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Sample records for aluminium potroom asthma

  1. Airway inflammation in aluminium potroom asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sjaheim, T; Halstensen, T; Lund, M; Bjortuft, O; Drablos, P; Malterud, D; Kongerud, J

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To examine whether asthma induced by exposure to aluminium potroom emissions (potroom asthma) is associated with inflammatory changes in the airways. Methods: Bronchial biopsy specimens from 20 asthmatic workers (8 non-smokers and 12 smokers), 15 healthy workers (8 non-smokers and 7 smokers), and 10 non-exposed controls (all non-smokers) were analysed. Immunohistofluorescent staining was performed to identify mucosal total leucocytes (CD45+ leucocytes), neutrophils, and mast cells. Results: Median RBM thickness was significantly increased in both asthmatic workers (8.2 µm) and healthy workers (7.4 µm) compared to non-exposed controls (6.7 µm). Non-smoking asthmatic workers had significantly increased median density of lamina propria CD45+ leucocytes (1519 cells/mm2v 660 and 887 cells/mm2) and eosinophils (27 cells/mm2v 10 and 3 cells/mm2) and significantly increased concentrations of exhaled NO (18.1 ppb v 6.5 and 5.1 ppb) compared to non-smoking healthy workers and non-exposed controls. Leucocyte counts and exhaled NO concentrations varied with smoking habits and fewer leucocytes were observed in asthmatic smokers than in non-smokers Asthmatic smokers had significantly increased numbers of eosinophils in lamina propria compared to non-exposed controls (10 v 3 cells/mm2). Both eosinophilic and non-eosinophilic phenotypes of asthma were recognised in the potroom workers and signs of airway inflammation were also observed in healthy workers. Conclusions: Airway inflammation is a central feature of potroom asthma and exposure to potroom emissions induces pathological alterations similar to those described in other types of asthma. Cigarette smoking seems to affect the underlying mechanisms involved in asthma, as the cellular composition of airway mucosa appears different in asthmatic smokers and non-smokers. PMID:15317920

  2. Increased nitric oxide in exhaled air: an early marker of asthma in non-smoking aluminium potroom workers?

    PubMed Central

    Lund, M; Oksne, P; Hamre, R; Kongerud, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To study exhaled nitric oxide (NO) as a marker of airway inflammation caused by potroom exposure, hypothesising that (a) workers exposed to potroom pollutants would have higher concentrations of NO in expired air than control subjects employed at the same plant but working outside of the potroom atmosphere, and (b) that concentrations of exhaled NO in potroom employees might be positively associated with concentrations of fluoride and exposure to dust.
METHODS—A study group comprising 186 male subjects (aged 24-63 years), employed in the potrooms of one Norwegian aluminium smelter, and 40 comparable control subjects (aged 25-60 years) recruited from the same plant, were examined by measurements of exhaled and nasal concentrations of NO, spirometry, and a questionnaire on respiratory symptoms as a part of an annual health surveillance programme. Estimates of exposure to fluorides and dust for selected job categories were obtained by means of personal samplers carried by the workers.
RESULTS—In the non-smokers, the concentrations of exhaled NO were higher in the potroom workers than in the controls (median (interquartile range) 9.3 (6.2-15.6) v 5.7 (4.6-8.3) ppb, p=0.001). The two groups did not differ in spirometry and asthma-like symptoms. Non-smoking potroom workers with asthma-like symptoms had higher concentrations of exhaled NO than those with no symptoms (median (interquartile range) 21.0 (19.3-41.4) v 8.5 (5.9-12.8) ppb, p=0.001), but had comparable spirometric values. In subjects who smoked, the concentrations of exhaled NO did not differ significantly between potroom workers and controls (median (interquartile range) 4.6 (3.3-8.0) v 4.0 (3.4-5.1) ppb. Exhaled NO was not significantly associated with either duration of employment or routine measurements of dust and fluorides.
CONCLUSIONS—Exposure to potroom pollutants is associated with increased concentrations of exhaled NO in non-smoking subjects. Nitric oxide in exhaled

  3. Relation between exposure to fluoride and bronchial responsiveness in aluminium potroom workers with work-related asthma-like symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Søyseth, V.; Kongerud, J.; Ekstrand, J.; Boe, J.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The relation between plasma fluoride levels and bronchial responsiveness was investigated in a longitudinal study in aluminium potroom workers who reported work-related asthmatic symptoms. METHODS--From a cross-sectional respiratory survey, 26 men who reported work-related asthmatic symptoms on a validated questionnaire were selected for repeated measurements of bronchial responsiveness to methacholine. Regular analyses of plasma fluoride levels were performed. Exposure to fluoride and total particulates was assessed from routine surveillance of the workplace. Bronchial responsiveness was expressed as the dose-response slope of the line through the origin and last data point. RESULTS--A positive association was found between bronchial responsiveness and plasma fluoride levels, such that an increase in the plasma fluoride level of 10 ng/ml was associated with an increase in the dose-response slope by a factor of 1.11 (95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.17). Plasma fluoride levels were associated with the total atmospheric fluoride concentration in mg/m3 (beta = 28.1), but not with total particulates in the environment. CONCLUSIONS--Bronchial responsiveness in aluminium potroom workers reporting work-related asthmatic symptoms appears to be related to plasma levels of fluoride. The underlying mechanism is, however, unknown. PMID:7974315

  4. Exposure to chemical agents in aluminium potrooms.

    PubMed

    Doko Jelinić, Jagoda; Nola, Iskra Alexandra; Udovicić, Ruzica; Ostojić, D; Zuskin, Eugenija

    2007-01-01

    To assess the effects of modernization of aluminium production on reducing the chemical health hazards in the working environment in aluminium potrooms (smelter). Modernization included the introduction ofa technique of point feeding of alumina and aluminium fluoride into the pots, semi-automatic equipment and computerized control. Periodical environmental measurements of chemical substances, dusts containing alumina and fluorides, and gases, i.e., carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, sulphur dioxide, hydrogen fluoride, nitrogen dioxide, and difluorosulphide, were performed at the same workplaces before (1986-1988) and sixteen years later, after modernization (2004). The measured values were compared with the recommended occupational safety and health standards. The concentrations of total dust (alumina and fluorides) and gases, i.e., carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, sulphur dioxide, hydrogen fluoride and phenol, were above the recommended standards in 76.6% (95/124) of the samples before modernization and in only 23.8% (57/240) of the samples tested after modernization. Before modernization in almost all jobs the workers were simultaneously exposed to higher concentrations of all chemical agents present in the working environment. After modernization high concentrations of hydrogen fluoride were the primary pollutant in this plant (GM = 4.5451 ppm), while the presence of other gases was significantly reduced. Dusts containing alumina and fluorides and hydrogen fluoride gas were still present in considerable concentrations in the working environments of jobs such as changing and covering of anodes. The modernization of the aluminium smelter plant reduced the concentrations of the most harmful substances in the working environment and reduced the number of jobs where workers were simultaneously exposed to a variety of health hazards.

  5. Are aluminium potroom workers at increased risk of neurological disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Sim, M; Dick, R; Russo, J; Bernard, B; Grubb, P; Krieg, E; Mueller, C; McCammon, C

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether long term potroom workers in an aluminium smelter are at increased risk of neurological disorders. METHODS: Cross sectional study of 63 current and former aluminium potroom workers first employed before 1970 and with at least 10 years of service. A group of 37 cast house and carbon plant workers with similar durations of employment and starting dates in the same smelter were used as controls. The prevalence of neurological symptoms was ascertained by questionnaire. Objective tests of tremor in both upper and lower limbs, postural stability, reaction time, and vocabulary were conducted. All subjects were examined by a neurologist. RESULTS: No significant differences in age, race, or education were found between the two groups. Although the potroom group had higher prevalences for all but one of the neurological symptoms, only three odds ratios (ORs) were significantly increased; for incoordination (OR 10.6), difficulty buttoning (OR 6.2), and depression (OR 6.2). Tests of arm or hand and leg tremor in both the visible and non-visible frequencies did not show any significant differences between the two groups. Testing of postural stability showed no definitive pattern of neurologically meaningful differences between the groups. There were no significant differences between the two groups in reaction time, vocabulary score, or clinical neurological assessment. CONCLUSIONS: The objective measures of neurological function provided little support for the finding of increased neurological symptom prevalences in the potroom workers, although increased symptoms may be an indicator of early, subtle neurological changes. The results provide no firm basis for concluding that neurological effects among long term potroom workers are related to the working environment, in particular aluminium exposure, in potrooms. These findings should be treated with caution due to the low participation of former workers and the possibility of information bias in

  6. Are aluminium potroom workers at increased risk of neurological disorders?

    PubMed

    Sim, M; Dick, R; Russo, J; Bernard, B; Grubb, P; Krieg, E; Mueller, C; McCammon, C

    1997-04-01

    To determine whether long term potroom workers in an aluminium smelter are at increased risk of neurological disorders. Cross sectional study of 63 current and former aluminium potroom workers first employed before 1970 and with at least 10 years of service. A group of 37 cast house and carbon plant workers with similar durations of employment and starting dates in the same smelter were used as controls. The prevalence of neurological symptoms was ascertained by questionnaire. Objective tests of tremor in both upper and lower limbs, postural stability, reaction time, and vocabulary were conducted. All subjects were examined by a neurologist. No significant differences in age, race, or education were found between the two groups. Although the potroom group had higher prevalences for all but one of the neurological symptoms, only three odds ratios (ORs) were significantly increased; for incoordination (OR 10.6), difficulty buttoning (OR 6.2), and depression (OR 6.2). Tests of arm or hand and leg tremor in both the visible and non-visible frequencies did not show any significant differences between the two groups. Testing of postural stability showed no definitive pattern of neurologically meaningful differences between the groups. There were no significant differences between the two groups in reaction time, vocabulary score, or clinical neurological assessment. The objective measures of neurological function provided little support for the finding of increased neurological symptom prevalences in the potroom workers, although increased symptoms may be an indicator of early, subtle neurological changes. The results provide no firm basis for concluding that neurological effects among long term potroom workers are related to the working environment, in particular aluminium exposure, in potrooms. These findings should be treated with caution due to the low participation of former workers and the possibility of information bias in the potroom group.

  7. Aluminium uptake and excretion in potroom workers of a new primary aluminium smelter during the construction stage.

    PubMed

    Röllin, H B; Theodorou, P; Nogueir, C M; Levin, J

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this study was to define bio-accumulation and excretion patterns of aluminium in newly employed potroom workers as well as changes in ambient aluminium levels in the potrooms of a modern aluminium smelter during the plant construction stage and one year into full production. A study was carried out on 115 newly employed volunteer potroom workers at various intervals, over a total period of 36 months. Before commencement of employment a structured questionnaire was completed by all study participants and the first collection of blood and urine specimens took place. As none of the subjects had ever worked in the aluminium industry before, they also served as their own controls. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to measure the aluminium content in the biological fluids and the content of the metal in the ambient air of the potrooms. Significantly, the study found an early and marked biological response to inhalation of very low levels of airborne aluminium. After only 12 months, the mean concentration of aluminium in serum had almost doubled; thereafter it levelled off. A mixed model analysis did not find any differences in the concentrations of aluminium in the serum of the subjects since the variation between subjects at any given time was much smaller than the variation within subjects. This may be an indication of the pronounced effect of aluminium inhalation on the kinetics of this metal in the human body. Furthermore, urinary excretion of aluminium by the potroom workers showed a linear increase reaching a concentration of only 49 microg l(-1) at the 36 month stage, suggesting a slow rate of elimination.

  8. Prevalence of respiratory disorders among aluminium potroom workers in relation to exposure to fluoride.

    PubMed Central

    Søyseth, V; Kongerud, J

    1992-01-01

    In a survey of 370 aluminium potroom workers in western Norway, bronchial responsiveness, lung function, and respiratory symptoms were studied in relation to occupational exposure to air contaminants in the potroom. Increased prevalences of respiratory symptoms, work related asthmatic symptoms, and abnormal lung function were found in subjects exposed to total fluorides above 0.5 mg/m3 when compared with workers exposed to total fluorides at concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/m3. No significant association between bronchial responsiveness and exposure to fluoride was found and the prevalence of respiratory symptoms was independent of the degree of dust exposure. These findings indicate that work related asthmatic symptoms in potroom workers may be related to exposure to fluorides. PMID:1536819

  9. Lack of combined effects of exposure and smoking on respiratory health in aluminium potroom workers

    PubMed Central

    Radon, K.; Nowak, D.; Szadkowski, D.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the combined influence on respiratory health of smoking and exposure in an aluminium potroom. METHODS: In a cross sectional study of 75 potroom workers (23 never smokers, 38 current smokers, 14 ex-smokers) and 56 controls in the same plant (watchmen, craftsmen, office workers, laboratory employees; 18 non-smokers, 21 current smokers, 17 ex-smokers), prevalences of respiratory symptoms and spirometric indices were compared. RESULTS: Smokers in the potroom group had a lower prevalence of respiratory symptoms than never smokers or ex-smokers, which was significant for wheezing (2.6% v 17.4% and 28.6% respectively, both p < 0.01), whereas respiratory symptoms in controls tended to be highest in smokers (NS). No effects of potroom work on the prevalence of respiratory symptoms could be detected. In potroom workers, impairment of lung function due to occupational exposure was found only in non-smokers, with lower results for forced vital capacity (FVC) (98.8% predicted), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (96.1% predicted) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) (80.2% predicted) compared with controls (114.2, 109.9, and 105.9% predicted; each p < 0.001). Conversely, effects of smoking on lung function were only detectable in non-exposed controls (current smokers v non-smokers: FVC 98.8% v 114.2% predicted; p < 0.01; FEV1 95.5 v 109.9% predicted; p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In a cross sectional survey such as this, the effects of both smoking and occupational exposure on respiratory health may be masked in subjects with both risk factors. This is probably due to strong selection processes which result in least susceptible subjects continuing to smoke and working in an atmosphere with respiratory irritants.   PMID:10472318

  10. Lack of combined effects of exposure and smoking on respiratory health in aluminium potroom workers.

    PubMed

    Radon, K; Nowak, D; Szadkowski, D

    1999-07-01

    To investigate the combined influence on respiratory health of smoking and exposure in an aluminium potroom. In a cross sectional study of 75 potroom workers (23 never smokers, 38 current smokers, 14 ex-smokers) and 56 controls in the same plant (watchmen, craftsmen, office workers, laboratory employees; 18 non-smokers, 21 current smokers, 17 ex-smokers), prevalences of respiratory symptoms and spirometric indices were compared. Smokers in the potroom group had a lower prevalence of respiratory symptoms than never smokers or ex-smokers, which was significant for wheezing (2.6% v 17.4% and 28.6% respectively, both p < 0.01), whereas respiratory symptoms in controls tended to be highest in smokers (NS). No effects of potroom work on the prevalence of respiratory symptoms could be detected. In potroom workers, impairment of lung function due to occupational exposure was found only in non-smokers, with lower results for forced vital capacity (FVC) (98.8% predicted), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (96.1% predicted) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) (80.2% predicted) compared with controls (114.2, 109.9, and 105.9% predicted; each p < 0.001). Conversely, effects of smoking on lung function were only detectable in non-exposed controls (current smokers v non-smokers: FVC 98.8% v 114.2% predicted; p < 0.01; FEV1 95.5 v 109.9% predicted; p < 0.05). In a cross sectional survey such as this, the effects of both smoking and occupational exposure on respiratory health may be masked in subjects with both risk factors. This is probably due to strong selection processes which result in least susceptible subjects continuing to smoke and working in an atmosphere with respiratory irritants.

  11. Characterization of individual aerosol particles in workroom air of aluminium smelter potrooms.

    PubMed

    Hoflich, Burkard L W; Weinbruch, Stephan; Theissmann, Ralf; Gorzawski, Hauke; Ebert, Martin; Ortner, Hugo M; Skogstad, Asbjorn; Ellingsen, Dag G; Drablos, Per A; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2005-05-01

    Aerosol particles with aerodynamic diameters between 0.18 and 10 microm were collected in the workroom air of two aluminium smelter potrooms with different production processes (Soderberg and Prebake processes). Size, morphology and chemical composition of more than 2000 individual particles were determined by high resolution scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Based on chemical composition and morphology, particles were classified into different groups. Particle groups with a relative abundance above 1%(by number) include aluminium oxides, cryolite, aluminium oxides-cryolite mixtures, soot, silicates and sea salt. In both production halls, mixtures of aluminium oxides and cryolite are the dominant particle group. Many particles have fluoride-containing surface coatings or show agglomerations of nanometer-sized fluoride-containing particles on their surface. The phase composition of approximately 100 particles was studied by transmission electron microscopy. According to selected area electron diffraction, sodium beta-alumina (NaAl(11)O(17)) is the dominant aluminium oxide and cryolite (Na(3)AlF(6)) the only sodium aluminium fluoride present. Implications of our findings for assessment of adverse health effects are discussed.

  12. Relation between decline in FEV1 and exposure to dust and tobacco smoke in aluminium potroom workers.

    PubMed Central

    Søyseth, V; Boe, J; Kongerud, J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relation between pulmonary function and occupational exposure in aluminium pot operators. METHODS: 2795 observations were obtained in 630 workers over six years of follow up. An autoregressive method of analysis was used. RESULTS: After adjustment for FEV1 in the three previous years, the effect of smoking v no smoking on FEV1 was -43.1 ml, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) -72.3 to -13.9. Similarly, an increase in the exposure to particulates by 1 mg/m3 corresponded to a decrease in FEV1 of -11.9 ml, 95% CI -19.9 to -3.9. Age was a significant predictor of both FEV1 and FVC. CONCLUSION: Exposure to particulates in aluminium potrooms seems to increase the decline in FEV15 thereby increasing the risk of development of chronic obstructive lung disease in pot operators. PMID:9072030

  13. Occupational asthma caused by aluminium welding.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, O; Delwiche, J P; Vanbilsen, M L; Joly, J; Roosels, D

    1998-05-01

    Work-related asthma has been documented in workers employed in the primary aluminium industry and in the production of aluminium salts. The role of aluminium in the development of occupational asthma has, however, never been convincingly substantiated. We investigated a subject who experienced asthmatic reactions related to manual metal arc welding on aluminium. Challenge exposure to aluminium welding with flux-coated electrodes, as well as with electrodes without flux, elicited marked asthmatic reactions. Manual metal arc welding on mild steel did not cause significant bronchial response. The results of inhalation challenges combined with exposure assessments provided evidence that aluminium can cause asthmatic reactions in the absence of fluorides. Awareness of this possibility may be relevant to the investigation of asthma in workers exposed to aluminium.

  14. Theoretical aspects of fluoride air contaminant formation in aluminium smelter potrooms.

    PubMed

    L'vov, Boris V; Polzik, Leonid K; Weinbruch, Stephan; Ellingsen, Dag G; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2005-05-01

    The amount of particulate fluorides evolved from aluminium electrolysis cells is not entirely accounted for by the fluorides entrained in the anode gas. The largest additional source of particulate fluoride formation is by direct evaporation of fluorides into the anode gas stream and subsequent condensation on the drops of electrolyte generated in the process of bubble burst. A theoretical model was used for the calculation of the main physical parameters responsible for the formation of particle nuclei when the hot anode-gas is mixed with ambient air. The results of these calculations are in agreement with experimental observations reported in the literature. In particular, the size distribution, composition and morphology of the nano-particles support the theory of a vapour condensation mechanism under conditions of extreme supersaturation, but further studies are necessary.

  15. Hygroscopic properties of the workroom aerosol in aluminium smelter potrooms: a case for transport of HF and SO2 into the lower airways.

    PubMed

    Weinbruch, S; Benker, N; Koch, W; Ebert, M; Drabløs, P A; Skaugset, N P; Ellingsen, D G; Thomassen, Y

    2010-02-01

    The hygroscopic behaviour of individual aerosol particles from workplaces in a primary aluminium smelter was investigated by environmental scanning electron microscopy. At a high relative humidity, comparable with the human respiratory tract, most particles encountered in the Søderberg and Prebake potrooms either undergo partial deliquescence (leading to a water droplet with an insoluble core) or form thin water films at the surface. As gaseous HF and SO(2) are highly soluble in water, the aerosol particles may act as carrier for these two gases into the alveolar region of the lower respiratory tract. Based on a one-dimensional mass balance model, it is estimated that under peak exposure conditions (particle surface area concentration of 10(-4) cm(2) cm(-3)) approximately 10% of the initial gaseous HF may be transferred to the particle phase. For SO(2), this fraction is much lower (approximately 1%). These results indicate that at least HF may penetrate deeper into the lung in the presence of soluble particles or particles that form surface water films compared to HF alone.

  16. Intelligent Potroom Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Jan Berkow; Larry Banta

    2003-07-29

    The Intelligent Potroom Operation project focuses on maximizing the performance of an aluminum smelter by innovating components for an intelligent manufacturing system. The Intelligent Potroom Advisor (IPA) monitors process data to identify reduction cells exhibiting behaviors that require immediate attention. It then advises operational personnel on those heuristic-based actions to bring the cell back to an optimal operating state in order to reduce the duration and frequency of substandard reduction cell performance referred to as ''Off-Peak Modes'' (OPMs). Techniques developed to identify cells exhibiting OPMs include the use of a finite element model-based cell state estimator for defining the cell's current operating state via advanced cell noise analyses. In addition, rule induction was also employed to identify statistically significant complex behaviors that occur prior to OPMs. The intelligent manufacturing system design, concepts and formalisms developed in this project w ere used as a basis for an intelligent manufacturing system design. Future research will incorporate an adaptive component to automate continuous process improvement, a technology platform with the potential to improve process performance in many of the other Industries of the Future applications as well.

  17. [Bronchopulmonary diseases in workers engaged into aluminium production in Transpolar area of Kolsky peninsula].

    PubMed

    Siurin, S A; Nikanov, A N; Rocheva, I I

    2008-01-01

    Findings are that chronic bronchitis (14.1-18.5% of workers) is leading among bronchopulmonary diseases in workers engaged into electrolysis and auxiliary workshops of aluminium production. Chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD) and bronchial asthma (BA) occur in 1.6-2.4% of the workers requiring employment. Among other variants of BA, potroom asthma--occupational form of the disease--should be emphasized. Risk of chronic bronchitis and COLD depends on length of exposure to the occupational hazards, and intensity of smoking habit.

  18. Asthma caused by potassium aluminium tetrafluoride: a case series.

    PubMed

    Laštovková, Andrea; Klusáčková, Pavlina; Fenclová, Zdenka; Bonneterre, Vincent; Pelclová, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe a case-series of potassium aluminium tetrafluoride (KAlF(4))-induced occupational asthma (OA) and/or occupational rhinitis (OR). The study involves five patients from a heat-exchanger production line who were examined (including specific inhalation challenge tests) for suspected OA and/or OR caused by a flux containing almost 100% KAlF(4) - with fluorides' workplace air concentrations ranging between 1.7 and 2.8 mg/m(3). No subject had a previous history of asthma. All five patients had a positive specific challenge test (three patients were diagnosed with OA alone, one with OR and one with both OR and OA). At the follow-up visit, after three years on average, all patients needed permanent corticosteroid therapy (four topical, one oral). After elimination from the exposure, only one of the observed subjects gave an indication of an improvement, two subjects stabilized and two worsened. Our case series focuses on the correlation between patients' exposure to fluorides in air-conditioner production and the subsequent occurrence of OR/OA. Currently, it is uncertain whether these OR/OA were caused by hypersensitivity or irritation.

  19. Asthma caused by potassium aluminium tetrafluoride: a case series

    PubMed Central

    LAŠTOVKOVÁ, Andrea; KLUSÁČKOVÁ, Pavlina; FENCLOVÁ, Zdenka; BONNETERRE, Vincent; PELCLOVÁ, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe a case-series of potassium aluminium tetrafluoride (KAlF4)-induced occupational asthma (OA) and/or occupational rhinitis (OR). The study involves five patients from a heat-exchanger production line who were examined (including specific inhalation challenge tests) for suspected OA and/or OR caused by a flux containing almost 100% KAlF4 − with fluorides’ workplace air concentrations ranging between 1.7 and 2.8 mg/m3. No subject had a previous history of asthma. All five patients had a positive specific challenge test (three patients were diagnosed with OA alone, one with OR and one with both OR and OA). At the follow-up visit, after three years on average, all patients needed permanent corticosteroid therapy (four topical, one oral). After elimination from the exposure, only one of the observed subjects gave an indication of an improvement, two subjects stabilized and two worsened. Our case series focuses on the correlation between patients’ exposure to fluorides in air-conditioner production and the subsequent occurrence of OR/OA. Currently, it is uncertain whether these OR/OA were caused by hypersensitivity or irritation. PMID:26212411

  20. Genetic factors and asthma in aluminum smelter workers.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz, Nilo O; Kaufman, Joel D; Daroowalla, Feroza M; Quigley, Sean; Farin, Federico; Checkoway, Harvey

    2003-04-01

    An asthma-like condition has been reported among aluminum smelter potroom workers. The pathophysiologic mechanisms and the causative agent involved are unknown. Inasmuch as gene polymorphisms are associated with asthma in the general population, the authors of this case-control study examined whether polymorphisms were associated with the development of potroom asthma. Genotyping was performed for the beta2-adrenoreceptor, high-affinity Ig (immunoglobulin) E receptor, and Tumor Necrosis Factor on potroom workers who developed a new asthma-like condition and on individuals who did not develop respiratory problems. No associations were found between potroom asthma case status and genotype. The asthma-like condition associated with potroom work remains poorly understood. Future investigations of genetic susceptibility and occupational asthma may provide pathophysiologic insights into these work-related conditions, but larger numbers of subjects will be required.

  1. A longitudinal study of respiratory symptoms in aluminum potroom workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kongerud, J.; Samuelsen, S.O. )

    1991-07-01

    The influence of occupational work exposure and host factors on the incidence of dyspnea and wheezing as reported in questionnaires was examined in 1,301 new employees in aluminum electrolytic potrooms. The incidence appeared to decrease after 2 yr of exposure, and the estimated probability of development of symptoms was nearly 20% after 4 yr. A total of 105 subjects developed dyspnea and wheezing. Of 78 symptomatic subjects who were interviewed, 76% experienced improvement or absence of symptoms when off work. In 523 subjects who were assigned to specific levels of exposure at the end of follow-up, a dose-response gradient was found between the development of symptoms and fluoride exposure. Increased risk with increasing amounts of tobacco was also observed, but childhood allergy and a family history of asthma were not significantly related to the outcome variable. The authors conclude that both total fluoride exposure and smoking are related to asthmatic symptoms in potroom workers, and the suggestion of a dose-response gradient was found for both variables. However, a causal relationship between fluorides and symptoms should be investigated further by specific bronchial provocation testing and by research for specific antibodies and other immunologic markers.

  2. Assessing individual employee risk factors for occupational asthma in primary aluminium smelting

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, C; McBride, D; Firth, H; Herbison, G

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To assess the significance of individual risk factors in the development of occupational asthma of aluminium smelting (OAAS). Methods: A matched case-control study nested in a cohort of 545 workers employed in areas with moderate to high levels of smelting dust and fume. The cohort comprised those who had their first pre-employment medical examination between 1 July 1982 and 1 July 1995; follow up was until 31 December 2000. Forty five cases diagnosed with OAAS and four controls per case were matched for the same year of pre-employment and age within ±5 years. The pre-employment medical questionnaires were examined, blinded as to case-control status, and information obtained on demographics and details of allergic symptoms, respiratory risk factors, respiratory symptoms, and spirometry. Data from the subsequent medical notes yielded subsequent history of hay fever, family history of asthma, full work history, date of termination or diagnosis, and tobacco smoking history at the end-point. Results: There was a significant positive association between hay fever diagnosed either at or during employment and OAAS (adjusted OR 3.58, 95% CI 1.57 to 8.21). A higher forced expiratory ratio (FEV1/FVC%) at employment reduced the risk of developing OAAS (adjusted OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.88 to 0.99). The risk of OAAS was more than three times higher in individuals with an FER of 70.0–74.9% than in individuals with an FER ⩾80.0% (adjusted OR 3.46, 95% CI 1.01 to 11.89). Conclusions: Individuals with hay fever may be more susceptible to occupational asthma when exposed to airborne irritants in aluminium smelting. The pathological basis may be reduced nasal filtration and increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness. PMID:15208376

  3. Annual decline in forced expiratory volume is steeper in aluminum potroom workers than in workers without exposure to potroom fumes.

    PubMed

    Søyseth, Vidar; Henneberger, Paul K; Einvik, Gunnar; Virji, Mohammed Abbas; Bakke, Berit; Kongerud, Johny

    2016-04-01

    Aluminum potroom exposure is associated with increased mortality of COPD but the association between potroom exposure and annual decline in lung function is unknown. We have measured lung volumes annually using spirometry from 1986 to 1996. The objective was to compare annual decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (dFEV1) and forced vital capacity (dFVC). The number of aluminum potroom workers was 4,546 (81% males) and the number of workers in the reference group was 651 (76% males). The number of spirometries in the index group and the references were 24,060 and 2,243, respectively. After adjustment for confounders, the difference in dFEV1 and dFVC between the index and reference groups were 13.5 (P < 0.001) and -8.0 (P = 0.060) ml/year. Aluminum potroom operators have increased annual decline in FEV1 relative to a comparable group with non-exposure to potroom fumes and gases. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Annual decline in forced expiratory volume is steeper in aluminum potroom workers than in workers without exposure to potroom fumes

    PubMed Central

    Henneberger, Paul K.; Einvik, Gunnar; Virji, Mohammed Abbas; Bakke, Berit; Kongerud, Johny

    2016-01-01

    Background Aluminum potroom exposure is associated with increased mortality of COPD but the association between potroom exposure and annual decline in lung function is unknown. We have measured lung volumes annually using spirometry from 1986 to 1996. The objective was to compare annual decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (dFEV1) and forced vital capacity (dFVC). Methods The number of aluminum potroom workers was 4,546 (81% males) and the number of workers in the reference group was 651 (76% males). The number of spirometries in the index group and the references were 24,060 and 2,243, respectively. Results After adjustment for confounders, the difference in dFEV1 and dFVC between the index and reference groups were 13.5 (P < 0.001) and −8.0 (P = 0.060) ml/year. Conclusion Aluminum potroom operators have increased annual decline in FEV1 relative to a comparable group with non‐exposure to potroom fumes and gases. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:322–329, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26853811

  5. Biological indicators of exposure to total and respirable aluminium dust fractions in a primary aluminium smelter.

    PubMed Central

    Röllin, H B; Theodorou, P; Cantrell, A C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The study attempts to define biological indicators of aluminium uptake and excretion in workers exposed to airborne aluminium compounds in a primary aluminium smelter. Also, this study defines the total and respirable aluminium dust fractions in two different potrooms, and correlates their concentrations with biological indicators in this group of workers. METHODS: Air was sampled at defined work sites. Non-destructive and conventional techniques were used to find total and respirable aluminium content of the dust. Blood and urine was collected from 84 volunteers employed at various work stations throughout the smelter and from two different cohorts of controls matched for sex, age, and socioeconomic status. Aluminium in serum samples and urine specimens was measured by flameless atomic absorption with a PE 4100 ZL spectrometer. RESULTS: The correlation of aluminium concentrations in serum and urine samples with the degree of exposure was assessed for three arbitrary exposure categories; low (0.036 mg Al/m3), medium (0.35 mg Al/m3) and high (1.47 mg Al/m3) as found in different areas of the smelter. At medium and high exposure, the ratio of respirable to total aluminium in the dust samples varied significantly. At high exposure, serum aluminium, although significantly raised, was still within the normal range of an unexposed population. The workers with low exposure excreted aluminium in urine at levels significantly higher than the controls, but still within the normal range of the population. However, potroom workers with medium and high exposure had significantly higher urinary aluminium than the normal range. CONCLUSIONS: It is concluded that only urinary aluminium constitutes a practical index of occupational exposure at or above 0.35 mg Al/m3, and that the respirable fraction of the dust may play a major role in the biological response to exposure to aluminium in a smelter environment. PMID:8758038

  6. 40 CFR 63.845 - Incorporation of new source performance standards for potroom groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... potroom group after the replacements; and (G) A discussion of any economic or technical limitations the... performance standards for potroom groups. 63.845 Section 63.845 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... groups. (a) Applicability. The provisions in paragraphs (a) through (i) of this section shall apply to...

  7. 40 CFR 63.845 - Incorporation of new source performance standards for potroom groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... potroom group after the replacements; and (G) A discussion of any economic or technical limitations the... performance standards for potroom groups. 63.845 Section 63.845 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... groups. (a) Applicability. The provisions in paragraphs (a) through (i) of this section shall apply to...

  8. 40 CFR 63.845 - Incorporation of new source performance standards for potroom groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... potroom group after the replacements; and (G) A discussion of any economic or technical limitations the... performance standards for potroom groups. 63.845 Section 63.845 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... groups. (a) Applicability. The provisions in paragraphs (a) through (i) of this section shall apply to...

  9. Acute and long-term airway hyperreactivity in aluminium-salt exposed workers with nocturnal asthma.

    PubMed

    Simonsson, B G; Sjöberg, A; Rolf, C; Haeger-Aronsen, B

    1985-02-01

    Nineteen young male workers exposed occupationally from 1975-1977 to inhaled particles of aluminium fluoride or sulphate at 2 plants, developed nocturnal wheezing and breathlessness with reversible airways obstruction after an average of 4 months employment. At standardized methacholine provocation tests (MPT), 17 of 19 workers with normal spirometry showed airway hyperreactivity with a fall of FEV1 of greater than or equal to 15% after 0.1% methacholine. We followed 15 initially asthmatic workers for 2-5 years with MPT. Mean TD 15% FEV1 in 11 workers did not change significantly after an average of 41 months of non-exposure. Six workers continuously exposed for 48 months also failed to change their TD 15% FEV1 MCh. In 1983, only one subject had returned to normal airway reactivity. We have no reason to suspect inducing agents other than aluminium salts.

  10. Follow-up of airway reactivity in potroom workers in relation to exposure.

    PubMed

    Sarić, M; Godnić-Cvar, J; Marelja, J

    1992-01-01

    Two groups of workers were studied: a) 24 workers with respiratory complaints--7 of whom were light and 4 borderline hyper-reactors--who continued to work on the electrolytic reduction of aluminium for up to two years; b) 30 workers with increased bronchial reactivity who ceased to work in potrooms for 3.7 years on average (range 2-11 years) because of respiratory complaints. Subjective respiratory complaints were recorded and a non specific bronchial reactivity test was performed one or two times during the follow-up period. A sustained level of airway reactivity was recorded in both groups of workers regardless of exposure conditions. In workers with dyspnoea and airway obstruction, bronchial reactivity did not worsen in spite of continued exposure. On the other hand cessation of exposure was not followed by normalization of bronchial reactivity. The potential role of atopy, smoking habits and length of previous exposure was analyzed. It appears that increased bronchial reactivity, once induced, has a tendency to persist. An improvement in subjective complaints may be expected after cessation of exposure.

  11. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Asthma KidsHealth > For Teens > Asthma Print A A A ... even an all-important geometry test. What Is Asthma? Asthma (pronounced: AZ-muh) is a lung condition ...

  12. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > Asthma A A A What's ... although it can take several days. Who Gets Asthma? No one really knows why one person's airways ...

  13. Symptoms of the musculoskeletal system and exposure to magnetic fields in an aluminium plant.

    PubMed Central

    Moen, B E; Drabløs, P A; Pedersen, S; Sjøen, M; Thommesen, G

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--The study was performed to examine the influence of the exposure to magnetic fields in the potrooms of an electrolysis plant on the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms among the employees. The study was performed after much discussion and worry in the aluminium industry about this issue. METHODS--A retrospective cohort study was performed at an aluminium plant. The occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms registered at health controls performed by the occupational health care unit in 1986 and 1991 was assessed from employees exposed to magnetic fields in the potrooms (n = 342) and from a control group (n = 277). The data were collected before the discussion about the effects of magnetic fields started. The exposure to static magnetic fields was found to be 3-20 mT inside the potrooms. Ripple components (alternating currents (AC fields)) were registered as well. RESULTS--No difference between the exposed and unexposed groups was found for the reported musculoskeletal symptoms in 1986 or in 1991. CONCLUSIONS--There seems to be no relation between work in potrooms with exposure to static magnetic fields and the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms. PMID:7663637

  14. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... stay healthier overall. Doctors can help people find treatments that allow them to them participate in their sports — in fact, a number of professional athletes have asthma. Taking Medicine Most asthma medicines are breathed directly into the ...

  15. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma. This video features an interview with Dr. Stewart Lavine, an NHLBI researcher, who is conducting a ... nhlbi.nih.gov/research/intramural/researchers/pi/levine-stewart/ Asthma Awareness Google+ Hangout On Air 06/04/ ...

  16. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... called allergens or triggers. Common asthma triggers include: Animals (pet hair or dander) Dust mites Certain medicines (aspirin and other NSAIDS) Changes in weather (most often cold weather) ... animal dander, fungi, or chemicals. Many people with asthma ...

  17. Improved injury management at an Australian aluminium smelter.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, Deon; Guest, Maya; Boggess, May; Duked, Janine

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study sought to determine the effectiveness of interventions to improve injury management in an industrial setting. Study participants were workers from three production departments of a large aluminium smelter. The interventions introduced were to encourage active participation in rehabilitation procedures by injured workers, improve communication with all stakeholders, identify and manage psychosocial issues, and focus the workforce on occupational health and safety matters. Linear regression modelling was used to determine the effectiveness of the interventions using data collected for fourteen months before and fifteen months after the introduction of interventions. Outcomes compared were the number of injuries, number of persons on restricted duty, and lost hours per month. Modelling showed the intervention significantly reduced the number of injuries in the potrooms (from 14 to 6 per month). The number of persons on restricted duties was reduced in all departments (potrooms: from 12 to 7 persons per month, cast house: 3 to 1 person per month, carbon plant: 3 to 1 person per month). Lost hours were significantly reduced in the potrooms (from 244 to 61 hours per month). These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of the revised injury management process introduced.

  18. 40 CFR 63.845 - Incorporation of new source performance standards for potroom groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: (A) The fixed capital cost of the replacements in comparison to the fixed capital cost that would be...=the lower TF emission limit in kg/Mg (lb/ton); f1=the fraction of the potline's total aluminum... potline's total aluminum production rate that is contained within all modified potroom...

  19. 40 CFR 63.845 - Incorporation of new source performance standards for potroom groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: (A) The fixed capital cost of the replacements in comparison to the fixed capital cost that would be...=the lower TF emission limit in kg/Mg (lb/ton); f1=the fraction of the potline's total aluminum... potline's total aluminum production rate that is contained within all modified potroom...

  20. Asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Calverley, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is now recognised to be a major cause of morbidity and even mortality in people of all ages. Two important ideas have changed our approach to asthma management. The first is understanding that asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder which needs regular treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs such as inhaled corticosteroids to prevent further attacks. The second development is the availability of prescribable peak flow meters, which allows both confident diagnosis and early prediction of relapse. Asthma management guidelines provide a logical treatment framework for most patients, but a few difficult cases still consume large amounts of medical time. The commonest problem is one of compliance with treatment which may respond to patient education, although this is not universally so. Other problems include misdiagnosis, acid reflux and, rarely, true corticosteroid-resistant asthma. Several potentially important new treatments have been developed. These include longer acting anticholinergic drugs, drugs with bronchodilator and some anti-inflammatory properties which antagonise or inhibit the production of leukotrienes, sub-types of phosphodiesterase inhibitor with anti-inflammatory properties and immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporin. Ultimately these new treatments must be rigorously tested and integrated into a care plan that remains centred on patient education. PMID:8746278

  1. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... inhaler has a plastic tube that holds the asthma medicine. When you press on the tube, a puff of medicine sprays out for you to breathe in. Using a Spacer Using an inhaler like this can be tricky, so a spacer ...

  2. Aluminium plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Davy; Gray, Stephen K.

    2015-05-01

    We present an overview of ‘aluminium plasmonics’, i.e. the study of both fundamental and practical aspects of surface plasmon excitations in aluminium structures, in particular thin films and metal nanoparticles. After a brief introduction noting both some recent and historical contributions to aluminium plasmonics, we discuss the optical properties of aluminium and aluminium nanostructures and highlight a few selected studies in a host of areas ranging from fluorescence to data storage.

  3. Aluminium plasmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Gerard, Davy; Gray, Stephen K.

    2014-12-15

    In this study, we present an overview of 'aluminium plasmonics', i.e. the study of both fundamental and practical aspects of surface plasmon excitations in aluminium structures, in particular thin films and metal nanoparticles. After a brief introduction noting both some recent and historical contributions to aluminium plasmonics, we discuss the optical properties of aluminium and aluminium nanostructures and highlight a few selected studies in a host of areas ranging from fluorescence to data storage.

  4. Aluminium plasmonics

    DOE PAGES

    Gerard, Davy; Gray, Stephen K.

    2014-12-15

    In this study, we present an overview of 'aluminium plasmonics', i.e. the study of both fundamental and practical aspects of surface plasmon excitations in aluminium structures, in particular thin films and metal nanoparticles. After a brief introduction noting both some recent and historical contributions to aluminium plasmonics, we discuss the optical properties of aluminium and aluminium nanostructures and highlight a few selected studies in a host of areas ranging from fluorescence to data storage.

  5. [Prevalence and estimation of the occupational risk of the musculosceletal disorders in workers of aluminum potrooms].

    PubMed

    Shirokov, V A; Makar', T V; Potaturko, A V

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the role of the occupational risks in the development of pain syndromes of the locomotor system in workers employed in basic workplaces at aluminum potrooms, basing on the periodic health screenings data. It has been determined that working under the conditions of toxical fluorides-related exposure and athletic overexertion increases the risk of the upper arm pain syndrome development 4.3 fold. The maximum relative risk (108.2) has been revealed in the workers of such kind of professions having the length of employment upper 20 years and suffering simultaneously from cervical osteochondrosis and pulmonary diseases.

  6. Aluminium in human sweat.

    PubMed

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Evidence of aluminium accumulation in aluminium welders.

    PubMed Central

    Elinder, C G; Ahrengart, L; Lidums, V; Pettersson, E; Sjögren, B

    1991-01-01

    Using atomic absorption spectrometry the aluminium concentrations in blood and urine and in two iliac bone biopsies obtained from welders with long term exposure to fumes containing aluminium were measured. The urinary excretion of two workers who had welded for 20 and 21 years varied between 107 and 351 micrograms Al/l, more than 10 times the concentration found in persons without occupational exposure. Urinary aluminium excretion remained high many years after stopping exposure. Blood and bone aluminium concentrations (4-53 micrograms Al/l and 18-29 micrograms Al/g respectively) were also raised but not to the same extent as urine excretion. It is concluded that long term exposure to aluminium by inhalation gives rise to accumulation of aluminium in the body and skeleton of health persons, and that the elimination of retained aluminium is very slow, in the order of several years. PMID:1954151

  8. Exposure and inhalation risk assessment in an aluminium cast-house.

    PubMed

    Godderis, L; Vanderheyden, W; Van Geel, J; Moens, G; Masschelein, R; Veulemans, H

    2005-12-01

    To date the exposure, absorption and respiratory health effects of cast-house workers have not been described since most studies performed in the aluminium industry are focused on exposure and health effects of potroom personnel. In the present study, we assessed the external exposure and the absorbed dose of metals in personnel from the aluminium cast house. This was combined with an evaluation of respiratory complaints and the lung function of the personnel. 30 workers from an aluminium casting plant participated and 17 individuals of the packaging and distribution departments were selected as controls. The exposure was assessed by the quantification of total inhalable fume with metal fraction and by the determination of urinary aluminium, chromium, beryllium, manganese and lead concentration. Carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), aldehydes and polyaromatic hydrocarbons and man-made mineral fibres concentration were assessed as well. In order to evaluate their respiratory status each participant filled out a questionnaire and their lung function was tested by forced spirometry. Total inhalable fume exposure was maximum 4.37 mg m(-3). Exposure to the combustion gases, man-made mineral fibres and metal fume was well below the exposure limits. Beryllium could not be detected in the urine. The values of aluminium, manganese and lead in the urine were all under the respective reference value. One individual had a urinary chromium excretion above the ACGIH defined biological exposure index (BEI) of 30 microg g(-1) creatinine. There was no significant difference in any of the categories of the respiratory questionnaire and in the results of the spirometry between cast house personnel and referents (Chi-square, all p > 0.05). Exposure in cast houses seem to be acceptable under these conditions. However, peak exposure to fumes cannot be excluded and the potential risk of chromium and beryllium exposure due to the recycling of aluminium requires further attention.

  9. Asthma Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Asthma Basics KidsHealth > For Parents > Asthma Basics Print A ... Asthma Categories en español Asma: aspectos fundamentales About Asthma Asthma is a common lung condition in kids ...

  10. Human exposure to aluminium.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  11. Occupational Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Library ▸ Asthma Library ▸ Occupational asthma TTR Share | Occupational Asthma This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI Occupational asthma has become the most common work-related lung ...

  12. Pediatric Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research & Science Education & Training Home Conditions Asthma (Pediatric) Asthma (Pediatric) Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... Ask a Question The first symptoms of childhood asthma – heavy wheezing, tight chest and shortness of breath – ...

  13. Occupational asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Asthma - occupational exposure; Irritant-induced reactive airways disease Images Spirometry Respiratory system References Lemiere C, Vandenplas O. Occupational allergy and asthma. In: Adkinson NF Jr., Bochner ...

  14. Asthma - quick-relief drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Allergies - overview Asthma Asthma and allergy - resources Asthma - children Wheezing Patient Instructions Asthma and school Asthma - child - discharge Asthma - control drugs Asthma - what to ask ...

  15. Aluminium toxicity during regular haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Elliott, H L; Dryburgh, F; Fell, G S; Sabet, S; Macdougall, A I

    1978-04-29

    In the west of Scotland the incidence of dialysis encephalopathy has been confined to three geographical areas where the concentration of aluminium in the water supply is greatly increased owing to the addition of aluminium sulphate. Eight patients with encephalopathy who dialysed at home in these areas had greatly increased serum aluminium concentrations, and a significant correlation was found between serum aluminium concentrations and the concentrations of aluminium in the water supply. This study provides further evidence that the dialysis encephalopathy syndrome is due to aluminium intoxication, the major source of aluminium being the water supply from which dialysis fluid prepared.

  16. Aluminium toxicity during regular haemodialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, H L; Dryburgh, F; Fell, G S; Sabet, S; Macdougall, A I

    1978-01-01

    In the west of Scotland the incidence of dialysis encephalopathy has been confined to three geographical areas where the concentration of aluminium in the water supply is greatly increased owing to the addition of aluminium sulphate. Eight patients with encephalopathy who dialysed at home in these areas had greatly increased serum aluminium concentrations, and a significant correlation was found between serum aluminium concentrations and the concentrations of aluminium in the water supply. This study provides further evidence that the dialysis encephalopathy syndrome is due to aluminium intoxication, the major source of aluminium being the water supply from which dialysis fluid prepared. PMID:638617

  17. An immunologic and genetic study of asthma in workers in an aluminum smelter

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, I.R.; Oliphant, R.C.; Laby, B.; Smith, M.M.; Fisher, J.N.; Mitchell, R.J.; Propert, D.N.; Tait, B.D. )

    1990-10-01

    The cause or causes of asthma among employees in aluminum smelters is unknown. We attempted to ascertain whether such workers who developed asthma differed in respect to indices of immunological function and certain genetic markers. Data were collected from 33 asthmatic and 127 nonasthmatic potroom workers. Asthmatic workers had significantly lower mean serum levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)M; however, mean levels of IgG and IgA, median levels of IgE, the capacity for recall of delayed type hypersensitivity, levels of immune complexes, and frequency of antinuclear or other autoantibodies did not differ from values for nonasthmatic workers. Asthma was found to develop on a background of atopy in 21 workers (64%), whereas there were no features of atopy in 12 workers (36%). Cigarette smoking had independent effects on immunological function. In respect to genetic markers, there was a higher frequency among asthmatic workers of the alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency phenotype MS, but the frequency of blood groups, Gm allotypes, or human leucocyte antigen types was similar. The study established that the profile of immune function, or genetic markers tested, did not differ essentially for workers in an aluminum smelter who did or did not develop asthma; however, there was an indication of heterogeneity in causation, as judged by atopy-related and non-atopy-related groups in the asthma population.

  18. Asthma Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is working to explore the role of common air pollutants in the development and exacerbation of asthma at different life stages as well as other environmental and genetic factors that might make a person more sensitive to developing asthma.

  19. Asthma Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... swimming, biking, etc.). Some develop symptoms only after physical activity, while others have additional asthma triggers. With the proper medicines, most kids with EIA can play sports like other kids. In fact, asthma affects more ...

  20. Nocturnal Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by an upper airway obstruction Treatment and Management Treatment of any underlying causes of nocturnal asthma should help you be able to sleep through the night without asthma symptoms. Controlling allergen exposure in the bedroom, treating sinusitis and/ ...

  1. Fatal aluminium phosphide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Sachin; Rani, Yashoda

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium phosphide (AlP) is a cheap solid fumigant and a highly toxic pesticide which is commonly used for grain preservation. AlP has currently aroused interest with a rising number of cases in the past four decades due to increased use for agricultural and non-agricultural purposes. Its easy availability in the markets has increased also its misuse for committing suicide. Phosphine inhibits cellular oxygen utilization and can induce lipid peroxidation. Poisoning with AlP has often occurred in attempts to commit suicide, and that more often in adults than in teenagers. This is a case of suicidal consumption of aluminium phosphide by a 32-year-old young medical anesthetist. Toxicological analyses detected aluminium phosphide. We believe that free access of celphos tablets in grain markets should be prohibited by law. PMID:27486362

  2. Asthma Outcomes: Asthma Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jerry A.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Canino, Glorisa J.; Elward, Kurtis S.; Kattan, Meyer; Matsui, Elizabeth C.; Mitchell, Herman; Sutherland, E. Rand; Minnicozzi, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory symptoms are commonly used to assess the impact of patient-centered interventions. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to propose which measurements of asthma symptoms should be used as a standardized measure in future clinical research studies. Methods Asthma symptom instruments were classified as daily diaries (prospectively recording symptoms between research visits) or retrospective questionnaires (completed at research visits). We conducted a systematic search in PubMed and a search for articles that cited key studies describing development of instruments. We classified outcome instruments as either core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to study aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results Four instruments (3 daily diaries, 1 for adults and 2 for children; and 1 retrospective questionnaire for adults) were identified. Minimal clinically important differences have not been established for these instruments, and validation studies were only conducted in a limited number of patient populations. Validity of existing instruments may not be generalizable across racial-ethnic or other subgroups. Conclusions An evaluation of symptoms should be a core asthma outcome measure in clinical research. However, available instruments have limitations that preclude selection of a core instrument. The working group participants propose validation studies in diverse populations, comparisons of diaries versus retrospective questionnaires, and evaluations of symptom assessment alone versus composite scores of asthma control. PMID:22386505

  3. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asthma: Associated Conditions Asthma and Pregnancy Asthma Medications Asthma Medications Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... make sure you are using it correctly. Other Asthma Related Medication Treatment Annual influenza vaccine (flu shot) ...

  4. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Newman Taylor, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    Occupational asthma is important both as a potentially curable and preventable cause of asthma and as a model of adult onset asthma. It is induced by sensitization to a specific agent inhaled at work; for many of its causes, including inhaled proteins and the low molecular weight chemicals acid anhydrides and reactive dyes, it is probably IgE dependent. The risk of developing specific IgE and associated asthma is markedly increased in cigarette smokers, probably as a consequence of non-specific damage to the respiratory mucosa. Asthma caused by several agents, which include some of its most frequent causes, isocyanates, colophony and plicatic acid (Western Red Cedar) persists in some 50% of cases for years, and possibly indefinitely, after avoidance of exposure. The development of chronic symptomatic asthma seems particularly to occur in those with longer duration of symptomatic exposure. PMID:3074282

  5. Aluminium and human breast diseases.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D; Pugazhendhi, D; Mannello, F

    2011-11-01

    The human breast is exposed to aluminium from many sources including diet and personal care products, but dermal application of aluminium-based antiperspirant salts provides a local long-term source of exposure. Recent measurements have shown that aluminium is present in both tissue and fat of the human breast but at levels which vary both between breasts and between tissue samples from the same breast. We have recently found increased levels of aluminium in noninvasively collected nipple aspirate fluids taken from breast cancer patients (mean 268 ± 28 μg/l) compared with control healthy subjects (mean 131 ± 10 μg/l) providing evidence of raised aluminium levels in the breast microenvironment when cancer is present. The measurement of higher levels of aluminium in type I human breast cyst fluids (median 150 μg/l) compared with human serum (median 6 μg/l) or human milk (median 25 μg/l) warrants further investigation into any possible role of aluminium in development of this benign breast disease. Emerging evidence for aluminium in several breast structures now requires biomarkers of aluminium action in order to ascertain whether the presence of aluminium has any biological impact. To this end, we report raised levels of proteins that modulate iron homeostasis (ferritin, transferrin) in parallel with raised aluminium in nipple aspirate fluids in vivo, and we report overexpression of mRNA for several S100 calcium binding proteins following long-term exposure of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro to aluminium chlorhydrate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Childhood asthma].

