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Sample records for aluminum barium calcium

  1. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this section... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this section... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese...

  6. Ferroelastic domains in lead-free barium zirconate titanate - barium calcium titanate piezoceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehmke, Matthias Claudius

    Piezoelectricity was first discovered by Pierre and Jaque Curie in the year 1880. Nowadays, piezoelectric materials are used in many application such as high voltage generation in gas igniters, actuation in micro-positioning devices, generation and detection of acoustic waves, emitters and receivers for sonar technology, ultrasonic cleaning, ultrasound medical therapy, and micropumps for ink-jet printers. The most commonly used piezoelectric material since the 1950's is the solid solution system lead zirconate titanate (PZT) that offers high piezoelectric performance under a large range of operating conditions. However, the toxicity of lead requires the replacement of PZT. The studied lead-free alternatives are commonly based on potassium sodium niobate (KNN) and bismuth sodium titanate (BNT), and more recently zirconium and calcium substituted barium titanate (BZT-BCT). The BZT-BCT system exhibits large piezoelectric coefficients that can exceed even those of most PZT compositions under certain conditions. Piezoelectricity was first discovered by Pierre and Jaque Curie in the year 1880. Nowadays, piezoelectric materials are used in many application such as high voltage generation in gas igniters, actuation in micro-positioning devices, generation and detection of acoustic waves, emitters and receivers for sonar technology, ultrasonic cleaning, ultrasound medical therapy, and micropumps for ink-jet printers. The most commonly used piezoelectric material since the 1950's is the solid solution system lead zirconate titanate (PZT) that offers high piezoelectric performance under a large range of operating conditions. However, the toxicity of lead requires the replacement of PZT. The studied lead-free alternatives are commonly based on potassium sodium niobate (KNN) and bismuth sodium titanate (BNT), and more recently zirconium and calcium substituted barium titanate (BZT-BCT). The BZT-BCT system exhibits large piezoelectric coefficients that can exceed even those of

  7. Growth of nanofibrous barium carbonate on calcium carbonate seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeijer, Sara J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Barrett, Richard A.; Gower, Laurie B.

    2008-05-01

    Fibrous barium carbonate (BaCO 3/witherite) crystals 50-100 nm in diameter and several microns in length were grown on calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) seeds at temperatures as low as 4 °C. The BaCO 3 fibers were deposited onto calcite rhombs or CaCO 3 films using the polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process, which was induced with the sodium salt of polyacrylic acid (PAA). The structure and morphology of the resultant fibers were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), and polarized light microscopy (PLM). Fibers were successfully grown on calcite seeds of various morphologies, with a range of barium concentrations, and PAA molecular weight and concentration. Two categories of fibers were grown: straight and twisted. Both types of fibers displayed single-crystalline SAED diffraction patterns, but after examining high-resolution TEM lattice images, it was revealed that the fibers were in fact made up of nanocrystalline domains. We postulate that these nanocrystalline domains are well aligned due to a singular nucleation event (i.e., each fiber propagates from a single nucleation event on the seed crystal) with the nanocrystalline domains resulting from stresses caused by dehydration during crystallization of the highly hydrated precursor phase. These BaCO 3 fibers grown on calcite substrates further illustrate the robustness and non-specificity of the PILP process.

  8. Nonlinear optical properties of calcium barium niobate epitaxial thin films.

    PubMed

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Vigne, Sébastien; Hossain, Nadir; Chaker, Mohammed; Légaré, François

    2016-07-25

    We investigate the potential of epitaxial calcium barium niobate (CBN) thin film grown by pulsed laser deposition for optical frequency conversion. Using second harmonic generation (SHG), we analyze the polarization response of the generated signal to determine the ratios d15 / d32 and d33 / d32 of the three independent components of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility tensor in CBN thin film. In addition, a detailed comparison to the signal intensity obtained in a y-cut quartz allows us to measure the absolute value of these components in CBN thin film: d15 = 5 ± 2 pm / V, d32 = 3.1 ± 0.6 pm / V and d33 = 9 ± 2 pm / V.

  9. Analysis of barium hydroxide and calcium hydroxide slurry carbonation reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Patch, K.D.; Hart, R.P.; Schumacher, W.A.

    1980-05-01

    The removal of CO/sub 2/ from air was investigated by using a continuous-agitated-slurry carbonation reactor containing either barium hydroxide (Ba(OH)/sub 2/) or calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)/sub 2/). Such a process would be applied to scrub /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from stack gases at nuclear-fuel reprocessing plants. Decontamination factors were characterized for reactor conditions which could alter hydrodynamic behavior. An attempt was made to characterize reactor performance with models assuming both plug flow and various degrees of backmixing in the gas phase. The Ba(OH)/sub 2/ slurry enabled increased conversion, but apparently the process was controlled under some conditions by phenomena differing from those observed for carbonation by Ca(OH)/sub 2/. Overall reaction mechanisms are postulated.

  10. Nonlinear optical properties of calcium barium niobate epitaxial thin films.

    PubMed

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Vigne, Sébastien; Hossain, Nadir; Chaker, Mohammed; Légaré, François

    2016-07-25

    We investigate the potential of epitaxial calcium barium niobate (CBN) thin film grown by pulsed laser deposition for optical frequency conversion. Using second harmonic generation (SHG), we analyze the polarization response of the generated signal to determine the ratios d15 / d32 and d33 / d32 of the three independent components of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility tensor in CBN thin film. In addition, a detailed comparison to the signal intensity obtained in a y-cut quartz allows us to measure the absolute value of these components in CBN thin film: d15 = 5 ± 2 pm / V, d32 = 3.1 ± 0.6 pm / V and d33 = 9 ± 2 pm / V. PMID:27464195

  11. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  12. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  13. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  14. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  15. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  16. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  17. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  18. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  19. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  20. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  1. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla.

  2. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla. PMID:27123456

  3. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla. PMID:27123456

  4. Life Model of Hollow Cathodes Using a Barium Calcium Aluminate Impregnated Tungsten Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Hollow cathodes with barium calcium aluminate impregnated tungsten emitters for thermionic emission are widely used in electric propulsion. These high current, low power cathodes are employed in ion thrusters, Hall thrusters, and on the International Space Station in plasma contactors. The requirements on hollow cathode life are growing more stringent with the increasing use of electric propulsion technology. The life limiting mechanism that determines the entitlement lifetime of a barium impregnated thermionic emission cathode is the evolution and transport of barium away from the emitter surface. A model is being developed to study the process of barium transport and loss from the emitter insert in hollow cathodes. The model accounts for the production of barium through analysis of the relevant impregnate chemistry. Transport of barium through the approximately static gas is also being treated. Finally, the effect of temperature gradients within the cathode are considered.

  5. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  6. Effect of chloride incorporation on the crystallization of zirconium-barium-lanthanum-aluminum fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, G. F.; Smith, G. L.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    One aspect of the influence of preparation procedure on the crystallization behavior of a zirconium-barium-lanthanum-aluminum fluoride glass was studied. The crystallization pattern of this glass may be affected by the chlorine concentration within it. In particular, when such glasses are heated at low temperatures, the alpha-Ba-Zr-F6 crystalline phase forms only in those glasses which contain chloride.

  7. Precipitation of Calcium, Magnesium, Strontium and Barium in Tissues of Four Acacia Species (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae)

    PubMed Central

    He, Honghua; Bleby, Timothy M.; Veneklaas, Erik J.; Lambers, Hans; Kuo, John

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation of calcium in plants is common. There are abundant studies on the uptake and content of magnesium, strontium and barium, which have similar chemical properties to calcium, in comparison with those of calcium in plants, but studies on co-precipitation of these elements with calcium in plants are rare. In this study, we compared morphologies, distributional patterns, and elemental compositions of crystals in tissues of four Acacia species grown in the field as well as in the glasshouse. A comparison was also made of field-grown plants and glasshouse-grown plants, and of phyllodes of different ages for each species. Crystals of various morphologies and distributional patterns were observed in the four Acacia species studied. Magnesium, strontium and barium were precipitated together with calcium, mainly in phyllodes of the four Acacia species, and sometimes in branchlets and primary roots. These elements were most likely precipitated in forms of oxalate and sulfate in various tissues, including epidermis, mesophyll, parenchyma, sclerenchyma (fibre cells), pith, pith ray and cortex. In most cases, precipitation of calcium, magnesium, strontium and barium was biologically induced, and elements precipitated differed between soil types, plant species, and tissues within an individual plant; the precipitation was also related to tissue age. Formation of crystals containing these elements might play a role in regulating and detoxifying these elements in plants, and protecting the plants against herbivory. PMID:22848528

  8. Effect of aluminum substitution on microwave absorption properties of barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jianxun; Zhang, Qiguo; Gu, Mingyuan; Shen, Haigen

    2005-11-01

    Aluminum substituted barium hexaferrites were prepared by the self-propagating combustion method and subsequent calcination at 850 °C. The crystalline structure, complex permittivity, complex permeability, and hyperfine parameters of BaFe12-xAlxO19 (x varies from 1.5 to 2.3 in steps of 0.2) were measured with x-ray diffraction (XRD), vector network analyzer and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The XRD results show that all Al3+ ions enter into the lattice of hexagonal barium ferrite. The substitution of Al3+ ions can greatly affect the complex permittivity and permeability of barium ferrite. With increasing substitution, the real part of complex permittivity increases gradually, and the peaks of the imaginary part of complex permeability shift into higher frequency band. When the substitution amount x is 1.9, the largest movement of the peaks is 1.95 GHz, which indicates that the ferromagnetic resonant frequency of barium ferrite increases by 1.95 GHz. The Al3+ ions preferentially occupy the 4f2, 2a, 4f1, and 12k sites in the subcrystalline structure up to x =1.9, and then the Al3+ ions mainly occupy 12k sites. This change also results in 2b sites with a large quadrupole splitting. These occupations lead to a variable magnetocrystalline anisotropy field.

  9. Calcium barium niobate as a functional material for broadband optical frequency conversion.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yan; Chen, Xin; Lukasiewicz, Tadeusz; Swirkowicz, Marek; Koynov, Kaloian; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2014-03-15

    We demonstrate the application of as-grown calcium barium niobate (CBN) crystal with random-sized ferroelectric domains as a broadband frequency converter. The frequency conversion process is similar to broadband harmonic generation in commonly used strontium barium niobate (SBN) crystal, but results in higher conversion efficiency reflecting a larger effective nonlinear coefficient of the CBN crystal. We also analyzed the polarization properties of the emitted radiation and determined the ratio of d32 and d33 components of the second-order susceptibility tensor of the CBN crystal.

  10. Pyroelectric and dielectric properties of calcium barium niobate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshkina, O. V.; Lisitsin, V. S.; Dec, J.; Łukasiewicz, T.

    2014-09-01

    The effect of the calcium concentration on the pyroelectric and dielectric properties of Ca x Ba1 - x Nb2O6 (CBN) crystals has been studied over a wide temperature range. It has been shown that the calcium concentration only influences the Curie point of crystals of this class. It insignificantly changes the absolute values of the permittivity, the coercive field, and the remanent polarization and does not influence their temperature dependences and the shape of the dielectric hysteresis loop. The possibility of the existence of relaxor properties in CBN crystals has been discussed.

  11. Aluminum Citrate Prevents Renal Injury from Calcium Oxalate Crystal Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Besenhofer, Lauren M.; Cain, Marie C.; Dunning, Cody

    2012-01-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals are responsible for the kidney injury associated with exposure to ethylene glycol or severe hyperoxaluria. Current treatment strategies target the formation of calcium oxalate but not its interaction with kidney tissue. Because aluminum citrate blocks calcium oxalate binding and toxicity in human kidney cells, it may provide a different therapeutic approach to calcium oxalate-induced injury. Here, we tested the effects of aluminum citrate and sodium citrate in a Wistar rat model of acute high-dose ethylene glycol exposure. Aluminum citrate, but not sodium citrate, attenuated increases in urea nitrogen, creatinine, and the ratio of kidney to body weight in ethylene glycol–treated rats. Compared with ethylene glycol alone, the addition of aluminum citrate significantly increased the urinary excretion of both crystalline calcium and crystalline oxalate and decreased the deposition of crystals in renal tissue. In vitro, aluminum citrate interacted directly with oxalate crystals to inhibit their uptake by proximal tubule cells. These results suggest that treating with aluminum citrate attenuates renal injury in rats with severe ethylene glycol toxicity, apparently by inhibiting calcium oxalate’s interaction with, and retention by, the kidney epithelium. PMID:23138489

  12. Optical planar waveguide in sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystals by carbon ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jin-Hua; Qin, Xi-Feng; Wang, Feng-Xiang; Fu, Gang; Wang, Hui-Lin; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2013-07-01

    There is great interest in niobate crystals which belong to the tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) families owing to their intriguing properties. As one representative of such crystals, CBN (calcium barium niobate) has attracted rapidly growing attention. Because it has a higher Curie temperature than SBN (strontium barium niobate), possesses outstanding ferroelectric and it possesses optical properties. In addition, doped with sodium, CBN will show a higher Curie temperature than pure CBN. We report on the fabrication and characterization of optical planar waveguide in x-cut sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystal by using C ion implantation. The guided-mode properties at the wavelength of 633 and 1539 nm are investigated through prism-coupling measurements, respectively. By applying direct end-face coupling arrangement, the near-field optical intensity distribution of waveguide modes is measured at 633 nm. For comparison, the modal profile of the same guided mode is also numerically calculated by the finite difference beam-propagation method via computer software BeamPROP. The transmission spectra of the waveguide before and after ion implantation treatments were investigated also. Our experiment results reveal that the waveguide could propagate light with transverse magnetic polarized direction only and it is assumed that the polarization selectivity of CBN crystal may responsible for this phenomenon.

  13. Curie temperature and magnetic properties of aluminum doped barium ferrite particles prepared by ball mill method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daming; Harward, Ian; Baptist, Joshua; Goldman, Sara; Celinski, Zbigniew

    2015-12-01

    Barium ferrite has attracted considerable interest in the fields of permanent magnets and perpendicular magnetic recording due to its strong uniaxial anisotropy and high Curie temperature (Tc). We prepared aluminum doped barium ferrite ceramics (BaAlxFe12-xO19, 0≤x≤6) by the ball mill method. The powder was milled for 96 h, and after forming pellets, annealed for 48 h in air at 1000 °C. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) data show that there are only single hexagonal phases in the samples without any impurity phase. The crystal lattice constants, a and c, were calculated by Cohen's method. Both a and c decrease with increasing x, ranging from 0.588 nm and 2.318 nm to 0.573 nm and 2.294 nm, respectively. A Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) were used to investigate Tc and magnetic properties of BaFe12-xAlxO19. It is found that Tc decreases with increasing x, from 425 °C to 298 °C. It is also found that the saturated magnetization (4πMs) decreases with increasing x, while the coercivity (Hc) increases with the increase in x. The anisotropy field was also determined from the SQUID measurement.

  14. Calcium citrate without aluminum antacids does not cause aluminum retention in patients with functioning kidneys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Wabner, C. L.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Copley, J. B.; Pak, L.; Poindexter, J. R.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that calcium citrate might enhance aluminum absorption from food, posing a threat of aluminum toxicity even in patients with normal renal function. We therefore measured serum and urinary aluminum before and following calcium citrate therapy in patients with moderate renal failure and in normal subjects maintained on constant metabolic diets with known aluminum content (967-1034 mumol/day, or 26.1-27.9 mg/day, in patients and either 834 or 1579 mumol/day, or 22.5 and 42.6 mg/day, in normal subjects). Seven patients with moderate renal failure (endogenous creatinine clearance of 43 ml/min) took 50 mmol (2 g) calcium/day as effervescent calcium citrate with meals for 17 days. Eight normal women received 25 mmol (1 g) calcium/day as tricalcium dicitrate tablets with meals for 7 days. In patients with moderate renal failure, serum and urinary aluminum were normal before treatment at 489 +/- 293 SD nmol/l (13.2 +/- 7.9 micrograms/l) and 767 +/- 497 nmol/day (20.7 +/- 13.4 micrograms/day), respectively. They remained within normal limits and did not change significantly during calcium citrate treatment (400 +/- 148 nmol/l and 600 +/- 441 nmol/day, respectively). Similarly, no significant change in serum and urinary aluminum was detected in normal women during calcium citrate administration (271 +/- 59 vs 293 +/- 85 nmol/l and 515 +/- 138 vs 615 +/- 170 nmol/day, respectively). In addition, skeletal bone aluminum content did not change significantly in 14 osteoporotic patients (endogenous creatinine clearance of 68.5 ml/min) treated for 24 months with calcium citrate, 10 mmol calcium twice/day separately from meals (29.3 +/- 13.9 ng/mg ash bone to 27.9 +/0- 10.4, P = 0.727). In them, histomorphometric examination did not show any evidence of mineralization defect. Thus, calcium citrate given alone without aluminum-containing drugs does not pose a risk of aluminum toxicity in subjects with normal or functioning kidneys, when it is administered on an

  15. Efficient ionisation of calcium, strontium and barium by resonant laser pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    Efficient ionization has been observed when an atomic vapor of strontium, barium or calcium was illuminated with a long pulse tunable laser at the frequency of the atomic resonance line. The variation in the degree of ionization with neutral density and laser intensity has been measured using the 'hook' method. The maximum ionization observed was 94%. Excited state populations were measured yielding an excitation temperature (depending on exact experimental conditions) in the region of 0.4 eV. The decay of ion density after the laser pulse was monitored and the recombination coefficients determined. The results are interpreted in terms of an electron heating model.

  16. Preparation, characterization, biological activity, and transport study of polystyrene based calcium-barium phosphate composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Mujahid Ali; Rafiuddin

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-barium phosphate (CBP) composite membrane with 25% polystyrene was prepared by co-precipitation method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize the membrane. The membrane was found to be crystalline in nature with consistent arrangement of particles and no indication of visible cracks. The electrical potentials measured across the composite membrane in contact with univalent electrolytes (KCl, NaCl and LiCl), have been found to increase with decrease in concentrations. Thus the membrane was found to be cation-selective. Transport properties of developed membranes may be utilized for the efficient desalination of saline water and more importantly demineralization process. The antibacterial study of this composite membrane shows good results for killing the disease causing bacteria along with waste water treatment.

