha-Ga2Se3 phases, respectively. The Gibbs energy of formation of CuGaSe2 was measured by an EMT experiment. The phase diagram of Cu-Ga system was calculated and the liquid phase Ga activity measurements was measured for 2 Ga rich compositions.

  7. Solid Phase Extraction and Preconcentration of Trace Gallium, Indium, and Thallium Using New Modified Amino Silica.

    PubMed

    Hassanien, Mohamed M; Mortada, Wael I; Kenawy, Ibrahim M; El-Daly, Heba

    2017-02-01

    Amino silica gel functionalized with 2-hydroxy-5 -(2-hydroxybenzylideneamino)benzoic acid was synthesized, characterized and used as adsorbent for the removal of Ga(3+), In(3+) and Tl(3+) from aqueous solution prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Experimental parameters that affect the separation process were investigated in both batch and column modes. The maximum adsorption capacities of the sorbent are 61.7 mg g(-1), 81.3 mg g(-1) and 133.0 mg g(-1) for Ga(3+), In(3+) and Tl(3+), respectively. The preconcentration factor is 200 and the limits of detection of Ga(3+), In(3+) and Tl(3+) are 4.10 μg L(-1), 1.55 μg L(-1) and 1.21 μg L(-1), respectively. Interference by Al(3+) can be masked by the addition of F(-); and that of Fe(3+) by its reduction to Fe(2+) using 10% ascorbic acid. The method was successfully applied for the determination of these ions in water, sediments and liquid crystal display samples.

  8. Characterization and modeling of tensil-strained gallium arsenide/indium aluminum arsenic quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingru

    This dissertation intended to provide a foundation for the development of electroabsorptive quantum well devices based on tensile strained GaAs/InAlAs double quantum well (DQW) structures which, in turn, provide polarization insensitivity in the optical response. The effects of structural parameters and electric field on eigenstates and optical properties were examined experimentally and theoretically. A self-consistent analysis program was developed for this study. Samples used in this work were grown by solid-source MBE. The in-situ calibration of alloy composition and growth rate by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) was compared with ex-situ characterization techniques including double-crystal X-ray diffractometry (DCXD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Quantum confinement effects, coupling effects, and strain effects on carrier eigenstates and interband transitions were investigated by low temperature photoluminescence (PL) and theoretical analysis. Depending on the amount of tensile strain and quantum confinement, electron-light hole transitions can be brought to the absorption edge, which is desired for achieving polarization independence in quantum well structures. Compared to single quantum well structures, the uniqueness of DQWs lies in the interaction of eigenstates in different wells through a finite potential barrier. Energy band diagrams, eigenstates, and absorption coefficients were examined theoretically as a function of electric field applied perpendicularly to the quantum well layers of tensile strained GaAs/InAlAs DQWs with various doping profiles (n-i-n and p-i-n). Low temperature PL measurements were performed on these samples under various bias conditions. It was shown that as far as polarization independence is concerned, the coupled DQW may provide some advantages over the single well. A self-consistent analysis program for tensile strained GaAs/InAlAs DQWs was developed to deal with the quasi-static condition of quantum well structures of interest. The one-dimensional Poisson and Schrodinger equations were solved self-consistently but decoupled from other device equations such as the continuity equations. The eigenstates in DQW structures were analyzed within the framework of the Bastard envelope function approximation using the transfer matrix method (TMM). The solution of Poisson's equation was obtained using a Jacobi-Newton iterator. The self-consistent solutions of eigenstates were then used to calculate the absorption of coupled quantum wells with exciton effects included. Four energy bands were included in the model, i.e.-Gamma band, X band, hh band and lh band. Fermi-Dirac statistics were used to describe the distribution of carriers. Constant quasi-Fermi potential were assumed for electrons and hole as the current flow was neglected. The same band offsets as those used in the Schrodinger equation were applied in Poisson's equation instead of using the electron affinity of the local material. The electron affinity rule is widely adopted by other models and simulators but does not match with experimental results.

  9. Surface preparation for ALD of High-k dielectrics on indium gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melitz, Wilhelm

    The key for a successful gate-first process is when subsequent processing steps cannot degrade the semiconductor, the dielectric, or the oxide-semiconductor interfaces. For silicon, the only commercial ALD high-k fabrication process, which avoids processing induced damage, is a replacement gate process (a type of gate-last process). While preparing silicon for gate-last processing is straightforward, the key to a gate-last process for III-V semiconductors is the order and cleanliness of the III-V channel prior to dielectric deposition. Aggressive oxide thickness reduction (equivalent oxide thickness, or EOT, scaling) is needed to fabricate small gate length devices with small subthreshold swings. Furthermore, aggressive EOT scaling requires a very high uniform ALD nucleation density, with no pinholes due to surface contaminants. The key barrier to solving a very practical problem is a surface chemistry challenge: develop a chemical process which removes nearly all air induced defects and contaminants and leaves the III-V surface flat and electrically active for high nucleation density ALD gate oxide deposition, which unpins the Fermi level. The following study uses scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) to observe the removal of the oxide layer and restoration of the clean InGaAs surface reconstruction with atomic hydrogen cleaning, allowing for a gate-last or replacement-gate process. Along with surface cleaning STM and STS was used to characterize the initial passivation of InGaAs surfaces via ALD of trimethyl aluminum (TMA). The substrate temperature and initial surface reconstruction was critical to forming an unpinned passivation layer with a high nucleation density. A method was developed to use Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) as a tool for insightful feedback on the electrostatics of scaled MOSFET devices. KPFM is a unique technique for providing two-dimensional potential profiles inside a working device. A procedure is described to obtain high-resolution KPFM results on ultra-high vacuum (UHV) cleaved III-V MOSCAPs.

  10. Control of gallium incorporation in sol–gel derived CuIn{sub (1−x)}Ga{sub x}S{sub 2} thin films for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bourlier, Yoan; Cristini Robbe, Odile; Lethien, Christophe; and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • CuIn{sub (1−x)}Ga{sub x}S{sub 2} thin films were prepared by sol–gel process. • Evolution of lattice parameters is characteristic of a solid solution. • Optical band gap was found to be linearly dependent on the gallium rate. - Abstract: In this paper, we report the elaboration of Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2} chalcopyrite thin films via a sol–gel process. To reach this aim, solutions containing copper, indium and gallium complexes were prepared. These solutions were thereafter spin-coated onto the soda lime glass substrates and calcined, leading to metallic oxides thin films. Expected chalcopyrite films were finally obtained by sulfurization of oxides layers using a sulfur atmosphere at 500 °C. The rate of gallium incorporation was studied both at the solutions synthesis step and at the thin films sulfurization process. Elemental and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses have shown the efficiency of monoethanolamine used as a complexing agent for the preparation of CuIn{sub (1−x)}Ga{sub x}S{sub 2} thin layers. Moreover, the replacement of diethanolamine by monoethanolamine has permitted the substitution of indium by isovalent gallium from x = 0 to x = 0.4 and prevented the precipitation of copper derivatives. XRD analyses of sulfurized thin films CuIn{sub (1−x)}Ga{sub x}S{sub 2,} clearly indicated that the increasing rate of gallium induced a shift of XRD peaks, revealing an evolution of the lattice parameter in the chalcopyrite structure. These results were confirmed by Raman analyses. Moreover, the optical band gap was also found to be linearly dependent upon the gallium rate incorporated within the thin films: it varies from 1.47 eV for x = 0 to 1.63 eV for x = 0.4.

  11. Window structure for passivating solar cells based on gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Allen M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Passivated gallium arsenide solar photovoltaic cells with high resistance to moisture and oxygen are provided by means of a gallium arsenide phosphide window graded through its thickness from arsenic rich to phosphorus rich.

  12. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 alleviates aluminium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Leilei; Zhai, Qixiao; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhao, Jianxin; Narbad, Arjan; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Fengwei; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Aluminium (Al) is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. Al exposure can cause a variety of adverse physiological effects in humans and animals. Our aim was to demonstrate that specific probiotic bacteria can play a special physiologically functional role in protection against Al toxicity in mice. Thirty strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were tested for their aluminium-binding ability, aluminium tolerance, their antioxidative capacity, and their ability to survive the exposure to artificial gastrointestinal (GI) juices. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 was selected for animal experiments because of its excellent performance in vitro. Forty mice were divided into four groups: control, Al only, Al plus CCFM639, and Al plus deferiprone (DFP). CCFM639 was administered at 10(9) CFU once daily for 10 days, followed by a single oral dose of aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 5.14 mg aluminium (LD50) for each mouse. The results showed that CCFM639 treatment led to a significant reduction in the mortality rates with corresponding decrease in intestinal aluminium absorption and in accumulation of aluminium in the tissues and amelioration of hepatic histopathological damage. This probiotic treatment also resulted in alleviation of hepatic, renal, and cerebral oxidative stress. The treatment of L. plantarum CCFM639 has potential as a therapeutic dietary strategy against acute aluminium toxicity.

  13. High aluminium content of infant milk formulas.

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, R; Hams, G; Meerkin, M; Rosenberg, A R

    1986-01-01

    The aluminium content of several commercially available infant milk formulas was measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Results were compared with those for fresh breast milk, cow's milk, and local tap water. Differences in aluminium concentration of greater than 150-fold were found, with the lowest concentrations in breast milk. PMID:3767424

  14. Mineral resource of the month: indium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tolcin, Amy C.

    2011-01-01

    Geologically, the occurrence of indium minerals is rare. The element most often occurs as a sulfide inclusion or substitutes in other base-metal minerals, including cassiterite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and stannite. Indium’s abundance in the crust is estimated to be 0.05 parts per million, which makes it more abundant than silver, but it is so widely disseminated that it does not occur in high enough concentrations to form mineable deposits. Therefore, indium is most often recovered from byproduct residues produced during the refining of lead and zinc. But only about one-quarter of the indium mined worldwide is refined into metal, as many indium-bearing concentrates are sent to refineries that do not have the capability of recovering the metal.

  15. Correction: Ambient temperature deposition of gallium nitride/gallium oxynitride from a deep eutectic electrolyte, under potential control.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sujoy; Sampath, S

    2016-05-28

    Correction for 'Ambient temperature deposition of gallium nitride/gallium oxynitride from a deep eutectic electrolyte, under potential control' by Sujoy Sarkar et al., Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 6407-6410.

  16. Aluminium Diphosphamethanides: Hidden Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    PubMed

    Styra, Steffen; Radius, Michael; Moos, Eric; Bihlmeier, Angela; Breher, Frank

    2016-07-04

    The synthesis and characterisation of two aluminium diphosphamethanide complexes, [Al(tBu)2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (3) and [Al(C6 F5 )2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (4), and the silylated analogue, Mes*PCHP(SiMe3 )Mes* (5), are reported. The aluminium complexes feature four-membered PCPAl core structures consisting of diphosphaallyl ligands. The silylated phosphine 5 was found to be a valuable precursor for the synthesis of 4 as it cleanly reacts with the diaryl aluminium chloride [(C6 F5 )2 AlCl]2 . The aluminium complex 3 reacts with molecular dihydrogen at room temperature under formation of the acyclic σ(2) λ(3) ,σ(3) λ(3) -diphosphine Mes*PCHP(H)Mes* and the corresponding dialkyl aluminium hydride [tBu2 AlH]3 . Thus, 3 belongs to the family of so-called hidden frustrated Lewis pairs.

  17. Indium Single-Ion Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagourney, Warren

    2001-01-01

    A single laser-cooled indium ion is a promising candidate for an ultimate resolution optical time or frequency standard. It can be shown that single ions from group IIIA of the periodic table (indium, thallium, etc.) can have extremely small systematic errors. In addition to being free from Doppler, transit-time and collisional shifts, these ions are also quite insensitive to perturbations from ambient magnetic and electric fields (mainly due to the use of a J=0-0 transition for spectroscopy). Of all group IIIA ions, indium seems to be the most practical, since it is heavy enough to have a tolerable intercombination cooling transition rate and (unlike thallium) has transitions which are easily accessible with frequency multiplied continuous-wave lasers. A single indium ion standard has a potential inaccuracy of one part in 10(exp 18) for integration times of 10(exp 6) seconds. We have made substantial progress during the grant period in constructing a frequency standard based upon a single indium ion. At the beginning of the grant period, single indium ions were being successfully trapped, but the lasers and optical systems were inadequate to achieve the desired goal. We have considerably improved the stability of the dye laser used to cool the ions and locked it to a molecular resonance line, making it possible to observe stable cooling-line fluorescence from a single indium ion for reasonable periods of time, as required by the demands of precision spectroscopy. We have substantially improved the single-ion fluorescence signal with significant benefits for the detection efficiency of forbidden transitions using the 'shelving' technique. Finally, we have constructed a compact, efficient UV 'clock' laser and observed 'clock' transitions in single indium ions using this laser system. We will elaborate on these accomplishments.

  18. Pressure-induced decomposition of indium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Gurlo, Aleksander; Dzivenko, Dmytro; Andrade, Miria; Riedel, Ralf; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim

    2010-09-15

    A static pressure-induced decomposition of indium hydroxide into metallic indium that takes place at ambient temperature is reported. The lattice parameter of c-In(OH)(3) decreased upon compression from 7.977(2) to approximately 7.45 A at 34 GPa, corresponding to a decrease in specific volume of approximately 18%. Fitting the second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state to the obtained compression data gave a bulk modulus of 99 +/- 3 GPa for c-In(OH)(3). The c-In(OH)(3) crystals with a size of approximately 100 nm are comminuted upon compression, as indicated by the grain-size reduction reflected in broadening of the diffraction reflections and the appearance of smaller (approximately 5 nm) incoherently oriented domains in TEM. The rapid decompression of compressed c-In(OH)(3) leads to partial decomposition of indium hydroxide into metallic indium, mainly as a result of localized stress gradients caused by relaxation of the highly disordered indium sublattice in indium hydroxide. This partial decomposition of indium hydroxide into metallic indium is irreversible, as confirmed by angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy imaging, Raman scattering, and FTIR spectroscopy. Recovered c-In(OH)(3) samples become completely black and nontransparent and show typical features of metals, i.e., a falling absorption in the 100-250 cm(-1) region accompanied by a featureless spectrum in the 250-2500 cm(-1) region in the Raman spectrum and Drude-like absorption of free electrons in the region of 4000-8000 cm(-1) in the FTIR spectrum. These features were not observed in the initial c-In(OH)(3), which is a typical white wide-band-gap semiconductor.

  19. Quantification of indium in steel using PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, A.; Miranda, J.; Rickards, J.; Cheang, J. C.

    1989-04-01

    The quantitative analysis of steel for endodontics tools was carried out using low-energy protons (≤ 700 keV). A computer program for a thick-target analysis which includes enhancement due to secondary fluorescence was used. In this experiment the L-lines of indium are enhanced due to the proximity of other elements' K-lines to the indium absorption edge. The results show that the ionization cross section expression employed to evaluate this magnitude is important.

  20. Gallium Zeolites for Light Paraffin Aromatization

    SciTech Connect

    Price, G.L.; Dooley, K.M.

    1999-02-10

    The primary original goal of this project was to investigate the active state of gallium-containing MFI catalysts for light paraffin aromatization, in particular the state of gallium in the active material. Our original hypothesis was that the most active and selective materials were those which contained gallium zeolitic cations, and that previously reported conditions for the activation of gallium-containing catalysts served to create these active centers. We believed that in high silica materials such as MFI, ion-exchange is most effectively accomplished with metals in their 1+ oxidation state, both because of the sparsity of the anionic ion-exchange sites associated with the zeolite, and because the large hydration shells associated with aqueous 3+ cations hinder transport. Metals such as Ga which commonly exist in higher oxidation states need to be reduced to promote ion-exchange and this is the reason that reduction of gallium-containing catalysts for light paraffin aromatization often yields a dramatic enhancement in catalytic activity. We have effectively combined reduction with ion-exchange and we term this combined process ''reductive solid-state ion-exchange''. Our hypothesis has largely been proven true, and a number of the papers we have published directly address this hypothesis.

  1. Magnesium, zinc, aluminium and gallium hydride complexes of the transition metals.

    PubMed

    Butler, Michael J; Crimmin, Mark R

    2017-01-24

    The preparation and applications of heterobimetallic complexes continue to occupy researchers in the fields of organometallic, main group, and coordination chemistry. This interest stems from the promise these complexes hold as precursors to materials, reagents in synthesis and as new catalysis. Here we survey and organise the state-of-the-art understanding of the TM-H-M linkage (M = Mg, Zn, Al, Ga). We discuss the structure and bonding in these complexes, their known reactivity, and their largely unrealised potential in catalysis.

  2. Aluminum gallium arsenide-gallium arsenide-indium gallium arsenide-indium arsenide quantum dot coupled to quantum well heterostructure lasers by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Theodore

    The Stranski-Krastanow growth mechanism of self-assembled InAs and InGaAs quantum dots on a GaAs substrate is examined. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) pictures show that the V/III ratio is the most important growth parameter in controlling the formation of three-dimensional islands, second only to the growth temperature. To adjust the arsine overpressure precisely on the epitaxial surface, a new gas switching sequence is designed and the use of hydrogen shroud flow as a means to change the surface kinetics is studied. With the new improved growth condition, InA quantum dot + quantum well lasers are demonstrated. In order to achieve lower V/III ratio in material deposition, a new arsenic bubbler source, Tertiarybutylarsine (TBA), is installed. Further experimentation shows the photoluminescence of the discrete energy transitions of a layer of InGaAs quantum dots embedded in a GaAs waveguide with a wavelength as long as 1.219 mum with the use of submonolayer cycled deposition. However, the self-annealing effect is determined to be the major factor in limiting the realization of high-quality InGaAs QD lasers. Data are presented showing that, besides the improvement in carrier collection, it is advantageous to locate strain-matching auxiliary InGaAs layers [quantum wells (QWs)] within tunneling distance of a single-quantum-dot (QD) layer of an AlGaAs-GaAs-InGaAs-InAs QD heterostructure laser to realize also smaller size QDs of greater density and uniformity. The QD density is changed from 2 x 1010/cm2 for a 50-A GaAs coupling barrier (QW to QD) to 3 x 1010/cm2 for a 5-A barrier. The improved QD density and uniformity, as well as improved carrier collection, make possible room-temperature continuous-wave (cw) QD + QW laser operation (a single InAs QD layer) at reasonable diode length (˜1 mm), current density 586 A/cm2, and wavelength 1057 nm. QW-assisted single-layer InAs QD laser, a QD + QW laser, is demonstrated that operates cw (300 K), and at diode length 150 mum in pulsed operation exhibits gain as high as ˜100 cm-1. The cw 300-K coupled InAs QD and InGaAs QW AlGaAs-GaAs-InGaA-InAs heterostructure lasers are grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition.