    PubMed

    Liñán Cortés, Santos; Cobos Barroso, Nicolás

    2004-11-01

    Very frequently we have to deal with children who follow specific treatment to combat their repetitive episodes of breathing difficulty and wheezing. In many cases, they suffer from asthma. Hippocrates defined asthma as "the condition which causes an excessive narrowing of the bronchi after a reaction with a provocative stimulus which usually does not produce any effect".

  7. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M

    1995-01-01

    Many toxic compounds found in air emissions may induce bronchoconstriction. In the workplace, workers are exposed to these compounds, often in much higher concentrations. Some of these compounds act as sensitizers. Of these, some compounds induce asthma by producing specific IgE antibodies to the compound or its protein conjugate, while others induce asthma through yet unidentified immunologic mechanisms. Some compounds, when inhaled in high concentrations, act as irritants and produce bronchoconstriction probably by inducing acute airway inflammation. The latter condition is called Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS) or irritant-induced asthma. Occupational asthma is an excellent model to study the pathogenesis and the natural history of adult onset asthma because the responsible agent can be identified, complete avoidance is possible, and exposure can be measured or estimated. PMID:8549481

  8. [Difficult asthma].

    PubMed

    Chanez, Pascal; Vachier, Isabelle; Bourdin, Arnaud; Halimi, Laurence; Godard, Philippe

    2006-10-01

    Difficult asthma is a major issue in pulmonary medicine today because of its cost for patients and society. Difficult asthma is asthma that remains uncontrolled despite optimal specialist management. The validity of the diagnosis must be reconsidered in these cases: associated or differential diagnoses may be involved in the lack of control, and it is always necessary to assess the patient's treatment adhesion. Sufficient time--at least a year--must be taken to get to know the patient and to meet the objectives set. The standard asthma therapies should be tested objectively. Severe asthma is the reality of difficult asthma that endures despite a reaffirmed diagnosis, optimal compliance and controlled comorbidities. Better knowledge is needed of the pathophysiology of these patients' asthma. Improved knowledge of these phenotypes will make it possible to develop innovative treatments. They will need to be validated in clinical research for subsequent use that is wider but more rational because targeted at phenotypes likely to benefit from them.

  9. Bronchial asthma and COPD due to irritants in the workplace - an evidence-based approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Respiratory irritants represent a major cause of occupational obstructive airway diseases. We provide an overview of the evidence related to irritative agents causing occupational asthma or occupational COPD. Methods We searched MEDLINE via PubMed. Reference lists of relevant reviews were also screened. The SIGN grading system was used to rate the quality of each study. The modified RCGP three-star system was used to grade the body of evidence for each irritant agent regarding its causative role in either occupational asthma or occupational COPD. Results A total of 474 relevant papers were identified, covering 188 individual agents, professions or work-sites. The focus of most of the studies and the predominant diagnosis was occupational asthma, whereas occupational COPD arose only incidentally. The highest level assigned using the SIGN grading was 2+ (well-conducted systematic review, cohort or case–control study with a low risk of confounding or bias). According to the modified RCGP three-star grading, the strongest evidence of association with an individual agent, profession or work-site (“**”) was found for 17 agents or work-sites, including benzene-1,2,4-tricarboxylicacid-1,2-anhydride, chlorine, platinum salt, isocyanates, cement dust, grain dust, animal farming, environmental tobacco smoke, welding fumes or construction work. Phthalic anhydride, glutaraldehyde, sulphur dioxide, cotton dust, cleaning agents, potrooms, farming (various), foundries were found to be moderately associated with occupational asthma or occupational COPD (“*[+]”). Conclusion This study let us assume that irritant-induced occupational asthma and especially occupational COPD are considerably underreported. Defining the evidence of the many additional occupational irritants for causing airway disorders will be the subject of continued studies with implications for diagnostics and preventive measures. PMID:23013890

  10. Exercise and Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Exercise and Asthma Page Content Article Body Almost every child (and ... of Pediatrics about asthma and exercise. What is asthma Asthma is the most common chronic medical problem ...

  11. Dealing with Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Dealing With Asthma Triggers KidsHealth > For Kids > Dealing With Asthma Triggers ... or the flu weather conditions exercise continue Managing Asthma Asthma can't be cured but it can ...

  12. How Is Asthma Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Asthma Diagnosed? Your primary care doctor will diagnose asthma ... other disease may be causing your symptoms. Diagnosing Asthma in Young Children Most children who have asthma ...

  13. What Is Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section What Is Asthma? Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... major trigger for asthma. Photo: iStock Who Gets Asthma? People get asthma because of an interaction between ...

  14. Asthma and allergy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - asthma and allergy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on asthma and allergies : Allergy and Asthma Network -- www.allergyasthmanetwork.org American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology -- www. ...

  15. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or Too Short All About Puberty Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Kids > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? ... a tight feeling in the chest. Do Allergies Cause YOUR Asthma? If you have asthma, it's a ...

  16. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Do Allergies Cause Asthma? ... Allergies Cause Asthma? Allergies don't cause asthma. But kids who have allergies , or a family history of allergies, are more likely to get asthma ...

  17. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Conditions Asthma & Pregnancy Asthma & Pregnancy: Medications Asthma & Pregnancy: Medications Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... mother and child. Making Decisions about Medication During Pregnancy It is important that your asthma be controlled ...

  18. Asthma Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... least likely to trigger asthma? Strenuous exercise A common cold Reading the newspaper Cat dander Tobacco smoke Reading ... individuals. Viral and bacterial infections, such as the common cold and sinusitis, and continuous exercise are also common ...

  19. Asthma Inhalers

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce the release of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) into the atmosphere when taking certain asthma medications. Until recently, most ... hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) inhalers, that do not rob the atmosphere of ozone. “The FDA [Food and Drug Administration] ...

  20. Childhood asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, N M; Brown, R W; Parker, E; Robins, T G; Remick, D G; Philbert, M A; Keeler, G J; Israel, B A

    1999-01-01

    Asthma prevalence in children has increased 58% since 1980. Mortality has increased by 78%. The burden of the disease is most acute in urban areas and racial/ethnic minority populations. Hospitalization and morbidity rates for nonwhites are more than twice those for whites. Asthma is characterized by recurrent wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing. Research in the past decade has revealed the importance of inflammation of the airways in asthma and clinical treatment to reduce chronic inflammation. Asthma is associated with production of IgE to common environmental allergens including house dust mite, animal dander, cockroach, fungal spores, and pollens. Some interventions to reduce symptoms through control of dust mite and animal dander have had positive results. Control of symptoms through interventions to reduce exposures to cockroach antigen has not been reported. Studies illustrating causal effects between outdoor air pollution and asthma prevalence are scant. Increases in asthma prevalence have occurred at the same time as general improvements in air quality. However, air quality appears to exacerbate symptoms in the child who already has the disease. Decreased pulmonary function has been associated with exposure to particulates and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to smoke, SO(2) and NO(2). Symptoms have been correlated with increased levels of respirable particulates, ozone, and SO(2). Interventions that reduce the negative outcomes in asthma associated with outdoor environmental factors have not been reported. Control of asthma in children will entail the collaborative efforts of patients, family, clinical professionals, and school personnel, as well as community-wide environmental control measures and conducive national and local policies based on sound research. Images Figure 1 PMID:10423388

  1. Recognizing asthma mimics and asthma complications.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Dennis; Seda, Gilbert; Daheshia, Massoud

    2011-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways characterized by airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperreactivity, and underlying inflammation. Two common reasons asthmatics fail standard therapy are incorrect diagnosis and failure to recognize underlying contributing factors. A correct diagnosis of asthma is of great importance to military practitioners since misdiagnosis or uncontrolled asthma affects an individual's operational readiness or determines whether one can receive a medical waiver to enlist in military service. This article presents four cases of patients with dyspnea that have conditions which mimic asthma or complicate asthma management: vocal cord dysfunction misdiagnosed as asthma, respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease mistaken as asthma, difficult-to-control asthma because of bronchiectasis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and difficult and fatal asthma. Asthma is contrasted to other respiratory disorders, and an outlined approach to asthma diagnosis and management is presented using the Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines.

  2. [Occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Cambray-Gutiérrez, Julio César; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha

    2015-01-01

    The occupational asthma is the most common form of lung disease caused by factors that are attributed to a specific working environment in industrialized countries. It causes variable limitation of airflow and/or hyper-responsiveness of the airway due to contact with specific agents present in an atmosphere of work and not to stimuli found out of this place. It is recognized more and more frequently, and many agents are capable of causing occupational asthma by different pathophysiological mechanisms. More than 400 agents causing occupational asthma are known and every year new triggers are detected. Numerous factors contribute to the pathogenesis of occupational asthma induced chemically, including immunological, non-immunological mechanisms of epithelial damage, airway remodeling, oxidative stress, neurogenic inflammation as well as genetic factors. The most important risk factors for occupational asthma include: atopy, smoking and genetic factors. The diagnosis is based on the clinical history, skin tests, immunological tests and functional studies. The fundamental treatment is removing the worker from exposure as soon as possible. The advance in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of occupational asthma will importantly influence in the prevention and the management of this disease.

  3. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer.

  4. The toxicity of aluminium in humans.

    PubMed

    Exley, C

    2016-06-01

    We are living in the 'aluminium age'. Human exposure to aluminium is inevitable and, perhaps, inestimable. Aluminium's free metal cation, Alaq(3+), is highly biologically reactive and biologically available aluminium is non-essential and essentially toxic. Biologically reactive aluminium is present throughout the human body and while, rarely, it can be acutely toxic, much less is understood about chronic aluminium intoxication. Herein the question is asked as to how to diagnose aluminium toxicity in an individual. While there are as yet, no unequivocal answers to this problem, there are procedures to follow to ascertain the nature of human exposure to aluminium. It is also important to recognise critical factors in exposure regimes and specifically that not all forms of aluminium are toxicologically equivalent and not all routes of exposure are equivalent in their delivery of aluminium to target sites. To ascertain if Alzheimer's disease is a symptom of chronic aluminium intoxication over decades or breast cancer is aggravated by the topical application of an aluminium salt or if autism could result from an immune cascade initiated by an aluminium adjuvant requires that each of these is considered independently and in the light of the most up to date scientific evidence. The aluminium age has taught us that there are no inevitabilities where chronic aluminium toxicity is concerned though there are clear possibilities and these require proving or discounting but not simply ignored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Aluminium Involvement in Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fulgenzi, Alessandro; Vietti, Daniele; Ferrero, Maria Elena

    2014-01-01

    The aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases (ND) seems to involve susceptibility genes and environmental factors. Toxic metals are considered major environmental pollutants. Following our study of a case of multiple sclerosis (MS) improvement due to removal of aluminium (Al) and other toxic metals, we have examined the possible relationship between Al intoxication and ND. We used the slow intravenous treatment with the chelating agent EDTA (calcium disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid) (chelation test) to remove Al and detected it in the urine collected from the patients for 12 hours. Patients affected by MS represented 85.6% of total ND. Al was present in 44.8% of cases comprehensive of ND and healthy patients. Al levels were significantly higher in ND patients than in healthy subjects. We here show that treatment of patients affected by Al burden with ten EDTA chelation therapies (EDTA intravenous administration once a week) was able to significantly reduce Al intoxication. PMID:25243176

  6. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M.; Grzybowski, S.

    1976-01-01

    Occupational asthma is probably much more common than is generally realized. Though many causes have been described, undoubtedly many more are yet to be recognized. One of the diagnostic difficulties lies in the fact that in most forms of this disease a late asthmatic reaction occurs in the evening rather than at work. The pathogenetic mechanisms differ in various forms of occupational asthma. In some, an immunologic mechanism is likely; in others, a "pharmacologic" action of the offending agent is implicated. Asthma due to inhalation of dusts of western red cedar, isocyanates, detergent enzymes and textiles is considered in detail. Periodic examination of workers at risk is of value for early diagnosis and prevention of irrversible airway obstruction. PMID:766943

  7. Dependence in Classification of Aluminium Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resti, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Based on the dependence between edge and colour intensity of aluminium waste image, the aim of this paper is to classify the aluminium waste into three types; pure aluminium, not pure aluminium type-1 (mixed iron/lead) and not pure aluminium type 2 (unrecycle). Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was employed to reduction the dimension of image data, while Bayes’ theorem with the Gaussian copula was applied to classification. The copula was employed to handle dependence between edge and colour intensity of aluminium waste image. The results showed that the classifier has been correctly classifiable by 88.33%.

  8. Asthma - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 53. Lugogo N, Que LG, Gilstrap DL, Kraft M. Asthma: clinical diagnosis and management. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  9. Thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    AN ASSOCIATION between asthma and thunderstorms based on retrospective data has been noted in several papers. This study, however, draws on almost-real-time, anonymised attendance data from 35 emergency departments (EDs) in the UK, and lightning-strike plots from the Met Office.

  10. [Severe asthma].

    PubMed

    González, Claudio D

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to investigate the frequency of severe asthma (SA) according to WHO definition and to compare SA patients' characteristics with those of non-severe asthma (NSA); secondly, to investigate the level of control reached throughout a period of regular treatment. Between 1-1-2005 and 12-31-2014, 471 medical records from patients with bronchial asthma assisted in Buenos Aires City were analyzed. SA frequency was 40.1% (189/471), being significantly higher among patients from the public health system (47.7%, 108/226 vs. 33%, 81/245, p = 0.001). SA patients were older than NSA ones (51.3 ± 17.4 vs. 42.6 ± 17.1 years, p = 0.000), presented longer time since onset of the disease (median 30 vs. 20 years, p = 0.000), lower educational levels (secondary level or higher 41.7% vs. 58.1%, p = 0.000), lower frequency of rhinitis (47% vs. 60.6%, p = 0.004), more severe levels of airway obstruction (FEV% 50.2 ± 13.7 vs. 77.7 ± 12.4, p = 0.000), more frequent antecedents of Near Fatal Asthma (11.1% vs. 2.8%, p = 0.000), higher levels of serum IgE (median of 410 vs. 279 UI/l, p = 0.01) and higher demand of systemic steroids requirements and hospitalizations (68.7% vs. 50.7%, p = 0.000 and 37.5% vs. 15.9%, p = 0.000, respectively). A 30.6% of SA patients (58/189) reached a follow-up period of 12 months, 13 (22.5%) of whom reached the controlled asthma level. The frequency of SA found seems to be considerable. Multicenter studies to investigate the levels of control reached by SA patients with access to proper treatment are recommended.

  11. Special issue on aluminium plasmonics

    DOE PAGES

    Gerard, Davy; Gray, Stephen K.

    2015-04-08

    Plasmonics is a rapidly growing field that takes advantage of the intense and confined electromagnetic fields that appear near metallic nanostructures illuminated at frequencies near their surface plasmon resonances. As plasmonics continues to develop, it faces the need to find new materials supporting well-defined surface plasmon resonances in different frequency ranges. In the visible and near-infrared ranges the noble metals, most typically gold and silver, exhibit relatively low losses. This is why they are quite ubiquitous in plasmonics literature. However it is somewhat ironic to see that a non-noble metal, aluminium, the metal upon which surface plasmons where first evidencedmore » in the 1950s, is now reappearing after fifty years of near oblivion as one of the 'hottest' materials for plasmonics. Several reasons explain the return of aluminium to the centre stage. First, aluminium exhibits good plasmonic properties in the ultraviolet and deep ultraviolet—a spectral range where gold and silver no longer behave as metals. Second, aluminium is cheap and widely available (Al is the third most abundant element in the earth's crust), criteria of paramount importance when discussing industry-related applications. It is furthermore compatible with complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) technology. In conclusion, this is why an ever-increasing number of papers report new advances on aluminium plasmonics.« less

  12. Special issue on aluminium plasmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Gerard, Davy; Gray, Stephen K.

    2015-04-08

    Plasmonics is a rapidly growing field that takes advantage of the intense and confined electromagnetic fields that appear near metallic nanostructures illuminated at frequencies near their surface plasmon resonances. As plasmonics continues to develop, it faces the need to find new materials supporting well-defined surface plasmon resonances in different frequency ranges. In the visible and near-infrared ranges the noble metals, most typically gold and silver, exhibit relatively low losses. This is why they are quite ubiquitous in plasmonics literature. However it is somewhat ironic to see that a non-noble metal, aluminium, the metal upon which surface plasmons where first evidenced in the 1950s, is now reappearing after fifty years of near oblivion as one of the 'hottest' materials for plasmonics. Several reasons explain the return of aluminium to the centre stage. First, aluminium exhibits good plasmonic properties in the ultraviolet and deep ultraviolet—a spectral range where gold and silver no longer behave as metals. Second, aluminium is cheap and widely available (Al is the third most abundant element in the earth's crust), criteria of paramount importance when discussing industry-related applications. It is furthermore compatible with complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) technology. In conclusion, this is why an ever-increasing number of papers report new advances on aluminium plasmonics.

  13. Asthma: Basic Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Learn How to Control Asthma Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Treated? Select a Language Español (Spanish) What Is Asthma? Asthma is a disease that affects your lungs. ...

  14. Publications about Asthma

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA provides the general public, partners, media outlets and health care professionals with a wide variety of asthma resources at no-cost. EPA develops resources to share information about asthma, its triggers, and comprehensive asthma management.

  15. Asthma and school

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma action plan - school; Wheezing - school; Reactive airway disease - school; Bronchial asthma - school ... Your child's school asthma action plan should include: Phone ... nurse, parents, and guardians A brief history of your child's ...

  16. Aluminium phosphide-induced leukopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ntelios, Dimitrios; Mandros, Charalampos; Potolidis, Evangelos; Fanourgiakis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Acute intoxication from the pesticide aluminium phosphide is a relatively rare, life-threatening condition in which cardiovascular decompensation is the most feared problem. We report the case of a patient exposed to aluminium phosphide-liberated phosphine gas. It resulted in the development of a gastroenteritis-like syndrome accompanied by severe reduction in white blood cell numbers as an early and prominent manifestation. By affecting important physiological processes such as mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species homeostasis, phosphine could cause severe toxicity. After presenting the characteristics of certain leucocyte subpopulations we provide the current molecular understanding of the observed leukopenia which in part seems paradoxical. PMID:24172776

  17. The prophylactic reduction of aluminium intake.

    PubMed

    Lione, A

    1983-02-01

    The use of modern analytical methods has demonstrated that aluminium salts can be absorbed from the gut and concentrated in various human tissues, including bone, the parathyroids and brain. The neurotoxicity of aluminium has been extensively characterized in rabbits and cats, and high concentrations of aluminium have been detected in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Various reports have suggested that high aluminium intakes may be harmful to some patients with bone disease or renal impairment. Fatal aluminium-induced neuropathies have been reported in patients on renal dialysis. Since there are no demonstrable consequences of aluminium deprivation, the prophylactic reduction of aluminium intake by many patients would appear prudent. In this report, the major sources of aluminium in foods and non-prescription drugs are summarized and alternative products are described. The most common foods that contain substantial amounts of aluminium-containing additives include some processed cheeses, baking powders, cake mixes, frozen doughs, pancake mixes, self-raising flours and pickled vegetables. The aluminium-containing non-prescription drugs include some antacids, buffered aspirins, antidiarrhoeal products, douches and haemorrhoidal medications. The advisability of recommending a low aluminium diet for geriatric patients is discussed in detail.

  18. Aluminium toxicity in chronic renal insufficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Savory, J.; Bertholf, R.L.; Wills, M.R.

    1985-08-01

    Aluminium is a ubiquitous element in the environment and has been demonstrated to be toxic, especially in individuals with impaired renal function. Not much is known about the biochemistry of aluminium and the mechanisms of its toxic effects. Most of the interest in aluminium has been in the clinical setting of the hemodialysis unit. Here aluminium toxicity occurs due to contamination of dialysis solutions, and treatment of the patients with aluminium-containing phosphate binding gels. Aluminium has been shown to be the major contributor to the dialysis encephalopathy syndrome and an osteomalacic component of dialysis osteodystrophy. Other clinical disturbances associated with aluminium toxicity are a microcytic anemia and metastatic extraskeletal calcification. Aluminium overload can be treated effectively by chelation therapy with desferrioxamine and hemodialysis. Aluminium is readily transferred from the dialysate to the patient's -bloodstream during hemodialysis. Once transferred, the aluminium is tightly bound to non-dialysable plasma constituents. Very low concentrations of dialysate aluminium in the range of 10-15 micrograms/l are recommended to guard against toxic effects. Very few studies have been directed towards the separation of the various plasma species which bind eluminium. Gel filtration chromatography has been used to identify five major fractions, one of which is of low molecular weight and the others appear to be protein-aluminium complexes. Recommendations on aluminium monitoring have been published and provide safe and toxic concentrations. Also, the frequency of monitoring has been addressed. Major problems exist with the analytical methods for measuring aluminium which result from inaccurate techniques and contamination difficulties. 136 references.

  19. Asthma Medicines: Quick Relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute asthma symptoms and to prevent exercise-induced asthma in children. They are first-line treatment of acute asthma ... Updated 11/21/2015 Source Guide to Your Childs Allergies and Asthma (Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Pediatrics) The information ...

  20. Bumblebee Pupae Contain High Levels of Aluminium

    PubMed Central

    Exley, Christopher; Rotheray, Ellen; Goulson, David

    2015-01-01

    The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD) value of 51.0 (33.0) μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer’s disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline. PMID:26042788

  1. Bumblebee pupae contain high levels of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Rotheray, Ellen; Goulson, David

    2015-01-01

    The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD) value of 51.0 (33.0) μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer's disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline.

  2. Aluminium content of Spanish infant formula.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Blasco, I; Alvarez-Galindo, J I

    2003-05-01

    Levels of aluminium in 82 different infant formulae from nine different manufacturers in Spain were determined by acid-microwave digestion and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The influence of aluminium content in tap water in reconstituted powder formulae was examined and an estimate was made of the theoretical toxic aluminium intake in comparison with the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI). Possible interactions between aluminium and certain essential trace elements added to infant formulations have been studied according to the type or main protein-based infant formula. In general, the infant formulae contained a higher aluminium content than that found in human milk, especially in the case of soya, preterm or hydrolysed casein-based formulae. Standard formulae gave lower aluminium intakes amounting to about 4% PTWI. Specialized and preterm formulae resulted in a moderate intake (11-12 and 8-10% PTWI, respectively) and soya formulae contributed the highest intake (15% PTWI). Aluminium exposure from drinking water used for powder formula reconstitution was not considered a potential risk. In accordance with the present state of knowledge about aluminium toxicity, it seems prudent to call for continued efforts to standardize routine quality control and reduce aluminium levels in infant formula as well as to keep the aluminium concentration under 300 microg l(-1) for all infant formulae, most specifically those formulae for premature and low birth neonates.

  3. Stay away from asthma triggers

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma triggers - stay away from; Asthma triggers - avoiding; Reactive airway disease - triggers; Bronchial asthma - triggers ... to them. Have someone who does not have asthma cut the grass, or wear a facemask if ...

  4. Psychological Factors in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Asthma has long been considered a condition in which psychological factors have a role. As in many illnesses, psychological variables may affect outcome in asthma via their effects on treatment adherence and symptom reporting. Emerging evidence suggests that the relation between asthma and psychological factors may be more complex than that, however. Central cognitive processes may influence not only the interpretation of asthma symptoms but also the manifestation of measurable changes in immune and physiologic markers of asthma. Furthermore, asthma and major depressive disorder share several risk factors and have similar patterns of dysregulation in key biologic systems, including the neuroendocrine stress response, cytokines, and neuropeptides. Despite the evidence that depression is common in people with asthma and exerts a negative impact on outcome, few treatment studies have examined whether improving symptoms of depression do, in fact, result in better control of asthma symptoms or improved quality of life in patients with asthma. PMID:20525122

  5. Aluminium in foodstuffs and diets in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Jorhem, L; Haegglund, G

    1992-01-01

    The levels of aluminium have been determined in a number of individual foodstuffs on the Swedish market and in 24 h duplicate diets collected by women living in the Stockholm area. The results show that the levels in most foods are very low and that the level in vegetables can vary by a factor 10. Beverages from aluminium cans were found to have aluminium levels not markedly different from those in glass bottles. Based on the results of the analysis of individual foods, the average Swedish daily diet was calculated to contain about 0.6 mg aluminium, whereas the mean content of the collected duplicate diets was 13 mg. A cake made from a mix containing aluminium phosphate in the baking soda was identified as the most important contributor of aluminium to the duplicate diets. Tea and aluminium utensils were estimated to increase the aluminium content of the diets by approximately 4 and 2 mg/day, respectively. The results also indicate that a considerable amount of aluminium must be introduced from other sources.

  6. Thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip E; Jonsson, Haflidi

    2004-09-01

    Thunderstorms have often been linked to epidemics of asthma, especially during the grass flowering season; however, the precise mechanisms explaining this phenomenon are unknown. Evidence of high respirable allergen loadings in the air associated with specific meteorologic events combined with an analysis of pollen physiology suggests that rupture of airborne pollen can occur. Strong downdrafts and dry, cold outflows distinguish thunderstorm rain from frontal rain. The weather system of a mature thunderstorm likely entrains grass pollen into the cloud base, where pollen rupture would be enhanced, then transports the respirable-sized fragments of pollen debris to ground level where outflows distribute them ahead of the rain. The conditions occurring at the onset of a thunderstorm might expose susceptible people to a rapid increase in concentrations of pollen allergens in the air that can readily deposit in the lower airways and initiate asthmatic reactions.

  7. For Parents of Children with Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asthma > Managing Asthma For Parents of Children with Asthma Your Child's Asthma: A Parent's Guide to Better Breathing This step- ... health considerations you should keep in mind. Diagnosing Asthma in Young Children Most children who have asthma ...

  8. Allergy in severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Del Giacco, S R; Bakirtas, A; Bel, E; Custovic, A; Diamant, Z; Hamelmann, E; Heffler, E; Kalayci, Ö; Saglani, S; Sergejeva, S; Seys, S; Simpson, A; Bjermer, L

    2017-02-01

    It is well recognized that atopic sensitization is an important risk factor for asthma, both in adults and in children. However, the role of allergy in severe asthma is still under debate. The term 'Severe Asthma' encompasses a highly heterogeneous group of patients who require treatment on steps 4-5 of GINA guidelines to prevent their asthma from becoming 'uncontrolled', or whose disease remains 'uncontrolled' despite this therapy. Epidemiological studies on emergency room visits and hospital admissions for asthma suggest the important role of allergy in asthma exacerbations. In addition, allergic asthma in childhood is often associated with severe asthma in adulthood. A strong association exists between asthma exacerbations and respiratory viral infections, and interaction between viruses and allergy further increases the risk of asthma exacerbations. Furthermore, fungal allergy has been shown to play an important role in severe asthma. Other contributing factors include smoking, pollution and work-related exposures. The 'Allergy and Asthma Severity' EAACI Task Force examined the current evidence and produced this position document on the role of allergy in severe asthma. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Aluminium Pneumoconiosis I. In Vitro Comparison of Stamped Aluminium Powders Containing Different Lubricating Agents and a Granular Aluminium Powder

    PubMed Central

    Corrin, B.

    1963-01-01

    The discrepancy in previous reports of the action of aluminium on the lung may be explained by differences between stamped and granular aluminium powders. A stamped powder of the variety causing pulmonary fibrosis showed a brisk reaction with water, but a granular powder was unreactive. This difference is primarily due to the granular particles being covered by inert aluminium oxide, the formation of which is partially prevented in the stamping process by stearine and mineral oil. The reactivity of the flake-like stamped particles is also dependent on their large surface area per unit volume. The appearance of aluminium pneumoconiosis in Britain is explained by the introduction of mineral oil into the stamping industry for, in contrast to stearine, mineral oil permits the powder to react with water. The lung damage is believed to be caused by a soluble form of aluminium. PMID:14072616

  10. Asthma and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Asthma Saturday, 01 August 2015 In every pregnancy, a ... her background risk. This sheet talks about whether asthma may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  11. Test Your Asthma Knowledge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Test Your Asthma Knowledge Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents ... page please turn Javascript on. True or False? Asthma is caused by an inflammation of the inner ...

  12. Asthma - child - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric asthma - discharge; Wheezing - discharge; Reactive airway disease - discharge ... Your child has asthma , which causes the airways of the lungs to swell and narrow. In the hospital, the doctors and nurses helped ...

  13. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000036.htm Exercise-induced asthma To use the sharing features on this page, ... such as running, basketball, or soccer. Use Your Asthma Medicine Before you Exercise Take your short-acting, ...

  14. Smoking and asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000504.htm Smoking and asthma To use the sharing features on this page, ... enable JavaScript. Things that make your allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Smoking is a trigger ...

  15. Asthma triggers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes. ... asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes.

  16. Asthma - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Asthma URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/asthma.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  17. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... using the heater. Top of Page Outdoor Air Pollution About Outdoor Air Pollution and Asthma Actions You Can Take Additional Resources About Outdoor Air Pollution and Asthma Outdoor air pollution is caused by ...

  18. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 alleviates aluminium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Leilei; Zhai, Qixiao; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhao, Jianxin; Narbad, Arjan; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Fengwei; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Aluminium (Al) is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. Al exposure can cause a variety of adverse physiological effects in humans and animals. Our aim was to demonstrate that specific probiotic bacteria can play a special physiologically functional role in protection against Al toxicity in mice. Thirty strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were tested for their aluminium-binding ability, aluminium tolerance, their antioxidative capacity, and their ability to survive the exposure to artificial gastrointestinal (GI) juices. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 was selected for animal experiments because of its excellent performance in vitro. Forty mice were divided into four groups: control, Al only, Al plus CCFM639, and Al plus deferiprone (DFP). CCFM639 was administered at 10(9) CFU once daily for 10 days, followed by a single oral dose of aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 5.14 mg aluminium (LD50) for each mouse. The results showed that CCFM639 treatment led to a significant reduction in the mortality rates with corresponding decrease in intestinal aluminium absorption and in accumulation of aluminium in the tissues and amelioration of hepatic histopathological damage. This probiotic treatment also resulted in alleviation of hepatic, renal, and cerebral oxidative stress. The treatment of L. plantarum CCFM639 has potential as a therapeutic dietary strategy against acute aluminium toxicity.

  19. Electron Conditioning of Technical Aluminium Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pimpec, F

    2004-09-02

    The effect of electron conditioning on commercially aluminium alloys 1100 and 6063 were investigated. Contrary to the assumption that electron conditioning, if performed long enough, can reduce and stabilize the SEY to low values (= 1.3, value of many pure elements [1]), the SEY of aluminium did not go lower than 1.8. In fact, it reincreases with continued electron exposure dose.

  20. High aluminium content of infant milk formulas.

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, R; Hams, G; Meerkin, M; Rosenberg, A R

    1986-01-01

    The aluminium content of several commercially available infant milk formulas was measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Results were compared with those for fresh breast milk, cow's milk, and local tap water. Differences in aluminium concentration of greater than 150-fold were found, with the lowest concentrations in breast milk. PMID:3767424

  1. Chelometric determination of aluminium in vaccines*

    PubMed Central

    Meijerman, G. W.; van Lier, K. L.

    1965-01-01

    A rapid and accurate chelometric method is described for the determination of aluminium in aluminium-phosphate-adsorbed vaccines. Thiomersal preservative in the vaccine is first destroyed and the aluminium content is determined by addition of excess disodium edetate (Na2-EDTA) and back-titration with zinc sulfate using dithizone as an indicator. Phosphate does not interfere with the method. The aluminium content of the samples under investigation varied from 0.3 mg/ml to 1.0 mg/ml. In analysis of vaccines containing inactivated poliomyelitis virus, aluminium was determined with a standard deviation of 0.0014 mg and in other vaccines with a standard deviation of approximately 0.0040 mg. PMID:5294262

  2. Aluminium Diphosphamethanides: Hidden Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    PubMed

    Styra, Steffen; Radius, Michael; Moos, Eric; Bihlmeier, Angela; Breher, Frank

    2016-07-04

    The synthesis and characterisation of two aluminium diphosphamethanide complexes, [Al(tBu)2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (3) and [Al(C6 F5 )2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (4), and the silylated analogue, Mes*PCHP(SiMe3 )Mes* (5), are reported. The aluminium complexes feature four-membered PCPAl core structures consisting of diphosphaallyl ligands. The silylated phosphine 5 was found to be a valuable precursor for the synthesis of 4 as it cleanly reacts with the diaryl aluminium chloride [(C6 F5 )2 AlCl]2 . The aluminium complex 3 reacts with molecular dihydrogen at room temperature under formation of the acyclic σ(2) λ(3) ,σ(3) λ(3) -diphosphine Mes*PCHP(H)Mes* and the corresponding dialkyl aluminium hydride [tBu2 AlH]3 . Thus, 3 belongs to the family of so-called hidden frustrated Lewis pairs.

  3. Airborne particulates and asthma: a Maine case study.

    PubMed

    Langley-Turnbaugh, Samantha J; Gordon, Nancy R; Lambert, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    Maine currently has the second fastest growing asthma rate in the nation 9.4% of the adult population has asthma and one out of eight children is affected. The factors behind this increase are poorly understood, but previous reports suggest that biologically soluble metal ions from particulate matter (PM10) may play a role in asthma episodes. In an effort to study this issue, we first identified geographic and temporal trends in Maine asthma hospitalizations. Clinical data show a strong fall peak in asthma admissions with weaker peaks in January and May, and a summer low in asthma admissions. Asthma admissions are also higher in the cities than in the rural areas in Maine. We then analysed PM10 collected by the Maine Department of Environmental Protection in three different Maine locations in the years 2000 and 2001, at times when clinical asthma data showed peaks and during the summer low period. We also collected soil samples in the same locations. The PM10 and soils were analysed for 10 metals by acid extraction to determine total metal content and then with cell culture medium, DMEM/F12+CCS growth medium, to determine metal biosolubility. Our results showed that Mn, Cu, Pb, As, V, Ni and Al were present in the Maine PM samples. V, Ni and Pb showed seasonal variation, while the others were relatively constant throughout the year. Pb and Al did not appear to be soluble in the biological medium. There was also variation from location to location with the urban area showing the highest concentrations for most metals. Aluminium was present in the highest concentration in soil samples, followed by Mn and V. Only Cu was biologically available in soils. We determined from M/Al ratios that most of the PM10 did not originate from local crustal material.

  4. School and Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? School and Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > School and Asthma A A A What's in this article? Have ... La escuela y el asma If you have asthma , you probably have a routine at home for ...

  5. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Exercise-Induced Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Exercise-Induced Asthma Print A ... previous continue Tips for Kids With Exercise-Induced Asthma For the most part, kids with exercise-induced ...

  6. School and Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray School and Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > School and Asthma Print A A A What's in this article? ... La escuela y el asma If you have asthma , you probably have a routine at home for ...

  7. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print A A A en español ¿Las alergias provocan asma? Do allergies cause asthma? The answer to that question is: yes and ...

  8. Emerging drugs for asthma.

    PubMed

    Quirce, Santiago; Bobolea, Irina; Barranco, Pilar

    2012-06-01

    Current drug treatments for asthma relieve bronchospasm and airway inflammation but do not offer a cure, and symptoms return when treatment is stopped. Asthma management guidelines emphasize the importance of effective asthma treatment to achieve and maintain asthma control. However, despite widely available and effective treatments, achieving asthma control is still an unmet need for many patients. Remarkable efforts have been made to identify the characteristic features of difficult-to-control (usually severe) asthma that are different from those described for mild-to-moderate asthma, setting the stage for the development of new and even individualized therapies. The most fascinating options of the new asthma treatments are biologic therapies, in particular monoclonal antibodies. In addition, some novel once-daily combinations of long-acting β(2)-agonist and inhaled corticosteroids are under development. Asthma is a complex syndrome made up of a number of disease variants or asthma phenotypes, with different underlying pathophysiology. As different drugs target different pathways, it is necessary to determine the individual profile of pathophysiological abnormalities for each patient. Several cytokines have been implicated in the inflammatory cascades leading to the different asthma phenotypes, and the most relevant ones are discussed. The challenge in treating asthma resides precisely in its heterogeneity.

  9. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? A A A en español ¿Las alergias provocan asma? Do allergies cause asthma? The answer to that question is: ...

  10. Severe asthma in children

    PubMed Central

    Guilbert, TW; Bacharier, LB; Fitzpatrick, AM

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma in children is characterized by sustained symptoms despite treatment with high doses of ICS or oral corticosteroids. Children with severe asthma may fall into two categories, difficult-to-treat asthma or severe therapy-resistant asthma. Difficult-to-treat asthma is defined as poor control due to an incorrect diagnosis or comorbidities, poor adherence due to adverse psychological or environmental factors. In contrast, treatment-resistant is defined as difficult asthma despite management of these factors. It is increasingly recognized that severe asthma is a highly heterogeneous disorder associated with a number of clinical and inflammatory phenotypes that have been described in children with severe asthma. Guideline based drug therapy of severe childhood asthma is based primarily on extrapolated data from adult studies. The recommendation is that children with severe asthma be treated with higher-dose inhaled or oral corticosteroids combined with long-acting beta-agonists and other add on therapies such as antileukotrienes and methylxanthines. It is important to identify and address the influences that make asthma difficult to control including reviewing the diagnosis and the removal of causal or aggravating factors. Better definition of the phenotypes and better targeting of therapy based upon individual patient phenotypes is likely to improve asthma treatment in the future. PMID:25213041

  11. Severe asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Guilbert, Theresa W; Bacharier, Leonard B; Fitzpatrick, Anne M

    2014-01-01

    Severe asthma in children is characterized by sustained symptoms despite treatment with high doses of inhaled corticosteroids or oral corticosteroids. Children with severe asthma may fall into 2 categories, difficult-to-treat asthma or severe therapy-resistant asthma. Difficult-to-treat asthma is defined as poor control due to an incorrect diagnosis or comorbidities, or poor adherence due to adverse psychological or environmental factors. In contrast, treatment resistant is defined as difficult asthma despite management of these factors. It is increasingly recognized that severe asthma is a highly heterogeneous disorder associated with a number of clinical and inflammatory phenotypes that have been described in children with severe asthma. Guideline-based drug therapy of severe childhood asthma is based primarily on extrapolated data from adult studies. The recommendation is that children with severe asthma be treated with higher-dose inhaled or oral corticosteroids combined with long-acting β-agonists and other add-on therapies, such as antileukotrienes and methylxanthines. It is important to identify and address the influences that make asthma difficult to control, including reviewing the diagnosis and removing causal or aggravating factors. Better definition of the phenotypes and better targeting of therapy based upon individual patient phenotypes is likely to improve asthma treatment in the future.

  12. Intestinal absorption of aluminium in renal failure.

    PubMed

    Drüeke, Tilman B

    2002-01-01

    The proportion of the daily ingested aluminium that is absorbed in the intestinal tract has remained a matter of debate for many years because no reliable method of measurement was available. Studies with earlier analytic techniques reported fractional absorption of aluminium from as little as 0.001% to as much as 27% of an oral dose. Measurement of (26)Al by high-energy accelerator mass spectrometry has permitted more accurate analyses. In normal young rats, 0.05-0.1% of ingested aluminium is absorbed in the intestine, of which roughly half goes to the skeleton within 2 h, whereas the remaining half is excreted in the urine, most of it within 48 h. Deposition in organs other than the skeleton appears to be negligible. In healthy human volunteers, the most recent estimates of fractional intestinal (26)Al absorption were also in the range of 0.06-0.1%. In both rats and humans, intestinal absorption of aluminium is subject to many systemic and local factors. The latter include various compounds with which aluminium is complexed in the gut lumen, and gastric acidity. The influence of food is controversial; however, absorption appears higher in the fasted than the post-prandial state. Luminal phosphate concentration decreases aluminium absorption, whereas citrate increases it. For theoretical reasons, silicates should prevent aluminium absorption, but experimental evidence has not supported this theory. Whether water hardness affects aluminium bioavailability remains a matter of debate. General conditions may also modify aluminium absorption and deposition in bone. Examples of these general factors include the uraemic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, secondary hyperparathyroidism, vitamin D status, Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Awareness of intestinal absorption of aluminium is particularly important, given that aluminium-based binders continue to be used in uraemic patients, despite the hazards of aluminium accumulation. The lessons we have learned about

  13. Epigenetic Mechanisms in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    DeVries, Avery

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases are among the most prevalent chronic noncommunicable diseases of childhood, but the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms are poorly understood. Because epigenetic mechanisms link gene regulation to environmental cues and developmental trajectories, their contribution to asthma and allergy pathogenesis is under active investigation. DNA methylation signatures associated with concurrent disease and with the development of asthma during childhood asthma have been identified, but their significance is not easily interpretable. On the other hand, the characterization of early epigenetic predictors of asthma points to a potential role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating the inception of, and the susceptibility to, this disease. PMID:27027952

  14. [Obesity and asthma].

    PubMed

    Vázquez García, Juan Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Obesity and asthma are two disorders of high and increasing worldwide prevalence. A consistent association between obesity and asthma has been recently found in case-control, cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. This association is more consistent in women after the puberty. Moreover, an improvement in the severity of asthma has been described after weight reduction in obese patients. A causal association between asthma and obesity may represent an additional respiratory work that could increase the morbidity and medical expenditures. The most striking studies which demonstrate association between obesity and asthma and the possible causal mechanisms are reviewed.

  15. Epigenetic Mechanisms in Asthma.

    PubMed

    DeVries, Avery; Vercelli, Donata

    2016-03-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases are among the most prevalent chronic noncommunicable diseases of childhood, but the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms are poorly understood. Because epigenetic mechanisms link gene regulation to environmental cues and developmental trajectories, their contribution to asthma and allergy pathogenesis is under active investigation. DNA methylation signatures associated with concurrent disease and with the development of asthma during childhood asthma have been identified, but their significance is not easily interpretable. On the other hand, the characterization of early epigenetic predictors of asthma points to a potential role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating the inception of, and the susceptibility to, this disease.

  16. [Cytokines and asthma].

    PubMed

    Gani, F; Senna, G; Piglia, P; Grosso, B; Mezzelani, P; Pozzi, E

    1998-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease in which eosinophils are one of the most important involved cells. These cells accumulate in the lung because of cytokines, which are able to regulate cellular responses. The role of cytokines is well known in allergic asthma: IL4, IL5, IL3, GMCSF are the principally cytokine involved. IL4 regulate IgE synthesis while IL5, (and IL3) cause the activation and accumulation of eosinophils. In non allergic asthma, whilst only IL5 seemed to be important recent data, shows that also IL4 plays an important role. Therefore nowadays no relevant difference seems to exist between allergic and non allergic asthma; instead the primer is different: the allergen in allergic asthma and often an unknown factor in the non allergic asthma. Recently other cytokines have been proved to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. IL8 is chemotactic not only for neutrophils but also for eosinophils and might cause chronic inflammation in severe asthma. IL13 works like IL4, while RANTES seems to be a more important chemotactic agent than IL5. Finally IL10, which immunoregulates T lymphocyte responses, may reduce asthma inflammation. In conclusion cytokine made us to learn more about the pathogenesis of asthma even if we do not yet know when and how asthma inflammation develops.

  17. Mortality and cancer morbidity in workers from an aluminium smelter with prebaked carbon anodes--Part III: Mortality from circulatory and respiratory diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Rønneberg, A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate associations between exposure to pot emissions (fluorides, sulphur dioxide) and mortality from chronic obstructive lung disease, coal tar pitch volatiles and mortality from diseases related to atherosclerosis, and carbon monoxide and mortality from ischaemic heart disease. METHODS--Mortality between 1962 to 1991 was investigated in a cohort of 1085 men hired by a Norwegian aluminium smelter between 1922 and 1975. Associations between cumulative exposure and mortality were investigated through SMR analysis based on national mortality rates; temporal relations were explored by considering exposures only within specific time windows. Circulatory mortality was also investigated by Poisson regression analysis. RESULTS--There were 501 deaths v 471.3 expected in the cohort. The excess was confined to short term workers and did not seem to be associated with exposures in the smelter. Analysis of mortality among the 661 men with at least three years employment showed associations between cumulative exposure to tar 40 years before observation and atherosclerotic mortality (P = 0.03), and between exposure to pot emissions 20-39 years before observation and mortality from chronic obstructive lung disease (P = 0.06). No association was found between exposure to carbon monoxide and mortality from ischaemic heart disease, but cerebrovascular mortality was associated with exposure to pot emissions (P = 0.02). Results for atherosclerotic and cerebrovascular diseases were confirmed through Poisson regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS--The data support previous findings of increased mortality from ischaemic heart disease in workers exposed to tar, and some support is also provided for earlier reports of increased respiratory mortality in potroom workers. PMID:7795741

  18. Vitamin D and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Grace; Brehm, John M.; Alcorn, John F.; Holguín, Fernando; Aujla, Shean J.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and asthma are common conditions that share risk factors such as African American ethnicity, inner-city residence, and obesity. This review provides a critical examination of current experimental and epidemiologic evidence of a causal association between vitamin D status and asthma or asthma morbidity, including potential protective mechanisms such as antiviral effects and enhanced steroid responsiveness. Because most published epidemiologic studies of vitamin D and asthma or asthma morbidity are observational, a recommendation for or against vitamin D supplementation as preventive or secondary treatment for asthma is not advisable and must await results of ongoing clinical trials. Should these trials confirm a beneficial effect of vitamin D, others will be needed to assess the role of vitamin D supplementation to prevent or treat asthma in different groups such as infants, children of school age, and ethnic minorities. PMID:22016447

  19. Asthma and coagulation.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J Daan; Majoor, Christof J; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Bel, Elisabeth H D; van der Poll, Tom

    2012-04-05

    Asthma is a chronic airway disease characterized by paroxysmal airflow obstruction evoked by irritative stimuli on a background of allergic lung inflammation. Currently, there is no cure for asthma, only symptomatic treatment. In recent years, our understanding of the involvement of coagulation and anticoagulant pathways, the fibrinolytic system, and platelets in the pathophysiology of asthma has increased considerably. Asthma is associated with a procoagulant state in the bronchoalveolar space, further aggravated by impaired local activities of the anticoagulant protein C system and fibrinolysis. Protease-activated receptors have been implicated as the molecular link between coagulation and allergic inflammation in asthma. This review summarizes current knowledge of the impact of the disturbed hemostatic balance in the lungs on asthma severity and manifestations and identifies new possible targets for asthma treatment.

  20. Epigenetics of asthma.

    PubMed

    Durham, Andrew L; Wiegman, Coen; Adcock, Ian M

    2011-11-01

    Asthma is caused by both heritable and environmental factors. It has become clear that genetic studies do not adequately explain the heritability and susceptibility to asthma. The study of epigenetics, heritable non-coding changes to DNA may help to explain the heritable component of asthma. Additionally, epigenetic modifications can be influenced by the environment, including pollution and cigarette smoking, which are known asthma risk factors. These environmental trigger-induced epigenetic changes may be involved in skewing the immune system towards a Th2 phenotype following in utero exposure and thereby enhancing the risk of asthma. Alternatively, they may directly or indirectly modulate the immune and inflammatory processes in asthmatics via effects on treatment responsiveness. The study of epigenetics may therefore play an important role in our understanding and possible treatment of asthma and other allergic diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biochemistry of Asthma.

  1. Alveolar proteinosis associated with aluminium dust inhalation.

    PubMed

    Chew, R; Nigam, S; Sivakumaran, P

    2016-08-01

    Secondary alveolar proteinosis is a rare lung disease which may be triggered by a variety of inhaled particles. The diagnosis is made by detection of anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which appears milky white and contains lamellar bodies. Aluminium has been suggested as a possible cause, but there is little evidence in the literature to support this assertion. We report the case of a 46-year-old former boilermaker and boat builder who developed secondary alveolar proteinosis following sustained heavy aluminium exposure. The presence of aluminium was confirmed both by histological examination and metallurgical analysis of a mediastinal lymph node. Despite cessation of exposure to aluminium and treatment with whole-lung lavage which normally results in improvements in both symptoms and lung function, the outcome was poor and novel therapies are now being used for this patient. It may be that the natural history in aluminium-related alveolar proteinosis is different, with the metal playing a mediating role in the disease process. Our case further supports the link between aluminium and secondary alveolar proteinosis and highlights the need for measures to prevent excessive aluminium inhalation in relevant industries. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Aluminium in Biological Environments: A Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mujika, Jon I; Rezabal, Elixabete; Mercero, Jose M; Ruipérez, Fernando; Costa, Dominique; Ugalde, Jesus M; Lopez, Xabier

    2014-01-01

    The increased availability of aluminium in biological environments, due to human intervention in the last century, raises concerns on the effects that this so far “excluded from biology” metal might have on living organisms. Consequently, the bioinorganic chemistry of aluminium has emerged as a very active field of research. This review will focus on our contributions to this field, based on computational studies that can yield an understanding of the aluminum biochemistry at a molecular level. Aluminium can interact and be stabilized in biological environments by complexing with both low molecular mass chelants and high molecular mass peptides. The speciation of the metal is, nonetheless, dictated by the hydrolytic species dominant in each case and which vary according to the pH condition of the medium. In blood, citrate and serum transferrin are identified as the main low molecular mass and high molecular mass molecules interacting with aluminium. The complexation of aluminium to citrate and the subsequent changes exerted on the deprotonation pathways of its tritable groups will be discussed along with the mechanisms for the intake and release of aluminium in serum transferrin at two pH conditions, physiological neutral and endosomatic acidic. Aluminium can substitute other metals, in particular magnesium, in protein buried sites and trigger conformational disorder and alteration of the protonation states of the protein's sidechains. A detailed account of the interaction of aluminium with proteic sidechains will be given. Finally, it will be described how alumnium can exert oxidative stress by stabilizing superoxide radicals either as mononuclear aluminium or clustered in boehmite. The possibility of promotion of Fenton reaction, and production of hydroxyl radicals will also be discussed. PMID:24757505

  3. Investigation of the aluminium-aluminium oxide reversible transformation as observed by hot stage electron microscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, C. A.; Judd, G.; Ansell, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Thin foils of high purity aluminium and an Al-Al2O3 SAP type of alloy were oxidised in a specially designed hot stage specimen chamber in an electron microscope. Below 450 C, amorphous aluminium oxide formed on the foil surface and was first detectable at foil edges, holes, and pits. Islands of aluminium then nucleated in this amorphous oxide. The aluminium islands displayed either a lateral growth with eventual coalescence with other islands, or a reoxidation process which caused the islands to disappear. The aluminium island formation was determined to be related to the presence of the electron beam. A mechanism based upon electron charging due to the electron beam was proposed to explain the nucleation, growth, coalescence, disappearance, and geometry of the aluminium islands.

  4. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I ...

  5. Asthma Research: The NIH–NJRC Connection

    MedlinePlus

    ... could help physicians decide definitively whether to prescribe antibiotics for asthma patients. ( See accompanying story. ) In pediatric asthma, doctors are studying and treating the progression of asthma, infant wheezing that leads to asthma, and severe asthma. ...

  6. Novel method for joining CFRP to aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, F.; Thomy, C.; Vollertsen, F.; Schiebel, P.; Hoffmeister, C.; Herrmann, A. S.

    The current state of the art in joining of carbon-fibre reinforced composites (CFRP) to metals such as aluminium is - for the case of aircraft structures, e.g.- riveting or bolting. However, to reduce structural weight and improve structural performance, integral, load-bearing aluminium-CFRP-structures are desirable. To produce such structures, a novel joint configuration together with an appropriate thermal, laser-based joining process is suggested by the authors. In this paper, the joint configuration (based on CFRP-Ti-aluminium joints) and the laser beam conduction welding process will be presented, and first specimens obtained will be discussed with respect to their properties. It will be shown that the novel approach is in principle suitable to produce load-bearing CFRP-aluminium structures.

  7. The removal of iron from molten aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Donk, H.M. van der; Nijhof, G.H.; Castelijns, C.A.M.