  17. Reactions of calcium orthosilicate and barium zirconate with oxides and sulfates of various elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1979-01-01

    Calcium orthosilicate and barium zirconate were evaluated as the insulation layer of thermal barrier coatings for air cooled gas turbine components. Their reactions with various oxides and sulfates were studied at 1100 C and 1300 C for times ranging up to 400 and 200 hours, respectively. These oxides and sulfates represent potential impurities or additives in gas turbine fuels and in turbine combustion air, as well as elements of potential bond coat alloys. The phase compositions of the reaction products were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. BaZrO3 and 2CaO-SiO2 both reacted with P2O5, V2O5, Cr2O3, Al2O3, and SiO2. In addition, 2CaO-SiO2 reacted with Na2O, BaO, MgO, and CoO and BaZrO3 reacted with Fe2O3.

  18. Interaction Studies Between Crofer-22APU Alloy And P{sub 2}O{sub 5} Containing Barium Calcium Alumino-borosilicate (BCABS) Sealant Glass-Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ananthanarayanan, A.; Montagne, L.; Revel, B.; Kothiyal, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    We present the effect of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} addition on barium calcium aluminum borosilicate BCABS glasses of composition (mol %)35BaO-15CaO-5Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-(37-x)SiO{sub 2}-8B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-xP{sub 2}O{sub 5}(0{<=}x{<=}5). The incorporation of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} increased network polymerization and crystallization tendency. However, addition of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} leads to the formation of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the interface, saturating it in the ions of the metal. This improves glass-to-metal bonding.

  19. Copper, aluminum, iron and calcium inhibit human acetylcholinesterase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important part of cholinergic nerves where it participates in termination of neurotransmission. AChE can be inhibited by e.g. some Alzheimer disease drugs, nerve agents, and secondary metabolites. In this work, metal salts aluminum chloride, calcium chloride, cupric chloride, ferric chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride and sodium chloride were tested for their ability to inhibit AChE. Standard Ellman assay based on human recombinant AChE was done and inhibition was measured using Dixon plot. No inhibition was proved for sodium, potassium and magnesium ions. However, aluminum, cupric, ferric and calcium ions were able to inhibit AChE via noncompetitive mechanism of inhibition. Though the inhibition is much weaker when compared to e.g. drugs with noncompetitive mechanism of action, biological relevance of the findings can be anticipated. PMID:24473150

  20. Chemical looping coal gasification with calcium ferrite and barium ferrite via solid--solid reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Richards, George

    2016-01-01

    Coal gasification to produce synthesis gas by chemical looping was investigated with two oxygen carriers, barium ferrite (BaFe2O4) and calcium ferrite (CaFe2O4). Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and fixed-bed flow reactor data indicated that a solid–solid interaction occurred between oxygen carriers and coal to produce synthesis gas. Both thermodynamic analysis and experimental data indicated that BaFe2O4 and CaFe2O4 have high reactivity with coal but have a low reactivity with synthesis gas, which makes them very attractive for the coal gasification process. Adding steam increased the production of hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO), but carbon dioxide (CO2) remained low because these oxygen carriers have minimal reactivity with H2 and CO. Therefore, the combined steam–oxygen carrier produced the highest quantity of synthesis gas. It appeared that neither the water–gas shift reaction nor the water splitting reaction promoted additional H2 formation with the oxygen carriers when steam was present. Wyodak coal, which is a sub-bituminous coal, had the best gasification yield with oxygen carrier–steam while Illinois #6 coal had the lowest. The rate of gasification and selectivity for synthesis gas production was significantly higher when these oxygen carriers were present during steam gasification of coal. The rates and synthesis gas yields during the temperature ramps of coal–steam with oxygen carriers were better than with gaseous oxygen.

  1. Chemical Interactions of Barium-Calcium-Aluminosilicate Based Sealing Glasses with Oxidation Resistant Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary ); Stevenson, Jeffry W. ); Meinhardt, Kerry D. )

    2003-04-04

    In most planar SOFC stack designs, the interconnect, which is typically made from an oxidation resistant alloy, potentially including austenitic chromia-forming, ferritic chromia-forming, and alumina-forming alloys, has to be hermitically sealed to its adjacent components, usually by a sealing glass. To maintain the structural stability and minimize the degradation of stack performance, the sealing glass must be chemically compatible with the alloy used for the interconnect. In this work, Nicrofer6025, AISI446 and a Fecralloy were selected as examples of austenitic chromia-forming, ferritic chromia-forming, and alumina-forming alloys, respectively. Their chemical compatibility with a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass, specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks, was evaluated. It was found that the BCAS sealing glass interacted chemically with both the chromia-forming alloys and the alumina-forming alloys. The extent and nature of the interactions and their final products depended on the matrix alloy compositions, the exposure conditions and/or proximity of the glass/alloy interface to the ambient air. These interactions and their mechanisms will be discussed with the assistance of thermodynamic modeling.

  2. Chemical Compatibility of Barium-Calcium-Aluminosilicate Based Sealing Glasses with Heat Resistant Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhenguo; Weil, K. Scott; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Paxton, Dean M.; Xia, Guanguang; Kim, Dong-Sang

    2003-01-02

    In most planar SOFC stacks operating at an intermediate temperature (700-800 degrees C), the interconnect is typically made from a ferritic stainless steel and has to be hermitically sealed to its adjacent components, such as the ceramic PEN (Positive electrode-Electrolyte-Negative electrode) by a sealing glass. To large extent the seal performance relies on the chemical compatibility of the sealing glass with the metallic interconnect. In this study, a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass-ceramic, specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks, and a ferritic stainless steel (446) were chosen as examples to investigate the chemical interactions or corrosions at the sealing glass interface with the ferritic stainless steels. Evaluation of the interfaces of coupon joints indicated that interactions between the BCAS glass-ceramic and the ferritic stainless steel depended on the exposure conditions. At the edges of joints, where oxygen or air was accessible, the interaction often led to the formation of BaCrO4, while in the interior of the joints, chromium or chromia dissolved into the glass to form a thin layer of chromium rich solid solution. It was also found that, in the interior of the joints, the interaction often resulted in the formation of pores aligning along the interface. The pore formation along the interface of sealing glass and ferritic stainless steel however could be avoided through a pre-heat treatment of the ferriitc stainless steel.

  3. Study of the Influence Between Barium Ions and Calcium Ions on Morphology and Size of Coprecipitation in Microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nong; Meng, Qing Luo

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we systematically drew a series of inverse-microemulsion quasi-ternary system phase diagrams of OP-10+C8H17OH+C6H12+brine (CaCl2/BaCl2) by adjusting the ratio of CaCl2 and BaCl2. On this basis, microemulsions have been prepared with seven different molar ratios of Ca2+/Ba2+, and calcium carbonate and barium carbonate coprecipitation products were obtained by reaction with an equimolar amount of sodium carbonate. The influence of barium ion to morphology and composition of nanometer calcium carbonate were studied. These samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The SEM photographs indicated that when the content of Ca2+ was higher, some incomplete large cube of coprecipitation particles were formed in solution, but with the content of Ba2+ increased gradually, they formed a large number of small spherical particles, with the further increase of Ba2+ concentration, the particles mainly had structures of irregular polyhedron eventually. The measurement results of FTIR and XRD indicated that CaCO3 coprecipitation products gradually changed from calcite to the vaterite, eventually turned into being aragonite with the further increase of Ba2+ concentration.

  4. The ferroelectric phase transition of calcium barium niobate: experimental evidence of Smolenskii's model for diffuse phase transitions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, Urs; Voelker, Uwe; Betzler, Klaus; Burianek, Manfred; Muehlberg, Manfred

    2009-08-01

    We present investigations on temperature-dependent changes in the size distribution of ferroelectric domains in single crystals of the novel tungsten bronze type calcium barium niobate (CBN). Since its congruently melting composition has a relatively high ferroelectric phase transition temperature of about 265 °C, CBN can be considered as an interesting material for various future applications. Using k-space spectroscopy, both unpoled polydomain crystals and crystals poled at room temperature have been investigated in the vicinity of the ferroelectric phase transition. In unpoled CBN, an intermixture of domain-size dependent phase transitions has been observed, which can be described with the model for diffuse phase transitions established by Smolenskii.

  5. Effect of multivalent salts -- calcium and aluminum -- on the flocculation of kaolin suspension with anionic polyacrylamide

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, F.F.; Di, P. . Dept. of Mineral Processing Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    The effects of calcium and aluminum ions on the interaction behavior of anionic polyacrylamide (anionic PAM or HPAM) and kaolin are important in determining the efficient flocculation of kaolin. While kaolin surfaces are negatively charged in media such as water, they exhibit the positive surface charge characteristic at pH below 3.2 in the solution of calcium cation, and at pH below 9.2 in the solution of aluminum cation. The. experimental results show that both calcium and aluminum ions suppress the kaolin flocculation process. The results are analyzed and explained by molecular orbital theory, solution chemistry, infrared spectra, and electronic probe examination of kaolin treated with and without anionic PAM. Analysis results indicate that the specific adsorption of Ca[sup 2+], Al[sup 3+] and their hydroxo complexes on anionic PAM causes the loss of anionic character in the low pH range and leads to a low flocculation efficiency. In the high pH range, the poor kaolin flocculation can be attributed to precipitation of calcium and aluminum hydroxides on active functional groups, which inhibits the hydrogen bonding between anionic PAM and kaolin surfaces. At neutral pH values, the trivalent aluminum ion has more significant adverse effect on the kaolin flocculation than the divalent calcium ion.

  6. Experimental and theoretical study of molecular structure of beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium 4-nitrobenzoates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonowicz, M.; Regulska, E.; Świsłocka, R.; Lewandowski, W.

    2013-02-01

    The influence of alkaline earth metal ions on the electronic system of 4-nitrobenzoic acid was studied in this paper. The vibrational (FT-IR) and NMR (1H and 13C) spectra were recorded for 4-nitrobenzoic acid (4-nba) and its salts (4-nb). The assignment of vibrational spectra was done. Some shifts of band wavenumbers in alkaline earth metal 4-nitrobenzoates spectra were observed in the series from magnesium to barium salts. Good correlations between wavenumbers of the vibrational bands in the IR spectra of studied salts and ionic potential, electronegativity, inverse of atomic mass, ionic radius and ionization energy of studied metals were found. The regular changes in the chemical shifts of protons (1H NMR) and carbons (13C NMR) in the series of studied salts were also observed. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G** as well as LANL2DZ basis sets. Theoretical wavenumbers and intensities in IR and chemical shifts in NMR spectra were also obtained. The calculated parameters were compared with experimental data of studied compounds.

  7. Chemical Compatibility of Barium-Calcium-Aluminosilicate Based Sealing Glasses with Heat Resistant Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Weil, K. Scott; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Paxton, Dean M.; Xia, Gordon; Kim, Dong-Sang

    2003-09-15

    Over the past several years, advances in the design and fabrication of planar SOFCs have led to a steady reduction in the temperatures necessary for their operation. Consequently, it appears more realistic now to use low cost heat resistant alloys for interconnect sub-components in the SOFC stack. Considering these materials requirements, heat resistant alloys, which overall demonstrate oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures, could be potential candidates. Overall, the heat resistant alloys of interest may include superalloys and the stainless steels. Depending whether a chromia or alumina scale forms on the alloy surface for protection, these heat resistant alloys can be also classified into chromia or alumina formers, repetitively. To help screening alloys and understanding the interface of sealing glass, a couple of alloy compositions have been carefully chosen as a reprehensive of different groups of alloys for the study on their chemical compatibility with a barium-aluminosilicate base glass. These alloys selected are AL 29-4, Nicrofer 6025, and Fecralloy, representing chromia forming stainless steels, superalloys and alumina formers, respectively. Results of chemical and microstructural analyses on sealing glass interfaces with different alloys will be presented, and accordingly, the applicability of alloys in terms of sealing glass chemical compatibility will be discussed. Possible means of modification on alloys for an improved applicability will be elaborated as well.

  8. Experimental and theoretical study of molecular structure of beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium 4-nitrobenzoates.

    PubMed

    Samsonowicz, M; Regulska, E; Świsłocka, R; Lewandowski, W

    2013-02-15

    The influence of alkaline earth metal ions on the electronic system of 4-nitrobenzoic acid was studied in this paper. The vibrational (FT-IR) and NMR ((1)H and (13)C) spectra were recorded for 4-nitrobenzoic acid (4-nba) and its salts (4-nb). The assignment of vibrational spectra was done. Some shifts of band wavenumbers in alkaline earth metal 4-nitrobenzoates spectra were observed in the series from magnesium to barium salts. Good correlations between wavenumbers of the vibrational bands in the IR spectra of studied salts and ionic potential, electronegativity, inverse of atomic mass, ionic radius and ionization energy of studied metals were found. The regular changes in the chemical shifts of protons ((1)H NMR) and carbons ((13)C NMR) in the series of studied salts were also observed. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G(**) as well as LANL2DZ basis sets. Theoretical wavenumbers and intensities in IR and chemical shifts in NMR spectra were also obtained. The calculated parameters were compared with experimental data of studied compounds.

  9. Chemical Compatibility of Barium-Calcium-Aluminosilicate Based Sealing Glasses with Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnect in SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2003-08-01

    In most planar SOFC stack designs, the interconnect, which is typically made from a ferritic stainless steel, is hermitically sealed to the ceramic PEN (Positive electrode-Electrolyte-Negative electrode) by a sealing glass. To maintain the structural stability and minimize degradation of the stack performance, the sealing glass must be chemically compatible with the stainless steel interconnect. In this study, a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass-ceramic, specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks, and a ferritic stainless steel (446) were selected as examples to increase the understanding the chemical compatibility issues in SOFC. Evaluation of the interfaces of coupon joints indicated that interactions between the BCAS glass-ceramic and the ferritic stainless steel was dependent on the exposure conditions. At the edges of joints, where oxygen or air was accessible, the interaction often led to the formation of BaCrO4, while in the interior of the joints, chromium or chromia dissolved into the glass to form a thin layer of chromium rich solid solution. It was also found that, in the interior of the joints, the interaction often resulted in the formation of pores aligned along the interface. It appears the pore formation along the interface can be avoided through a pre-heat treatment.

  10. Orexin-A potentiates L-type calcium/barium currents in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Weng, S-J; Yang, X-L; Zhong, Y-M

    2015-10-01

    Two neuropeptides, orexin-A and orexin-B (also called hypocretin-1 and -2), have been implicated in sleep/wake regulation, feeding behaviors via the activation of two subtypes of G-protein-coupled receptors: orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors (OX1R and OX2R). While the expression of orexins and orexin receptors is immunohistochemically revealed in retinal neurons, the function of these peptides in the retina is largely unknown. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in rat retinal slices, we demonstrated that orexin-A increased L-type-like barium currents (IBa,L) in ganglion cells (GCs), and the effect was blocked by the selective OX1R antagonist SB334867, but not by the OX2R antagonist TCS OX2 29. The orexin-A effect was abolished by intracellular dialysis of GDP-β-S/GPAnt-2A, a Gq protein inhibitor, suggesting the mediation of Gq. Additionally, during internal dialysis of the phosphatidylinositol (PI)-phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, orexin-A did not change the IBa,L of GCs, whereas the orexin-A effect persisted in the presence of the phosphatidylcholine (PC)-PLC inhibitor D609. The orexin-A-induced potentiation was not seen with internal infusion of Ca(2+)-free solution or when inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores was blocked by heparin/xestospongins-C. Moreover, the orexin-A effect was mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, but was eliminated when PKC was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide IV (Bis-IV)/Gö6976. Neither adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) nor guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-protein kinase G (PKG) signaling pathway was likely involved, as orexin-A persisted to potentiate the IBa,L of GCs no matter these two pathways were activated or inhibited. These results suggest that, by activating OX1R, orexin-A potentiates the IBa,L of rat GCs through a distinct Gq/PI-PLC/IP3/Ca(2+)/PKC signaling pathway.

  11. Thermoelectric performance enhancement of calcium cobaltite through barium grain boundary segregation.

    PubMed

    Carvillo, Paulo; Chen, Yun; Boyle, Cullen; Barnes, Paul N; Song, Xueyan

    2015-09-21

    We report the dramatic increase of the Seebeck coefficient S and thermoelectric performance of calcium cobaltite Ca3Co4O9+δ ceramics through non-stoichiometric addition of minute amount of Ba. The nominal chemistry of polycrystal pellets are Ca3BaxCo4O9+δ (x = 0, 0.01, 0.05, and 0.1). At 323 K, S of Ca3Co4O9+δ is 135 μV K(-1), whereas S of Ba incorporated Ca3Ba0.05Co4O9+δ is 162.5 μV·K(-1), which is the highest S value near room temperature regime reported for calcium cobaltite. The increase of S for Ca3Ba0.05Co4O9+δ sample is accompanied by the decrease of the electrical resistivity ρ, resulting in high power factor S(2)/ρ of 843 μW·m(-1) K(-2) at 1007 K. Moreover, the thermal conductivities κ of Ca3BaxCo4O9+δ decrease with the increase of the Ba addition. The figure-of-merit ZT for Ca3Ba0.05Co4O9+δ reaches 0.52 at 1073 K and a factor of 2.5 increment in comparison with undoped Ca3Co4O9+δ. Nanostructure examinations show that the added Ba segregated at the Ca3Co4O9+δ grain boundaries, while the Ca3Co4O9+δ grain interior is free of Ba. Performance enhancement is attributed to the carrier filtering effect caused by the Ba segregation. In addition, Ba segregation promotes the better crystal alignment and the development of crystal texture. PMID:26357956

  12. Barium enema

    MedlinePlus

    ... series; Colorectal cancer - lower GI series; Colorectal cancer - barium enema; Crohn disease - lower GI series; Crohn disease - barium enema; Intestinal blockage - lower GI series; Intestinal blockage - ...

  13. Formation of calcium in the products of iron oxide-aluminum thermite combustion in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, A. A.; Gromov, A. M.; Popenko, E. M.; Sergienko, A. V.; Sabinskaya, O. G.; Raab, B.; Teipel, U.