  3. Single gallium nitride nanowire lasers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Justin C; Choi, Heon-Jin; Knutsen, Kelly P; Schaller, Richard D; Yang, Peidong; Saykally, Richard J

    2002-10-01

    There is much current interest in the optical properties of semiconductor nanowires, because the cylindrical geometry and strong two-dimensional confinement of electrons, holes and photons make them particularly attractive as potential building blocks for nanoscale electronics and optoelectronic devices, including lasersand nonlinear optical frequency converters. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor of much practical interest, because it is widely used in electrically pumped ultraviolet-blue light-emitting diodes, lasers and photodetectors. Recent progress in microfabrication techniques has allowed stimulated emission to be observed from a variety of GaN microstructures and films. Here we report the observation of ultraviolet-blue laser action in single monocrystalline GaN nanowires, using both near-field and far-field optical microscopy to characterize the waveguide mode structure and spectral properties of the radiation at room temperature. The optical microscope images reveal radiation patterns that correlate with axial Fabry-Perot modes (Q approximately 10(3)) observed in the laser spectrum, which result from the cylindrical cavity geometry of the monocrystalline nanowires. A redshift that is strongly dependent on pump power (45 meV microJ x cm(-2)) supports the idea that the electron-hole plasma mechanism is primarily responsible for the gain at room temperature. This study is a considerable advance towards the realization of electron-injected, nanowire-based ultraviolet-blue coherent light sources.

  4. Intestinal absorption of aluminium in renal failure.

    PubMed

    Drüeke, Tilman B

    2002-01-01

    The proportion of the daily ingested aluminium that is absorbed in the intestinal tract has remained a matter of debate for many years because no reliable method of measurement was available. Studies with earlier analytic techniques reported fractional absorption of aluminium from as little as 0.001% to as much as 27% of an oral dose. Measurement of (26)Al by high-energy accelerator mass spectrometry has permitted more accurate analyses. In normal young rats, 0.05-0.1% of ingested aluminium is absorbed in the intestine, of which roughly half goes to the skeleton within 2 h, whereas the remaining half is excreted in the urine, most of it within 48 h. Deposition in organs other than the skeleton appears to be negligible. In healthy human volunteers, the most recent estimates of fractional intestinal (26)Al absorption were also in the range of 0.06-0.1%. In both rats and humans, intestinal absorption of aluminium is subject to many systemic and local factors. The latter include various compounds with which aluminium is complexed in the gut lumen, and gastric acidity. The influence of food is controversial; however, absorption appears higher in the fasted than the post-prandial state. Luminal phosphate concentration decreases aluminium absorption, whereas citrate increases it. For theoretical reasons, silicates should prevent aluminium absorption, but experimental evidence has not supported this theory. Whether water hardness affects aluminium bioavailability remains a matter of debate. General conditions may also modify aluminium absorption and deposition in bone. Examples of these general factors include the uraemic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, secondary hyperparathyroidism, vitamin D status, Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Awareness of intestinal absorption of aluminium is particularly important, given that aluminium-based binders continue to be used in uraemic patients, despite the hazards of aluminium accumulation. The lessons we have learned about

  5. Highly efficient blue organic light emitting devices with indium-free transparent anode on flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liang; Swensen, James S.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Matson, Dean W.; Bonham, Charles C.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2010-09-30

    Indium-free transparent conducting oxides may provide a lower cost solution for the transparent anode in flexible displays and energy efficient solid state lighting. We report herein a near room temperature sputtering process for generating an indium-free transparent conductive oxide (TCO) coating on a flexible substrate. Specifically, we deposited gallium-doped zinc oxide (GZO) uniformly over a 12” diameter area at room temperature on polyethylene terephthalate (PET). During deposition, the system heats to about 60oC due to the energetic sputtering conditions, without any noticeable damage to the PET substrate. The GZO films exhibit excellent physical, optical and electrical properties: roughness ~7 nm, transmittance >85% and resistivity ~ 10-3 ohm• cm. Phosphorescent blue organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) were fabricated on these substrates with comparable performance (16% external quantum efficiency and 33 lm/W power efficiency at 1mA/cm2) to that of devices fabricated on GZO (or ITO) deposited on glass substrates, suggesting flexible GZO/PET substrates may be used instead of high-cost and rigid ITO and glass for flexible displays and solid state lighting.

  6. New SMU Gallium Fixed-Point Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranostaj, Juraj; Ďuriš, Stanislav; Knorová, Renáta; Kaskötö, Mariana; Vyskočilová, Irena

    2011-08-01

    In the framework of the European research project EURAMET 732, the Slovak Institute of Metrology (SMU) built three primary gallium fixed-point cells of different designs. The cells are designed for the calibration of the long-stem SPRT. In regard to the procedure commonly used at SMU when realizing the gallium point, the cells are designed for use in a stirred liquid bath. This article provides information about the cell designs, materials used, method of filling, and results of the performed experiments. The experiments were focused on the study of the cells' metrological characteristics, some effects that could influence the melting-point temperature and the effect of the melted metal fraction on the immersion profile. New cells were compared with the SMU reference gallium cell.

  7. /sup 67/Gallium lung scans in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, M.; Feiglin, D.; Hyland, R.; Urowitz, M.B.; Shiff, B.

    1983-08-01

    /sup 67/Gallium lung scans were performed in 19 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (scleroderma). Results were expressed quantitatively as the /sup 67/Gallium Uptake Index. The mean total pulmonary /sup 67/Gallium Uptake Index in patients was significantly higher than that in controls (41 versus 25), and 4 patients (21%) fell outside the normal range. There were no clinical or laboratory variables that correlated with the /sup 56/Gallium uptake. Increased pulmonary /sup 67/Gallium uptake in scleroderma may prove useful as an index of pulmonary disease activity.

  8. Radiation damage of gallium arsenide production cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Joslin, D.; Garlick, J.; Lillington, D.; Gillanders, M.; Cavicchi, B.; Scott-Monck, J.; Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B.

    1987-01-01

    High efficiency liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) gallium arsenide cells were irradiated with 1 Mev electrons up to fluences of 1 times 10 to the 16th power cm-2. Measurements of spectral response and dark and illuminated I-V data were made at each fluence and then, using computer codes, the experimental data was fitted to gallium arsenide cell models. In this way it was possible to determine the extent of the damage, and hence damage coefficients in both the emitter and base of the cell.

  9. Investigation of the aluminium-aluminium oxide reversible transformation as observed by hot stage electron microscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, C. A.; Judd, G.; Ansell, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Thin foils of high purity aluminium and an Al-Al2O3 SAP type of alloy were oxidised in a specially designed hot stage specimen chamber in an electron microscope. Below 450 C, amorphous aluminium oxide formed on the foil surface and was first detectable at foil edges, holes, and pits. Islands of aluminium then nucleated in this amorphous oxide. The aluminium islands displayed either a lateral growth with eventual coalescence with other islands, or a reoxidation process which caused the islands to disappear. The aluminium island formation was determined to be related to the presence of the electron beam. A mechanism based upon electron charging due to the electron beam was proposed to explain the nucleation, growth, coalescence, disappearance, and geometry of the aluminium islands.

  10. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... secondary indium subcategory. 421.190 Section 421.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory § 421.190 Applicability: Description of the secondary indium... indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal...

  11. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... secondary indium subcategory. 421.190 Section 421.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory § 421.190 Applicability: Description of the secondary indium... indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal...

  12. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... secondary indium subcategory. 421.190 Section 421.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory § 421.190 Applicability: Description of the secondary indium... indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal...

  13. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary indium subcategory. 421.190 Section 421.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory § 421.190 Applicability: Description of the secondary indium... indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal...

  14. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... secondary indium subcategory. 421.190 Section 421.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory § 421.190 Applicability: Description of the secondary indium... indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal...

  15. Four Terminal Gallium Nitride MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veety, Matthew Thomas

    All reported gallium nitride (GaN) transistors to date have been three-terminal devices with source, drain, and gate electrodes. In the case of GaN MOSFETs, this leaves the bulk of the device at a floating potential which can impact device threshold voltage. In more traditional silicon-based MOSFET fabrication a bulk contact can be made on the back side of the silicon wafer. For GaN grown on sapphire substrates, however, this is not possible and an alternate, front-side bulk contact must be investigated. GaN is a III-V, wide band gap semiconductor that as promising material parameters for use in high frequency and high power applications. Possible applications are in the 1 to 10 GHz frequency band and power inverters for next generation grid solid state transformers and inverters. GaN has seen significant academic and commercial research for use in Heterojunction Field Effect Transistors (HFETs). These devices however are depletion-mode, meaning the device is considered "on" at zero gate bias. A MOSFET structure allows for enhancement mode operation, which is normally off. This mode is preferrable in high power applications as the device has lower off-state power consumption and is easier to implement in circuits. Proper surface passivation of seminconductor surface interface states is an important processing step for any device. Preliminary research on surface treatments using GaN wet etches and depletion-mode GaN devices utilizing this process are discussed. Devices pretreated with potassium pursulfate prior to gate dielectric deposition show significant device improvements. This process can be applied to any current GaN FET. Enhancement-mode GaN MOSFETs were fabricated on magnesium doped p-type Wurtzite gallium nitride grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on c-plane sapphire substrates. Devices utilized ion implant source and drain which was activated under NH3 overpressure in MOCVD. Also, devices were fabricated with a SiO2 gate dielectric

  16. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy of gallium in bladder tissue following gallium maltolate administration during urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Ball, Katherine R; Sampieri, Francesca; Chirino, Manuel; Hamilton, Don L; Blyth, Robert I R; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Dowling, Patricia M; Thompson, Julie

    2013-11-01

    A mouse model of cystitis caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli was used to study the distribution of gallium in bladder tissue following oral administration of gallium maltolate during urinary tract infection. The median concentration of gallium in homogenized bladder tissue from infected mice was 1.93 μg/g after daily administration of gallium maltolate for 5 days. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bladder sections confirmed that gallium arrived at the transitional epithelium, a potential site of uropathogenic E. coli infection. Gallium and iron were similarly but not identically distributed in the tissues, suggesting that at least some distribution mechanisms are not common between the two elements. The results of this study indicate that gallium maltolate may be a suitable candidate for further development as a novel antimicrobial therapy for urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic E. coli.

  17. Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy of Gallium in Bladder Tissue following Gallium Maltolate Administration during Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Francesca; Chirino, Manuel; Hamilton, Don L.; Blyth, Robert I. R.; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Dowling, Patricia M.; Thompson, Julie

    2013-01-01

    A mouse model of cystitis caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli was used to study the distribution of gallium in bladder tissue following oral administration of gallium maltolate during urinary tract infection. The median concentration of gallium in homogenized bladder tissue from infected mice was 1.93 μg/g after daily administration of gallium maltolate for 5 days. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bladder sections confirmed that gallium arrived at the transitional epithelium, a potential site of uropathogenic E. coli infection. Gallium and iron were similarly but not identically distributed in the tissues, suggesting that at least some distribution mechanisms are not common between the two elements. The results of this study indicate that gallium maltolate may be a suitable candidate for further development as a novel antimicrobial therapy for urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic E. coli. PMID:23877680

  18. Thermal Stability of Chelated Indium Activable Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Chrysikopoulos, Costas; Kruger, Paul

    1986-01-21

    The thermal stability of indium tracer chelated with organic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was measured for reservoir temperatures of 150, 200, and 240 C. Measurements of the soluble indium concentration was made as a function of time by neutron activation analysis. From the data, approximate thermal decomposition rates were estimated. At 150 C, both chelated tracers were stable over the experimental period of 20 days. At 200 C, the InEDTA concentration remained constant for 16 days, after which the thermal decomposition occurred at a measured rate constant of k = 0.09 d{sup -1}. The thermal decomposition of InNTA at 200 C showed a first order reaction with a measured rate constant of k = 0.16 d{sup -1}. At 240 C, both indium chelated tracers showed rapid decomposition with rate constants greater than 1.8 d{sup -1}. The data indicate that for geothermal reservoir with temperatures up to about 200 C, indium chelated tracers can be used effectively for transit times of at least 20 days. These experiments were run without reservoir rock media, and do not account for concomitant loss of indium tracer by adsorption processes.

  19. Indium: bringing liquid-crystal displays into focus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, Celestine N.

    2015-07-30

    Compared to more abundant industrial metals such as lead and zinc, information about the behavior and toxicity of indium in the environment is limited. However, many indium compounds have been proven to be toxic to animals.

  20. Indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1982-12-28

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  1. Indium adhesion provides quantitative measure of surface cleanliness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krieger, G. L.; Wilson, G. J.

    1968-01-01

    Indium tipped probe measures hydrophobic and hydrophilic contaminants on rough and smooth surfaces. The force needed to pull the indium tip, which adheres to a clean surface, away from the surface provides a quantitative measure of cleanliness.

  2. The removal of iron from molten aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Donk, H.M. van der; Nijhof, G.H.; Castelijns, C.A.M.

    1995-12-31

    In this work an overview is given about the techniques available for the removal of metallic impurities from molten aluminium. The overview is focused on the removal of iron. Also, some experimental results are given about the creation of iron-rich intermetallic compounds in an aluminium system, which are subsequently removed by gravity segregation and filtration techniques. This work is part of an ongoing research project of three major European aluminium companies who are co-operating on the subject of recycling of aluminium packaging materials recovered from household waste by means of Eddy-Current techniques. Using this technique the pick-up of some contaminating metals, particularly iron, is almost unavoidable.

  3. Novel method for joining CFRP to aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, F.; Thomy, C.; Vollertsen, F.; Schiebel, P.; Hoffmeister, C.; Herrmann, A. S.

    The current state of the art in joining of carbon-fibre reinforced composites (CFRP) to metals such as aluminium is - for the case of aircraft structures, e.g.- riveting or bolting. However, to reduce structural weight and improve structural performance, integral, load-bearing aluminium-CFRP-structures are desirable. To produce such structures, a novel joint configuration together with an appropriate thermal, laser-based joining process is suggested by the authors. In this paper, the joint configuration (based on CFRP-Ti-aluminium joints) and the laser beam conduction welding process will be presented, and first specimens obtained will be discussed with respect to their properties. It will be shown that the novel approach is in principle suitable to produce load-bearing CFRP-aluminium structures.

  4. Gallium-67 imaging in pulmonary eosinophilic granuloma

    SciTech Connect

    Makhija, M.C.; Davis, G.

    1984-03-01

    Gallium-67 citrate has been known to localize in the lungs in a variety of pulmonary diseases. Abnormal lung activity implies active underlying disease. Serial Ga-67 lung scans may be helpful when steroids are used as therapeutic agents. A case of pulmonary eosinophic granuloma is reported here with diffuse bilateral Ga-67 pulmonary activity.

  5. Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thruster Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Burton, Rodney L.; Polzin, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Discharge current, terminal voltage, and mass bit measurements are performed on a coaxial gallium electromagnetic thruster at discharge currents in the range of 7-23 kA. It is found that the mass bit varies quadratically with the discharge current which yields a constant exhaust velocity of 20 km/s. Increasing the electrode radius ratio of the thruster from to 2.6 to 3.4 increases the thruster efficiency from 21% to 30%. When operating with a central gallium anode, macroparticles are ejected at all energy levels tested. A central gallium cathode ejects macroparticles when the current density exceeds 3.7 10(exp 8) A/square m . A spatially and temporally broad spectroscopic survey in the 220-520 nm range is used to determine which species are present in the plasma. The spectra show that neutral, singly, and doubly ionized gallium species are present in the discharge, as well as annular electrode species at higher energy levels. Axial Langmuir triple probe measurements yield electron temperatures in the range of 0.8-3.8 eV and electron densities in the range of 8 x 10(exp )20 to 1.6 x 10(exp 21) m(exp -3) . Triple probe measurements suggest an exhaust plume with a divergence angle of 9 , and a completely doubly ionized plasma at the ablating thruster cathode.

  6. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  7. Solar cell with a gallium nitride electrode

    DOEpatents

    Pankove, Jacques I.

    1979-01-01

    A solar cell which comprises a body of silicon having a P-N junction therein with a transparent conducting N-type gallium nitride layer as an ohmic contact on the N-type side of the semiconductor exposed to solar radiation.

  8. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  9. Anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of gallium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pankey, T.

    1960-01-01

    The bulk magnetic susceptibilities of single gallium crystals and polycrystalline gallium spheres were measured at 25??C. The following anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibilities were found: a axis (-0.119??0. 001)??10-6 emu/g, b axis (-0.416??0.002)??10 -6 emu/g, and c axis (-0.229??0.001) emu/g. The susceptibility of the polycrystalline spheres, assumed to be the average value for the bulk susceptibility of gallium, was (-0.257??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at 25??C, and (-0.299??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at -196??C. The susceptibility of liquid gallium was (0.0031??0.001) ??10-6 emu/g at 30??C and 100??C. Rotational diagrams of the susceptibilities in the three orthogonal planes of the unit cell were not sinusoidal. The anisotropy in the single crystals was presumably caused by the partial overlap of Brillouin zone boundaries by the Fermi-energy surface. The large change in susceptibility associated with the change in state was attributed to the absence of effective mass influence in the liquid state. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  10. SPECT gallium imaging in abdominal lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Adcock, K.A.; Friefeld, G.D.; Waldron, J.A. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    A case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the abdomen studied by gallium SPECT imaging is reported. The tomographic slices accurately demonstrated the location of residual disease after chemotherapy in the region of the transverse mesocolon. Previous transmission CT had shown considerable persistent retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, but was not helpful in determining the presence of viable lymphoma.

  11. A Gallium Multiphase Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, Scott; Greeff, Carl

    2009-06-01

    A new SESAME multiphase gallium equation of state (EOS) has been developed. The equation of state includes two of the solid phases (Ga I, Ga III) and a fluid phase. The EOS includes consistent latent heat between the phases. We compare the results to the liquid Hugoniot data. We will also explore refreezing via isentropic release and compression.

  12. Gallium-positive Lyme disease myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, L.I.; Welch, P.; Fisher, N.

    1985-09-01

    In the course of a work-up for fever of unknown origin associated with intermittent arrhythmias, a gallium scan was performed which revealed diffuse myocardial uptake. The diagnosis of Lyme disease myocarditis subsequently was confirmed by serologic titers. One month following recovery from the acute illness, the abnormal myocardial uptake completely resolved.

  13. Gallium Nitride Crystals: Novel Supercapacitor Electrode Materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouzhi; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Lv, Jiaxin; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    A type of single-crystal gallium nitride mesoporous membrane is fabricated and its supercapacitor properties are demonstrated for the first time. The supercapacitors exhibit high-rate capability, stable cycling life at high rates, and ultrahigh power density. This study may expand the range of crystals as high-performance electrode materials in the field of energy storage.