    1995-12-31

    In this work an overview is given about the techniques available for the removal of metallic impurities from molten aluminium. The overview is focused on the removal of iron. Also, some experimental results are given about the creation of iron-rich intermetallic compounds in an aluminium system, which are subsequently removed by gravity segregation and filtration techniques. This work is part of an ongoing research project of three major European aluminium companies who are co-operating on the subject of recycling of aluminium packaging materials recovered from household waste by means of Eddy-Current techniques. Using this technique the pick-up of some contaminating metals, particularly iron, is almost unavoidable.

  8. Predicting Asthma in Preschool Children with Asthma-Like Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: allergic asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions allergic asthma allergic asthma Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Asthma is a breathing disorder characterized by inflammation of ...

  10. How Do Asthma Medicines Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? How Do Asthma Medicines Work? KidsHealth > For Kids > How Do Asthma Medicines ... of medicines for treating asthma: 1. Quick-relief Medicines Quick-relief medicines (also called rescue or fast- ...

  11. Aluminium speciation in effluents and receiving waters.

    PubMed

    Gardner, M J; Comber, S D W

    2003-12-01

    The respective speciation of aluminium in sewage effluent and in river water receiving effluent, has been examined. Results showed that concentrations of reactive aluminium changed over a timescale of hours and were controlled predominantly by pH. A minimum concentration of reactive aluminium occurred at a pH of approximately 6.8, coinciding with the prevalence of non-reactive, insoluble Al(OH)3 species. For receiving waters of low pH value, typically < pH 5, a large proportion of the 'naturally present' aluminium can be present in a reactive form at concentrations higher than the proposed Environmental Quality Standard (EQS). Mixing of waters of this type with effluent of a higher pH value leads to the precipitation of aluminium hydroxide. Mixing of effluent of pH value in the range 7.5-8.0 with river water in the same (or slightly higher) pH range appears to result in no appreciable change in the proportion of reactive aluminium; the change in concentration tends to be related simply to dilution. On the basis of a theoretical knowledge of aluminium speciation, results obtained in this work indicate that it is possible to make predictions about the proportion of reactive aluminium present in a receiving water, based on the pH values of the effluent water mixture and the concentration in the effluent. Reasonable comparisons between measured and predicted values were obtained at higher pH values, but the relationship was less certain at pH values less than 6.5 for which levels of reactive metal tended to be higher than the quality standard value.

  12. Asthma in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Forno, Erick; Gogna, Mudita; Cepeda, Alfonso; Yañez, Anahi; Solé, Dirceu; Cooper, Philip; Avila, Lydiana; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A.; Celedón, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Consistent with the diversity of Latin America, there is profound variability in asthma burden among and within countries in this region. Regional variation in asthma prevalence is likely multifactorial and due to genetics, perinatal exposures, diet, obesity, tobacco use, indoor and outdoor pollutants, psychosocial stress, and microbial or parasitic infections. Similarly, nonuniform progress in asthma management leads to regional variability in disease morbidity. Future studies of distinct asthma phenotypes should follow up well-characterized Latin American subgroups and examine risk factors that are unique or common in Latin America (e.g. stress and violence, parasitic infections and use of biomass fuels for cooking). Because most Latin American countries share the same barriers to asthma management, concerted and multifaceted public health and research efforts are needed, including approaches to curtail tobacco use, campaigns to improve asthma treatment, broadening access to care and clinical trials of non-pharmacologic interventions (e.g. replacing biomass fuels with gas or electric stoves). PMID:26103996

  13. Psychological aspects of asthma.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, Paul; Feldman, Jonathan; Giardino, Nicholas; Song, Hye-Sue; Schmaling, Karen

    2002-06-01

    Asthma can be affected by stress, anxiety, sadness, and suggestion, as well as by environmental irritants or allergens, exercise, and infection. It also is associated with an elevated prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders. Asthma and these psychological states and traits may mutually potentiate each other through direct psychophysiological mediation, nonadherence to medical regimen, exposure to asthma triggers, and inaccuracy of asthma symptom perception. Defensiveness is associated with inaccurate perception of airway resistance and stress-related bronchoconstriction. Asthma education programs that teach about the nature of the disease, medications, and trigger avoidance tend to reduce asthma morbidity. Other promising psychological interventions as adjuncts to medical treatment include training in symptom perception, stress management, hypnosis, yoga, and several biofeedback procedures.

  14. Occupational asthma in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Research into occupational asthma (OA) in Japan has been led by the Japanese Society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy. The first report about allergic OA identified konjac asthma. After that, many kinds of OA have been reported. Cases of some types of OA, such as konjac asthma and sea squirt asthma, have been dramatically reduced by the efforts of medical personnel. Recently, with the development of new technologies, chemical antigen-induced asthma has increased in Japan. Due to advances in anti-asthma medication, control by medical treatment tends to be emphasized and the search for causative antigens seems to be neglected. Furthermore, we do not have a Japanese guideline for diagnosis and management of OA. This article discusses the current state of OA in Japan. PMID:22872819

  15. Severe Asthma in Children.

    PubMed

    Chipps, Bradley E; Parikh, Neil G; Maharaj, Sheena K

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize, diagnose, evaluate, and treat severe childhood asthma. Understanding the occurrence of the physiologic and clinical presentations of childhood severe asthma, the treatment and response may be predicted by biomarkers, but the patient's response is highly variable. The onset of severe asthma occurs early and is primarily predicted by severity of viral infection and coexistence of the atopic state.

  16. Asthma in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Andrew; Douglass, Jo A

    2012-04-01

    As the population increases in age, the diseases of older age will have increasing prevalence and place a greater burden on the health system. Despite asthma being usually considered a disease of younger people, asthma mortality is currently greatest in the over 55 age-group. Symptoms and emergency presentations for health care due to asthma place a great burden on the quality of life of those over age 55 with asthma. Asthma in older people is under-diagnosed due to patient and physiological factors. Medication strategies for asthma have been dominantly derived from younger cohorts so that effective medication strategies have usually not been explored in older people. Older people with asthma are very concerned regarding side effects of medication so that adherence to therapeutic regimes is often poor. In addition physical disability can lead to difficulty in accessing treatment and using inhaler devices. Practical strategies to improve asthma outcomes in older people have been studied infrequently and the goals of self-management suitable for younger age-groups may not be applicable in this group. Consequently, asthma in older people is deserving of further attention both to basic mechanisms of disease, precision in diagnosis and effective therapeutic strategies, including those that involve self-management and device use.

  17. [Aluminium content in foods with aluminium-containing food additives].

    PubMed

    Ogimoto, Mami; Suzuki, Kumi; Kabashima, Junichiro; Nakazato, Mitsuo; Uematsu, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    The aluminium (Al) content of 105 samples, including bakery products made with baking powder, agricultural products and seafoods treated with alum, was investigated. The amounts of Al detected were as follows (limit of quantification: 0.01 mg/g): 0.01-0.37 mg/g in 26 of 57 bakery products, 0.22-0.57 mg/g in 3 of 6 powder mixes, 0.01-0.05 mg/g in all three agricultural products examined, 0.03-0.90 mg/g in 4 of 6 seafood samples, 0.01-0.03 mg/g in 3 of 11 samples of instant noodles, 0.04-0.14 mg/g in 3 of 4 samples of vermicelli, 0.01 mg/g in 1 of 16 soybean products, but none in soybeans. Amounts equivalent to the PTWI of a 16 kg infant were detected in two samples of bakery products, two samples of powder mixes and one sample of salted jellyfish, if each sample was taken once a week. These results suggest that certain foods, depending on the product and the intake, might exceed the PTWI of children, especially infants.

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea and asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Cristina; Terse-Ramos, Regina; Souza-Machado, Adelmir; Cruz, Álvaro A

    2013-01-01

    Symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing, especially obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), are common in asthma patients and have been associated with asthma severity. It is known that asthma symptoms tend to be more severe at night and that asthma-related deaths are most likely to occur during the night or early morning. Nocturnal symptoms occur in 60-74% of asthma patients and are markers of inadequate control of the disease. Various pathophysiological mechanisms are related to the worsening of asthma symptoms, OSAS being one of the most important factors. In patients with asthma, OSAS should be investigated whenever there is inadequate control of symptoms of nocturnal asthma despite the treatment recommended by guidelines having been administered. There is evidence in the literature that the use of continuous positive airway pressure contributes to asthma control in asthma patients with obstructive sleep apnea and uncontrolled asthma. PMID:24310634

  19. Advances in pediatric asthma in 2013: coordinating asthma care.

    PubMed

    Szefler, Stanley J

    2014-03-01

    Last year's "Advances in pediatric asthma: moving toward asthma prevention" concluded that "We are well on our way to creating a pathway around wellness in asthma care and also to utilize new tools to predict the risk for asthma and take steps to not only prevent asthma exacerbations but also to prevent the early manifestations of the disease and thus prevent its evolution to severe asthma." This year's summary will focus on recent advances in pediatric asthma on prenatal and postnatal factors altering the natural history of asthma, assessment of asthma control, and new insights regarding potential therapeutic targets for altering the course of asthma in children, as indicated in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology publications in 2013 and early 2014. Recent reports continue to shed light on methods to understand factors that influence the course of asthma, methods to assess and communicate levels of control, and new targets for intervention, as well as new immunomodulators. It will now be important to carefully assess risk factors for the development of asthma, as well as the risk for asthma exacerbations, and to improve the way we communicate this information in the health care system. This will allow parents, primary care physicians, specialists, and provider systems to more effectively intervene in altering the course of asthma and to further reduce asthma morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Kerosene-induced asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez de la Vega, A.; Casaco, A.; Garcia, M.; Noa, M.; Carvajal, D.; Arruzazabala, L.; Gonzalez, R. )

    1990-04-01

    Clinical evaluation of 286 asthmatic women showed 15.5% of those who improved clinically had contact with kerosene, while 43.9% of those who failed to improve used kerosene as fuel for cooking. In 16 women the onset of asthma occurred soon after they began to use kerosene. Kerosene can cause and aggravate asthma.

  1. Occupational asthma: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, L J; Balmes, J R

    2000-01-01

    Occupational asthma is the most common form of occupational lung disease in the developed world at the present time. In this review, the epidemiology, pathogenesis/mechanisms, clinical presentations, management, and prevention of occupational asthma are discussed. The population attributable risk of asthma due to occupational exposures is considerable. Current understanding of the mechanisms by which many agents cause occupational asthma is limited, especially for low-molecular-weight sensitizers and irritants. The diagnosis of occupational asthma is generally established on the basis of a suggestive history of a temporal association between exposure and the onset of symptoms and objective evidence that these symptoms are related to airflow limitation. Early diagnosis, elimination of exposure to the responsible agent, and early use of inhaled steroids may play important roles in the prevention of long-term persistence of asthma. Persistent occupational asthma is often associated with substantial disability and consequent impacts on income and quality of life. Prevention of new cases is the best approach to reducing the burden of asthma attributable to occupational exposures. Future research needs are identified. PMID:10931788

  2. Traveling and Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Traveling and Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > Traveling and Asthma A A A What's in this ... t have to get in the way of travel fun. Let's find out how to be prepared ...

  3. Stepwise management of asthma.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Ayesha N

    2015-09-01

    Stepwise management of asthma remains an area of evolving research. Asthma is one of the most expensive chronic diseases in the United States; stepwise management is an important area of focus, with several recent guidelines recommending management. This is a review of published English language literature, focusing on management guidelines for asthma in adult and pediatric patients. Asthma is a chronic disease whose assessment of severity allows for therapeutic goals to match the impairment noted. Good evidence exists to aid risk reduction, leading to decreased emergency room visits, preventing loss of lung function in adults and lung growth in children, and optimizing pharmacotherapy with reduced side effects profile. Recent asthma management guidelines incorporate 4 components of asthma care including: monitoring of severity, patient education, controlling external triggers, and medications, including recent attention to medication adherence. Asthma is an expensive chronic disease with preventive measures leading to reduced healthcare costs. Future targeted cytokine therapy to decrease serum and blood eosinophils may become an integral part of asthma management. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  4. Asthma - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Asthma - control drugs URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000005.htm Asthma - control ...

  5. [Occupational asthma in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Endre, László

    2015-05-10

    Occupational asthma belongs to communicable diseases, which should be reported in Hungary. During a 24-year period between January 1990 and December 2013, 180 occupational asthma cases were reported in Hungary (52 cases between 1990 and 1995, 83 cases between 1996 and 2000, 40 cases between 2001 and 2006, and 5 cases between 2007 and 2013). These data are unusual, because according to the official report of the National Korányi Pulmonology Institute in Budapest, at least 14,000 new adult asthma cases were reported in every year between 2000 and 2012 in Hungary. Also, international data indicate that at least 2% of adult patients with asthma have occupational asthma and at least 50 out of 1 million employees develop occupational asthma in each year. In 2003, 631 new occupational asthma patients were reported in the United Kingdom, but only 7 cases in Hungary. Because it is unlikely that the occupational environment in Hungary is much better than anywhere else in the world, it seems that not all new occupational asthma cases are reported in Hungary. Of the 180 reported cases in Hungary, 55 were bakers or other workers in flour mills. There were 11 metal-workers, 10 health care assistants, 9 workers dealing with textiles (tailors, dressmakers, workers in textile industry) and 9 employees worked upon leather and animal fur. According to international data, the most unsafe profession is the animal keeper in scientific laboratories, but only 4 of them were reported as having occupational asthma during the studied 24 years in Hungary. Interestingly, 3 museologists with newly-diagnosed occupational asthma were reported in 2003, but not such cases occurred before or after that year. In this paper the Hungarian literature of occupational asthma is summarized, followed by a review on the classification, pathomechanism, clinical presentation, predisposing factors, diagnostics and therapeutic aspects of the disease. Epidemiological data of adult asthma in Hungary and data from

  6. Investigation of the formability of aluminium alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisza, M.; Budai, D.; Kovács, P. Z.; Lukács, Zs

    2016-11-01

    Aluminium alloys are more and more widely applied in car body manufacturing. Increasing the formability of aluminium alloys are one of the most relevant tasks in todays’ research topics. In this paper, the focus will be on the investigation of the formability of aluminium alloys concerning those material grades that are more widely applied in the automotive industry including the 5xxx and 6xxx aluminium alloy series. Recently, besides the cold forming of aluminium sheets the forming of aluminium alloys at elevated temperatures became a hot research topic, too. In our experimental investigations, we mostly examined the EN AW 5754 and EN AW 6082 aluminium alloys at elevated temperatures. We analysed the effect of various material and process parameters (e.g. temperature, sheet thickness) on the formability of aluminium alloys with particular emphasis on the Forming Limit Diagrams at elevated temperatures in order to find the optimum forming conditions for these alloys.

  7. Pharmacologic therapy of asthma.

    PubMed

    Ellis, E F

    1976-04-01

    Asthma is treated by avoiding the precipitants of symptoms, by a trial of hyposensitization (immunotherapy) if the precipitant cannot be avoided, and principally by pharmacologic therapy. Acute attacks have been most widely treated with epinephrine, but adrenergic aerosol bronchodilators and aminophylline are being used increasingly. When an acute attack of asthma does not respond to treatment, a diagnosis of status asthmaticus should be considered and the patient treated in a hospital intensive care unit because of the potentially life-threatening sequela of respiratory failure. Periodic mild episodes of asthma usually respond to administration of an oral bronchodilator. Chronic low-grade asthma is best treated with an around-the-clock regimen of theophylline. Patients whose asthma is not under satisfactory control with conventional bronchodilators may be given a trial of cromolyn sodium. Chronic severe cases may be treated with corticosteroids, but these drugs must be skillfully administered to avoid adverse effects.

  8. Asthma Review for Pharmacists Providing Asthma Education

    PubMed Central

    Lampkin, Stacie J.; Maslouski, Cheryl A.; Maish, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is the most common pediatric illness affecting more than 6 million children in the United States. Children with asthma have more frequent office visits and hospitalizations compared with adults. Despite advances in therapies, asthma still has a significant effect on the health care system. Regardless of the setting, pharmacists are uniquely equipped with an intimate knowledge of medications. With this knowledge, they can provide education to patients at various points throughout the health care system, from hospitalization to office visits to point of pick up at the pharmacy. The goal of this article is to equip the pharmacist with the necessary knowledge to provide education to these patients in a variety of practice settings, including community pharmacies, ambulatory care settings, and during transitions in care. PMID:27877099

  9. Asthma Review for Pharmacists Providing Asthma Education.

    PubMed

    Lampkin, Stacie J; Maslouski, Cheryl A; Maish, William A; John, Barnabas M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is the most common pediatric illness affecting more than 6 million children in the United States. Children with asthma have more frequent office visits and hospitalizations compared with adults. Despite advances in therapies, asthma still has a significant effect on the health care system. Regardless of the setting, pharmacists are uniquely equipped with an intimate knowledge of medications. With this knowledge, they can provide education to patients at various points throughout the health care system, from hospitalization to office visits to point of pick up at the pharmacy. The goal of this article is to equip the pharmacist with the necessary knowledge to provide education to these patients in a variety of practice settings, including community pharmacies, ambulatory care settings, and during transitions in care.

  10. Wheezing and Asthma in Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Baby Is Wheezing. Is It Asthma? Bronchiolitis and RSV Delaying Asthma Diagnosis Diagnosing Asthma in Older Babies Treating the Symptoms en español Respiración sibilante o jadeante y asma en bebés Millions of kids under the age of 18 have asthma. Most ...

  11. Advances in Pediatric Asthma in 2013: Coordinating Asthma Care

    PubMed Central

    Szefler, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Last year’s Advances in Pediatric Asthma: Moving Toward Asthma Prevention concluded that: “We are well on our way to creating a pathway around wellness in asthma care and also to utilize new tools to predict the risk for asthma and take steps to not only prevent asthma exacerbations but also to prevent the early manifestations of the disease and thus prevent its evolution to severe asthma.” This year’s summary will focus on recent advances in pediatric asthma on pre- and postnatal factors altering the natural history of asthma, assessment of asthma control, and new insights regarding potential therapeutic targets for altering the course of asthma in children as indicated in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology publications in 2013 and early 2014. Recent reports continue to shed light on methods to understand factors that influence the course of asthma, methods to assess and communicate levels of control, and new targets for intervention as well as new immunomodulators. It will now be important to carefully assess risk factors for the development of asthma as well as the risk for asthma exacerbations and to improve the way we communicate this information in the health care system. This will allow parents, primary care physicians, specialists and provider systems to more effectively intervene in altering the course of asthma and to further reduce asthma morbidity and mortality. PMID:24581430

  12. Analysis of aluminium in rat following administration of allergen immunotherapy using either aluminium or microcrystalline-tyrosine-based adjuvants.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Stuart A; Heath, Matthew D; Kramer, Matthias F; Skinner, Murray A

    2016-03-01

    Investigation into the absorption, distribution and elimination of aluminium in rat after subcutaneous aluminium adjuvant formulation administration using ICP-MS is described. Assays were verified under the principles of a tiered approach. There was no evidence of systemic exposure of aluminium, in brain or in kidney. Extensive and persistent retention of aluminium at the dose site was observed for at least 180 days after administration. This is the first published work that has quantified aluminium adjuvant retention based on the quantity of aluminium delivered in a typical allergy immunotherapy course. The results indicate that the repeated administration of aluminium-containing adjuvants will likely contribute directly and significantly to an individual's body burden of aluminium.

  13. [Aluminium allergy and granulomas induced by vaccinations for children].

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rosa Marie Ø; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2015-04-27

    Vaccination with aluminium-adsorbed vaccines can induce aluminium allergy with persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site – vaccination granulomas. In this article we give an overview of childhood aluminium-adsorbed vaccines available in Denmark. Through literature studies we examine the incidence, the symptoms and the prognosis for the vaccination granulomas and the allergy. Finally we discuss the status in Denmark.

  14. Aluminium levels in spices and aromatic herbs.

    PubMed

    López, F F; Cabrera, C; Lorenzo, M L; López, M C

    2000-08-10

    We evaluated the levels of aluminium in a total of 72 samples of 17 different spices and aromatic herbs that are widely consumed in Spain, and in the Mediterranean diet, in general. Aluminium was determined in the samples mineralized with HNO3 and V2O5, using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectroscopy as the analytical technique. The accuracy and precision of the proposed method was verified against an NBS-certified reference material. Precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, ranged from 1.10 to 4.07%. The results obtained from recovery studies were of 97.90 +/- 1.20. Aluminium concentrations ranged from 3.74 to 56.50 microg/g (dry wt.). The presence of this metal was detected in all the samples we analysed.

  15. Aluminium and zinc phosphide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Alex T

    2009-02-01

    Aluminium and zinc phosphides are highly effective insecticides and rodenticides and are used widely to protect grain in stores and during its transportation. Acute poisoning with these compounds may be direct due to ingestion of the salts or indirect from accidental inhalation of phosphine generated during their approved use. Both forms of poisoning are mediated by phosphine which has been thought to be toxic because it inhibits cytochrome c oxidase. While phosphine does inhibit cytochrome C oxidase in vitro, the inhibition is much less in vivo. It has been shown recently in nematodes that phosphine rapidly perturbs mitochondrial morphology, inhibits oxidative respiration by 70%, and causes a severe drop in mitochondrial membrane potential. This failure of cellular respiration is likely to be due to a mechanism other than inhibition of cytochrome C oxidase. In addition, phosphine and hydrogen peroxide can interact to form the highly reactive hydroxyl radical and phosphine also inhibits catalase and peroxidase; both mechanisms result in hydroxyl radical associated damage such as lipid peroxidation. The major lethal consequence of phosphide ingestion, profound circulatory collapse, is secondary to factors including direct effects on cardiac myocytes, fluid loss, and adrenal gland damage. In addition, phosphine and phosphides have corrosive actions. There is usually only a short interval between ingestion of phosphides and the appearance of systemic toxicity. Phosphine-induced impairment of myocardial contractility and fluid loss leads to circulatory failure, and critically, pulmonary edema supervenes, though whether this is a cardiogenic or non-cardiogenic is not always clear. Metabolic acidosis, or mixed metabolic acidosis and respiratory alkalosis, and acute renal failure are frequent. Other features include disseminated intravascular coagulation, hepatic necrosis and renal failure. There is conflicting evidence on the occurrence of magnesium disturbances. There

  16. Aluminium and the human breast.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2016-06-01

    The human population is exposed to aluminium (Al) from diet, antacids and vaccine adjuvants, but frequent application of Al-based salts to the underarm as antiperspirant adds a high additional exposure directly to the local area of the human breast. Coincidentally the upper outer quadrant of the breast is where there is also a disproportionately high incidence of breast cysts and breast cancer. Al has been measured in human breast tissues/fluids at higher levels than in blood, and experimental evidence suggests that at physiologically relevant concentrations, Al can adversely impact on human breast epithelial cell biology. Gross cystic breast disease is the most common benign disorder of the breast and evidence is presented that Al may be a causative factor in formation of breast cysts. Evidence is also reviewed that Al can enable the development of multiple hallmarks associated with cancer in breast cells, in particular that it can cause genomic instability and inappropriate proliferation in human breast epithelial cells, and can increase migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. In addition, Al is a metalloestrogen and oestrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer known to influence multiple hallmarks. The microenvironment is established as another determinant of breast cancer development and Al has been shown to cause adverse alterations to the breast microenvironment. If current usage patterns of Al-based antiperspirant salts contribute to causation of breast cysts and breast cancer, then reduction in exposure would offer a strategy for prevention, and regulatory review is now justified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Diamond grooving of rapidly solidified optical aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-El-Hossein, Khaled; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Ghobashy, Sameh; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Mkoko, Zwelinzima

    2015-10-01

    Traditional optical aluminium grades such as Al 6061 are intensively used for making optical components for applications ranging from mould insert fabrication to laser machine making. However, because of their irregular microstructure and relative inhomogeneity of material properties at micro scale, traditional optical aluminium may exhibit some difficulties when ultra-high precision diamond turned. Inhomogeneity and micro-variation in the material properties combined with uneven and coarse microstructure may cause unacceptable surface finish and accelerated tool wear, especially in grooving operation when the diamond tool edge is fully immersed in the material surface. Recently, new grades of optical aluminium that are featured by their ultra-fine microstructure and improved material properties have been developed to overcome the problem of high tool wear rates. The new aluminium grades have been developed using rapid solidification process which results in extremely small grain sizes combined with improved mechanical properties. The current study is concerned with investigating the performance of single-point diamond turning when grooving two grades of rapidly solidified aluminium (RSA) grades: RSA905 which is a high-alloyed aluminium grade and RSA443 which has a high silicon content. In this study, two series of experiments employed to create radial microgrooves on the two RSA grades. The surface roughness obtained on the groove surface is measured when different combinations of cutting parameters are used. Cutting speed is varied while feed rate and depth of cut were kept constant. The results show that groove surface roughness produced on RSA443 is higher than that obtained on RSA905. Also, the paper reports on the effect of cutting speed on surface roughness for each RSA grade.

  18. Asthma: definitions and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Mims, James W

    2015-09-01

    Asthma is a common condition due to chronic inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. Chronic lower airway inflammation is known to be more common in individuals that also have inflammatory disorders of the upper airway. The scientific understanding of asthma continues to improve and it is important for providers who treat upper or lower airway inflammation to be familiar with asthma's definition and pathophysiology. Articles were selected based on literature reviews through PubMed and personal knowledge of the author. The search selection was not standardized. Asthma is a heterogenic condition that is underdiagnosed and undertreated despite that the skills needed to diagnose it are readily attainable and effective treatments are available. Providers need a working understanding of asthma in order to be proficient at managing their patients with chronic nasal or sinus inflammation. This article provides a primer focusing on the current conception asthma in terms of definition, possible etiologies, inflammatory profile, pathophysiology, subtypes, and overlapping conditions. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder arising from not fully understood heterogenic gene-environment interactions. It features variable airway obstruction and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Clinically, asthmatics exhibit recurrent episodes of wheeze, cough, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  19. African Americans with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Kathleen C.; Grant, Audrey V.; Hansel, Nadia N.; Gao, Peisong; Dunston, Georgia M.

    2007-01-01

    It has been well established that genetic factors strongly affect susceptibility to asthma and its associated traits. It is less clear to what extent genetic variation contributes to the ethnic disparities observed for asthma morbidity and mortality. Individuals of African descent with asthma have more severe asthma, higher IgE levels, a higher degree of steroid dependency, and more severe clinical symptoms than individuals of European descent with asthma but relatively few studies have focused on this particularly vulnerable ethnic group. Similar underrepresentation exists for other minorities, including Hispanics. In this review, a summary of linkage and association studies in populations of African descent is presented, and the role of linkage disequilibrium in the dissection of a complex trait such as asthma is discussed. Consideration for the impact of population stratification in recently admixed populations (i.e., European, African) is essential in genetic association studies focusing on African ancestry groups. With the most recent update on the International HapMap Project, efficient selection of haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (htSNPs) for African Americans has accelerated and efficiency of htSNPs chosen from one population to represent other continental groups (e.g., African) has been demonstrated. Cutting-edge approaches, such as genomewide association studies, admixture mapping, and phylogenetic analyses, offer new opportunities for dissecting the genetic basis for asthma in populations of African descent. PMID:17202293

  20. Cleaning agents and asthma.

    PubMed

    Quirce, S; Barranco, P

    2010-01-01

    Although cleaners represent a significant part of the working population worldwide, they remain a relatively understudied occupational group. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between cleaning work and asthma, but the risk factors are uncertain. Cleaning workers are exposed to a large variety of cleaning products containing both irritants and sensitizers, as well as to common indoor allergens and pollutants. Thus, the onset or aggravation of asthma in this group could be related to an irritant-induced mechanism or to specific sensitization. The main sensitizers contained in cleaning products are disinfectants, quaternary ammonium compounds (such as benzalkonium chloride), amine compounds, and fragrances.The strongest airway irritants in cleaning products are bleach (sodium hypochlorite), hydrochloric acid, and alkaline agents (ammonia and sodium hydroxide), which are commonly mixed together. Exposure to the ingredients of cleaning products may give rise to both new-onset asthma, with or without a latency period, and work-exacerbated asthma. High-level exposure to irritants may induce reactive airways dysfunction syndrome. Cleaning workers may also have a greater relative risk of developing asthma due to prolonged low-to-moderate exposure to respiratory irritants. In addition, asthma-like symptoms without confirmed asthma are also common after exposure to cleaning agents. In many cleaners, airway symptoms induced by chemicals and odors cannot be explained by allergic or asthmatic reactions. These patients may have increased sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin, which is known to reflect sensory reactivity, and this condition is termed airway sensory hyperreactivity.

  1. [Environmental influences in asthma].

    PubMed

    Vermeire, P

    1999-01-01

    Beside genetic factors environmental factors largely determine prevalence and severity of bronchial asthma. They seem to explain better the large time-related and geographic differences in prevalence, supported by several recent studies. Among environmental risk factors, those present indoors, linked to our modern homes, are considered most important. This applies to early exposure to allergens, especially to house dust mite, first leading to sensitisation and later to asthma. The indoor air may also be contaminated by tobacco smoke and other substances like nitric oxide, acting directly on the airways or indirectly by promoting sensitisation to allergens. Atmospheric air pollution is the environmental factor mostly considered as responsible for the asthma increase. Its role as inducer of the disease has not been established, but cannot be excluded. New and known agents of air pollution in the working place have resulted in asthma becoming the most frequent occupational respiratory disease. Respiratory infections have long been considered as a risk factor for asthma, e.g. those caused by RSV-viruses; however, recent evidence suggests that infections during the first year of life could be protective for asthma. Changed dietary habits are a possible risk factor linked to our altered life style. Current research evaluates the role of excessive salt intake, or deficient intake of fruit and omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil. There is growing evidence that risk factors for later occurrence of asthma could already act very soon after birth or even during pregnancy; this would apply for exposure to parental smoking or to allergens. Although aggravating environmental factors undoubtedly have an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma, it remains an intriguing question to what extent the loss of protective mechanisms resulting from our Western life style is not the main cause of the increased occurrence of asthma. Better understanding of this problem is mandatory and

  2. Aluminium ring pulls: an invisible foreign body.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, G D; Lakshmi, M V; Jackson, A

    1994-01-01

    The aluminium ring pulls associated with the latest designs of drinks cans can be relatively easily detached from their mounting on the top of the can and subsequently aspirated. Their small size predisposes them to lodge as foreign bodies (FBs) in the throat. The similarity of atomic number between soft tissue (7.5) and aluminium (13) makes detection of these FBs difficult on soft tissue radiography. If aspiration is suspected direct visualization and removal may be indicated even if radiography is negative. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7804592

  3. The future of asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, I. P.

    1997-01-01

    Reports in the media describing the discovery of "the asthma gene" or "a new vaccine for asthma" may be inaccurate and often raise patients' hopes unjustifiably. This article is a personal view of key areas in current asthma research, and it examines how they may impinge on the care of asthmatic patients in the next decade. I have tried to explain the thinking behind some of the approaches under study. I discuss the potential contributions of genetic studies, immunological approaches, and new therapeutic approaches. PMID:9001482

  4. Eosinophilic Endotype of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Fernando; Lim, Hui Fang; Nair, Parameswaran

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into different clinical endotypes, depending on the type of airway inflammation, clinical severity, and response to treatment. This article focuses on the eosinophilic endotype of asthma, which is defined by the central role that eosinophils play in the pathophysiology of the condition. It is characterized by elevated sputum and/or blood eosinophils on at least 2 occasions and by a significant response to treatments that suppress eosinophilia. Histopathologic demonstration of eosinophils in the airways provides the most direct diagnosis of eosinophilic asthma; but it is invasive, thus, impractical in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. EAACI position statement on asthma exacerbations and severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Custovic, A; Johnston, S L; Pavord, I; Gaga, M; Fabbri, L; Bel, E H; Le Souëf, P; Lötvall, J; Demoly, P; Akdis, C A; Ryan, D; Mäkelä, M J; Martinez, F; Holloway, J W; Saglani, S; O'Byrne, P; Papi, A; Sergejeva, S; Magnan, A; Del Giacco, S; Kalayci, O; Hamelmann, E; Papadopoulos, N G

    2013-12-01

    Asthma exacerbations and severe asthma are linked with high morbidity, significant mortality and high treatment costs. Recurrent asthma exacerbations cause a decline in lung function and, in childhood, are linked to development of persistent asthma. This position paper, from the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, highlights the shortcomings of current treatment guidelines for patients suffering from frequent asthma exacerbations and those with difficult-to-treat asthma and severe treatment-resistant asthma. It reviews current evidence that supports a call for increased awareness of (i) the seriousness of asthma exacerbations and (ii) the need for novel treatment strategies in specific forms of severe treatment-resistant asthma. There is strong evidence linking asthma exacerbations with viral airway infection and underlying deficiencies in innate immunity and evidence of a synergism between viral infection and allergic mechanisms in increasing risk of exacerbations. Nonadherence to prescribed medication has been identified as a common clinical problem amongst adults and children with difficult-to-control asthma. Appropriate diagnosis, assessment of adherence and other potentially modifiable factors (such as passive or active smoking, ongoing allergen exposure, psychosocial factors) have to be a priority in clinical assessment of all patients with difficult-to-control asthma. Further studies with improved designs and new diagnostic tools are needed to properly characterize (i) the pathophysiology and risk of asthma exacerbations, and (ii) the clinical and pathophysiological heterogeneity of severe asthma. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old What's an Asthma Flare-Up? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma ... of a straw that's being pinched. Causes of Asthma Flare-Ups People with asthma have airways that ...

  7. Aluminium in over-the-counter drugs: risks outweigh benefits?

    PubMed

    Reinke, Claudia M; Breitkreutz, Jörg; Leuenberger, Hans

    2003-01-01

    In the early 1970s, aluminium toxicity was first implicated in the pathogenesis of clinical disorders in patients with chronic renal failure involving bone (renal osteomalacia) or brain tissue (dialysis encephalopathy). Before that time the toxic effects of aluminium ingestion were not considered to be a major concern because absorption seemed unlikely to occur. Meanwhile, aluminium toxicity has been investigated in countless epidemiological and clinical studies as well as in animal experiments and many papers have been published on the subject. It is now commonly acknowledged that aluminium toxicity can be induced by infusion of aluminium-contaminated dialysis fluids, by parenteral nutrition solutions, and by oral exposure as a result of aluminium-containing pharmaceutical products such as aluminium-based phosphate binders or antacid intake. Over-the-counter antacids are the most important source for human aluminium exposure from a quantitative point of view. However, aluminium can act as a powerful neurological toxicant and provoke embryonic and fetal toxic effects in animals and humans after gestational exposure. Despite these facts, the patient information leaflets from European antacids that are available OTC show substantial differences regarding warnings from aluminium toxicity. It seems advisable that all patients should receive the same information on aluminium toxicity from patient information leaflets, in particular with regard to the increased absorption through concomitant administration with citrate-containing beverages and the use of such antacids during pregnancy.

  8. Aluminium in Alzheimer's disease: are we still at a crossroad?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Veer Bala; Anitha, S; Hegde, M L; Zecca, L; Garruto, R M; Ravid, R; Shankar, S K; Stein, R; Shanmugavelu, P; Jagannatha Rao, K S

    2005-01-01

    Aluminium, an environmentally abundant non-redox trivalent cation has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the definite mechanism of aluminium toxicity in AD is not known. Evidence suggests that trace metal homeostasis plays a crucial role in the normal functioning of the brain, and any disturbance in it can exacerbate events associated with AD. The present paper reviews the scientific literature linking aluminium with AD. The focus is on aluminium levels in brain, region-specific and subcellular distribution, its relation to neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid beta, and other metals. A detailed mechanism of the role of aluminium in oxidative stress and cell death is highlighted. The importance of complex speciation chemistry of aluminium in relation to biology has been emphasized. The debatable role of aluminium in AD and the cross-talk between aluminium and genetic susceptibility are also discussed. Finally, it is concluded based on extensive literature that the neurotoxic effects of aluminium are beyond any doubt, and aluminium as a factor in AD cannot be discarded. However, whether aluminium is a sole factor in AD and whether it is a factor in all AD cases still needs to be understood.

  9. Allergies, asthma, and pollen

    MedlinePlus

    ... hay fever (allergic rhinitis) and asthma include: Some trees Some grasses Weeds Ragweed ... pollen at different times of the year. Most trees produce pollen in the spring. Grasses usually produce ...

  10. What Is Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... ethnic groups, male and female, young and old, city dwellers and rural dwellers. In the United States, ... to protect children from environmental asthma triggers. EPA's Clean Air Research website offers information on how we ...

  11. Exercise and Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All Rights Reserved. Legal Notices | Site Map | Contact Us Social navigation Facebook Twitter Mobile navigation Home Conditions & Treatments Education & Training Practice Resources About AAAAI Search navigation Find ...

  12. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... triggered by an allergy to something (called an allergen ). In these people, the symptoms of asthma like ... breathing are often brought on by being around allergens. Allergies have a lot to do with your ...

  13. Inhaled Asthma Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some bronchodilators are rapid-acting, and some are long-acting. The rapid-acting bronchodilators are used as "rescue" ... blocked. See your allergist to change your treatment. Long-acting bronchodilators are used to provide asthma control instead ...

  14. Asthma, Allergies and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  15. The interrelationship between silicon and aluminium in the biological effects of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Birchall, J D

    1992-01-01

    It is well established that aluminium is toxic at the cellular level and that pathological symptoms follow its entry into organisms (plants, fish, humans) when the normal exclusion mechanisms fail or are bypassed, as for example in renal dialysis. The present debate concerns the availability of environmental aluminium and the possible impact of its slow and insidious absorption and accumulation in vulnerable individuals. Silicon is considered as essential element but the mechanisms underlying its essentiality remain unknown and binding of the element (through oxygen) with biomolecules has not been demonstrated. There is, however, a unique affinity between aluminium and silicon, not only in solid state chemistry ([AlO4]5- and [SiO4]4- are isostructural), but also in aqueous solution chemistry as illustrated by the synthesis of zeolite from aluminate and silicate anions at high pH and under hydrothermal conditions. This affinity exists also in very dilute solution (< 10(-5) M) at near-neutral pH when hydroxyalumino-silicate species form. These species mediate the bioavailability and cellular toxicity of aluminium. The observed effects of silicon deficiency can be attributed to consequential aluminium availability. There are important implications for the epidemiology and biochemistry of aluminium-induced disorders and any consideration of one element must include the other.

  16. Asthma and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and risk of specific congenital anomalies: A European case-malformed control study. J Allergy Clin Immunol. Jul 25. pii: S0091-6749(15)00837-4. Kallen B 2007. The safety of asthma medications during pregnancy. Expert Opin Drug Saf 6(1):15-26. Kwon HL, et al. 2006. The epidemiology of asthma during pregnancy: ... In case you missed it: Free Zika Webinar- Recording April ...

  17. Asthma Outcomes: Exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Fuhlbrigge, Anne; Peden, David; Apter, Andrea J.; Boushey, Homer A.; Camargo, Carlos; Gern, James; Heymann, Peter W.; Martinez, Fernando D.; Mauger, David; Teague, William G.; Blaisdell, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Background The goals of asthma treatment include preventing recurrent exacerbations. Yet there is no consensus about the terminology for describing or defining “exacerbation,” or about how to characterize an episode’s severity. Objective National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies convened an expert group to propose how asthma exacerbation should be assessed as a standardized asthma outcome in future asthma clinical research studies. Methods We utilized comprehensive literature reviews and expert opinion to compile a list of asthma exacerbation outcomes, and classified them as either core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to study aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results No dominant definition of “exacerbation” was found. The most widely used definitions included 3 components, all related to treatment, rather than symptoms: (1) systemic use of corticosteroids, (2) asthma-specific emergency department visits or hospitalization, and (3) use of short-acting β-agonists (SABAs) as quick-relief (sometimes referred to as “rescue” or “reliever”) medications. Conclusions The working group participants propose that the definition of “asthma exacerbation” be “a worsening of asthma requiring the use of systemic corticosteroids to prevent a serious outcome.” As core outcomes, they propose inclusion and separate reporting of several essential variables of an exacerbation. Further, they propose the development of a standardized, component-based definition of “exacerbation” with clear thresholds of severity for each component. PMID:22386508

  18. Relvar Ellipta for asthma.

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    ▼Relvar Ellipta (GSK) is a dry powder inhaler that contains a corticosteroid (fluticasone furoate) and a long-acting beta2 agonist (vilanterol trifenatate). It is licensed for once-daily use as maintenance therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. In a previous article we considered its use in the management of COPD.1 Here we review the evidence for Relvar Ellipta in the treatment of patients with asthma.

  19. An ultrafast rechargeable aluminium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meng-Chang; Gong, Ming; Lu, Bingan; Wu, Yingpeng; Wang, Di-Yan; Guan, Mingyun; Angell, Michael; Chen, Changxin; Yang, Jiang; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Dai, Hongjie

    2015-04-01

    The development of new rechargeable battery systems could fuel various energy applications, from personal electronics to grid storage. Rechargeable aluminium-based batteries offer the possibilities of low cost and low flammability, together with three-electron-redox properties leading to high capacity. However, research efforts over the past 30 years have encountered numerous problems, such as cathode material disintegration, low cell discharge voltage (about 0.55 volts ref. 5), capacitive behaviour without discharge voltage plateaus (1.1-0.2 volts or 1.8-0.8 volts) and insufficient cycle life (less than 100 cycles) with rapid capacity decay (by 26-85 per cent over 100 cycles). Here we present a rechargeable aluminium battery with high-rate capability that uses an aluminium metal anode and a three-dimensional graphitic-foam cathode. The battery operates through the electrochemical deposition and dissolution of aluminium at the anode, and intercalation/de-intercalation of chloroaluminate anions in the graphite, using a non-flammable ionic liquid electrolyte. The cell exhibits well-defined discharge voltage plateaus near 2 volts, a specific capacity of about 70 mA h g-1 and a Coulombic efficiency of approximately 98 per cent. The cathode was found to enable fast anion diffusion and intercalation, affording charging times of around one minute with a current density of ~4,000 mA g-1 (equivalent to ~3,000 W kg-1), and to withstand more than 7,500 cycles without capacity decay.

  20. Molecular breeding of cereals for aluminium resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aluminium (Al3+) toxicity is the primary factor limiting crop production on acidic soils worldwide. In addition to an application of lime for soil amelioration, Al3+ resistant plant varieties have been deployed to raise productivity on such hostile soils. This has been possible due to the exploita...

  1. Effect of aluminium chloride on human spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, S.

    1988-03-01

    Aluminium (Al), which is the most prevalent metal in the earth's crust, has been implicated as an etiological factor in a variety of clinical disorders. Only recently Al has been discussed in the pathogenesis of the parenteral nutrition - associated liver disease. Included in this report are the preliminary findings on its effects on the reproductive functions of human beings.

  2. Indentation of aluminium foam at low velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaopeng; Miao, Yinggang; Liu, Shuangyan; Li, Yulong; Lu, Guoxing

    2015-09-01

    The indentation behaviour of aluminium foams at low velocity (10 m/s ˜ 30 m/s) was investigated both in experiments and numerical simulation in this paper. A flat-ended indenter was used and the force-displacement history was recorded. The Split Hopkinson Pressure bar was used to obtain the indentation velocity and forces in the dynamic experiments. Because of the low strength of the aluminium foam, PMMA bar was used, and the experimental data were corrected using Bacon's method. The energy absorption characteristics varying with impact velocity were then obtained. It was found that the energy absorption ability of aluminium foam gradually increases in the quasi-static regime and shows a significant increase at ˜10 m/s velocity. Numerical simulation was also conducted to investigate this process. A 3D Voronoi model was used and models with different relative densities were investigated as well as those with different failure strain. The indentation energy increases with both the relative density and failure strain. The analysis of the FE model implies that the significant change in energy absorption ability of aluminium foam in indentation at ˜10 m/s velocity may be caused by plastic wave effect.

  3. Toxicity of dissolved and precipitated aluminium to marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Gillmore, Megan L; Golding, Lisa A; Angel, Brad M; Adams, Merrin S; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-05-01

    Localised aluminium contamination can lead to high concentrations in coastal waters, which have the potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. This research investigated the toxicity of 72-h exposures of aluminium to three marine diatoms (Ceratoneis closterium (formerly Nitzschia closterium), Minutocellus polymorphus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) by measuring population growth rate inhibition and cell membrane damage (SYTOX Green) as endpoints. Toxicity was correlated to the time-averaged concentrations of different aluminium size-fractions, operationally defined as <0.025μm filtered, <0.45μm filtered (dissolved) and unfiltered (total) present in solution over the 72-h bioassay. The chronic population growth rate inhibition after aluminium exposure varied between diatom species. C. closterium was the most sensitive species (10% inhibition of growth rate (72-h IC10) of 80 (55-100)μg Al/L (95% confidence limits)) while M. polymorphus (540 (460-600)μg Al/L) and P. tricornutum (2100 (2000-2200)μg Al/L) were less sensitive (based on measured total aluminium). Dissolved aluminium was the primary contributor to toxicity in C. closterium, while a combination of dissolved and precipitated aluminium forms contributed to toxicity in M. polymorphus. In contrast, aluminium toxicity to the most tolerant diatom P. tricornutum was due predominantly to precipitated aluminium. Preliminary investigations revealed the sensitivity of C. closterium and M. polymorphus to aluminium was influenced by initial cell density with aluminium toxicity significantly (p<0.05) increasing with initial cell density from 10(3) to 10(5)cells/mL. No effects on plasma membrane permeability were observed for any of the three diatoms suggesting that mechanisms of aluminium toxicity to diatoms do not involve compromising the plasma membrane. These results indicate that marine diatoms have a broad range in sensitivity to aluminium with toxic mechanisms related to both dissolved and precipitated

  4. Evolving Concepts of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Anuradha; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of asthma has evolved over time from a singular disease to a complex of various phenotypes, with varied natural histories, physiologies, and responses to treatment. Early therapies treated most patients with asthma similarly, with bronchodilators and corticosteroids, but these therapies had varying degrees of success. Similarly, despite initial studies that identified an underlying type 2 inflammation in the airways of patients with asthma, biologic therapies targeted toward these type 2 pathways were unsuccessful in all patients. These observations led to increased interest in phenotyping asthma. Clinical approaches, both biased and later unbiased/statistical approaches to large asthma patient cohorts, identified a variety of patient characteristics, but they also consistently identified the importance of age of onset of disease and the presence of eosinophils in determining clinically relevant phenotypes. These paralleled molecular approaches to phenotyping that developed an understanding that not all patients share a type 2 inflammatory pattern. Using biomarkers to select patients with type 2 inflammation, repeated trials of biologics directed toward type 2 cytokine pathways saw newfound success, confirming the importance of phenotyping in asthma. Further research is needed to clarify additional clinical and molecular phenotypes, validate predictive biomarkers, and identify new areas for possible interventions. PMID:26161792

  5. Asthma: a chronic infectious disease?

    PubMed

    Caramori, Gaetano; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Contoli, Marco; Marku, Brunilda; Forini, Giacomo; Pauletti, Alessia; Johnston, Sebastian L; Papi, Alberto

    2012-09-01

    There are increasing data to support the "hygiene" and "microbiota" hypotheses of a protective role of infections in modulating the risk of subsequent development of asthma. There is less evidence that respiratory infections can actually cause the development of asthma. There is some evidence that rhinovirus respiratory infections are associated with the development of asthma, particularly in childhood, whereas these infections in later life seem to have a weaker association with the development of asthma. The role of bacterial infections in chronic asthma remains unclear. This article reviews the available evidence indicating that asthma may be considered as a chronic infectious disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Asthma is Different in Women

    PubMed Central

    Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in asthma incidence, prevalence and severity have been reported worldwide. After puberty, asthma becomes more prevalent and severe in women, and is highest in women with early menarche or with multiple gestations, suggesting a role for sex hormones in asthma genesis. However, the impact of sex hormones on the pathophysiology of asthma is confounded by and difficult to differentiate from age, obesity, atopy, and other gender associated environmental exposures. There are also gender discrepancies in the perception of asthma symptoms. Understanding gender differences in asthma is important to provide effective education and personalized management plans for asthmatics across the lifecourse. PMID:26141573

  7. Bone aluminium in haemodialysed patients and in rats injected with aluminium chloride: relationship to impaired bone mineralisation.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, H A; McCarthy, J H; Herrington, J

    1979-01-01

    Iliac bone aluminium was determined by neutron activation analysis in 34 patients with chronic renal failure and in eight control subjects. In 17 patients treated by haemodialysis there was a significant increase in the amount of aluminium (mean +/- SE = 152 +/- 30 ppm bone ash). In eight patients treated by haemodialysis and subsequent renal transplantation, bone aluminium was still significantly increased (92 +/- 4.5 ppm bone ash) but was less than in the haemodialysed patients. In some patients aluminium persisted in bone for many years after successful renal transplantation. There was no relationship between hyperparathyroidism and bone aluminium. Although no statistically significant relationship was found between the mineralisation status of bone and bone aluminium, patients dialysed for the longest periods tended to be those with the highest levels of aluminium, osteomalacia, and dialysis encephalopathy. In 20 rats given daily intraperitoneal injections of aluminium chloride for periods of up to three months, there was accumulation of aluminium in bone (163 +/- 9 ppm ash) to levels comparable to those obtained in the dialysis patients, and after about eight weeks osteomalacia developed. The increased bone aluminium and osteomalacia persisted after injections had been stopped for up to 49 days, although endochondral ossification was restored to normal. As a working hypothesis it is suggested that aluminium retained in the bone of the dialysis patients and the experimental animals interferes with normal mineralisation. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:389958

  8. Pediatric asthma controller therapy.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Mark

    2011-02-01

    The treatment of children with asthma has historically relied upon expert opinion using data extrapolated from adult studies. Over the past few years, landmark studies have been completed providing healthcare professionals with evidence on which a reasonable approach can be made for children suffering from this common and serious disease. Asthmatic phenotype in children, unlike adults, tends to differ according to age, which must be taken into account as well as triggers, severity, and level of control. The care of the child with asthma is complex, but accumulating data have demonstrated that we are on the right path for optimizing control while reducing the burden of side effects. The newest Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines, as well as recent updates from the landmark CAMP (Childhood Asthma Management Program) study and information from the PACT (Pediatric Asthma Control Trial) and budesonide/formoterol controller and reliever studies, along with recent comparisons of higher dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), and ICS/long-acting β(2)-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) combination and leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) therapies in children have clarified a few of the big questions in pediatric asthma. For children with asthma aged 5 years and older, the CAMP trial demonstrated that regular use of ICS reduces the frequency of symptoms; however, height was adversely affected and there is no evidence for altering the natural history of asthma. In patients aged 6 years and over whose asthma is uncontrolled on ICS alone, combination therapy with ICS and a LABA has been recently compared with the use of higher dose ICS and the addition of an LTRA in pediatric patients. The addition of a LABA statistically will be of most benefit; however, some children will have optimal control with doubling the baseline dose of ICS or addition of an LTRA. Use of budesonide/formoterol as a controller and reliever therapy extends the time to first exacerbation versus

  9. Microemulsion extraction separation and determination of aluminium species by spectrofluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jusheng; Tian, Jiuying; Guo, Na; Wang, Yan; Pan, Yichun

    2011-01-30

    A simple and sensitive microemulsion extraction separation method was developed for the speciation of aluminium in tea samples by spectrofluorimetry. With 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) as the chelating agent and Triton X-100 Winsor II microemulsion as the extractant, separation of aluminium species in different pH solutions was achieved by microemulsion extraction. The formation of microemulsion, the conditions of extraction and determination of aluminium species were studied. The results showed that, the contents of aluminium species in tea leaves and infusions samples, such as total aluminium, total soluble aluminium, total granular aluminium, inorganic aluminium except Al-F, and (Al-F+Al-org), were obtained successfully under the optimal conditions. The limit of detection was 0.23 μg L(-1) in pH 9.5 solution, and 0.59 μg L(-1) in pH 6.0 solution respectively; the precision (RSD) for 11 replicate measurements of 10 μg L(-1) aluminium was 2.1% in pH 9.5 solution, and 2.8% in pH 6.0 solution respectively; the recoveries for the spiked samples were 96.8-103.5%. The proposed method is simple and efficient, which has been applied to the speciation of aluminium in tea samples with satisfactory results.