    2016-10-01

    The composition of condensed products resulting from the combustion of thermite mixtures (Al + Fe2O3) in air is studied by precise methods. It is shown that during combustion, calcium is formed and stabilized in amounts of maximal 0.55 wt %, while is missing from reactants of 99.7 wt % purity. To explain this, it is hypothesized that a low-energy nuclear reaction takes place alongside the reactions of aluminum oxidation and nitridation, resulting in the formation of calcium (Kervran-Bolotov reaction).

  14. Protective effect of a calcium channel blocker "diltiazem" on aluminum chloride-induced dementia in mice.

    PubMed

    Rani, Anu; Neha; Sodhi, Rupinder K; Kaur, Amanpreet

    2015-11-01

    Many studies report that heavy metals such as aluminum are involved in amyloid beta aggregation and neurotoxicity. Further, high concentration of aluminum in the brain deregulates calcium signaling which contributes to synaptic dysfunction and halts neuronal communication which ultimately leads to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Recently, diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker clinically used in angina, is reported to decrease amyloid beta production by inhibiting calcium influx, decreasing inflammation and oxidative stress. However, the probable role of this drug in aluminum chloride (AlCl3)-induced experimental dementia is yet to be explored. Therefore, the present study is designed to investigate the effect of AlCl3-induced dementia in mice. Morris water maze test and elevated plus maze were utilized to evaluate learning and memory. Various biochemical estimations including brain acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), brain total protein, thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS) level, reduced glutathione (GSH) level, nitrate/nitrite, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured. AlCl3 significantly impaired learning and memory and increased brain AChE, brain total protein, TBARS, and nitrate/nitrite and decreased brain GSH or SOD. On the other hand, treatment with diltiazem significantly reversed AlCl3-induced behavioral and biochemical deficits. The present study indicates the beneficial role of diltiazem in AlCl3-induced dementia.

  15. Imaging of calcium and aluminum in neurofibrillary tangle-bearing neurons in parkinsonism-dementia of Guam.

    PubMed Central

    Garruto, R M; Fukatsu, R; Yanagihara, R; Gajdusek, D C; Hook, G; Fiori, C E

    1984-01-01

    We report the distribution and imaging of calcium and aluminum in neurofibrillary tangle (NFT)-bearing neurons within Sommer's sector of the hippocampus in Guamanian patients with parkinsonism-dementia, using a method of computer-controlled electron beam x-ray micro-analysis and wavelength dispersive spectrometry. Calcium and aluminum were distributed in cell bodies and axonal processes of NFT-bearing neurons. The elemental images show that both calcium and aluminum deposits occur within the same NFT-bearing hippocampal neuron in this dementing disease, suggesting that these elements are involved in NFT formation. No prominent concentrations of calcium and aluminum were imaged in non-NFT-containing regions within the pyramidal cell layer of the parkinsonism-dementia cases or in the control cases. These findings support the hypothesis that secondary hyperparathyroidism resulting from low environmental calcium and magnesium in the high-incidence focus of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia on Guam had led to abnormal deposition of calcium and aluminum in the central nervous system. Images PMID:6584922

  16. Oxygen isotopic abundances in calcium- aluminum-rich inclusions from ordinary chondrites: implications for nebular heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    McKeegan, K D; Leshin, L A; Russell, S S; MacPherson, G J

    1998-04-17

    The oxygen isotopic compositions of two calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from the unequilibrated ordinary chondrite meteorites Quinyambie and Semarkona are enriched in 16O by an amount similar to that in CAIs from carbonaceous chondrites. This may indicate that most CAIs formed in a restricted region of the solar nebula and were then unevenly distributed throughout the various chondrite accretion regions. The Semarkona CAI is isotopically homogeneous and contains highly 16O-enriched melilite, supporting the hypothesis that all CAI minerals were originally 16O-rich, but that in most carbonaceous chondrite inclusions some minerals exchanged oxygen isotopes with an external reservoir following crystallization.

  17. The Effects of Aluminum on the Influx of Calcium, Potassium, Ammonium, Nitrate, and Phosphate in an Aluminum-Sensitive Cultivar of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed Central

    Nichol, B. E.; Oliveira, L. A.; Glass, ADM.; Siddiqi, M. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism by which aluminum interferes with ion influx is not known. In this study, the effects of aluminum on the influx of the cations calcium, potassium, and ammonium and the anions nitrate and phosphate were measured in an aluminum-sensitive cultivar of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Aluminum (100 [mu]M) was found to inhibit the influx of the cations calcium (69%), ammonium (40%), and potassium (13%) and enhancing the influx of the anions nitrate (44%) and phosphate (17%). Aluminum interfered with the binding of the cations in the cell wall by the same order of magnitude as their respective influxes, whereas phosphate binding was strongly enhanced. The results are consistent with a mechanism whereby aluminum binds to the plasma membrane phospholipids, forming a positively charged layer that influences ion movement to the binding sites of the transport proteins. A positive charge layer would retard the movement of cations and increase the movement of anions to the plasma membrane in proportion to the charges carried by these ions. PMID:12231781

  18. Incorporation of short-lived (10)Be in a calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion from the allende meteorite

    PubMed

    McKeegan; Chaussidon; Robert

    2000-08-25

    Enrichments in boron-10/boron-11 in a calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion from the Allende carbonaceous chondrite are correlated with beryllium/boron in a manner indicative of the in situ decay of short-lived beryllium-10. Because this radionuclide is produced only by nuclear spallation reactions, its existence in early solar system materials attests to intense irradiation processes in the solar nebula. The particle fluence inferred from the initial beryllium-10/beryllium-9 is sufficient to produce other short-lived nuclides, calcium-41 and manganese-53, found in meteorites, but the high canonical abundance of aluminum-26 may still require seeding of the solar system by radioactive stellar debris.

  19. Tantalum oxide and barium sulfate as radiopacifiers in injectable calcium phosphate-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) cements for monitoring in vivo degradation.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Jan Willem M; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Meijer, Gert J; Jansen, John A

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the degradation of calcium phosphate-based bone substitute materials in vivo by means of noninvasive techniques (e.g., radiography) is often a problem due to the chemical resemblance of those substitutes with the mineral phase of bone. In the view of that, the present study aimed at enhancing the radiopacity of calcium phosphate cement enriched with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (CPC-PLGA) microspheres, by adding tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) or the more traditional radiopacifier barium sulfate (BaSO4). The radiopacifying capacity of these radiopacifiers was first evaluated in vitro by microcomputed tomography (μCT). Thereafter, both radiopacifiers were tested in vivo using a distal femoral condyle model in rabbits, with subsequent ex vivo μCT analysis in parallel with histomorphometry. Addition of either one of the radiopacifiers proved to enhance radiopacity of CPC-PLGA in vitro. The in vivo experiment showed that both radiopacifiers did not induce alterations in biological performance compared to plain CPC-PLGA, hence both radiopacifiers can be considered safe and biocompatible. The histomorphometrical assessment of cement degradation and bone formation showed similar values for the three experimental groups. Interestingly, μCT analysis showed that monitoring cement degradation becomes feasible upon incorporation of either type of radiopacifier, albeit that BaSO4 showed more accuracy compared to Ta2O5.

  20. Datasets depicting mobility retardation of NCS proteins observed upon incubation with calcium, but not with magnesium, barium or strontium.

    PubMed

    Viviano, Jeffrey; Krishnan, Anuradha; Scully, Jenna; Wu, Hao; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2016-06-01

    In this data article we show the specificity of the Ca(2+)-induced mobility shift in three proteins that belong to the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) protein family: Hippocalcin, GCAP1 and GCAP2. These proteins did not display a shift in mobility in native gels when incubated with divalent cations other than Ca(2+) - such as Mg(2+), Ba(2+), and Sr(2+), even at 10× concentrations. The data is similar to that obtained with another NCS protein, neurocalcin delta (Viviano et al., 2016, "Electrophoretic Mobility Shift in Native Gels Indicates Calcium-dependent Structural Changes of Neuronal Calcium Sensor Proteins", [1]). PMID:27222862

  1. Microstructure of amorphous aluminum hydroxide in belite-calcium sulfoaluminate cement

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Fei; Yu, Zhenglei; Yang, Fengling; Lu, Yinong Liu, Yunfei

    2015-05-15

    Belite-calcium sulfoaluminate (BCSA) cement is a promising low-CO{sub 2} alternative to ordinary Portland cement. Herein, aluminum hydroxide (AH{sub 3}), the main amorphous hydration product of BCSA cement, was investigated in detail. The microstructure of AH{sub 3} with various quantities of gypsum was investigated via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The AH{sub 3} with various morphologies were observed and confirmed in the resulting pastes. Particular attention was paid to the fact that AH{sub 3} always contained a small amount of Ca according to the results of EDS analysis. The AH{sub 3} was then characterized via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results of HRTEM indicated that Ca arose from nanosized tricalcium aluminate hexahydrate which existed in the AH{sub 3}.

  2. Searching for calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions in cometary particles with Rosetta/COSIMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquette, John A.; Engrand, Cecile; Stenzel, Oliver; Hilchenbach, Martin; Kissel, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    The calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) found in chondritic meteorites are probably the oldest solar system solids, dating back to 4567.30 ± 0.16 million years ago. They are thought to have formed in the protosolar nebula within a few astronomical units of the Sun, and at a temperature of around 1300 K. The Stardust mission found evidence of CAI-like material in samples recovered from comet Wild 2. The appearance of CAIs in comets, which are thought to be formed at lower temperatures and larger distances from the Sun, is only explicable if some mechanism allows the efficient transfer of such objects from the inner solar nebula to the outer solar nebula. Such mechanisms have been proposed such as an X-wind or turbulence. In this work, particles collected from within the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko are examined for compositional evidence of the presence of CAIs. COSIMA (the Cometary Secondary Ion Mass Analyzer) uses secondary ion mass spectrometry to analyze the composition of cometary dust captured on metal targets. While CAIs can have a radius of centimeters, they are more typically a few hundred microns in size, and can be smaller than 1 μm, so it is conceivable that particles visible on COSIMA targets (ranging in size from about 10 μm to hundreds of microns) could contain CAIs. Using a peak fitting technique, the composition of a set of 13 particles was studied, looking for material rich in both calcium and aluminum. One such particle was found.

  3. Aluminum effects upon calbindin D9k-linked duodenal calcium transport in diabetic male rats.

    PubMed

    Orihuela, D; Favre, C; Monti, J A; Carnovale, C E; Carrillo, M C

    1999-02-22

    In order to elucidate if the inhibition mechanisms of Aluminum (Al) on intestinal calcium flux involve some possible action on calbindin-D9k, a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments were carried out in normal and in streptozotocin-induced diabetic male rats. The dose-response curves obtained from the in vitro studies indicate that, in the diabetic group (which has a lower content of calbindin-D9k), the effect of Al on JCa(ms) has a small dependence on rising Al concentration (0-10 microM). The parameters obtained from those curves: Emax (maximum reduction percentage of JCa(ms)) and ED50 (Al concentration that produces half of the highest inhibition) were significantly diminished in this group compared to control. Both s.c. injections of calcitriol (D3) at doses of 0.08 and 0.40 microg/kg body wt. per day and insulin (10 IU/kg body wt. per day), increase the inhibitory effect of Al to levels that did not differ from controls. In vivo gavage of 60 mg/kg body wt. per day of aluminum chloride for 1 week reveals that the degree of reduction of intestinal CaBP9k by Al is directly correlated to duodenal content of this protein (r2 = 0.683, P = 0.022). PMID:10079056

  4. Aluminum effects upon calbindin D9k-linked duodenal calcium transport in diabetic male rats.

    PubMed

    Orihuela, D; Favre, C; Monti, J A; Carnovale, C E; Carrillo, M C

    1999-02-22

    In order to elucidate if the inhibition mechanisms of Aluminum (Al) on intestinal calcium flux involve some possible action on calbindin-D9k, a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments were carried out in normal and in streptozotocin-induced diabetic male rats. The dose-response curves obtained from the in vitro studies indicate that, in the diabetic group (which has a lower content of calbindin-D9k), the effect of Al on JCa(ms) has a small dependence on rising Al concentration (0-10 microM). The parameters obtained from those curves: Emax (maximum reduction percentage of JCa(ms)) and ED50 (Al concentration that produces half of the highest inhibition) were significantly diminished in this group compared to control. Both s.c. injections of calcitriol (D3) at doses of 0.08 and 0.40 microg/kg body wt. per day and insulin (10 IU/kg body wt. per day), increase the inhibitory effect of Al to levels that did not differ from controls. In vivo gavage of 60 mg/kg body wt. per day of aluminum chloride for 1 week reveals that the degree of reduction of intestinal CaBP9k by Al is directly correlated to duodenal content of this protein (r2 = 0.683, P = 0.022).

  5. Optical behavior of Pr3+-doped barium titanate-calcium titanate material prepared by sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Tang, Yanxue; He, Xiyun; Qiu, Pingsun; He, Qizhuang; Peng, Zifei; Sun, Dazhi

    2009-07-01

    Photoluminescence performances of Pr-doped alkaline-earth titanates (Ba,Ca)TiO3 (with rich barium) prepared by a solgel technique are investigated at room temperature. A relatively strong red luminescence is observed in (Ba0.80Ca0.20)TiO3 material when Pr-BaTiO3 material does not exhibit obvious red luminescence. The phenomenon is discussed with respect to the substitute of Ca and the two-photon luminescence effect. The red luminescence is enhanced by a fast thermal treatment. The wavelength range of luminescence near red and infrared light is broadened by the same process as well. These behaviors are ascribed to the randomization of distribution of Ca and Ba at A site in ABO3 perovskite structure. The experimental results provide not only a possible way to develop new materials with pastel visual impression, but also a potential technique to modify photoluminescence properties that can be controlled by external fields because the microscopic structure of BaTiO3, such as electric domains, can be changed by electric field, temperature, and so on.

  6. SOLAR WIND IMPLANTATION MODEL FOR {sup 10}Be IN CALCIUM-ALUMINUM INCLUSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, Glynn E.; Caffee, Marc W. E-mail: mcaffee@purdue.ed

    2010-12-10

    We propose a model for the incorporation of {sup 10}Be within calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAIs) in primitive carbonaceous meteorites. In this model, {sup 10}Be is produced by energetic particle reactions in the proto-solar atmosphere of a more active proto-Sun characterized by energetic particle fluxes higher than contemporary particle fluxes. This {sup 10}Be is incorporated into the solar wind that is then implanted into CAI precursor material. This production mechanism is operational in the contemporary solar system implanting {sup 10}Be in lunar materials. The contemporary production rate of {sup 10}Be at the surface of the Sun is {approx}0.1 {sup 10}Be cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Scaling up the contemporary {sup 10}Be production in the proto-Sun by a factor of 10{sup 5} would increase the production rate to 10{sup 410}Be cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Using this enhanced production value in conjunction with refractory mass inflow rates at 0.06 AU from the proto-Sun we model {sup 10}Be concentrations in CAI precursors. We calculate the content of solar-wind-implanted {sup 10}Be would have been of the order of 10{sup 1210}Be g{sup -1} in CAIs, consistent with initial{sup 10}Be content found from boron-beryllium isotopic systematics in CAIs.

  7. Use of calcium/aluminum ratios as indicators of stress in forest ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Cronan, C.S.; Grigal, D.F.

    1995-03-01

    The calcium/aluminum (Ca/Al) molar ratio of the soil solution provides a valuable measurement endpoint or ecological indicator for identification of approximate thresholds beyond which the risk of forest damage from Al stress and nutrient imbalances increases. The Ca/Al ratio can also be used as an indicator to assess forest ecosystem changes over time in response to acidic deposition, forest harvesting, or other processes contributing to acid soil infertility. Based on a critical review of literature on Al stress, we estimate that there is a 50:50 risk of adverse impacts on tree growth or nutrition when the soil solution Ca/Al ratio is as low as 1.0, a 75% risk when the soil solution ratio is as low as 0.5, and nearly a 100% risk when the soil solution Ca/Al molar ratio is as low as 0.2. The Ca/Al ratio of the soil solution can be corroborated with other complementary indices.

  8. Solar Wind Implantation Model for 10Be in Calcium-Aluminum Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricker, Glynn E.; Caffee, Marc W.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a model for the incorporation of 10Be within calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAIs) in primitive carbonaceous meteorites. In this model, 10Be is produced by energetic particle reactions in the proto-solar atmosphere of a more active proto-Sun characterized by energetic particle fluxes higher than contemporary particle fluxes. This 10Be is incorporated into the solar wind that is then implanted into CAI precursor material. This production mechanism is operational in the contemporary solar system implanting 10Be in lunar materials. The contemporary production rate of 10Be at the surface of the Sun is ~0.1 10Be cm-2 s-1. Scaling up the contemporary 10Be production in the proto-Sun by a factor of 105 would increase the production rate to 104 10Be cm-2 s-1. Using this enhanced production value in conjunction with refractory mass inflow rates at 0.06 AU from the proto-Sun we model 10Be concentrations in CAI precursors. We calculate the content of solar-wind-implanted 10Be would have been of the order of 1012 10Be g-1 in CAIs, consistent with initial10Be content found from boron-beryllium isotopic systematics in CAIs.