  14. Development of gallium aluminum phosphide electroluminescent diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicotka, R. J.; Lorenz, M. R.; Nethercot, A. H.; Pettit, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Work done on the development of gallium aluminum phosphide alloys for electroluminescent light sources is described. The preparation of this wide band gap semiconductor alloy, its physical properties (particularly the band structure, the electrical characteristics, and the light emitting properties) and work done on the fabrication of diode structures from these alloys are broadly covered.

  15. Aluminium speciation in effluents and receiving waters.

    PubMed

    Gardner, M J; Comber, S D W

    2003-12-01

    The respective speciation of aluminium in sewage effluent and in river water receiving effluent, has been examined. Results showed that concentrations of reactive aluminium changed over a timescale of hours and were controlled predominantly by pH. A minimum concentration of reactive aluminium occurred at a pH of approximately 6.8, coinciding with the prevalence of non-reactive, insoluble Al(OH)3 species. For receiving waters of low pH value, typically < pH 5, a large proportion of the 'naturally present' aluminium can be present in a reactive form at concentrations higher than the proposed Environmental Quality Standard (EQS). Mixing of waters of this type with effluent of a higher pH value leads to the precipitation of aluminium hydroxide. Mixing of effluent of pH value in the range 7.5-8.0 with river water in the same (or slightly higher) pH range appears to result in no appreciable change in the proportion of reactive aluminium; the change in concentration tends to be related simply to dilution. On the basis of a theoretical knowledge of aluminium speciation, results obtained in this work indicate that it is possible to make predictions about the proportion of reactive aluminium present in a receiving water, based on the pH values of the effluent water mixture and the concentration in the effluent. Reasonable comparisons between measured and predicted values were obtained at higher pH values, but the relationship was less certain at pH values less than 6.5 for which levels of reactive metal tended to be higher than the quality standard value.

  16. Hydrogen chemisorption on gallium oxide polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sebastián E; Baltanás, Miguel A; Bonivardi, Adrian L

    2005-02-01

    The chemisorption of H(2) over a set of gallia polymorphs (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-Ga(2)O(3)) has been studied by temperature-programmed adsorption equilibrium and desorption (TPA and TPD, respectively) experiments, using in situ transmission infrared spectroscopy. Upon heating the gallium oxides above 500 K in 101.3 kPa of H(2), two overlapped infrared signals developed. The 2003- and 1980-cm(-1) bands were assigned to the stretching frequencies of H bonded to coordinatively unsaturated (cus) gallium cations in tetrahedral and octahedral positions [nu(Ga(t)-H) and nu(Ga(o)-H), respectively]. Irrespective to the gallium cation geometrical environment, (i) a linear relationship between the integrated intensity of the whole nu(Ga-H) infrared band versus the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of the gallia was found and (ii) TPA and TPD results revealed that molecular hydrogen is dissociatively chemisorbed on any bulk gallium oxide polymorph following two reaction pathways. An endothermal, homolytic dissociation occurs over surface cus-gallium sites at T > 450 K, giving rise to Ga-H(I) bonds. The heat and entropy of this type I hydrogen adsorption were determined by the Langmuir's adsorption model as Deltah(I) = 155 +/- 25 kJ mol(-1) and Deltas(I) = 0.27 +/- 0.11 kJ mol(-1) K(-1). In addition, another exothermic, heterolytic adsorption sets in already in the low-temperature region. This type of hydrogen chemisorption involves surface Ga-O-Ga species, originating GaO-H and Ga-H(II) bonds which can only be removed from the gallia surface after heating under evacuation at T > 650 K. The measured desorption energy of this last, second-order process was equal to 77 +/- 10 kJ mol(-1). The potential of the H(2) chemisorption as a tool to measure or estimate the specific surface area of gallia and to discern the nature and proportion of gallium cation coordination sites on the surface of bulk gallium oxides is also analyzed.

  17. Indium-111 leukocyte scanning and fracture healing

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, L.P.; Scott, A.C.; Bondurant, F.J.; Browner, B.D. )

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the specificity of indium-111 leukocyte scans for osteomyelitis when fractures are present. Midshaft tibial osteotomies were performed in 14 New Zealand white rabbits, seven of which were infected postoperatively with Staphylococcus aureus per Norden's protocol. All 14 rabbits were scanned following injection with 75 microCi of indium 111 at 72 h after osteotomy and at weekly intervals for 4 weeks. Before the rabbits were killed, the fracture sites were cultured to document the presence or absence of infection. The results of all infected osteotomy sites were positive, whereas no positive scans were found in the noninfected osteotomies. We concluded from this study that uncomplicated fracture healing does not result in a positive indium-111 leukocyte scan.

  18. Chemistry and pharmacokinetics of gallium maltolate, a compound with high oral gallium bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, L R; Tanner, T; Godfrey, C; Noll, B

    2000-01-01

    Gallium maltolate, tris(3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-onato)gallium (GaM), is an orally active gallium compound for therapeutic use. It is moderately soluble in water (10.7 +/- 0.9 mg/mL at 25 composite functionC) with an octanol partition coefficient of 0.41+/-0.08. The molecule is electrically neutral in aqueous solution at neutral pH; a dilute aqueous solution (2.5 x10-(-5) M) showed little dissociation at pH 5.5-8.0. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis found the GaM molecule to consist of three maltolate ligands bidentately bound to a central gallium atom in a propeller-like arrangement, with one of the ligands disordered in two possible orientations. The compound is orthorhombic, space group Pbca, unit cell a = 16.675(3), b = 12.034(2), c = 18.435(2) A at 158K. GaM was administered to healthy human volunteers at single doses of 100, 200, 300, and 500 mg (three subjects per dose). GaM was very well tolerated. Oral absorption of Ga into plasma was fairly rapid (absorption half life = 0.8-2.0h), with a central compartment excretion half life of 17-21h. Absorption appeared dose proportional over the dosage range studied. Estimated oral gallium bioavailability was approximately 25-57%, based on comparison with published data on intravenous gallium nitrate. Urinary Ga excretion following oral GaM administration was approximately 2% of the administered dose over 72h, in contrast to 49-94% urinary Ga excretion over 24h following i.v. gallium nitrate administration. We suggest that oral administration of GaM results in nearly all plasma gallium being bound to transferrin, whereas i.v. administration of gallium nitrate results in formation of considerable plasma gallate [Ga(OH)(4) (-)], which is rapidly excreted in the urine. These data support the continued investigation of GaM as an orally active therapeutic gallium compound.

  19. Chemistry and Pharmacokinetics of Gallium Maltolate, a Compound With High Oral Gallium Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Trevor; Godfrey, Claire; Noll, Bruce

    2000-01-01

    Gallium maltolate, tris(3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-onato)gallium (GaM), is an orally active gallium compound for therapeutic use. It is moderately soluble in water (10.7 ± 0.9 mg/mL at 25∘C) with an octanol partition coefficient of 0.41±0.08. The molecule is electrically neutral in aqueous solution at neutral pH; a dilute aqueous solution (2.5 ×10−-5 M) showed little dissociation at pH 5.5-8.0. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis found the GaM molecule to consist of three maltolate ligands bidentately bound to a central gallium atom in a propeller-like arrangement, with one of the ligands disordered in two possible orientations. The compound is orthorhombic, space group Pbca, unit cell a = 16.675(3), b = 12.034(2), c = 18.435(2) Å at 158K. GaM was administered to healthy human volunteers at single doses of 100, 200, 300, and 500 mg (three subjects per dose). GaM was very well tolerated. Oral absorption of Ga into plasma was fairly rapid (absorption half life = 0.8-2.0h), with a central compartment excretion half life of 17-21h. Absorption appeared dose proportional over the dosage range studied. Estimated oral gallium bioavailability was approximately 25-57%, based on comparison with published data on intravenous gallium nitrate. Urinary Ga excretion following oral GaM administration was approximately 2% of the administered dose over 72h, in contrast to 49-94% urinary Ga excretion over 24h following i.v. gallium nitrate administration. We suggest that oral administration of GaM results in nearly all plasma gallium being bound to transferrin, whereas i.v. administration of gallium nitrate results in formation of considerable plasma gallate [Ga(OH)4−], which is rapidly excreted in the urine. These data support the continued investigation of GaM as an orally active therapeutic gallium compound. PMID:18475921

  20. Gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Levy, P.S.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

    1988-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease, 45 patients with various glomerulopathies, excluding lupus nephritis and renal vasculitis, were studied. Persistent renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive scintigram, was graded as + (less than), ++ (equal to), and +++ (greater than) the hepatic uptake. Positive scintigrams were seen in ten of 16 cases of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, six of 11 cases of proliferative glomerulonephritis, and one case of minimal change, and one of two cases of membranous nephropathy; also in three of six cases of sickle glomerulopathy, two cases of diabetic neuropathy, one of two cases of amyloidosis, and one case of mild chronic allograft rejection. The 25 patients with positive scans were younger than the 20 with negative scans (31 +/- 12 v 42 +/- 17 years; P less than 0.01), and exhibited greater proteinuria (8.19 +/- 7.96 v 2.9 +/- 2.3 S/d; P less than 0.01) and lower serum creatinine values (2 +/- 2 v 4.1 +/- 2.8 mg/dL; P less than 0.01). The amount of proteinuria correlated directly with the intensity grade of the gallium image (P less than 0.02), but there was no correlation between the biopsy diagnosis and the outcome of the gallium scan. It was concluded that gallium scintigraphy is not useful in the differential diagnosis of the glomerular diseases under discussion. Younger patients with good renal function and heavy proteinuria are likely to have a positive renal scintigram regardless of the underlying glomerulopathy.

  1. Survey of the market, supply and availability of gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Rosi, F.D.

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the present consumption and supply of gallium, its potential availability in the satellite power system (SPS) implementation time frame, and commercial and new processing methods for increasing the production of gallium. Findings are reported in detail. The findings strongly suggest that with proper long range planning adequate gallium would be available from free-enterprise world supplies of bauxite for SPS implementation.

  2. Magnetostriction and Magnetic Heterogeneities in Iron-Gallium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-08

    REPORT Magnetostriction and Magnetic Heterogeneities in Iron-Gallium 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Iron-gallium alloys Fe1-xGax exhibit...an exceptional increase in magnetostriction with gallium content. We present small-angle neutron scattering investigations on a Fe0.81Ga0.19 single...magnetic heterogeneities in the mechanism for magnetostriction in this material. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES

  3. Surface photovoltage spectroscopy applied to gallium arsenide surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bynik, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical basis for surface photovoltage spectroscopy is outlined. Results of this technique applied to gallium arsenide surfaces, are reviewed and discussed. The results suggest that in gallium arsenide the surface voltage may be due to deep bulk impurity acceptor states that are pinned at the Fermi level at the surface. Establishment of the validity of this model will indicate the direction to proceed to increase the efficiency of gallium arsenide solar cells.

  4. Inflammatory pseudotumor: A gallium-avid mobile mesenteric mass

    SciTech Connect

    Auringer, S.T.; Scott, M.D.; Sumner, T.E. )

    1991-08-01

    An 8-yr-old boy with a 1-mo history of culture-negative fever and anemia underwent gallium, ultrasound, and computed tomography studies as part of the evaluation of a fever of unknown origin. These studies revealed a mobile gallium-avid solid abdominal mass subsequently proven to be an inflammatory pseudotumor of the mesentery, a rare benign mass. This report documents the gallium-avid nature of this rare lesion and discusses associated characteristic clinical, pathologic, and radiographic features.

  5. Gallium Nitride (GaN) High Power Electronics (FY11)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Gallium Nitride (GaN) High Power Electronics (FY11) by Kenneth A. Jones, Randy P. Tompkins, Michael A. Derenge, Kevin W. Kirchner, Iskander...Army Research Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-5903 January 2012 Gallium Nitride (GaN) High Power Electronics (FY11) Kenneth A...DSI 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gallium Nitride (GaN) High Power Electronics (FY11) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  6. Interactions of Zircaloy cladding with gallium: 1998 midyear status

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.F.; DiStefano, J.R.; Strizak, J.P.; King, J.F.; Manneschmidt, E.T.

    1998-06-01

    A program has been implemented to evaluate the effect of gallium in mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel derived from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium on Zircaloy cladding performance. The objective is to demonstrate that low levels of gallium will not compromise the performance of the MOX fuel system in a light-water reactor. The graded, four-phase experimental program was designed to evaluate the performance of prototypic Zircaloy cladding materials against (1) liquid gallium (Phase 1), (2) various concentrations of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Phase 2), (3) centrally heated surrogate fuel pellets with expected levels of gallium (Phase 3), and (4) centrally heated prototypic MOX fuel pellets (Phase 4). This status report describes the results of a series of tests for Phases 1 and 2. Three types of tests are being performed: (1) corrosion, (2) liquid metal embrittlement, and (3) corrosion-mechanical. These tests will determine corrosion mechanisms, thresholds for temperature and concentration of gallium that may delineate behavioral regimes, and changes in the mechanical properties of Zircaloy. Initial results have generally been favorable for the use of WG-MOX fuel. The MOX fuel cladding, Zircaloy, does react with gallium to form intermetallic compounds at {ge}300 C; however, this reaction is limited by the mass of gallium and is therefore not expected to be significant with a low level (parts per million) of gallium in the MOX fuel. Although continued migration of gallium into the initially formed intermetallic compound can result in large stresses that may lead to distortion, this was shown to be extremely unlikely because of the low mass of gallium or gallium oxide present and expected clad temperatures below 400 C. Furthermore, no evidence for grain boundary penetration by gallium has been observed.

  7. Interactions of zircaloy cladding with gallium -- 1997 status

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.F.; DiStefano, J.R.; King, J.F.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Strizak, J.P.

    1997-11-01

    A four phase program has been implemented to evaluate the effect of gallium in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel derived from weapons grade (WG) plutonium on Zircaloy cladding performance. The objective is to demonstrate that low levels of gallium will not compromise the performance of the MOX fuel system in LWR. This graded, four phase experimental program will evaluate the performance of prototypic Zircaloy cladding materials against: (1) liquid gallium (Phase 1), (2) various concentrations of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Phase 2), (3) centrally heated surrogate fuel pellets with expected levels of gallium (Phase 3), and (4) centrally heated prototypic MOX fuel pellets (Phase 4). This status report describes the results of an initial series of tests for phases 1 and 2. Three types of tests are being performed: (1) corrosion, (2) liquid metal embrittlement (LME), and (3) corrosion mechanical. These tests are designed to determine the corrosion mechanisms, thresholds for temperature and concentration of gallium that may delineate behavioral regimes, and changes in mechanical properties of Zircaloy. Initial results have generally been favorable for the use of WG-MOX fuel. The MOX fuel cladding, Zircaloy, does react with gallium to form intermetallic compounds at {ge} 300 C; however, this reaction is limited by the mass of gallium and is therefore not expected to be significant with a low level (in parts per million) of gallium in the MOX fuel. While continued migration of gallium into the initially formed intermetallic compound results in large stresses that can lead to distortion, this is also highly unlikely because of the low mass of gallium or gallium oxide present and expected clad temperatures below 400 C. Furthermore, no evidence for grain boundary penetration by gallium has been observed.

  8. Developmental toxicity of indium: embryotoxicity and teratogenicity in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Mikio; Usami, Makoto; Nakazawa, Ken; Arishima, Kazuyoshi; Yamamoto, Masako

    2008-12-01

    Indium, a precious metal classified in group 13 (IIIB) in the periodic table, has been used increasingly in the semiconductor industry. Because indium is a rare metal, technology for indium recycling from transparent conducting films for liquid crystal displays is desired, and its safety evaluation is becoming increasingly necessary. The developmental toxicity of indium in experimental animals was summarized. The intravenous or oral administration of indium to pregnant animals causes growth inhibition and the death of embryos in hamsters, rats, and mice. The intravenous administration of indium to pregnant animals causes embryonic or fetal malformation, mainly involving digit and tail deformities, in hamsters and rats. The oral administration of indium also induces fetal malformation in rats and rabbits, but requires higher doses. No teratogenicity has been observed in mice. Caudal hypoplasia, probably due to excessive cell loss by increased apoptosis in the tailbud, in the early postimplantation stage was considered to account for indium-induced tail malformation as a possible pathogenetic mechanism. Findings from in vitro experiments indicated that the embryotoxicity of indium could have direct effects on the conceptuses. Toxicokinetic studies showed that the embryonic exposure concentration was more critical than the exposure time regarding the embryotoxicity of indium. It is considered from these findings that the risk of the developmental toxicity of indium in humans is low, unless an accidentally high level of exposure or unknown toxic interaction occurs because of possible human exposure routes and levels (i.e. oral, very low-level exposure).

  9. Proteomic analysis of indium embryotoxicity in cultured postimplantation rat embryos.

    PubMed

    Usami, Makoto; Nakajima, Mikio; Mitsunaga, Katsuyoshi; Miyajima, Atsuko; Sunouchi, Momoko; Doi, Osamu

    2009-12-01

    Indium embryotoxicity was investigated by proteomic analysis with two-dimensional electrophoresis of rat embryos cultured from day 10.5 of gestation for 24h in the presence of 50 microM indium trichloride. In the embryo proper, indium increased quantity of several protein spots including those identified as serum albumin, phosphorylated cofilin 1, phosphorylated destrin and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. The increased serum albumin, derived from the culture medium composed of rat serum, may decrease the toxicity of indium. The increase of phosphorylated cofilin 1 might be involved in dysmorphogenicity of indium through perturbation of actin functions. In the yolk sac membrane, indium induced quantitative and qualitative changes in the protein spots. Proteins from appeared spots included stress proteins, and those from decreased or disappeared spots included serum proteins, glycolytic pathway enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, indicating yolk sac dysfunction. Thus, several candidate proteins that might be involved in indium embryotoxicity were identified.

  10. Sinterless Formation Of Contacts On Indium Phosphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1995-01-01

    Improved technique makes it possible to form low-resistivity {nearly equal to 10(Sup-6) ohm cm(Sup2)} electrical contacts on indium phosphide semiconductor devices without damaging devices. Layer of AgP2 40 Angstrom thick deposited on InP before depositing metal contact. AgP2 interlayer sharply reduces contact resistance, without need for sintering.