  10. Aluminium in brain tissue in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Ambreen; King, Andrew; Troakes, Claire; Exley, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    The genetic predispositions which describe a diagnosis of familial Alzheimer's disease can be considered as cornerstones of the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Essentially they place the expression and metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein as the main tenet of disease aetiology. However, we do not know the cause of Alzheimer's disease and environmental factors may yet be shown to contribute towards its onset and progression. One such environmental factor is human exposure to aluminium and aluminium has been shown to be present in brain tissue in sporadic Alzheimer's disease. We have made the first ever measurements of aluminium in brain tissue from 12 donors diagnosed with familial Alzheimer's disease. The concentrations of aluminium were extremely high, for example, there were values in excess of 10μg/g tissue dry wt. in 5 of the 12 individuals. Overall, the concentrations were higher than all previous measurements of brain aluminium except cases of known aluminium-induced encephalopathy. We have supported our quantitative analyses using a novel method of aluminium-selective fluorescence microscopy to visualise aluminium in all lobes of every brain investigated. The unique quantitative data and the stunning images of aluminium in familial Alzheimer's disease brain tissue raise the spectre of aluminium's role in this devastating disease.

  11. Drugs for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    Current drug therapy for asthma is highly effective and has evolved from naturally occurring substances through logical pharmaceutical developments. Pharmacology has played a critical role in asthma drug development and several key experimental observations have been published in this journal. Understanding the pharmacology of effective drug therapies has also taught us much about the underlying mechanisms of asthma. β2-Adrenoceptor agonists are the most effective bronchodilators and evolved from catecholamines from the adrenal medulla, whereas corticosteroids, from the adrenal cortex, are by far the most effective controllers of the underlying inflammatory process in the airways. The current ‘gold standard' of asthma therapy is a combination inhaler containing a long-acting β2-agonist with a corticosteroid – an improved form of adrenal gland extract. Cromoglycate, derived from a plant product and theophylline, a dietary methyl xanthine, have also been extensively used in the therapy of asthma, but we still do not understand their molecular mechanisms. Pharmacology has played an important role in improving natural products to make effective long lasting and safe asthma therapies, but has so far been challenged to produce new classes of antiasthma therapy. The only novel class of antiasthma therapy introduced in the last 30 years are leukotriene antagonists, which are less effective than existing treatments. New, more specific, therapies targeted at specific cytokines are less effective than corticosteroids, whereas more effective therapies carry a risk of side effects that may not be acceptable. It seems likely that pharmacology, rather than molecular genetics, will remain the main approach to the further improvement of treatment for asthma. PMID:16402117

  12. Pediatric asthma readmission: asthma knowledge is not enough?

    PubMed

    Auger, Katherine A; Kahn, Robert S; Davis, Matthew M; Simmons, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    To characterize factors associated with readmission for acute asthma exacerbation, particularly around caregiver asthma knowledge, beliefs, and reported adherence to prescribed medication regimens. We enrolled 601 children (aged 1-16 years) who had been hospitalized for asthma. Caregivers completed a face-to-face survey regarding their asthma knowledge, beliefs, and medication adherence. Caregivers also reported demographic data, child's asthma severity, exposure to triggers, access to primary care, and financial strains. We prospectively identified asthma readmission events via billing data over a 1-year minimum follow-up period. We examined time to readmission with Cox proportional hazards. The study cohort's median age was 5 years, 53% were African American, and 57% were covered by Medicaid. At 1 year, 22% had been readmitted for asthma. In the multivariate analysis, a caregiver's demonstration of increased asthma knowledge was associated with increased readmission risk. In addition, children whose caregivers reported less-than-perfect adherence to daily medication regimens had increased readmission risk. Likewise, having previously been admitted for asthma, decreased medical home access, and black race were associated with increased readmission risk. In a multifactorial assessment of risk factors for asthma readmission, greater asthma knowledge and decreased medication adherence were associated with readmission. Inpatient efforts to prevent readmission might best target medication adherence rather than continuing to primarily provide asthma education. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Innate lymphoid cells and asthma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sanhong; Kim, Hye Young; Chang, Ya-Jen; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H; Umetsu, Dale T

    2014-04-01

    Asthma is a complex and heterogeneous disease with several phenotypes, including an allergic asthma phenotype characterized by TH2 cytokine production and associated with allergen sensitization and adaptive immunity. Asthma also includes nonallergic asthma phenotypes, such as asthma associated with exposure to air pollution, infection, or obesity, that require innate rather than adaptive immunity. These innate pathways that lead to asthma involve macrophages, neutrophils, natural killer T cells, and innate lymphoid cells, newly described cell types that produce a variety of cytokines, including IL-5 and IL-13. We review the recent data regarding innate lymphoid cells and their role in asthma. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Smoking and Asthma (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... discourage this bad habit in kids who have asthma. If your child has asthma, smoking may actually undo the effect of any long-term control medicine . Your child also may need to use quick-relief medicine ...

  15. How Do Asthma Medicines Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches How Do Asthma Medicines Work? KidsHealth > For Kids > How Do Asthma Medicines ... long-term control medicines . What Are Quick-Relief Medicines? Quick-relief medicines (also called rescue or fast- ...

  16. Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Of Age Older Adults Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine Women Infant, Children and Teenagers Living With Lung ... written by Respiratory Experts Like no other health magazine, Allergy & Asthma Health Magazine is published by people ...

  17. Obesity, Asthma, and the Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Youngji

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for asthma, but standard asthma drugs have reduced efficacy in the obese. Obesity alters the gastrointestinal microbial community structure. This change in structure contributes to some obesity-related conditions and also could be contributing to obesity-related asthma. Although currently unexplored, obesity may also be altering lung microbiota. Understanding the role of microbiota in obesity-related asthma could lead to novel treatments for these patients. PMID:26889016

  18. Obesity, Asthma, and the Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Cho, Youngji; Shore, Stephanie A

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for asthma, but standard asthma drugs have reduced efficacy in the obese. Obesity alters the gastrointestinal microbial community structure. This change in structure contributes to some obesity-related conditions and also could be contributing to obesity-related asthma. Although currently unexplored, obesity may also be altering lung microbiota. Understanding the role of microbiota in obesity-related asthma could lead to novel treatments for these patients. ©2016 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  19. Tribological properties of aluminium-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias Victoria, Patricia

    In order to improve the tribological performance of the aluminium-steel contact, two research lines have been followed: (1) Use of the ordered fluids liquid crystals and ionic liquids as lubricant additives. (2) Tribological behaviour of new powder metallurgy aluminium materials processed by mechanical milling. A parafinic-naftenic base oil modified by a 1wt% of four additives has been used: Three liquid crystals with increasing polarity: 4,4' -dibutylazobenzene (LC1) < colesteryl linoleate (LC2) < n-dodecyl ammonium chloride (LC3), and the ionic liquid 1-ethyl, 3-methyl-imidazolonium tetrafluoroborate. This is the first time that a ionic liquid is studied as lubricant additive. Viscosity measurements at 25 and 100°C, maximum number of molecules by unit aluminium surface and comparative costs of the additives showed the advantage of the ionic additives over the neutral ones. Pin-on-disk tests were performed according to ASTM G99. Influence of load, speed and temperature on friction and wear was studied for each additive. While the ionic liquid gives low friction (<0.1) and wear (≤10-5 mm3m-1), the performance of the liquid crystalline additives depends on the conditions. LC3 shows a higher lubricating ability than the neutral LC1 and LC2 under high load, speed or temperature. Only the ionic liquid shows tribochemical interaction (by SEM and EDS) with the steel and aluminium surfaces, with an increment in the fluorine content inside the wear track. The second line was to study the influence of the process conditions on the dry and lubricated wear of new powder-metallurgy aluminium materials. MA Al-NH3 milled under NH3 atmosphere was compared with (MA Al-Air) processed in air and with Al-1 which has not been mechanically alloyed. Conditions for mild to severe wear transition have been established. Al-1 is always under a severe wear regime. MA Al-NH3 shows transition to severe wear at 150°C, showing a 60% reduction in wear rate with respect to MA Al-Air and a two

  20. Obesity and poor asthma control in patients with severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Barros, Luísa L; Souza-Machado, Adelmir; Corrêa, Luciana B; Santos, Jéssica S; Cruz, Constança; Leite, Mylene; Castro, Lourdes; Coelho, Ana Carla; Almeida, Paula; Cruz, Alvaro A

    2011-03-01

    Asthma is a public health problem as it leads to hospitalization and eventual death, particularly in its severe forms. Many studies have demonstrated an association between obesity and asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between obesity and asthma control in a group of patients at a reference center for severe asthma in Brazil. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the outpatient central reference clinic of the Program for Control of Asthma in the State of Bahia. It included 508 subjects with severe asthma of both genders and above 18 years of age. All the participants answered a sociodemographic and a clinical questionnaire to collect information on their asthma and comorbidities, such as rhinitis and gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Participants also completed the Asthma Control Questionnaire, performed a spirometry test, and had their weight, height, and waist and hip circumferences registered. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated a positive association between body mass index (BMI) and uncontrolled asthma [odds ratio (OR) 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-2.20]. Symptoms of chronic rhinitis and GERD were also significantly associated with uncontrolled asthma (OR 3.68, 95% CI 1.50-9.01; and OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.91-4.03, respectively). There was no correlation between waist-to-hip ratios and asthma control. In our sample of patients with severe asthma, those who were obese were more likely to have uncontrolled asthma than patients with a normal BMI. Nevertheless, this is not conclusive evidence for a direct causal association between obesity and poor asthma control. Future studies are necessary to dissect the relationship between obesity and asthma outcomes.

  1. Anxiety and depression in asthma patients: impact on asthma control.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Aline Arlindo; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Dracoulakis, Samir; Caetano, Lilian Ballini; Fernandes, Ana Luisa Godoy

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence that asthma is associated with an increase in psychiatric symptoms and mental disorders. This association can make it difficult to achieve asthma control. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the level of asthma control is associated with anxiety and depression. A crosssectional study involving 78 patients with confirmed moderate or severe asthma and under regular treatment at the Asthma Outpatient Clinic of the Federal University of São Paulo Hospital São Paulo, in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The patients were divided into two groups by asthma control status, as assessed by the asthma control test, and were subsequently compared in terms of demographic, clinical, and spirometric data, as well as scores for asthma quality of life and hospital anxiety/depression. The sample was predominantly female. Of the 78 patients, 49 (63%) were classified as having uncontrolled asthma. The prevalence of anxiety and of anxiety+depression was significantly higher among patients with uncontrolled asthma than among those with controlled asthma (78% and 100%; p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively), whereas there were no differences between the two groups in terms of the prevalence of depression, spirometry results, or quality of life score. In this sample, the prevalence of anxiety symptoms was higher in the patients with uncontrolled asthma than in those with controlled asthma.In the evaluation of asthma patients, the negative impact of mood states ought to be taken into consideration when asthma control strategies are being outlined.

  2. Pharmacogenetics of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lima, John J.; Blake, Kathryn V.; Tantisira, Kelan G.; Weiss, Scott T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Patient response to the asthma drug classes, bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids and leukotriene modifiers, are characterized by a large degree of heterogeneity, which is attributable in part to genetic variation. Herein, we review and update the pharmacogenetics and pharmaogenomics of common asthma drugs. Recent findings Early studies suggest that bronchodilator reversibility and asthma worsening in patients on continuous short-acting and long-acting β-agonists are related to the Gly16Arg genotype for the ADRB2. More recent studies including genome-wide association studies implicate variants in other genes contribute to bronchodilator response heterogeneity and fail to replicate asthma worsening associated with continuous β-agonist use. Genetic determinants of the safety of long-acting β-agonist require further study. Variants in CRHR1, TBX21, and FCER2 contribute to variability in response for lung function, airways responsiveness, and exacerbations in patients taking inhaled corticosteroids. Variants in ALOX5, LTA4H, LTC4S, ABCC1, CYSLTR2, and SLCO2B1 contribute to variability in response to leukotriene modifiers. Summary Identification of novel variants that contribute to response heterogeneity supports future studies of single nucleotide polymorphism discovery and include gene expression and genome-wide association studies. Statistical models that predict the genomics of response to asthma drugs will complement single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in moving toward personalized medicine. PMID:19077707

  3. Allergens, germs and asthma.

    PubMed

    Scadding, Glenis Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    To explore asthma pathogenesis using data from upper and lower airways. English-language papers on human asthma and nasal polyp subjects from 1990 onwards. High-quality studies in established journals. The recognition of its inflammatory nature led to a quantum leap in the understanding and treatment of asthma, with lives saved by inhaled corticosteroids. Further work at genetic, molecular, histological and clinical levels has shown that asthma is polymorphic and rarely involves isolated Th2 bronchial inflammation. Viral infections may act as an initiating event in children and adults, showing synergy with atopy. Chronic staphylococcal colonization of the mucosa may act as a promoter, as in atopic dermatitis. These two observations may be linked, with viruses providing an entry for bacteria into the mucosal epithelium. Most asthma begins in the nose and involves allergy and infection: both viral and bacterial. The combination of atopy and infection suggests new possibilities for therapy. © 2014 The Author. The Clinical Respiratory Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Microbiome in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yvonne J.; Boushey, Homer A.

    2014-01-01

    The application of recently developed sensitive, specific, culture-independent tools for identification of microbes is transforming concepts of microbial ecology, including concepts of the relationships between the vast, complex populations of microbes associated with ourselves and with states of health and disease. While most work initially focused on the community of microbes (microbiome) in the gastrointestinal tract and its relationships to gastrointestinal disease, interest has expanded to include study of the relationships of the microbiome of the airways to asthma and its phenotypes, and to the relationships between the gastrointestinal microbiome, development of immune function, and predisposition to development of allergic sensitization and asthma. We here provide our perspective on the findings of studies of differences in the airway microbiome in patients with asthma vs. healthy subjects, and of studies of relationships between environmental microbiota, gut microbiota, immune function, and the development of asthma, and additionally provide our perspective on how these findings suggest in broad outline a rationale for approaches involving directed manipulation of the gut and airway microbiome for treatment and prevention of allergic asthma. PMID:25567040

  5. [Epigenetics, environment and asthma].

    PubMed

    Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha; Silva-García, Raúl; Oliva-Rico, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the respiratory tract with a complex genetic background influenced by the exposition to a series of environmental factors. Genetic studies can only elucidate part of the heritability and susceptibility of asthma and even though several diseases have an evident genetic etiology, only a fraction of the genes involved in their pathogenicity have been identified. The epigenetic regulation of the latter is a fact one should bear in mind in order to explain the major triggers of diseases whose understanding is complicated, such as allergies and asthma. External stimulus such as nourishment, stress, physical activity, atmospheric pollution, tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking can induce either gene silencing or gene expression. In this regard, epigenetics can explain how these environmental factors influence our genetic inheritance. There is growing evidence that backs-up the fact that DNA methylation, histone post-translational modification and microRNA expression are influenced by the environment. This helps explaining how several of the risk factors mentioned contribute to the development and inheritance of asthma. In this review, different environmental factors and their relation with the main epigenetic regulatory mechanisms will be analyzed, as well as their possible role in the development of asthma.

  6. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  7. Managing Asthma in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Ellen M.

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting nearly 5 million children under the age of 18. Children with asthma account for 3 million hospital visits and 200,000 hospitalizations yearly. This adds up to an estimated $2 billion annually in health care costs (American Academy of Pediatrics, 1999). A child with asthma has three…

  8. Swimming pool-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Beretta, S; Vivaldo, T; Morelli, M; Carlucci, P; Zuccotti, G V

    2011-01-01

    A 13-year-old elite swimmer presented with wheezing after indoor swimming training. On the basis of her clinical history and the tests performed, exercise-induced asthma and mold-induced asthma were ruled out and a diagnosis of chlorine-induced asthma was made.

  9. Managing Asthma in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Ellen M.

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting nearly 5 million children under the age of 18. Children with asthma account for 3 million hospital visits and 200,000 hospitalizations yearly. This adds up to an estimated $2 billion annually in health care costs (American Academy of Pediatrics, 1999). A child with asthma has three…

  10. Feet sunk in molten aluminium: The burn and its prevention.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Peña, David; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Valero-Gasalla, Javier Luis; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Campillo-Campaña, Ramón; Alonso-Peña, Javier; González-Santos, Jose María; Fernández-Díaz, Alaska Leonor; Arnáiz, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, despite improvements in safety rules and inspections in the metal industry, foundry workers are not free from burn accidents. Injuries caused by molten metals include burns secondary to molten iron, aluminium, zinc, copper, brass, bronze, manganese, lead and steel. Molten aluminium is one of the most common causative agents of burns (60%); however, only a few publications exist concerning injuries from molten aluminium. The main mechanisms of lesion from molten aluminium include direct contact of the molten metal with the skin or through safety apparel, or when the metal splash burns through the pants and rolls downward along the leg. Herein, we report three cases of deep dermal burns after 'soaking' the foot in liquid aluminium and its evolutive features. This paper aims to show our experience in the management of burns due to molten aluminium. We describe the current management principles and the key features of injury prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. What is the risk of aluminium as a neurotoxin?

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    Aluminium is neurotoxic. Its free ion, Al(3+) (aq), is highly biologically reactive and uniquely equipped to do damage to essential cellular (neuronal) biochemistry. This unequivocal fact must be the starting point in examining the risk posed by aluminium as a neurotoxin in humans. Aluminium is present in the human brain and it accumulates with age. The most recent research demonstrates that a significant proportion of individuals older than 70 years of age have a potentially pathological accumulation of aluminium somewhere in their brain. What are the symptoms of chronic aluminium intoxication in humans? What if neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease are the manifestation of the risk of aluminium as a neurotoxin? How might such an (outrageous) hypothesis be tested?

  12. ALUHAB — The Superior Aluminium Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcsan, N.; Beke, S.; Makk, P.; Soki, P.; Számel, Gy; Degischer, H. P.; Mokso, R.

    A new metal foaming technology has been developed to produce aluminum foams with controlled cell sizes, a wide range of alloy compositions, and attractive mechanical properties. ALUHAB aluminium foams are manufactured from a special foamable aluminium alloy containing ultrafine particles (80-3000 nm). The technology uses high temperature ultrasonication to homogeneously disperse the particles and thus create a stable, foamable aluminum melt. Oscillating gas injector (loud-nozzle) technology permits the injection of optimally sized bubbles into the melt that are independent of the injector orifice diameter. Using this direct gas injection method, bubble size is regulated by the frequency and the power of the ultrasound, producing uniform bubble sizes in the sub-millimeter range. The technology results in extremely stable metal foams which can be cast into complex forms and re-melted without loss of foam integrity. Processing methods and properties of the ALUHAB foams will be discussed.

  13. [Asthma in children].

    PubMed

    Labbé, A

    2000-12-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic condition in paediatrics. Nowadays the prevalence is of multi-factorial origin. Clinical symptoms in children are often deceptive (isolated cough, winter bronchitis, caused by effort) often to the point of delaying diagnosis. This depends on a network of clinical arguments established by indispensable complementary investigations (thoracic plate and exploration of respiratory function). Search for atopy is systematic whatever the age of the child. Therapeutic care includes educative programmes for both children and their parents. Basal treatment is necessary when the asthma is persistent. Recourse must be made to drugs of which the type and dosage vary according to the state of development. Inhaled corticosteroid is often indicated for a prolonged period. Indications for specific desensitization are now well codified. The concern cases where the allergy has a significant impact on the development of the asthma. Individualised reception plans give a better integration of asthmatic children into school.

  14. [Inhaled therapy in asthma].

    PubMed

    Plaza Moral, Vicente; Giner Donaire, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Because of its advantages, inhaled administration of aerosolized drugs is the administration route of choice for the treatment of asthma and COPD. Numerous technological advances in the devices used in inhaled therapy in recent decades have boosted the appearance of multiple inhalers and aerosolized drugs. However, this variety also requires that the prescribing physician is aware of their characteristics. The main objective of the present review is to summarize the current state of knowledge on inhalers and inhaled drugs commonly used in the treatment of asthma. The review ranges from theoretical aspects (fundamentals and available devices and drugs) to practical and relevant aspects for asthma care in the clinical setting (therapeutic strategies, education, and adherence to inhalers).

  15. The aluminium content of infant formulas remains too high.

    PubMed

    Chuchu, Nancy; Patel, Bhavini; Sebastian, Blaise; Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-08

    Recent research published in this journal highlighted the issue of the high content of aluminium in infant formulas. The expectation was that the findings would serve as a catalyst for manufacturers to address a significant problem of these, often necessary, components of infant nutrition. It is critically important that parents and other users have confidence in the safety of infant formulas and that they have reliable information to use in choosing a product with a lower content of aluminium. Herein, we have significantly extended the scope of the previous research and the aluminium content of 30 of the most widely available and often used infant formulas has been measured. Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were subjected to microwave digestion in the presence of 15.8 M HNO3 and 30% w/v H2O2 and the aluminium content of the digests was measured by TH GFAAS. Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were contaminated with aluminium. The concentration of aluminium across all milk products ranged from ca 100 to 430 μg/L. The concentration of aluminium in two soya-based milk products was 656 and 756 μg/L. The intake of aluminium from non-soya-based infant formulas varied from ca 100 to 300 μg per day. For soya-based milks it could be as high as 700 μg per day. All 30 infant formulas were contaminated with aluminium. There was no clear evidence that subsequent to the problem of aluminium being highlighted in a previous publication in this journal that contamination had been addressed and reduced. It is the opinion of the authors that regulatory and other non-voluntary methods are now required to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas and thereby protect infants from chronic exposure to dietary aluminium.

  16. The aluminium content of infant formulas remains too high

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent research published in this journal highlighted the issue of the high content of aluminium in infant formulas. The expectation was that the findings would serve as a catalyst for manufacturers to address a significant problem of these, often necessary, components of infant nutrition. It is critically important that parents and other users have confidence in the safety of infant formulas and that they have reliable information to use in choosing a product with a lower content of aluminium. Herein, we have significantly extended the scope of the previous research and the aluminium content of 30 of the most widely available and often used infant formulas has been measured. Methods Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were subjected to microwave digestion in the presence of 15.8 M HNO3 and 30% w/v H2O2 and the aluminium content of the digests was measured by TH GFAAS. Results Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were contaminated with aluminium. The concentration of aluminium across all milk products ranged from ca 100 to 430 μg/L. The concentration of aluminium in two soya-based milk products was 656 and 756 μg/L. The intake of aluminium from non-soya-based infant formulas varied from ca 100 to 300 μg per day. For soya-based milks it could be as high as 700 μg per day. Conclusions All 30 infant formulas were contaminated with aluminium. There was no clear evidence that subsequent to the problem of aluminium being highlighted in a previous publication in this journal that contamination had been addressed and reduced. It is the opinion of the authors that regulatory and other non-voluntary methods are now required to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas and thereby protect infants from chronic exposure to dietary aluminium. PMID:24103160

  17. Improvement of photodynamic activity of aluminium sulphophthalocyanine due to biotinylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerovich, Irina G.; Jerdeva, Victoria V.; Derkacheva, Valentina M.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Lukyanets, Eugeny A.; Kogan, Eugenia A.; Savitsky, Alexander P.

    2003-09-01

    The photodynamic activity of dibiotinylated aluminium sulphophthalocyanine in vitro and in vivo were studied. It was obtained that in vitro dibiotinylated aluminium sulphophthalocyanine provides the effective damage of small cell lung carcinoma OAT-75. In vivo dibiotinylated aluminium sulphophthalocyanine causes destruction of tumor (Erlich carcinoma), results in total necrosis of tumor tissue and expresses vascular damage (trombosis and destruction of vascular walls) even in concentration 0.25 mg/kg of a body weight.

  18. An ultrafast rechargeable aluminium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Chang; Gong, Ming; Lu, Bingan; Wu, Yingpeng; Wang, Di-Yan; Guan, Mingyun; Angell, Michael; Chen, Changxin; Yang, Jiang; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Dai, Hongjie

    2015-04-16

    The development of new rechargeable battery systems could fuel various energy applications, from personal electronics to grid storage. Rechargeable aluminium-based batteries offer the possibilities of low cost and low flammability, together with three-electron-redox properties leading to high capacity. However, research efforts over the past 30 years have encountered numerous problems, such as cathode material disintegration, low cell discharge voltage (about 0.55 volts; ref. 5), capacitive behaviour without discharge voltage plateaus (1.1-0.2 volts or 1.8-0.8 volts) and insufficient cycle life (less than 100 cycles) with rapid capacity decay (by 26-85 per cent over 100 cycles). Here we present a rechargeable aluminium battery with high-rate capability that uses an aluminium metal anode and a three-dimensional graphitic-foam cathode. The battery operates through the electrochemical deposition and dissolution of aluminium at the anode, and intercalation/de-intercalation of chloroaluminate anions in the graphite, using a non-flammable ionic liquid electrolyte. The cell exhibits well-defined discharge voltage plateaus near 2 volts, a specific capacity of about 70 mA h g(-1) and a Coulombic efficiency of approximately 98 per cent. The cathode was found to enable fast anion diffusion and intercalation, affording charging times of around one minute with a current density of ~4,000 mA g(-1) (equivalent to ~3,000 W kg(-1)), and to withstand more than 7,500 cycles without capacity decay.

  19. Asthma in Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Hunninghake, Gary M.; Weiss, Scott T.; Celedón, Juan C.

    2006-01-01

    Hispanic individuals trace their ancestry to countries that were previously under Spanish rule, including Mexico, large parts of Central and South America, and some Caribbean islands. Most—but not all—Hispanics have variable proportions of European, Amerindian, and African ancestry. Hispanics are diverse with regard to many factors, including racial ancestry, country of origin, area of residence, socioeconomic status, education, and access to health care. Recent findings suggest that there is marked variation in the prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of asthma in Hispanics in the United States and in Hispanic America. The reasons for differences in asthma and asthma morbidity among and within Hispanic subgroups are poorly understood but are likely due to the interaction between yet-unidentified genetic variants and other factors, including environmental tobacco smoke exposure, obesity, allergen exposure, and availability of health care. Barriers to optimal management of asthma in Hispanics in the United States and in Hispanic America include inadequate access to health care, suboptimal use of antiinflammatory medications, and lack of reference values for spirometric measures of lung function in many subgroups (e.g., Puerto Ricans). Future studies of asthma in Hispanics should include large samples of subgroups that are well characterized with regard to self-reported ethnicity, country of origin, place of birth, area of residence, and indicators of socioeconomic status. Because Hispanics are disproportionately represented among the poor in the United States, implementation of adequate access to health care and social reforms (e.g., improving housing conditions) would likely have a major impact on reducing asthma morbidity in this population. PMID:16210666

  20. Immunotherapy in asthma.

    PubMed

    Warrington, Richard

    2010-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways in which many cells and cellular elements play a role. Chronic inflammation is associated with airway hyper-responsiveness that leads to recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness and coughing, as well as variable airflow obstruction within the lung. With time, such airflow obstruction may become permanent due to remodeling. It has been treated for more than 100 years by subcutaneous immunotherapy with allergen extracts but in recent years, other forms and types of immunotherapy have been introduced. Perhaps the most successful of these to date, is sublingual immunotherapy, which has attained significant usage in European countries but has yet to make inroads into clinical practice in North America. Other mechanisms to modify the inflammatory responses of asthma have included immunotherapy with recombinant allergens, the use of allergen peptides targeting antigen-specific T cells and the administration of Toll-like receptor agonists coupled to allergen proteins. As the inflammatory responses in asthma frequently involve IgE, a modified monoclonal antibody to IgE and interfering with its binding to the IgE receptor have gained acceptance for treating severe allergic asthma. Other monoclonal antibodies or recombinant receptor antagonists are being assessed for their ability to block other contributors to the inflammatory response. Finally, attempts have been made to generate autoantibody responses to cytokines implicated in asthma. Most of these therapies aim to modify or inhibit the so-called Th 2 immune response, which is implicated in many forms of asthma, or to inhibit cytokines involved in these responses. However, an added benefit of classical immunotherapy seems to be the ability to prevent the allergic progression to new sensitivities and new forms of allergic disease.

  1. Asthma Outcomes: Pulmonary Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Robert S.; Wise, Robert S.; Covar, Ronina; Irvin, Charles G.; Kercsmar, Carolyn M.; Kraft, Monica; Liu, Mark C.; O’Connor, George T.; Peters, Stephen P.; Sorkness, Ronald; Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    Background Outcomes of pulmonary physiology have a central place in asthma clinical research. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to provide recommendations on the use of pulmonary function measures as asthma outcomes that should be assessed in a standardized fashion in future asthma clinical trials and studies to allow for cross-study comparisons. Methods Our subcommittee conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed to identify studies that focused on the validation of various airway response tests used in asthma clinical research. The subcommittee classified the instruments as core (to be required in future studies), supplemental (to be used according to study aims and in a standardized fashion), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results A list of pulmonary physiology outcomes that applies to both adults and children older than 6 years was created. These outcomes were then categorized into core, supplemental, and emerging. Spirometric outcomes (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and FEV1/FVC) are proposed as core outcomes for study population characterization, for observational studies, and for prospective clinical trials. Bronchodilator reversibility and pre- and post-bronchodilator FEV1 also are core outcomes for study population characterization and observational studies. Conclusions The subcommittee considers pulmonary physiology outcomes of central importance in asthma and proposes spirometric outcomes as core outcomes for all future NIH-initiated asthma clinical research. PMID:22386510

  2. Pathology of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Makoto; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Aoki, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a serious health and socioeconomic issue all over the world, affecting more than 300 million individuals. The disease is considered as an inflammatory disease in the airway, leading to airway hyperresponsiveness, obstruction, mucus hyper-production and airway wall remodeling. The presence of airway inflammation in asthmatic patients has been found in the nineteenth century. As the information in patients with asthma increase, paradigm change in immunology and molecular biology have resulted in an extensive evaluation of inflammatory cells and mediators involved in the pathophysiology of asthma. Moreover, it is recognized that airway remodeling into detail, characterized by thickening of the airway wall, can be profound consequences on the mechanics of airway narrowing and contribute to the chronic progression of the disease. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition plays an important role in airway remodeling. These epithelial and mesenchymal cells cause persistence of the inflammatory infiltration and induce histological changes in the airway wall, increasing thickness of the basement membrane, collagen deposition and smooth muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Resulting of airway inflammation, airway remodeling leads to the airway wall thickening and induces increased airway smooth muscle mass, which generate asthmatic symptoms. Asthma is classically recognized as the typical Th2 disease, with increased IgE levels and eosinophilic inflammation in the airway. Emerging Th2 cytokines modulates the airway inflammation, which induces airway remodeling. Biological agents, which have specific molecular targets for these Th2 cytokines, are available and clinical trials for asthma are ongoing. However, the relatively simple paradigm has been doubted because of the realization that strategies designed to suppress Th2 function are not effective enough for all patients in the clinical trials. In the future, it is required to understand more details for phenotypes of

  3. Caffeine for asthma.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Emma J; Bara, Anna; Barley, Elizabeth; Cates, Christopher J

    2010-01-20

    Caffeine has a variety of pharmacological effects; it is a weak bronchodilator and it also reduces respiratory muscle fatigue. It is chemically related to the drug theophylline which is used to treat asthma. It has been suggested that caffeine may reduce asthma symptoms and interest has been expressed in its potential role as an asthma treatment. A number of studies have explored the effects of caffeine in asthma, this is the first review to systematically examine and summarise the evidence. To assess the effects of caffeine on lung function and identify whether there is a need to control for caffeine consumption prior to either lung function or exhaled nitric oxide testing. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and the reference lists of articles (August 2009). We also contacted study authors. Randomised clinical trials of oral caffeine compared to placebo or coffee compared to decaffeinated coffee in adults with asthma. Trial selection, quality assessment and data extraction were done independently by two reviewers. Seven trials involving a total of 75 people with mild to moderate asthma were included. The studies were all of cross-over design .Six trials involving 55 people showed that in comparison with placebo, caffeine, even at a 'low dose' (< 5mg/kg body weight), appears to improve lung function for up to two hours after consumption. Forced expiratory volume in one minute showed a small improvement up to two hours after caffeine ingestion (SMD 0.72; 95% CI 0.25 to 1.20), which translates into a 5% mean difference in FEV1. However in two studies the mean differences in FEV1 were 12% and 18% after caffeine. Mid-expiratory flow rates also showed a small improvement with caffeine and this was sustained up to four hours.One trial involving 20 people examined the effect of drinking coffee versus a decaffeinated variety on the exhaled nitric oxide levels in patients with asthma and concluded that there was no significant effect on this outcome

  4. Inner City Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inner city has long been recognized as an area of high asthma morbidity and mortality. A wide range of factors interact to create this environment. These factors include well-recognized asthma risk factors that are not specific to the inner city, the structure and delivery of health care, the location and function of the urban environment, and social inequities. This article will review these facets and discuss successful and unsuccessful interventions in order to understand what is needed to solve this problem. PMID:25459579

  5. Structural engineering of nanoporous anodic aluminium oxide by pulse anodization of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo; Schwirn, Kathrin; Steinhart, Martin; Pippel, Eckhard; Scholz, Roland; Gösele, Ulrich

    2008-04-01

    Nanoporous anodic aluminium oxide has traditionally been made in one of two ways: mild anodization or hard anodization. The first method produces self-ordered pore structures, but it is slow and only works for a narrow range of processing conditions; the second method, which is widely used in the aluminium industry, is faster, but it produces films with disordered pore structures. Here we report a novel approach termed "pulse anodization" that combines the advantages of the mild and hard anodization processes. By designing the pulse sequences it is possible to control both the composition and pore structure of the anodic aluminium oxide films while maintaining high throughput. We use pulse anodization to delaminate a single as-prepared anodic film into a stack of well-defined nanoporous alumina membrane sheets, and also to fabricate novel three-dimensional nanostructures.

  6. The potential role of aluminium in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Arezoo

    2002-01-01

    Aluminium is a trivalent cation that does not undergo redox changes. It has, nonetheless, been implicated in a variety of neurological disorders that have been associated with an increase in the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The exact mechanism of aluminium toxicity is not known. However, accumulating evidence suggests that the metal can potentiate oxidative and inflammatory events, leading to tissue damage. A review of the epidemiological and clinical evidence linking aluminium to Alzheimer's disease (AD) is presented. The article discusses the role of aluminium in two mechanisms that have been linked to neurodegenerative disorders, including AD. Studies are summarized that describe how aluminium can potentiate iron-induced oxidative events. Involvement of aluminium in inflammatory responses, mediated by interleukins and other inflammatory cytokines, is also discussed. Although a direct relationship between aluminium and AD has not been clearly demonstrated, a detailed mechanistic basis for the hypothesis that aluminium may exacerbate events associated with AD is clearly emerging. The results discussed here have broad implications for the role played by aluminium and other metals in neurodegenerative diseases, and suggest that long-term exposure to supra-physiological amounts these metals should be avoided.

  7. Dietary sodium manipulation and asthma.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Zara; McKeever, Tricia

    2011-03-16

    There is a wide geographical variation in the prevalence of asthma and observational studies have suggested that dietary sodium may play a role. To assess the effect of dietary sodium manipulation on asthma control. We carried out a search using the Cochrane Airways Group asthma register. We searched the bibliographies of included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) for additional studies. We carried out the most recent search in November 2010. We considered only RCTs that involved dietary sodium reduction or increased sodium intake in patients with asthma. Both review authors assessed study and extracted data. We conducted data analyses in RevMan 5 using mean differences and random effects. We identified a total of nine studies in relation to sodium manipulation and asthma, of which five were in people with asthma (318 participants), and four in people with exercise-induced asthma (63 participants). There were no significant benefits of salt restriction on the control of asthma. There was some evidence from the exercise-induced asthma studies that a low sodium diet may improve lung function after exercise and possibly baseline lung function, but this is based on findings from a very small numbers of participants. This review did not find any evidence that dietary sodium reduction significantly improves asthma control. Although dietary sodium reduction may result in improvements in lung function in exercise-induced asthma, the clinical significance of this effect is unclear.

  8. School-based asthma programs.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, Jean-Marie; Evans, David; Kattan, Meyer

    2009-08-01

    Asthma is prevalent in school-age children and contributes to school absenteeism and limitation of activity. There is a sizable literature on school-based interventions for asthma that attempt to identify children with asthma and improve outcomes. The purpose of this review is to describe and discuss limitations of screening tools and school-based asthma interventions. Identification of children with asthma may be appropriate in schools located in districts with a high prevalence of children experiencing significant morbidity and a high prevalence of undiagnosed asthma, provided there is access to high-quality asthma care. We review strategies for improving access to care, for teaching self-management skills in schools, and for improving school personnel management skills. Although studies indicate that school-based programs have the potential to improve outcomes, competing priorities in the educational system present challenges to their implementation and emphasize the need for practical, targeted, and cost-effective strategies.

  9. Difficult childhood asthma: management and future.

    PubMed

    Tillie-Leblond, Isabelle; Deschildre, Antoine; Gosset, Philippe; de Blic, Jacques

    2012-09-01

    Diagnosis and management of severe asthma implies the definition of different entities, that is, difficult asthma and refractory severe asthma, but also the different phenotypes included in the term refractory severe asthma. A complete evaluation by a physician expert in asthma is necessary, adapted for each child. Identification of mechanisms involved in different phenotypes in refractory severe asthma may improve the therapeutic approach. The quality of care and monitoring of children with severe asthma is as important as the prescription drug, and is also crucial for differentiating between severe asthma and difficult asthma, whereby expertise is required.

  10. The microbiome in asthma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yvonne J; Boushey, Homer A

    2015-01-01

    The application of recently developed sensitive, specific, culture-independent tools for identification of microbes is transforming concepts of microbial ecology, including concepts of the relationships between the vast complex populations of microbes associated with ourselves and with states of health and disease. Although most work initially focused on the community of microbes (microbiome) in the gastrointestinal tract and its relationship to gastrointestinal disease, interest has expanded to include study of the relationships of the airway microbiome to asthma and its phenotypes and to the relationships between the gastrointestinal microbiome, development of immune function, and predisposition to allergic sensitization and asthma. Here we provide our perspective on the findings of studies of differences in the airway microbiome between asthmatic patients and healthy subjects and of studies of relationships between environmental microbiota, gut microbiota, immune function, and asthma development. In addition, we provide our perspective on how these findings suggest the broad outline of a rationale for approaches involving directed manipulation of the gut and airway microbiome for the treatment and prevention of allergic asthma.

  11. Asthma Home Environment Checklist

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This checklist guides home care visitors in identifying environmental asthma triggers most commonly found in homes. It includes sections on the building, home interior and room interior and provides low-cost action steps for remediation. EPA 402-F-03-030.

  12. Occupational allergies and asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Tarlo, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review aspects of occupational allergies and asthma for primary care physicians recognizing, diagnosing, and managing patients with these conditions. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Studies in the medical literature mainly provide level 2 evidence, that is, from at least one well-designed clinical trial without randomization, from cohort or case-control analytical studies, from multiple time series, or from dramatic results in uncontrolled experiments. MAIN MESSAGE: Occupational allergies and asthma have the best prognosis with an early, accurate diagnosis and subsequent avoidance of exposure to the relevant sensitizer. These diagnoses can normally be suspected from the clinical history. Primary care physicians can also initiate investigations to make an objective diagnosis, can assess workplace exposure agents from the history, and can review appropriate data sheets on material safety. Specialist evaluation is likely to be needed for skin tests, however, and for other specialized tests (such as pulmonary function assessments at work and off work or specific challenges with the suspected workplace agent). Patients with a confirmed diagnosis need appropriate medical management of their allergic manifestations or asthma, but also often require psychosocial support during the period of investigation and management, especially in relation to required changes in their work and to compensation or insurance claims. CONCLUSIONS: Consider workplace exposure as a source of patients' allergies or asthma and aim to make an early, accurate diagnosis. PMID:10386216

  13. Acute asthma: under attack.

    PubMed

    Kissoon, Niranjan

    2002-06-01

    The burden of asthma (death, disability, and an increasing prevalence) makes it a major public health problem worldwide. In an effort to decrease this burden, investigators are studying many aspects of this disease. The role of race, ethnicity, infections, and pollutants as triggers, as well as the risk factors are now being defined. Research into methods to decrease acute exacerbations and improve emergency and in-hospital management, using standardized protocols and incentives for follow-up care, has yielded valuable information but has met with limited success. Adherence to the national guidelines has been poor and to some extent can be attributed to the lack of a practical method of measuring the degree of lung inflammation and cumbersome treatment protocols. Exhaled nitric oxide is a noninvasive marker of inflammation and may provide a rational method to titrate corticosteroid and leukotriene receptor antagonist therapy. The best route and dosing regimen for corticosteroid administration (oral vs intramuscular vs nebulized) are the subject of several studies, with no clear-cut winner. The burden of asthma in developing countries with limited financial resources has also triggered a search for simpler, cheaper, and practical methods for beta-agonist delivery using indigenous spacers. Recent research in asthma has unveiled our incomplete knowledge of the disease but has also provided a sense of where efforts should be expended. Research into the genetics and pharmacogenetics of asthma and into the societal factors limiting the delivery of optimal care is likely to yield useful and practical information.

  14. Common Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... your bedroom. Wash your bedding on the hottest water setting. Outdoor Air Pollution Outdoor air pollution can trigger an asthma attack. ... newspaper to plan your activities for when air pollution levels will be ... home by removing as many water and food sources as you can. Cockroaches are ...

  15. [Swimming-induced asthma].

    PubMed

    Fjellbirkeland, L; Gulsvik, A; Walløe, A

    1995-06-30

    Swimming is said to have low asthmogeneity especially when compared with other physical activities. Four young athletes who participated in heavy swimming exercise are reported as having symptoms of exercise-induced asthma (EIA). Three of them started to develop the symptoms after several years of training and had no former history of asthma. In the fourth, the asthma was diagnosed in childhood but the EIA-symptoms here exacerbated by swimming. All four experienced more symptoms when the air in the swimming pool was warm, or when there was a strong smell of chlorine. Two of the athletes reported having no symptoms when they swam in outdoor pools and had only minor symptoms, or none at all, when they did other formes of physical exercise, including running. In all four their swimming performance was hampered by their respiratory symptoms. Two of the swimmers improved when they inhaled steroids and adrenerg-beta 2 agonists, and continued their swimming carrier. The cases suggest that an irritant may provoke asthma symptoms in susceptible swimmers. Volatile compounds from chlorination of the pools are suspected as possible irritant agents.

  16. New drugs for asthma.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2012-12-01

    Current therapy for asthma with inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting inhaled β(2)-agonists is highly effective, safe, and relatively inexpensive, but many patients remain poorly controlled. Most advances have been through improving these drug classes and a major developmental hurdle is to improve existing drug classes. Major unmet needs include better treatment of severe asthma (which has some similarity to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), as well as curative therapies for mild to moderate asthma that do not result in the return of symptoms when the treatment is stopped. Several new treatments are in development, but many are specific, targeting a single mediator or receptor, and are unlikely to have a major clinical impact, although they may be effective in specific asthma phenotypes (endotypes). Drugs with more widespread effects, such as kinase inhibitors, may be more effective but have a greater risk of side effects so inhaled delivery may be needed. Several new treatments target the underlying allergic/immune process and would treat concomitant allergic diseases. Improved immunotherapy approaches have the potential for disease modification, although prospects for a cure are currently remote.

  17. Mortality from asthma.

    PubMed

    Sly, R M

    1986-01-01

    Since 1979 there has been a progressive increase in rates of death from asthma in the United States. This increase in mortality has been most extreme among blacks. It has occurred in all regions of the U.S. as well as some other countries. The problem requires further study to identify the cause.

  18. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessed Oct. 1, 2014. Stickland MK, et al. Effect of warm-up exercise on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2012;44:383. Asthma action plans: Help patients take control. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih. ...

  19. The Finnish national asthma programme: communication in asthma care--quality assessment of asthma referral letters.

    PubMed

    Tuomisto, Leena E; Erhola, Marina; Marina, Erhola; Kaila, Minna; Minna, Kaila; Brander, Pirkko E; Kauppinen, Ritva; Ritva, Kauppinen; Puolijoki, Hannu; Hannu, Puolijoki; Kekki, Pertti; Pertti, Kekki

    2007-02-01

    The Finnish National Asthma Programme, which was launched in year 1994, considered the management of asthma as a community problem. The role of the primary health care in the management of asthma was emphasized. Optimal asthma management includes good communication between health care professionals. Referral letters are an accepted tool for evaluation of the communication process. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of asthma-related referral letters. All non-acute referral letters (n=3176) to three pulmonary departments were screened in 2001 and all those related to asthma were included (n=1289). The 14 previously derived asthma-specific criteria were applied: occupation, smoking, known allergies, current medication, other diseases, onset of symptoms, wheezing, dyspnoea, specified dyspnoea, cough, specified cough, use of asthma medication, peak-flow follow-up or spirometry with bronchodilatation test as an attachment. The study group was prepared to accept the maximum of 30% of the referral letters to be of poor quality. Twenty-one per cent of the referral letters were graded good, 34% satisfactory and 45% poor. Information on wheezing, smoking habits and current medication was mentioned in 44%, 42% and 41% of asthma letters respectively. The Finnish National Asthma Programme calls for optimizing communication between doctors. The proportion of poor letters was 50% higher than the preset standard and clearly indicates a need for improvement. We found several issues, which need to be better communicated (smoking, lung function tests, wheezing, medication) when referring a patient with suspected asthma.

  20. Prevalence of beryllium sensitization among aluminium smelter workers

    PubMed Central

    Slade, M. D.; Cantley, L. F.; Kirsche, S. R.; Wesdock, J. C.; Cullen, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Beryllium exposure occurs in aluminium smelters from natural contamination of bauxite, the principal source of aluminium. Aims To characterize beryllium exposure in aluminium smelters and determine the prevalence rate of beryllium sensitization (BeS) among aluminium smelter workers. Methods A population of 3185 workers from nine aluminium smelters owned by four different aluminium-producing companies were determined to have significant beryllium exposure. Of these, 1932 workers participated in medical surveillance programmes that included the serum beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT), confirmation of sensitization by at least two abnormal BeLPT test results and further evaluation for chronic beryllium disease in workers with BeS. Results Personal beryllium samples obtained from the nine aluminium smelters showed a range of <0.01–13.00 μg/m3 time-weighted average with an arithmetic mean of 0.25 μg/m3 and geometric mean of 0.06 μg/m3. Nine workers were diagnosed with BeS (prevalence rate of 0.47%, 95% confidence interval = 0.21–0.88%). Conclusions BeS can occur in aluminium smelter workers through natural beryllium contamination of the bauxite and further concentration during the refining and smelting processes. Exposure levels to beryllium observed in aluminium smelters are similar to those seen in other industries that utilize beryllium. However, compared with beryllium-exposed workers in other industries, the rate of BeS among aluminium smelter workers appears lower. This lower observed rate may be related to a more soluble form of beryllium found in the aluminium smelting work environment as well as the consistent use of respiratory protection. PMID:20610489

  1. There is (still) too much aluminium in infant formulas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Infant formulas are sophisticated milk-based feeds for infants which are used as a substitute for breast milk. Historically they are known to be contaminated by aluminium and in the past this has raised health concerns for exposed infants. We have measured the aluminium content of a number of widely used infant formulas to determine if their contamination by aluminium and consequent issues of child health persists. Methods Samples of ready-made milks and powders used to make milks were prepared by microwave digestion of acid/peroxide mixtures and their aluminium content determined by THGA. Results The concentration of aluminium in ready-made milks varied from ca 176 to 700 μg/L. The latter concentration was for a milk for preterm infants. The aluminium content of powders used to make milks varied from ca 2.4 to 4.3 μg/g. The latter content was for a soya-based formula and equated to a ready-to-drink milk concentration of 629 μg/L. Using the manufacturer's own guidelines of formula consumption the average daily ingestion of aluminium from infant formulas for a child of 6 months varied from ca 200 to 600 μg of aluminium. Generally ingestion was higher from powdered as compared to ready-made formulas. Conclusions The aluminium content of a range of well known brands of infant formulas remains high and particularly so for a product designed for preterm infants and a soya-based product designed for infants with cow's milk intolerances and allergies. Recent research demonstrating the vulnerability of infants to early exposure to aluminium serves to highlight an urgent need to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas to as low a level as is practically possible. PMID:20807425

  2. Long-term effects of aluminium dust inhalation.

    PubMed

    Peters, Susan; Reid, Alison; Fritschi, Lin; de Klerk, Nicholas; Musk, A W Bill

    2013-12-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s, aluminium dust inhalation was used as a potential prophylaxis against silicosis in underground miners, including in Australia. We investigated the association between aluminium dust inhalation and cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and Alzheimer's diseases in a cohort of Australian male underground gold miners. We additionally looked at pneumoconiosis mortality to estimate the effect of the aluminium therapy. SMRs and 95% CI were calculated to compare mortality of the cohort members with that of the Western Australian male population (1961-2009). Internal comparisons on duration of aluminium dust inhalation were examined using Cox regression. Aluminium dust inhalation was reported for 647 out of 1894 underground gold miners. During 42 780 person-years of follow-up, 1577 deaths were observed. An indication of increased mortality of Alzheimer's disease among miners ever exposed to aluminium dust was found (SMR=1.38), although it was not statistically significant (95% CI 0.69 to 2.75). Rates for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular death were above population levels, but were similar for subjects with or without a history of aluminium dust inhalation. HRs suggested an increasing risk of cardiovascular disease with duration of aluminium dust inhalation (HR=1.02, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.04, per year of exposure). No difference in the association between duration of work underground and pneumoconiosis was observed between the groups with or without aluminium dust exposure. No protective effect against silicosis was observed from aluminium dust inhalation. Conversely, exposure to aluminium dust may possibly increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and dementia of the Alzheimer's type.

  3. There is (still) too much aluminium in infant formulas.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Shelle-Ann M; Exley, Christopher

    2010-08-31

    Infant formulas are sophisticated milk-based feeds for infants which are used as a substitute for breast milk. Historically they are known to be contaminated by aluminium and in the past this has raised health concerns for exposed infants. We have measured the aluminium content of a number of widely used infant formulas to determine if their contamination by aluminium and consequent issues of child health persists. Samples of ready-made milks and powders used to make milks were prepared by microwave digestion of acid/peroxide mixtures and their aluminium content determined by THGA. The concentration of aluminium in ready-made milks varied from ca 176 to 700 μg/L. The latter concentration was for a milk for preterm infants. The aluminium content of powders used to make milks varied from ca 2.4 to 4.3 μg/g. The latter content was for a soya-based formula and equated to a ready-to-drink milk concentration of 629 μg/L. Using the manufacturer's own guidelines of formula consumption the average daily ingestion of aluminium from infant formulas for a child of 6 months varied from ca 200 to 600 μg of aluminium. Generally ingestion was higher from powdered as compared to ready-made formulas. The aluminium content of a range of well known brands of infant formulas remains high and particularly so for a product designed for preterm infants and a soya-based product designed for infants with cow's milk intolerances and allergies. Recent research demonstrating the vulnerability of infants to early exposure to aluminium serves to highlight an urgent need to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas to as low a level as is practically possible.