  9. Calcium and aluminum impacts on sugar maple physiology in a northern hardwood forest.

    PubMed

    Halman, Joshua M; Schaberg, Paul G; Hawley, Gary J; Pardo, Linda H; Fahey, Timothy J

    2013-11-01

    Forests of northeastern North America have been exposed to anthropogenic acidic inputs for decades, resulting in altered cation relations and disruptions to associated physiological processes in multiple tree species, including sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.). In the current study, the impacts of calcium (Ca) and aluminum (Al) additions on mature sugar maple physiology were evaluated at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (Thornton, NH, USA) to assess remediation (Ca addition) or exacerbation (Al addition) of current acidified conditions. Fine root cation concentrations and membrane integrity, carbon (C) allocation, foliar cation concentrations and antioxidant activity, foliar response to a spring freezing event and reproductive ability (flowering, seed quantity, filled seed and seed germination) were evaluated for dominant sugar maple trees in a replicated plot study. Root damage and foliar antioxidant activity were highest in Al-treated trees, while growth-associated C, foliar re-flush following a spring frost and reproductive ability were highest in Ca-treated trees. In general, we found that trees on Ca-treated plots preferentially used C resources for growth and reproductive processes, whereas Al-treated trees devoted C to defense-based processes. Similarities between Al-treated and control trees were observed for foliar cation concentrations, C partitioning and seed production, suggesting that sugar maples growing in native forests may be more stressed than previously perceived. Our experiment suggests that disruption of the balance of Ca and Al in sugar maples by acid deposition continues to be an important driver of tree health. PMID:24300338

  10. Calcium and aluminum impacts on sugar maple physiology in a northern hardwood forest.

    PubMed

    Halman, Joshua M; Schaberg, Paul G; Hawley, Gary J; Pardo, Linda H; Fahey, Timothy J

    2013-11-01

    Forests of northeastern North America have been exposed to anthropogenic acidic inputs for decades, resulting in altered cation relations and disruptions to associated physiological processes in multiple tree species, including sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.). In the current study, the impacts of calcium (Ca) and aluminum (Al) additions on mature sugar maple physiology were evaluated at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (Thornton, NH, USA) to assess remediation (Ca addition) or exacerbation (Al addition) of current acidified conditions. Fine root cation concentrations and membrane integrity, carbon (C) allocation, foliar cation concentrations and antioxidant activity, foliar response to a spring freezing event and reproductive ability (flowering, seed quantity, filled seed and seed germination) were evaluated for dominant sugar maple trees in a replicated plot study. Root damage and foliar antioxidant activity were highest in Al-treated trees, while growth-associated C, foliar re-flush following a spring frost and reproductive ability were highest in Ca-treated trees. In general, we found that trees on Ca-treated plots preferentially used C resources for growth and reproductive processes, whereas Al-treated trees devoted C to defense-based processes. Similarities between Al-treated and control trees were observed for foliar cation concentrations, C partitioning and seed production, suggesting that sugar maples growing in native forests may be more stressed than previously perceived. Our experiment suggests that disruption of the balance of Ca and Al in sugar maples by acid deposition continues to be an important driver of tree health.

  11. Barium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Barium cyanide ; CASRN 542 - 62 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  12. Simultaneous direct determination of aluminum, calcium and iron in silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders by slurry-sampling graphite furnace AAS.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hirotsugu; Yada, Masako; Yoshida, Tomomi; Zhang, Qiangbin; Inoue, Sadanobu; Atsuya, Ikuo

    2004-03-01

    A fast and accurate analytical method was established for the simultaneous direct determination of aluminum, calcium and iron in silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using a slurry sampling technique and a Hitachi Model Z-9000 atomic absorption spectrometer. The slurry samples were prepared by the ultrasonication of silicon carbide or silicon nitride powders with 0.1 M nitric acid. Calibration curves were prepared by using a mixed standard solution containing aluminum, calcium, iron and 0.1 M nitric acid. The analytical results of the proposed method for aluminum, calcium and iron in silicon carbide and silicon nitride reference materials were in good agreement with the reference values. The detection limits for aluminum, calcium and iron were 0.6 microg/g, 0.15 microg/g and 2.5 microg/g, respectively, in solid samples, when 200 mg of powdered samples were suspended in 20 ml of 0.1 M nitric acid and a 10 microl portion of the slurry sample was then measured. The relative standard deviation of the determination of aluminum, calcium and iron was 5 - 33%.

  13. Effect of co-existing copper and calcium on the removal of As(V) by reused aluminum oxides.

    PubMed

    Yang, J K; Park, Y J; Kim, K H; Lee, H Y; Min, K C; Lee, S M

    2013-01-01

    Among the various heavy metals, arsenic is frequently found in abandoned mine drainage and the environmental fate of arsenic in real aqueous solutions can be highly dependent on the presence of co-existing ions. In this study, removal of arsenate through adsorption on the reused aluminum oxide or through precipitation was investigated in a single and in a binary system as a function of pH and concentration. Different removal behaviors of arsenate were observed in the presence of different cations as well as a variation of the molar ratios of arsenate to cations. Co-operative effects on arsenate removal by precipitation in solution occurred with an increase of copper concentration, while a decrease of arsenate removal resulted in increasing calcium concentration. It was observed that the arsenate removal in the presence of calcium would be highly dependent on the molar ratios of both elements. PMID:23128638

  14. Comparison of the adjuvant activity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response towards Bothrops asper snake venom.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Hidekel; Herrera, María; Rojas, Leonardo; Villalta, Mauren; Vargas, Mariángela; Leiguez, Elbio; Teixeira, Catarina; Estrada, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, José María; León, Guillermo; Montero, Mavis L

    2014-01-01

    The adjuvanticity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response in mice towards the venom of the snake Bothrops asper was studied. It was found that, in vitro, most of the venom proteins are similarly adsorbed by both mineral salts, with the exception of some basic phospholipases A2, which are better adsorbed by calcium phosphate. After injection, the adjuvants promoted a slow release of the venom, as judged by the lack of acute toxicity when lethal doses of venom were administered to mice. Leukocyte recruitment induced by the venom was enhanced when it was adsorbed on both mineral salts; however, venom adsorbed on calcium phosphate induced a higher antibody response towards all tested HPLC fractions of the venom. On the other hand, co-precipitation of venom with calcium phosphate was the best strategy for increasing: (1) the capacity of the salt to couple venom proteins in vitro; (2) the venom ability to induce leukocyte recruitment; (3) phagocytosis by macrophages; and (4) a host antibody response. These findings suggest that the chemical nature is not the only one determining factor of the adjuvant activity of mineral salts. PMID:23506358

  15. Aluminum compounds in calcium chloride extracts from podzolic soil and their possible sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolpeshta, I. I.; Sokolova, T. A.

    2008-06-01

    Aluminum concentrations in organoaluminum complexes, mineral polymers, Al(H2O){6/3+}, Al(OH)(H2O){5/2+}, Al(OH)2(H2O){4/+}, AlH3SiO{4/2+}, and Al(OH)3(H2O){3/0} extracted with 0.001 M CaCl2 from the main genetic horizons of a podzolic soil on two-layered deposits were determined experimentally and calculated from thermodynamic equations. It was found that aluminum bound in organic complexes was predominant in extracts from the AE horizon, and mineral polymer aluminum compounds prevailed in extracts from the E and IIBD horizons. In the AE horizon, organoaluminum compounds were a major source of aluminum, which passed into solution predominantly by exchange reactions. In the E horizon, aluminum hydroxide interlayers in soil chlorites were the main source of aluminum, which passed into solution by dissolution reactions. In extracts from the IIBD horizon, aluminum was solubilized by the dissolution of aluminosilicates inherited from the parent rock.

  16. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  17. Aluminum Chloride Induces Osteoblasts Apoptosis via Disrupting Calcium Homeostasis and Activating Ca(2+)/CaMKII Signal Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Liu, Dawei; Zhang, Qiuyue; Sun, Xudong; Li, Yanfei

    2016-02-01

    Aluminum promotes osteoblast (OB) apoptosis. Apoptosis is induced by the disordered calcium homeostasis. Therefore, to investigate the relationship between Al-induced OB apoptosis and calcium homeostasis, calvarium OBs from neonatal rats (3-4 days) were cultured and exposed to 0.048-mg/mL Al(3+) or 0.048-mg/mL Al(3+) combined with 5 μM BAPTA-AM (OBs were pretreated with 5 μM BAPTA-AM for 1 h, then added 0.048 mg/mL Al(3+)), respectively. Then OB apoptosis rate, intracellular calcium ions concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), mRNA expression level of calmodulin (CaM), and protein expression levels of CaM and p-CaMKII in OBs were examined. The result showed that AlCl3 increased OB apoptosis rate, and [Ca(2+)]i and p-CaMKII expression levels and decreased CaM expression levels, whereas BAPTA-AM relieved the effects. These results proved that AlCl3 induced OB apoptosis by disrupting the intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and activating the Ca(2+)/CaMKII signal pathway. Our findings can provide new insights for revealing the apoptosis mechanism of OBs exposed to AlCl3.

  18. Calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate "cement" phases and rare Ca-zeolite association at Colle Fabbri, Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoppa, F.; Scordari, F.; Mesto, E.; Sharygin, V. V.; Bortolozzi, G.

    2010-06-01

    Very high temperature, Ca-rich alkaline magma intruded an argillite formation at Colle Fabbri, Central Italy, producing cordierite-tridymite metamorphism in the country rocks. An intense Ba-rich sulphate-carbonate-alkaline hydrothermal plume produced a zone of mineralization several meters thick around the igneous body. Reaction of hydrothermal fluids with country rocks formed calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH), i.e., tobermorite-afwillite-jennite; calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate (CASH) — "cement" phases - i.e., thaumasite, strätlingite and an ettringite-like phase and several different species of zeolites: chabazite-Ca, willhendersonite, gismon-dine, three phases bearing Ca with the same or perhaps lower symmetry of phillipsite-Ca, levyne-Ca and the Ca-rich analogue of merlinoite. In addition, apophyllite-(KF) and/or apophyllite-(KOH), Ca-Ba-carbonates, portlandite and sulphates were present. A new polymorph from the pyrrhotite group, containing three layers of sphalerite-type structure in the unit cell, is reported for the first time. Such a complex association is unique. Most of these minerals are specifically related to hydration processes of: (1) pyrometamorphic metacarbonate/metapelitic rocks (natural analogues of cement clinkers); (2) mineralization between intrusive stocks and slates; and (3) high-calcium, alkaline igneous rocks such as melilitites and foidites as well as carbonatites. The Colle Fabbri outcrop offers an opportunity to study in situ complex crystalline overgrowth and specific crystal chemistry in mineral phases formed in igneous to hydrothermal conditions.

  19. Microstructure characterization and micro- and nanoscale mechanical behaviour of magnesium-aluminum and magnesium-aluminum-calcium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lihong

    The application in the automotive industry of the as-cast AM50 alloy (Mg-5.0 wt.%%Al-0.3 wt.%Mn) has been limited by its low creep resistance at elevated temperatures. Permanent mold cast (PM) Mg-Al-Ca alloys with calcium additions (0 ˜ 2.0 wt.%) were investigated in this study due to their potential for improving the high temperature creep strength. The microstructures of the die cast (DC) or PM AM50 alloys consisted of an intergranular beta-Mg17Al12 phase surrounded by a region of Al-rich eutectic alpha-Mg phase, sometimes with attached Al8Mn5 particles. In this study, significant grain refinement was observed in the PM Mg-Al-Ca alloys with Ca addition to the AM50 alloy. The grain refining effect was confirmed by quantitative image analysis through measurement of the secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS). The intergranular phases in Mg-Al-Ca alloys with 0.5 or 1.0 wt.% Ca were beta-Mg17Al 12 and (Al, Mg)2Ca phases. As the Ca addition was increased to 1.5 wt.% Ca, the (beta-Mg17Al12 phase was completely replaced by a (Al, Mg)2Ca phase. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results showed that the (Al, Mg)2Ca phase was thermally more stable than the beta-Mg 17Al12 phase, which contributed to the better creep strength of the Mg-Al-Ca alloys. The change in heating/cooling rates played an important role in the redistribution of alloying elements and the dissolution or precipitation of the eutectic phases in the as-cast Mg alloys during DSC runs. The micro- and nano-scale hardness and composite modulus of the PM Mg-Al-Ca alloys increased with increasing Ca content, and the indentation size effect (ISE) was also observed in the as-cast Mg-Al and Mg-Al-Ca alloys. PM AC52 alloy (Mg-5.0wt.%Al-2.0wt.%Ca) was a much more creep resistant alloy than other Mg-Al-Ca alloys with lower Ca contents because of the higher solute content in the primary alpha-Mg in the as-cast state and also because of the presence of nano precipitates within the primary alpha-Mg. The size and

  20. Chemical Processes in Igneous Calcium-Aluminum-rich Inclusions: A Mostly CMAS View of Melting and Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckett, J. R.; Connolly, H. C.; Ebel, D. S.

    Calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) and Al-rich chondrules reflect multiple processes in many different environments. In this chapter, we consider constraints on high-temperature processes from the perspective of phase equilibria and dynamic crystallization experiments. With chondrules, whose evolution is discussed in the chapter in this volume by Lauretta et al., it is almost axiomatic that one or more igneous events were involved in processing, so the focus of research becomes one of constraining the nature of the melting event(s). CAIs are not so simple. While many CAIs are thought to have crystallized from partially or completely molten droplets, others did not, and one of the first tasks in constraining processes involved in the evolution of an object is to decide whether or not an igneous event was involved.

  1. Heat storage material comprising calcium chloride-hexahydrate and a nucleating agent

    SciTech Connect

    Gawron, K.; Schroder, J.

    1980-02-19

    The utility of calcium chloride-hexahydrate as a heat storage material is improved when barium carbonate, strontium carbonate, barium fluoride, barium fluoride-hydrofluoride and/or strontium fluoride is used as a nucleating agent to prevent supercooling.

  2. Alleviating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil from Peninsular Malaysia by calcium silicate application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elisa, A. A.; Ninomiya, S.; Shamshuddin, J.; Roslan, I.

    2016-03-01

    In response to human population increase, the utilization of acid sulfate soils for rice cultivation is one option for increasing production. The main problems associated with such soils are their low pH values and their associated high content of exchangeable Al, which could be detrimental to crop growth. The application of soil amendments is one approach for mitigating this problem, and calcium silicate is an alternative soil amendment that could be used. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to ameliorate soil acidity in rice-cropped soil. The secondary objective was to study the effects of calcium silicate amendment on soil acidity, exchangeable Al, exchangeable Ca, and Si content. The soil was treated with 0, 1, 2, and 3 Mg ha-1 of calcium silicate under submerged conditions and the soil treatments were sampled every 30 days throughout an incubation period of 120 days. Application of calcium silicate induced a positive effect on soil pH and exchangeable Al; soil pH increased from 2.9 (initial) to 3.5, while exchangeable Al was reduced from 4.26 (initial) to 0.82 cmolc kg-1. Furthermore, the exchangeable Ca and Si contents increased from 1.68 (initial) to 4.94 cmolc kg-1 and from 21.21 (initial) to 81.71 mg kg-1, respectively. Therefore, it was noted that calcium silicate was effective at alleviating Al toxicity in acid sulfate, rice-cropped soil, yielding values below the critical level of 2 cmolc kg-1. In addition, application of calcium silicate showed an ameliorative effect as it increased soil pH and supplied substantial amounts of Ca and Si.

  3. BARIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Blanco, R.E.

    1959-07-21

    A method of separating barium from nuclear fission products is described. In accordance with the invention, barium may be recovered from an acidic solution of neutron-irradiated fissionable material by carrying ihe barium cut of solution as a sulfate with lead as a carrier and then dissolving the barium-containing precipitate in an aqueous solution of an aliphatic diamine chelating reagent. The barium values together with certain other metallic values present in the diamine solution are then absorbed onto a cation exchange resin and the barium is selectively eluted from the resin bed with concentrated nitric acid.

  4. Effect of dietary aluminum sulfate on calcium and phosphorus metabolism of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Hussein, A S; Cantor, A H; Johnson, T H; Yokel, R A

    1990-06-01

    The effect of dietary aluminum sulfate on Ca and P metabolism was studied using 1-day-old male broiler chicks. In Experiment 1, practical diets providing .90% Ca plus .45% available P (Pav), .90% Ca plus .78% Pav, 1.80% Ca plus .45% Pav, or 1.80% Ca plus .90% Pav were fed with 0 or .392% A1 as aluminum sulfate for 21 days. The control diet (.90% Ca plus .45% Pav) without added A1 was fed to all chicks during Days 22 to 49. In general, A1 significantly (P less than .05) decreased BW gain, feed intake, gain:feed ratio, plasma inorganic P (Pi), tibia breaking strength, tibia weight, percentage of tibia ash, and plasma Zn, measured at Day 21. Elevating Pav increased BW gain, feed intake, gain:feed ratio, tibia weight and plasma Zn, and decreased plasma total Ca in the presence of .392% A1 plus 1.80% Ca. Plasma Pi, tibia breaking strength, and percentage of tibia ash were increased by raising dietary Pav in the presence of .392% A1 with either level of Ca. Negative effects of dietary A1 on feed intake and BW persisted through Day 49. In Experiment 2, a control diet (.90% Ca, .45% Pav) was fed for ad libitum access either alone or supplemented with .2% A1 as aluminum sulfate or with an equivalent amount of sulfate provided by potassium sulfate. The control diet was also pair-fed to chicks given .2% A1. Dietary A1 significantly depressed weight gain, feed intake, gain:feed ratio, and plasma Pi.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Barium enema (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The barium enema is a valuable diagnostic tool that helps detect abnormalities in the large intestine (colon). The barium enema, along with colonoscopy, remain standards in the diagnosis of colon cancer, ulcerative colitis, and other diseases of the colon.

  6. Barium enema (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A barium enema is performed to examine the walls of the colon. During the procedure, a well lubricated enema tube is inserted gently into the rectum. The barium, a radiopaque (shows up on X-ray) contrast ...

  7. Emission spectrographic determination of barium in sea water using a cation exchange concentration procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, B. J.; Joensuu, O.

    1967-01-01

    A concentration technique employing Dowex 50W cation exchange resin is described for the determination of barium in sea water. The separated barium is precipitated as fluoride together with calcium and strontium and measured by emission spectrographic analysis. The vertical distribution of barium in sea water has been measured in the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. The barium content varied between 7 and 23 ??g. per liter; in two profiles, the lowest concentrations were at a depth of about 1000 meters.