  11. Investigation of the formability of aluminium alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisza, M.; Budai, D.; Kovács, P. Z.; Lukács, Zs

    2016-11-01

    Aluminium alloys are more and more widely applied in car body manufacturing. Increasing the formability of aluminium alloys are one of the most relevant tasks in todays’ research topics. In this paper, the focus will be on the investigation of the formability of aluminium alloys concerning those material grades that are more widely applied in the automotive industry including the 5xxx and 6xxx aluminium alloy series. Recently, besides the cold forming of aluminium sheets the forming of aluminium alloys at elevated temperatures became a hot research topic, too. In our experimental investigations, we mostly examined the EN AW 5754 and EN AW 6082 aluminium alloys at elevated temperatures. We analysed the effect of various material and process parameters (e.g. temperature, sheet thickness) on the formability of aluminium alloys with particular emphasis on the Forming Limit Diagrams at elevated temperatures in order to find the optimum forming conditions for these alloys.

  12. Efficient water reduction with gallium phosphide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Standing, Anthony; Assali, Simone; Gao, Lu; Verheijen, Marcel A.; van Dam, Dick; Cui, Yingchao; Notten, Peter H. L.; Haverkort, Jos E. M.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from solar energy and water offers a clean and sustainable fuel option for the future. Planar III/V material systems have shown the highest efficiencies, but are expensive. By moving to the nanowire regime the demand on material quantity is reduced, and new materials can be uncovered, such as wurtzite gallium phosphide, featuring a direct bandgap. This is one of the few materials combining large solar light absorption and (close to) ideal band-edge positions for full water splitting. Here we report the photoelectrochemical reduction of water, on a p-type wurtzite gallium phosphide nanowire photocathode. By modifying geometry to reduce electrical resistance and enhance optical absorption, and modifying the surface with a multistep platinum deposition, high current densities and open circuit potentials were achieved. Our results demonstrate the capabilities of this material, even when used in such low quantities, as in nanowires.

  13. Efficient water reduction with gallium phosphide nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Standing, Anthony; Assali, Simone; Gao, Lu; Verheijen, Marcel A.; van Dam, Dick; Cui, Yingchao; Notten, Peter H. L.; Haverkort, Jos E. M.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from solar energy and water offers a clean and sustainable fuel option for the future. Planar III/V material systems have shown the highest efficiencies, but are expensive. By moving to the nanowire regime the demand on material quantity is reduced, and new materials can be uncovered, such as wurtzite gallium phosphide, featuring a direct bandgap. This is one of the few materials combining large solar light absorption and (close to) ideal band-edge positions for full water splitting. Here we report the photoelectrochemical reduction of water, on a p-type wurtzite gallium phosphide nanowire photocathode. By modifying geometry to reduce electrical resistance and enhance optical absorption, and modifying the surface with a multistep platinum deposition, high current densities and open circuit potentials were achieved. Our results demonstrate the capabilities of this material, even when used in such low quantities, as in nanowires. PMID:26183949

  14. A Gallium multiphase equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Scott D; Greeff, Carl

    2009-01-01

    A new SESAME multiphase Gallium equation of state (EOS) has been developed. The equation of state includes three of the solid phases (Ga I, Ga II, Ga III) and a fluid phase (liquid/gas). The EOS includes consistent latent heat between the phases. We compare the results to the liquid Hugoniol data. We also explore the possibility of re-freezing via dynamic means such as isentropic and shock compression.

  15. Gallium-67 radionuclide imaging in acute pyelonephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, G.; Morillo, G.; Alonso, M.; Isikoff, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The symptoms and clinical course of patients with acute pyelonephritis are variable; likewise, urinalysis, blood cultures, and excretory urography may be normal or equivocal. The ability of gallium-67 to accumulate in areas of active inflammation was useful in the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis in 12 cases. A multiplane tomographic scanner was used for imaging four of these patients. Initial experience with this scanner is also discussed.

  16. a Gallium Multiphase Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, Scott D.; Greeff, Carl W.

    2009-12-01

    A new SESAME multiphase Gallium equation of state (EOS) has been developed. It includes three of the solid phases (Ga I, Ga II, Ga III) and a fluid phase (liquid/gas). The EOS includes consistent latent heat between the phases. We compare the results to the liquid Hugoniot data. We also explore the possibility of re-freezing via dynamic means such as isentropic and shock compression. We predict an unusual spontaneous spreading of low pressure shocks from STP.

  17. Positron study of annealing of gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Rice-Evans, P.C.; Smith, D.L.; Evans, H.E.; Gledhill, G.A. )

    1991-02-01

    A positron beam has been used to investigate the sub-surface changes in semi-insulating gallium arsenide which had been annealed to a range of temperatures. The variations of the Doppler S parameter as a function of positron implantation energy, when subjected to a diffusion analysis, indicate variations in positron trapping at different depths. The results indicate the changes in the type of point defect that accompany the annealing.

  18. Crossover from weak localization to anti-weak localization in indium oxide systems with wide range of resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, B.; Hidaka, K.; Ezaki, S.; Makise, K.; Asano, T.; Tomai, S.; Yano, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the magnetoconductivity Δσ(H)≡1/ρ(H)-1/ρ(0) in a wide range of magnetic fields for three-dimensional indium oxide films doped with zinc, tin, or gallium in the range of resistivity ρ(300K) between 4.1×10-6 Ωm and 1.7×10-3 Ωm. The weak localization theory was fitted to data for Δσ(H) at various temperatures in the range 2.0 K ≤T≤50 K by the use of suitable characteristics Dτin(T) and Dτso, where D , τin, and τso are the electron diffusion constant, inelastic scattering time, and spin-orbit (s-o) scattering time, respectively. It was found that (i) for films with a large value of ρ, the sign of Δσ(H) changes from positive to negative with decreasing temperature as a precursor to an anti-weak localization effect; (ii) the ratio τso/τin decreases from ≈4000 to≈4.0 with increasing ρ; (iii) the strong ρ dependence of Dτso cannot be explained by the model with a constant atomic number Z in a formula τso∝1/Z4 proposed by Abrikozov and Gorkov Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 42, 1088 (1962); [Sov. Phys. JETP 15, 752 (1962)]. As a reason for this ρ dependence, we suggest that the s-o scattering changes with increasing ρ from light oxygen atoms to heavy atoms, i.e., indium, zinc, and gallium, because of the decrease in the number of oxygen vacancies acting as s-o scattering centers.

  19. High-dose gallium imaging in lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.C.; Leonard, R.C.; Canellos, G.P.; Skarin, A.T.; Kaplan, W.D.

    1983-08-01

    The role of gallium-67 imaging in the management of patients with lymphoma, traditionally assessed using low tracer doses and the rectilinear scanner, was assessed when using larger doses (7 to 10 mCi) and a triple-peak Anger camera. Gallium scan results in 51 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 21 patients with Hodgkin's disease were compared with simultaneous radiologic, clinical, and histopathologic reports. Subsequent disease course was also evaluated in light of radionuclide findings. Sensitivity and specificity of the scans were 0.90 or greater for both non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease, and overall accuracy by site was 96 percent. Although there are insufficient numbers of pretreatment scans to allow any conclusions, our data suggest that newer approaches to gallium scanning in treated patients are (1) highly specific in all lymphomas and most sensitive in high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease; (2) valuable in assessing the mediastinum in both non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease; and (3) helpful adjuncts to computed tomographic scanning and ultrasonography in assessing abdominal node disease.

  20. [Aluminium allergy and granulomas induced by vaccinations for children].

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rosa Marie Ø; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2015-04-27

    Vaccination with aluminium-adsorbed vaccines can induce aluminium allergy with persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site – vaccination granulomas. In this article we give an overview of childhood aluminium-adsorbed vaccines available in Denmark. Through literature studies we examine the incidence, the symptoms and the prognosis for the vaccination granulomas and the allergy. Finally we discuss the status in Denmark.

  1. Diamond grooving of rapidly solidified optical aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-El-Hossein, Khaled; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Ghobashy, Sameh; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Mkoko, Zwelinzima

    2015-10-01

    Traditional optical aluminium grades such as Al 6061 are intensively used for making optical components for applications ranging from mould insert fabrication to laser machine making. However, because of their irregular microstructure and relative inhomogeneity of material properties at micro scale, traditional optical aluminium may exhibit some difficulties when ultra-high precision diamond turned. Inhomogeneity and micro-variation in the material properties combined with uneven and coarse microstructure may cause unacceptable surface finish and accelerated tool wear, especially in grooving operation when the diamond tool edge is fully immersed in the material surface. Recently, new grades of optical aluminium that are featured by their ultra-fine microstructure and improved material properties have been developed to overcome the problem of high tool wear rates. The new aluminium grades have been developed using rapid solidification process which results in extremely small grain sizes combined with improved mechanical properties. The current study is concerned with investigating the performance of single-point diamond turning when grooving two grades of rapidly solidified aluminium (RSA) grades: RSA905 which is a high-alloyed aluminium grade and RSA443 which has a high silicon content. In this study, two series of experiments employed to create radial microgrooves on the two RSA grades. The surface roughness obtained on the groove surface is measured when different combinations of cutting parameters are used. Cutting speed is varied while feed rate and depth of cut were kept constant. The results show that groove surface roughness produced on RSA443 is higher than that obtained on RSA905. Also, the paper reports on the effect of cutting speed on surface roughness for each RSA grade.

  2. The effect of annealing temperature on the stability of gallium tin zinc oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ngoc; McCall, Briana; Alston, Robert; Collis, Ward; Iyer, Shanthi

    2015-10-01

    With the growing need for large area display technology and the push for a faster and cheaper alternative to the current amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) as the active channel layer for pixel-driven thin film transistors (TFTs) display applications, gallium tin zinc oxide (GSZO) has shown to be a promising candidate due to the similar electronic configuration of Sn4+ and In3+. In this work TFTs of GSZO sputtered films with only a few atomic % of Ga and Sn have been fabricated. A systematic and detailed comparison has been made of the properties of the GSZO films annealed at two temperatures: 140 °C and 450 °C. The electrical and optical stabilities of the respective devices have been studied to gain more insight into the degradation mechanism and are correlated with the initial TFT performance prior to the application of stress. Post deposition annealing at 450 °C of the films in air was found to lead to a higher atomic concentration of Sn4+ in these films and a superior quality of the film, as attested by the higher film density and less surface and interface roughness in comparison to the lower annealed temperature device. These result in significantly reduced shallow and deep interface traps with improved performance of the device exhibiting VON of -3.5 V, ION/IOFF of 108, field-effect mobility (μFE) of 4.46 cm2 V-1s-1, and sub-threshold swing of 0.38 V dec-1. The device is stable under both electrical and optical bias for wavelengths of 550 nm and above. Thus, this work demonstrates GSZO-based TFTs as a promising viable option to the IGZO TFTs by further tailoring the film composition and relevant processing temperatures.

  3. Compensation and Characterization of Gallium Arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roush, Randy Allen

    1995-01-01

    The properties of transition metals in gallium arsenide have been previously investigated extensively with respect to activation energies, but little effort has been made to correlate processing parameters with electronic characteristics. Diffusion of copper in gallium arsenide is of technological importance due to the development of GaAs:Cu bistable photoconductive devices. Several techniques are demonstrated in this work to develop and characterize compensated gallium arsenide wafers. The material is created by the thermal diffusion of copper into silicon-doped GaAs. Transition metals generally form deep and shallow acceptors in GaAs, and therefore compensation is possible by material processing such that the shallow silicon donors are compensated by deep acceptors. Copper is an example of a transition metal that forms deep acceptors in GaAs, and therefore this work will focus on the compensation and characterization of GaAs:Si:Cu. The compensation of the material has shown that the lower diffusion temperatures (500-600^ circC) form primarily the well-known Cu _{rm B} centers whereas the higher temperature anneals (>750 ^circC) result in the formation of CU_{rm A}. Using compensation curves, the copper density is found by comparing the compensation temperature with copper solubility curves given by others. These curves also show that the formation of CU_{rm B}, EL2, and CU_{rm A} can be manipulated by varying processing parameters such as annealing temperature and arsenic pressure. The compensation results are confirmed using Temperature-Dependent Hall (TDH) measurements to detect the copper levels. Also, the photoconductive properties of the material under illumination from 1.06 and 2.1 μm wavelength laser pulses have been used to demonstrate the effects of the different processing procedures. The persistent photoconductivity inherent to these devices under illumination from the 1.06 μm laser pulse is used to predict the concentration of the Cu_ {rm B

  4. Repurposing of gallium-based drugs for antibacterial therapy.

    PubMed

    Bonchi, Carlo; Imperi, Francesco; Minandri, Fabrizia; Visca, Paolo; Frangipani, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    While the occurrence and spread of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens is vanishing current anti-infective therapies, the antibiotic discovery pipeline is drying up. In the last years, the repurposing of existing drugs for new clinical applications has become a major research area in drug discovery, also in the field of anti-infectives. This review discusses the potential of repurposing previously approved gallium formulations in antibacterial chemotherapy. Gallium has no proven function in biological systems, but it can act as an iron-mimetic in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The activity of gallium mostly relies on its ability to replace iron in redox enzymes, thus impairing their function and ultimately hampering cell growth. Cancer cells and bacteria are preferential gallium targets due to their active metabolism and fast growth. The wealth of knowledge on the pharmacological properties of gallium has opened the door to the repurposing of gallium-based drugs for the treatment of infections sustained by antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens, such as Acinetobacter baumannii or Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and for suppression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth. The promising antibacterial activity of gallium both in vitro and in different animal models of infection raises the hope that gallium will confirm its efficacy in clinical trials, and will become a valuable therapeutic option to cure otherwise untreatable bacterial infections.

  5. Gallium scintigraphy in bone infarction. Correlation with bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Armas, R.R.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The appearance of gallium-67 images in bone infarction was studied in nine patients with sickle cell disease and correlated with the bone scan findings. Gallium uptake in acute infarction was decreased or absent with a variable bone scan uptake, and normal in healing infarcts, which showed increased uptake on bone scan. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  6. Indium and indium tin oxide induce endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Brun, Nadja Rebecca; Christen, Verena; Furrer, Gerhard; Fent, Karl

    2014-10-07

    Indium and indium tin oxide (ITO) are extensively used in electronic technologies. They may be introduced into the environment during production, use, and leaching from electronic devices at the end of their life. At present, surprisingly little is known about potential ecotoxicological implications of indium contamination. Here, molecular effects of indium nitrate (In(NO3)3) and ITO nanoparticles were investigated in vitro in zebrafish liver cells (ZFL) cells and in zebrafish embryos and novel insights into their molecular effects are provided. In(NO3)3 led to induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of transcripts of pro-apoptotic genes and TNF-α in vitro at a concentration of 247 μg/L. In(NO3)3 induced the ER stress key gene BiP at mRNA and protein level, as well as atf6, which ultimately led to induction of the important pro-apoptotic marker gene chop. The activity of In(NO3)3 on ER stress induction was much stronger than that of ITO, which is explained by differences in soluble free indium ion concentrations. The effect was also stronger in ZFL cells than in zebrafish embryos. Our study provides first evidence of ER stress and oxidative stress induction by In(NO3)3 and ITO indicating a critical toxicological profile that needs further investigation.

  7. Sorption of indium (III) onto carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alguacil, F J; Lopez, F A; Rodriguez, O; Martinez-Ramirez, S; Garcia-Diaz, I

    2016-08-01

    Indium has numerous applications in different industrial sectors and is not an abundant element. Therefore appropriate technology to recover this element from various process wastes is needed. This research reports high adsorption capacity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for In(III). The effects of pH, kinetics, isotherms and adsorption mechanism of MWCNT on In(III) adsorption were investigated and discussed in detail. The pH increases improves the adsorption capacity for In(III). The Langmuir adsorption model is the best fit with the experimental data. For the kinetic study, the adsorption onto MWCNT could be fitted to pseudo second-order. The adsorption of indium(III) can be described to a mechanism which consists of a film diffusion controlled process. Metal desorption can be achieved with acidic solutions.

  8. Oxidation state, aggregation, and heterolytic dissociation of allyl indium reagents.

    PubMed

    Koszinowski, Konrad

    2010-05-05

    Solutions of allyl indium reagents formed in the reactions of indium with allyl bromide and allyl iodide, respectively, in N,N-dimethylformamide, tetrahydrofuran, and water were analyzed by a combination of electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry, temperature-dependent (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements. Additional mass spectrometric experiments probed charge-tagged derivatives of the allyl indium reagents. The results obtained indicate the presence of allyl indium(+3) species, which undergo heterolytic dissociation to yield ions such as InR(2)(solv)(+) and InRX(3)(-) with R = allyl and X = Br and I. The extent of dissociation is greatest for N,N-dimethylformamide, whereas aggregation effects are more pronounced for the less polar tetrahydrofuran. The heterolytic dissociation of the allyl indium reagents supposedly enhances their reactivity by simultaneously providing highly Lewis acidic allyl indium cations and nucleophilic allyl indate anions.

  9. Laser photochemistry of gallium-containing compounds. [Trimethylgallium

    SciTech Connect

    Baughcum, S.L.; Oldenborg, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The production of gas-phase gallium atoms in the photolysis of trimethylgallium has been investigated at 193 nm and at other laser wavelengths. Ground state (4 /sup 2/P/sup 0//sub 1/2) and metastable (4 /sup 2/P/sup 0//sub 3/2/) gallium atoms are detected using laser-induced fluorescence techniques. Our results indicate that gallium atoms continue to be produced at long times after the laser pulse. The observed dependence on photolysis laser fluence, trimethylgallium pressure, and buffer gas pressure are consistent with a mechanism in which highly excited gallium methyl radicals undergo unimolecular decomposition to produce gallium atoms. Since this process is observed to happen on the time scale of hundreds of microseconds, these results have important implications for studies of metal deposition and direct laser writing by laser photolysis of organometallic compounds. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Indium Alloy as Cadmium Brush Plating Replacement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-17

    Aged In- Sn Aged Cd In- Sn before Aging Cd before Aging Sn -Zn (12V) before Aging 18 Temperature Cycling Table 6. Temperature Cycling Conditions for Each...selection Key Requirements Candidate Cd Plating Replacement Processing Al Zn Ni Sn Zn-Ni Sn -Ni Sn -Zn Sn -In Meet Environmental Health and Safety (EHS...Corrosion Protection P P F P ? ? P P Whisker Growth (FOR INFO) ? F P F P P ? ? Al = Aluminum; In = Indium; Ni = Nickel; Sn =

  11. Indium 111 toxicity in the human lymphocyte

    SciTech Connect

    Silberstein, E.B.; Watson, S.; Mayfield, G.; Kereiakes, J.G.; Bullock, W.

    1985-05-01

    Indium-labeled lymphocytes were examined for response to a variety of mitogens, ability to synthesize immunoglobulins, mitotic index, and presence of chromosome aberrations at a range of exposures from 0.2 to 500 muCi/10(8) cells. Results of all four tests were found to be abnormal when the lymphocytes were labeled with /sup 111/In activities well within those employed for diagnostic testing.