  4. Clinical review: Severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Papiris, Spyros; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Malagari, Katerina; Roussos, Charis

    2002-01-01

    Severe asthma, although difficult to define, includes all cases of difficult/therapy-resistant disease of all age groups and bears the largest part of morbidity and mortality from asthma. Acute, severe asthma, status asthmaticus, is the more or less rapid but severe asthmatic exacerbation that may not respond to the usual medical treatment. The narrowing of airways causes ventilation perfusion imbalance, lung hyperinflation, and increased work of breathing that may lead to ventilatory muscle fatigue and life-threatening respiratory failure. Treatment for acute, severe asthma includes the administration of oxygen, β2-agonists (by continuous or repetitive nebulisation), and systemic corticosteroids. Subcutaneous administration of epinephrine or terbutaline should be considered in patients not responding adequately to continuous nebulisation, in those unable to cooperate, and in intubated patients not responding to inhaled therapy. The exact time to intubate a patient in status asthmaticus is based mainly on clinical judgment, but intubation should not be delayed once it is deemed necessary. Mechanical ventilation in status asthmaticus supports gas-exchange and unloads ventilatory muscles until aggressive medical treatment improves the functional status of the patient. Patients intubated and mechanically ventilated should be appropriately sedated, but paralytic agents should be avoided. Permissive hypercapnia, increase in expiratory time, and promotion of patient-ventilator synchronism are the mainstay in mechanical ventilation of status asthmaticus. Close monitoring of the patient's condition is necessary to obviate complications and to identify the appropriate time for weaning. Finally, after successful treatment and prior to discharge, a careful strategy for prevention of subsequent asthma attacks is imperative. PMID:11940264

  5. Rhinoviruses, Allergic Inflammation, and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gavala, Monica; Bertics, Paul J.; Gern, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Viral infections affect wheezing and asthma in children and adults of all ages. In infancy, wheezing illnesses are usually viral in origin, and children with more severe wheezing episodes are more likely to develop recurrent episodes of asthma and to develop asthma later in childhood. Children who develop allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (allergic sensitization), and those who wheeze with rhinoviruses (HRV) are at especially high risk for asthma. In older children and adults, HRV infections generally cause relatively mild respiratory illnesses and yet contribute to acute and potentially severe exacerbations in patients with asthma. These findings underline the importance of understanding the synergistic nature of allergic sensitization and infections with HRV in infants relative to the onset of asthma and in children and adults with respect to exacerbations of asthma. This review discusses clinical and experimental evidence of virus/allergen interactions and evaluates theories which relate immunologic responses to respiratory viruses and allergens to the pathogenesis and disease activity of asthma. Greater understanding of the relationship between viral respiratory infections, allergic inflammation, and asthma is likely to suggest new strategies for the prevention and treatment of asthma. PMID:21682739

  6. Introduction to genetics and genomics in asthma: genetics of asthma.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Rasika Ann

    2014-01-01

    While asthma is a heterogeneous disease, a strong genetic basis has been firmly established. Rather than being a single disease entity, asthma consists of related, overlapping syndromes [Barnes (Proc Am Thor Soc 8:143-148, 2011)] including three general domains: variable airway obstruction, airway hyper-responsiveness, and airway inflammation with a considerable proportion, but not all, of asthma being IgE-mediated further adding to its heterogeneity. This chapter reviews the approaches to the elucidation of genetics of asthma from the early evidence of familial clustering to the current state of knowledge with genome-wide approaches. The conclusion is that research efforts have led to a tremendous repository of genetic determinants of asthma, most of which fall into the above phenotypic domains of the syndrome. We now look to future integrative approaches of genetics, genomics (Chap. 10), and epigenetics (Chap. 11) to better understand the causal mechanism through which, these genetic loci act in manifesting asthma.

  7. Speciation analysis of aluminium and aluminium fluoride complexes by HPIC-UVVIS.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Marcin; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta

    2010-10-15

    The study presents a new analytical method for speciation analysis in fractionation of aluminium fluoride complexes and free Al(3+) in soil samples. Aluminium speciation was studied in model solutions and soil extract samples by means of high performance ion chromatography (HPIC) with UV-VIS detection using post-column reaction with tiron for the separation and detection of aluminium fluoride complex and Al(3+) forms during one analysis. The paper presents particular stages of the chromatographic process optimization involving selecting the appropriate eluent strength, type of elution or concentration and quantity of derivatization reagent. HPIC was performed on a bifunctional analytical column Dionex IonPac CS5A. The use of gradient elution and the eluents A: 1M NH(4)Cl and B: water acidified to pH of eluent phase, enabled full separation of fluoride aluminium forms as AlF(2)(+), AlF(3)(0), AlF(4)(-) (first signal), AlF(2+) (second signal) and form Al(3+) in a single analytical procedure. The proposed new method HPIC-UVVIS was applied successfully in the quantitative and qualitative analysis of soil samples. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Aluminium salt slag characterization and utilization--a review.

    PubMed

    Tsakiridis, P E

    2012-05-30

    Aluminium salt slag (also known as aluminium salt cake), which is produced by the secondary aluminium industry, is formed during aluminium scrap/dross melting and contains 15-30% aluminium oxide, 30-55% sodium chloride, 15-30% potassium chloride, 5-7% metallic aluminium and impurities (carbides, nitrides, sulphides and phosphides). Depending on the raw mix the amount of salt slag produced per tonne of secondary aluminium ranges from 200 to 500 kg. As salt slag has been classified as toxic and hazardous waste, it should be managed in compliance with the current legislation. Its landfill disposal is forbidden in most of the European countries and it should be recycled and processed in a proper way by taking the environmental impact into consideration. This paper presents a review of the aluminium salt slag chemical and mineralogical characteristics, as well as various processes for metal recovery, recycling of sodium and potassium chlorides content back to the smelting process and preparation of value added products from the final non metallic residue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Aluminium removal from water after defluoridation with the electrocoagulation process.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Richa; Mathur, Sanjay; Brighu, Urmila

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride is the most electronegative element and has a strong affinity for aluminium. Owing to this fact, most of the techniques used for fluoride removal utilized aluminium compounds, which results in high concentrations of aluminium in treated water. In the present paper, a new approach is presented to meet the WHO guideline for residual aluminium concentration as 0.2 mg/L. In the present work, the electrocoagulation (EC) process was used for fluoride removal. It was found that aluminium content in water increases with an increase in the energy input. Therefore, experiments were optimized for a minimum energy input to achieve the target value (0.7 mg/L) of fluoride in resultant water. These optimized sets were used for further investigations of aluminium control. The experimental investigations revealed that use of bentonite clay as coagulant in clariflocculation brings down the aluminium concentration of water below the WHO guideline. Bentonite dose of 2 g/L was found to be the best for efficient removal of aluminium.

  10. Aluminium in Bone from Patients with Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Victor; Davies, Christine; Goode, Clifford; Ogg, Chisholm; Siddiqui, J.

    1971-01-01

    Some samples of bone from patients with renal failure contained more aluminium than others, and the concentration tended to be highest in patients who had been uraemic or on dialysis longest. The significance of the association of raised concentrations of aluminium in bone with renal failure is discussed. PMID:5123910

  11. Yoga for asthma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zu-Yao; Zhong, Hui-Bin; Mao, Chen; Yuan, Jin-Qiu; Huang, Ya-Fang; Wu, Xin-Yin; Gao, Yuan-Mei; Tang, Jin-Ling

    2016-04-27

    Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disorder affecting about 300 million people worldwide. As a holistic therapy, yoga has the potential to relieve both the physical and psychological suffering of people with asthma, and its popularity has expanded globally. A number of clinical trials have been carried out to evaluate the effects of yoga practice, with inconsistent results. To assess the effects of yoga in people with asthma. We systematically searched the Cochrane Airways Group Register of Trials, which is derived from systematic searches of bibliographic databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, and PsycINFO, and handsearching of respiratory journals and meeting abstracts. We also searched PEDro. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP search portal. We searched all databases from their inception to 22 July 2015, and used no restriction on language of publication. We checked the reference lists of eligible studies and relevant review articles for additional studies. We attempted to contact investigators of eligible studies and experts in the field to learn of other published and unpublished studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared yoga with usual care (or no intervention) or sham intervention in people with asthma and reported at least one of the following outcomes: quality of life, asthma symptom score, asthma control, lung function measures, asthma medication usage, and adverse events. We extracted bibliographic information, characteristics of participants, characteristics of interventions and controls, characteristics of methodology, and results for the outcomes of our interest from eligible studies. For continuous outcomes, we used mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) to denote the treatment effects, if the outcomes were measured by the same scale across studies. Alternatively, if the outcomes were measured by different scales

  12. Yoga for asthma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zu-Yao; Zhong, Hui-Bin; Mao, Chen; Yuan, Jin-Qiu; Huang, Ya-Fang; Wu, Xin-Yin; Gao, Yuan-Mei; Tang, Jin-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disorder affecting about 300 million people worldwide. As a holistic therapy, yoga has the potential to relieve both the physical and psychological suffering of people with asthma, and its popularity has expanded globally. A number of clinical trials have been carried out to evaluate the effects of yoga practice, with inconsistent results. To assess the effects of yoga in people with asthma. We systematically searched the Cochrane Airways Group Register of Trials, which is derived from systematic searches of bibliographic databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, and PsycINFO, and handsearching of respiratory journals and meeting abstracts. We also searched PEDro. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP search portal. We searched all databases from their inception to 22 July 2015, and used no restriction on language of publication. We checked the reference lists of eligible studies and relevant review articles for additional studies. We attempted to contact investigators of eligible studies and experts in the field to learn of other published and unpublished studies. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared yoga with usual care (or no intervention) or sham intervention in people with asthma and reported at least one of the following outcomes: quality of life, asthma symptom score, asthma control, lung function measures, asthma medication usage, and adverse events. We extracted bibliographic information, characteristics of participants, characteristics of interventions and controls, characteristics of methodology, and results for the outcomes of our interest from eligible studies. For continuous outcomes, we used mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) to denote the treatment effects, if the outcomes were measured by the same scale across studies. Alternatively, if the outcomes were measured by different scales

  13. How Is Asthma Treated and Controlled?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Asthma Treated and Controlled? Asthma is a long-term ... adjusted to meet their special needs. Follow an Asthma Action Plan You can work with your doctor ...

  14. Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Asthma Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders National data for ... very limited. While all of the causes of asthma remain unclear, children exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke ...

  15. Treating Asthma in Children under 5

    MedlinePlus

    ... laughing Gastrointestinal reflux Changes or extremes in weather Asthma emergencies Severe asthma attacks can be life-threatening ... Changes in activity levels or sleep patterns Control asthma triggers Depending on the triggers for your child's ...

  16. Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Year-Old Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma? KidsHealth > For Parents > Can the Weather Affect My ... empeorar el asma de mi hijo? Weather and Asthma The effect of weather on asthma symptoms isn' ...

  17. Children and Asthma: The Goal Is Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Children and Asthma: The Goal Is Control Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... how FDA approved treatments can help children with asthma lead active lives. Most asthma medicines are inhaled, ...

  18. Aluminium Electroplating on Steel from a Fused Bromide Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhat Tripathy; Laura Wurth; Eric Dufek; Toni Y. Gutknecht; Natalie Gese; Paula Hahn; Steven Frank; Guy Fredrickson; J Stephen Herring

    2014-08-01

    A quaternary bromide bath (LiBr-KBr-CsBr-AlBr3) was used to electro-coat aluminium on steel substrates. The electrolyte was prepared by the addition of AlBr3 into the eutectic LiBr-KBr-CsBr melt. A smooth, thick, adherent and shiny aluminium coating could be obtained with 80 wt.% AlBr3 in the ternary melt. The SEM photographs of the coated surfaces suggest the formation of thick and dense coatings with good aluminium coverage. Both salt immersion and open circuit potential measurement suggest that the coatings did display good corrosion-resistance behavior. Annealing of the coated surfaces, prior to corrosion tests, suggested the robustness of the metallic aluminium coating in preventing the corrosion of the steel surfaces. Studies also indicated that the quaternary bromide plating bath can potentially provide a better aluminium coating on both ferrous and non-ferrous metals, including complex surfaces/geometries.

  19. Experimental investigations on mechanical behavior of aluminium metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, A. M.; Kaleemulla, Mohammed

    2016-09-01

    Today we are widely using aluminium based metal matrix composite for structural, aerospace, marine and automobile applications for its light weight, high strength and low production cost. The purpose of designing metal matrix composite is to add the desirable attributes of metals and ceramics to the base metal. In this study we developed aluminium metal matrix hybrid composite by reinforced Aluminium7075 alloy with silicon carbide (SiC) and aluminium oxide (alumina) by method of stir casting. This technique is less expensive and very effective. The Hardness test and Wear test were performed on the specimens which are prepared by stir casting techniques. The result reveals that the addition of silicon carbide and alumina particles in aluminium matrix improves the mechanical properties.

  20. Usage of Neural Network to Predict Aluminium Oxide Layer Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Michal, Peter; Vagaská, Alena; Gombár, Miroslav; Kmec, Ján; Spišák, Emil; Kučerka, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows an influence of chemical composition of used electrolyte, such as amount of sulphuric acid in electrolyte, amount of aluminium cations in electrolyte and amount of oxalic acid in electrolyte, and operating parameters of process of anodic oxidation of aluminium such as the temperature of electrolyte, anodizing time, and voltage applied during anodizing process. The paper shows the influence of those parameters on the resulting thickness of aluminium oxide layer. The impact of these variables is shown by using central composite design of experiment for six factors (amount of sulphuric acid, amount of oxalic acid, amount of aluminium cations, electrolyte temperature, anodizing time, and applied voltage) and by usage of the cubic neural unit with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm during the results evaluation. The paper also deals with current densities of 1 A·dm−2 and 3 A·dm−2 for creating aluminium oxide layer. PMID:25922850

  1. Galvanised steel to aluminium joining by laser and GTAW processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sierra, G.; Peyre, P.; Deschaux Beaume, F. Stuart, D.; Fras, G.

    2008-12-15

    A new means of assembling galvanised steel to aluminium involving a reaction between solid steel and liquid aluminium was developed, using laser and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes. A direct aluminium melting strategy was investigated with the laser process, whereas an aluminium-induced melting by steel heating and heat conduction through the steel was carried out with the GTAW process. The interfaces generated during the interaction were mainly composed of a 2-40 {mu}m thick intermetallic reaction layers. The linear strength of the assemblies can be as high as 250 N/mm and 190 N/mm for the assemblies produced respectively by laser and GTAW processes. The corresponding failures were located in the fusion zone of aluminium (laser assemblies), or in the reaction layer (GTAW assemblies)

  2. Multilayer roll bonded aluminium foil: processing, microstructure and flow stress

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, C.Y.; Nielsen, P.; Hansen, N

    2004-08-02

    Bulk aluminium has been produced by warm-rolling followed by cold-rolling of commercial purity (99% purity) aluminium foil. The bonding appeared perfect from observation with the naked eye, light and transmission electron microscopy. By comparison with bulk aluminium of similar purity (AA1200) rolled to a similar strain (90%RA), the roll-bonded metal showed a much higher density of high-angle grain boundaries, similar strength and improved thermal stability. This study has implications for a number of applications in relation to the processing of aluminium. Roll bonding is of interest as a method for grain size refinement; oxide-containing materials have increased strength, enhanced work-hardening behaviour, and exhibit alterations in recrystallisation behaviour. The behaviour of the hard oxide film is of interest in aluminium processing, and has been investigated by characterising the size and distribution of oxide particles in the roll-bonded samples.

  3. Dehumidifiers for chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Meenu; Jaiswal, Nishant

    2013-06-13

    Humidity control measures in the home environment of patients with asthma have been recommended, since a warm humid environment favours the growth of house dust mites. However, there is no consensus about the usefulness of these measures. To study the effect of dehumidification of the home environment on asthma control. The clinical trials registers of the Cochrane Collaboration and Cochrane Airways Group were searched. Searches were current as of March 2013. Randomised controlled trials on the use of humidity control measures in the home environment of patients with asthma were evaluated for inclusion. Data were extracted independently using a pre-designed data extraction form by two review authors. A second trial has been added for the 2013 update of this review. The original open-label trial compared an intervention consisting of mechanical ventilation heat recovery system with or without high efficiency vacuum cleaner fitted in 40 homes of patients with asthma who had positive tests for sensitivity to house dust mite. The new double-blind trial also compared a mechanical ventilation heat recovery system with a placebo machine in the homes of 120 adults with allergy to house dust mite. The new trial, which was at low risk of bias, showed no significant difference in morning peak flow (mean difference (MD) 13.59; 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.66 to 29.84), which was the primary outcome of the trial. However, there was a statistically significant improvement in evening peak flow only (MD 24.56; 95% CI 8.97 to 40.15). There was no significant difference in quality of life, rescue medication, requirement for oral corticosteroids, visits to the GP, emergency department (ED) or hospitalisations for asthma. There was no significant difference in the house dust mite count and the antigen levels in the new trial, in contrast to the previous trial. Evidence on clinical benefits of dehumidification using mechanical ventilation with dehumidifiers remains scanty, and the

  4. Acoustic Emission from the Aluminium Alloy 7050.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    thick-section applications, has good stress - corrosion resistance, and is now being used in airframe construction. In this report, we present our AE...160.00 1S0.00 200.90 2SO.I9 TIMlE (sec) Fig. 8 Count-rate/time and nominal- stress /time curves for 7050 C-specimen (a) and 0-speimen lb). CO 0 CC 0T LLQ...A094 38" AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABS MELBOURNE (AUSTRALIA) F/6 11/6 ACOUSTIC EMISSION FROM THE ALUMINIUM ALLOY 7050 .(U) OCT 79 S M COUSLAND, C M SCALA

  5. Experimental fatigue curves for aluminium brazed areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitescu, A.; Babiş, C.; Niţoi, D. F.; Radu, C.

    2017-08-01

    An important factor for the quality of joints is the brazed area. The fatigue check occupies a major position among many test procedures and methods, especially by the joining technologies. The results of processing the fatigue data experiments for aluminium brazed samples are used to find the regression function and the response surface methodology. The fatigue process of mechanical components under service loading is stochastic in nature. The prediction of time-dependent fatigue reliability is critical for the design and maintenance planning of many structural components.

  6. Forming of aluminium alloy friction stir welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    The present paper aims at investigating, through analytical models, numerical models and experiments, the effect of the warm deformation phase, realised with an in temperature upsetting, on the weld previously performed by friction stir lap welding on aluminium alloy blanks. The investigation allows to show the deformation zones after upsetting that determine the homogenisation of the weld section. The analytical model allows to relate the friction factor with the upsetting load. The presence on the weld of not elevated friction factor values determines the deformation and localisation levels very useful for the weld. Such methodology allows to improve the weld itself with the forming phase.

  7. Alumina Concentration Gradients in Aluminium Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Pascal; Taylor, Mark P.

    The length of aluminium electrolysis cells have constantly increased over the last decades. The drive to increase productivity resulted in the need to feed and dissolve more alumina in less electrolyte. There is mounting evidence that these two trends are pushing the electrolysis cells above their capability to maintain alumina concentration, through time and space, at levels preventing both conventional and non-propagating anode effects. Alumina concentration gradient measurements were performed within large industrial cells and showed that large gradients occurred between locations in cells.

  8. Deviatoric response of the aluminium alloy, 5083

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Hazell, Paul; Millett, Jeremy; Bourne, Neil

    2009-06-01

    Aluminium alloys such as 5083 are established light weight armour materials. As such, the shock response of these materials is of great importance. The shear strength of a material under shock loading provides an insight into its ballistic performance. In this investigation embedded manganin stress gauges have been employed to measure both the longitudinal and lateral components of stress during plate impact experiments over a range of impact stresses. In turn, these results were used to determine the shear strength and to investigate the time dependence of lateral stress behind the shock front to give an indication of material response.

  9. [The history of bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Carlo-Stella, N

    1998-01-01

    The history of bronchial asthma from ancient times is traced. The first accounts of asthma in the ancient Greeks and Romans with clinical descriptions by Aretus of Cappadocia and Aulus Celsus Cornelius are recounted. These are followed by the medieval habits of the Middle East as described by Moises Maimonides. The Renaissance is witness to a new scientific fervor in postulating theories on the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma by van Helmont, Willis and Floyer. The seventeenth and eighteenth centuries will see the discovery of the anatomical foundation of bronchial asthma thanks largely to the technical advances in the diagnostic field by Auerbrugge and Laennec. The allergic nature of bronchial asthma is studied by Salter. S Meltzer's hypothesis of histamine release as the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma leads the way for the twentieth century's leading discoveries.

  10. Current treatment of severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, S; Bel, E H

    2012-05-01

    Severe asthma is considered a heterogeneous disease in which a variety of clinical, physiological and inflammatory markers determine disease severity. Pivotal studies in the last 5 years have led to substantial progress in many areas, ranging from a more accurate definition of truly severe, refractory asthma, to classification of the disease into distinct clinical phenotypes, and introduction of new therapies. This review focuses on three common clinical phenotypes of severe asthma in adults (early onset severe allergic asthma, late onset non-atopic eosinophilic asthma, late onset non-eosinophilic asthma with obesity), and provides an overview of recent developments regarding treatment options that are best suited for each of these phenotypes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Outpatient treatment of adult asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Kleerup, E C; Tashkin, D P

    1995-01-01

    As a chronic disease with intermittent exacerbations, asthma is treated primarily in the outpatient setting by primary care physicians. Asthma is the result of complex and only partially understood interactions of respiratory, inflammatory, and neural cells and their mediators. The goals of asthma therapy are to prevent and relieve symptoms, allow normal activities of daily living, restore and maintain normal pulmonary function, avoid adverse effects from interventions, and minimize inconvenience and cost. These goals can be achieved through educating patients, assessing and monitoring asthma severity, avoiding or controlling asthma triggers, establishing an intervention plan for routine self-management and the management of exacerbations, and providing regular follow-up care. We present a stepped approach to asthma pharmacotherapy, emphasizing anti-inflammatory therapy--inhaled corticosteroids, cromolyn sodium, or nedocromil sodium--as a summary of recent national and international recommendations. PMID:7667983

  12. Volatilisation and oxidation of aluminium scraps fed into incineration furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Biganzoli, Laura; Gorla, Leopoldo; Nessi, Simone; Grosso, Mario

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminium packaging partitioning in MSW incineration residues is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amount of aluminium packaging recoverable from the bottom ashes is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminium packaging oxidation rate in the residues of MSW incineration is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 80% of aluminium cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered from bottom ashes. - Abstract: Ferrous and non-ferrous metal scraps are increasingly recovered from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash and used in the production of secondary steel and aluminium. However, during the incineration process, metal scraps contained in the waste undergo volatilisation and oxidation processes, which determine a loss of their recoverable mass. The present paper evaluates the behaviour of different types of aluminium packaging materials in a full-scale waste to energy plant during standard operation. Their partitioning and oxidation level in the residues of the incineration process are evaluated, together with the amount of potentially recoverable aluminium. About 80% of post-consumer cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered through an advanced treatment of bottom ash combined with a melting process in the saline furnace for the production of secondary aluminium. The residual amount of aluminium concentrates in the fly ash or in the fine fraction of the bottom ash and its recovery is virtually impossible using the current eddy current separation technology. The average oxidation levels of the aluminium in the residues of the incineration process is equal to 9.2% for cans, 17.4% for trays and 58.8% for foils. The differences between the tested packaging materials are related to their thickness, mechanical strength and to the alloy.

  13. Asthma myths, controversies, and dogma.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Bruce K

    2015-03-01

    Although the symptom complex we call asthma has been well described since antiquity, our understanding of the causes and therapy of asthma has evolved. Even with this evolution in our understanding, there are persistent myths (widely held but false beliefs) and dogma (entrenched beliefs) regarding the causes, classification, and therapy of asthma. It is sobering that some of the knowledge we hold dear today, will become the mythology of tomorrow.

  14. Allergens and thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Shuaib M; Pulimood, Thomas B

    2009-09-01

    Thunderstorm-related asthma is increasingly recognized in many parts of the world. This review focuses on important advances in the understanding of the mechanism of the role of allergens, in particular fungal spores such as Alternaria, in asthma epidemics associated with thunderstorms. From our observations, we have proposed that the prerequisites for this phenomenon are as follows: 1) a sensitized, atopic, asthmatic individual; 2) prior airway hyperresponsiveness before a sudden, large allergen exposure; 3) a large-scale thunderstorm with cold outflow occurring at a time and location during an allergen season in which large numbers of asthmatics are outdoors; and 4) sudden release of large amounts of respirable allergenic fragments, particularly fungal spores such as Alternaria.

  15. Asthma Management for the Otolaryngologist.

    PubMed

    Krouse, John H

    2017-10-05

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease that will frequently be encountered by otolaryngologists as they manage their patients with upper respiratory diseases. Symptoms such as cough should alert otolaryngologists to consider more broadly the potential role of asthma in the differential diagnosis. It is critical for otolaryngologists to appreciate that patients with allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis will often have asthma, and that many of them may not be diagnosed at the time of presentation. Appropriate diagnosis of the patient with asthma, as well as effective treatment for its symptoms, will improve patient function and enhance quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Premenstrual asthma: relation to hormones].

    PubMed

    Hernández Colin, D; Zárate Treviño, A; Martínez Cairo Cueto, S

    1997-01-01

    Exacerbation of asthmatic symptoms just before or at the time of menstruation documented in some women with asthma has been called "premenstrual asthma" (PMA). The effect of sex hormones on airway function has not been well studied in spite of much evidence to suggest, therefore about relationships between the sex hormones and airway. The investigations of (PMA) have been based on studies of asthmatics already aware of a deterioration of asthma premenstrually. Little is known, therefore, about relationships between the menstrual cycle with asthma and (PMA) subjects. Although the mechanism of PMA remains unclear.

  17. Prevalence of asthma in Portugal - The Portuguese National Asthma Survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Asthma is a frequent chronic respiratory disease in both children and adults. However, few data on asthma prevalence are available in Portugal. The Portuguese National Asthma Survey is the first nationwide study that uses standardized methods. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of current asthma in the Portuguese population and to assess the association between ‘Current asthma’ and comorbidities such as upper airways disease. Methods A cross-sectional, population-based, telephone interview survey including all municipalities of Portugal was undertaken. Participants were randomly selected to answer a questionnaire based on the Portuguese version of the GA2LEN survey. ‘Current asthma’ was defined as self-reported lifetime asthma and at least one of 3 symptoms in the last 12 months: wheezing, waking with breathlessness or having an asthma attack. Results Data were obtained for 6 003 respondents, with mean age of 38.9 (95%CI 38.2-39.6) years and 57.3% females. In the Portuguese population, the prevalence of ‘Current asthma’ was 6.8% (95%CI 6.0-7.7) and of ‘Lifetime asthma’ was 10.5% (95%CI 9.5-11.6) Using GA2LEN definition for asthma, our prevalence estimate was 7.8% (95%CI 7.0-8.8). Rhinitis had a strong association with asthma (Adjusted OR 3.87, 95%CI 2.90-5.18) and the association between upper airway diseases and asthma was stronger in patients with both rhinitis and sinusitis (Adjusted OR 13.93, 95%CI 6.60-29.44). Conclusions Current asthma affects 695 000 Portuguese, with a prevalence of 6.8%. People who reported both rhinitis and sinusitis had the highest risk of having asthma. PMID:22931550

  18. Metabolomics in asthma.

    PubMed

    Luxon, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Asthma and airway inflammation are responses to infectious stimuli and the mechanisms of how they are mediated, whether by the innate or adaptive immune response systems, are complex and results in a broad spectrum of possible metabolic products. In principle, a syndrome such as asthma should have a characteristic temporal-spatial metabolic signature indicative of its current state and the constituents that caused it. Generally, the term metabolomics refers to the quantitative analysis of sets of small compounds from biological samples with molecular masses less than 1 kDa so unambiguous identification can be difficult and usually requires sophisticated instrumentation. The practical success of clinical metabolomics will largely hinge on a few key issues such as the ability to capture a readily available biofluid that can be analyzed to identify metabolite biomarkers with the required sensitivity and specificity in a cost-effective manner in a clinical setting. In this chapter, we review the current state of the metabolomics of asthma and airway inflammation with a focus on the different methods and instrumentation being used for the discovery of biomarkers in research and their future translation into the clinic as diagnostic aids for the choice of patient-specific therapies.

  19. [Asthma and cyclic neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Salazar Cabrera, A N; Berrón Pérez, R; Ortega Martell, J A; Onuma Takane, E

    1996-01-01

    We report a male with history of recurrent infections (recurrent oral aphtous disease [ROAD], middle ear infections and pharyngo amigdalitis) every 3 weeks since he was 7 months old. At the age of 3 years cyclic neutropenia was diagnosed with cyclic fall in the total neutrophil count in blood smear every 21 days and prophylactic antimicrobial therapy was indicated. Episodic events every 3 weeks of acute asthma and allergic rhinitis were detected at the age of 6 years old and specific immunotherapy to Bermuda grass was given during 3 years with markedly improvement in his allergic condition but not in the ROAD. He came back until the age of 16 with episodic acute asthma and ROAD. The total neutrophil count failed to 0 every 21 days and surprisingly the total eosinophil count increased up to 2,000 at the same time, with elevation of serum IgE (412 Ul/mL). Specific immunotherapy to D.pt. and Aller.a. and therapy with timomodulin was indicated. After 3 months we observed clinical improvement in the asthmatic condition and the ROAD disappeared, but the total neutrophil count did not improve. We present this case as a rare association between 2 diseases with probably no etiological relationship but may be physiopatological that could help to understand more the pathogenesis of asthma.

  20. Psychopathology in difficult asthma.

    PubMed

    Prins, Lonneke C J; van Son, Maarten J M; van Keimpema, Anton R J; van Ranst, Dirk; Pommer, Antoinette; Meijer, Jan-Willem G; Pop, Victor J M

    2015-01-01

    Within the asthma population, difficult asthma (DA) is a severe condition in which patients present with frequent exacerbations, hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The identification and treatment of psychopathology is included in the management of DA. Psychopathology is supposed to predispose patients to DA or vice versa; psychopathology may develop as a consequence of DA. We reviewed the available literature on empirical findings regarding psychopathology in adult patients with DA. Studies in English language journals using MEDLINE, Cochrane and PsycINFO databases, were retrieved by an electronic search published from 1990 till July 2014. Literature on psychopathology in DA is scarce. The search identified 16 articles of which only 6 articles were specifically about psychopathology in adult patients with DA. Almost half of the patients with DA had evidence of psychopathology at both syndrome and symptom level. Moreover, psychopathology appeared to be related to frequent exacerbations in patients with DA. This literature review suggests a high prevalence of psychopathology of patients with DA, although it remains unclear whether psychopathology occurs more often in DA compared to "stable asthma". More research is needed on a possible role of psychopathology on clinical signs and symptoms in DA.

  1. The Microbiome and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yvonne J.

    2014-01-01

    That the subglottic airways are not sterile, as was once believed, but are populated by a distinct “bronchial microbiome,” is now accepted. Also accepted is the concept that asthma is associated with differences in the composition of this microbiome. What is not clear is whether the differences in microbial community composition themselves mediate pathologic changes in the airways or whether they reflect differences in systemic immune function driven by differences in the development of the gastrointestinal microbiome in early life, when the immune system is most malleable. Recognition of the probable existence of a “common mucosal immune system” allowed synthesis of these apparently opposing ideas into a single conceptual model. Gastrointestinal microbiome–driven differences in systemic immune function predispose to sensitization to allergens deposited on mucosal surfaces, whereas possibly similar, but not identical, differences in immune function predispose to less effective responses to microbial infection of the airways, resulting in persistence of the inflammation underlying the structural and functional abnormalities of asthma. In this model, allergic sensitization and asthma are thus seen as commonly overlapping but not necessarily coincident consequences of abnormalities in microbial colonization, development of immune function, and encounter with agents infecting the respiratory tract. PMID:24437406

  2. Occupational asthma: an overview.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jessica; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2014-05-01

    Occupational asthma is a form of asthma that is often under-diagnosed and under-reported. Unrecognized occupational asthma can lead to progression of disease and increased morbidity. The medical history is a critical element for establishing a diagnosis of OA. The history should include a detailed assessment of the workplace environment, the work process, changes in symptoms in and away from the workplace, and a review of relevant material safety data sheets that may provide clues regarding exposure(s) and the potential cause(s). Objective testing including spirometry pre- and post-bronchodilators, peak expiratory flow rate monitoring in and out of the workplace, provocation testing (i.e., methacholine challenge) to assess for airway hyperresponsiveness, and, if feasible, specific provocation by experienced personnel in a controlled setting to a suspected inciting agent are necessary for confirming a diagnosis. Skin or serologic testing for specific IgE to aeroallergens to assess the worker's atopic status is useful especially when considering certain forms of OA where atopy is a risk factor. Specialized laboratory testing may be useful for specific OA causes. It is important to correctly make the diagnosis of OA as the impact on the worker's future employment and earning power can be significantly affected.

  3. Study on aluminium-based single films.

    PubMed

    Vinod Kumar, G S; García-Moreno, F; Babcsán, N; Brothers, A H; Murty, B S; Banhart, J

    2007-12-28

    In the present paper the authors studied isolated metallic films made from the same material used for making metallic foams, and then characterised their properties. Metal films were made from a liquid aluminium alloy reinforced with ceramic particles of known concentration. Melts without such particles were also investigated. It is shown that stable films could not be made from Al-Si alloy having no particles, and just extremely thin and fragile films could be made from commercially-pure Al. In contrast, aluminium alloys containing particles such as SiC and TiB(2) allowed pulling thin, stable films, which did not rupture. Significant thinning of films was observed when the particle concentration in the melt decreased. By in situ X-ray monitoring of liquid films during pulling, film thickness and drainage effects within the liquid film could be studied. The morphology and microstructure of films was characterised after solidification. Our work shows that the question of how foams are stabilised can be studied using a simplified system such as a film, instead of having to deal with the multitude of different structural elements present in a foam.

  4. Precipitate strengthening of nanostructured aluminium alloy.

    PubMed

    Wawer, Kinga; Lewandowska, Malgorzata; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof J

    2012-11-01

    Grain boundaries and precipitates are the major microstructural features influencing the mechanical properties of metals and alloys. Refinement of the grain size to the nanometre scale brings about a significant increase in the mechanical strength of the materials because of the increased number of grain boundaries which act as obstacles to sliding dislocations. A similar effect is obtained if nanoscale precipitates are uniformly distributed in coarse grained matrix. The development of nanograin sized alloys raises the important question of whether or not these two mechanisms are "additive" and precipitate strengthening is effective in nanostructured materials. In the reported work, hydrostatic extrusion (HE) was used to obtain nanostructured 7475 aluminium alloy. Nanosized precipitates were obtained by post-HE annealing. It was found that such annealing at the low temperatures (100 degrees C) results in a significant increase in the microhardness (HV0.2) and strength of the nanostructured 7475 aluminium alloy. These results are discussed in terms of the interplay between the precipitation and deformation of nanocrystalline metals.

  5. Hearing conservation in the primary aluminium industry

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, N.; Dixon-Ernst, C.; Chesson, B. J.; Cullen, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Noise-induced hearing loss has been an intractable problem for heavy industry. Aims To report our experience in reducing the incidence of age-corrected confirmed 10 dB hearing shifts (averaged over 2, 3 and 4kHz) in employees in the primary aluminium industry in Australia over the period 2006–13. Methods We analysed annual audiometric data to determine the number of permanent hearing shifts that occurred in employees in two bauxite mines, three alumina refineries and two aluminium smelters. Annual hearing shift rates were calculated based on the number of employees tested per year. Hearing conservation initiatives undertaken during the study period are described. An assessment of similar exposure group noise exposures was also undertaken to determine the magnitude of noise exposure reduction during the study period. Results Across all operations, hearing shift rates declined from 5.5% per year in 2006 to 1.3% per year in 2013 (P < 0.001). The decline in shift rates was greater in mines and refineries, where baseline shift rates were higher, than in smelter workers. Modest reductions in noise exposure occurred during the study period. Conclusions We observed a substantial decline in hearing shift rates during the study period. We describe the hearing conservation initiatives that were collectively associated with this decline. We suspect these initiatives could be deployed relatively easily and at modest cost in other industries with noise-exposed employees. PMID:26470945

  6. Hearing conservation in the primary aluminium industry.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, A M; Frisch, N; Dixon-Ernst, C; Chesson, B J; Cullen, M R

    2016-04-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss has been an intractable problem for heavy industry. To report our experience in reducing the incidence of age-corrected confirmed 10 dB hearing shifts (averaged over 2, 3 and 4 kHz) in employees in the primary aluminium industry in Australia over the period 2006-13. We analysed annual audiometric data to determine the number of permanent hearing shifts that occurred in employees in two bauxite mines, three alumina refineries and two aluminium smelters. Annual hearing shift rates were calculated based on the number of employees tested per year. Hearing conservation initiatives undertaken during the study period are described. An assessment of similar exposure group noise exposures was also undertaken to determine the magnitude of noise exposure reduction during the study period. Across all operations, hearing shift rates declined from 5.5% per year in 2006 to 1.3% per year in 2013 (P < 0.001). The decline in shift rates was greater in mines and refineries, where baseline shift rates were higher, than in smelter workers. Modest reductions in noise exposure occurred during the study period. We observed a substantial decline in hearing shift rates during the study period. We describe the hearing conservation initiatives that were collectively associated with this decline. We suspect these initiatives could be deployed relatively easily and at modest cost in other industries with noise-exposed employees. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine.

  7. [Skin vessel lesions in aluminum potroom workers].

    PubMed

    Siurin, S A; Nikanov, A N; Shilov, V V

    2012-01-01

    The features of development of the skin vessels lesions in 550 aluminum production workers have been investigated. The high prevalence of these disorders have been revealed in anode-operators and cell-operators, 49, 3 and 26.0% of workers, respectively. The regularity and staging of the development of this abnormity have been established, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical significance of those remain unknown.

  8. Global Asthma Network survey suggests more national asthma strategies could reduce burden of asthma.

    PubMed

    Asher, I; Haahtela, T; Selroos, O; Ellwood, P; Ellwood, E

    Several countries or regions within countries have an effective national asthma strategy resulting in a reduction of the large burden of asthma to individuals and society. There has been no systematic appraisal of the extent of national asthma strategies in the world. The Global Asthma Network (GAN) undertook an email survey of 276 Principal Investigators of GAN centres in 120 countries, in 2013-2014. One of the questions was: "Has a national asthma strategy been developed in your country for the next five years? For children? For adults?". Investigators in 112 (93.3%) countries answered this question. Of these, 26 (23.2%) reported having a national asthma strategy for children and 24 (21.4%) for adults; 22 (19.6%) countries had a strategy for both children and adults; 28 (25%) had a strategy for at least one age group. In countries with a high prevalence of current wheeze, strategies were significantly more common than in low prevalence countries (11/13 (85%) and 7/31 (22.6%) respectively, p<0.001). In 25% countries a national asthma strategy was reported. A large reduction in the global burden of asthma could be potentially achieved if more countries had an effective asthma strategy. Copyright © 2017 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Occupational asthma often goes unrecognised.

    PubMed

    Cullinan, Paul; Cannon, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Occupational asthma is induced de novo by an airborne agent encountered in the workplace. The risk of occupational asthma is greater in those with a prior atopic history. Work-exacerbated asthma is the provocation of pre-existing, or coincidental, disease by one or more irritant exposures at work. Distinguishing occupational from work-exacerbated asthma can be difficult but it is important since the two have very different clinical, occupational and legal implications. Occupational asthma is underrecognised, the disease often develops in young people who are otherwise fit. They may not recognise their symptoms as anything out of the ordinary, or may confuse them with hay fever or a cold. It is sensible to consider occupational and work-exacerbated asthma in every working adult who has asthma or who presents with suggestive symptoms such as rhinitis. Occupational asthma almost always arises from an immediate-type hypersensitivity reaction to a respiratory sensitising agent in the workplace. The disease has a short latency with symptoms developing 6 to 36 months after employment in a new job. Rhinitis is common and in those working in an environment with airborne proteins the absence of rhinitis effectively rules out occupational asthma. In occupational asthma, symptoms (including nasal symptoms) improve away from work. Once the disease is established symptoms are provoked by even very small exposures at work and begin to be provoked by a wide variety of irritant exposures both at, and away from, work. It is good practice to enquire into the employment of every working-age adult with asthma, or rhinitis, and particularly in those presenting with new symptoms or symptoms that have become more difficult to manage. Patients should routinely be asked whether their symptoms improve when they are not at work.

  10. Emerging therapeutic options for asthma.

    PubMed

    Colice, Gene L

    2011-04-01

    Asthma is characterized by eosinophilic airway inflammation and elevated serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels. Due to these pathologic features, the foundation of asthma treatment has historically been anti-inflammatory therapy with inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs). Numerous factors in addition to IgE and eosinophils, however, likely play important roles in mediating the airway inflammatory response characteristic of asthma. ICSs are effective therapy for some patients with persistent asthma, but clinical trials have shown that even increasing doses of ICSs under carefully controlled situations does not always result in acceptable asthma control. Consequently, other classes of medications, in addition to ICSs, are recommended in those patients with more severe asthma. The class of medication most commonly used in more severe asthma, along with ICSs, is long-acting inhaled beta2-agonists, but leukotriene modifying agents and anti-IgE monoclonal antibodies may also be used. Agents such as tiotropium, a long-acting inhaled anti-muscarinic agent, and those aimed at inhibiting cytokines, such as mepoluzimab, daclizumab, and etanercept, hold promise in the treatment of asthma. Other agents under investigation include phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors and oligonucleotides. Bronchial thermoplasty, a nonpharmacologic option, may also be beneficial in patients with poorly controlled asthma. As our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of asthma increases, it will enable the development of novel therapeutic approaches for patients who are not responding well to traditional treatments. Although more studies are necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety of both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches, there is future promise for therapeutic advances in severe, persistent asthma.

  11. Unexpected loss of contact allergy to aluminium induced by vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gente Lidholm, Anette; Bergfors, Elisabet; Inerot, Annica; Blomgren, Ulla; Gillstedt, Martin; Trollfors, Birger

    2013-05-01

    In studies in Gothenburg, Sweden, in the 1990s of an aluminium hydroxide-adsorbed pertussis toxoid vaccine, 745 of ~76 000 vaccinated children developed long-lasting itchy subcutaneous nodules at the vaccination site. Of 495 children with itchy nodules patch tested for aluminium allergy, 376 (76%) were positive. To study the prognosis of the vaccine-induced aluminium allergy. Two hundred and forty-one children with demonstrated aluminium allergy in the previous study were patch tested again 5-9 years after the initial test, with the same procedure as used previously. Contact allergy to aluminium was no longer demonstrable in 186 of the retested 241 children (77%). A negative test result was more common in children who no longer had itching at the vaccination site; it was also related to the age of the child, the time after the first aluminium-adsorbed vaccine dose, and the strength of the reaction in the first test. Patch test reactivity to aluminium seems to disappear or weaken with time. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Does allergen-specific immunotherapy induce contact allergy to aluminium?

    PubMed

    Netterlid, Eva; Hindsén, Monica; Siemund, Ingrid; Björk, Jonas; Werner, Sonja; Jacobsson, Helene; Güner, Nuray; Bruze, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Persistent, itching nodules have been reported to appear at the injection site after allergen-specific immuno-therapy with aluminium-precipitated antigen extract, occasionally in conjunction with contact allergy to aluminium. This study aimed to quantify the development of contact allergy to aluminium during allergen-specific immunotherapy. A randomized, controlled, single-blind multicentre study of children and adults entering allergen-specific immunotherapy was performed using questionnaires and patch-testing. A total of 205 individuals completed the study. In the 3 study groups all subjects tested negative to aluminium before allergen-specific immunotherapy and 4 tested positive after therapy. In the control group 4 participants tested positive to aluminium. Six out of 8 who tested positive also had atopic dermatitis. Positive test results were found in 5/78 children and 3/127 adults. Allergen-specific immunotherapy was not shown to be a risk factor for contact allergy to aluminium. Among those who did develop aluminium allergy, children and those with atopic dermatitis were more highly represented.

  13. New insights into asthma pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Szefler, Stanley J; Dakhama, Azzeddine

    2011-12-01

    Although national asthma guidelines help organize standards for asthma care, current asthma management is still primarily symptom based. Recent reports provide insights on how to improve asthma management through steps to better understand the natural history of asthma, individualize asthma care, reduce asthma exacerbations, manage inner city asthma, and some potential new ways to use available medications to improve asthma control. Despite many significant gains in managing asthma, we must now find improved strategies to prevent asthma exacerbations, alter the natural history of the disease, and to reduce health disparities in asthma care. Perhaps new directions in personalized medicine including a systems biology approach, along with improved health care access and communication will lead to better methods to alleviate the burden of asthma. This review will discuss the benefits and limitations of the current approach to asthma management, new studies that could impact new directions in asthma management, and new insights related to mechanisms of asthma and allergic airways inflammation that could eventually lead to improved asthma control.

  14. The varied functions of aluminium-activated malate transporters-much more than aluminium resistance.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Antony J; Baker, Alison; Muench, Stephen P

    2016-06-15

    The ALMT (aluminium-activated malate transporter) family comprises a functionally diverse but structurally similar group of ion channels. They are found ubiquitously in plant species, expressed throughout different tissues, and located in either the plasma membrane or tonoplast. The first family member identified was TaALMT1, discovered in wheat root tips, which was found to be involved in aluminium resistance by means of malate exudation into the soil. However, since this discovery other family members have been shown to have many other functions such as roles in stomatal opening, general anionic homoeostasis, and in economically valuable traits such as fruit flavour. Recent evidence has also shown that ALMT proteins can act as key molecular actors in GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) signalling, the first evidence that GABA can act as a signal transducer in plants. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. The varied functions of aluminium-activated malate transporters–much more than aluminium resistance

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Antony J.; Baker, Alison; Muench, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    The ALMT (aluminium-activated malate transporter) family comprises a functionally diverse but structurally similar group of ion channels. They are found ubiquitously in plant species, expressed throughout different tissues, and located in either the plasma membrane or tonoplast. The first family member identified was TaALMT1, discovered in wheat root tips, which was found to be involved in aluminium resistance by means of malate exudation into the soil. However, since this discovery other family members have been shown to have many other functions such as roles in stomatal opening, general anionic homoeostasis, and in economically valuable traits such as fruit flavour. Recent evidence has also shown that ALMT proteins can act as key molecular actors in GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) signalling, the first evidence that GABA can act as a signal transducer in plants. PMID:27284052

  16. Aluminium migration into beverages: are dented cans safe?

    PubMed

    Veríssimo, Marta I S; Gomes, M Teresa S R

    2008-11-01

    Aluminium (Al) migration from cans to beer and tea was studied along time. Analyses of Al in the canned drinks were performed till the sell-by date, and, in seven months, aluminium migration was found to increase 0.14 mg L(-1) in beer, and 0.6 mg L(-1) in tea. This study included dented cans from which aluminium migration into tea was found to be particularly severe. Al concentration in dented canned tea increased 9.6 mg L(-1) in seven months.

  17. Recurrent sterile abscesses following aluminium adjuvant-containing vaccines.

    PubMed

    Klein, Nicola P; Edwards, Kathryn M; Sparks, Robert C; Dekker, Cornelia L

    2009-01-01

    Abscess formation following immunisation is a previously reported complication, generally associated with microbial contamination of the vaccine. Less commonly, such abscesses have been sterile. Here we describe two children evaluated in the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-funded Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment (CISA) network who developed recurrent sterile abscesses after administration of vaccines containing aluminium adjuvant, either individually or in combination. Although the abscesses healed without sequelae, these occurrences support an association between receipt of aluminium adjuvant and sterile abscesses in susceptible patients. For patients with similar symptoms, clinicians may wish to choose a vaccine formulation containing the least amount of aluminium adjuvant.

  18. Renal excretion of aluminium in the rat: effect of citrate infusion.

    PubMed

    Lote, C J; Willmott, K; Wood, J A; Thewles, A; Freeman, M

    1995-12-01

    When aluminium is administered intravenously to rats, the speciation of the aluminium has a major effect on its renal excretion. Aluminium administered as citrate is much more effectively excreted than that administered as chloride or sulphate. This suggests that citrate could be therapeutically useful in patients who have been exposed to aluminium. Accordingly, we have performed two series of experiments in rats, in which a citrate infusion (intravenous), was begun either immediately after, or one hour after, the administration of an intravenous aluminium sulphate bolus. Both protocols led to markedly enhanced aluminium excretion compared to controls in which only 0.7% NaCl was infused. The enhancement of aluminium excretion was 783% if citrate infusion was begun immediately after aluminium administration, and 335% if the citrate infusion began after an hour delay. The increased excretion was due to an increase in the freely filterable fraction of aluminium. In the control experiments, in which aluminium sulphate administration was followed by 0.7% NaCl infusion, aluminium was found to be deposited in the liver. Administration of citrate one hour after the aluminium bolus did not reduce this liver deposition. The results indicate that a fraction of the plasma aluminium is accessible to the citrate infused and can thereby be converted into a filterable form which can be excreted. It appears that, for maximum therapeutic effect, citrate should be infused as rapidly as possible after an aluminium load, to limit aluminium binding to ligands which allow it to enter cells.

  19. Understanding Asthma in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohay, Heather; Holzheimer, Leisa

    1997-01-01

    Asthma is an incurable respiratory disease characterized by increased responsiveness of the tracheobronchial tree to a variety of stimuli. Associated symptoms include shortness of breath, chest tightness, and a cough or wheeze. This resource booklet for child caregivers presents comprehensive information on the nature of asthma and caring for a…

  20. Smoking and Asthma (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth > For Teens > Smoking and Asthma Print A A A What's in ... family photo albums full of pictures with people smoking at all kinds of events, from kids' birthday ...

  1. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  2. Asthma: where is it going?

    PubMed

    Faffe, D S

    2008-09-01

    Asthma is characterized by reversible airway obstruction, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway inflammation. Although our understanding of its pathophysiological mechanisms continues to evolve, the relative contributions of airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation are still debated. The first mechanism identified as important for asthma was bronchial hyperresponsiveness. In a second step, asthma was recognized also as an inflammatory disease, with chronic inflammation inducing structural changes or remodeling. However, persistence of airway dysfunction despite inflammatory control is observed in chronic severe asthma of both adults and children. More recently, a potential role for epithelial-mesenchymal communication or transition is emerging, with epithelial injury often resulting in a self-sustaining phenotype of wound repair modulation by activation/reactivation of the epithelial-mesenchymal trophic unit, suggesting that chronic asthma can be more than an inflammatory disease. It is noteworthy that the gene-environmental interactions critical for the development of a full asthma phenotype involve processes similar to those occurring in branching morphogenesis. In addition, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of the disease has been explored, highlighting its secretory function as well as different intrinsic properties compared to normal subjects. These new concepts can potentially shed light on the mechanisms underlying some asthma phenotypes and improve our understanding of the disease in terms of the therapeutic strategies to be applied. How we understand asthma and its mechanisms along time will be the focus of this overview.

  3. Understanding Asthma in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohay, Heather; Holzheimer, Leisa

    1997-01-01

    Asthma is an incurable respiratory disease characterized by increased responsiveness of the tracheobronchial tree to a variety of stimuli. Associated symptoms include shortness of breath, chest tightness, and a cough or wheeze. This resource booklet for child caregivers presents comprehensive information on the nature of asthma and caring for a…

  4. Wheezing and Asthma in Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Wheezing and Asthma in Infants KidsHealth > For Parents > Wheezing and Asthma in Infants Print A A ...

  5. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  6. Comorbidity of Asthma with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Riise, Trond; Eagan, Tomas Mikal; Lund, Anders; Dilsaver, Steven C.; Hundal, Oivind; Oedegaard, Ketil J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess how frequently drugs used to treat asthma and ADHD are prescribed to the same patients. Method: The authors used data from the Norwegian Prescription Database for 2006, including the total Norwegian population (n = 4,640,219). Results: Anti-asthma drugs were prescribed to 350,894 persons (7.56 % of the population), anti-ADHD…

  7. Aluminium and iron air pollution near an iron casting and aluminium foundry in Turin district (Italy).

    PubMed

    Polizzi, Salvatore; Ferrara, Mauro; Bugiani, Massimiliano; Barbero, Domenico; Baccolo, Tiziana

    2007-09-01

    This work reports the results of an environmental survey carried out in an industrial area in the Province of Turin: its main aim is to assess the levels of iron and aluminium in the outside air during the period from July to September to assess the influence of industrial activity (a cast-iron and aluminium foundry) which is interrupted during the month of August, on the level of metals present in the air. Conducting the analysis during this period of time made it possible to avoid the confounding effect of pollution due to domestic central heating. The measurements were taken from nine areas at different distances from the foundry in the area and according to the direction of the prevailing winds, as deduced from the historical data. The results of this survey show a statistically significant difference in iron and aluminium levels in the outside air in the geographic areas between the two main periods examined: during August (no foundry activity) v/s July-September (foundry activity). The values recorded are: Aluminium 0.4+/-0.45 microg/m(3) v/s 1.12+/-1.29 microg/m(3) (p<0.0001); Iron 0.95+/-0.56 microg/m(3) v/s 1.6+/-1.0 microg/m(3) (p<0.0001). There were no statistically significant differences between the nine sampling points from the point of view of the sampling sites, climate conditions and wind directions. We found no correlation with car traffic, in terms of the number of vehicles, and metals. The values of iron tended to be higher in the areas farther away from the foundry site in the areas located along the path of the prevailing winds.