  8. Nanoparticles of barium induce apoptosis in human phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mores, Luana; França, Eduardo Luzia; Silva, Núbia Andrade; Suchara, Eliane Aparecida; Honorio-França, Adenilda Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nutrients and immunological factors of breast milk are essential for newborn growth and the development of their immune system, but this secretion can contain organic and inorganic toxins such as barium. Colostrum contamination with barium is an important issue to investigate because this naturally occurring element is also associated with human activity and industrial pollution. The study evaluated the administration of barium nanoparticles to colostrum, assessing the viability and functional activity of colostral mononuclear phagocytes. Methods Colostrum was collected from 24 clinically healthy women (aged 18–35 years). Cell viability, superoxide release, intracellular Ca2+ release, and phagocyte apoptosis were analyzed in the samples. Results Treatment with barium lowered mononuclear phagocyte viability, increased superoxide release, and reduced intracellular calcium release. In addition, barium increased cell death by apoptosis. Conclusion These data suggest that nanoparticles of barium in colostrum are toxic to cells, showing the importance of avoiding exposure to this element. PMID:26451108

  9. Binding and leakage of barium in alginate microbeads.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Yrr A; Qi, Meirigeng; Gundersen, Per Ole M; Formo, Kjetil; Lacik, Igor; Skjåk-Braek, Gudmund; Oberholzer, Jose; Strand, Berit L

    2012-11-01

    Microbeads of alginate crosslinked with Ca(2+) and/or Ba(2+) are popular matrices in cell-based therapy. The aim of this study was to quantify the binding of barium in alginate microbeads and its leakage under in vitro and accumulation under in vivo conditions. Low concentrations of barium (1 mM) in combination with calcium (50 mM) and high concentrations of barium (20 mM) in gelling solutions were used for preparation of microbeads made of high-G and high-M alginates. High-G microbeads accumulated barium from gelling solution and contained higher concentrations of divalent ions for both low- and high-Ba exposure compared with high-G microbeads exposed to calcium solely and to high-M microbeads for all gelling conditions. Although most of the unbound divalent ions were removed during the wash and culture steps, leakage of barium was still detected during storage. Barium accumulation in blood and femur bone of mice implanted with high-G beads was found to be dose-dependent. Estimated barium leakage relevant to transplantation to diabetic patients with islets in alginate microbeads showed that the leakage was 2.5 times lower than the tolerable intake value given by WHO for high-G microbeads made using low barium concentration. The similar estimate gave 1.5 times higher than is the tolerable intake value for the high-G microbeads made using high barium concentration. To reduce the risk of barium accumulation that may be of safety concern, the microbeads made of high-G alginate gelled with a combination of calcium and low concentration of barium ions is recommended for islet transplantation.

  10. Binding and Leakage of Barium in Alginate Microbeads

    PubMed Central

    Mørch, Yrr A.; Qi, Meirigeng; Gundersen, Per Ole M.; Formo, Kjetil; Lacik, Igor; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Oberholzer, Jose; Strand, Berit L.

    2013-01-01

    Microbeads of alginate cross-linked with Ca2+ and/or Ba2+ are popular matrices in cell-based therapy. The aim of this study was to quantify the binding of barium in alginate microbeads and its leakage under in vitro and accumulation under in vivo conditions. Low concentrations of barium (1 mM) in combination with calcium (50 mM) and high concentrations of barium (20 mM) in gelling solutions were used for preparation of microbeads made of high-G and high-M alginates. High-G microbeads accumulated barium from gelling solution and contained higher concentrations of divalent ions for both low- and high-Ba exposure compared to high-G microbeads exposed to calcium solely and to high-M microbeads for all gelling conditions. Although most of the unbound divalent ions were removed during the wash and culture steps, leakage of barium was still detected during storage. Barium accumulation in blood and femur bone of mice implanted with high-G beads was found to be dose-dependent. Estimated barium leakage relevant to transplantation to diabetic patients with islets in alginate microbeads showed that the leakage was 2.5 times lower than the tolerable intake value given by WHO for high-G microbeads made using low barium concentration. The similar estimate gave 1.5 times higher than is the tolerable intake value for the high-G microbeads made using high barium concentration. In order to reduce the risk of barium accumulation that may be of safety concern, the microbeads made of high-G alginate gelled with a combination of calcium and low concentration of barium ions is recommended for islet transplantation. PMID:22700168

  11. DEGRADATION OF SM2ZR2O7 THERMAL BARRIER COATING CAUSED BY CALCIUM-MAGNESIUM-ALUMINUM-SILICON OXIDE (CMAS) DEPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Honglong; Sheng, Zhizhi; Tarwater, Emily; Zhang, Xingxing; Dasgupta, Sudip; Fergus, Jeffrey

    2015-03-16

    Rare earth zirconates are promising materials for use as thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engines. Among the lanthanide zirconate materials, Sm2Zr2O7 with the pyrochlore structure has lower thermal conductivity and better corrosion resistance against calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicon oxide (CMAS). In this work, after reaction with CMAS, the pyrochlore structure transforms to the cubic fluorite structure and Ca2Sm8(SiO4)6O2 forms in elongated grain.

  12. Calcium and aluminum cycling in a temperate broadleaved deciduous forest of the eastern USA: relative impacts of tree species, canopy state, and flux type.

    PubMed

    Levia, Delphis F; Shiklomanov, Alexey N; Van Stan, John T; Scheick, Carrie E; Inamdar, Shreeram P; Mitchell, Myron J; McHale, Patrick J

    2015-07-01

    Ca/Al molar ratios are commonly used to assess the extent of aluminum stress in forests. This is among the first studies to quantify Ca/Al molar ratios for stemflow. Ca/Al molar ratios in bulk precipitation, throughfall, stemflow, litter leachate, near-trunk soil solution, and soil water were quantified for a deciduous forest in northeastern MD, USA. Data were collected over a 3-year period. The Ca/Al molar ratios in this study were above the threshold for aluminum stress (<1). Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech) had a median annual stemflow Ca/Al molar ratio of 15.7, with the leafed and leafless values of 12.4 and 19.2, respectively. The corresponding Ca/Al molar ratios for Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar) were 11.9 at the annual time scale and 11.9 and 13.6 for leafed and leafless periods, respectively. Bayesian statistical analysis showed no significant effect of canopy state (leafed, leafless) on Ca/Al molar ratios. DOC was consistently an important predictor of calcium, aluminum, and Ca/Al ratios. pH was occasionally an important predictor of calcium and aluminum concentrations, but was not a good predictor of Ca/Al ratio in any of the best-fit models (of >500 examined). This study supplies new data on Ca/Al molar ratios for stemflow from two common deciduous tree species. Future work should examine Ca/Al molar ratios in stemflow of other species and examine both inorganic and organic aluminum species to better gauge the potential for, and understand the dynamics of, aluminum toxicity in the proximal area around tree boles. PMID:26100445

  13. Calcium and aluminum cycling in a temperate broadleaved deciduous forest of the eastern USA: relative impacts of tree species, canopy state, and flux type.

    PubMed

    Levia, Delphis F; Shiklomanov, Alexey N; Van Stan, John T; Scheick, Carrie E; Inamdar, Shreeram P; Mitchell, Myron J; McHale, Patrick J

    2015-07-01

    Ca/Al molar ratios are commonly used to assess the extent of aluminum stress in forests. This is among the first studies to quantify Ca/Al molar ratios for stemflow. Ca/Al molar ratios in bulk precipitation, throughfall, stemflow, litter leachate, near-trunk soil solution, and soil water were quantified for a deciduous forest in northeastern MD, USA. Data were collected over a 3-year period. The Ca/Al molar ratios in this study were above the threshold for aluminum stress (<1). Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech) had a median annual stemflow Ca/Al molar ratio of 15.7, with the leafed and leafless values of 12.4 and 19.2, respectively. The corresponding Ca/Al molar ratios for Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar) were 11.9 at the annual time scale and 11.9 and 13.6 for leafed and leafless periods, respectively. Bayesian statistical analysis showed no significant effect of canopy state (leafed, leafless) on Ca/Al molar ratios. DOC was consistently an important predictor of calcium, aluminum, and Ca/Al ratios. pH was occasionally an important predictor of calcium and aluminum concentrations, but was not a good predictor of Ca/Al ratio in any of the best-fit models (of >500 examined). This study supplies new data on Ca/Al molar ratios for stemflow from two common deciduous tree species. Future work should examine Ca/Al molar ratios in stemflow of other species and examine both inorganic and organic aluminum species to better gauge the potential for, and understand the dynamics of, aluminum toxicity in the proximal area around tree boles.

  14. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  15. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements and fortified foods include gluconate, lactate, and phosphate. Calcium absorption is best when a person consumes ... also interfere with the body's ability to absorb iron and zinc, but this effect is not well ...

  16. Calcium.

    PubMed

    Williams, Robert J P

    2002-01-01

    This chapter describes the chemical and biological value of the calcium ion. In calcium chemistry, our main interest is in equilibria within static, nonflowing systems. Hence, we examined the way calcium formed precipitates and complex ions in solution. We observed thereafter its uses by humankind in a vast number of materials such as minerals, e.g., marble, concrete, mortars, which parallel the biological use in shells and bones. In complex formation, we noted that many combinations were of anion interaction with calcium for example in the uses of detergents and medicines. The rates of exchange of calcium from bound states were noted but they had little application. Calcium ions do not act as catalysts of organic reactions. In biological systems, interest is in the above chemistry, but extends to the fact that Ca2+ ions can carry information by flowing in one solution or from one solution to another through membranes. Hence, we became interested in the details of rates of calcium exchange. The fast exchange of this divalent ion from most organic binding sites has allowed it to develop as the dominant second messenger. Now the flow can be examined in vitro as calcium binds particular isolated proteins, which it activates as seen in physical mechanical changes or chemical changes and this piece-by-piece study of cells is common. Here, however, we have chosen to stress the whole circuit of Ca2+ action indicating that the cell is organized both at a basal and an activated state kinetic level by the steady state flow of the ion (see Fig. 11). Different time constants of exchange utilizing very similar binding constants lead to: 1) fast responses as in the muscle of an animal; or 2) slower change as in differentiation of an egg or seed. Many other changes of state may relate to Ca2+ steady-state levels of flow in the circuitry and here we point to two: 1) dormancy in reptiles and animals; and 2) sporulation in both bacteria and lower plants. In the other chapters of

  17. Growth of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions by coagulation and fragmentation in a turbulent protoplanetary disk: Observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnoz, Sébastien; Aléon, Jérôme; Chaumard, Noël; Baillié, Kévin; Taillifet, Esther

    2015-05-01

    Whereas it is generally accepted that calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from chondritic meteorites formed in a hot environment in the solar protoplanetary disk, the conditions of their formation remain debated. Recent laboratory studies of CAIs have provided new kind of data: their size distributions. We report that size distributions of CAIs measured in laboratory from sections of carbonaceous chondrites have a power law size distribution with cumulative size exponent between -1.7 and -1.9, which translates into cumulative size exponent between -2.5 and -2.8 after correction for sectioning. To explain these observations, numerical simulations were run to explore the growth of CAIs from micrometer to centimeter sizes, in a hot and turbulent protoplanetary disk through the competition of coagulation and fragmentation. We show that the size distributions obtained in growth simulations are in agreement with CAIs size distributions in meteorites. We explain the CAI sharp cut-off of their size distribution at centimeter sizes as the direct result from the famous fragmentation barrier, provided that CAI fragment for impact velocities larger than 10 m/s. The growth/destruction timescales of millimeter- and centimeter-sized CAIs is inversely proportional to the local dust/gas ratio and is about 10 years at 1300 K and up to 104 years at 1670 K. This implies that the most refractory CAIs are expected to be smaller in size owing to their long growth timescale compared to less refractory CAIs. Conversely, the least refractory CAIs could have been recycled many times during the CAI production era which may have profound consequences for their radiometric age.

  18. Aluminum disruption of calcium homeostasis and signal transduction resembles change that occurs in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Walton, J R

    2012-01-01

    Most humans living in industrialized societies are routinely exposed to bioavailable aluminum salts in the form of additives-in commercially-prepared foods, alum-clarified drinking water, certain pharmaceuticals, sunscreens, and other topical applications. Minute amounts of this aluminum are absorbed into the circulation. Trace aluminum levels cross the blood-brain barrier and progressively accumulate in large pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus, cortex, and other brain regions vulnerable in Alzheimer's disease. More aluminum enters the brain than leaves, resulting in a net increase in intraneuronal aluminum with advancing age. Aluminum is responsible for two main types of toxic damage in cells. As a pro-oxidant, aluminum causes oxidative damage both on its own and in synergy with iron. Aluminum also competes with, and substitutes for, essential metals-primarily Mg2+, iron and Ca2+ ions-in or on proteins and their co-factors. The author hypothesizes that intraneuronal aluminum interferes with Ca2+ metabolism in the aged brain and describes a way to test this hypothesis. This paper reviews: 1) major changes that occur in brain Ca2+ homeostasis and Ca2+ signaling, subtly with aging and more overtly in Alzheimer's disease; and 2) evidence from the scientific literature that aluminum causes these same changes in neurons.

  19. Constraints on formation processes of two coarse-grained calcium- aluminum-rich inclusions: a study of mantles, islands and cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeker, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    Many coarse-grained calcium- aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) contain features that are inconsistent with equilibrium liquid crystallization models of origin. Spinel-free islands (SFIs) in spinel-rich cores of Type B CAIs are examples of such features. One model previously proposed for the origin of Allende 5241, a Type B1 CAI containing SFIs, involves the capture and assimilation of xenoliths by a liquid droplet in the solar nebula (El Goresy et al, 1985; MacPherson et al 1989). This study reports new textural and chemical zoning data from 5241 and identifies previously unrecognized chemical zoning patterns in the melilite mantle and in a SFI. -from Author

  20. Barium periostitis: an intraoral complication following barium swallow.

    PubMed

    Stanton, David C; Seeger, Douglas; Robinson, Brian T

    2007-05-01

    Barium is used with great frequency for various gastrointestinal radiographic studies. Complications arising from the use of barium are uncommon and can range from peritonitis, pneumonitis, vascular intravasation, allergic reactions, and even "barium appendicitis." We report a case of an unusual complication, periostitis, from the use of barium in a 46-year-old male.

  1. Isotopically uniform, 16O-depleted calcium, aluminum-rich inclusions in CH and CB carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Petaev, Michail I.

    2012-04-01

    In situ oxygen-isotope measurements of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from the metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites Isheyevo (CH/CB-like), Acfer 214 paired with Acfer 182 (CH), QUE 94411 paired with QUE 94627 (CBb), and Hammadah al Hamra 237 (CBb) revealed the presence of a common population of igneous, isotopically uniform, 16O-depleted inclusions: Δ17O (average ± 2 standard deviations) = -7 ± 4‰, -6 ± 5‰, and -8 ± 3‰, respectively. All CAIs from CBs and a significant fraction of those from CHs and Isheyevo are 16O-depleted. Most of the 16O-depleted CAIs consist of Ti-poor Al-diopside, spinel, melilite, and forsterite and surrounded by a single- and double-layered rim of forsterite ± diopside. The 16O-depleted CAIs composed of hibonite, grossite, melilite, and spinel, and surrounded by the multilayered melilite + diopside ± forsterite rims are less common. Some of the 16O-depleted refractory igneous inclusions composed of Al-diopside, forsterite, and ±spinel have chondrule-like textures (skeletal or barred). They are mineralogically most similar to Al-diopside-rich chondrules found in metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites and composed of Al-diopside, forsterite, Al-rich low-Ca pyroxene, ±glassy mesostasis, and ±spinel, suggesting there is a continuum between these objects. We suggest that (i) most of the isotopically uniform and 16O-depleted CAIs resulted from remelting of pre-existing, possibly 16O-rich refractory inclusions. The remelting may have occurred during formation of the magnesian, non-porphyritic (cryptocrystalline and skeletal) chondrules in CHs, CBs, and Isheyevo either by an unspecified, late, single-stage, highly-energetic event or in an impact-generated plume previously hypothesized for their origin; both mechanisms probably occurred in the solar nebula (i.e., in the presence of the nebula gas). The forsterite ± pyroxene rims around 16O-depleted CAIs may have resulted from evaporation-recondensation of silicon and magnesium

  2. Barium bright and heavy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, Katharina M.

    2013-02-01

    Katharina M. Fromm relates how barium and its ores went from a magical, glowing species that attracted witches and alchemists to components in a variety of compounds that are key parts of modern life.

  3. Effects of aluminum and other cations on the structure of brain and liver chromatin.

    PubMed

    Walker, P R; LeBlanc, J; Sikorska, M

    1989-05-01

    The reactivity of aluminum and several other divalent and trivalent metallic cations toward chromatin from rat brain and liver has been investigated. Two criteria are used to determine the relative reactivity of these cations toward chromatin. The first involves the ability of the ions to compact the chromatin fibers to the point where chromatin precipitates. The second criterion measures the ability of cations to interfere with the accessibility of exogenous structural probes (nucleases) to chromatin. Of the divalent cations tested, nickel, cobalt, zinc, cadmium, and mercury were the most reactive toward chromatin, on the basis of their ability to induce precipitation of chromatin in the micromolar concentration range. The divalent cations magnesium, calcium, copper, strontium, and barium were much less effective, although all cations precipitate chromatin if their concentration is increased. Of the trivalent cations tested, aluminum, indium, and gallium were very effective precipitants, whereas iron and scandium were without effect at the concentrations tested. Of all the cations tested, aluminum was the most reactive. Aluminum's ability to alter the structure of chromatin was investigated further by testing its ability to interfere with nuclease accessibility. This test confirmed that aluminum does induce considerable changes in chromatin structure at micromolar concentrations. Furthermore, chromatin from cortical areas of the brain was much more sensitive to aluminum than chromatin from liver. These results are discussed in light of the known toxicity of these cations, with particular emphasis on the possible role of aluminum in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:2752000

  4. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  5. Aspiration of Barium Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes Santos, Cristina; Steen, Bárbara

    2014-01-01

    The aspiration of barium contrast is a rare complication that may occur during studies of the digestive tract. Barium is an inert material that can cause anywhere from an asymptomatic mechanical obstruction to serious symptoms of respiratory distress that can result in patient death. We present the case of a 79-year-old male patient in whom we observed the presence of contrast medium residue in the lung parenchyma as an incidental finding during hospitalization. When the patient's medical file was reviewed, images were found of a barium swallow study that the patient had undergone months earlier, and we were able to observe the exact moment of the aspiration of the contrast material. The patient had been asymptomatic since the test. PMID:25309769

  6. Acid precipitation and food quality: Inhibition of growth and survival in black ducks and mallards by dietary aluminum, calcium and phosphorus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    In areas impacted by acid precipitation, water chemistry of acidic ponds and streams often changes, resulting in increased mobilization of aluminum and decreased concentration of calcium carbonate. Aluminum binds with phosphorus and inhibits its uptake by organisms. Thus, invertebrate food organisms used by waterfowl may have inadequate Ca and P or elevated Al for normal growth and development. Acid rain and its effects may be one of the factors negatively impacting American black ducks (Anas rubripes) in eastern North America. One-day old mallards (A. platyrhynchos) and black ducks were placed on one of three Ca:P regimens: low:low (LL), normal:normal (NN), and low:high (LH) with each regimen divided further into three or four Al levels for 10 weeks. Forty-five % of the black ducks died on nine different diets whereas only 28% of the mallards died on three different diets. Mortality was significantly related to diet in both species. Growth rates for body weight, culmens, wings, and tarsi of both species on control diets exceeded those on many treatment diets but the differences were less apparent for mallards than for black ducks. Differences among treatments were due to both Ca:P and Al levels.