  12. Aluminium in over-the-counter drugs: risks outweigh benefits?

    PubMed

    Reinke, Claudia M; Breitkreutz, Jörg; Leuenberger, Hans

    2003-01-01

    In the early 1970s, aluminium toxicity was first implicated in the pathogenesis of clinical disorders in patients with chronic renal failure involving bone (renal osteomalacia) or brain tissue (dialysis encephalopathy). Before that time the toxic effects of aluminium ingestion were not considered to be a major concern because absorption seemed unlikely to occur. Meanwhile, aluminium toxicity has been investigated in countless epidemiological and clinical studies as well as in animal experiments and many papers have been published on the subject. It is now commonly acknowledged that aluminium toxicity can be induced by infusion of aluminium-contaminated dialysis fluids, by parenteral nutrition solutions, and by oral exposure as a result of aluminium-containing pharmaceutical products such as aluminium-based phosphate binders or antacid intake. Over-the-counter antacids are the most important source for human aluminium exposure from a quantitative point of view. However, aluminium can act as a powerful neurological toxicant and provoke embryonic and fetal toxic effects in animals and humans after gestational exposure. Despite these facts, the patient information leaflets from European antacids that are available OTC show substantial differences regarding warnings from aluminium toxicity. It seems advisable that all patients should receive the same information on aluminium toxicity from patient information leaflets, in particular with regard to the increased absorption through concomitant administration with citrate-containing beverages and the use of such antacids during pregnancy.

  13. Thermal Plasma Synthesis of Crystalline Gallium Nitride Nanopowder from Gallium Nitrate Hydrate and Melamine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Choi, Sooseok; Park, Dong-Wha

    2016-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanopowder used as a blue fluorescent material was synthesized by using a direct current (DC) non-transferred arc plasma. Gallium nitrate hydrate (Ga(NO3)3∙xH2O) was used as a raw material and NH3 gas was used as a nitridation source. Additionally, melamine (C3H6N6) powder was injected into the plasma flame to prevent the oxidation of gallium to gallium oxide (Ga2O3). Argon thermal plasma was applied to synthesize GaN nanopowder. The synthesized GaN nanopowder by thermal plasma has low crystallinity and purity. It was improved to relatively high crystallinity and purity by annealing. The crystallinity is enhanced by the thermal treatment and the purity was increased by the elimination of residual C3H6N6. The combined process of thermal plasma and annealing was appropriate for synthesizing crystalline GaN nanopowder. The annealing process after the plasma synthesis of GaN nanopowder eliminated residual contamination and enhanced the crystallinity of GaN nanopowder. As a result, crystalline GaN nanopowder which has an average particle size of 30 nm was synthesized by the combination of thermal plasma treatment and annealing.

  14. Non-Stoichiometric Amorphous Indium Selenide Thin Films as a Buffer Layer for CIGS Solar Cells with Various Temperatures in Rapid Thermal Annealing.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Myoung Han; Kim, Nam-Hoon

    2016-05-01

    The conventional structure of most of copper indium gallium diselenide (Culn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2, CIGS) solar cells includes a CdS thin film as a buffer layer. Cd-free buffer layers have attracted great interest for use in photovoltaic applications to avoid the use of hazardous and toxic materials. The RF magnetron sputtering method was used with an InSe2 compound target to prepare the indium selenide precursor. Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) was conducted in ambient N2 gas to control the concentration of volatile Se from the precursor with a change in temperature. The nature of the RTA-treated indium selenide thin films remained amorphous under annealing temperatures of ≤ 700 degrees C. The Se concentration of the RTA-treated specimens demonstrated an opposite trend to the annealing temperature. The optical transmittance and band gap energies were 75.33% and 2.451-3.085 eV, respectively, and thus were suitable for the buffer layer. As the annealing temperature increased, the resistivity decreased by an order-of-magnitude from 10(4) to 10(1) Ω-cm. At lower Se concentrations, the conductivity abruptly changed from p-type to n-type without crystallite formation in the amorphous phase, with the carrier concentration in the order of 10(17) cm(-3).

  15. The toxicology of indium tin oxide.

    PubMed

    Bomhard, Ernst M

    2016-07-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is a technologically important semiconductor. An increasing number of cases of severe lung effects (characterized by pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and/or interstitial fibrosis) in ITO-exposed workers warrants a review of the toxicological hazards. Short- and long-term inhalation studies in rats and mice revealed persistent alveolar proteinosis, inflammation and fibrosis in the lungs down to concentrations as low as 0.01mg/m(3). In rats, the incidences of bronchiolo-alveolar adenomas and carcinomas were significantly increased at all concentrations. In mice, ITO was not carcinogenic. A few bronchiolo-alveolar adenomas occurring after repeated intratracheal instillation of ITO to hamsters have to be interpreted as treatment-related. In vitro and in vivo studies on the formation of reactive oxygen species suggest epigenetic effects as cause of the lung tumor development. Repeated intratracheal instillation of ITO to hamsters slightly affected the male sexual organs, which might be interpreted as a secondary effect of the lung damage. Epidemiological and medical surveillance studies, serum/blood indium levels in workers as well as data on the exposure to airborne indium concentrations indicate a need for measures to reduce exposure at ITO workplaces.

  16. Two chain gallium fluorodiphosphates: synthesis, structure solution, and their transient presence during the hydrothermal crystallisation of a microporous gallium fluorophosphate.

    PubMed

    Millange, Franck; Walton, Richard I; Guillou, Nathalie; Loiseau, Thierry; O'Hare, Dermot; Férey, Gérard

    2002-04-21

    Two novel gallium fluorodiphosphates have been isolated and their structures solved ab initio from powder X-ray diffraction data; the materials readily interconvert under hydrothermal conditions, and are metastable with respect to an open-framework zeolitic gallium fluorophosphate, during the synthesis of which they are present as transient intermediates.

  17. The interrelationship between silicon and aluminium in the biological effects of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Birchall, J D

    1992-01-01

    It is well established that aluminium is toxic at the cellular level and that pathological symptoms follow its entry into organisms (plants, fish, humans) when the normal exclusion mechanisms fail or are bypassed, as for example in renal dialysis. The present debate concerns the availability of environmental aluminium and the possible impact of its slow and insidious absorption and accumulation in vulnerable individuals. Silicon is considered as essential element but the mechanisms underlying its essentiality remain unknown and binding of the element (through oxygen) with biomolecules has not been demonstrated. There is, however, a unique affinity between aluminium and silicon, not only in solid state chemistry ([AlO4]5- and [SiO4]4- are isostructural), but also in aqueous solution chemistry as illustrated by the synthesis of zeolite from aluminate and silicate anions at high pH and under hydrothermal conditions. This affinity exists also in very dilute solution (< 10(-5) M) at near-neutral pH when hydroxyalumino-silicate species form. These species mediate the bioavailability and cellular toxicity of aluminium. The observed effects of silicon deficiency can be attributed to consequential aluminium availability. There are important implications for the epidemiology and biochemistry of aluminium-induced disorders and any consideration of one element must include the other.

  18. Molecular breeding of cereals for aluminium resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminium (Al3+) toxicity is the primary factor limiting crop production on acidic soils worldwide. In addition to an application of lime for soil amelioration, Al3+ resistant plant varieties have been deployed to raise productivity on such hostile soils. This has been possible due to the exploita...

  19. Effect of aluminium chloride on human spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, S.

    1988-03-01

    Aluminium (Al), which is the most prevalent metal in the earth's crust, has been implicated as an etiological factor in a variety of clinical disorders. Only recently Al has been discussed in the pathogenesis of the parenteral nutrition - associated liver disease. Included in this report are the preliminary findings on its effects on the reproductive functions of human beings.

  20. An ultrafast rechargeable aluminium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meng-Chang; Gong, Ming; Lu, Bingan; Wu, Yingpeng; Wang, Di-Yan; Guan, Mingyun; Angell, Michael; Chen, Changxin; Yang, Jiang; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Dai, Hongjie

    2015-04-01

    The development of new rechargeable battery systems could fuel various energy applications, from personal electronics to grid storage. Rechargeable aluminium-based batteries offer the possibilities of low cost and low flammability, together with three-electron-redox properties leading to high capacity. However, research efforts over the past 30 years have encountered numerous problems, such as cathode material disintegration, low cell discharge voltage (about 0.55 volts ref. 5), capacitive behaviour without discharge voltage plateaus (1.1-0.2 volts or 1.8-0.8 volts) and insufficient cycle life (less than 100 cycles) with rapid capacity decay (by 26-85 per cent over 100 cycles). Here we present a rechargeable aluminium battery with high-rate capability that uses an aluminium metal anode and a three-dimensional graphitic-foam cathode. The battery operates through the electrochemical deposition and dissolution of aluminium at the anode, and intercalation/de-intercalation of chloroaluminate anions in the graphite, using a non-flammable ionic liquid electrolyte. The cell exhibits well-defined discharge voltage plateaus near 2 volts, a specific capacity of about 70 mA h g-1 and a Coulombic efficiency of approximately 98 per cent. The cathode was found to enable fast anion diffusion and intercalation, affording charging times of around one minute with a current density of ~4,000 mA g-1 (equivalent to ~3,000 W kg-1), and to withstand more than 7,500 cycles without capacity decay.

  1. Indentation of aluminium foam at low velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaopeng; Miao, Yinggang; Liu, Shuangyan; Li, Yulong; Lu, Guoxing

    2015-09-01

    The indentation behaviour of aluminium foams at low velocity (10 m/s ˜ 30 m/s) was investigated both in experiments and numerical simulation in this paper. A flat-ended indenter was used and the force-displacement history was recorded. The Split Hopkinson Pressure bar was used to obtain the indentation velocity and forces in the dynamic experiments. Because of the low strength of the aluminium foam, PMMA bar was used, and the experimental data were corrected using Bacon's method. The energy absorption characteristics varying with impact velocity were then obtained. It was found that the energy absorption ability of aluminium foam gradually increases in the quasi-static regime and shows a significant increase at ˜10 m/s velocity. Numerical simulation was also conducted to investigate this process. A 3D Voronoi model was used and models with different relative densities were investigated as well as those with different failure strain. The indentation energy increases with both the relative density and failure strain. The analysis of the FE model implies that the significant change in energy absorption ability of aluminium foam in indentation at ˜10 m/s velocity may be caused by plastic wave effect.

  2. Toxicity of dissolved and precipitated aluminium to marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Gillmore, Megan L; Golding, Lisa A; Angel, Brad M; Adams, Merrin S; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-05-01

    Localised aluminium contamination can lead to high concentrations in coastal waters, which have the potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. This research investigated the toxicity of 72-h exposures of aluminium to three marine diatoms (Ceratoneis closterium (formerly Nitzschia closterium), Minutocellus polymorphus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) by measuring population growth rate inhibition and cell membrane damage (SYTOX Green) as endpoints. Toxicity was correlated to the time-averaged concentrations of different aluminium size-fractions, operationally defined as <0.025μm filtered, <0.45μm filtered (dissolved) and unfiltered (total) present in solution over the 72-h bioassay. The chronic population growth rate inhibition after aluminium exposure varied between diatom species. C. closterium was the most sensitive species (10% inhibition of growth rate (72-h IC10) of 80 (55-100)μg Al/L (95% confidence limits)) while M. polymorphus (540 (460-600)μg Al/L) and P. tricornutum (2100 (2000-2200)μg Al/L) were less sensitive (based on measured total aluminium). Dissolved aluminium was the primary contributor to toxicity in C. closterium, while a combination of dissolved and precipitated aluminium forms contributed to toxicity in M. polymorphus. In contrast, aluminium toxicity to the most tolerant diatom P. tricornutum was due predominantly to precipitated aluminium. Preliminary investigations revealed the sensitivity of C. closterium and M. polymorphus to aluminium was influenced by initial cell density with aluminium toxicity significantly (p<0.05) increasing with initial cell density from 10(3) to 10(5)cells/mL. No effects on plasma membrane permeability were observed for any of the three diatoms suggesting that mechanisms of aluminium toxicity to diatoms do not involve compromising the plasma membrane. These results indicate that marine diatoms have a broad range in sensitivity to aluminium with toxic mechanisms related to both dissolved and precipitated

  3. InP (Indium Phosphide): Into the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Major industry is beginning to be devoted to indium phosphide and its potential applications. Key to these applications are high speed and radiation tolerance; however the high cost of indium phosphide may be an inhibitor to progress. The broad applicability of indium phosphide to many devices will be discussed with an emphasis on photovoltaics. Major attention is devoted to radiation tolerance and means of reducing cost of devices. Some of the approaches applicable to solar cells may also be relevant to other devices. The intent is to display the impact of visionary leadership in the field and enable the directions and broad applicability of indium phosphide.

  4. Method to Improve Indium Bump Bonding via Indium Oxide Removal Using a Multi-Step Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, H. Frank (Inventor); Jones, Todd J. (Inventor); Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Dickie, Matthew R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A process for removing indium oxide from indium bumps in a flip-chip structure to reduce contact resistance, by a multi-step plasma treatment. A first plasma treatment of the indium bumps with an argon, methane and hydrogen plasma reduces indium oxide, and a second plasma treatment with an argon and hydrogen plasma removes residual organics. The multi-step plasma process for removing indium oxide from the indium bumps is more effective in reducing the oxide, and yet does not require the use of halogens, does not change the bump morphology, does not attack the bond pad material or under-bump metallization layers, and creates no new mechanisms for open circuits.

  5. The Preparation and Structural Characterization of Three Structural Types of Gallium Compounds Derived from Gallium (II) Chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Edward M.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Duraj. Stan A.; Habash, Tuhfeh S.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Schupp, John D.; Eckles, William E.; Long, Shawn

    1997-01-01

    The three compounds Ga2Cl4(4-mepy)2 (1),[GaCl2(4-mepy)4]GaCl4x1/2(4-mepy); (2) and GaCl2(4-mepy)2(S2CNEt2); (3) (4-mepy= 4-methylpyridine) have been prepared from reactions of gallium (II) chloride in 4-methylpyridine and characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Small variations in the reaction conditions for gallium(II) chloride can produce crystals with substantially different structural properties. The three compounds described here encompass a neutral gallium(II) dimer in which each gallium is four-coordinate, an ionic compound containing both anionic and cationic gallium complex ions with different coordination numbers and a neutral six-coordinate heteroleptic

  6. Electrical characterization of germanium implanted gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrotti, F. L.

    1980-06-01

    The amphoteric electrical properties of germanium single implants into gallium arsenide, and of dual implants of germanium with either gallium or arsenic into gallium arsenide, have been studied. Room temperature implantation was performed for all implanted ions at 120 keV, with doses ranging from 5E12 to 3E15 ions per square centimeter. Implanted samples were annealed with pyrolytic silicon nitride encapsulants at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1000 degrees Celsius. Both p- and n-type layers were observed. Type of conductivity, electrical activation, and carrier mobility were found to depend critically upon ion dose and anneal temperature. The general electrical behavior suggests that in samples of lower dose and anneal temperature, the implanted Ge ions go into As sites preferentially, producing p-type activity, whereas in samples of higher dose and anneal temperature, more Ge ions go into Ga sites, producing n-type activity. Conductivity was found to change from p- to n-type at an intermediate dose of 3E14 ions per square centimeter and at an anneal temperature between 900 and 950 degrees Celsius. It has been determined that additional implantation of As into GaAs Ge favors Ge occupancy of Ga sites and an enhancement of n-type activity, whereas the additional implantation of Ga encourages Ge occupancy of As sites and an enhancement of p-type activity. Enhancement factors of as much as 8 for p-type activations, and as much as 50 for n-type activations have been measured.

  7. Gallium scintigraphic pattern in lung CMV infections

    SciTech Connect

    Ganz, W.I.; Cohen, D.; Mallin, W.

    1994-05-01

    Due to extensive use of prophylactic therapy for Pneumonitis Carinii Pneumonia (PCP), Cytomegalic Viral (CMV) infection may now be the most common lung infection in AIDS patients. This study was performed to determine Gallium-67 patterns in AIDS patients with CMV. Pathology reports were reviewed in AIDS patients who had a dose of 5 to 10 mCi of Gallium-67 citrate. Analysis of images were obtained 48-72 hours later of the entire body was performed. Gallium-67 scans in 14 AIDS patients with biopsy proven CMV, were evaluated for eye, colon, adrenal, lung and renal uptake. These were compared to 40 AIDS patients without CMV. These controls had infections including PCP, Mycobacterial infections, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis. 100% of CMV patients had bowel uptake greater than or equal to liver. Similar bowel activity was seen in 50% of AIDS patients without CMV. 71% had intense eye uptake which was seen in only 10% of patients without CMV. 50% of CMV patients had renal uptake compared to 5% of non-CMV cases. Adrenal uptake was suggested in 50%, however, SPECT imaging is needed for confirmation. 85% had low grade lung uptake. The low grade lung had perihilar prominence. The remaining 15% had high grade lung uptake (greater than sternum) due to superimposed PCP infection. Colon uptake is very sensitive indicator for CMV infection. However, observing eye, renal, and or adrenal uptake improved the diagnostic specificity. SPECT imaging is needed to confirm renal or adrenal abnormalities due to intense bowel activity present in 100% of cases. When high grade lung uptake is seen superimposed PCP is suggested.

  8. Improvements in the realization of the ITS-90 over the temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.; Zhang, J. T.; Ping, Q.

    2013-09-11

    The temperature primary standard over the range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver in National institute of Metrology (NIM), China, was established in the early 1990s. The performance of all of fixed-point furnaces degraded and needs to be updated due to many years of use. Nowadays, the satisfactory fixed point materials can be available with the development of the modern purification techniques. NIM plans to use a group of three cells for each defining fixed point temperature. In this way the eventual drift of individual cells can be evidenced by periodic intercomparison and this will increase the reliability in disseminating the ITS-90 in China. This article describes the recent improvements in realization of ITS-90 over temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM. Taking advantages of the technological advances in the design and manufacture of furnaces, the new three-zone furnaces and the open-type fixed points were developed from the freezing point of indium to the freezing point of silver, and a furnace with the three-zone semiconductor cooling was designed to automatically realize the melting point of gallium. The reproducibility of the new melting point of gallium and the new open-type freezing points of In, Sn, Zn. Al and Ag is improved, especially the freezing points of Al and Ag with the reproducibility of 0.2mK and 0.5mK respectively. The expanded uncertainty in the realization of these defining fixed point temperatures is 0.34mK, 0.44mK, 0.54mK, 0.60mK, 1.30mK and 1.88mK respectively.