  8. Pilot Testing "Okay with Asthma"[TM]: An Online Asthma Intervention for School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Tami H.; Hauenstein, Emily J.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is the leading cause of missed school days despite advancements in asthma treatment. This may be, in part, due to a lack of understanding about asthma. "Okay With Asthma"[TM], an online story with psychosocial management strategies for school-age children, was pilot tested to measure its effect on asthma knowledge and attitude. The online…

  9. Pilot Testing "Okay with Asthma"[TM]: An Online Asthma Intervention for School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Tami H.; Hauenstein, Emily J.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is the leading cause of missed school days despite advancements in asthma treatment. This may be, in part, due to a lack of understanding about asthma. "Okay With Asthma"[TM], an online story with psychosocial management strategies for school-age children, was pilot tested to measure its effect on asthma knowledge and attitude. The online…

  10. Agreement between current and active asthma classification methods, Asthma Call-back Survey, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Katelynn E; Mazurek, Jacek M

    2016-10-01

    Various approaches have been developed to identify persons with asthma using survey data. To assess agreement between current and active asthma classifications, 2011-2012 Asthma Call-back Survey landline telephone household data from 38 states, District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico for adults aged ≥18 years who have ever been told by a health professional they have asthma were analyzed. Respondents were classified to have current asthma if they reported still having asthma, and active asthma if they reported within the past year: 1) talking to a doctor about asthma, 2) taking asthma medication, or 3) having any symptoms of asthma. Agreement between classifications was assessed using the Kappa statistic. Among adults ever told by a health professional they have asthma, an estimated 72% had current asthma and 75% had active asthma. Overall, 67% of individuals met classifications of both current and active asthma and 20% had neither current nor active asthma (Kappa = 0.68). The Kappa increased to 0.72 when talking to a doctor about asthma was removed from the active asthma classification. Results indicated substantial agreement between current and active asthma. Agreement was strengthened when talking to a doctor about asthma was removed from the active asthma classification.

  11. A quest for super dense aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiquet, G.; Narayana, C.; Bellin, C.; Shukla, A.; Esteve, I.; Mezouar, N.

    2013-12-01

    The extreme pressure phase diagram of materials is important not only for understanding the interiors of planets or stars, but also for the fundamental understanding of the relation between crystal structure and electronic structure. Structural transitions induced by extreme pressure are governed by the deformation of valence electron charge density which bears the brunt of increasing compression while the relative volume occupied by the nearly incompressible ionic core electrons increases. At extreme pressures common materials are expected to transform into new dense phases with extremely compact atomic arrangements that may also have unusual physical properties. In this report, we present new experiments carried out on aluminium. A simple system like Al is not only important as a benchmark for theory, but can also be used as a standard for pressures in the TPa range and beyond which are targeted at new dynamic compression facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the US or Laser Mégajoule (LMJ) in Bordeaux in France. For aluminium, first principle calculations have consistently predicted a phase transition sequence from fcc to hcp and hcp to bcc in a pressure range below 0.5 TPa [Tambe et al., Phys. Rev. B 77, 172102, 2008]. The hcp phase was identified at 217 GPa in a recent experiment [Akahama et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 45505, 2006] but the detection of the predicted bcc phase has been hampered by the difficulty of routine static high pressure experiments beyond 350 GPa. Here, we report on the overcoming of this obstacle and the detection of all the structural phase transitions predicted in Al by achieving a pressure in excess of 500 GPa in the static regime in a diamond-anvil cell. In particular, using X-ray diffraction at the high-pressure beamline ID27 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), we find a bcc super-dense phase of aluminium at a pressure of 380 GPa. In this report

  12. Is asthma prevalence still increasing?

    PubMed

    Lundbäck, Bo; Backman, Helena; Lötvall, Jan; Rönmark, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Increased awareness of asthma in society and altered diagnostic practices makes evaluation of data on prevalence change difficult. In most parts of the world the asthma prevalence seems to still be increasing. The increase is associated with urbanization and has been documented particularly among children and teenagers in urban areas of middle- and low-level income countries. Use of validated questionnaires has enabled comparisons of studies. Among adults there are few studies based on representative samples of the general population which allow evaluation of time trends of prevalence. This review focuses mainly on studies of asthma prevalence and symptoms among adults. Parallel with increased urbanization, we can assume that the increase in asthma prevalence in most areas of the world will continue. However, in Australia and North-West Europe studies performed, particularly among children and adolescents, indicate that the increase in asthma prevalence may now be leveling off.

  13. Current concepts of severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Ray, Anuradha; Raundhal, Mahesh; Oriss, Timothy B; Ray, Prabir; Wenzel, Sally E

    2016-07-01

    The term asthma encompasses a disease spectrum with mild to very severe disease phenotypes whose traditional common characteristic is reversible airflow limitation. Unlike milder disease, severe asthma is poorly controlled by the current standard of care. Ongoing studies using advanced molecular and immunological tools along with improved clinical classification show that severe asthma does not identify a specific patient phenotype, but rather includes patients with constant medical needs, whose pathobiologic and clinical characteristics vary widely. Accordingly, in recent clinical trials, therapies guided by specific patient characteristics have had better outcomes than previous therapies directed to any subject with a diagnosis of severe asthma. However, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of the full scope of this disease that hinder the development of effective treatments for all severe asthmatics. In this Review, we discuss our current state of knowledge regarding severe asthma, highlighting different molecular and immunological pathways that can be targeted for future therapeutic development.

  14. Hazardous air pollutants and asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Leikauf, George D

    2002-01-01

    Asthma has a high prevalence in the United States, and persons with asthma may be at added risk from the adverse effects of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). Complex mixtures (fine particulate matter and tobacco smoke) have been associated with respiratory symptoms and hospital admissions for asthma. The toxic ingredients of these mixtures are HAPs, but whether ambient HAP exposures can induce asthma remains unclear. Certain HAPs are occupational asthmagens, whereas others may act as adjuncts during sensitization. HAPs may exacerbate asthma because, once sensitized, individuals can respond to remarkably low concentrations, and irritants lower the bronchoconstrictive threshold to respiratory antigens. Adverse responses after ambient exposures to complex mixtures often occur at concentrations below those producing effects in controlled human exposures to a single compound. In addition, certain HAPs that have been associated with asthma in occupational settings may interact with criteria pollutants in ambient air to exacerbate asthma. Based on these observations and past experience with 188 HAPs, a list of 19 compounds that could have the highest impact on the induction or exacerbation of asthma was developed. Nine additional compounds were identified that might exacerbate asthma based on their irritancy, respirability, or ability to react with biological macromolecules. Although the ambient levels of these 28 compounds are largely unknown, estimated exposures from emissions inventories and limited air monitoring suggest that aldehydes (especially acrolein and formaldehyde) and metals (especially nickel and chromium compounds) may have possible health risk indices sufficient for additional attention. Recommendations for research are presented regarding exposure monitoring and evaluation of biologic mechanisms controlling how these substances induce and exacerbate asthma. PMID:12194881

  15. Managing Asthma: A Guide for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This guide was developed to provide school personnel with practical ways to help students with asthma participate fully in all school activities. It begins by noting the prevalence of asthma and stating that asthma is a leading cause of absenteeism among students. This is followed by a brief description of asthma as a chronic lung disease…

  16. [COPD and Asthma: same same but different].

    PubMed

    Rothe, T

    2012-02-15

    In clinical practice, differentiation of COPD and asthma is difficult. A case report of an asthma patient with a drifter type of asthma imitating COPD is presented. In this context differences and similarities of both diseases are high-lighted. The definitions of asthma and COPD in international guidelines leave some space to misdiagnosing.

  17. Asthma and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Oseid, S

    1982-01-01

    Physical activity regularly leads to a decline in lung function in children and adolescents with asthma. This decline is a consequence of what is known as exercise-induced asthma (EIA), and can be determined and graded with the help of lung function tests before and after submaximal workloads on the ergometer cycle or the treadmill. Typical EIA appears in asthmatic individuals with entirely normal lung function before the effort, but EIA may also become clinically manifest with exercise in patients who have a subclinical degree of obstruction. The grade of EIA is essentially dependent on the duration and intensity of effort but also on the type of exercise. For example, free running causes much greater bronchoconstriction than swimming. The temperature and humidity of the inspired air may partially explain this difference. At the Voksentoppen Allergy Institute we find that about 85% of children develop a fall in lung function of 15% or more after a six minute ergometer cycle test. With typical EIA the fall may be totally or partially abolished by prophylactic medication 10 minutes before the start of the test. Disodium cromoglycate (Intal) and/or beta-adrenergic drugs are regularly used before all physical activity. Training programmes must be based on the interval principle. Swimming, ball games, relay races and dancing are examples of useful activities in the training and rehabilitation of children and adolescents with asthma. Through prophylactic medication and physical training, the aerobic work capacity, muscle strength and lung function in asthmatic children is improved. Training also leads to a significant mobilisation of mental resources and an increase in social integration.

  18. Hydrogenated vacancies lock dislocations in aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Degang; Li, Suzhi; Li, Meng; Wang, Zhangjie; Gumbsch, Peter; Sun, Jun; Ma, Evan; Li, Ju; Shan, Zhiwei

    2016-11-03

    Due to its high diffusivity, hydrogen is often considered a weak inhibitor or even a promoter of dislocation movements in metals and alloys. By quantitative mechanical tests in an environmental transmission electron microscope, here we demonstrate that after exposing aluminium to hydrogen, mobile dislocations can lose mobility, with activating stress more than doubled. On degassing, the locked dislocations can be reactivated under cyclic loading to move in a stick-slip manner. However, relocking the dislocations thereafter requires a surprisingly long waiting time of ~103 s, much longer than that expected from hydrogen interstitial diffusion. Both the observed slow relocking and strong locking strength can be attributed to superabundant hydrogenated vacancies, verified by our atomistic calculations. In conclusion, vacancies therefore could be a key plastic flow localization agent as well as damage agent in hydrogen environment.

  19. Hydrogenated vacancies lock dislocations in aluminium

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Degang; Li, Suzhi; Li, Meng; ...

    2016-11-03

    Due to its high diffusivity, hydrogen is often considered a weak inhibitor or even a promoter of dislocation movements in metals and alloys. By quantitative mechanical tests in an environmental transmission electron microscope, here we demonstrate that after exposing aluminium to hydrogen, mobile dislocations can lose mobility, with activating stress more than doubled. On degassing, the locked dislocations can be reactivated under cyclic loading to move in a stick-slip manner. However, relocking the dislocations thereafter requires a surprisingly long waiting time of ~103 s, much longer than that expected from hydrogen interstitial diffusion. Both the observed slow relocking and strongmore » locking strength can be attributed to superabundant hydrogenated vacancies, verified by our atomistic calculations. In conclusion, vacancies therefore could be a key plastic flow localization agent as well as damage agent in hydrogen environment.« less

  20. Hydrogenated vacancies lock dislocations in aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Degang; Li, Suzhi; Li, Meng; Wang, Zhangjie; Gumbsch, Peter; Sun, Jun; Ma, Evan; Li, Ju; Shan, Zhiwei

    2016-11-01

    Due to its high diffusivity, hydrogen is often considered a weak inhibitor or even a promoter of dislocation movements in metals and alloys. By quantitative mechanical tests in an environmental transmission electron microscope, here we demonstrate that after exposing aluminium to hydrogen, mobile dislocations can lose mobility, with activating stress more than doubled. On degassing, the locked dislocations can be reactivated under cyclic loading to move in a stick-slip manner. However, relocking the dislocations thereafter requires a surprisingly long waiting time of ~103 s, much longer than that expected from hydrogen interstitial diffusion. Both the observed slow relocking and strong locking strength can be attributed to superabundant hydrogenated vacancies, verified by our atomistic calculations. Vacancies therefore could be a key plastic flow localization agent as well as damage agent in hydrogen environment.

  1. Telangiectasia in aluminium workers: a follow up.

    PubMed

    Thériault, G; Gingras, S; Provencher, S

    1984-08-01

    A five step investigation was carried out to gain a better understanding of the morbidity that accompanied the development of telangiectasia on aluminium workers and to find its cause. Fifty workers with multiple telangiectasia when matched with normal controls showed the same amount of illness except that evidence of ischaemia on the ECG was found in nine cases and one control. The cases did not show an excess of abnormal biochemical tests. The basic histopathological lesion affected the surrounding tissue rather than the vessels themselves. Working in the current environment and wearing masks seems to protect young workers from developing the lesions. The Soderberg and not the prebake process was associated with the lesions; the causative agent is probably a gas that contains both hydrocarbons and fluoride components emitted from the electrolytic reactors.

  2. Hydrogenated vacancies lock dislocations in aluminium

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Degang; Li, Suzhi; Li, Meng; Wang, Zhangjie; Gumbsch, Peter; Sun, Jun; Ma, Evan; Li, Ju; Shan, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Due to its high diffusivity, hydrogen is often considered a weak inhibitor or even a promoter of dislocation movements in metals and alloys. By quantitative mechanical tests in an environmental transmission electron microscope, here we demonstrate that after exposing aluminium to hydrogen, mobile dislocations can lose mobility, with activating stress more than doubled. On degassing, the locked dislocations can be reactivated under cyclic loading to move in a stick-slip manner. However, relocking the dislocations thereafter requires a surprisingly long waiting time of ∼103 s, much longer than that expected from hydrogen interstitial diffusion. Both the observed slow relocking and strong locking strength can be attributed to superabundant hydrogenated vacancies, verified by our atomistic calculations. Vacancies therefore could be a key plastic flow localization agent as well as damage agent in hydrogen environment. PMID:27808099

  3. Telangiectasia in aluminium workers: a follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Thériault, G; Gingras, S; Provencher, S

    1984-01-01

    A five step investigation was carried out to gain a better understanding of the morbidity that accompanied the development of telangiectasia on aluminium workers and to find its cause. Fifty workers with multiple telangiectasia when matched with normal controls showed the same amount of illness except that evidence of ischaemia on the ECG was found in nine cases and one control. The cases did not show an excess of abnormal biochemical tests. The basic histopathological lesion affected the surrounding tissue rather than the vessels themselves. Working in the current environment and wearing masks seems to protect young workers from developing the lesions. The Soderberg and not the prebake process was associated with the lesions; the causative agent is probably a gas that contains both hydrocarbons and fluoride components emitted from the electrolytic reactors. PMID:6743585

  4. DNA strand patterns on aluminium thin films.

    PubMed

    Khatir, Nadia Mahmoudi; Banihashemian, Seyedeh Maryam; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Majid, Wan Haliza Abd; Rahman, Saadah Abdul; Shahhosseini, Fatemeh

    2011-01-01

    A new patterning method using Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid (DNA) strands capable of producing nanogaps of less than 100 nm is proposed and investigated in this work. DNA strands from Bosenbergia rotunda were used as the fundamental element in patterning DNA on thin films of aluminium (Al) metal without the need for any lithographic techniques. The DNA strands were applied in buffer solutions onto thin films of Al on silicon (Si) and the chemical interactions between the DNA strands and Al creates nanometer scale arbitrary patterning by direct transfer of the DNA strands onto the substrate. This simple and cost-effective method can be utilized in the fabrication of various components in electronic chips for microelectronics and Nano Electronic Mechanical System (NEMS) applications in general.

  5. Strategies in managing asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, A F

    1989-01-01

    The management of adult asthma involves a concerted effort to identify and remove or mollify inciting or triggering stimuli such as respiratory tract infections, gastric reflux, aspirin, beta-antagonists, and environmental agents; educate patients, using written treatment plans and pulmonary function monitoring; and properly use the antiasthmatic medications including beta-agonists, theophylline, anticholinergics, and corticosteroids, with an emphasis on aerosol delivery and the use of corticosteroids during exacerbations. This strategy is summarized with suggestions on therapy in emergency departments, during the transition from hospital to ambulatory care, before exercise, and during pregnancy. PMID:2660411

  6. Childhood asthma management pre- and post-incident asthma hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Marina; Clavenna, Antonio; Sequi, Marco; Bortolotti, Angela; Fortino, Ida; Merlino, Luca; Bonati, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Many hospitalizations for asthma could potentially be avoided with appropriate management. The aim of this study was to analyze data on disease management of a paediatric population with a hospitalization for asthma. The study population comprised 6-17 year old subjects belonging to three local health units of the Lombardy Region, northern Italy. Regional administrative databases were used to collect data on: the number of children with an incident hospitalization for asthma during the 2004-2006 period, anti-asthma therapy, specialist visit referrals, and claims for spirometry, released in the 12 months before and after hospitalization. Each patient's asthma management profile was compared with GINA guideline recommendations. Among the 183 hospitalized subjects, 101 (55%) received therapy before hospitalization and 82 (45%) did not. 10% did not receive any therapy either before or after hospital admission and in 13% the therapy was discontinued afterward. Based on GINA guidelines, asthma management adhered to recommendations only for 55% of subjects. Results may suggest that for half of hospitalized subjects, inaccurate diagnosis, under-treatment/scarce compliance with asthma guidelines by physicians, and/or scarce compliance to therapy by patients/their parents occurred. In all these cases, hospitalization would be a proxy indicator of preventable poor control of disease, rather than a proxy indicator of severity.

  7. Age at asthma onset and asthma self-management education among adults in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mirabelli, Maria C.; Beavers, Suzanne F.; Shepler, Samantha H.; Chatterjee, Arjun B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Asthma self-management education improves asthma-related outcomes. We conducted this analysis to evaluate variation in the percentages of adults with active asthma reporting components of asthma self-management education by age at asthma onset. Methods Data from 2011 to 2012 Asthma Call-back Surveys were used to estimate percentages of adults with active asthma reporting six components of asthma self-management education. Components of asthma self-management education include having been taught to what to do during an asthma attack and receiving an asthma action plan. Differences in the percentages of adults reporting each component and the average number of components reported across categories of age at asthma onset were estimated using linear regression, adjusted for age, education, race/ethnicity, sex, smoking status, and years since asthma onset. Results Overall, an estimated 76.4% of adults with active asthma were taught what to do during an asthma attack and 28.7% reported receiving an asthma action plan. Percentages reporting each asthma self-management education component declined with increasing age at asthma onset. Compared with the referent group of adults whose asthma onset occurred at 5–14 years of age, the percentage of adults reporting being taught what to do during an asthma attack was 10% lower among those whose asthma onset occurred at 65–93 years of age (95% CI: −18.0, −2.5) and the average number of components reported decreased monotonically across categories of age at asthma onset of 35 years and older. Conclusions Among adults with active asthma, reports of asthma self-management education decline with increasing age at asthma onset. PMID:26291134

  8. Aluminium alloys in municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanjun; Rem, Peter

    2009-05-01

    With the increasing growth of incineration of household waste, more and more aluminium is retained in municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash. Therefore recycling of aluminium from bottom ash becomes increasingly important. Previous research suggests that aluminium from different sources is found in different size fractions resulting in different recycling rates. The purpose of this study was to develop analytical and sampling techniques to measure the particle size distribution of individual alloys in bottom ash. In particular, cast aluminium alloys were investigated. Based on the particle size distribution it was computed how well these alloys were recovered in a typical state-of-the-art treatment plant. Assessment of the cast alloy distribution was carried out by wet physical separation processes, as well as chemical methods, X-ray fluorescence analysis and electron microprobe analysis. The results from laboratory analyses showed that cast alloys tend to concentrate in the coarser fractions and therefore are better recovered in bottom ash treatment plants.

  9. Aluminium leaching from red mud by filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Urík, Martin; Bujdoš, Marek; Milová-Žiaková, Barbora; Mikušová, Petra; Slovák, Marek; Matúš, Peter

    2015-11-01

    This contribution investigates the efficient and environmentally friendly aluminium leaching from red mud (bauxite residue) by 17 species of filamentous fungi. Bioleaching experiments were examined in batch cultures with the red mud in static, 7-day cultivation. The most efficient fungal strains in aluminium bioleaching were Penicillium crustosum G-140 and Aspergillus niger G-10. The A. niger G-10 strain was capable to extract up to approximately 141 mg·L(-1) of aluminium from 0.2 g dry weight red mud. Chemical leaching with organic acids mixture, prepared according to A. niger G-10 strain's respective fungal excretion during cultivation, proved that organic acids significantly contribute to aluminium solubilization from red mud. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Incremental forming of aluminium alloys in cryogenic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhove, Hans; Mohammadi, Amirahmad; Duflou, Joost R.

    2016-10-01

    Incremental Sheet Forming processes suffer from stringent forming limits, restricting the range of producible geometries. Through in-process cooling of the sheet to cryogenic level, this paper explores the potential of altering material properties benefiting the formability and residual hardness of different aluminium alloys. Global cooling of aluminium sheets with liquid nitrogen and dry ice allows to reach temperatures of 78K and 193K respectively. Extended with experiments at room temperature (293K), these tests form a base for comparison of surface quality, formability and residual hardness. As an aluminium alloy commonly used for its high strength to weight ratio, but suffering from limited formability compared to draw-quality steels, AA5083-H111 is of interest for cryogenic treatment. AA1050-H24 is included in the test campaign as a base for commercially pure aluminium.

  11. Manufacturing and Machining Challenges of Hybrid Aluminium Metal Matix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baburaja, Kammuluri; Sainadh Teja, S.; Karthik Sri, D.; Kuldeep, J.; Gowtham, V.

    2017-08-01

    Manufacturing which involves material removal processes or material addition processes or material transformation processes. One or all the processes to obtain the final desired properties for a material with desired shape which meets the required precision and accuracy values for the expected service life of a material in working conditions. Researchers found the utility of aluminium to be the second largest after steel. Aluminium and its metal matrix composite possess wide applications in various applications in aerospace industry, automobile industry, Constructions and even in kitchen utensils. Hybrid Al-MMCconsist of two different materials, and one will be from organic origin along with the base material. In this paper an attempt is made to bring out the importance of utilization of aluminium and the challenges concerned in manufacturing and machining of hybrid aluminium MMC.

  12. Efficacy of asthma education program on asthma control in children with uncontrolled asthma.

    PubMed

    Arıkan-Ayyıldız, Zeynep; Işık, Sakine; Çağlayan-Sözmen, Şule; Anal, Özden; Karaman, Özkan; Uzuner, Nevin

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a group education program on asthma control for children with uncontrolled asthma. Patients were randomized to receive 1-hour group education program with their parents or usual care. Our primary outcome was the change in asthma control test (ACT) between baseline and month 3 and secondary outcomes were health care utilizations and self report of exacerbations of asthma symptoms and missed school days. Change of ACT between baseline and 1st month and 3rd month was not significant in education and usual care groups. Health care utilizations and self reported exacerbations in the study groups were similar while missed school days were significantly higher in usual care group. The results of the study suggest that group education may play a useful role in the management of children with uncontrolled asthma but it is not significantly effective when compared with usual care.

  13. Aluminium assay and evaluation of the local reaction at several time points after intramuscular administration of aluminium containing vaccines in the Cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Verdier, François; Burnett, Roger; Michelet-Habchi, Claire; Moretto, Philippe; Fievet-Groyne, Françoise; Sauzeat, Elisabeth

    2005-02-03

    Aluminium hydroxide and aluminium phosphate have been widely used as vaccine adjuvants with a good safety record for several decades. The recent observation in human deltoid muscle of macrophage aggregates containing aluminium hydroxide spicules and termed Macrophagic Myofasciitis (MMF) has encouraged research on aluminium salts. This study was conducted in order to further investigate the clearance of aluminium at the vaccine injection site and the features of induced histopathological lesions. Two groups of 12 monkeys were immunised in the quadriceps muscle with Diphtheria-Tetanus vaccines, which were adjuvanted with either aluminium hydroxide or aluminium phosphate. Three, six or twelve months after vaccination, four monkeys from each group were sacrificed and histopathological examination and aluminium assays were performed on quadriceps muscle sections. Histopathological lesions, similar to the MMF described in humans, were observed and were still present 3 months after aluminium phosphate and 12 months after aluminium hydroxide adjuvanted vaccine administration. An increase in aluminium concentration, more marked in the area of the lesions, was also observed at the 3- and 6-month time points. These findings were localised at the injection site and no similar changes were observed in the distal or proximal muscle fragments. We conclude from this study that aluminium adjuvanted vaccines administered by the intramuscular route trigger histopathological changes restricted to the area around the injection site which persist for several months but are not associated with abnormal clinical signs.

  14. A cross-sectional study of exposures, lung function and respiratory symptoms among aluminium cast-house workers.

    PubMed

    van Rooy, F G B G J; Houba, R; Stigter, H; Zaat, V A C; Zengeni, M M; Rooyackers, J M; Boers, H E; Heederik, D J J

    2011-12-01

    OBJECTIVES To investigate exposures, respiratory symptoms, lung function and exposure-response relationships among aluminium cast-house workers. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 182 workers. Exposure data were used to model exposure to irritants. Lung function and questionnaire data on respiratory symptoms were compared to a general population sample and an internal reference group. Blood samples were taken from 156 workers to examine total IgE, eosinophils and sensitisation to common allergens. Average daily mean exposure to inhalable dust, metals, hydrogen fluoride, fluoride salts and sulphur dioxide was relatively low compared to reference values. Airflow patterns in the hall were disturbed regularly and resulted in pot emissions with high concentrations of fluorides. Peak exposures to chlorine gas occurred intermittently due to production process disturbances. Workers reported significantly more respiratory symptoms (continuous trouble with breathing (prevalence ratio (PR) 2.5; 95% CI 1.2 to 5.3), repeated trouble with breathing (PR 1.8; 95% CI 1.1 to 3.0), wheezing (PR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1 to 1.8), asthma attack (ever) (PR 2.8; 95% CI 1.7 to 4.6) and doctor diagnosed asthma (PR 2.6; 95% CI 1.5 to 4.4). Regression analysis showed significantly lower FEV(1) values (-195 ml) and FVC values (-142 ml) compared to a general population sample. Lung function did not differ between groups. This epidemiological study suggests cast-house workers in the aluminium industry are exposed to respiratory hazards. Exposure-response relationships could not be demonstrated but this study supports preventive measures in the work environment with a focus on (peak) exposures to irritants.

  15. Aluminium radiopacity standards for dentistry: an international survey.

    PubMed

    Watts, D C; McCabe, J F

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the appropriate composition and purity limits of aluminium alloy radiopacity standards for dental biomaterials, taking into account the current status in representative laboratories worldwide, and to formalise the calculation procedure for processing radiopacity data. A series of aluminium step-wedges were obtained from academic and industrial research laboratories. These were analysed by energy dispersive X-ray procedures. The set of step-wedges were independently characterised for radiopacity at two University dental schools. The percentage of aluminium together with the percentages of minor alloying elements (magnesium, manganese, iron and silicon) have been determined as mass percentages. For each centre, the optical density versus step-height for all wedges was judged to fall on a common curve, with the main exception of one step-wedge that was found to contain 4% copper, by mass. A suitable calculation procedure was described explicitly. Of the examined representative step-wedges, all but the aluminium--4% copper material were satisfactory and gave results comparable with wedges of high purity. Limits should therefore be revised for composition of aluminium radiopacity step-wedges or test blocks to a more realistic level of purity. Alloys with more than 0.05% copper or 1.0% iron should be excluded and the aluminium content should be at least 98% by mass. In the calculations deployed for deriving radiopacity as 'equivalent aluminium thicknesses', an appropriate linear regression procedure should be employed and considerable care taken in the evaluation of materials of low or borderline radiopacity, relative to specification limits. The method described is principally suitable for materials with radiopacity greater than 1 mm. For materials with radiopacity less than 1 mm aluminium, thicker specimens (2 mm) should be used.

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Khoshoo, Vikram; Haydel, Robert; Saturno, Emilio

    2006-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs in about two thirds of children with asthma. It may simply represent a concomitant unrelated finding or it may be responsible for provoking or worsening asthma. GERD could also be a byproduct of asthma itself. In any case, aggressive treatment of GERD seems to improve asthma outcomes. GERD should be suspected in asthma patients who do not have any known risk factors or those who are becoming difficult to treat.

  17. Asthma: a disuse contracture?

    PubMed

    Alexander, C J

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of asthma is increasing. There is no obvious explanation for this increase and current theory has no explanation for the occurrence of the disease in the non-allergic, the sudden onset of the asthma attack, the hyper-reactivity of the muscular wall, the association of the disease with obesity, or its precipitation by exercise. Biopsy studies have shown that the narrowing of air passages which characterises the disease is associated with thickening of their fibrous and muscular layers. As narrowing of air passages necessarily involves shortening of annular and helical components, this narrowing is in effect an annular contracture, analogous to those seen in underextended longitudinal structures such as muscles and tendons. The only common cause for such contractures is habitual underextension. As the only extending force in annular air passages is inspiration, this leads to the hypothesis that the basic cause of the disease is an insufficiency of aerobic exercise in childhood. Should the airways fail to develop their normal calibre, the narrowing will precipitate a sequence of events which can be predicted from the laws of physics. La Place's Law explains the instability of the muscle wall, the sudden onset of the attacks, reflecting episodes of critical collapse and the occurrence of the disease in the non-allergic. Bernoulli's Law explains the provocative effect of exercise and the postulated lack of exercise explains the increasing prevalence and the association with obesity. The hypothesis can be tested by comparative epidemiology. If it is correct, the disease should be preventable.

  18. Psychosocial stress and asthma morbidity.

    PubMed

    Yonas, Michael A; Lange, Nancy E; Celedón, Juan C

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this review is to provide an overview and discussion of recent epidemiologic and mechanistic studies of stress in relation to asthma incidence and morbidity. Recent findings suggest that stress, whether at the individual (i.e. epigenetics, perceived stress), family (i.e. prenatal maternal stress, early-life exposure, or intimate partner violence) or community (i.e. neighborhood violence; neighborhood disadvantage) level, influences asthma and asthma morbidity. Key recent findings regarding how psychosocial stress may influence asthma through Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, prenatal and postnatal maternal/caregiver stress, and community violence and deprivation are highlighted. New research illustrates the need to further examine, characterize, and address the influence of social and environmental factors (i.e. psychological stress) on asthma. Further, research and innovative methodologies are needed to characterize the relationship and pathways associated with stress at multiple levels to more fully understand and address asthma morbidity, and to design potential interventions, especially to address persistent disparities in asthma in ethnic minorities and economically disadvantaged communities.

  19. Japanese guideline for childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Nishimuta, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Naomi; Hamasaki, Yuhei; Morikawa, Akihiro; Nishima, Sankei

    2011-03-01

    The Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Diseases 2010 (JAGL 2010) describes childhood asthma based on the Japanese Pediatric Guideline for the Treatment and Management of Asthma 2008 (JPGL 2008) published by the Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology. JAGL 2010 provides information on diagnosis by age groups from infancy to puberty, treatment for acute exacerbations, long-term management by medication, daily life guidance, and patient education to allow physicians, not specialized in childhood asthma, to refer to this guideline for routine medical treatment. JAGL differs from the Global Initiative for Asthma Guideline (GINA) in that the former emphasizes long-term management of childhood asthma based on asthma severity and early diagnosis and intervention at <2 years and 2-5 years of age. However, a management method, including step-up or step-down of long-term management agents based on the status of asthma symptoms, is easy to understand and thus JAGL is suitable for routine medical treatment. JAGL also introduced treatment and management using a control test for children, recommending treatment and management aimed at complete control through avoiding exacerbation factors and appropriate use of antiinflammatory agents.

  20. Guidelines for severe uncontrolled asthma.

    PubMed

    Cisneros Serrano, Carolina; Melero Moreno, Carlos; Almonacid Sánchez, Carlos; Perpiñá Tordera, Miguel; Picado Valles, César; Martínez Moragón, Eva; Pérez de Llano, Luis; Soto Campos, José Gregorio; Urrutia Landa, Isabel; García Hernández, Gloria

    2015-05-01

    Since the publication, 9 years ago, of the latest SEPAR (Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery) Guidelines on Difficult-to-Control Asthma (DCA), much progress has been made in the understanding of asthmatic disease. These new data need to be reviewed, analyzed and incorporated into the guidelines according to their level of evidence and recommendation. Recently, consensus documents and clinical practice guidelines (CPG) addressing this issue have been published. In these guidelines, specific mention will be made of what the previous DCA guidelines defined as "true difficult-to-control asthma". This is asthma that remains uncontrolled after diagnosis and a systematic evaluation to rule out factors unrelated to the disease itself that lead to poor control ("false difficult-to-control asthma"), and despite an appropriate treatment strategy (Spanish Guidelines for the Management of Asthma [GEMA] steps 5 and 6): severe uncontrolled asthma. In this respect, the guidelines propose a revised definition, an attempt to classify the various manifestations of this type of asthma, a proposal for a stepwise diagnostic procedure, and phenotype-targeted treatment. A specific section has also been included on DCA in childhood, aimed at assisting healthcare professionals to improve the care of these patients.

  1. Buckling tests of aluminium columns at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Langhelle, N.K.; Amdahl, J.; Eberg, E.; Lundberg, S.

    1996-12-31

    Accidental fires are events with severe catastrophe potential for all offshore structures, and in particular for aluminium structures. Due to aluminium`s rapid strength degradation at elevated temperatures, this is particular true for aluminium structures. Accurate prediction of fire resistance is therefore essential. Experimental tests are needed to evaluate current design rules and state-of-the-art material models for aluminium under elevated temperatures. An experimental investigation was undertaken in order to study the behavior of AA 6082 alloy aluminium columns at elevated temperatures. Some of the tests were carried out at constant load with increasing temperature. Other tests experienced constant temperature and increasing load. Buckling tests at ambient temperature were also conducted. Particular emphasis was put on high temperature creep effects. The purpose of the tests was to provide data for verification of the material model implemented in the computer program USFOS, for analysis of progressive collapse analyses of space frame structures. The performance of the tempers T4 and T6 as well as columns with transversal welds are compared internally as well as to column buckling curves given in current design codes.

  2. The binding, transport and fate of aluminium in biological cells.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Mold, Matthew J

    2015-04-01

    Aluminium is the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust and yet, paradoxically, it has no known biological function. Aluminium is biochemically reactive, it is simply that it is not required for any essential process in extant biota. There is evidence neither of element-specific nor evolutionarily conserved aluminium biochemistry. This means that there are no ligands or chaperones which are specific to its transport, there are no transporters or channels to selectively facilitate its passage across membranes, there are no intracellular storage proteins to aid its cellular homeostasis and there are no pathways which evolved to enable the metabolism and excretion of aluminium. Of course, aluminium is found in every compartment of every cell of every organism, from virus through to Man. Herein we have investigated each of the 'silent' pathways and metabolic events which together constitute a form of aluminium homeostasis in biota, identifying and evaluating as far as is possible what is known and, equally importantly, what is unknown about its uptake, transport, storage and excretion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Volatilisation and oxidation of aluminium scraps fed into incineration furnaces.

    PubMed

    Biganzoli, Laura; Gorla, Leopoldo; Nessi, Simone; Grosso, Mario

    2012-12-01

    Ferrous and non-ferrous metal scraps are increasingly recovered from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash and used in the production of secondary steel and aluminium. However, during the incineration process, metal scraps contained in the waste undergo volatilisation and oxidation processes, which determine a loss of their recoverable mass. The present paper evaluates the behaviour of different types of aluminium packaging materials in a full-scale waste to energy plant during standard operation. Their partitioning and oxidation level in the residues of the incineration process are evaluated, together with the amount of potentially recoverable aluminium. About 80% of post-consumer cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered through an advanced treatment of bottom ash combined with a melting process in the saline furnace for the production of secondary aluminium. The residual amount of aluminium concentrates in the fly ash or in the fine fraction of the bottom ash and its recovery is virtually impossible using the current eddy current separation technology. The average oxidation levels of the aluminium in the residues of the incineration process is equal to 9.2% for cans, 17.4% for trays and 58.8% for foils. The differences between the tested packaging materials are related to their thickness, mechanical strength and to the alloy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. COS, CS2 and SO 2 in aluminium smelter exhaust : The contribution of aluminium production to the global COS budget.

    PubMed

    Harnisch, J; Borchers, R; Fabian, P

    1995-07-01

    Measurements of carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbondisulfide (CS2) were carried out on samples drawn from a smoke stack of an aluminium smelter. Volume mixing ratios of 6 ppm COS and 0.1 ppm CS2 were measured for gases from the electrolysis unit that had previously passed an Al2O3 fluid bed reactor and electrostatic precipitators. Specific emissions of 1.6 kg COS and 0.03 kg CS2 per ton of primary aluminium were found. Extrapolating from this particular smelter's conditions to a world mix specific COS emissions of about 4 kg/t(Al) are calculated resulting in emissions of annually 0.08 Tg COS into the atmosphere due to electrolytic aluminium production in 1995. Besides the photochemical conversion of anthropogenic CS2 aluminium production is established to be the second major industrial source of COS probably exceeding automotive tire wear's and coal combustion's contributions.

  5. Aluminium Pneumoconiosis II. Effect on the Rat Lung of Intratracheal Injections of Stamped Aluminium Powders Containing Different Lubricating Agents and of a Granular Aluminium Powder

    PubMed Central

    Corrin, B.

    1963-01-01

    Three stamped aluminium powders were injected into the lungs of rats. One powder contained stearine and another mineral oil, whilst the third had had its lubricant removed. The powders produced a rapid and marked fibrosis of equal severity. It is concluded that aluminium rather than any additive in the powders is the fibrogenic agent. The protective action of stearine demonstrated in vitro was not confirmed in vivo, suggesting that pulmonary fibrosis may also occur in men handling stearine-containing powders. Such a case has recently been reported by McLaughlin et al. (1962), but this is exceptional to the general industrial experience. A granular aluminium powder was also injected into the lungs of rats. In accordance with the results of in vitro experiments, this produced only minimal fibrosis, contrasting strongly with the action of the stamped powders. Images PMID:14072617

  6. Asthma exacerbations · 3: Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wark, P A B; Gibson, P G

    2006-01-01

    Asthma exacerbations are an exaggerated lower airway response to an environmental exposure. Respiratory virus infection is the most common environmental exposure to cause a severe asthma exacerbation. Airway inflammation is a key part of the lower airway response in asthma exacerbation, and occurs together with airflow obstruction and increased airway responsiveness. The patterns of airway inflammation differ according to the trigger factor responsible for the exacerbation. The reasons for the exaggerated response of asthmatic airways are not completely understood, but recent studies have identified a deficient epithelial type 1 interferon response as an important susceptibility mechanism for viral infection. PMID:17008482

  7. [Epidural emphysema complicating bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Rouetbi, N; Ben Saad, A; Joobeur, S; Skhiri, N; Cheikh Mhamed, S; Mribah, H; El Kamel, A

    2012-12-01

    Epidural emphysema is an exceptional complication of bronchial asthma, revealed by an incidental finding in chest tomography. We report a case of a 21-year-old man admitted with asthma attack complicated by subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema. Chest tomography confirmed the mediastinal emphysema and also revealed the epidural emphysema within the vertebral canal. Neurological examination was negative. The patient showed complete recovery 10days after the onset of symptoms. The epidural emphysema is a rare complication during asthma attacks. The benignity of this complication should not require a systematic chest tomography.

  8. Environmental factors associated with asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Bailus; Stokes, Lynette D.; Warren, Rueben

    2003-01-01

    Asthma, a disease of attacks and remission, continues to account for substantial morbidity and direct economic costs. Numerous studies--epidemiologic, toxicologic and clinical--present evidence for a broad spectrum of environmental risk factors associated with asthma. This review summarizes current thinking on a subset of these factors. Knowledge of potential environmental determinants of asthma is important to both the patient and healthcare professional in the application of multiple modalities of medical and environmental intervention for management of the development, and exacerbation of this chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways. PMID:12760611

  9. [Occupational asthma--the case of bakers' asthma].

    PubMed

    Bishara, Hasham; Carel, Rafael S

    2013-08-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) is the most common of all occupational lung diseases in industrialized countries and its prevalence has been rising steadily. It is estimated that occupational factors account for one out of six cases of adult asthmatic patients causing significant morbidity, disability and costs. Due to its high prevalence and substantial health and socio-economic impacts OA represents a significant public health concern. OA can be divided into allergic and non allergic asthma. Allergic OA is further divided into IgE mediated and non IgE mediated. Baker's asthma (BA), is the leading cause of IgE mediated OA caused by high molecular weight antgens in industrialized countries. Innovations in the baking industry during the last few decades have led to the introduction of new allergens inducing OA. OA is potentially preventable, through early diagnosis and exposure cessation interventions. Thus, clinicians should consider the occupational history in every adult patient presenting with newly diagnosed asthma.

  10. Dialysis encephalopathy in a non-dialysed uraemic boy treated with aluminium hydroxide orally.

    PubMed

    Nathan, E; Pedersen, S E

    1980-11-01

    Brain aluminium concentration has been found significantly higher in patients dying with dialysis encephalopathy than in uraemic patients without this syndrome, and it has previously been reported only in haemodialysed patients. We report a case of high brain aluminium concentration in a uraemic boy showing symptoms of severe encephalopathy. He was never dialysed but only treated with aluminium hydroxide orally. Baluarte reported corresponding symptoms in nondialysed uraemic children, but brain aluminium concentrations were not reported. His patients as well as our had very high levels of parathormone which may play a role in the resorption and distribution of aluminium. Aluminium preparations should be avoided in children with renal failure.

  11. [From asthma attack to fatal asthma in children].

    PubMed

    Brémont, F

    2004-06-01

    Mortality by asthma has decreased, but the number of children being hospitalized is stable: 10% of the asthmatic children are hospitalized within the year, or will be at least once before their tenth year. Some factors are associated with occurrence of a severe asthma attack: poor lung function, bronchial hyperreactivity or poor asthma control, a food allergy, a decreased perception of airway obstruction prior hospitalisation, denial of illness, psychological and social difficulties. The prevention of most asthma exacerbations is possible. The treatment must be adapted to severity of asthma: inhaled steroids, even low doses, have been proven efficient. The follow-up must be regular: planned consultations, repeated lung function testing. Educational programs show an increased quality of life, therapeutic adherence or reduction of hospitalization. The patient and care giver must be able to recognize the signs of severity of asthma exacerbation; an exacerbation is considered severe if it begins suddenly, if its progression or symptoms are unusual, and therefore requires a prompt adapted treatment. An action plan and accessible emergency care are essential.

  12. Spirometry for Asthma - When You Need It and Why

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Patient Resources Spirometry for Asthma Spirometry for Asthma When you need the test—and why DOWNLOAD ... ADVICE FROM CONSUMER REPORTS How should you manage asthma? The following steps can help to control asthma: ...

  13. Barriers to effective pediatric asthma care.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Martha K; Banasiak, Nancy Cantey; Meadows-Oliver, Mikki

    2005-01-01

    Although progress has been made in understanding the pathophysiology of asthma and identifying key features of quality asthma care, the prevalence of childhood asthma remains high. Barriers to effective asthma care that currently exist include the persistence of environmental risk factors, disparities in care that stem from poverty and cultural differences, and inconsistencies in the quality of asthma care provided by clinicians. Pediatric nurse practitioners at Yale New Haven Children's Hospital have actively implemented the recommended guidelines for asthma care and addressed causes for some of the disparities in asthma health care. Two major initiatives are described: the Asthma Care Coordination Project at Yale New Haven Hospital Pediatric Primary Care Center, and the establishment of an Asthma Outreach Program. Recommended resources and Web sites for the practitioner are also provided.

  14. Asthma disease management: a provider's perspective.

    PubMed

    Abisheganaden, J

    2002-07-01

    Asthma is a highly prevalent problem in Singapore, with an increasing societal and economic burden. However, asthma is also an eminently treatable condition, with evidence that integrated education-treatment efforts directed at important patient sub-groups can be cost-effective. What is important is a comprehensive and integrated asthma management programme, aimed at reducing the burden of asthma at all levels of the healthcare system, with the long-term goal of improving asthma care cost-effectively. This refers to asthma disease management. Asthma disease management should focus on identifying deficiencies in asthma management across the population diagnosed with the condition and establish a partnership between the patient, provider and the healthcare system to improve the overall quality of asthma care. The framework for implementing such a programme bridges key concepts and programmes that are already in place in the various institutions. These include patient and physician education, the use of clinical practice guidelines, clinical pathways, outcomes management, quality improvement processes, information technology, case management and existing asthma shared-care programmes and resources. In order to significantly reduce asthma morbidity, an integrated approach is required, involving individuals providing asthma care at various levels of care delivery. There is also a need to co-ordinate the efforts of such individuals and institutions involved so that there is good horizontal and vertical integration of care. The disease management approach described is intended to raise the overall standard of asthma care across a spectrum of patients with asthma.

  15. The placebo effect in asthma.

    PubMed

    Dutile, Stefanie; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Wechsler, Michael E

    2014-08-01

    The placebo effect is a complex phenomenon occurring across a variety of clinical conditions. While much placebo research has been conducted in diseases defined by self-report such as depression, chronic pain, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), asthma has been proposed as a useful model because of its easily measured objective outcomes. Studies examining the placebo response in asthma have not only contributed to an understanding of the mechanisms behind the placebo response but also shed an interesting light on the current treatment and diagnosis of asthma. This paper will review current literature on placebos in general and specifically on the placebo response in asthma. It focuses on what we know about the mechanisms behind the placebo effect, whether there is a specific portion of the population who responds to placebos, which patient outcomes are influenced by the placebo effect, and whether the effect can be augmented.

  16. Signs of an asthma attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... irritable Feeling nervous or edgy Danger Signs Call 911 or your local emergency number right away if ... asthma, the child's caregivers must know to call 911 if your child has any of these symptoms. ...

  17. Exercising and asthma at school

    MedlinePlus

    ... not exercise. Taking part in recess, physical education (PE), and after-school sports is important for all ... action plan. Encourage the student to participate in PE. To help prevent an asthma attack, modify PE ...

  18. Outdoor air pollution and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Michael; Balmes, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Traffic and power generation are the main sources of urban air pollution. The idea that outdoor air pollution can cause exacerbations of pre-existing asthma is supported by an evidence base that has been accumulating for several decades, with several studies suggesting a contribution to new-onset asthma as well. In this Series paper, we discuss the effects of particulate matter (PM), gaseous pollutants (ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulphur dioxide), and mixed traffic-related air pollution. We focus on clinical studies, both epidemiological and experimental, published in the previous 5 years. From a mechanistic perspective, air pollutants probably cause oxidative injury to the airways, leading to inflammation, remodelling, and increased risk of sensitisation. Although several pollutants have been linked to new-onset asthma, the strength of the evidence is variable. We also discuss clinical implications, policy issues, and research gaps relevant to air pollution and asthma. PMID:24792855

  19. Lung Macrophage Diversity and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages (MPs) are one of the most prominent leukocyte populations in the lung and, in many ways, a forgotten player in asthma pathogenesis. Diverse functions in asthma initiation and maintenance in chronic disease have been demonstrated, which has led to confusion as to if pulmonary MPs are agents of good or evil in asthma. Much of this is due to the wide diversity of MP populations in the lung, many of which are inaccessible experimentally in most clinical studies. This review frames lung MP biology in the context of location, phenotype, function, and response phase in asthma pathogenesis. It also assesses new findings regarding MP diversity that have challenged old dogmas and generates new ways to understand how MPs function. PMID:27027949

  20. Iloprost inhalation in mild asthma.

    PubMed

    Majeski, Elizabeth; Hoskins, Aimee; Dworski, Ryszard; Sheller, James R

    2012-11-01

    To determine the feasibility of administering iloprost by inhalation in patients with mild atopic asthma. Volunteers underwent supervised inhalation of iloprost in the clinic with measurement of spirometry and blood pressure for 2 hours. The volunteers then inhaled iloprost four times daily at a dose of 2.5 or 5 μg for 14 days. Spirometry, asthma questionnaires, peak flow diaries, measurement of methacholine responsiveness, and exhaled nitric oxide concentrations were obtained prior to and after the treatment period. Chronic inhalation of iloprost (2.5-5 μg) did not alter spirometry or methacholine responsiveness. Inhaled iloprost in carefully selected volunteers with mild asthma appears to be a suitable intervention to explore the effects of prostacyclin in human asthma.

  1. Emerging molecular phenotypes of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Anuradha; Oriss, Timothy B.

    2014-01-01

    Although asthma has long been considered a heterogeneous disease, attempts to define subgroups of asthma have been limited. In recent years, both clinical and statistical approaches have been utilized to better merge clinical characteristics, biology, and genetics. These combined characteristics have been used to define phenotypes of asthma, the observable characteristics of a patient determined by the interaction of genes and environment. Identification of consistent clinical phenotypes has now been reported across studies. Now the addition of various 'omics and identification of specific molecular pathways have moved the concept of clinical phenotypes toward the concept of molecular phenotypes. The importance of these molecular phenotypes is being confirmed through the integration of molecularly targeted biological therapies. Thus the global term asthma is poised to become obsolete, being replaced by terms that more specifically identify the pathology associated with the disease. PMID:25326577

  2. Outdoor air pollution and asthma.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Michael; Balmes, John R

    2014-05-03

    Traffic and power generation are the main sources of urban air pollution. The idea that outdoor air pollution can cause exacerbations of pre-existing asthma is supported by an evidence base that has been accumulating for several decades, with several studies suggesting a contribution to new-onset asthma as well. In this Series paper, we discuss the effects of particulate matter (PM), gaseous pollutants (ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulphur dioxide), and mixed traffic-related air pollution. We focus on clinical studies, both epidemiological and experimental, published in the previous 5 years. From a mechanistic perspective, air pollutants probably cause oxidative injury to the airways, leading to inflammation, remodelling, and increased risk of sensitisation. Although several pollutants have been linked to new-onset asthma, the strength of the evidence is variable. We also discuss clinical implications, policy issues, and research gaps relevant to air pollution and asthma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Asthma in Children - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Asthma in Children URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/asthmainchildren.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  4. Teaching Your Child about Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  5. Accumulation and toxicity of aluminium-contaminated food in the freshwater crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus.

    PubMed

    Woodburn, Katie; Walton, Rachel; McCrohan, Catherine; White, Keith

    2011-10-01

    The accumulation and toxicity of aluminium in freshwater organisms have primarily been examined following aqueous exposure. This study investigated the uptake, excretion and toxicity of aluminium when presented as aluminium-contaminated food. Adult Pacifastacus leniusculus were fed control (3 μg aluminium/g) or aluminium-spiked pellets (420 μg aluminium/g) over 28 days. Half the crayfish in each group were then killed and the remainder fed control pellets for a further 10 days (clearance period). Concentrations of aluminium plus the essential metals calcium, copper, potassium and sodium were measured in the gill, hepatopancreas, flexor muscle, antennal gland (kidney) and haemolymph. Histopathological analysis of tissue damage and sub-cellular distribution of aluminium were examined in the hepatopancreas. Haemocyte number and protein concentration in the haemolymph were analysed as indicators of toxicity. The hepatopancreas of aluminium-fed crayfish contained significantly more aluminium than controls on days 28 and 38, and this amount was positively correlated with the amount ingested. More than 50% of the aluminium in the hepatopancreas of aluminium-fed crayfish was located in sub-cellular fractions thought to be involved in metal detoxification. Aluminium concentrations were also high in the antennal glands of aluminium-fed crayfish suggesting that some of the aluminium lost from the hepatopancreas is excreted. Aluminium exposure via contaminated food caused inflammation in the hepatopancreas but did not affect the number of circulating haemocytes, haemolymph ion concentrations or protein levels. In conclusion, crayfish accumulate, store and excrete aluminium from contaminated food with only localised toxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Asthma and mountain air].

    PubMed

    Carlsen, K H; Oseid, S; Sandnes, T; Trondskog, B; Røksund, O

    1991-03-20

    Geilomo hospital for children with asthma and allergy is situated 800 m above sea level in a non-polluted area in the central part of Norway. 31 children who were admitted to this hospital from different parts of Norway (mostly from the main cities) were studied for six weeks. They underwent physical training and daily measurements were taken of lung function and the effect of bronchodilators. The bronchial responsiveness of the children improved significantly from week 1 to week 6, as measured by reduction in lung function after sub-maximal running on a treadmill. There was significant improvement in daily symptom score, and in degree of obstruction as shown by physical examination. The children's improvement was probably the result of a stay in a mountainous area with very little air pollution or allergens, combined with regular planned physical activity, and regular medication and surveillance.

  7. [Control of asthma].

    PubMed

    Godard, Philippe

    2005-06-30

    Asthma is a chronic, variable bronchial disease in time, sometimes over short periods. the follow-up must be based on the regular evaluation of control. this represents the respiratory health during last weeks, between the two last consultations. it is a composite score which takes into account clinical and functional parameters, as well as the consumption of beta2-mimetics of immediate action. recommendations have been just published by the anaes, defining the importance of respiratory functional testing in the follow-up of asthmatics, and proposing a gradation in the therapeutic adaptation to each consultation according to the levels of control and requirement that the patient and his doctor have defined together.

  8. [Macrophages in asthma].