  7. Acid precipitation and food quality: inhibition of growth and survival in black ducks and mallards by dietary aluminum, calcium, and phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Sparling, D W

    1990-01-01

    In areas impacted by acid precipitation, water chemistry of acidic ponds and streams often changes, resulting in increased mobilization of aluminum and decreased concentration of calcium carbonate. Aluminum binds with phosphorus and inhibits its uptake by organisms. Thus, invertebrate food organisms used by waterfowl may have inadequate Ca and P or elevated Al for normal growth and development. Acid rain and its effects may be one of the factors negatively impacting American black ducks (Anas rubripes) in eastern North America. One-day old mallards (A. platyrhynchos) and black ducks were placed on one of three Ca:P regimens: low:low (LL), normal:normal (NN), and low:high (LH) with each regimen divided further into three or four Al levels for 10 weeks. Forty-five % of the black ducks died on nine different diets whereas only 28% of the mallards died on three different diets. Mortality was significantly related to diet in both species. Growth rates for body weight, culmens, wings, and tarsi of both species on control diets exceeded those on many treatment diets but the differences were less apparent for mallards than for black ducks. Differences among treatments were due to both Ca:P and Al levels.

  8. Barium stone impaction in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Erhan, Y; Koyuncu, A; Osmanoglu, N

    1995-06-01

    Autonomic symptoms such as orthostatic hypotension, abnormal sweating and constipation occur frequently in Parkinson's disease. In our case, barium meal used for upper gastrointestinal study caused barium stone formation and a paralytic-ileus-like syndrome. Therefore, attention should be paid while using barium meal for diagnostic purpose in Parkinsonism. PMID:7474296

  9. Salicylic acid alleviates aluminum toxicity in rice seedlings better than magnesium and calcium by reducing aluminum uptake, suppressing oxidative damage and increasing antioxidative defense.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Poonam; Srivastava, Rajneesh Kumar; Dubey, R S

    2013-05-01

    Aluminum toxicity is a major constraint to crop production in acid soils. The present study was undertaken to examine the comparative ameliorating effects of salicylic acid, Ca and Mg on Al toxicity in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings grown in hydroponics. Al treatment (0.5 mM AlCl3) caused decrease in plant vigour, loss of root plasma membrane integrity, increased contents of O 2 (∙-) , H2O2, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls and decline in the level of protein thiol. Al treatment caused significant changes in activity of antioxidative enzymes in rice seedlings. Exogenously added salicylic acid (60 μM), Ca (1 mM) and Mg (0.25 mM) significantly alleviated Al toxicity effects in the seedlings marked by restoration of growth, suppression of Al uptake, restoration of root plasma membrane integrity and decline in O 2 (∙-) , H2O2, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl contents. Salicylic acid, Ca and Mg suppressed Al-induced increase in SOD, GPX and APX activities while it elevated Al-induced decline in CAT activity. By histochemical staining of O 2 (∙-) using NBT and H2O2 using DAB, it was further confirmed that added salicylic acid, Ca or Mg decreased Al-induced accumulation of O 2 (∙-) and H2O2 in the leaf tissues. Results indicate that exogenously added salicylic acid, Ca or Mg alleviates Al toxicity in rice seedlings by suppressing Al uptake, restoring root membrane integrity, reducing ROS level and ROS induced oxidative damage and regulating the level of antioxidative enzyme activities. Further salicylic appears to be superior to Mg and Ca in alleviating Al toxicity effects in rice plants.

  10. Barium and Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Barium and Compounds ; CASRN 7440 - 39 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  11. Ultra-low temperature processing of barium tellurate dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Do-Kyun

    Ceramics, metals and polymers have unique electrical properties that are combined for electronic devices and systems. It necessitates lower processing temperatures for ceramics to be compatible with metal and polymer systems. In this thesis, the synthesis, crystal structure, and dielectric properties of barium tellurate are studied for temperatures between 500 and 900°C. Barium tellurate dielectric ceramics (BaTe4O9, BaTe 2O5, BaTe2O6, BaTeO3, BaTeO 4, and Ba2TeO5) are extensively investigated as new LTCC (Low-Temperature Cofired Ceramics) dielectric systems integrated with low resistivity metal electrodes such as silver and aluminum for microwave application. Studies on the phase formation and crystal structure through thermal analyses (Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Thermogravimetric Analysis, DSC-TGA) and X-ray diffraction phase analysis attest that barium tellurates are formed in the temperature range of 500 ˜ 900°C, through the sequential phase formations from Te-rich to Ba-rich phases. The oxygen coordination of the tellurium ion progresses from TeO4 to TeO6 via TeO 3+1 and TeO3 with increasing barium content as confirmed by structural analysis using infrared spectroscopy. High density barium tellurate ceramics are achieved at temperatures as low as 550°C, which provides the potential to be co-fired with low-melting aluminum metal electrodes in LTCC processing. Dielectric permittivity, loss, and temperature stability of barium tellurate dielectric ceramics were measured from 100 Hz to 13 GHz. Barium tellurate ceramics exhibit excellent microwave dielectric properties with intermediate dielectric permittivities and high quality factors (Q). The dielectric properties at microwave frequencies are epsilonr = 17.5, Qxf = 54700 GHz, TCf = -90 ppm/°C for BaTe4O9, epsilonr = 21, Qxf = 50300 GHz, TCf = -51 ppm/°C for BaTe2O6, epsilonr = 10, Qxf = 34000 GHz, TCf = -54 ppm/°C for BaTeO3, and epsilonr = 17, Qx f = 49600 GHz, TCf = -124 ppm/°C for Ba 2TeO5

  12. Barium Stars: Theoretical Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husti, Laura; Gallino, Roberto; Bisterzo, Sara; Straniero, Oscar; Cristallo, Sergio

    2009-09-01

    Barium stars are extrinsic Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. They present the s-enhancement characteristic for AGB and post-AGB stars, but are in an earlier evolutionary stage (main sequence dwarfs, subgiants, red giants). They are believed to form in binary systems, where a more massive companion evolved faster, produced the s-elements during its AGB phase, polluted the present barium star through stellar winds and became a white dwarf. The samples of barium stars of Allen & Barbuy (2006) and of Smiljanic et al. (2007) are analysed here. Spectra of both samples were obtained at high-resolution and high S/N. We compare these observations with AGB nucleosynthesis models using different initial masses and a spread of 13C-pocket efficiencies. Once a consistent solution is found for the whole elemental distribution of abundances, a proper dilution factor is applied. This dilution is explained by the fact that the s-rich material transferred from the AGB to the nowadays observed stars is mixed with the envelope of the accretor. We also analyse the mass transfer process, and obtain the wind velocity for giants and subgiants with known orbital period. We find evidence that thermohaline mixing is acting inside main sequence dwarfs and we present a method for estimating its depth.

  13. [Barium intoxication: a case report].

    PubMed

    Jan, I S; Jong, Y S; Lo, H M

    1991-09-01

    Barium intoxication, a rare cause of hypokalemia, can sometimes result in respiratory paralysis and ventricular tachyarrhythmia. Herein, we report one such case. A 29-year-old man swallowed barium-contaminated fried flour-coated sweet potatoes. Then, abdominal discomfort, vomiting, diarrhea, progressive muscular weakness, apnea and ventricular tachycardia developed and laboratory data revealed profound hypokalemia. He regained his health after mechanical ventilation, anti-arrhythmic agent and aggressive potassium chloride supplement. Analysis of blood, urine and contaminated flour showed the presence of barium carbonate. Barium intoxication is a medical emergency which requires rapid therapy to prevent mortality.

  14. Refinement of the crystal structure of calcium-lithium-aluminum tourmaline from the pegmatite vein in the Sangilen Upland (Tuva Republic)

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhdestvenskaya, I. V. Bronzova, Yu. M.; Frank-Kamenetskaya, O. V.; Zolotarev, A. A.; Kuznetsova, L. G.; Bannova, I. I.

    2008-03-15

    The crystal structure of a natural calcium-lithium-aluminum tourmaline, which has the unique composition (Ca{sub 0.62}Na{sub 0.32}{open_square}{sub 0.06})(Al{sub 1.08}Li{sub 0.99}Fe{sub 0.66}{sup 2+} Mg{sub 0.24}Ti{sub 0.03})Al{sub 6}[Si{sub 6}O{sub 18}](BO{sub 3}){sub 3}(OH{sub 2.28}O{sub 0.72}) {center_dot} (F{sub 0.84}O{sub 0.16}), is refined (R = 0.019, R{sub w} = 0.022, S = 1.47). It is found that the O(1)(W) site is split into two sites, O(1) and O(11), which are incompletely occupied by fluorine and oxygen anions, respectively, and that the O(3)(V) site contains bivalent oxygen anions. The solid solution studied is close in composition to the liddicoatite mineral species and differs from the latter one by the Li: Al ratio in the Y octahedra and the presence of bivalent oxygen anions in the O(3) site. The tourmaline studied differs from the hypothetical oxyliddicoatite by the population of the O(1)(W) site by fluorine and accommodation of additional oxygen anions in the O(3)(V) site.

  15. Refinement of the crystal structure of calcium-lithium-aluminum tourmaline from the pegmatite vein in the Sangilen Upland (Tuva Republic)

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhdestvenskaya, I. V. Bronzova, Yu. M.; Frank-Kamenetskaya, O. V.; Zolotarev, A. A.; Kuznetsova, L. G.; Bannova, I. I.

    2008-03-15

    The crystal structure of a natural calcium-lithium-aluminum tourmaline, which has the unique composition (Ca{sub 0.62}Na{sub 0.32}{open_square}{sub 0.06})(Al{sub 1.08}Li{sub 0.99}Fe{sub 0.66}{sup 2+} Mg{sub 0.24}Ti{sub 0.03})Al{sub 6}[Si{sub 6}O{sub 18}](BO{sub 3}){sub 3}(OH{sub 2.28}O{sub 0.72}) . (F{sub 0.84}O{sub 0.16}), is refined (R = 0.019, R{sub w} = 0.022, S = 1.47). It is found that the O(1)(W) site is split into two sites, O(1) and O(11), which are incompletely occupied by fluorine and oxygen anions, respectively, and that the O(3)(V) site contains bivalent oxygen anions. The solid solution studied is close in composition to the liddicoatite mineral species and differs from the latter one by the Li: Al ratio in the Y octahedra and the presence of bivalent oxygen anions in the O(3) site. The tourmaline studied differs from the hypothetical oxyliddicoatite by the population of the O(1)(W) site by fluorine and accommodation of additional oxygen anions in the O(3)(V) site.

  16. AN ALUMINUM/CALCIUM-RICH, IRON-POOR, WHITE DWARF STAR: EVIDENCE FOR AN EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY LITHOSPHERE?

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckerman, B.; Klein, B.; Jura, M.; Koester, D.; Dufour, P.; Melis, Carl

    2011-10-01

    The presence of elements heavier than helium in white dwarf atmospheres is often a signpost for the existence of rocky objects that currently or previously orbited these stars. We have measured the abundances of various elements in the hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarfs G149-28 and NLTT 43806. In comparison with other white dwarfs with atmospheres polluted by heavy elements, NLTT 43806 is substantially enriched in aluminum but relatively poor in iron. We compare the relative abundances of Al and eight other heavy elements seen in NLTT 43806 with the elemental composition of bulk Earth, with simulated extrasolar rocky planets, with solar system meteorites, with the atmospheric compositions of other polluted white dwarfs, and with the outer layers of the Moon and Earth. The best agreement is found with a model that involves accretion of a mixture of terrestrial crust and upper mantle material onto NLTT 43806. The implication is that NLTT 43806 is orbited by a differentiated rocky planet, perhaps quite similar to Earth, that has suffered a collision that stripped away some of its outer layers.

  17. Setting process of lime-based conservation mortars with barium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Karatasios, Ioannis . E-mail: ikarat@ims.demokritos.gr; Kilikoglou, Vassilis; Colston, Belinda; Theoulakis, Panagiotis; Watt, David

    2007-06-15

    This paper presents the effect of barium hydroxide on the setting mechanism of lime-based conservation mortars, when used as an additive material. The study focuses on the monitoring of the setting process and the identification of the mineral phases formed, which are essential for furthering the study of the durability of barium mixtures against chemical degradation. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal analysis (DTA-TG) were used to monitor the setting processes of these mixtures and identify new phases formed. The results suggest that barium hydroxide is evenly distributed within the lime and produces a homogeneous binding material, consisting of calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), witherite (BaCO{sub 3}) and barium-calcium carbonate [BaCa(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}]. Finally, it was found that barium carbonate can be directly bonded to calcitic aggregates and therefore increases its chemical compatibility with the binding material.

  18. Barium uranyl diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Anna-Gay D.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2012-08-15

    Three Ba{sup 2+}/UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} methylenediphosphonates have been prepared from mild hydrothermal treatment of uranium trioxide, methylendiphosphonic acid (C1P2) with barium hydroxide octahydrate, barium iodate monohydrate, and small aliquots of HF at 200 Degree-Sign C. These compounds, Ba[UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{center_dot}1.4H{sub 2}O (Ba-1), Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2}F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O (Ba-2), and Ba{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2})F{sub 4}]{center_dot}5.75H{sub 2}O (Ba-3) all adopt layered structures based upon linear uranyl groups and disphosphonate molecules. Ba-2 and Ba-3 are similar in that they both have UO{sub 5}F{sub 2} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged and chelated by the diphosphonate moiety into a two-dimensional zigzag anionic sheet (Ba-2) and a one-dimensional ribbon anionic chain (Ba-3). Ba-1, has a single crystallographically unique uranium metal center where the C1P2 ligand solely bridges to form [UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} sheets. The interlayer space of the structures is occupied by Ba{sup 2+}, which, along with the fluoride ion, mediates the structure formed and maintains overall charge balance. - Graphical abstract: Illustration of the stacking of the layers in Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2})F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O viewed along the c-axis. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramidal units, U(1)O{sub 7}=gray, U(2)O{sub 7}=yellow, barium=blue, phosphorus=magenta, fluorine=green, oxygen=red, carbon=black, and hydrogen=light peach. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymerization of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} sites to form uranyl dimers leads to structural variations in compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Barium cations stitch uranyl diphosphonate anionic layers together, and help mediate structure formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HF acts as both a

  19. Factors controlling soil water and stream water aluminum concentrations after a clearcut in a forested watershed with calcium-poor soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHale, M.R.; Burns, Douglas A.; Lawrence, G.B.; Murdoch, Peter S.

    2007-01-01

    The 24 ha Dry Creek watershed in the Catskill Mountains of southeastern New York State USA was clearcut during the winter of 1996-1997. The interactions among acidity, nitrate (NO3- ), aluminum (Al), and calcium (Ca2+) in streamwater, soil water, and groundwater were evaluated to determine how they affected the speciation, solubility, and concentrations of Al after the harvest. Watershed soils were characterized by low base saturation, high exchangeable Al concentrations, and low exchangeable base cation concentrations prior to the harvest. Mean streamwater NO3- concentration was about 20 ??mol l-1 for the 3 years before the harvest, increased sharply after the harvest, and peaked at 1,309 ??mol l -1 about 5 months after the harvest. Nitrate and inorganic monomeric aluminum (Alim) export increased by 4-fold during the first year after the harvest. Alim mobilization is of concern because it is toxic to some fish species and can inhibit the uptake of Ca2+ by tree roots. Organic complexation appeared to control Al solubility in the O horizon while ion exchange and possibly equilibrium with imogolite appeared to control Al solubility in the B horizon. Alim and NO3- concentrations were strongly correlated in B-horizon soil water after the clearcut (r2 = 0.96), especially at NO3- concentrations greater than 100 ??mol l-1. Groundwater entering the stream from perennial springs contained high concentrations of base cations and low concentrations of NO3- which mixed with acidic, high Alim soil water and decreased the concentration of Alim in streamwater after the harvest. Five years after the harvest soil water NO 3- concentrations had dropped below preharvest levels as the demand for nitrogen by regenerating vegetation increased, but groundwater NO3- concentrations remained elevated because groundwater has a longer residence time. As a result streamwater NO3- concentrations had not fallen below preharvest levels, even during the growing season, 5 years after the harvest

  20. On Barium Oxide Solubility in Barium-Containing Chloride Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Elena V.; Zakiryanova, Irina D.; Bovet, Andrey L.; Korzun, Iraida V.

    2016-08-01

    Oxide solubility in chloride melts depends on temperature and composition of molten solvent. The solubility of barium oxide in the solvents with barium chloride content is essentially higher than that in molten alkali chlorides. Spectral data demonstrate the existence of oxychloride ionic groupings in such melts. This work presents the results of the BaO solubility in two molten BaCl2-NaCl systems with different barium chloride content. The received data together with earlier published results revealed the main regularities of BaO solubility in molten BaO-BaCl2-MCl systems.

  1. A CRITICAL EXAMINATION OF THE X-WIND MODEL FOR CHONDRULE AND CALCIUM-RICH, ALUMINUM-RICH INCLUSION FORMATION AND RADIONUCLIDE PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Desch, S. J.; Morris, M. A.; Connolly, H. C.; Boss, Alan P.