  9. Sodium Flux Growth of Bulk Gallium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Dollen, Paul Martin

    This dissertation focused on development of a novel apparatus and techniques for crystal growth of bulk gallium nitride (GaN) using the sodium flux method. Though several methods exist to produce bulk GaN, none have been commercialized on an industrial scale. The sodium flux method offers potentially lower cost production due to relatively mild process conditions while maintaining high crystal quality. But the current equipment and methods for sodium flux growth of bulk GaN are generally not amenable to large-scale crystal growth or in situ investigation of growth processes, which has hampered progress. A key task was to prevent sodium loss or migration from the sodium-gallium growth melt while permitting N2 gas to access the growing crystal, which was accomplished by implementing a reflux condensing stem along with a reusable sealed capsule. The reflux condensing stem also enabled direct monitoring and control of the melt temperature, which has not been previously reported for the sodium flux method. Molybdenum-based materials were identified from a corrosion study as candidates for direct containment of the corrosive sodium-gallium melt. Successful introduction of these materials allowed implementation of a crucible-free containment system, which improved process control and can potentially reduce crystal impurity levels. Using the new growth system, the (0001) Ga face (+c plane) growth rate was >50 mum/hr, which is the highest bulk GaN growth rate reported for the sodium flux method. Omega X-ray rocking curve (?-XRC) measurements indicated the presence of multiple grains, though full width at half maximum (FWHM) values for individual peaks were <100 arcseconds. Oxygen impurity concentrations as measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) were >1020 atoms/cm3, possibly due to reactor cleaning and handling procedures. This dissertation also introduced an in situ technique to correlate changes in N2 pressure with dissolution of nitrogen and precipitation of

  10. Gallium Lanthanum Sulphide Fibers for Infrared Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Y. D.; Schweizer, T.; Brady, D. J.; Hewak, D. W.

    Gallium lanthanum sulphide (GLS) glass and fiber have potential for use in both active and passive infrared applications. In this paper the optical, thermal, and other key properties, which are essential for understanding the applications and crucial in the quest for practical fibres, are discussed. Glass preparation by melt-quenchingand subsequent fibre fabrication is described using both rod-in-tube and extruded preforms. Absorptive and scattering losses are explored as they could represent a fundamental limitation to successful device fabrication. Potential passive and active applications are reported and the prospects for a future generation of sulphide fiber-based devices examined.

  11. Patterned gallium surfaces as molecular mirrors.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Alessandra; Rivetti, Claudio; Mangiarotti, Laura; Whitcombe, Michael J; Turner, Anthony P F; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2007-09-30

    An entirely new means of printing molecular information on a planar film, involving casting nanoscale impressions of the template protein molecules in molten gallium, is presented here for the first time. The metallic imprints not only replicate the shape and size of the proteins used as template. They also show specific binding for the template species. Such a simple approach to the creation of antibody-like properties in metallic mirrors can lead to applications in separations, microfluidic devices, and the development of new optical and electronic sensors, and will be of interest to chemists, materials scientists, analytical specialists, and electronic engineers.

  12. Design, fabrication, and characterization of indium(gallium,aluminum)arsenic/(gallium,aluminum)arsenic quantum dot infrared photodetectors for high-temperature operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne Diarra

    Infrared (IR) detectors are used in a range of imaging applications, including environmental monitoring, medical diagnosis, and space science. The typical components of an IR camera system include: light-collecting optics, a focal plane array (FPA) for detection and signal processing, a cooling system for photodetector FPAs, and electronics for displaying images. The cost of IR cameras can be reduced significantly if traditional FPA cooling systems (liquid-nitrogen dewars) are replaced by thermo-electric coolers. Such a design change requires the development of IR photodetectors that operate at elevated temperatures (≥120K). Quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) have great potential to provide the requisite detector array performance at high temperatures due to three-dimensional quantum confinement of the detector active region. Low dark current (˜10-5A/cm 2 at 78K), high responsivity (˜1A/W), and high detectivity (˜10 11cmHz1/2/W) are design benchmarks for IR photodetector arrays. Through the device fabrication and characterization of several QDIP heterostructure designs, as well as preliminary QDIP array studies, this work demonstrates that QDIPs meet many FPA requirements. Theoretical modeling and experimental verification of dark current in QDIPs determined that a 70-layer InAs/GaAs QDIP with 50nm GaAs barriers yields extremely low dark currents (Jdark = 2.8 x 10-8 A/cm2, T = 78K, Vbias = -1.0V), contributing to high-temperature operation (175K). These 70-layer QDIPs also yield estimated D*Peak and NEDeltaT values of 1011cmHz 1/2/W and 15mK, respectively, at operating bias and T = 100K, representing state-of-the-art QDIP performance. An InAs dot-in-a-well QDIP featuring AlAs/GaAs superlattice barriers demonstrated high responsivity and conversion efficiency (RPeak = 2.5A/W, ηconv = 70%, T = 78K, V bias = -1.5V) due to increased dot density and carrier confinement. Dark current non-uniformity was measured at several temperatures across a (4 x 4) InAs/GaAs QDIP array. At 100K, the dark current non-uniformity in the QDIP array was 12%, comparable to other IR photodetector technologies. The imaging capability of QDIPs was demonstrated through a raster-scan imaging experiment in which a small (13 x 13) interconnected InAs/GaAs QDIP array imaged a hot plate heating element at 500°C. To conclude, this dissertation research has advanced the state-of-the-art in QDIP performance, demonstrating that it is reasonable to incorporate these devices into a FPA operating at 150K for detection from 3--5mum.

  13. Strained-Layer INDIUM(X)GALLIUM(1-X)ARSENIDE - Gallium-Arsenide Heterojunctions, Quantum Wells, and Superlattices: Electronic Structure and Optical Properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Neal Gordon

    The electronic structure and light-emission properties of strained-layer In_{rm x} Ga_{rm 1-x}As -GaAs heterojunctions, quantum wells, and superlattices are investigated through photoluminescence experiments and theoretical models. Spontaneous and stimulated emission from a variety of structures (layers as thin as a few monolayers and alloy compositions up to x = 1), grown by molecular -beam epitaxy and atomic-layer epitaxy, is studied over a range of experimental conditions. Results concerning the strain effects in biaxially strained {rm In_{x}Ga _{1-x}As} are presented first. Critical thicknesses for dislocation formation and strain-induced band-gap shifts are measured for a number of structures and shown to agree well with results from theoretical models. A perturbation-theoretic model is used to study optical transition probabilities, and is shown to predict that electron-to -light-hole emission and absorption characteristics should be highly strain dependent. The electronic structure of strained {rm In_{x}Ga_{1 -x}As}-GaAs heterojunctions is considered next. General considerations relevant to the modeling and measurement of band offsets at strained heterojunctions are discussed, and perturbation-theoretic and tight-binding models for strained zincblende junctions are developed and evaluated. The two models predict that the heavy-hole (m_{rm J} = 3/2) valence-band offset for biaxially strained In_ {rm x}Ga_{rm 1-x}As grown on unstrained (100) GaAs is 20 -30% of the difference between the unstrained gaps for the two materials, and that the m_{rm J} = 3/2 and m_{rm J} = 1/2 valence-band offsets are of opposite sign. These predictions are consistent with the most reliable experimental data currently available. Pseudomorphic single- and multiple-quantum-well heterostructures and strained-layer superlattices are then investigated. Quantum-well structures with strains as high as ~7% are shown to exhibit excellent luminescence characteristics (spectral halfwidths of 7-11 meV at 20K for wells thinner than 50A) provided that layer thicknesses are below critical values, and the observed transition energies are found to agree well with predictions from quantum-mechanical finite-square-well and Kronig-Penney models which incorporate strain effects perturbatively. Spontaneous and stimulated emission from quantum-well structures is concentrated in a single emission band attributable to n = 1 electron-to-heavy-hole quantum -well transitions. Experimental and theoretical evidence is presented which suggests that, in contrast, electron -to-light-hole transitions can be the dominant transitions in some types of In_{rm x} Ga_{rm 1-x}As -GaAs strained-layer superlattices.

  14. a Study of Om-Cvd Processes for GALLIUM(1-X)INDIUM(X)ARSENIDE Growth on Gallium-Arsenide Substrates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung Kul

    This work investigates OM-CVD growth processes of Ga(,l-x)In(,x)As. The motivation for this work has been the eventual application of this material in two-junction, cascaded solar cells. The growths were made using trimethylgallium, triethylindium and arsine and growths have been done on GaAs substrates. An attempt has been made to understand the growth process itself, and a possible mechanism for the growth process is proposed to explain the observations made in many aspects of crystal growth by OM-CVD. Heterogeneous catalysis of AsH(,3) on GaAs is viewed as providing a key step in understanding the growth mechanism. The growth of GaInAs on GaAs is interpreted in terms of an interfacial interaction between the grown layer and the substrate. The growth of InAs is found to be difficult on GaAs due to the large lattice mismatch. As the InAs composition is decreased, a coherent interface appears to be reached below an InAs composition of around 30-40%, where the growth displays single crystal epitaxy. The growth rate of GaInAs on GaAs is found to be more complicated than that for the lattice-matched situation of AlGaAs growth on the same GaAs substrate. Also, introduction of lattice strain appears to make the growth rate smaller than in the strain-free case. Growth of GaInAs on GaAs substrates of different orientations shows that good epitaxial growth with low defect densities can be obtained by some combinations of (100) and (111) faces. It is argued that the excellent epitaxial growth observed on the (511) surface should be on the "B" face by considering predicted growth behaviors on basic planes combined with the crystal growth mechanism of OM-CVD proposed. Background doping concentrations of layers grown by OM-CVD are found to be a strong function of source material purity as concluded by other workers. It is also found that incorporation of group II and group VI dopants decreaes with increasing growth temperature in contrast to group IV impurities, namely, C and Si, which show the opposite trend. Finally, spectral response measurement on GaInAs p-n junctions grown on GaAs exhibits favorable quantum efficiency of up to 40% without any anti-reflective coating. A type of photodetector with an interdigital Al Schottky electrode pattern deposited on lattice-mismatched GaInAs epi-layers grown on semi-insulating GaAs displays very good photodetector responses with rise and fall times of less than 25 and 50 - 100 picoseconds, respectively. The leakage current of the Schottky structure is also very low, on the order of 10-300 nA.

  15. The Effect of Low-Energy High-Flux Ion Bombardment on the Nucleation and Growth of INDIUM(X)GALLIUM(1-X)ARSENIDE/GALLIUM Arsenide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millunchick, Joanna Mirecki

    The growth of In_{rm x}Ga_{rm1-x} As/GaAs using Ion-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy (IAMBE) was investigated to determine the effect of low energy (E < 100eV) high flux (0.1 < J < 0.75 mA/cm^2 ) ion irradiation on nucleation and strain relaxation as compared to conventional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Experiments were carried out to investigate the modification of nucleation as a result of E < 30 eV ion bombardment. It was found that the island densities of the IAMBE films fell into two temperature regimes. At low temperatures, nucleation parameters were altered by ion-induced island dissociation, whereas at high temperatures, ion-enhanced diffusion dominated. The effect of ion bombardment on the growth of highly strained thin films was examined. It was found that the rate of strain relaxation and the surface roughness decreased for 16 < E < 27 eV. Also, the IAMBE films were smoother than their MBE counterparts. Based on these results, it was inferred that surface roughening of large-mismatch MBE InGaAs films allows strain relaxation well before misfit dislocations are introduced. A Monte Carlo simulation was developed to model the growth of strained layers with and without ion bombardment. This simulation showed that the nucleation mechanism strongly depends on the adatom interaction with the second nearest neighbor E_{rm2nn}. Also, in the presence of ion bombardment, the simulated RHEED oscillation intensities improved for increasing ion energy and ion to atom ratio, in agreement with experimental results. Defect generation as a consequence of ion bombardment was also studied to ascertain whether IAMBE can be utilized in this regime without damage. IAMBE of In_ {rm x}Ga_{rm1 -x}As/GaAs showed improved crystalline quality compared to MBE-grown films, however, a significant amount of ion-injected point defects were found to be present. These point defects degraded optical properties, but no discernible effect was observed on electronic properties. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy showed that subsurface dislocation loops were generated when E >=q 55eV. The defect density increased with increasing E and J, and decreased with increasing temperature. Loops sizes were strongly affected by the substrate temperature and ion dose. Films grown with E <=q 50 eV were free of extended defects, showing that the beneficial effects of IAMBE can be achieved without causing ion damage.

  16. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Ternary Semiconductors GALLIUM(X)-INDIUM(1-X) Phosphide and GALLIUM-ARSENIDE(1 - Under Picosecond Laser Pulse Excitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarrabi, Hassan J.

    In the thesis, the ultrafast physics of carriers in two ternary semiconductors GA(,x)In(,1-x)P and GaAs(,1 -x)P(,x) were studied under picosecond Laser Pulse Excitation. The dynamics of hot carriers In Ga(,.5)In(,.5)P, were studied by means of time resolved spectroscopy. The effect of high pump intensity on the temporal behavior of the emission at different wavelengths were investigated. At high excitation power fluence, the temporal profile at short wavelengths (high energy portion of the photoluminescence spectra) were exponential similar to the low excitation power fluence. However the temporal profiles at long wavelengths (low energy portion of the photoluminescence spectra close to band edge) exhibited an unusual and complex profile. The time resolved profiles at long wavelength acquired a district tail as excitation power increased even to the point of developing a second peak. A model is proposed to explain the temporal behavior of the emission at different wavelengths. The rate equations describing the time dependence of dynamical variables (n(,e), T(,c), (phi)((nu))) were solved numerically by computer to simulate the temporal behavior of the emission at different wavelengths under different excitation power fluence. The time resolved photoluminescence spectra in Ga(,.56)In(,.44)P was measured with 10 ps time resolution using the streak camera as a detection system. From the theoretical fitting of the photoluminescence spectra we have determined the time evolution of carrier density and carrier temperature. We found that the carrier energy loss rate to be slower than predicted from a simple model assuming a Maxwell Boltzmann distribution function. This is attributed to the screening of the hot carrier energy relaxation under high carrier densities. Integro-differential equations describing the time dependence of carrier temperature have been solved and the results are compared with the experimental data. The time resolved photoluminescence kinetics in GaAs(,.62)P(,.38), were measured by streak camera to determine the radiative, non radiative recombination rates. The photoluminescence decay profile was found to be intensity dependent. When excitation power fluence increased above 6 x 10('8) W/cm('2), the decay profile of emission deviated from an exponential form. This is attributed to bimolecular and Auger processes. The biomolecular and Auger rates were determined to be B(,R) = 9 x 10('-10)cm('-3)/s and C(,NR) = 3 x 10('-29)cm('6)/s by fitting the time resolved photoluminescence decay profiles to the solution of rate equations which describes the dynamical behavior of the photogenerated carriers.

  17. Characterization and modeling of the intrinsic properties of 1.5-micrometer gallium indium nitrogen arsenic antimonide/gallium arsenide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Lynford

    2005-12-01

    Low cost access to optical communication networks is needed to satisfy the rapidly increasing demands of home-based high-speed Internet. Existing light sources in the low-loss 1.2--1.6mum telecommunication wavelength bandwidth are prohibitively expensive for large-scale deployment, e.g. incorporation in individual personal computers. Recently, we have extended the lasing wavelength of room-temperature CW GaInNAs(Sb) lasers grown monolithically on GaAs by MBE up to 1.52mum in an effort to replace the traditional, more expensive, InP-based devices. Besides lower cost wafers, GaInNAs(Sb) opto-electronic devices have fundamental material advantages over InP-based devices: a larger conduction band offset which reduces temperature sensitivity and enhances differential gain, a lattice match to a material with a large refractive index contrast, i.e. AlAs, which decreases the necessary number of mirror pairs in DBRs for VCSELs, and native oxide apertures for current confinement. High performance GaInNAs(Sb) edge-emitting lasers, VCSELs, and DFB lasers have been demonstrated throughout the entire telecommunication band. In this work, we analyze the intrinsic properties of the GaInNAsSb material system, e.g. recombination, gain, band structure and renormalization, and efficiency. Theoretical modeling is performed to calculate a map of the bandgap and effective masses for various material compositions. We also present device performance results, such as: room temperature CW threshold densities below 450A/cm2, quantum efficiencies above 50%, and over 425mW of total power from a SQW laser when mounted epi-up and minimally packaged. These results are generally 2--4x better than previous world records for GaAs based devices at 1.5mum. The high CW power and low threshold exhibited by these SQW lasers near 1.5mum make feasible many novel applications, such as broadband Raman fiber amplifiers and uncooled WDM at the chip scale. Device reliability of almost 500 hours at 200mW CW output power has also been demonstrated. Comparative experiments using innovative characterization techniques, such as: the multiple section absorption/gain method to explore the band structure, as well as the Z-parameter to analyze the dominant recombination processes, have identified the physical mechanisms responsible for improved performance. Also, by measuring the temperature dependence of relevant laser parameters, we have been able to simulate device operation while varying temperature and device geometry.

  18. Microemulsion extraction separation and determination of aluminium species by spectrofluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jusheng; Tian, Jiuying; Guo, Na; Wang, Yan; Pan, Yichun

    2011-01-30

    A simple and sensitive microemulsion extraction separation method was developed for the speciation of aluminium in tea samples by spectrofluorimetry. With 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) as the chelating agent and Triton X-100 Winsor II microemulsion as the extractant, separation of aluminium species in different pH solutions was achieved by microemulsion extraction. The formation of microemulsion, the conditions of extraction and determination of aluminium species were studied. The results showed that, the contents of aluminium species in tea leaves and infusions samples, such as total aluminium, total soluble aluminium, total granular aluminium, inorganic aluminium except Al-F, and (Al-F+Al-org), were obtained successfully under the optimal conditions. The limit of detection was 0.23 μg L(-1) in pH 9.5 solution, and 0.59 μg L(-1) in pH 6.0 solution respectively; the precision (RSD) for 11 replicate measurements of 10 μg L(-1) aluminium was 2.1% in pH 9.5 solution, and 2.8% in pH 6.0 solution respectively; the recoveries for the spiked samples were 96.8-103.5%. The proposed method is simple and efficient, which has been applied to the speciation of aluminium in tea samples with satisfactory results.

  19. Aluminium in brain tissue in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Ambreen; King, Andrew; Troakes, Claire; Exley, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    The genetic predispositions which describe a diagnosis of familial Alzheimer's disease can be considered as cornerstones of the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Essentially they place the expression and metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein as the main tenet of disease aetiology. However, we do not know the cause of Alzheimer's disease and environmental factors may yet be shown to contribute towards its onset and progression. One such environmental factor is human exposure to aluminium and aluminium has been shown to be present in brain tissue in sporadic Alzheimer's disease. We have made the first ever measurements of aluminium in brain tissue from 12 donors diagnosed with familial Alzheimer's disease. The concentrations of aluminium were extremely high, for example, there were values in excess of 10μg/g tissue dry wt. in 5 of the 12 individuals. Overall, the concentrations were higher than all previous measurements of brain aluminium except cases of known aluminium-induced encephalopathy. We have supported our quantitative analyses using a novel method of aluminium-selective fluorescence microscopy to visualise aluminium in all lobes of every brain investigated. The unique quantitative data and the stunning images of aluminium in familial Alzheimer's disease brain tissue raise the spectre of aluminium's role in this devastating disease.