    PubMed

    Medina Avalos, M A; Orea Solano, M

    1997-01-01

    Every time they exist more demonstrations of the paper than performs the line monocytes-macrophage in the patogenesis of the bronchial asthma. The mononuclear phagocytes cells, as the alveolar macrophages, also they can be activated during allergic methods. The monocytes macrophages are possible efficient inductors of the inflammation; this due to the fact that they can secrete inflammatory mediators, between those which are counted the pre-forming granules of peptides, metabolites of oxidation activation, activator of platelets activator and metabolites of the arachidonic acid. The identification of IL-1 in the liquidate of the bronchial ablution of sick asthmatic, as well as the identification of IL-1 in the I bronchioalveolar washing of places of allergens cutaneous prick, supports the activation concept mononuclear of phagocytic cells in allergic sufferings.

  9. Occupational Asthma in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoo Sang

    2010-01-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) is the leading occupational respiratory disease. Cases compensated as OA by the Korea Workers' Compensation and Welfare Service (COMWEL) (218 cases), cases reported by a surveillance system (286 cases), case reports by related scientific journals and cases confirmed by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute (OSHRI) over 15 yr from 1992 to 2006 were analyzed. Annual mean incidence rate was 1.6 by compensation and 3.5 by surveillance system, respectively. The trend appeared to increase according to the surveillance system. Incidence was very low compared with other countries. The most frequently reported causative agent was isocyanate followed by reactive dye in dyeing factories. Other chemicals, metals and dust were also found as causative agents. OA was underreported according to compensation and surveillance system data. In conclusion, a more effective surveillance system is needed to evaluate OA causes and distribution, and to effectively prevent newly developing OA. PMID:21258586

  10. Identification of asthma clusters in two independent Korean adult asthma cohorts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Bum; Jang, An-Soo; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Park, Jong-Sook; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Cho, Sang-Heon; Choi, Byoung Whui; Park, Jung-Won; Nam, Dong-Ho; Yoon, Ho-Joo; Cho, Young-Joo; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook; Park, Choon-Sik

    2013-06-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous airway disease with various clinical phenotypes. It is crucial to clearly identify clinical phenotypes to achieve better asthma management. We used cluster analysis to classify the clinical groups of 724 asthmatic patients from the Cohort for Reality and Evolution of Adult Asthma in Korea (COREA), and in 1843 subjects from another independent Korean asthma cohort of Soonchunhyang University Asthma Genome Research Centre (SCH) (Bucheon, Republic of Korea). Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed by Ward's method, followed by κ-means cluster analysis. Cluster analysis of the COREA cohort indicated four asthma subtypes: 1) smoking asthma; 2) severe obstructive asthma; 3) early-onset atopic asthma; and 4) late-onset mild asthma. An independent cluster analysis of the SCH cohort also indicated four clusters that were similar to the COREA clusters. Our results indicate that adult Korean asthma patients can be classified into four distinct clusters.

  11. Environment and asthma in adults.

    PubMed

    Le Moual, Nicole; Jacquemin, Bénédicte; Varraso, Raphaëlle; Dumas, Orianne; Kauffmann, Francine; Nadif, Rachel

    2013-09-01

    The present review addresses recent advances and especially challenging aspects regarding the role of environmental risk factors in adult-onset asthma, for which the causes are poorly established. In the first part of the review, we discuss aspects regarding some environmental risk factors for adult-onset asthma: air pollution, occupational exposures with a focus on an emerging risk represented by exposure to cleaning agents (both at home and in the workplace), and lifestyle and nutrition. The second part is focused on perspectives and challenges, regarding relevant topics on which research is needed to improve the understanding of the role of environmental factors in asthma. Aspects of exposure assessment, the complexity of multiple exposures, the interrelationships of the environment with behavioral characteristics and the importance of studying biological markers and gene-environment interactions to identify the role of the environment in asthma are discussed. We conclude that environmental and lifestyle exposures play an important role in asthma or related phenotypes. The changes in lifestyle and the environment in recent decades have modified the specific risk factors in asthma even for well-recognized risks such as occupational exposures. To better understand the role of the environment in asthma, the use of objective (quantitative measurement of exposures) or modern tools (bar code, GPS) and the development of multidisciplinary collaboration would be very promising. A better understanding of the complex interrelationships between socio-economic, nutritional, lifestyle and environmental conditions might help to study their joint and independent roles in asthma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Occupational asthma due to azodicarbonamide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheol-Woo; Cho, Jae-Hwa; Leem, Jong-Han; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Lee, Hong-Lyeol; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2004-04-30

    Azodicarbonamide is a low molecular weight foaming agent for plastics and rubbers. Azodicarbonamide can elicit acute and chronic health related problems due to its potential for pulmonary and cutaneous sensitization. Some cases of occupational asthma associated with exposure to azodicarbonamide have been reported, of which only a few cases were confirmed by specific inhalation challenges. Here, the first case of occupational asthma due to azodicarbonamide in Korea, in which the diagnosis was confirmed by specific inhalation challenge, is reported.

  13. Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yi-Xian; Xiao, Yi

    2015-10-20

    To get a comprehensive understanding about the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and asthma by reviewing the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestation and then summarizing the latest progress on diagnosis and treatment. Articles referred in this review were mainly collected from a comprehensive search of the PubMed published in English from 1990 to 2015 with the terms "OSA" and "asthma" as the main keywords. Highly regarded older publications were also included. Information about the features of the two diseases in common, the pathophysiologic association between them and their current treatments from the literature search were identified, retrieved, and summarized. Both OSA and asthma are very prevalent conditions. The incidences of them have kept on rising in recent years. Asthma is often accompanied by snoring and apnea, and OSA often combines with asthma, as well. They have many predisposing and aggravating factors in common. Possible shared direct mechanistic links between them include mechanical effects, intermittent hypoxia, nerve reflex, inflammation, leptin, etc. Indirect mechanistic links include medication, nose diseases, smoking, obesity, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Since OSA presents many similar features with nocturnal asthma, some scholars termed them as a sole syndrome - "alternative overlap syndrome," and proved that asthma symptoms in those patients could be improved through the treatment of continuous positive airway pressure. OSA and asthma are closely associated in pathogenesis, symptoms, and therapies. With the growing awareness of the relationship between them, we should raise our vigilance on the coexistence of OSA in those difficult-to-control asthmatic patients. Further studies are still needed to guide the clinical works.

  14. Moses Maimonides' treatise on asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, F

    1981-01-01

    This paper contains an analysis and appreciation of one of Moses Maimonides' authentic medical works, his Treatise on Asthma. After a brief biographical section, passages from the work are cited and analysed to illustrate the approach of this medieval physician who organised the knowledge of Greeks and others who preceded him. Maimonides presents a logical and systematic approach to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, an approach which is clearly evident in his Treatise on Asthma. PMID:7025335

  15. The disease management approach to controlling asthma.

    PubMed

    Haahtela, T

    2002-02-01

    Asthma has become an important public health issue worldwide and certain groups, such as children, are at particular risk of the disease. Often asthma remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. Despite these worrying trends, the disease management approach to asthma control can help most asthma patients achieve a 'normal' way of life. The increased prevalence and greater diagnostic awareness of asthma have placed increased demands on healthcare resources, but effective asthma control can minimize the personal, social and economic burdens of asthma. Early diagnosis and immediate anti-inflammatory treatment is the first step in gaining control of symptoms. A stepwise approach is then used to classify asthma severity and treatment, with the number and frequency of medications increasing (step up) as asthma severity increases and decreasing (step down) when asthma is under control. This stepwise approach to asthma management necessitates regular review of treatment once asthma is under control. However, effective asthma management is dependent on successful patient education, adherence to prescribed medication and good doctor patient partnerships. Current treatment guidelines recommend the use of a written asthma management plan that should be agreed between the doctor and patient. These plans should cover all aspects of asthma treatment, including prevention steps for long-term control and action steps to stop attacks once a worsening in asthma has been recognized. This comprehensive approach to asthma management increases the likelihood of achieving asthma control, which in turn reduces the need for emergency visits to the hospital or clinic and reduces the limitations on physical activity previously imposed by the condition.

  16. [Association between serum aluminium level and methylation of amyloid precursor protein gene in workers engaged in aluminium electrolysis].

    PubMed

    Yang, X J; Yuan, Y Z; Niu, Q

    2016-04-20

    To investigate the association between serum aluminium level and methylation of the promoter region of amyloid precursor protein (APP)gene in workers engaged in aluminium electrolysis. In 2012, 366 electrolysis workers in an aluminium factory were enrolled as exposure group (working years >10 and age >40 years)and divided into low-exposure group and high-exposure group based on the median serum aluminium level. Meanwhile, 102 workers in a cement plant not exposed to aluminium were enrolled as control group. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used to measure serum aluminium level, methylation specific PCR was used to measure the methylation rate of the promoter region of APP gene, and ELI-SA was used to measure the protein expression of APP in lymphocytes in peripheral blood. The exposure group had a significantly higher serum aluminium level than the control group (45.07 μg/L vs 30.51 μg/L, P< 0.01). The exposure group had a significantly lower methylation rate of the promoter region of APP gene than the control group (18.85% vs 25.49%, P=0.025), and the high-exposure group had a significantly lower methylation rate of the promoter region of APP gene than the low-exposure group (15.84% vs 21.85%, P<0.05). The exposure group had a significantly higher protein expression of APP in lymphocytes in peripheral blood than the control group (66.73 ng/ml vs 54.17 ng/ml, P<0.05); compared with the low-exposure group (65.39 ng/ml), the high-exposure group showed an increase in the protein expression of APP in lymphocytes in peripheral blood (67.22 ng/ml), but there was no significant difference between these two groups (P>0.05). The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that with reference to the control group, low aluminium exposure (OR=1.86, 95% CI 1.67~3.52)and high aluminium exposure (OR=2.98, 95% CI 1.97~4.15)were risk factors for a reduced methylation rate of the promoter region of APP gene. Reduced methylation of the promoter region of APP

  17. Introduction of Asthma APGAR tools improve asthma management in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Barbara P; Bertram, Susan; Wollan, Peter

    2008-08-31

    Primary care asthma management is often not compatible with national evidence-based guidelines. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility and impact of the Asthma APGAR tools to enhance implementation of asthma guideline-compatible management in primary care practices. Twenty-four primary care practices across the US. This is a mixed methods study. Quantitative data were used to assess changes in guideline recommended asthma management including use of daily controller therapy, planned care visits, and education and information documentation before and after implementation of the Asthma APGAR. Qualitative data from focus group sessions were used to assess health care professional and patient perceived usability and value of the Asthma APGAR tools during office visits for asthma. Implementing the Asthma APGAR tools in the 24 practices was associated with enhanced asthma visit-related medical record documentation including significant increases in recording of activity limitations due to asthma and asthma symptom frequency, asthma medication nonadherence, asthma triggers, and the patients' perceived response to therapy (p < 0.01 for each item). Some care processes also increased significantly including assessment of inhaler technique and prescribing of daily controller therapy among patients with persistent asthma. Focus groups of patients and of clinical staff reported that the Asthma APGAR tools were easy to use, "made sense" and "improved care" was given and received. The Asthma APGAR tools are feasible to implement in primary care practices and their implementation is associated with increased guideline-compliant asthma management.

  18. Indoor Air Quality and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    Numerous contaminants in indoor air and their potential to cause or exacerbate asthma continue to be a subject of public health concern. Many agents are causally associated with or can exacerbate asthma, particularly in children. For formaldehyde, an established respiratory irritant based on numerous studies, the evidence for an association with asthma is still considered only limited or suggestive. However, there is no evidence that indicates increased sensitivity to sensory irritation to formaldehyde in people often regarded as susceptible such as asthmatics. Acrolein, but not formaldehyde, was significantly associated with asthma in a large cohort of children. This prompted an evaluation of this highly irritating chemical that had never previously been considered in the context of the indoor air/childhood asthma issue. Because acrolein is more potent than formaldehyde as a respiratory irritant and ubiquitous in indoor air, it is plausible that previous studies on potential risk factors and childhood asthma may be confounded by formaldehyde acting as an unrecognized proxy for acrolein. PMID:28250718

  19. [Difficult to control severe asthma].

    PubMed

    Magnan, Antoine; Pipet, Anaïs

    2011-03-01

    Difficult to control severe asthma is characterized by the persistence of inacceptable symptoms of asthma despite a continuous treatment with at least high doses of inhaled steroids and long acting bronchodilators. The diagnosis is done after a period of observation and some investigations that will allow confirm the diagnosis of asthma, eliminate alternative diagnosis and etiological forms that would be difficult to treat intrinsically (allergic broncho-pulmonary aspergillosis, Churg and Strauss disease, chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, occupational asthma). At the end of this period devoted to diagnosis a systematic approach is set up to take care of these patients. Therapeutic education includes action plans and measures for triggering factors avoidance in order to prevent exacerbations. Comorbidities such as rhinitis, nasal polyposis, gastro-oesophageal reflux and obesity are taken into account. Lastly, the treatment must be adapted according to the patient's preferences and aims, and to the asthma severity. Ultimately in steroid-dependent asthma, the lowest efficient dose is tracked continuously. For these patients, new molecules are needed.

  20. Humidity control for chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Bara, A; Gibson, P

    2002-01-01

    Humidity control measures in the home environment of patients with asthma have been recommended, however there is no consensus about the usefulness of these measures. To study the effect of dehumidification of the home environment on asthma control. A search of the clinical trials registers of the Cochrane Collaboration and Cochrane Airways Group using search terms for asthma and [humid* OR water vapour OR water vapor* OR water-vapour* OR water-vapor*]. Randomized controlled trials on the use of humidity control measures in the home environment of patients with asthma were evaluated for inclusion. Only one trial could be included. Data was extracted using a predesigned data extraction form. No data was available for entering into RevMan for analysis. The included trial using mechanical ventilation with or without high efficiency vacuum cleaners did not show any clinical benefit to asthma patients. There was a decline in the house dust mite count and the antigen level. This open trial had a low sample size. There is a need for studying the health benefits of dehumidification by a double blind randomized controlled trial with adequate sample size measuring clinical outcomes in patients of asthma.

  1. Asthma Knowledge and Asthma Management Behavior in Urban Elementary School Teachers

    PubMed Central

    Unikel, Lynne H.; Evans, David; Bornstein, Lea; Surrence, Katherine; Mellins, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND While schools are an important setting for asthma care in youth, teachers’ asthma knowledge and symptom management is poor. This study investigated the knowledge, prevention and management behaviors, and communication regarding asthma of teachers of low income ethnic minority students. It was hypothesized that relative to colleagues whose students did not have active asthma (i.e., did not have symptoms during the day), teachers of students with active asthma would have better asthma knowledge and that more would take asthma prevention steps and communicate with parents and school nurses. METHODS Drawing from 25 elementary schools in NYC, 320 Pre-Kindergarten through 5th grade classroom teachers with at least one student with asthma completed measures assessing their asthma knowledge, steps taken to manage asthma, communication with the school nurse or parents, information they received about asthma and whether or not they had at least one student in their class experience asthma symptoms. T-test and chi-square were used to test hypotheses. RESULTS Asthma knowledge varied among teachers. Most could identify potential triggers, yet few knew that medication taken prior to exercise could prevent symptoms and that students with asthma need not avoid exercise. Communication between teachers and school nurses and between teachers and parents was lacking. Relative to colleagues whose students did not have active asthma, teachers whose students had active asthma had better asthma knowledge; more took steps to prevent students from having asthma symptoms, communicated with parents and initiated communication with the nurse. CONCLUSIONS Teacher knowledge about asthma and asthma management is limited, especially among those whose students did not have active asthma. Teachers respond reactively to students who have symptoms in class by increasing prevention steps and communications with parents and the school nurse. A more proactive approach to managing asthma in

  2. Asthma knowledge, subjective assessment of severity and symptom perception in parents of children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cláudia Mendes; Barros, Luísa

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to confirm the tendency for parents to underestimate the severity of symptoms and the poor consistency between parents' reports of symptoms and the physicians' evaluation of asthma control. Additionally, the relationship between parents' asthma knowledge and their report of symptoms and estimation of asthma severity was explored. Fifty children (M = 10.5 years) and their caregivers were recruited from two Portuguese hospitals. A measure of asthma symptoms report (Severity of Chronic Asthma, SCA) and a subjective evaluation of asthma severity were collected and compared with physicians' ratings of asthma control, as well as parents' knowledge about asthma (Asthma Knowledge Questionnaire, AKQ) and emotional disturbance (Brief Symptom Inventory, BSI). Although parents' evaluation of perceived asthma severity was moderately correlated to symptoms reported, results confirm an inconsistency between parents' reports of symptoms, their subjective rating of asthma severity and the physician's rating of clinical control, revealing a tendency for parents to underestimate disease severity and to underreport asthma symptoms. Asthma knowledge was not significantly correlated to SCA or to parents' subjective evaluation of asthma severity. Parents with poorer knowledge reported fewer symptoms. Portuguese parents revealed a tendency to overestimate their child's level of asthma control and a low level of asthma knowledge. Parents' education, psychological disturbance and time since diagnosis were associated with asthma knowledge. Parents' knowledge was not related to the child's asthma outcomes or to their subjective evaluation of asthma severity or symptoms reports. Parents' asthma knowledge deficits, underreporting of symptoms and underestimation of asthma severity, may affect parent-provider communication and impede asthma control.

  3. Patient and physician asthma deterioration terminology: results from the 2009 Asthma Insight and Management survey.

    PubMed

    Blaiss, Michael S; Nathan, Robert A; Stoloff, Stuart W; Meltzer, Eli O; Murphy, Kevin R; Doherty, Dennis E

    2012-01-01

    Long-term achievement of asthma control is dependent in part on the use of mutually understandable asthma terminology in all verbal and written patient-physician communications. Using data from the Asthma Insight and Management (AIM) survey, the objective of this analysis is to provide a contemporary depiction of asthma deterioration terminology as used by current asthma patients and physicians in the United States. As part of the 2009 AIM survey, current asthma patients (≥12 years of age; weighted n = 2499) and physicians (n = 309) were queried about their recognition, understanding, and/or use of the terms "asthma attack," "asthma flare-up," and "asthma exacerbation" in telephone interviews. Nearly all patients had heard the term "asthma attack" (97%), but relatively few had heard the term "asthma exacerbation" (24%); 71% had heard "asthma flare-up." In contrast, physicians reported using the term "asthma attack" least (65%) and the term "asthma exacerbation" most (77%) when discussing asthma with their patients; 70% reported using "asthma flare-up." Among patients familiar with "asthma flare-up" and "asthma exacerbation" (n = 502), only 38% said that the terms mean the same thing; nearly all physicians (94%) said that the terms mean the same thing. Collectively, data from the AIM survey suggest that patients and physicians use different asthma deterioration terminology and, more importantly, that they do not necessarily understand each other's terms. Standardizing asthma deterioration terminology may help optimize asthma patient-physician communication to improve patient understanding of written asthma action plans and therefore, enhance patient outcomes.

  4. Difficult asthma: assessment and management, Part 1.

    PubMed

    Long, Aidan A; Fanta, Christopher H

    2012-01-01

    A minority of asthma patients have disease that proves difficult to control with usual medications and experience ongoing symptoms, poor quality of life, and limitations in activity and/or frequent asthma exacerbations. This group of patients accounts for much of the expense associated with asthma care and is the focus of national and international collaborative study groups. Distinguishing between "difficult-to-manage asthma" and truly "therapy-resistant asthma" is helpful and promotes a systematic consideration of contributory factors. Critical evaluation of factors contributing to difficult-to-manage asthma including adverse environment, comorbidities, nonadherence, and incorrect diagnosis is recommended in a systematic fashion in Part 1 of this contribution.

  5. Asthma, culture, and cultural analysis: continuing challenges.

    PubMed

    Fortun, Mike; Fortun, Kim; Costelloe-Kuehn, Brandon; Saheb, Tahereh; Price, Daniel; Kenner, Alison; Crowder, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Recent research indicates that asthma is more complicated than already recognized, requiring a multilateral approach of study in order to better understand its many facets. Apart from being a health problem, asthma is seen as a knowledge problem, and as we argue here, a cultural problem. Employing cultural analysis we outline ways to challenge conventional ideas and practices about asthma by considering how culture shapes asthma experience, diagnosis, management, research, and politics. Finally, we discuss the value of viewing asthma through multiple lenses, and how such "explanatory pluralism" advances transdisciplinary approaches to asthma.

  6. Fuzzy Multicriteria Ranking of Aluminium Coating Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzias, A. F.

    2007-12-01

    This work deals with multicriteria ranking of aluminium coating methods. The alternatives used are: sulfuric acid anodization, A1; oxalic acid anodization, A2; chromic acid anodization, A3; phosphoric acid anodization, A4; integral color anodizing, A5; chemical conversion coating, A6; electrostatic powder deposition, A7. The criteria used are: cost of production, f1; environmental friendliness of production process, f2; appearance (texture), f3; reflectivity, f4; response to coloring, f5; corrosion resistance, f6; abrasion resistance, f7; fatigue resistance, f8. Five experts coming from relevant industrial units set grades to the criteria vector and the preference matrix according to a properly modified Delphi method. Sensitivity analysis of the ranked first alternative A1 against the `second best', which was A3 at low and A7 at high resolution levels proved that the solution is robust. The dependence of anodized products quality on upstream processes is presented and the impact of energy price increase on industrial cost is discussed.

  7. Neurocognitive effects in welders exposed to aluminium.

    PubMed

    Giorgianni, Concetto Mario; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Brecciaroli, Renato; Abbate, Adriana; Spatari, Giovanna; Tringali, Maria Antonietta; Gangemi, Silvia; De Luca, Annamaria

    2014-05-01

    Various authors who studied the effects of aluminium (Al) exposure on the neurocognitive system in the last 30 years have reached different and often contradictory conclusions. The aim of this study is to help clarify the effects that the metal causes on cognitive ability in a group of naval welders exposed to Al. The study was performed on a sample of 86 male Al welders in a shipyard in Messina. The average value of environmental Al, recorded in the workplace, was 19.5 mg/m(3). The blood levels of Al, zinc, manganese, lead and chromium were monitored in all the subjects. The reagents used for the neuropsychic study were the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS), the Colour Word Test or Stroop Test and the Test of Attention Matrixes. The results were compared with those obtained in a similar control group not exposed to Al and with an Al-b value of 6.93 g/l. For all the mental reagents used, the reply is obtained in the sample of exposed subjects showed decreased cognitive response with regard to attention and memory performance. The comparison between the individual tests showed greater sensitivity of performance studied using the WMS and the Stroop Test compared with the Test of Attention Matrixes. The alterations encountered in the cognitive functions studied increased proportionally to time of exposure and quantity of metal absorbed. The study confirmed that occupational exposure to Al causes alteration in cognitive responses that are more evident in complex functions.

  8. Biological monitoring of welders exposed to aluminium.

    PubMed

    Rossbach, Bernd; Buchta, Mark; Csanády, György A; Filser, Johannes G; Hilla, Wolfgang; Windorfer, Klaus; Stork, Joachim; Zschiesche, Wolfgang; Gefeller, Olaf; Pfahlberg, Annette; Schaller, Karl-Heinz; Egerer, Ellen; Escobar Pinzón, Luis Carlos; Letzel, Stephan

    2006-04-10

    To evaluate an adequate strategy for biological monitoring of aluminium (Al), a group of 62 Al welders (age in 1999: 23-51 years, median 35 years) was surveyed annually from 1999 to 2003 by determination of pre- and post-shift Al in urine and plasma. Biomonitoring was supplemented by personal air measurements of the total dust concentration. The welders' internal exposure was compared to the exposure of 60 non-exposed assembly workers (age in 1999: 21-51 years, median: 36 years) who were surveyed in 1999, 2001 and 2003. Having a nearly constant dust exposure, median concentrations of Al in urine (Al in plasma) of the welders decreased from 40.1 microg/g to 19.8 microg/g creatinine (8.7 to 4.6 microg/l). For the control group the median levels of Al in urine (plasma) ranged from 4.8 microg/g to 5.2 microg/g creatinine (2.4-4.3 microg/l) indicating a higher sensitivity for the marker Al in urine. No systematic differences have been found between pre- and post-shift internal exposure. This might be caused by the slow elimination kinetics and low systemic bioavailability of Al. A correlation analysis did not yield close relationships between dust exposure, Al in plasma and Al in urine underlining the importance of biomonitoring for assessment of Al exposure.

  9. Corrosion of aluminium in soft drinks.

    PubMed

    Seruga, M; Hasenay, D

    1996-04-01

    The corrosion of aluminium (Al) in several brands of soft drinks (cola- and citrate-based drinks) has been studied, using an electrochemical method, namely potentiodynamic polarization. The results show that the corrosion of Al in soft drinks is a very slow, time-dependent and complex process, strongly influenced by the passivation, complexation and adsorption processes. The corrosion of Al in these drinks occurs principally due to the presence of acids: citric acid in citrate-based drinks and orthophosphoric acid in cola-based drinks. The corrosion rate of Al rose with an increase in the acidity of soft drinks, i.e. with increase of the content of total acids. The corrosion rates are much higher in the cola-based drinks than those in citrate-based drinks, due to the facts that: (1) orthophosphoric acid is more corrosive to Al than is citric acid, (2) a quite different passive oxide layer (with different properties) is formed on Al, depending on whether the drink is cola or citrate based. The method of potentiodynamic polarization was shown as being very suitable for the study of corrosion of Al in soft drinks, especially if it is combined with some non-electrochemical method, e.g. graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS).

  10. Corrosion of aluminium metal in OPC- and CAC-based cement matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Hajime; Swift, Paul; Utton, Claire; Carro-Mateo, Beatriz; Collier, Nick; Milestone, Neil

    2013-08-15

    Corrosion of aluminium metal in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based pastes produces hydrogen gas and expansive reaction products causing problems for the encapsulation of aluminium containing nuclear wastes. Although corrosion of aluminium in cements has been long known, the extent of aluminium corrosion in the cement matrices and effects of such reaction on the cement phases are not well established. The present study investigates the corrosion reaction of aluminium in OPC, OPC-blast furnace slag (BFS) and calcium aluminate cement (CAC) based systems. The total amount of aluminium able to corrode in an OPC and 4:1 BFS:OPC system was determined, and the correlation between the amount of calcium hydroxide in the system and the reaction of aluminium obtained. It was also shown that a CAC-based system could offer a potential matrix to incorporate aluminium metal with a further reduction of pH by introduction of phosphate, producing a calcium phosphate cement.

  11. MOCVD of aluminium oxide films using aluminium β-diketonates as precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, A.; Shivashankar, S. A.; Samuelson, A. G.

    2002-06-01

    Deposition of Al203 coatings by CVD is of importance because they are often used as abrading material in cemented carbide cutting tools. The conventionally used CVD process for Al203 involves the corrosive reactant AICl3. In this paper, we report on the thermal characterisation of the metalorganic precursors namely aluminium tris-tetramethyl-heptanedionate [ Al(thd)3] and aluminium tris-acetylacetonate [ Al(acac)3] and their application to the CVD of Al203 films. Crystalline A1203 films were deposited by MOCVD at low temperatures by the pyrolysis of Al(thd)3 and AI(acac)3. The films were deposited on a TiN-coated tungsten carbide (TiN/WC) and Si(100) substrates in the temperature range 500-1100 °C. The as-deposited films were characterised by x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy. The observed crystallinity of films grown at low temperatures, their microstructure, and composition may be interpreted in terms of a growth process that involves the melting of the metalorganic precursor on the hot growth surface.

  12. Computer modelling of age hardening for cast aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Linda; Ferguson, W. George

    2009-08-01

    Age hardening, or precipitation hardening, is one of the most widely adopted techniques for strengthening of aluminium alloys. Although various age hardening models have been developed for aluminium alloys, from the large volume of literature reviewed, it appears that the bulk of the research has been concentrated on wrought aluminium alloys, only a few of the established precipitation models have been applied to the casting aluminium alloys. In the present work, there are two modelling methods that have been developed and applied to the casting aluminium alloys A356 and A357. One is based on the Shercliff-Ashby methodology to produce a process model, by which we mean a mathematical relationship between process variables (alloy composition, ageing temperature and time) and material properties (yield strength or hardness) through microstructure evolution (precipitate radius, volume fraction). The other method is based on the Kampmann and Wagner Numerical (KWN) model which deals with concomitant nucleation, growth and coarsening and is thus capable of predicting the full evolution of the particle size distribution and then a strength model is used to evaluate the resulting change in hardness or yield strength at room temperature by taking into account contributions from lattice resistance, solid solution hardening and precipitation hardening.

  13. Improving Efficiency of Aluminium Sacrificial Anode Using Cold Work Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmara, Y. P.; Siregar, J. P.; Tezara, C.; Ann, Chang Tai

    2016-02-01

    Aluminium is one of the preferred materials to be used as sacrificial anode for carbon steel protection. The efficiency of these can be low due to the formation of oxide layer which passivate the anodes. Currently, to improve its efficiency, there are efforts using a new technique called surface modifications. The objective of this research is to study corrosion mechanism of aluminium sacrificial anode which has been processed by cold work. The cold works are applied by reducing the thickness of aluminium sacrificial anodes at 20% and 40% of thickness reduction. The cathodic protection experiments were performed by immersion of aluminium connected to carbon steel cylinder in 3% NaCl solutions. Visual inspections using SEM had been conducted during the experiments and corrosion rate data were taken in every week for 8 weeks of immersion time. Corrosion rate data were measured using weight loss and linear polarization technique (LPR). From the results, it is observed that cold worked aluminium sacrificial anode have a better corrosion performance. It shows higher corrosion rate and lower corrosion potential. The anodes also provided a long functional for sacrificial anode before it stop working. From SEM investigation, it is shown that cold works have changed the microstructure of anodes which is suspected in increasing corrosion rate and cause de-passivate of the surface anodes.

  14. Cancer risk among workers of a secondary aluminium smelter.

    PubMed

    Maltseva, A; Serra, C; Kogevinas, M

    2016-07-01

    Cancer risk in secondary aluminium production is not well described. Workers in this industry are exposed to potentially carcinogenic agents from secondary smelters that reprocess aluminium scrap. To evaluate cancer risk in workers in a secondary aluminium plant in Spain. Retrospective cohort study of male workers employed at an aluminium secondary smelter (1960-92). Exposure histories and vital status through 2011 were obtained through personal interviews and hospital records, respectively. Standardized mortality (SMRs) and incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated. The study group consisted of 98 workers. We found increased incidence and mortality from bladder cancer [SIR = 2.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23-5.62; SMR = 5.90, 95% CI 1.58-15.11]. Increased incidence was also observed for prostate cancer and all other cancers but neither were statistically significant. No increased risk was observed for lung cancer. Results of this study suggest that work at secondary aluminium smelters is associated with bladder cancer risk. Identification of occupational carcinogens in this industry is needed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. AE Monitoring of Diamond Turned Rapidly Soldified Aluminium 443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onwuka, G.; Abou-El-Hossein, K.; Mkoko, Z.

    2017-05-01

    The fast replacement of conventional aluminium with rapidly solidified aluminium alloys has become a noticeable trend in the current manufacturing industries involved in the production of optics and optical molding inserts. This is as a result of the improved performance and durability of rapidly solidified aluminium alloys when compared to conventional aluminium. Melt spinning process is vital for manufacturing rapidly solidified aluminium alloys like RSA 905, RSA 6061 and RSA 443 which are common in the industries today. RSA 443 is a newly developed alloy with few research findings and huge research potential. There is no available literature focused on monitoring the machining of RSA 443 alloys. In this research, Acoustic Emission sensing technique was applied to monitor the single point diamond turning of RSA 443 on an ultrahigh precision lathe machine. The machining process was carried out after careful selection of feed, speed and depths of cut. The monitoring process was achieved with a high sampling data acquisition system using different tools while concurrent measurement of the surface roughness and tool wear were initiated after covering a total feed distance of 13km. An increasing trend of raw AE spikes and peak to peak signal were observed with an increase in the surface roughness and tool wear values. Hence, acoustic emission sensing technique proves to be an effective monitoring method for the machining of RSA 443 alloy.

  16. Aluminium recycling and environmental issues of salt slag treatment.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yanping; Reuter, Markus A; Boin, Udo

    2005-01-01

    Environmental friendly recycling is the trend toward total recycling of aluminium metal. In the secondary aluminium industry, due to the complexity of compositions and contaminants in the various types of aluminium scraps, an understanding of the behavior of different scraps during melting is crucial in the recycling process. Salt slags are the byproducts of the secondary aluminium industry, which should be recycled and processed in a proper way by taking the environmental impact into consideration. This article provides qualitative assessment on 10 different commercial aluminium scraps for their relative recyclability via well-designed and controlled laboratory experiments. It confirms that more nonmetallic contaminants, smaller size, and higher ratio of surface area to body volume generally lead to a lower metal recovery. Recycling the scraps with lower recyclability normally generates more salt slags. High slag viscosity leads to more fine aluminum metal entrapped in the salt slag and thus increases the load of salt slag recycling. It was found that viscosity of the salt flux is increased with the amount of entrapped nonmetallic components, which affect the settling of heavier materials. In addition, the slag samples from the melting tests were leached and analyzed to evaluate the behavior of carbon containing scrap. The elevated carbon content in the scrap resulted in more carbide formation in salt slags and thus more methane generation in salt slag recycling with a higher environmental impact.

  17. Ageing characteristics of aluminium alloy aluminosilicate discontinuous fiber reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, D.; Singh, V.

    1999-03-05

    Development of continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites is aimed at providing high specific strength and stiffness needed for aerospace and some critical high temperature structural applications. Considerable efforts have been made, during the last decade, to improve the strength of age-hardening aluminium alloy matrix composites by suitable heat treatment. It has also been well established that age-hardenable aluminium alloy composites show accelerated ageing behavior because of enhanced dislocation density at the fiber/matrix interface resulting from thermal expansion mismatch between ceramic fiber and the metal matrix. The accelerated ageing of aluminium alloy composites either from dislocation density or the residual stress, as a result of thermal expansion mismatch is dependent on the size of whisker and particulate. Investigations have also been made on the effect of volume fraction of particulate on the ageing behavior of aluminium alloys. The present investigation is concerned with characterization of age-hardening behavior of an Al-Si-Cu-Mg(AA 336) alloy alumino-silicate discontinuous fiber-reinforced composites (referred to as aluminium MMCs in the present text) being developed for automotive pistons. An effort is made to study the effect of volume fraction of the reinforcement on age-hardening behavior of this composite.

  18. Online monitoring of aluminium in drinking water with fluorimetric detection.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Mateos, A; Almendral-Parra, M J; Curto-Serrano, Y; Rodríguez-Martín, F J

    2008-01-01

    We report a procedure for the online monitoring of aluminium in drinking water by flow injection analysis. The reaction used is the formation of a complex with morin. Under the working conditions, this can be accomplished in an ethanol-rich hydroalcoholic medium, which modifies the fluorescent characteristics of the complex, allowing the determination of aluminium concentrations higher than 3.1 microgl(-1), with a linear application range between 2 and 250 microgl(-1), an R.S.D. of 2.3% (n=10, 120 microgl(-1)) and a sampling frequency of 90 h(-1). The method can thus be considered one of the most sensitive and fastest for the continuous determination of aluminium. In the presence of anionic surfactants, the sensitivity of the determination is increased. In this form, aluminium is detected at concentrations higher than 2.8 microgl(-1), with a linear application range of 2-50 microgl(-1). The procedure was applied to the analysis of aluminium in drinking, river, and underground water. Under the proposed working conditions, only Fe(III), fluoride and phosphates interfere. The interference of Fe(III) can be avoided with hydroxylamine and that of phosphates and polyphosphates by acid digestion of the samples.

  19. Effects of aqueous aluminium on four fish ectoparasites.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Ruben A; Vøllestad, L Asbjørn; Flodmark, Lars E W; Poléo, Antonio B S

    2006-10-01

    Effects of aqueous aluminium on four species of fish ectoparasites were studied. Fish infected by Gyrodactylus derjavini, G. macronychus and Anodonta anatina glochidia, and free living Argulus foliaceus were exposed to acidic Al-rich water (pH 5.8), acidic Al-poor water (pH 5.8) and control water (pH 6.3). The results showed that aqueous aluminium had a negative effect on the ectoparasites tested, without any apparent negative effect on the fish hosts. The effect of aluminium was dependent on the kind of organism tested. The gyrodactylids were eliminated, while the duck mussel glochidia showed a decrease in abundance when exposed to 200-260 mug Al/l at pH 5.8. The little fish louse showed increased mortality rate when exposed to aluminium. The effects of aluminium on the parasites in the present study confirm the importance of water quality in general, and acidification in particular, for the distribution and population dynamics of ectoparasites in freshwater environments.

  20. Psychological Characteristics of Patients with Asthma.

    PubMed

    Bulcun, Emel; Turkel, Yakup; Oguztürk, Omer; Dag, Ersel; Buturak, S Visal; Ekici, Aydanur; Ekici, Mehmet

    2016-05-05

    Psychological distress of patients with asthma may be reduced when they learned to live with their illness. Asthma can change the psychological and personality characteristics. We aim to investigate the psychological and personality characteristics of patients with asthma by using MMPI (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory). Thirty-three adult patients with asthma (23 female and 10 male) and 20 healthy controls (14 females and 6 males) were enrolled in the present study. Psychometric evaluation was made with the Turkish version of the MMPI. The patients were separated into two groups according to the duration of symptoms (recent-onset asthma < 10 years, long-standing asthma ≥10 years). Patients with asthma compared to control group had significantly higher the rate of clinical elevation on depression, hysteria, psychasthenia and social introversion. Patients with recent-onset asthma compared with long-standing asthma have significantly higher the rate of clinical elevation on depression,hysteria,psychopathic deviate, psychasthenia and social introversion. MMPI mean t score in patients with recent-onset asthma was higher than patients with long-standing asthma.MMPI mean t score in patients with asthma was negatively associated with the symptom duration in multivariate model. Patients with asthma have relatively more inactivity, anergia, guilt, pessimism, nonspecific physical complaints, irrational fears and introvert. Patients with long-standing asthma have less psychological distress, suggesting that learned to cope with his illness. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. [Work-relatedness of asthma among outpatients].

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, Mitsuhiko; Tamura, Akihiko; Taoda, Kazushi; Kakudou, Shiori; Kaji, Osamu; Samejima, Kenji

    2004-11-01

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS) issued a statement in 2002 that approximately 15% of adult asthma was likely to be work related and emphasized the importance of prevention for occupational asthma. However, the occupational contribution of the burden of asthma has been not understood, because there are very few epidemiological studies in the general population in Japan that examined the population attributable risk (PAR) of asthma due to occupational exposures. Assessing this component of the burden of asthma can better inform preventive strategies. Therefore, we examined the PAR of adult asthma due to occupational exposures among outpatients by using the National Institute for Occupational Safery and Health (NIOSH) criteria. Additionally we examined characteristics of cases of work-related asthma. The results indicate that the PAR of asthma due to occupational exposures is 22.7%, a value comparable to previous reports in Western countries. Therefore, we thought that it suggested that the prevalence of work-related asthma in Japan is similar to Western countries. Five patients met the criteria for having "probable OA", and their occupations were pest control industry, florist, hairdresser and pet groomer. Two patients (40%) changed their jobs due to asthma, which suggests that work-related asthma materially affects continuation of employment. Four patients (80%) had asthma despite leaving their jobs, which suggests that it is crucial to prevent work-related asthma.

  2. Removal of chelated aluminium during haemodialysis using polysulphone high-flux dialysers.

    PubMed

    Aarseth, H P; Ganss, R

    1990-01-01

    Polysulphone high-flux dialysers were used for removal of chelated aluminium in desferrioxamine-treated patients on maintenance haemodialysis. When compared with charcoal haemoperfusion in series with a cuprophane dialyser, the same aluminium clearance was obtained (34% of blood flow). During 4 h of haemodialysis serum aluminium was reduced to the concentration seen before desferrioxamine infusion. We conclude that high-flux polysulphone dialysers remove chelated aluminium as efficiently as does charcoal haemoperfusion, and at a lower cost.

  3. Does antiperspirant use increase the risk of aluminium-related disease, including Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Exley, C

    1998-03-01

    Aluminium salts are the major constituent of many widely used antiperspirant products. The use of such antiperspirants has been linked with the systemic accumulation of aluminium and an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. But can the frequent use of aluminium-based antiperspirants lead to the accumulation of toxic levels of aluminium? And are there measures that we can take to reduce such accumulation without reducing the effectiveness of antiperspirants?

  4. The Corrosion Resistance and Paint Adhesion Properties of Chromate Conversion Coatings on Aluminium and Its Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-01

    aluminium and its alloys has been evaluated with respect to both corrosion resistance of, and paint adhesion to, the chromate films. The process involves...The findings in this Report will be used as the basis for a Defence Standard for chromate conversion coatings for aluminium and aluminium alloys...3 PROPRIETARY CHROMATE CONVERSION COATINGS FOR ALUMINIUM 17 4 PAINT ADHESION 19 5 DISCUSSION 21 6 CONCLUSIONS 24 Acknowledgments 25 Appendix A

  5. Addressing the Childhood Asthma Crisis in Harlem: The Harlem Children’s Zone Asthma Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Stephen W.; Jean-Louis, Betina; Ortiz, Benjamin; Northridge, Mary; Shoemaker, Katherine; Vaughan, Roger; Rome, Michaela; Canada, Geoffrey; Hutchinson, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the prevalence of asthma and estimated baseline asthma symptoms and asthma management strategies among children aged 0–12 years in Central Harlem. Methods. The Harlem Children’s Zone Asthma Initiative is a longitudinal, community-based intervention designed for poor children with asthma. Children aged 0–12 years who live or go to school in the Harlem Children’s Zone Project or who participate in any Harlem Children’s Zone, Inc, program were screened for asthma. Children with asthma or asthma-like symptoms were invited to participate in an intensive intervention. Results. Of the 1982 children currently screened, 28.5% have been told by a doctor or nurse that they have asthma, and 30.3% have asthma or asthma-like symptoms. To date, 229 children are enrolled in the Harlem Children’s Zone Asthma Initiative; at baseline, 24.0% had missed school in the last 14 days because of asthma. Conclusion. The high prevalence of asthma among children in the Harlem Children’s Zone Project is consistent with reports from other poor urban communities. Intensive efforts are under way to reduce children’s asthma symptoms and improve their asthma management strategies. PMID:15671459

  6. "Kickin' Asthma": School-Based Asthma Education in an Urban Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Patel, Bina; Davis, Adam; Edelstein, Joan; Tager, Ira B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In urban communities with high prevalence of childhood asthma, school-based educational programs may be the most appropriate approach to deliver interventions to improve asthma morbidity and asthma-related outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implementation of "Kickin' Asthma", a school-based asthma…

  7. "Kickin' Asthma": School-Based Asthma Education in an Urban Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Patel, Bina; Davis, Adam; Edelstein, Joan; Tager, Ira B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In urban communities with high prevalence of childhood asthma, school-based educational programs may be the most appropriate approach to deliver interventions to improve asthma morbidity and asthma-related outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implementation of "Kickin' Asthma", a school-based asthma…

  8. Determination of aluminium in groundwater samples by GF-AAS, ICP-AES, ICP-MS and modelling of inorganic aluminium complexes.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Marcin; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Kurzyca, Iwona; Novotný, Karel; Vaculovič, Tomas; Kanický, Viktor; Siepak, Marcin; Siepak, Jerzy

    2011-11-01

    The paper presents the results of aluminium determinations in ground water samples of the Miocene aquifer from the area of the city of Poznań (Poland). The determined aluminium content amounted from <0.0001 to 752.7 μg L(-1). The aluminium determinations were performed using three analytical techniques: graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results of aluminium determinations in groundwater samples for particular analytical techniques were compared. The results were used to identify the ascent of ground water from the Mesozoic aquifer to the Miocene aquifer in the area of the fault graben. Using the Mineql+ program, the modelling of the occurrence of aluminium and the following aluminium complexes: hydroxy, with fluorides and sulphates was performed. The paper presents the results of aluminium determinations in ground water using different analytical techniques as well as the chemical modelling in the Mineql+ program, which was performed for the first time and which enabled the identification of aluminium complexes in the investigated samples. The study confirms the occurrence of aluminium hydroxy complexes and aluminium fluoride complexes in the analysed groundwater samples. Despite the dominance of sulphates and organic matter in the sample, major participation of the complexes with these ligands was not stated based on the modelling.

  9. Environmental issues in managing asthma.

    PubMed

    Diette, Gregory B; McCormack, Meredith C; Hansel, Nadia N; Breysse, Patrick N; Matsui, Elizabeth C

    2008-05-01

    Management of asthma requires attention to environmental exposures both indoors and outdoors. Americans spend most of their time indoors, where they have a greater ability to modify their environment. The indoor environment contains both pollutants (eg, particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, secondhand smoke, and ozone) and allergens from furred pets, dust mites, cockroaches, rodents, and molds. Indoor particulate matter consists of particles generated from indoor sources such as cooking and cleaning activities, and particles that penetrate from the outdoors. Nitrogen dioxide sources include gas stoves, furnaces, and fireplaces. Indoor particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide are linked to asthma morbidity. The indoor ozone concentration is mainly influenced by the outdoor ozone concentration. The health effects of indoor ozone exposure have not been well studied. In contrast, there is substantial evidence of detrimental health effects from secondhand smoke. Guideline recommendations are not specific for optimizing indoor air quality. The 2007 National Asthma Education and Prevention Program asthma guidelines recommend eliminating indoor smoking and improving the ventilation. Though the guidelines state that there is insufficient evidence to recommend air cleaners, air cleaners and reducing activities that generate indoor pollutants may be sound practical approaches for improving the health of individuals with asthma. The guidelines are more specific about allergen avoidance; they recommend identifying allergens to which the individual is immunoglobin E sensitized and employing a multifaceted, comprehensive strategy to reduce exposure. Outdoor air pollutants that impact asthma include particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide, and guidelines recommend that individuals with asthma avoid exertion outdoors when these pollutants are elevated. Outdoor allergens include tree, grass, and weed pollens, which vary in concentration by season

  10. Future biologic therapies in asthma.

    PubMed

    Quirce, Santiago; Bobolea, Irina; Domínguez-Ortega, Javier; Barranco, Pilar

    2014-08-01

    Despite the administration of appropriate treatment, a high number of patients with asthma remain uncontrolled. This suggests the need for alternative treatments that are effective, safe and selective for the established asthma phenotypes, especially in patients with uncontrolled severe asthma. The most promising options among the new asthma treatments in development are biological therapies, particularly those monoclonal antibodies directed at selective targets. It should be noted that the different drugs, and especially the new biologics, act on very specific pathogenic pathways. Therefore, determination of the individual profile of predominant pathophysiological alterations of each patient will be increasingly important for prescribing the most appropriate treatment in each case. The treatment of severe allergic asthma with anti-IgE monoclonal antibody (omalizumab) has been shown to be effective in a large number of patients, and new anti-IgE antibodies with improved pharmacodynamic properties are being investigated. Among developing therapies, biologics designed to block certain pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-5 (mepolizumab) and IL-13 (lebrikizumab), have a greater chance of being used in the clinic. Perhaps blocking more than one cytokine pathway (such as IL-4 and IL-13 with dulipumab) might confer increased efficacy of treatment, along with acceptable safety. Stratification of asthma based on the predominant pathogenic mechanisms of each patient (phenoendotypes) is slowly, but probably irreversibly, emerging as a tailored medical approach to asthma, and is becoming a key factor in the development of drugs for this complex respiratory syndrome. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Therapeutic interventions in severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Senna, Gianenrico; Mitchell, Patrick D; O'Byrne, Paul M; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Varricchi, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    The present paper addresses severe asthma which is limited to 5-10% of the overall population of asthmatics. However, it accounts for 50% or more of socials costs of the disease, as it is responsible for hospitalizations and Emergency Department accesses as well as expensive treatments. The recent identification of different endotypes of asthma, based on the inflammatory pattern, has led to the development of tailored treatments that target different inflammatory mediators. These are major achievements in the perspective of Precision Medicine: a leading approach to the modern treatment strategy. Omalizumab, an anti-IgE antibody, has been the only biologic treatment available on the market for severe asthma during the last decade. It prevents the linkage of the IgE and the receptors, thereby inhibiting mast cell degranulation. In clinical practice omalizumab significantly reduced the asthma exacerbations as well as the concomitant use of oral glucocorticoids. In the "Th2-high asthma" phenotype, the hallmarks are increased levels of eosinophils and other markers (such as periostin). Because anti-IL-5 in this condition plays a crucial role in driving eosinophil inflammation, this cytokine or its receptors on the eosinophil surface has been studied as a potential target for therapy. Two different anti-IL-5 humanized monoclonal antibodies, mepolizumab and reslizumab, have been proven effective in this phenotype of asthma (recently they both came on the market in the United States), as well as an anti-IL-5 receptor alpha (IL5Rα), benralizumab. Other monoclonal antibodies, targeting different cytokines (IL-13, IL-4, IL-17 and TSLP) are still under evaluation, though the preliminary results are encouraging. Finally, AIT, Allergen Immunotherapy, a prototype of Precision Medicine, is considered, also in light of the recent evidences of Sublingual Immunotherapy (SLIT) tablet efficacy and safety in mite allergic asthma patients. Given the high costs of these therapies

  12. Environmental Issues in Managing Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Diette, Gregory B; McCormack, Meredith C; Hansel, Nadia N; Breysse, Patrick N; Matsui, Elizabeth C

    2008-01-01

    Management of asthma requires attention to environmental exposures both indoors and outdoors. Americans spend most of their time indoors, where they have a greater ability to modify their environment. The indoor environment contains both pollutants (eg, particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, secondhand smoke, and ozone) and allergens from furred pets, dust mites, cockroaches, rodents, and molds. Indoor particulate matter consists of particles generated from indoor sources such as cooking and cleaning activities, and particles that penetrate from the outdoors. Nitrogen dioxide sources include gas stoves, furnaces, and fireplaces. Indoor particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide are linked to asthma morbidity. The indoor ozone concentration is mainly influenced by the outdoor ozone concentration. The health effects of indoor ozone exposure have not been well studied. In contrast, there is substantial evidence of detrimental health effects from secondhand smoke. Guideline recommendations are not specific for optimizing indoor air quality. The 2007 National Asthma Education and Prevention Program asthma guidelines recommend eliminating indoor smoking and improving the ventilation. Though the guidelines state that there is insufficient evidence to recommend air cleaners, air cleaners and reducing activities that generate indoor pollutants may be sound practical approaches for improving the health of individuals with asthma. The guidelines are more specific about allergen avoidance; they recommend identifying allergens to which the individual is immunoglobin E sensitized and employing a multifaceted, comprehensive strategy to reduce exposure. Outdoor air pollutants that impact asthma include particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide, and guidelines recommend that individuals with asthma avoid exertion outdoors when these pollutants are elevated. Outdoor allergens include tree, grass, and weed pollens, which vary in concentration by season

  13. The Yes We Can Urban Asthma Partnership: a medical/social model for childhood asthma management.

    PubMed

    Thyne, Shannon M; Rising, Joshua P; Legion, Vicki; Love, Mary Beth

    2006-11-01

    Pediatric asthma programs have struggled to integrate children's medical and social needs. We developed and piloted an integrated team model for asthma care for low-income children through the Yes We Can Urban Asthma Partnership. Program evaluation demonstrated increases in prescribing controller medications (p <0.05), use of action plans (p<0.001), and the use of mattress covers (p<0.001); and decrease in asthma symptoms (p<0.01). Additional changes occurred within the local system of asthma care to support ongoing efforts to improve asthma management. We conclude that pediatric asthma programs can effectively target the social and medical needs of children in a sustainable manner.

  14. Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL Past Issues / Fall 2007 ... a peak flow meter. Photo courtesy of MCAN Asthma, a reality of daily life for more than ...

  15. Diagnosing Asthma in Very Young Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Diagnosing Asthma in Babies & Toddlers Page Content Article Body One ... family with recurrent bronchitis or sinus problems. When Asthma is Not the Cause Your pediatrician will listen ...

  16. National Environmental Leadership Award in Asthma Management

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Asthma Awards recognizes health plans, healthcare providers and communities in action that demonstrate an environmental component to address asthma triggers, collaborate with others and save healthcare dollars with their programming.

  17. Asthma - Improving Health in Communities and Schools

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To improve asthma health, it takes a variety of people working together to reduce triggers and provide safe and healthy environments for people with asthma. This includes parents and caregivers, community organizations, healthcare providers and schools.

  18. New Asthma Guidelines What You Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section New Asthma Guidelines: What You Should Know Past Issues / Fall ... on. If you or a relative suffers from asthma, it is important to know that quality care ...