    2010-12-10

    Meteoritic data, especially regarding chondrules and calcium-rich, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs), and isotopic evidence for short-lived radionuclides (SLRs) in the solar nebula, potentially can constrain how planetary systems form. Interpretation of these data demands an astrophysical model, and the 'X-wind' model of Shu et al. and collaborators has been advanced to explain the origin of chondrules, CAIs, and SLRs. It posits that chondrules and CAIs were thermally processed <0.1 AU from the protostar, then flung by a magnetocentrifugal outflow to the 2-3 AU region to be incorporated into chondrites. Here we critically examine key assumptions and predictions of the X-wind model. We find a number of internal inconsistencies: theory and observation show no solid material exists at 0.1 AU; particles at 0.1 AU cannot escape being accreted into the star; particles at 0.1 AU will collide at speeds high enough to destroy them; thermal sputtering will prevent growth of particles; and launching of particles in magnetocentrifugal outflows is not modeled, and may not be possible. We also identify a number of incorrect predictions of the X-wind model: the oxygen fugacity where CAIs form is orders of magnitude too oxidizing, chondrule cooling rates are orders of magnitude lower than those experienced by barred olivine chondrules, chondrule-matrix complementarity is not predicted, and the SLRs are not produced in their observed proportions. We conclude that the X-wind model is not relevant to chondrule and CAI formation and SLR production. We discuss more plausible models for chondrule and CAI formation and SLR production.

  2. Removal of uranium and fluorine from wastewater by double-functional microsphere adsorbent of SA/CMC loaded with calcium and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liping; Lin, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Xingbao; Luo, Xuegang

    2016-10-01

    A novel dual functional microsphere adsorbent of alginate/carboxymethyl cellulose sodium composite loaded with calcium and aluminum (SA/CMC-Ca-Al) is prepared by an injection device to remove fluoride and uranium, respectively, from fluoro-uranium mixed aqueous solution. Batch experiments are performed at different conditions: pH, temperature, initial concentration and contact time. The results show that the maximum adsorption amount for fluoride is 35.98 mg/g at pH 2.0, 298.15 K concentration 100 mg/L, while that for uranium is 101.76 mg/g at pH 4.0, 298.15 K concentration 100 mg/L. Both of the adsorption process could be well described by Langmuir model. The adsorption kinetic data is fitted well with pseudo-first-order model for uranium and pseudo-second-order model for fluoride. Thermodynamic parameters are also evaluated, indicating that the adsorption of uranium on SA/CMC-Ca-Al is a spontaneous and exothermic process, while the removal of fluoride is non-spontaneous and endothermic process. The mechanism of modification and adsorption process on SA/CMC-Ca-Al is characterized by FT-IR, SEM, EDX and XPS. The results show that Ca (II) and Al (III) are loaded on SA/CMC through ion-exchange of sodium of SA/CMC. The coordination reaction and ion-exchange happen during the adsorption process between SA/CMC-Ca-Al and uranium, fluoride. Results suggest that the SA/CMC-Ca-Al adsorbent has a great potential in removing uranium and fluoride from aqueous solution.

  3. An Improved Qualitative Analysis Procedure for Aluminum Subgroup Cations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kistner, C. R.; Robinson, Patricia J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a procedure for the qualitative analysis of aluminum subgroup cations designed to avoid failure to obtain lead or barium chromate precipitates or failure to report aluminum hydroxide when present (due to staining). Provides a flow chart and step-by-step explanation for the new procedure, indicating significantly improved student results.…

  4. Tungsten and Barium Transport in the Internal Plasma of Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the flow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushedback to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. Thisbarium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream endgreater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length,so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollowcathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  5. Barium light source method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, John J. (Inventor); MacDonagh-Dumler, Jeffrey (Inventor); Anderson, Heidi M. (Inventor); Lawler, James E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Visible light emission is obtained from a plasma containing elemental barium including neutral barium atoms and barium ion species. Neutral barium provides a strong green light emission in the center of the visible spectrum with a highly efficient conversion of electrical energy into visible light. By the selective excitation of barium ionic species, emission of visible light at longer and shorter wavelengths can be obtained simultaneously with the green emission from neutral barium, effectively providing light that is visually perceived as white. A discharge vessel contains the elemental barium and a buffer gas fill therein, and a discharge inducer is utilized to induce a desired discharge temperature and barium vapor pressure therein to produce from the barium vapor a visible light emission. The discharge can be induced utilizing a glow discharge between electrodes in the discharge vessel as well as by inductively or capacitively coupling RF energy into the plasma within the discharge vessel.

  6. Silico-ferrite of Calcium and Aluminum (SFCA) Iron Ore Sinter Bonding Phases: New Insights into Their Formation During Heating and Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2012-12-01

    The formation of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter phases during heating and cooling of synthetic iron ore sinter mixtures in the range 298 K to 1623 K (25 °C to 1350 °C) and at oxygen partial pressure of 5 × 10-3 atm has been characterized using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. SFCA and SFCA-I are the key bonding phases in iron ore sinter, and an improved understanding of their formation mechanisms may lead to improved efficiency of industrial sintering processes. During heating, SFCA-I formation at 1327 K to 1392 K (1054 °C to 1119 °C) (depending on composition) was associated with the reaction of Fe2O3, 2CaO·Fe2O3, and SiO2. SFCA formation (1380 K to 1437 K [1107 °C to 1164 °C]) was associated with the reaction of CaO·Fe2O3, SiO2, and a phase with average composition 49.60, 9.09, 0.14, 7.93, and 32.15 wt pct Fe, Ca, Si, Al, and O, respectively. Increasing Al2O3 concentration in the starting sinter mixture increased the temperature range over which SFCA-I was stable before the formation of SFCA, and it stabilized SFCA to a higher temperature before it melted to form a Fe3O4 + melt phase assemblage (1486 K to 1581 K [1213 °C to 1308 °C]). During cooling, the first phase to crystallize from the melt (1452 K to 1561 K [1179 °C to 1288 °C]) was an Fe-rich phase, similar in composition to SFCA-I, and it had an average composition 58.88, 6.89, 0.82, 3.00, and 31.68 wt pct Fe, Ca, Si, Al, and O, respectively. At lower temperatures (1418 K to 1543 K [1145 °C to 1270 °C]), this phase reacted with melt to form SFCA. Increasing Al2O3 increased the temperature at which crystallization of the Fe-rich phase occurred, increased the temperature at which crystallization of SFCA occurred, and suppressed the formation of Fe2O3 (1358 K to 1418 K [1085 °C to 1145 °C]) to lower temperatures.

  7. Fluorescent lighting with aluminum nitride phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Srivastava, Alok M.

    2016-05-10

    A fluorescent lamp includes a glass envelope; at least two electrodes connected to the glass envelope; mercury vapor and an inert gas within the glass envelope; and a phosphor within the glass envelope, wherein the phosphor blend includes aluminum nitride. The phosphor may be a wurtzite (hexagonal) crystalline structure Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN phosphor, where M may be drawn from beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, ytterbium, bismuth, manganese, silicon, germanium, tin, boron, or gallium is synthesized to include dopants to control its luminescence under ultraviolet excitation. The disclosed Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN:Mn phosphor provides bright orange-red emission, comparable in efficiency and spectrum to that of the standard orange-red phosphor used in fluorescent lighting, Y.sub.2O.sub.3:Eu. Furthermore, it offers excellent lumen maintenance in a fluorescent lamp, and does not utilize "critical rare earths," minimizing sensitivity to fluctuating market prices for the rare earth elements.

  8. In situ cross-linking of sodium alginate with calcium and aluminum ions to sustain the release of theophylline from polymeric matrices.

    PubMed

    Nokhodchi, Ali; Tailor, Anish

    2004-12-01

    Small matrices of calcium alginate or aluminium alginate have been investigated as possible controlled release systems for drugs. The objective of the present study was to sustain the release of theophylline from alginate matrices using different concentrations of aluminium chloride and calcium chloride in presence and absence of HPMC. Tablets containing differing concentrations of aluminium and calcium chloride were produced and the release rate of theophylline was tested using the basket dissolution apparatus over 8 h. Increasing amounts of aluminium chloride from 0.0001 to 0.00068 moles decreased the release of theophylline from 95.1 +/- 0.27 to 29.5 +/- 1.5, indicating a significant effect of aluminium ions on a reduction in the release rate of theophylline from sodium alginate matrices. In the case of matrices containing different concentrations of calcium ions, as the concentration of calcium chloride increased, the release rate increased to an optimum then declined after this. This was due to insufficient calcium ions being available to cross-link with the sodium alginate to form an insoluble gel. The effect of aluminium ions, as this is a trivalent ion compared to calcium, which is a divalent ion, aluminium ions are able to decrease the release rate with a smaller concentration compared to calcium ions. The results also showed that the presence of HPMC caused a reduction in release rate of theophylline from alginate matrices containing calcium chloride. Whereas, in the case of alginate matrices containing aluminium chloride the release rate of theophylline increased in presence of HPMC. For comparing the dissolution data, dissolution efficiency (DE) was used. The values of DE are consistent with the dissolution data. The results show that within a formulation series, DE values generally decrease when the cation concentration increases and this criterion can be used to describe the effect of calcium and aluminium ions on the release behaviour of theophylline

  9. Efficient polymer light-emitting diode with air-stable aluminum cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaszadeh, D.; Wetzelaer, G. A. H.; Doumon, N. Y.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2016-03-01

    The fast degradation of polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) in ambient conditions is primarily due to the oxidation of highly reactive metals, such as barium or calcium, which are used as cathode materials. Here, we report the fabrication of PLEDs using an air-stable partially oxidized aluminum (AlOx) cathode. Usually, the high work function of aluminum (4.2 eV) imposes a high barrier for injecting electrons into the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the emissive polymer (2.9 eV below the vacuum level). By partially oxidizing aluminum, its work function is decreased, but not sufficiently low for efficient electron injection. Efficient injection is obtained by inserting an electron transport layer of poly[(9,9-di-n-octylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-(benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazol-4,8-diyl)] (F8BT), which has its LUMO at 3.3 eV below vacuum, between the AlOx cathode and the emissive polymer. The intermediate F8BT layer not only serves as a hole-blocking layer but also provides an energetic staircase for electron injection from AlOx into the emissive layer. PLEDs with an AlOx cathode and F8BT interlayer exhibit a doubling of the efficiency as compared to conventional Ba/Al PLEDs, and still operate even after being kept in ambient atmosphere for one month without encapsulation.

  10. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  11. Uranium Sequestration by Aluminum Phosphate Minerals in Unsaturated Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Jerden, James L. Jr.

    2007-07-01

    A mineralogical and geochemical study of soils developed from the unmined Coles Hill uranium deposit (Virginia) was undertaken to determine how phosphorous influences the speciation of uranium in an oxidizing soil/saprolite system typical of the eastern United States. This paper presents mineralogical and geochemical results that identify and quantify the processes by which uranium has been sequestered in these soils. It was found that uranium is not leached from the saturated soil zone (saprolites) overlying the deposit due to the formation of a sparingly soluble uranyl phosphate mineral of the meta-autunite group. The concentration of uranium in the saprolites is approximately 1000 mg uranium per kg of saprolite. It was also found that a significant amount of uranium was retained in the unsaturated soil zone overlying uranium-rich saprolites. The uranium concentration in the unsaturated soils is approximately 200 mg uranium per kg of soil (20 times higher than uranium concentrations in similar soils adjacent to the deposit). Mineralogical evidence indicates that uranium in this zone is sequestered by a barium-strontium-calcium aluminum phosphate mineral of the crandallite group (gorceixite). This mineral is intimately inter-grown with iron and manganese oxides that also contain uranium. The amount of uranium associated with both the aluminum phosphates (as much as 1.4 weight percent) has been measured by electron microprobe micro-analyses and the geochemical conditions under which these minerals formed has been studied using thermodynamic reaction path modeling. The geochemical data and modeling results suggest the meta-autunite group minerals present in the saprolites overlying the deposit are unstable in the unsaturated zone soils overlying the deposit due to a decrease in soil pH (down to a pH of 4.5) at depths less than 5 meters below the surface. Mineralogical observations suggest that, once exposed to the unsaturated environment, the meta-autunite group

  12. Comparison of Barium and Arsenic Concentrations in Well Drinking Water and in Human Body Samples and a Novel Remediation System for These Elements in Well Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Masashi; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y.; Ohnuma, Shoko; Furuta, Akio; Kato, Yoko; Shekhar, Hossain U.; Kojima, Michiyo; Koike, Yasuko; Dinh Thang, Nguyen; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Ly, Thuy Bich; Jia, Xiaofang; Yetti, Husna; Naito, Hisao; Ichihara, Gaku; Yajima, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Health risk for well drinking water is a worldwide problem. Our recent studies showed increased toxicity by exposure to barium alone (≤700 µg/L) and coexposure to barium (137 µg/L) and arsenic (225 µg/L). The present edition of WHO health-based guidelines for drinking water revised in 2011 has maintained the values of arsenic (10 µg/L) and barium (700 µg/L), but not elements such as manganese, iron and zinc. Nevertheless, there have been very few studies on barium in drinking water and human samples. This study showed significant correlations between levels of arsenic and barium, but not its homologous elements (magnesium, calcium and strontium), in urine, toenail and hair samples obtained from residents of Jessore, Bangladesh. Significant correlation between levels of arsenic and barium in well drinking water and levels in human urine, toenail and hair samples were also observed. Based on these results, a high-performance and low-cost adsorbent composed of a hydrotalcite-like compound for barium and arsenic was developed. The adsorbent reduced levels of barium and arsenic from well water in Bangladesh and Vietnam to <7 µg/L within 1 min. Thus, we have showed levels of arsenic and barium in humans and propose a novel remediation system. PMID:23805262

  13. The problem of the barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, E.; Nemec, J.; Proffitt, C.

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of barium stars and other cool stars with peculiar element abundances are reported. Those observations attempted to find hot white dwarf companions. Among six real barium stars studied, only Zeta Cap was found to have a white dwarf companion. Among seven mild, or marginal, barium stars studied, at least three were found to have hot subluminous companions. It is likely that all of them have white dwarf companions.

  14. Aluminum Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  15. Processing science of barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygun, Seymen Murat

    Barium titanate and barium strontium titanate thin films were deposited on base metal foils via chemical solution deposition and radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The films were processed at elevated temperatures for densification and crystallization. Two unifying research goals underpin all experiments: (1) To improve our fundamental understanding of complex oxide processing science, and (2) to translate those improvements into materials with superior structural and electrical properties. The relationships linking dielectric response, grain size, and thermal budget for sputtered barium strontium titanate were illustrated. (Ba 0.6Sr0.4)TiO3 films were sputtered on nickel foils at temperatures ranging between 100-400°C. After the top electrode deposition, the films were co-fired at 900°C for densification and crystallization. The dielectric properties were observed to improve with increasing sputter temperature reaching a permittivity of 1800, a tunability of 10:1, and a loss tangent of less than 0.015 for the sample sputtered at 400°C. The data can be understood using a brick wall model incorporating a high permittivity grain interior with low permittivity grain boundary. However, this high permittivity value was achieved at a grain size of 80 nm, which is typically associated with strong suppression of the dielectric response. These results clearly show that conventional models that parameterize permittivity with crystal diameter or film thickness alone are insufficiently sophisticated. Better models are needed that incorporate the influence of microstructure and crystal structure. This thesis next explores the ability to tune microstructure and properties of chemically solution deposited BaTiO3 thin films by modulation of heat treatment thermal profiles and firing atmosphere composition. Barium titanate films were deposited on copper foils using hybrid-chelate chemistries. An in-situ gas analysis process was developed to probe the organic removal and the

  16. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  17. Calcium alloy as active material in secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Roche, Michael F.; Preto, Sandra K.; Martin, Allan E.

    1976-01-01

    Calcium alloys such as calcium-aluminum and calcium-silicon, are employed as active material within a rechargeable negative electrode of an electrochemical cell. Such cells can use a molten salt electrolyte including calcium ions and a positive electrode having sulfur, sulfides, or oxides as active material. The calcium alloy is selected to prevent formation of molten calcium alloys resulting from reaction with the selected molten electrolytic salt at the cell operating temperatures.

  18. Radium/Barium Waste Project

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Allen K.; Ellefson, Mark D.; McDonald, Kent M.

    2015-06-25

    The treatment, shipping, and disposal of a highly radioactive radium/barium waste stream have presented a complex set of challenges requiring several years of effort. The project illustrates the difficulty and high cost of managing even small quantities of highly radioactive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-regulated waste. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research activities produced a Type B quantity of radium chloride low-level mixed waste (LLMW) in a number of small vials in a facility hot cell. The resulting waste management project involved a mock-up RCRA stabilization treatment, a failed in-cell treatment, a second, alternative RCRA treatment approach, coordinated regulatory variances and authorizations, alternative transportation authorizations, additional disposal facility approvals, and a final radiological stabilization process.

  19. Barium Isotopes in Single Presolar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellin, M. J.; Davis, A. M.; Savina, M. R.; Kashiv, Y.; Clayton, R. N.; Lewis, R. S.; Amari, S.

    2001-01-01

    Barium isotopic compositions of single presolar grains were measured by laser ablation laser resonant ionization mass spectrometry and the implications of the data for stellar processes are discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Intracellular calcium puffs in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Radding, W; Jordan, S E; Hester, R B; Blair, H C

    1999-12-15

    We studied intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in acid-secreting bone-attached osteoclasts, which produce a high-calcium acidic extracellular compartment. Acid secretion and [Ca(2+)](i) were followed using H(+)-restricted dyes and fura-2 or fluo-3. Whole cell calcium of acid-secreting osteoclasts was approximately 100 nM, similar to cells on inert substrate that do not secrete acid. However, measurements in restricted areas of the cell showed [Ca(2+)](i) transients to 500-1000 nM consistent with calcium puffs, transient (millisecond) localized calcium elevations reported in other cells. Spot measurements at 50-ms intervals indicated that puffs were typically less than 400 ms. Transients did not propagate in waves across the cell in scanning confocal measurements. Calcium puffs occurred mainly over regions of acid secretion as determined using lysotracker red DND99 and occurred at irregular periods averaging 5-15 s in acid secreting cells, but were rare in lysotracker-negative nonsecretory cells. The calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine, cell-surface calcium transport inhibitors lanthanum or barium, and the endoplasmic reticulum ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin had variable acute effects on the mean [Ca(2+)](i) and puff frequency. However, none of these agents prevented calcium puff activity, suggesting that the mechanism producing the puffs is independent of these processes. We conclude that [Ca(2+)](i) transients in osteoclasts are increased in acid-secreting osteoclasts, and that the puffs occur mainly near the acid-transporting membrane. Cell membrane acid transport requires calcium, suggesting that calcium puffs function to maintain acid secretion. However, membrane H(+)-ATPase activity was insensitive to calcium in the 100 nM-1 microM range. Thus, any effects of calcium puffs on osteoclastic acid transport must be indirect.