  20. Gallium induces the production of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-02-01

    The novel antimicrobial gallium is a nonredox iron III analogue with bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties, effective for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo in mouse and rabbit infection models. It interferes with iron metabolism, transport, and presumably its homeostasis. As gallium exerts its antimicrobial effects by competing with iron, we hypothesized that it ultimately will lead cells to an iron deficiency status. As iron deficiency promotes the expression of virulence factors in vitro and promotes the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa in animal models, it is anticipated that treatment with gallium will also promote the production of virulence factors. To test this hypothesis, the reference strain PA14 and two clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis were exposed to gallium, and their production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipids, elastase, alkaline protease, alginate, pyoverdine, and biofilm was determined. Gallium treatment induced the production of all the virulence factors tested in the three strains except for pyoverdine. In addition, as the Ga-induced virulence factors are quorum sensing controlled, co-administration of Ga and the quorum quencher brominated furanone C-30 was assayed, and it was found that C-30 alleviated growth inhibition from gallium. Hence, adding both C-30 and gallium may be more effective in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections.

  1. The effect of gallium nitrate on synoviocyte MMP activity.

    PubMed

    Panagakos, F S; Kumar, E; Venescar, C; Guidon, P

    2000-02-01

    Gallium, a group IIIa metal salt, has been demonstrated to be an effective immunosuppressive agent. Gallium has also been shown to inhibit the production of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1beta, produced by macrophage-like cells in vitro. To further characterize the effects of gallium on the inflammatory process, we examined the effects of gallium nitrate on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity utilizing the rabbit synoviocyte cell line HIG-82. HIG-82 cells were incubated with IL-1beta and TPA, with and without increasing concentrations of gallium nitrate. Conditioned medium was collected and assayed for MMP activity using a synthetic substrate and substrate gel zymography. IL-1beta and TPA alone induced MMP activity in HIG-82 cells. A dose-dependent inhibition of IL-1beta and TPA stimulated MMP activity by gallium nitrate at increasing concentrations was observed. This study demonstrates that gallium nitrate can inhibit the activity of MMPs and may be useful as a modulator of inflammation in arthritis.

  2. Compatibility of ITER candidate structural materials with static gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Luebbers, P.R.; Michaud, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1993-12-01

    Tests were conducted on the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chromium. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400{degrees}C, corrosion rates are {approx}4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr for type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo- 1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than nickel. The corrosion rates at 400{degrees}C are {ge}88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400{degrees}C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The solubility data for pure metals and oxygen in gallium are reviewed. The physical, chemical, and radioactive properties of gallium are also presented. The supply and availability of gallium, as well as price predictions through the year 2020, are summarized.

  3. Behavior of Zircaloy Cladding in the Presence of Gallium

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; King, J.F.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Strizak, J.P.; Wilson, D.F.

    1998-09-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy has established a dual-track approach to the disposition of plutonium arising from the dismantling of nuclear weapons. Both immobilization and reactor-based mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel technologies are being evaluated. The reactor-based MOX fuel option requires assessment of the potential impact of concentrations of gallium (on the order of 1 to 10 ppm), not present in conventional MOX fuel, on cladding material performance. An experimental program was designed to evaluate the performance of prototypic Zircaloy cladding materials against (1) liquid gallium, and (2) various concentrations of G~03. Three types of tests were performed: (1) corrosion, (2) liquid metal embrittlement, and (3) corrosion-mechanical. These tests were to determine corrosion mechanisms, thresholds for temperature and concentration of gallium that delineate behavioral regimes, and changes in the mechanical properties of Zircaloy. Results have generally been favorable for the use of weapons-grade (WG) MOX fhel. The Zircaloy cladding does react with gallium to form intermetallic compounds at >3000 C; however, this reaction is limited by the mass of gallium and is therefore not expected to be significant with a low level (parts per million) of gallium in the MOX fuel. Furthermore, no evidence for grain boundary penetration by gallium or liquid metal embrittlement was observed.

  4. Near-infrared electroluminescence at room temperature from neodymium-doped gallium nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Joo Han; Holloway, Paul H.

    2004-09-06

    Strong near-infrared (NIR) electroluminescence (EL) at room temperature from neodymium (Nd)-doped gallium nitride (GaN) thin films is reported. The Nd-doped GaN films were grown by radio-frequency planar magnetron cosputtering of separate GaN and metallic Nd targets in a pure nitrogen ambient. X-ray diffraction data did not identify the presence of any secondary phases and revealed that the Nd-doped GaN films had a highly textured wurtzite crystal structure with the c-axis normal to the surface of the film. The EL devices were fabricated with a thin-film multilayered structure of Al/Nd-doped GaN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2}/indium-tin oxide and tested at room temperate. Three distinct NIR EL emission peaks were observed from the devices at 905, 1082, and 1364 nm, arising from the radiative relaxation of the {sup 4}F{sub 3sol2} excited-state energy level to the {sup 4}I{sub 9sol2}, {sup 4}I{sub 11sol2}, and {sup 4}I{sub 13sol2} levels of the Nd{sup 3+} ion, respectively. The threshold voltage for all the three emission peaks was {approx}150 V. The external power efficiency of the fabricated EL devices was {approx}1x10{sup -5} measured at 40 V above the threshold voltage.

  5. Influence of water on the interfacial behavior of gallium liquid metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad R; Trlica, Chris; So, Ju-Hee; Valeri, Michael; Dickey, Michael D

    2014-12-24

    Eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn) is a promising liquid metal for a variety of electrical and optical applications that take advantage of its soft and fluid properties. The presence of a rapidly forming oxide skin on the surface of the metal causes it to stick to many surfaces, which limits the ability to easily reconfigure its shape on demand. This paper shows that water can provide an interfacial slip layer between EGaIn and other surfaces, which allows the metal to flow smoothly through capillaries and across surfaces without sticking. Rheological and surface characterization shows that the presence of water also changes the chemical composition of the oxide skin and weakens its mechanical strength, although not enough to allow the metal to flow freely in microchannels without the slip layer. The slip layer provides new opportunities to control and actuate liquid metal plugs in microchannels-including the use of continuous electrowetting-enabling new possibilities for shape reconfigurable electronics, sensors, actuators, and antennas.

  6. Flexible copper-indium-diselenide films and devices for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. H.; Pistole, C. O.; Misra, M. S.; Kapur, V. K.; Basol, B. M.

    1991-01-01

    With the ever increasing demands on space power systems, it is imperative that low cost, lightweight, reliable photovoltaics be developed. One avenue of pursuit for future space power applications is the use of low cost, lightweight flexible PV cells and arrays. Most work in this area assumes the use of flexible amorphous silicon (a-Si), despite its inherent instability and low efficiencies. However, polycrystalline thin film PV such as copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) are inherently more stable and exhibit better performance than a-Si. Furthermore, preliminary data indicate that CIS also offers exciting properties with respect to space applications. However, CIS has only heretofore only produced on rigid substrates. The implications of flexible CIS upon present and future space power platforms was explored. Results indicate that space qualified CIS can dramatically reduce the cost of PV, and in most cases, can be substituted for silicon (Si) based on end-of-life (EOL) estimations. Furthermore, where cost is a prime consideration, CIS can become cost effective than gallium arsenide (GaAs) in some applications. Second, investigations into thin film deposition on flexible substrates were made, and data from these tests indicate that fabrication of flexible CIS devices is feasible. Finally, data is also presented on preliminary TCO/CdS/CuInSe2/Mo devices.

  7. Role of indium-111 white blood cells in inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, J.W.; Field, S.A.

    1988-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease in patients may be difficult to diagnose because of the complex problems associated with this disease. Radionuclides are able to provide a rapid and effective method of imaging the bowel in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease. In the past, clinical work-ups have included barium x-ray studies and endoscopy. Scarring and fistula formation have made it difficult to determine between the active disease and abscesses that may occur. Gallium-67 (67Ga) has been very useful in imaging patients with inflammatory bowel disease, but the multiple-day imaging procedure has been a limitation for the clinicians when achieving a diagnosis. Recent results with Indium-111 (111In)--labeled WBCs have provided excellent correlation between clinical symptoms and colonoscopy findings in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. This technique has also allowed the differentiation between reoccurring inflammatory bowel disease and abscesses that accompany the disease within a 24-hour time period. The use of intravenous (IV) glucagon has increased the clarity of the images in the small bowel. Technetium 99m (99mTc) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) has been used in patients with inflammatory bowel disease demonstrating promising results. Investigators feel labelling 99mTc with WBCs will be improved, therefore yielding a greater efficiency, which will have a major impact on imaging patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Imaging patients with inflammatory bowel disease using radionuclides has yielded promising results. This is a significant advancement over barium radiography and endoscopy exams.24 references.

  8. J/{psi} production in indium-indium collisions at SPS energies

    SciTech Connect

    Pillot, P.; Ducroux, L.; Guichard, A.; Tieulent, R.; Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Keil, M.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.

    2006-01-12

    The NA60 experiment collected data on dimuon production in indium-indium collisions at 158 GeV/c per incident nucleon, in year 2003, to contribute to the clarification of several questions raised by previous experiments studying high-energy heavy-ion physics at the CERN SPS in search of the quark gluon plasma. Among these previous results stands the observation, by NA50, that the production yield of J/{psi} mesons is suppressed in central Pb-Pb collisions beyond the normal nuclear absorption defined by proton-nucleus data. By comparing the centrality dependence of the suppression pattern between different colliding systems, S-U, Pb-Pb and In-In, we should be able to identify the corresponding scaling variable, and the physics mechanism driving the suppression. In this paper, we will present the ratio of J/{psi} and Drell-Yan production cross-sections in indium-indium collisions, in three centrality bins, and how these values compare to previous measurements. We will also present a study of the transverse momentum distributions of the J/{psi} mesons, in seven centrality bins.

  9. Tribological properties of aluminium-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias Victoria, Patricia

    In order to improve the tribological performance of the aluminium-steel contact, two research lines have been followed: (1) Use of the ordered fluids liquid crystals and ionic liquids as lubricant additives. (2) Tribological behaviour of new powder metallurgy aluminium materials processed by mechanical milling. A parafinic-naftenic base oil modified by a 1wt% of four additives has been used: Three liquid crystals with increasing polarity: 4,4' -dibutylazobenzene (LC1) < colesteryl linoleate (LC2) < n-dodecyl ammonium chloride (LC3), and the ionic liquid 1-ethyl, 3-methyl-imidazolonium tetrafluoroborate. This is the first time that a ionic liquid is studied as lubricant additive. Viscosity measurements at 25 and 100°C, maximum number of molecules by unit aluminium surface and comparative costs of the additives showed the advantage of the ionic additives over the neutral ones. Pin-on-disk tests were performed according to ASTM G99. Influence of load, speed and temperature on friction and wear was studied for each additive. While the ionic liquid gives low friction (<0.1) and wear (≤10-5 mm3m-1), the performance of the liquid crystalline additives depends on the conditions. LC3 shows a higher lubricating ability than the neutral LC1 and LC2 under high load, speed or temperature. Only the ionic liquid shows tribochemical interaction (by SEM and EDS) with the steel and aluminium surfaces, with an increment in the fluorine content inside the wear track. The second line was to study the influence of the process conditions on the dry and lubricated wear of new powder-metallurgy aluminium materials. MA Al-NH3 milled under NH3 atmosphere was compared with (MA Al-Air) processed in air and with Al-1 which has not been mechanically alloyed. Conditions for mild to severe wear transition have been established. Al-1 is always under a severe wear regime. MA Al-NH3 shows transition to severe wear at 150°C, showing a 60% reduction in wear rate with respect to MA Al-Air and a two

  10. Gallium scanning in lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis of children with AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, R.G.; Kabat, L.; Kamani, N.

    1987-12-01

    Lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) is a frequent pulmonary complication in the child with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We report the gallium scan findings in two children with AIDS and LIP. Gallium scintigraphy in both children demonstrated increased radionuclide concentration throughout the lungs, a pattern indistinguishable scintigraphically from that of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). This should alert nuclear medicine practitioners and referring physicians to another cause of diffusely increased gallium uptake in the lungs of patients with AIDS.

  11. Antitumor effect of novel gallium compounds and efficacy of nanoparticle-mediated gallium delivery in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wehrung, Daniel; Oyewumi, Moses O

    2012-02-01

    The widespread application of gallium (Ga) in cancer therapy has been greatly hampered by lack of specificity resulting in poor tumor accumulation and retention. To address the challenge, two lipophilic gallium (III) compounds (gallium hexanedione; GaH and gallium acetylacetonate; GaAcAc) were synthesized and antitumor studies were conducted in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. Nanoparticles (NPs) containing various concentrations of the Ga compounds were prepared using a binary mixture of Gelucire 44/14 and cetyl alcohol as matrix materials. NPs were characterized based on size, morphology, stability and biocompatibility. Antitumor effects of free or NP-loaded Ga compounds were investigated based on cell viability, production of reactive oxygen species and reduction of mitochondrial potential. Compared to free Ga compounds, cytotoxicity of NP-loaded Ga (5-150 microg/ml) was less dependent on concentration and incubation time (exposure) with A549 cells. NP-mediated delivery (5-150 microg Ga/ml) enhanced antitumor effects of Ga compounds and the effect was pronounced at: (i) shorter incubation times; and (ii) at low concentrations of gallium (approximately 50 microg/ml) (p < 0.0006). Additional studies showed that NP-mediated Ga delivery was not dependent on transferrin receptor uptake mechanism (p > 0.13) suggesting the potential in overcoming gallium resistance in some tumors. In general, preparation of stable and biocompatible NPs that facilitated Ga tumor uptake and antitumor effects could be effective in gallium-based cancer therapy.

  12. Two-Step Plasma Process for Cleaning Indium Bonding Bumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Harold F.; Vasquez, Richard P.; Jones, Todd J.; Hoenk, Michael E.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2009-01-01

    A two-step plasma process has been developed as a means of removing surface oxide layers from indium bumps used in flip-chip hybridization (bump bonding) of integrated circuits. The two-step plasma process makes it possible to remove surface indium oxide, without incurring the adverse effects of the acid etching process.

  13. Role of indium-111 chloride imaging in osteoid osteoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Swischuk, L.E.; Schreiber, M.H.

    1986-10-01

    Indium-111 chloride imaging plays an important role in differentiating intracortical osteoid osteoma from chronic cortical abscess. The study also may be useful in the detection of intramedullary osteoid osteoma. Four patients who greatly benefited from indium-111 chloride imaging are presented.

  14. Interactions of Zircaloy Cladding with Gallium: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    D.F. Wilson; E.T. Manneschmidt; J.F. King; J.P. Strizak; J.R. DiStefano

    1998-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has established a dual-track approach to the disposition of plutonium arising from the dismantling of nuclear weapons. Both immobilization and reactor-based mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel technologies are being evaluated. The reactor-based MOX fuel option requires assessment of the potential impact of concentrations of gallium (on the order of 1 to 10 ppm), not present in conventional MOX fhel, on cladding material performance. Three previous repmts"3 identified several compatibility issues relating to the presence of gallium in MOX fuel and its possible reaction with fiel cladding. Gallium initially present in weapons-grade (WG) plutonium is largely removed during processing to produce MOX fhel. After blending the plutonium with uranium, only 1 to 10 ppm gallium is expected in the sintered MOX fuel. Gallium present as gallium oxide (G~OJ could be evolved as the suboxide (G~O). Migration of the evolved G~O and diffusion of gallium in the MOX matrix along thermal gradients could lead to locally higher concentrations of G~03. Thus, while an extremely low concentration of gallium in MOX fiel almost ensures a lack of significant interaction of gallium whh Zircaloy fhel cladding, there remains a small probability that corrosion effects will not be negligible. General corrosion in the form of surface alloying resulting from formation of intermetallic compounds between Zircaloy and gallium should be ma& limited and, therefore, superficial because of the expected low ratio of gallium to the surface area or volume of the Zircaloy cladding. Although the expected concentration of gallium is low and there is very limited volubility of gallium in zirconium, especially at temperatures below 700 "C,4 grain boundary penetration and liquid metal embrittlement (LME) are forms of localized corrosion that were also considered. One fuel system darnage mechanism, pellet clad interaction, has led to some failure of the Zircaloy cladding in light-water reactors (LWRS

  15. Feet sunk in molten aluminium: The burn and its prevention.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Peña, David; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Valero-Gasalla, Javier Luis; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Campillo-Campaña, Ramón; Alonso-Peña, Javier; González-Santos, Jose María; Fernández-Díaz, Alaska Leonor; Arnáiz, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, despite improvements in safety rules and inspections in the metal industry, foundry workers are not free from burn accidents. Injuries caused by molten metals include burns secondary to molten iron, aluminium, zinc, copper, brass, bronze, manganese, lead and steel. Molten aluminium is one of the most common causative agents of burns (60%); however, only a few publications exist concerning injuries from molten aluminium. The main mechanisms of lesion from molten aluminium include direct contact of the molten metal with the skin or through safety apparel, or when the metal splash burns through the pants and rolls downward along the leg. Herein, we report three cases of deep dermal burns after 'soaking' the foot in liquid aluminium and its evolutive features. This paper aims to show our experience in the management of burns due to molten aluminium. We describe the current management principles and the key features of injury prevention.

  16. What is the risk of aluminium as a neurotoxin?

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    Aluminium is neurotoxic. Its free ion, Al(3+) (aq), is highly biologically reactive and uniquely equipped to do damage to essential cellular (neuronal) biochemistry. This unequivocal fact must be the starting point in examining the risk posed by aluminium as a neurotoxin in humans. Aluminium is present in the human brain and it accumulates with age. The most recent research demonstrates that a significant proportion of individuals older than 70 years of age have a potentially pathological accumulation of aluminium somewhere in their brain. What are the symptoms of chronic aluminium intoxication in humans? What if neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease are the manifestation of the risk of aluminium as a neurotoxin? How might such an (outrageous) hypothesis be tested?

  17. Fabrication, structure and mechanical properties of indium nanopillars

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gyuhyon; Kim, Ju-Young; Budiman, Arief Suriadi; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Chen, Kai; Burek, Michael J.; Greer, Julia R.; Tsui, Ting Y.