  19. Students With Asthma and Its Impacts.

    PubMed

    Isik, Elif; Isik, Ismet S

    2017-07-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease in children. Uncontrolled asthma is a significant contributor to school absenteeism, emergency room visits, and hospitalization, all of which can lead to low school performance, financial burdens, and emotional problems for children and their parents. Asthma in children restricts the activities of school-aged children, such as participating in before- and after-school activity and extracurricular activities such as sports. Uncontrolled asthma has the potential to impact a student's self-confidence and social interactions. This article reviews the physical, emotional, and social burden of asthma on school-aged children/parents as well as recounting school asthma intervention programs. One of the roles of the school nurse is to be the leader of the intervention programs, manage asthma, and provide education for the students, parents, and school community to promote knowledge about asthma and its management.

  20. Asthma: New Information for the Early Interventionist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simeonsson, Nancy; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This article highlights key portions of the National Institutes of Health's National Asthma Education Program. Guidelines for understanding asthma triggers and medications are provided, and approaches to controlling environmental factors are suggested. (Author/PB)

  1. Supporting Self-management of Asthma Care.

    PubMed

    Keep, Suzanne M; Reiffer, Alice; Bahl, Thomas E

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a major public health concern, with an estimated 18.8 million adults in the United States having the disease. Asthma can be controlled with a variety of effective treatment options; however, only half the people with asthma report their asthma is well controlled. Uncontrolled asthma leads to high direct and indirect costs as well as decreased quality of life. The pathophysiology of asthma, current asthma practice guidelines, and common barriers to self-management will be discussed. Through use of motivational interviewing techniques and knowledge of available self-management tools, the home care clinician is poised to help increase self-management of asthma, decrease hospitalizations, and improve quality of life.

  2. [Seasonality in asthma: Impact and treatments].

    PubMed

    Guilleminault, L; Just, J; Humbert, M; Leroyer, C; Epaud, R

    2016-11-01

    The role of seasons should be taken into account in the management of asthma. The environment varies between seasons and it is well documented that asthma is modulated by environment. Viruses cause asthma exacerbations peak, in winter, in adults while the peak is present in September in children. Allergens are probably a less powerful source of asthma exacerbation than viruses but pollen involvement in spring and summer and dust mites in autumn are indisputable. Air pollutants, present in summer during the hottest periods, are also highly involved in asthma exacerbations. Indoor air pollution, in winter, is also implicated in asthma disease. All these environmental factors are synergistic and increase the risk of asthma exacerbation. Therapies should be adapted to each season depending on environmental factors potentially involved in the asthma disease.

  3. Recent advances in understanding and managing asthma

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Su-Ling; Wark, Peter A.B.

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the important articles published in the area of asthma research from January 2015 to July 2016. In basic science, significant advances have been made in understanding the link between the innate immune response and type II acquired immune responses in asthma and the role of the airway epithelium. Novel information continues to emerge with regard to the pathogenesis and heterogeneity of severe asthma. There have been important translational clinical trials in the areas of childhood asthma, treatment of allergy to improve asthma outcomes, and improving drug delivery to optimize the management of asthma. In addition, there are increasing data concerning the application of biological agents to the management of severe asthma. This body of work discusses the most notable advances in the understanding and management of asthma. PMID:27610226

  4. Obesity-related asthma in adults.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Nikunj A; Lazarus, Angeline

    2016-08-01

    Obesity as a risk factor for asthma has been identified in previous studies. Additionally, a disproportionate number of patients with severe or difficult-to-control asthma are obese. Patients with obesity-related asthma tend to have worse asthma control and quality of life disproportionate to their pulmonary function tests, are less responsive to corticosteroid therapy, and are more likely to have obesity-related comorbidities such as obstructive sleep apnea and gastroesophageal disease that complicate asthma treatment. With the increasing prevalence of obesity, the prevalence of asthma is anticipated to grow proportionally. Addressing weight loss and encouraging activity is essential in the management of obesity-related asthma. This article briefly overviews the epidemiology, unique distinguishing features, potential mechanisms, and approach to management of patients with obesity-related asthma in adults.

  5. Ozone, Air Quality, and Asthma (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Poor Air Quality Affects People With Asthma Air pollution is a problem for everyone — not just people ... asthma. Studies have shown that high levels of air pollution can be associated with decreased lung function and ...

  6. IEC 61267: Feasibility of type 1100 aluminium and a copper/aluminium combination for RQA beam qualities.

    PubMed

    Leong, David L; Rainford, Louise; Zhao, Wei; Brennan, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    In the course of performance acceptance testing, benchmarking or quality control of X-ray imaging systems, it is sometimes necessary to harden the X-ray beam spectrum. IEC 61267 specifies materials and methods to accomplish beam hardening and, unfortunately, requires the use of 99.9% pure aluminium (Alloy 1190) for the RQA beam quality, which is expensive and difficult to obtain. Less expensive and more readily available filters, such as Alloy 1100 (99.0% pure) aluminium and copper/aluminium combinations, have been used clinically to produce RQA series without rigorous scientific investigation to support their use. In this paper, simulation and experimental methods are developed to determine the differences in beam quality using Alloy 1190 and Alloy 1100. Additional simulation investigated copper/aluminium combinations to produce RQA5 and outputs from this simulation are verified with laboratory tests using different filter samples. The results of the study demonstrate that although Alloy 1100 produces a harder beam spectrum compared to Alloy 1190, it is a reasonable substitute. A combination filter of 0.5 mm copper and 2 mm aluminium produced a spectrum closer to that of Alloy 1190 than Alloy 1100 with the added benefits of lower exposures and lower batch variability. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Constitutive modelling of aluminium alloy sheet at warm forming temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurukuri, S.; Worswick, M. J.; Winkler, S.

    2016-08-01

    The formability of aluminium alloy sheet can be greatly improved by warm forming. However predicting constitutive behaviour under warm forming conditions is a challenge for aluminium alloys due to strong, coupled temperature- and rate-sensitivity. In this work, uniaxial tensile characterization of 0.5 mm thick fully annealed aluminium alloy brazing sheet, widely used in the fabrication of automotive heat exchanger components, is performed at various temperatures (25 to 250 °C) and strain rates (0.002 and 0.02 s-1). In order to capture the observed rate- and temperature-dependent work hardening behaviour, a phenomenological extended-Nadai model and the physically based (i) Bergstrom and (ii) Nes models are considered and compared. It is demonstrated that the Nes model is able to accurately describe the flow stress of AA3003 sheet at different temperatures, strain rates and instantaneous strain rate jumps.

  8. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  9. The immunobiology of aluminium adjuvants: how do they really work?

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Siesjö, Peter; Eriksson, Håkan

    2010-03-01

    Aluminium adjuvants potentiate the immune response, thereby ensuring the potency and efficacy of typically sparingly available antigen. Their concomitant critical importance in mass vaccination programmes may have prompted recent intense interest in understanding how they work and their safety. Progress in these areas is stymied, however, by a lack of accessible knowledge pertaining to the bioinorganic chemistry of aluminium adjuvants, and, consequently, the inappropriate application and interpretation of experimental models of their mode of action. The objective herein is, therefore, to identify the many ways that aluminium chemistry contributes to the wide and versatile armoury of its adjuvants, such that future research might be guided towards a fuller understanding of their role in human vaccinations.

  10. The global impact of vaccines containing aluminium adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Clements, C J; Griffiths, E

    2002-05-31

    Immunization against childhood vaccine-preventable diseases has arguably had the greatest impact on the health of children of any public health intervention. Many of the vaccines used in the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) have contained aluminium-based adjuvants. As such, these adjuvants have played a vital role in enabling the basic vaccines to be used effectively. DTP global supply is fragile and could easily be upset through the loss of even one major vaccine manufacturer. Non-aluminium adjuvants could not readily replace aluminium adjuvants. New generation vaccines will probably need new generation adjuvants. The impact of vaccines with adjuvants is discussed. Having provided decades of reliable, safe service in their relatively simple chemical formulations, adjuvants are likely to be with us, in one form or another, for the indefinite future.

  11. [Photophysical properties and photodynamic activity of nanostructured aluminium phthalocyanines].

    PubMed

    Udartseva, O O; Lobanov, A V; Andeeva, E R; Dmitrieva, G S; Mel'nikov, M Ia; Buravkova, L B

    2014-01-01

    We developed water-soluble supramolecular complexes of aluminium phthalocyanine based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles and polyvinylpirrolidone containing rare photoactive nanoaggregates. Radiative lifetimes, extinction coefficients and energy of electronic transitions of isolated and associated metal phthalocyanine complexes were calculated. Nontoxic concentrations of synthesized nanocomposite photosensibilizers were in vitro determined. In present study we compared photodynamic treatment efficacy using different modifications of aluminium phthalocyanine (Photosens®, AlPc-nSiO2 and AlPc-PVP). Mesenchymal stromal cells were used as a model for photodynamic treatment. Intracellular accumulation of aluminium phthalocyanine based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles AlPc-nSiO2 was the most efficient. Illumination of phthalocyanine-loaded cells led to reactive oxygen species generation and subsequent apoptotic cell death. Silica nanoparticles provided a significant decrease of effective phthalocyanine concentration and enhanced cytotoxicity of photodynamic treatment.

  12. Thermodynamic remarks on chelating ligands for aluminium related diseases.

    PubMed

    Crisponi, Guido; Nurchi, Valeria Marina

    2011-11-01

    Attention is devoted to the role of chelating agents in the treatment of aluminium related diseases. In fact, in spite of the actions that have drastically reduced the occurrence of dialysis diseases, they so far constitute a cause of great medical concern. Being aluminium chelators strictly related to iron chelators, a comparison is made of the complex formation properties of these two hard metal ions towards ligands characterized by charged oxygen donor groups. Empirical correlations between aluminium(III) and iron(III) complex formation constants, and their behavior are discussed in terms of structural and thermodynamic stabilities. Insertion of proper substituents to enhance the chelator binding capacity is debated on the bases of substituent effects on protonation and complex formation constants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Surface chemical studies of anodically oxidised aluminium membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treverton, J. A.; West, R.; Johnson, D.; Thornton, M.

    1993-12-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and fast atom bombardment secondary ion mass spectrometry (FAB-SIMS) have been used to study the surfaces of inorganic microfiltration membranes produced by controlled removal of anodic films formed on aluminium in phosphoric and oxalic acid electrolytes. The results are compared with those of similar analyses of membranes produced from anodic films formed in mixed oxalic/phosphoric acid electrolyte. Both techniques established that phosphates were concentrated on the surface of membranes formed in phosphoric acid and oxalic/phosphoric acid and that oxalate ions were present on the surfaces of membranes formed in oxalic acid. The low intensity of the AlO -x fragments implies that all of the aluminium ions in the surface are coordinated to phosphates or oxalates. However, any differences its the chemical state of the aluminium on the different membranes were not detectable by either technique.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of a new aluminium-based compound.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Cosp, José; Artiaga, Ramón; Corpas-Iglesias, Francisco; Benítez-Guerrero, Mónica

    2009-08-28

    A new aluminium polynuclear crystalline species, Al(13)(OH)(30)(H(2)O)(15)Cl(9) has been synthesized and characterized. It is a particular case of the Al(13)(OH)(30-y)(H(2)O)(18-x)Cl(9) x zH(2)O family. It has been obtained from aluminium waste cans treated with HCl solution in strong acid media, followed by an ageing period. The crystalline structure of the complex was determined by XRD spectroscopy. Twelve reflections were found and indexed with the DICVOL04 software. Morphologically, a flattened preferred orientation was observed by SEM and FESEM. The chemical structure was studied by several absorption spectroscopy techniques: FTIR, ATR-FTIR and Raman dispersion spectroscopy. The coordination of the aluminium nuclei was determined by Al-MAS-NMR. Only octahedral sites were observed. Thermal characterization of the compound was performed by evolved gas analysis (EGA) coupled to simultaneous TGA-DSC.

  15. Coal fly ash: a potential resource for aluminium and titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, J.R.; Murtha, M.J.; Burnet, G.

    1980-01-01

    Two processes are described which utilize fly ash as a source of metals and by-products. The lime-soda sinter process involves sintering of the fly ash and alkaline oxides at 1100-1300/sup 0/C to break the alumina-silica bonds and form soluble aluminate compounds and insoluble calcium silicates. The aluminates are extracted from the sinter by dissolution in sodium carbonate. The calcium silicate sinter extract shows promise as a raw material for the manufacture of portland cement. The HiChlor process uses high temperature chlorination of fly ash in the presence of a reductant to form volatile metal chlorides of aluminium, titanium, iron, and silicon. The HiChlor process extracts aluminium, titanium, and iron, while the sinter process extracts only aluminium.

  16. Aluminium toxicity in the rat liver and brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Ohashi, H.; Nagai, H.; Kakimi, S.; Ishikawa, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Ogawa, Y.; Ishii, K.

    1993-04-01

    To investigate the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, we examined the brain and liver tissue uptake of aluminium 5-75 days after aluminium injection into healthy rats. Ten days after the last injection, Al was detected in the brain and the brain cell nuclei by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Al was also demonstrated in the liver and the liver cell nuclei by PIXE analysis and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS). The morphological changes of the rat brain examined 75 days after the injection were similar to those which have been reportedly observed in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. These results support the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminium in the brain, as well as in the nuclei of brain cells.

  17. Different Approach to the Aluminium Oxide Topography Characterisation

    SciTech Connect

    Poljacek, Sanja Mahovic; Gojo, Miroslav; Raos, Pero; Stoic, Antun

    2007-04-07

    Different surface topographic techniques are being widely used for quantitative measurements of typical industrial aluminium oxide surfaces. In this research, specific surface of aluminium oxide layer on the offset printing plate has been investigated by using measuring methods which have previously not been used for characterisation of such surfaces. By using two contact instruments and non-contact laser profilometer (LPM) 2D and 3D roughness parameters have been defined. SEM micrographs of the samples were made. Results have shown that aluminium oxide surfaces with the same average roughness value (Ra) and mean roughness depth (Rz) typically used in the printing plate surface characterisation, have dramatically different surface topographies. According to the type of instrument specific roughness parameters should be used for defining the printing plate surfaces. New surface roughness parameters were defined in order to insure detailed characterisation of the printing plates in graphic reproduction process.

  18. Stimulation of eryptosis by aluminium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Niemoeller, Olivier M.; Kiedaisch, Valentin; Dreischer, Peter; Wieder, Thomas; Lang, Florian . E-mail: florian.lang@uni-tuebingen.de

    2006-12-01

    Aluminium salts are utilized to impede intestinal phosphate absorption in chronic renal failure. Toxic side effects include anemia, which could result from impaired formation or accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Erythrocytes may be cleared secondary to suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) at the erythrocyte surface. As macrophages are equipped with PS receptors, they bind, engulf and degrade PS-exposing cells. The present experiments have been performed to explore whether Al{sup 3+} ions trigger eryptosis. The PS exposure was estimated from annexin binding and cell volume from forward scatter in FACS analysis. Exposure to Al{sup 3+} ions ({>=} 10 {mu}M Al{sup 3+} for 24 h) indeed significantly increased annexin binding, an effect paralleled by decrease of forward scatter at higher concentrations ({>=} 30 {mu}M Al{sup 3+}). According to Fluo3 fluorescence Al{sup 3+} ions ({>=} 30 {mu}M for 3 h) increased cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} activity. Al{sup 3+} ions ({>=} 10 {mu}M for 24 h) further decreased cytosolic ATP concentrations. Energy depletion by removal of glucose similarly triggered annexin binding, an effect not further enhanced by Al{sup 3+} ions. The eryptosis was paralleled by release of hemoglobin, pointing to loss of cell membrane integrity. In conclusion, Al{sup 3+} ions decrease cytosolic ATP leading to activation of Ca{sup 2+}-permeable cation channels, Ca{sup 2+} entry, stimulation of cell membrane scrambling and cell shrinkage. Moreover, Al{sup 3+} ions lead to loss of cellular hemoglobin, a feature of hemolysis. Both effects are expected to decrease the life span of circulating erythrocytes and presumably contribute to the development of anemia during Al{sup 3+} intoxication.

  19. Aluminium in parenteral nutrition: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sánchez, A; Tejada-González, P; Arteta-Jiménez, M

    2013-03-01

    Aluminium (Al) toxicity problem in parenteral nutrition solutions (PNS) is decades old and is still unresolved. The aim of this review is to gather updated information about this matter, regarding legislation, manifestations, diagnostics and treatment, patient population at risk and the actions to be taken to limit its accumulation. A structured search using MeSH vocabulary and Title/Abstract searches was conducted in PubMed (http://www.pubmed.gov) up to November 2012. Al is ubiquitous, facilitating its potential for exposure. Nevertheless, humans have several mechanisms to prevent significant absorption and to aid its elimination; therefore, the vast majority of the population is not at risk for Al toxicity. However, when protective gastrointestinal mechanisms are bypassed (for example, parenteral fluids), renal function is impaired (for example, adult patients with renal compromise and neonates) or exposure is high (for example, long-term PNS), Al is prone to accumulate in the body, including manifestations such as impaired neurological development, Alzheimer's disease, metabolic bone disease, dyslipemia and even genotoxic activity. A high Al content in PNS is largely the result of three parenteral nutrient additives: calcium gluconate, inorganic phosphates and cysteine hydrochloride. Despite the legislative efforts, some factors make difficult to comply with the rule and, therefore, to limit the Al toxicity. Unfortunately, manufacturers have not universally changed their processes to obtain a lower Al content of parenteral drug products (PDP). In addition, the imprecise information provided by PDP labels and the high lot-to-lot variation make the prediction of Al content rather inaccurate.

  20. Better Asthma Management with Advanced Technology

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, James H.; Gutierrez, Benjamin; Lunacsek, Orsolya E.; Ramachandran, Sulabha

    2009-01-01

    With nearly 23 million people affected by asthma each year, optimizing care among patients with persistent disease is a constant challenge for health care providers. The Asthma Utilization Rx Analyzer (AURA) tool enables health plan managers to evaluate quality and resource utilization for its members with asthma by analyzing medical and pharmacy claims. Customizable quality measures allow users of the tool to generate results from specific plans in order to optimize asthma disease management. PMID:19561841

  1. The team approach to pediatric asthma education.

    PubMed

    Capen, C L; Dedlow, E R; Robillard, R H; Fuller, B M; Fuller, C P

    1994-01-01

    An interdisciplinary pediatric pulmonary team of nurses, pharmacists, and social workers developed an asthma education program for presentation to children with asthma, ages 7-11, in a camp setting. Sound educational principles provide the foundation for this program, which includes a variety of teaching methods including puppet shows, games, crafts, and song. Informal evaluation methods of observation and feedback indicated that children's knowledge of asthma and asthma management increased.

  2. Current and emerging treatments for severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Al Efraij, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma, which is poorly controlled despite the elimination of modifiable factors and the correct use of standard therapy, accounts only for 5% of people with asthma but it contributes to approximately 50% of the economic costs of asthma. Because of this unmet need, novel therapies have been developed for optimal treatment of these patients. The use of tiotropium, omalizumab, mepolizumab and thermoplasty in well-selected patients provides better control and most importantly a reduction in asthma exacerbations. PMID:26716048

  3. Antiasthmatic Role of "Pentapala -04" a Herbal Formulation Against Ova Albumin and Aluminium HydroxideInduced LungDamage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rao, D Srinivasa; Jayaraaj, Indira A; Jayaraaj, R

    2005-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a clinical syndrome characterized by proximal dysphasia and wheeze due to increased resistance to the flow of air through the narrowed bronchi. Asthma has become the most common chronic disease in the world and epidemiological studies suggest that its prevalence, severity and mortality are rising at a time when mortality from other common treatable conditions is falling. The reasons for the above statistics are environmental factors such as increased exposure to allergens and atmospheric pollutants. Antiasthmatic treatment includes corticosteroids, which are very effective in the treatment of asthma. But corticosteroids are costly and if given systemically, have many severe adverse effects. Hence, the present research work involves the use of a herbal compound formulation Pentapala -04 prepared from five medicinal plants namely, Adhatoda vasica Need, Ocimum sanctum Linn, Coleus aromaticus Benth, Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn and Alpiania galangal Sw.The effect of "Pentapala-04" on ova albumin and aluminium hydroxide induced lung damage in albino wistar rats was investigated. The rats were divided into three groups of four animals each. Group I, II and III serves as control, toxic and post treatment group respectively. Our results showed that their was increased level of lipid peroxidation and secreased level of antioxidants in toxic group animals. But the levels of antioxidant enzymes were restored in post-treated groups of animals, which might be due to the ability of "ability of "Pentapala-04 to scavenge the reactive oxygen species.

  4. Antiasthmatic Role of “Pentapala -04” a Herbal Formulation Against Ova Albumin and Aluminium HydroxideInduced LungDamage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rao, D. Srinivasa; Jayaraaj, Indira A.; Jayaraaj, R.

    2005-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a clinical syndrome characterized by proximal dysphasia and wheeze due to increased resistance to the flow of air through the narrowed bronchi. Asthma has become the most common chronic disease in the world and epidemiological studies suggest that its prevalence, severity and mortality are rising at a time when mortality from other common treatable conditions is falling. The reasons for the above statistics are environmental factors such as increased exposure to allergens and atmospheric pollutants. Antiasthmatic treatment includes corticosteroids, which are very effective in the treatment of asthma. But corticosteroids are costly and if given systemically, have many severe adverse effects. Hence, the present research work involves the use of a herbal compound formulation Pentapala -04 prepared from five medicinal plants namely, Adhatoda vasica Need, Ocimum sanctum Linn, Coleus aromaticus Benth, Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn and Alpiania galangal Sw. The effect of “Pentapala-04” on ova albumin and aluminium hydroxide induced lung damage in albino wistar rats was investigated. The rats were divided into three groups of four animals each. Group I, II and III serves as control, toxic and post treatment group respectively. Our results showed that their was increased level of lipid peroxidation and secreased level of antioxidants in toxic group animals. But the levels of antioxidant enzymes were restored in post-treated groups of animals, which might be due to the ability of “ability of “Pentapala-04 to scavenge the reactive oxygen species. PMID:22557168

  5. Characterisation of Ga-coated and Ga-brazed aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Ferchaud, E.; Christien, F.; Barnier, V.; Paillard, P.

    2012-05-15

    This work is devoted to the brazing of aluminium using liquid gallium. Gallium was deposited on aluminium samples at {approx} 50 Degree-Sign C using a liquid gallium 'polishing' technique. Brazing was undertaken for 30 min at 500 Degree-Sign C in air. EDS (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) and AES (Auger Electron Spectroscopy) characterisation of Ga-coated samples has shown that the Ga surface layer thickness is of ten (or a few tens of) nanometres. Furthermore, aluminium oxide layer (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was shown to be 'descaled' during Ga deposition, which ensures good conditions for further brazing. Cross-section examination of Ga-coated samples shows that liquid gallium penetrates into the aluminium grain boundaries during deposition. The thickness of the grain boundary gallium film was measured using an original EDS technique and is found to be of a few tens of nanometres. The depth of gallium grain boundary penetration is about 300 {mu}m at the deposition temperature. The fracture stress of the brazed joints was measured from tensile tests and was determined to be 33 MPa. Cross-section examination of brazed joints shows that gallium has fully dissolved into the bulk and that the joint is really autogenous. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminium can be brazed using liquid gallium deposited by a 'polishing' technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aluminium oxide layer is 'descaled' during liquid Ga 'polishing' deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EDS can be used for determination of surface and grain boundary Ga film thickness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface and grain boundary Ga film thickness is of a few tens of nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface and grain boundary gallium dissolves in the bulk during brazing.

  6. Maternal depressive symptoms, maternal asthma, and asthma in school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Medsker, Brock H; Brew, Bronwyn K; Forno, Erick; Olsson, Henrik; Lundholm, Cecilia; Han, Yueh-Ying; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Canino, Glorisa J; Almqvist, Catarina; Celedón, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the joint effects of maternal asthma and maternal depression on childhood asthma. To examine whether maternal depression and maternal asthma lead to greater risk of childhood asthma than maternal asthma alone. Cross-sectional studies of children (6-14 years old) in San Juan, Puerto Rico (n = 655) and Sweden (n = 6,887) were conducted. In Puerto Rico, maternal depressive symptoms were defined using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) questionnaire. In Sweden, maternal physician-diagnosed depression was derived from national registries, and maternal depressive symptoms were defined using an abbreviated CES-D questionnaire. Childhood asthma was defined as physician-diagnosed asthma plus current wheeze (in Puerto Rico) or plus medication use (in Sweden). Logistic regression was used for multivariable analysis. Compared with Puerto Rican children whose mothers had neither asthma nor depressive symptoms, those whose mothers had asthma but no depressive symptoms had 3.2 times increased odds of asthma (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.1-4.8) and those whose mothers had asthma and depressive symptoms had 6.5 times increased odds of asthma (95% CI = 3.3-13.0). Similar results were obtained for maternal depression and maternal asthma in the Swedish cohort (odds ratio for maternal asthma without maternal depression = 2.8, 95% CI = 2.1-3.7; odds ratio for maternal asthma and maternal depression = 4.0, 95% CI = 1.7-9.6). Although the estimated effect of maternal asthma on childhood asthma was increased when maternal depressive symptoms (Puerto Rico) or maternal depression (Sweden) was present, there were no statistically significant additive interactions. Maternal depression can further increase the risk of asthma in children whose mothers have a history of asthma. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Korean Asthma Guideline 2014: Summary of Major Updates to the Korean Asthma Guideline 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog Kyeom; Park, Yong Bum; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Jung, Ki-Suck; Yoo, Ji Hong

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a prevalent and serious health problem in Korea. Recently, the Korean Asthma Guideline has been updated by The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases (KATRD) in an effort to improve the clinical management of asthma. This guideline focuses on adult patients with asthma and aims to deliver up to date scientific evidence and recommendations to general physicians for the management of asthma. For this purpose, this guideline was updated following systematic review and meta-analysis of recent studies and adapting some points of international guidelines (Global Initiative for Asthma [GINA] report 2014, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program [NAEPP] 2007, British Thoracic Society [BTS/SIGN] asthma guideline 2012, and Canadian asthma guideline 2012). Updated issues include recommendations derived using the population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) model, which produced 20 clinical questions on the management of asthma. It also covers a new definition of asthma, the importance of confirming various airflow limitations with spirometry, the epidemiology and the diagnostic flow of asthma in Korea, the importance and evidence for inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and ICS/formoterol as a single maintenance and acute therapy in the stepwise management of asthma, assessment of severity of asthma and management of exacerbation, and an action plan to cope with exacerbation. This guideline includes clinical assessments, and treatment of asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome, management of asthma in specific conditions including severe asthma, elderly asthma, cough variant asthma, exercise-induced bronchial contraction, etc. The revised Korean Asthma Guideline is expected to be a useful resource in the management of asthma. PMID:27433170

  8. Asthma control questionnaires in the management of asthma in children: A review.

    PubMed

    Voorend-van Bergen, S; Vaessen-Verberne, A A; de Jongste, J C; Pijnenburg, M W

    2015-02-01

    Several self-administered questionnaires have been developed to assess childhood asthma control in a simple and standardized way. This review discusses the most commonly used questionnaires and explores their usefulness in asthma management in children. We conclude that the use of asthma control questionnaires in daily practice and in research contributes to the standardized evaluation of children with asthma and helps to track asthma symptoms, but validation studies in a wider range of settings are needed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Pathogenesis of asthma.

    PubMed

    Holgate, Stephen T

    2008-06-01

    While asthma is considered an inflammatory disorder of the conducting airways, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the disease is heterogeneous with respect to immunopathology, clinical phenotypes, response to therapies, and natural history. Once considered purely an allergic disorder dominated by Th2-type lymphocytes, IgE, mast cells, eosinophils, macrophages, and cytokines, the disease also involves local epithelial, mesenchymal, vascular and neurologic events that are involved in directing the Th2 phenotype to the lung and through aberrant injury-repair mechanisms to remodeling of the airway wall. Structural cells provide the necessary "soil" upon which the "seeds" of the inflammatory response are able to take root and maintain a chronic phenotype and upon which are superimposed acute and subacute episodes usually driven by environmental factors such as exposure to allergens, microorganisms, pollutants or caused by inadequate antiinflammatory treatment. Greater consideration of additional immunologic and inflammatory pathways are revealing new ways of intervening in the prevention and treatment of the disease. Thus increased focus on environmental factors beyond allergic exposure (such as virus infection, air pollution, and diet) are identifying targets in structural as well as immune and inflammatory cells at which to direct new interventions.

  10. Occupational asthma in greenhouse workers.

    PubMed

    Monsó, Eduard

    2004-03-01

    A prevalence of asthma over 5% has been reported in flower farmers,and work inside greenhouses has emerged as an additional risk factor. Workplace determinants behind this high prevalence has been examined, and a prevalence of sensitization to workplace allergens over 30% has been reported being pollens, moulds, and Tetranychus urticae allergens the main sensitizers. Bronchial challenge tests in the workplace have demonstrated occupational asthma in more than 20% of the sensitized greenhouse growers. Air contamination inside greenhouses is mainly related to moulds, and is facilitated by the high indoor temperature and humidity. Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Alternaria and a wide range of flower pollens are able to sensitize the greenhouse worker and cause occupational asthma. Tetranychus urticae have allergens shared with other mites, but the low prevalence of cross-sensitization between them confirm that Tetranychus urticae contains species-specific allergens that may cause respiratory symptoms. Additionally, working inside greenhouses has been related to an increase in the prevalence of chronic bronchitis in nonsmokers. The cultivation of greenhouse crops may cause occupational asthma through sensitization to workplace pollens, moulds, and Tetranychus urticae allergens. In greenhouse flower growers, skin testing identifies sensitization to these allergens in one third of the growers, and more than one fifth of the sensitized workers will develop occupational asthma. Greenhouse work has also been related to chronic bronchitis in nonsmokers, suggesting a causal effect of greenhouse air contaminants on this disease as well.

  11. Baseline management of asthma control.

    PubMed

    Cavkaytar, O; Sekerel, B E

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a complex, chronic inflammatory disease of the lower airways affecting people of all ages. Approximately 300 million individuals are currently suffering from asthma worldwide. The prevalence of asthma is estimated to range from 3% to 38% in children and from 2% to 12% in adults. The disease causes lost school and work days, limitations in daily activities, and sleep disturbances. Lung function impairment also occurs, resulting in decreased quality of life unless disease control is achieved and a high annual financial burden is incurred. Achievement and maintenance of control through assessment of clinical manifestations and future risk has become the aim of treatment over the years. Unfortunately, the desired level of asthma control has not been achieved in a considerable number of regions throughout the world, and the level of control is overestimated by both patients and their parents. This review examines the mortality and morbidity rates for asthma, emphasizes the challenges inherent to control management, and provides data on the tools used to measure control level. Copyright © 2012 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. An Online Simulation in Pediatric Asthma Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Keith B.

    2004-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that nearly 20 million Americans suffer from asthma, 6.3 million of which are children (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2004). It is not merely an annoyance disease, as is commonly believed. Asthma kills. It takes more than 5,000 American lives each year (Asthma Statistics in America,…

  13. Managing Asthma in the Early Childhood Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graville, Iris

    2011-01-01

    Asthma, one of the most common chronic disorders in childhood, affects more than seven million children in the United States, and is the third leading cause of hospitalization for children. Statistics like these make planning and preparing for asthma in the early childhood setting a high priority. With the high rates of asthma in the U.S. today,…

  14. Understanding Children with Asthma: Trouble and Triggers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, JungHa; Wood, Beatrice L.; Cheah, PoAnn

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common illnesses of childhood; in the United States, nearly 9% of children have the condition (Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, 2006). Among children with chronic illnesses, asthma is the most common cause for school absence and hospitalization (Akinbami, 2006). Asthma is a chronic disorder of the…

  15. Consequences of Asthma in Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales-Macias, Laura Denise

    2009-01-01

    Much of the literature on asthma is based on non-school data collected primarily in clinics. As asthma is given greater national attention, it is crucial to examine the educational consequences of the disease in the context of school where children spend much of their days. This study examines the educational impact of asthma on elementary and…

  16. Consequences of Asthma in Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales-Macias, Laura Denise

    2009-01-01

    Much of the literature on asthma is based on non-school data collected primarily in clinics. As asthma is given greater national attention, it is crucial to examine the educational consequences of the disease in the context of school where children spend much of their days. This study examines the educational impact of asthma on elementary and…

  17. Managing Asthma in the Early Childhood Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graville, Iris

    2011-01-01

    Asthma, one of the most common chronic disorders in childhood, affects more than seven million children in the United States, and is the third leading cause of hospitalization for children. Statistics like these make planning and preparing for asthma in the early childhood setting a high priority. With the high rates of asthma in the U.S. today,…

  18. Understanding Children with Asthma: Trouble and Triggers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, JungHa; Wood, Beatrice L.; Cheah, PoAnn

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common illnesses of childhood; in the United States, nearly 9% of children have the condition (Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, 2006). Among children with chronic illnesses, asthma is the most common cause for school absence and hospitalization (Akinbami, 2006). Asthma is a chronic disorder of the…

  19. Asthma Education Programme in Russia: Educating Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslennikova, G. Ya.; Morosova, M. E.; Salman, N. V.; Kulikov, S. M.; Oganov, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    U.S. recommendations for asthma management were adapted for use in educating Moscow families with children with asthma (N=252). Use of anti-inflammatory drugs, doctor visits, peak flow rates, and daily peak flow were also measured. One-year follow up showed significant improvement in asthma self-management skills among the education group.…

  20. Emergency management of acute adult asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Grunfeld, A. F.; Ho, K.

    1995-01-01

    Despite advances in understanding the pathophysiology of acute asthma and the development of new, effective therapies, patients still die. While physicians agree that most asthma deaths could be prevented if patients were treated adequately, evidence suggests that both patients and physicians continue to underestimate the severity of asthma attacks and delay adequate treatment. PMID:8563508

  1. Asthma Education Programme in Russia: Educating Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslennikova, G. Ya.; Morosova, M. E.; Salman, N. V.; Kulikov, S. M.; Oganov, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    U.S. recommendations for asthma management were adapted for use in educating Moscow families with children with asthma (N=252). Use of anti-inflammatory drugs, doctor visits, peak flow rates, and daily peak flow were also measured. One-year follow up showed significant improvement in asthma self-management skills among the education group.…

  2. Towards an understanding of the adjuvant action of aluminium

    PubMed Central

    Marrack, Philippa; McKee, Amy S.; Munks, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of vaccines depends on the presence of an adjuvant in conjunction with the antigen. Of these adjuvants, the ones that contain aluminium, which were first discovered empirically in 1926, are currently the most widely used. However, a detailed understanding of their mechanism of action has only started to be revealed. In this Timeline article, we briefly describe the initial discovery of aluminium adjuvants and discuss historically important advances. We also summarize recent progress in the field and discuss their implications and the remaining questions on how these adjuvants work. PMID:19247370

  3. Transmittance jump in a thin aluminium layer during laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Bykovsky, N E; Senatsky, Yu V; Pershin, S M; Samokhin, A A

    2016-02-28

    A jump in the transmittance (from ∼0.1% to ∼50% for ∼1 ns) of an optical gate on a Mylar film (a thin aluminium layer on a Lavsan substrate) irradiated by nanosecond (10{sup -7} – 10{sup -8} s) pulses of a neodymium laser with an intensity up to 0.1 GW cm{sup -2} has been recorded. The mechanism of a fast (10{sup -10} – 10{sup -11} s) increase in the transmittance of the aluminium layer upon its overheating (without boiling) to the metal – insulator phase-transition temperature is discussed. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  4. Silver coated aluminium microrods as highly colloidal stable SERS platforms.

    PubMed

    Pazos-Perez, Nicolas; Borke, Tina; Andreeva, Daria V; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A

    2011-08-01

    We report on the fabrication of a novel material with the ability to remain in solution even under the very demanding conditions required for structural and dynamic characterization of biomacromolecule assays. This stability is provided by the increase in surface area of a low density material (aluminium) natively coated with a very hydrophilic surface composed of aluminium oxide (Al(2)O(3)) and metallic silver nanoparticles. Additionally, due to the dense collection of active hot spots on their surface, this material offers higher levels of SERS intensity as compared with the same free and aggregated silver nanoparticles.

  5. Asthma and the Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Insight into the Heterogeneity and Phenotypes of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Rolfes, Mary Claire; Juhn, Young Jun; Wi, Chung-Il

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is traditionally regarded as a chronic airway disease, and recent literature proves its heterogeneity, based on distinctive clusters or phenotypes of asthma. In defining such asthma clusters, the nature of comorbidity among patients with asthma is poorly understood, by assuming no causal relationship between asthma and other comorbid conditions, including both communicable and noncommunicable diseases. However, emerging evidence suggests that the status of asthma significantly affects the increased susceptibility of the patient to both communicable and noncommunicable diseases. Specifically, the impact of asthma on susceptibility to noncommunicable diseases such as chronic systemic inflammatory diseases (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis), may provide an important insight into asthma as a disease with systemic inflammatory features, a conceptual understanding between asthma and asthma-related comorbidity, and the potential implications on the therapeutic and preventive interventions for patients with asthma. This review discusses the currently under-recognized clinical and immunological phenotypes of asthma; specifically, a higher risk of developing a systemic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis and their implications, on the conceptual understanding and management of asthma. Our discussion is divided into three parts: literature summary on the relationship between asthma and the risk of rheumatoid arthritis; potential mechanisms underlying the association; and implications on asthma management and research. PMID:28416952

  6. Exploring Asthma in the Workplace: A Triangulation of Perspectives from Management, Employees and People with Asthma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Denise H; Smith, Lorraine; Saini, Bandana

    2017-08-31

    People with asthma spend a significant amount of time in the workplace but little is known about the current state of disease management in such contexts. The aim of the current study is to explore the experiences, attitudes and perceptions of asthma across different stakeholders in the workplace to help inform potential recommendations for workplace asthma policies. Using a purposive convenience sampling method, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted in Australia with 5 human resource personnel, 10 employees with asthma and 10 employees without asthma. Interviews were guided by a schedule of questions focusing on attitudes and experiences of asthma in the workplace, which were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Analysis of the qualitative dataset revealed three key themes: Beliefs and Attitudes about Asthma, Asthma Solutions in the Workplace and Workplace Obstacles. Findings suggest employees with asthma experience problems managing their asthma at work and there is a lack of workplace support in relation to asthma emergency management. Key recommendations for workplace asthma policies have been made to provide better support for employees with asthma. However, further investigation into the experience of managing asthma is required in a wider variety of occupations and work experiences to inform the development of a workplace asthma policy.

  7. Accumulation of Aluminium and Physiological Status of Tree Foliage in the Vicinity of a Large Aluminium Smelter

    PubMed Central

    Wannaz, E. D.; Rodriguez, J. H.; Wolfsberger, T.; Carreras, H. A.; Pignata, M. L.; Fangmeier, A.; Franzaring, J.

    2012-01-01

    A pollution gradient was observed in tree foliage sampled in the vicinity of a large aluminium production facility in Patagonia (Argentina). Leaves of Eucalyptus rostrata, and Populus hybridus and different needle ages of Pinus spec. were collected and concentrations of aluminium (Al) and sulphur (S) as well as physiological parameters (chlorophyll and lipid oxidation products) were analyzed. Al and S concentrations indicate a steep pollution gradient in the study showing a relationship with the physiological parameters in particular membrane lipid oxidation products. The present study confirms that aluminium smelting results in high Al and sulphur deposition in the study area, and therefore further studies should be carried out taking into account potentially adverse effects of these compounds on human and ecosystem health. PMID:22654642

  8. Accumulation of aluminium and physiological status of tree foliage in the vicinity of a large aluminium smelter.

    PubMed

    Wannaz, E D; Rodriguez, J H; Wolfsberger, T; Carreras, H A; Pignata, M L; Fangmeier, A; Franzaring, J

    2012-01-01

    A pollution gradient was observed in tree foliage sampled in the vicinity of a large aluminium production facility in Patagonia (Argentina). Leaves of Eucalyptus rostrata, and Populus hybridus and different needle ages of Pinus spec. were collected and concentrations of aluminium (Al) and sulphur (S) as well as physiological parameters (chlorophyll and lipid oxidation products) were analyzed. Al and S concentrations indicate a steep pollution gradient in the study showing a relationship with the physiological parameters in particular membrane lipid oxidation products. The present study confirms that aluminium smelting results in high Al and sulphur deposition in the study area, and therefore further studies should be carried out taking into account potentially adverse effects of these compounds on human and ecosystem health.

  9. Inhalation of honey reduces airway inflammation and histopathological changes in a rabbit model of ovalbumin-induced chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Honey is widely used in folk medicine to treat cough, fever, and inflammation. In this study, the effect of aerosolised honey on airway tissues in a rabbit model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma was investigated. The ability of honey to act either as a rescuing agent in alleviating asthma-related symptoms or as a preventive agent to preclude the occurrence of asthma was also assessed. Methods Forty New Zealand white rabbits were sensitized twice with mixture of OVA and aluminium hydroxide on days 1 and 14. Honey treatments were given from day 23 to day 25 at two different doses (25% (v/v) and 50% (v/v) of honey diluted in sterile phosphate buffer saline. In the aerosolised honey as a rescue agent group, animals were euthanized on day 28; for the preventive group, animals were further exposed to aerosolised OVA for 3 days starting from day 28 and euthanized on day 31. The effects of honey on inflammatory cell response, airway inflammation, and goblet cell hyperplasia were assessed for each animal. Results Histopathological analyses revealed that aerosolised honey resulted in structural changes of the epithelium, mucosa, and submucosal regions of the airway that caused by the induction with OVA. Treatment with aerosolised honey has reduced the number of airway inflammatory cells present in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and inhibited the goblet cell hyperplasia. Conclusion In this study, aerosolised honey was used to effectively treat and manage asthma in rabbits, and it could prove to be a promising treatment for asthma in humans. Future studies with a larger sample size and studies at the gene expression level are needed to better understand the mechanisms by which aerosolised honey reduces asthma symptoms. PMID:24886260

  10. Carbon treated commercial aluminium alloys as anodes for aluminium-air batteries in sodium chloride electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, M.; Herranz, D.; Chacón, J.; Fatás, E.; Ocón, P.

    2016-09-01

    An easy treatment based in carbon layer deposition into aluminium alloys is presented to enhance the performance of Al-air primary batteries with neutral pH electrolyte. The jellification of aluminate in the anode surface is described and avoided by the carbon covering. Treated commercial Al alloys namely Al1085 and Al7475 are tested as anodes achieving specific capacities above 1.2 Ah g-1vs 0.5 Ah g-1 without carbon covering. The influence of the binder proportion in the treatment as well as different carbonaceous materials, Carbon Black, Graphene and Pyrolytic Graphite are evaluated as candidates for the covering. Current densities of 1-10 mA cm-2 are measured and the influence of the alloy explored. A final battery design of 4 cells in series is presented for discharges with a voltage plateau of 2 V and 1 Wh g-1 energy density.

  11. Asthma education for school staff.

    PubMed

    Kew, Kayleigh M; Carr, Robin; Donovan, Tim; Gordon, Morris

    2017-04-12

    Teachers and school staff should be competent in managing asthma in schools. Demonstrated low levels of asthma knowledge mean that staff may not know how best to protect a child with asthma in their care, or may fail to take appropriate action in the event of a serious attack. Education about asthma could help to improve this knowledge and lead to better asthma outcomes for children. To assess the effectiveness and safety of asthma education programmes for school staff, and to identify content and attributes underpinning them. We conducted the most recent searches on 29 November 2016. We included randomised controlled trials comparing an intervention to educate school staff about asthma versus a control group. We included studies reported as full text, those published as abstract only and unpublished data. At least two review authors screened the searches, extracted outcome data and intervention characteristics from included studies and assessed risk of bias. Primary outcomes for the quantitative synthesis were emergency department (ED) or hospital visits, mortality and asthma control; we graded the main results and presented evidence in a 'Summary of findings' table. We planned a qualitative synthesis of intervention characteristics, but study authors were unable to provide the necessary information.We analysed dichotomous data as odds ratios, and continuous data as mean differences or standardised mean differences, all with a random-effects model. We assessed clinical, methodological and statistical heterogeneity when performing meta-analyses, and we narratively described skewed data. Five cluster-RCTs of 111 schools met the review eligibility criteria. Investigators measured outcomes in participating staff and often in children or parents, most often at between 1 and 12 months.All interventions were educational programmes but duration, content and delivery varied; some involved elements of training for pupils or primary care providers. We noted risk of selection

  12. Respiratory Disorders in Aluminum Smelter Workers

    PubMed Central

    Søyseth, Vidar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Summarizing the knowledge status, including the morphology, possible etiological factors, and clinical expression of aluminum potroom asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease related to aluminum potroom exposure. Methods: A review of the literature from the last two decades as it appears in PubMed. Results: There is substantial evidence for the existence of potroom asthma, although the incidence seems to decline over the last 10 years. Increased mortality from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and longitudinal decline in forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration has been shown in aluminum potroom workers. Morphological manifestations in bronchial biopsies and the inflammatory markers NO and eosinophils in airway tissue and blood are consistent with asthma in general. The causative agent(s) is (are) not known. Conclusions: Reduction of exposure and cessation of smoking seem to be the major preventive measures to avoid respiratory disorders in the aluminum industry. PMID:24806727

  13. A Numerical Analysis of the Resistance and Stiffness of the Aluminium and Concrete Composite Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polus, Łukasz; Szumigała, Maciej

    2015-03-01

    In this paper a numerical analysis of the resistance and stiffness of the aluminium and concrete composite beam is presented. Composite aluminium and concrete structures are quite new and they have not been thoroughly tested. Composite structures have a lot of advantages. The composite aluminium and concrete beam is more corrosion-resistant, fire-resistant and stiff than the aluminium beam. The contemporary idea of sustainable buildings relies on new solutions which are more environmentally friendly. Aluminium is lighter and more resistant to corrosion than steel, which is often used in composite structures.

  14. [Plant physiological and molecular biological mechanism in response to aluminium toxicity].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Zheng, Shaojian; Lin, Xianyong

    2004-09-01

    Aluminium toxicity is the major factor limiting crop growth on acid soils, which greatly affects the crop productivity on about 40% cultivated soils of the world and 21% of China. In the past decades, a lot of researches on aluminium toxicity and resistant mechanisms have been doing, and great progress was achieved. This paper dealt with the genetic differences in aluminium tolerance among plants, screening and selecting methods and technologies for identifying aluminium resistance in plants, and physiological and molecular mechanism resistance to aluminium toxicity. Some aspects needed to be further studied were also briefly discussed.

  15. Intestinal perfusion of dietary levels of aluminium: association with the mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, J J; Ainley, C C; Evans, R; Thompson, R P

    1994-01-01

    An aluminium (93 microM) sulphate solution freshly adjusted to pH 7.0 was perfused through the rat small bowel to mimic the reported physiological conditions that follow dietary aluminium ingestion. One third of this aluminium was taken up from the perfusate, but > 90% of this was then recovered from the intestinal mucus/mucosa and most (> 70%) from the distal third of the small bowel. The fresh perfusate was shown by ultrafiltration to contain largely particulate/colloidal aluminium-hydroxide, and this probably adhered to intestinal mucus which may be an important barrier to the gastrointestinal absorption of aluminium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7926905

  16. [Asthma and intolerance to benzoates].

    PubMed

    Petrus, M; Bonaz, S; Causse, E; Rhabbour, M; Moulie, N; Netter, J C; Bildstein, G

    1996-10-01

    Some foods and drug additives may induce allergic reactions. A girl with a family history of asthma in both parents developed asthma in her early life. She was successfully given continuous bronchodilator therapy until the age of 7 years. At that time, she had more frequent and severe exacerbations (8 within 10 months) despite reinforced continuous treatment. Oral challenges with bisulfite and sodium benzoate, both additives abundantly ingested by the patient, revealed heightened sensitivity to administration of sodium benzoate. Avoidance of this additive was followed by complete and prolonged disappearance of episodes of coughing and wheezing. Adverse reactions to benzoate in this patient required avoidance of some drugs, some of those classically prescribed under the form of syrups in asthma.

  17. Asthma and domestic air quality.

    PubMed

    Jones, A P

    1998-09-01

    In recent years, there has been a global increase in the prevalence of asthma. This has coincided with many modifications to the home environment, resulting in changes to the quality of indoor air. This article considers the links between indoor air pollution and asthma. Exposure to a range of pollutants is examined. Airborne allergens such as those from house dust mites and cockroaches, domestic pets and moulds and fungal spores may be important. Pollution from particulate materials associated with bio-fuel combustion and smoking is discussed, as is the role of chemical vapours and gases including nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds. The efficacy of various environmental controls to limit the impact of these pollutants is explored. It is concluded that indoor air pollution may be an important risk for asthma and the health impacts of building design and management require greater recognition and further research.

  18. Asthma in the geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Madeo, Jennifer; Li, Zhenhong; Frieri, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the geriatric population. Despite the rising incidence of asthma in people >65 years of age, the diagnosis is frequently missed in this population. Factors that contribute to this include respiratory changes caused by aging, immunosenescence, lack of symptoms, polypharmacy, clinician unawareness, and lack of evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and management that target this population. This literature review addresses the current state of research in this area. Age-related changes influence the pathophysiology and role of allergy in elderly asthmatic patients. Specific obstacles encountered in caring for these patients are discussed. Asthma in the elderly and younger population are compared. We conclude with a broad set of goals to guide future management driven by a multidiscipline approach.

  19. Do oral aluminium phosphate binders cause accumulation of aluminium to toxic levels?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aluminium (Al) toxicity was frequent in the 1980s in patients ingesting Al containing phosphate binders (Alucaps) whilst having HD using water potentially contaminated with Al. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of Al toxicity in HD patients receiving Alucaps but never exposed to contaminated dialysate water. Methods HD patients only treated with Reverse Osmosis(RO) treated dialysis water with either current or past exposure to Alucaps were given standardised DFO tests. Post-DFO serum Al level > 3.0 μmol/L was defined to indicate toxic loads based on previous bone biopsy studies. Results 39 patients (34 anuric) were studied. Mean dose of Alucap was 3.5 capsules/d over 23.0 months. Pre-DFO Al levels were > 1.0 μmol/L in only 2 patients and none were > 3.0 μmol/L. No patients had a post DFO Al levels > 3.0 μmol/L. There were no correlations between the serum Al concentrations (pre-, post- or the incremental rise after DFO administration) and the total amount of Al ingested. No patients had unexplained EPO resistance or biochemical evidence of adynamic bone. Conclusions Although this is a small study, oral aluminium exposure was considerable. Yet no patients undergoing HD with RO treated water had evidence of Al toxicity despite doses equivalent to 3.5 capsules of Alucap for 2 years. The relationship between the DFO-Al results and the total amount of Al ingested was weak (R2 = 0.07) and not statistically significant. In an era of financial prudence, and in view of the recognised risk of excess calcium loading in dialysis patients, perhaps we should re-evaluate the risk of using Al-based phosphate binders in HD patients who remain uric. PMID:21992770

  20. Evaluation of quality of life according to asthma control and asthma severity in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Natasha Yumi; Ribeiro, Maria Angela Gonçalves de Oliveira; Saad, Ivete Alonso Bredda; Morcillo, André Moreno; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Toro, Adyléia Aparecida Dalbo Contrera

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate quality of life according to the level of asthma control and degree of asthma severity in children and adolescents. We selected children and adolescents with asthma (7-17 years of age) from the Pediatric Pulmonology Outpatient Clinic of the State University of Campinas Hospital de Clínicas, located in the city of Campinas, Brazil. Asthma control and asthma severity were assessed by the Asthma Control Test and by the questionnaire based on the Global Initiative for Asthma, respectively. The patients also completed the Paediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ), validated for use in Brazil, in order to evaluate their quality of life. The mean age of the patients was 11.22 ± 2.91 years, with a median of 11.20 (7.00-17.60) years. We selected 100 patients, of whom 27, 33, and 40 were classified as having controlled asthma (CA), partially controlled asthma (PCA), and uncontrolled asthma (UA), respectively. As for asthma severity, 34, 19, and 47 were classified as having mild asthma (MiA), moderate asthma (MoA), and severe asthma (SA), respectively. The CA and the PCA groups, when compared with the NCA group, showed higher values for the overall PAQLQ score and all PAQLQ domains (activity limitation, symptoms, and emotional function; p < 0.001 for all). The MiA group showed higher scores for all of the PAQLQ components than did the MoA and SA groups. Quality of life appears to be directly related to asthma control and asthma severity in children and adolescents, being better when asthma is well controlled and asthma severity is lower.