    2010-01-01

    Solid and hollow cylindrical indium pillars with nanoscale diameters were prepared using electron beam lithography followed by the electroplating fabrication method. The microstructure of the solid-core indium pillars was characterized by scanning micro-X-ray diffraction, which shows that the indium pillars were annealed at room temperature with very few dislocations remaining in the samples. The mechanical properties of the solid pillars were characterized using a uniaxial microcompression technique, which demonstrated that the engineering yield stress is {approx}9 times greater than bulk and is {approx}1/28 of the indium shear modulus, suggesting that the attained stresses are close to theoretical strength. Microcompression of hollow indium nanopillars showed evidence of brittle fracture. This may suggest that the failure mode for one of the most ductile metals can become brittle when the feature size is sufficiently small.

  18. Measurement of arsenic and gallium content of gallium arsenide semiconductor waste streams by ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Torrance, Keith W; Keenan, Helen E; Hursthouse, Andrew S; Stirling, David

    2010-01-01

    The chemistry of semiconductor wafer processing liquid waste, contaminated by heavy metals, was investigated to determine arsenic content. Arsenic and gallium concentrations were determined for waste slurries collected from gallium arsenide (GaAs) wafer processing at three industrial sources and compared to slurries prepared under laboratory conditions. The arsenic and gallium content of waste slurries was analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry (ICP-MS) and it is reported that the arsenic content of the waste streams was related to the wafer thinning process, with slurries from wafer polishing having the highest dissolved arsenic content at over 1,900 mgL(-1). Lapping slurries had much lower dissolved arsenic (< 90 mgL(-1)) content, but higher particulate contents. It is demonstrated that significant percentage of GaAs becomes soluble during wafer lapping. Grinding slurries had the lowest dissolved arsenic content at 15 mgL(-1). All three waste streams are classified as hazardous waste, based on their solids content and dissolved arsenic levels and treatment is required before discharge or disposal. It is calculated that as much as 93% of material is discarded through the entire GaAs device manufacturing process, with limited recycling. Although gallium can be economically recovered from waste slurries, there is little incentive to recover arsenic, which is mostly landfilled. Options for treating GaAs processing waste streams are reviewed and some recommendations made for handling the waste. Therefore, although the quantities of hazardous waste generated are miniscule in comparison to other industries, sustainable manufacturing practices are needed to minimize the environmental impact of GaAs semiconductor device fabrication.

  19. Improvement of photodynamic activity of aluminium sulphophthalocyanine due to biotinylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerovich, Irina G.; Jerdeva, Victoria V.; Derkacheva, Valentina M.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Lukyanets, Eugeny A.; Kogan, Eugenia A.; Savitsky, Alexander P.

    2003-09-01

    The photodynamic activity of dibiotinylated aluminium sulphophthalocyanine in vitro and in vivo were studied. It was obtained that in vitro dibiotinylated aluminium sulphophthalocyanine provides the effective damage of small cell lung carcinoma OAT-75. In vivo dibiotinylated aluminium sulphophthalocyanine causes destruction of tumor (Erlich carcinoma), results in total necrosis of tumor tissue and expresses vascular damage (trombosis and destruction of vascular walls) even in concentration 0.25 mg/kg of a body weight.

  20. An ultrafast rechargeable aluminium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Chang; Gong, Ming; Lu, Bingan; Wu, Yingpeng; Wang, Di-Yan; Guan, Mingyun; Angell, Michael; Chen, Changxin; Yang, Jiang; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Dai, Hongjie

    2015-04-16

    The development of new rechargeable battery systems could fuel various energy applications, from personal electronics to grid storage. Rechargeable aluminium-based batteries offer the possibilities of low cost and low flammability, together with three-electron-redox properties leading to high capacity. However, research efforts over the past 30 years have encountered numerous problems, such as cathode material disintegration, low cell discharge voltage (about 0.55 volts; ref. 5), capacitive behaviour without discharge voltage plateaus (1.1-0.2 volts or 1.8-0.8 volts) and insufficient cycle life (less than 100 cycles) with rapid capacity decay (by 26-85 per cent over 100 cycles). Here we present a rechargeable aluminium battery with high-rate capability that uses an aluminium metal anode and a three-dimensional graphitic-foam cathode. The battery operates through the electrochemical deposition and dissolution of aluminium at the anode, and intercalation/de-intercalation of chloroaluminate anions in the graphite, using a non-flammable ionic liquid electrolyte. The cell exhibits well-defined discharge voltage plateaus near 2 volts, a specific capacity of about 70 mA h g(-1) and a Coulombic efficiency of approximately 98 per cent. The cathode was found to enable fast anion diffusion and intercalation, affording charging times of around one minute with a current density of ~4,000 mA g(-1) (equivalent to ~3,000 W kg(-1)), and to withstand more than 7,500 cycles without capacity decay.

  1. The dimeric nature of bonding in gallium: from small clusters to the α-gallium phase.

    PubMed

    Tonner, Ralf; Gaston, Nicola

    2014-11-28

    We consider the structural similarity of small gallium clusters to the bulk structure of α-gallium, which has been previously described as a molecular metal, via density functional theory-based computations. Previous calculations have shown that the tetramer, the hexamer, and the octamer of gallium are all structurally similar to the α-phase. We perform an analysis of the bonding in these clusters in terms of the molecular orbitals and atoms in molecules description in order to assess whether we can see similarities at these sizes to the bonding pattern, which is ascribed to the co-existence of covalent and metallic bonding in the bulk. The singlet Ga4 and Ga8 clusters can be constructed in a singlet ground state from the Ga-dimers in the first excited triplet state of the Ga2-molecule, the (3)Σg(-) state. Molecular orbital (MO) analysis confirms that the dimer is an essential building block of these small clusters. Comparison of the AIM characteristics of the bonds within the clusters to the bonds in the bulk α-phase supports the identification of the covalent bond in the bulk as related to the (3)Σg(-) state of the dimer.

  2. Structural engineering of nanoporous anodic aluminium oxide by pulse anodization of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo; Schwirn, Kathrin; Steinhart, Martin; Pippel, Eckhard; Scholz, Roland; Gösele, Ulrich

    2008-04-01

    Nanoporous anodic aluminium oxide has traditionally been made in one of two ways: mild anodization or hard anodization. The first method produces self-ordered pore structures, but it is slow and only works for a narrow range of processing conditions; the second method, which is widely used in the aluminium industry, is faster, but it produces films with disordered pore structures. Here we report a novel approach termed "pulse anodization" that combines the advantages of the mild and hard anodization processes. By designing the pulse sequences it is possible to control both the composition and pore structure of the anodic aluminium oxide films while maintaining high throughput. We use pulse anodization to delaminate a single as-prepared anodic film into a stack of well-defined nanoporous alumina membrane sheets, and also to fabricate novel three-dimensional nanostructures.

  3. Computer simulation of radiation damage in gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stith, John J.; Davenport, James C.; Copeland, Randolph L.

    1989-01-01

    A version of the binary-collision simulation code MARLOWE was used to study the spatial characteristics of radiation damage in proton and electron irradiated gallium arsenide. Comparisons made with the experimental results proved to be encouraging.

  4. Gallium accumulation in early pulmonary Pneumocystis carinii infection

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.A.; Allegra, J.C.

    1986-09-01

    The accumulation of gallium 67 citrate in pulmonary Pneumocystis carinii is well known. The sensitivity of gallium uptake in detecting early inflammatory processes, even when conventional roentgenograms are normal, would seem to make it possible in immunocompromised patients to make a presumptive diagnosis of this serious infection early in its course without using invasive techniques to demonstrate the organism. However, the presence of gallium uptake in radiation pneumonitis, pulmonary drug toxicity, and other processes that also occur in this group limit its usefulness. In our two patients--a young woman with Hodgkin's disease and an elderly woman with small cell lung cancer--this technique proved helpful. Although the latter patient was successfully treated empirically, such empiric treatment should be reserved for patients unable or unwilling to undergo invasive tests. Pulmonary gallium uptake in patients with respiratory symptoms, even with a normal chest film, should prompt attempts to directly demonstrate the organism.

  5. Preliminary Experimental Measurements for a Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Burton, Rodney L.; Glumac, Nick G.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    A low-energy gallium plasma source is used to perform a spatially and temporally broad spectroscopic survey in the 220-520 nm range. Neutral, singly, and doubly ionized gallium are present in a 20 J, 1.8 kA (peak) arc discharge operating with a central cathode. When the polarity of the inner electrode is reversed the discharge current and arc voltage waveforms remain similar. Utilizing a central anode configuration, multiple Ga lines are absent in the 270-340 nm range. In addition, neutral and singly ionized Fe spectral lines are present, indicating erosion of the outer electrode. With graphite present on the insulator to facilitate breakdown, line emission from the gallium species is further reduced and while emissions from singly and doubly ionized carbon atoms and molecular carbon (C2) radicals are observed. These data indicate that a significant fraction of energy is shifted from the gallium and deposited into the various carbon species.

  6. Ellipsometric study of silicon nitride on gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Bu-Abbud, G. H.; Woollam, J. A.; Liu, D.; Chung, Y.; Langer, D.

    1982-01-01

    A method for optimizing the sensitivity of ellipsometric measurements for thin dielectric films on semiconductors is described in simple physical terms. The technique is demonstrated for the case of sputtered silicon nitride films on gallium arsenide.

  7. Fluxless indium and silver-indium bonding processes for photonics and high-temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, William Wilson

    A fluxless oxidation-free bonding technology using multilayer composite solders based on indium, or low melting temperature indium. alloys such as Ag-In, In-Sn and Au-In has been developed and studied. This technology eliminates the need of flux and scrubbing motion that are used in conventional soldering processes, and still produces good quality joints. By depositing multilayer composite materials in high vacuum, we eliminate the formation of an oxide layer thus removing the origin of the problem---solder oxidation. To understand the oxidation kinetics in the bonding process, I have modeled the oxidation rate of tin, which follows a parabolic growth law. For completeness of the oxidation model, I incorporated the temperature dependency of Henry's coefficient in the oxidation model. To prevent the solder material from oxidation when exposing to atmosphere, I have developed a technique, which utilizes the in-situ formation of stable intermetallic compound on the outer surface, or a gold layer to protect the bonding materials. The bonding is achieved by means of solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) and in-situ compound formation. The first alloy system that I studied is indium-silver. GaAs and silicon dice have been successfully bonded on silicon or glass substrates. The bonding quality is examined by a Scanning Acoustic Microscope (SAM). The results confirm that void-free joints are achieved. Cross-sections of the joint are examined using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The results reveal that the joint is composed of AuIn2, AgIn2-intermetallic compound and pure indium. From the Ag-In phase diagram, as indium composition is reduced to 25 wt. %, the solidus temperature jumps from 144 to above 695°C. By modifying the design of the multilayer composite, we developed a 210°C process to produce 700°C joints. All the well-bonded devices, before or after annealing, exceed the shear test force requirement of 2

  8. Patterning of Indium Tin Oxide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    A relatively rapid, economical process has been devised for patterning a thin film of indium tin oxide (ITO) that has been deposited on a polyester film. ITO is a transparent, electrically conductive substance made from a mixture of indium oxide and tin oxide that is commonly used in touch panels, liquid-crystal and plasma display devices, gas sensors, and solar photovoltaic panels. In a typical application, the ITO film must be patterned to form electrodes, current collectors, and the like. Heretofore it has been common practice to pattern an ITO film by means of either a laser ablation process or a photolithography/etching process. The laser ablation process includes the use of expensive equipment to precisely position and focus a laser. The photolithography/etching process is time-consuming. The present process is a variant of the direct toner process an inexpensive but often highly effective process for patterning conductors for printed circuits. Relative to a conventional photolithography/ etching process, this process is simpler, takes less time, and is less expensive. This process involves equipment that costs less than $500 (at 2005 prices) and enables patterning of an ITO film in a process time of less than about a half hour.

  9. Complexometric determination of gallium with calcein blue as indicator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elsheimer, H.N.

    1967-01-01

    A metalfluorechromic indicator, Calcein Blue, has been used for the back-titration of milligram amounts of EDTA in presence of gallium complexes. The indicator was used in conjunction with an ultraviolet titration assembly equipped with a cadmium sulphide detector cell and a microammeter for enhanced end-point detection. The result is a convenient and rapid method with an accuracy approaching 0.1 % and a relative standard deviation of about 0.4% for 10 mg of gallium. ?? 1967.

  10. Generator for ionic gallium-68 based on column chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Neirinckx, Rudi D.; Davis, Michael A.

    1981-01-01

    A physiologically acceptable solution of gallium-68 fluorides, having an activity of 0.1 to 50 millicuries per milliliter of solution is provided. The solution is obtained from a generator comprising germanium-68 hexafluoride bound to a column of an anion exchange resin which forms gallium-68 in situ by eluting the column with an acid solution to form a solution containing .sup.68 Ga-fluorides. The solution then is neutralized prior to administration.

  11. Method of fabricating germanium and gallium arsenide devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, Murzban (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method of semiconductor diode fabrication is disclosed which relies on the epitaxial growth of a precisely doped thickness layer of gallium arsenide or germanium on a semi-insulating or intrinsic substrate, respectively, of gallium arsenide or germanium by either molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The method involves: depositing a layer of doped or undoped silicon dioxide on a germanium or gallium arsenide wafer or substrate, selectively removing the silicon dioxide layer to define one or more surface regions for a device to be fabricated thereon, growing a matched epitaxial layer of doped germanium or gallium arsenide of an appropriate thickness using MBE or MOCVD techniques on both the silicon dioxide layer and the defined one or more regions; and etching the silicon dioxide and the epitaxial material on top of the silicon dioxide to leave a matched epitaxial layer of germanium or gallium arsenide on the germanium or gallium arsenide substrate, respectively, and upon which a field effect device can thereafter be formed.

  12. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Gallium arsenide in mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Greenspan, B.J.; Dill, J.A.; Stoney, K.H.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1990-12-01

    Gallium arsenide is a crystalline compound used extensively in the semiconductor industry. Workers preparing solar cells and gallium arsenide ingots and wafers are potentially at risk from the inhalation of gallium arsenide dust. The potential for gallium arsenide to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague- Dawley rats and CD-1 (Swiss) mice exposed to 0, 10, 37, or 75 mg/m{sup 3} gallium arsenide, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and {approx}30 positively mated rats or {approx}24 positively mated mice. Mice were exposed on 4--17 days of gestation (dg), and rats on 4--19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Gallium and arsenic concentrations were determined in the maternal blood and uterine contents of the rats (3/group) at 7, 14, and 20 dg. 37 refs., 11 figs., 30 tabs.

  13. Direct Band Gap Wurtzite Gallium Phosphide Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The main challenge for light-emitting diodes is to increase the efficiency in the green part of the spectrum. Gallium phosphide (GaP) with the normal cubic crystal structure has an indirect band gap, which severely limits the green emission efficiency. Band structure calculations have predicted a direct band gap for wurtzite GaP. Here, we report the fabrication of GaP nanowires with pure hexagonal crystal structure and demonstrate the direct nature of the band gap. We observe strong photoluminescence at a wavelength of 594 nm with short lifetime, typical for a direct band gap. Furthermore, by incorporation of aluminum or arsenic in the GaP nanowires, the emitted wavelength is tuned across an important range of the visible light spectrum (555–690 nm). This approach of crystal structure engineering enables new pathways to tailor materials properties enhancing the functionality. PMID:23464761

  14. Producing gallium arsenide crystals in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randolph, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The production of high quality crystals in space is a promising near-term application of microgravity processing. Gallium arsenide is the selected material for initial commercial production because of its inherent superior electronic properties, wide range of market applications, and broad base of on-going device development effort. Plausible product prices can absorb the high cost of space transportation for the initial flights provided by the Space Transportation System. The next step for bulk crystal growth, beyond the STS, is planned to come later with the use of free flyers or a space station, where real benefits are foreseen. The use of these vehicles, together with refinement and increasing automation of space-based crystal growth factories, will bring down costs and will support growing demands for high quality GaAs and other specialty electronic and electro-optical crystals grown in space.

  15. The interaction of gold with gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar-cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments designed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions have yielded several interesting results. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are also explained by invoking this mechanism.

  16. Radiation damage of gallium arsenide production cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Garlick, G. F. J.

    1987-01-01

    High-efficiency gallium arsenide cells, made by the liquid epitaxy method (LPE), have been irradiated with 1-MeV electrons up to fluences of 10 to the 16th e/sq cm. Measurements have been made of cell spectral response and dark and light-excited current-voltage characteristics and analyzed using computer-based models to determine underlying parameters such as damage coefficients. It is possible to use spectral response to sort out damage effects in the different cell component layers. Damage coefficients are similar to other reported in the literature for the emitter and buffer (base). However, there is also a damage effect in the window layer and possibly at the window emitter interface similar to that found for proton-irradiated liquid-phase epitaxy-grown cells. Depletion layer recombination is found to be less than theoretically expected at high fluence.

  17. Contact formation in gallium arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments were performed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are explained by invoking this mechanism.

  18. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studied. The results reveal that the 3.2-eV peak comes from the structural defect at the interface between the GaN nanorod and Si substrate. The surface state emission of the single GaN nanorod is stronger as the diameter of the GaN nanorod becomes smaller due to an increased surface-to-volume ratio. PMID:22168896

  19. Cavity optomechanics in gallium phosphide microdisks

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Matthew; Barclay, Paul E.; Hryciw, Aaron C.

    2014-04-07

    We demonstrate gallium phosphide (GaP) microdisk optical cavities with intrinsic quality factors >2.8 × 10{sup 5} and mode volumes <10(λ/n){sup 3}, and study their nonlinear and optomechanical properties. For optical intensities up to 8.0 × 10{sup 4} intracavity photons, we observe optical loss in the microcavity to decrease with increasing intensity, indicating that saturable absorption sites are present in the GaP material, and that two-photon absorption is not significant. We observe optomechanical coupling between optical modes of the microdisk around 1.5 μm and several mechanical resonances, and measure an optical spring effect consistent with a theoretically predicted optomechanical coupling rate g{sub 0}/2π∼30 kHz for the fundamental mechanical radial breathing mode at 488 MHz.

  20. Gallium Arsenide solar cell radiation damage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.; Herbert, G. A.; Meulenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells for space applications from three different manufactures were irradiated with 10 MeV protons or 1 MeV electrons. The electrical performance of the cells was measured at several fluence levels and compared. Silicon cells were included for reference and comparison. All the GaAs cell types performed similarly throughout the testing and showed a 36 to 56 percent power areal density advantage over the silicon cells. Thinner (8-mil versus 12-mil) GaAs cells provide a significant weight reduction. The use of germanium (Ge) substrates to improve mechanical integrity can be implemented with little impact on end of life performance in a radiation environment.