  1. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Barium Chloride Dihydrate (CAS No. 10326-27-9) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Drinking Water Studies).

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    Barium chloride dihydrate, a white crystalline granule or powder, is used in pigments, aluminum refining, leather tanning and coloring, the manufacture of magnesium metal, ceramics, glass, and paper products, as a pesticide, and in medicine as a cardiac stimulant. Toxicology and carcinogenicity studies were conducted by administering barium chloride dihydrate (99% pure) in drinking water to F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice for 15 days, 13 weeks, and 2 years. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium, cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, and mouse lymphoma cells. 15-DAY STUDY IN RATS: Groups of five males and five females received barium chloride dihydrate in the drinking water at concentrations of 0, 125, 250, 500, 1,000, or 2,000 ppm for 15 days, corresponding to average daily doses of 10, 15, 35, 60, or 110 mg barium/kg body weight to males and females. No chemical-related deaths, differences in final mean body weights, or clinical findings of toxicity were observed. Water consumption by male and female rats exposed to 2,000 ppm was slightly less (S16%) than controls during week 2. There were no significant differences in absolute or relative organ weights between exposed and control rats. No biologically significant differences in hematology, clinical chemistry, or neurobehavioral parameters occurred in rats. 15-DAY STUDY IN MICE: Groups of five males and five females received barium chloride dihydrate in the drinking water at concentrations of 0, 40, 80,173, 346, or 692 ppm for 15 days, corresponding to average daily doses of 5,10, 20, 40, or 70 mg barium/kg body weight to males and 5, 10, 15, 40, or 85 mg barium/kg body weight to females. No chemical-related deaths, differences in mean body weights or in water consumption, or clinical findings of toxicity were observed in mice. The relative liver weight of males receiving 692 ppm was significantly greater than that of the controls. The absolute and relative liver weights of females that

  2. Small barium rail gun for plasma injection.

    PubMed

    Kiwamoto, Y

    1980-03-01

    A small rail gun with a barium electrode can be operated at higher than one shot per second to produce more than 2x10(16) barium ions with energy 10-20 eV. The operation of the gun takes advantage of the external magnetic field for cross-field plasma injection into a trap. Up to 7 kG of the magnetic field examined, the gun performance improves with the increased magnetic field strength.

  3. Absolute magnitudes and kinematics of barium stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A. E.; Luri, X.; Grenier, S.; Prevot, L.; Mennessier, M. O.; Figueras, F.; Torra, J.

    1997-03-01

    The absolute magnitude of barium stars has been obtained from kinematical data using a new algorithm based on the maximum-likelihood principle. The method allows to separate a sample into groups characterized by different mean absolute magnitudes, kinematics and z-scale heights. It also takes into account, simultaneously, the censorship in the sample and the errors on the observables. The method has been applied to a sample of 318 barium stars. Four groups have been detected. Three of them show a kinematical behaviour corresponding to disk population stars. The fourth group contains stars with halo kinematics. The luminosities of the disk population groups spread a large range. The intrinsically brightest one (M_v_=-1.5mag, σ_M_=0.5mag) seems to be an inhomogeneous group containing barium binaries as well as AGB single stars. The most numerous group (about 150 stars) has a mean absolute magnitude corresponding to stars in the red giant branch (M_v_=0.9mag, σ_M_=0.8mag). The third group contains barium dwarfs, the obtained mean absolute magnitude is characteristic of stars on the main sequence or on the subgiant branch (M_v_=3.3mag, σ_M_=0.5mag). The obtained mean luminosities as well as the kinematical results are compatible with an evolutionary link between barium dwarfs and classical barium giants. The highly luminous group is not linked with these last two groups. More high-resolution spectroscopic data will be necessary in order to better discriminate between barium and non-barium stars.

  4. Small barium rail gun for plasma injection

    SciTech Connect

    Kiwamoto, Y.

    1980-03-01

    A small rail gun with a barium electrode can be operated at higher than one shot per second to produce more than 2 x 10/sup 16/ barium ions with energy 10--20 eV. The operation of the gun takes advantage of the external magnetic field for cross-field plasma injection into a trap. Up to 7 kG of the magnetic field examined, the gun performance improves with the increased magnetic field strength.

  5. Small barium rail gun for plasma injection.

    PubMed

    Kiwamoto, Y

    1980-03-01

    A small rail gun with a barium electrode can be operated at higher than one shot per second to produce more than 2x10(16) barium ions with energy 10-20 eV. The operation of the gun takes advantage of the external magnetic field for cross-field plasma injection into a trap. Up to 7 kG of the magnetic field examined, the gun performance improves with the increased magnetic field strength. PMID:18647050

  6. Barium compatibility of insulator material systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, John M.; Zee, Ralph; Schuller, Michael

    1997-01-01

    The compatibility of insulator material systems in a barium environment was investigated. This work is part of an ongoing program to identify weaknesses in insulator/braze/refractory metal materials systems which provide electrical insulation in alkali-metal enhanced thermionic devices and other alkali-metal thermal-to-electric converters. Test articles consisting of alumina or sapphire insulators brazed to molybdenum via a nominal Cu-30% Ni braze, were exposed to barium vapor to ascertain possible reactions and/or failure mechanisms. The test matrix consisted of eight samples; 5 with a sapphire insulator, 3 with an alumina insulator. Each sample was exposed to a different combination of insulator/braze region temperature (1000 K or 1100 K) and partial pressure of barium (10-3 or 10-2 torr) for approximately 750 hours. Initial analysis indicated that the ceramic portions were free from corrosion and that the braze material was the weak link in the material system. Evidence of formation of a Cu-Ba intermetallic at the braze region was visible. Further analysis indicated that in some cases Al2O3 was being reduced by the Barium. The results of this research imply that use of Al2O3 based ceramics in a barium environment may be suspect to failures in the long term and that Cu-Ni brazes are not suitable for the barium environment.

  7. Distribution and source of barium in ground water at Cattaraugus Indian Reservation, southwestern New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.; Staubitz, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    High concentrations of dissolved barium have been found in ground water from bedrock wells on the Seneca Nation of Indians Reservation on Cattaraugus Creek in southwestern New York. Concentrations in 1982 were as high as 23.0 milligrams per liter , the highest found reported from any natural ground-water system in the world. The highest concentrations are in a bedrock aquifer and in small lenses of saturated gravel between bedrock and the overlying till. The bedrock aquifer is partly confined by silt, clay, and till. The high barium concentrations are attributed to dissolution of the mineral barite (BaSO4), which is present in the bedrock and possibly in overlying silt, clay, or till. The dissolution of barite seems to be controlled by action of sulfate-reducing bacteria, which alter the BaSO4 equilibrium by removing sulfate ions and permitting additional barite to dissolve. Ground water from the surficial, unconsolidated deposits and surface water in streams contain little or no barium. Because barium is chemically similar to calcium, it probably could be removed by cation exchange or treatments similar to those used for water softening. (USGS)

  8. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  9. Fabrication of aluminum nitride crucibles for molten salt and plutonium compatibility studies

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.A.

    1991-07-24

    The overall objective of this research was to fabricate a calcium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride crucible and determine the compatibility of this crucible with molten chloride salts and plutonium metal in the DOR process. Calcium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride was preferred over yttrium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride because of (1) the presence of calcium chloride, calcium oxide, and calcium metal in the molten salts utilized in the DOR process, and (2) the higher volatility of the secondary phases formed compared with phases resulting from the addition of yttrium oxide during the aluminum nitride sintering process. The calcium oxide system may yield a higher purity crystal structure with fewer secondary phases present than in the yttrium oxide system. The secondary phases that are present in the grain boundaries may be unreactive with the calcium chloride salt due to the presence of calcium in the secondary phases.

  10. Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine and recovery of barium as a barium salt mixture.

    PubMed

    Vadapalli, Viswanath R K; Zvimba, John N; Mulopo, Jean; Motaung, Solly

    2013-01-01

    Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine using barium hydroxide and recovery of the barium salts has been investigated. The sodium sulphate-rich brine treated with different dosages of barium hydroxide to precipitate barium sulphate showed sulphate removal from 13.5 g/L to less than 400 mg/L over 60 min using a barium to sulphate molar ratio of 1.1. The thermal conversion of precipitated barium sulphate to barium sulphide achieved a conversion yield of 85% using coal as both a reducing agent and an energy source. The recovery of a pure mixture of barium salts from barium sulphide, which involved dissolution of barium sulphide and reaction with ammonium hydroxide resulted in recovery of a mixture of barium carbonate (62%) and barium hydroxide (38%), which is a critical input raw material for barium salts based acid mine drainage (AMD) desalination technologies. Under alkaline conditions of this barium salt mixture recovery process, ammonia gas is given off, while hydrogen sulfide is retained in solution as bisulfide species, and this provides basis for ammonium hydroxide separation and recovery for reuse, with hydrogen sulfide also recoverable for further industrial applications such as sulfur production by subsequent stripping.

  11. Development of the barium shaped charge technique in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, J.

    1982-09-01

    In order to generate an artificial, barium luminescent cloud for the study of magnetic or electric field line configurations in the upper atmosphere, it is necessary to initiate a well collimated barium jet with an initial velocity of 8-12 km/sec by means of a shaped charge. Attention is presently given to recent developments in barium shaped charge techniques, including the molding of barium liners, the prevention of rust on the metallic barium charge, the production of a plane detonation wave, and a method for the ground testing of a barium ion jet.

  12. Bioavailability and intestinal absorption of aluminum in rats: effects of aluminum compounds and some dietary constituents.

    PubMed

    Cunat, L; Lanhers, M C; Joyeux, M; Burnel, D

    2000-07-01

    In the present investigation, the deposition of aluminum in intestinal fragment and the appearance in blood were studied in a perfused rat intestine in situ for 1 h with several aluminum forms (16 mM). We observed that aluminum absorption was positively correlated with the theoretic affinity of aluminum and the functional groups of the chelating agent. The absorption of aluminum after ingestion of organic compounds is more important than after ingestion of mineral compounds, with the following order: Al citrate > Al tartrate, Al gluconate, Al lactate > Al glutamate, Al chloride, Al sulfate, Al nitrate. Absorption depends on the nature of the ligands associated with the Al3+ ion in the gastrointestinal fluid. The higher the aluminum retention in intestinal fragment, the lower the absorption and appearance in blood. However, the higher aluminum concentration is always in the jejunal fragment because of the influence of pH variation on this fragment. Another objective of the present study was to determine the influence of several parameters on aluminum citrate absorption: with or without 0.1 mmol dinitrophenol/L, with aluminum concentration from 3.2, 16, 32, and 48, to 64 mmol/L, media containing 0, 3, or 6 mmol Ca/L, with or without phosphorus or glucose. It is concluded that aluminum is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract by (1) a paracellular energy independent and nonsaturable route, mainly used for high aluminum concentration, which is modified by extracellular calcium, and (2) a transcellular and saturable route, the aluminum level was not modified with enhancement of aluminum quantity in intestinal lumen. This pathway can be similar with calcium transfer through the intestine and is energy dependent because of a decrease of aluminum absorption that follows the removal of glucose and phosphorus.

  13. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Sales Silva, J. V.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scaleheight, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, α-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars cannot be represented by a single Gaussian distribution. The abundances of α-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anticorrelated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90 per cent of the barium stars belong to the thin disc population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an asymptotic giant branch star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  14. Aluminum Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents three problems based on the price of aluminum designed to encourage students to be cooperative and to use an investigative approach to learning. Students collect and synthesize information, analyze results, and draw conclusions. (AIM)

  15. Constraining the oceanic barium cycle with stable barium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhimian; Siebert, Christopher; Hathorne, Ed C.; Dai, Minhan; Frank, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of barium (Ba) concentrations in seawater resembles that of nutrients and Ba has been widely used as a proxy of paleoproductivity. However, the exact mechanisms controlling the nutrient-like behavior, and thus the fundamentals of Ba chemistry in the ocean, have not been fully resolved. Here we present a set of full water column dissolved Ba (DBa) isotope (δ137BaDBa) profiles from the South China Sea and the East China Sea that receives large freshwater inputs from the Changjiang (Yangtze River). We find pronounced and systematic horizontal and depth dependent δ137BaDBa gradients. Beyond the river influence characterized by generally light signatures (0.0 to + 0.3 ‰), the δ137BaDBa values in the upper water column are significantly higher (+ 0.9 ‰) than those in the deep waters (+ 0.5 ‰). Moreover, δ137BaDBa signatures are essentially constant in the entire upper 100 m, in which dissolved silicon isotopes are fractionated during diatom growth resulting in the heaviest isotopic compositions in the very surface waters. Combined with the decoupling of DBa concentrations and δ137BaDBa from the concentrations of nitrate and phosphate this implies that the apparent nutrient-like fractionation of Ba isotopes in seawater is primarily induced by preferential adsorption of the lighter isotopes onto biogenic particles rather than by biological utilization. The subsurface δ137BaDBa distribution is dominated by water mass mixing. The application of stable Ba isotopes as a proxy for nutrient cycling should therefore be considered with caution and both biological and physical processes need to be considered. Clearly, however, Ba isotopes show great potential as a new tracer for land-sea interactions and ocean mixing processes.

  16. Inhibition of barium sulfate deposition by polycarboxylates of various molecular structures

    SciTech Connect

    van der Leeden, M.C.; van Rosmalen, G.M. )

    1990-02-01

    To establish a relationship between the molecular structure of polycarboxylates and their growth-retarding influence on barium sulfate, seeded-suspension-growth experiments were performed at various inhibitor concentrations and pH values. Two types of polycarboxylates with a molecular structure based on their polyacrylic or maleic acid were studied. The molecular structure of these compounds were varied by particle substitution with monomers containing hydroxyl, amide, and sulfonic acid, as well as hydrophobic groups. Hydrophobic groups are detrimental to good inhibitor performance, whereas the introduction of OH, NH {sub 2}, or SO {sub 3} H groups presents opportunities to enhance the inhibitor effectiveness. The sequence in performance of the compounds on barium sulfate was compared with the sequence formerly obtained for calcium sulfate dihydrate.

  17. Regeneration of barium carbonate from barium sulphide in a pilot-scale bubbling column reactor and utilization for acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, J; Zvimba, J N; Swanepoel, H; Bologo, L T; Maree, J

    2012-01-01

    Batch regeneration of barium carbonate (BaCO(3)) from barium sulphide (BaS) slurries by passing CO(2) gas into a pilot-scale bubbling column reactor under ambient conditions was used to assess the technical feasibility of BaCO(3) recovery in the Alkali Barium Calcium (ABC) desalination process and its use for sulphate removal from high sulphate Acid Mine Drainage (AMD). The effect of key process parameters, such as BaS slurry concentration and CO(2) flow rate on the carbonation, as well as the extent of sulphate removal from AMD using the recovered BaCO(3) were investigated. It was observed that the carbonation reaction rate for BaCO(3) regeneration in a bubbling column reactor significantly increased with increase in carbon dioxide (CO(2)) flow rate whereas the BaS slurry content within the range 5-10% slurry content did not significantly affect the carbonation rate. The CO(2) flow rate also had an impact on the BaCO(3) morphology. The BaCO(3) recovered from the pilot-scale bubbling column reactor demonstrated effective sulphate removal ability during AMD treatment compared with commercial BaCO(3).

  18. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  19. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    High levels of urine calcium (above 300 mg/day) may be due to: Chronic kidney disease High vitamin D levels Leaking of calcium from the kidneys into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking ...

  20. Characterization of Medicago truncatula reduced calcium oxalate crystal mutant alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium oxalate crystal formation is common in plants. Formation of these crystals has been shown to function in plant defense, calcium regulation, and aluminum tolerance. Although calcium oxalate is common and plays important roles in plant development, our understanding of how these crystals form ...

  1. Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Seeley, Forest G.

    1981-01-01

    The invention described herein relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

  2. Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, W.J.; Seeley, F.G.

    1979-11-01

    The invention relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

  3. Aluminum phosphide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Aluminum phosphide ; CASRN 20859 - 73 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  4. 75 FR 20625 - Barium Chloride From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... established a schedule for the conduct of this review (74 FR 62587, November 30, 2010). Subsequently, counsel... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Barium Chloride From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION:...

  5. 75 FR 19657 - Barium Chloride From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... Commission found that the domestic interested party group response to its notice of institution (74 FR 31757... COMMISSION Barium Chloride From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice of... chloride from China. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it will proceed with a full...

  6. Bone healing response to an injectable calcium phosphate cement with enhanced radiopacity.

    PubMed

    Acarturk, Oguz; Lehmicke, Michael; Aberman, Harold; Toms, Derek; Hollinger, Jeffrey O; Fulmer, Mark

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of barium sulfate on remodeling and regeneration in standard tibial defects in rabbits treated with the Norian skeletal repair system (SRS). Two formulations of SRS (with and without barium sulfate) were injected into the medullary canal of the tibia of New Zealand white rabbits. Animals were sacrificed at 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. Over the 2-year duration of the study, standard SRS and SRS with barium sulfate appeared to be biocompatible and osteoconductive with no evidence of either inflammation or fibrous tissue around the implant materials or at the bone-material interfaces. This outcome underscores the osteophilic property of the SRS. A difference we observed between the standard SRS and the SRS with barium sulfate was the appearance of acellular material contiguous to the SRS with barium sulfate. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis was conducted and confirmed that the acellular material was barium sulfate. Pathological examination of additional tissues including regional lymph nodes revealed neither dissemination of calcium phosphate nor barium sulfate. We concluded that the residual barium sulfate detected by EDX was localized to the intramedullary canal of the tibia. PMID:18098201

  7. ARE THERE ANY STARS LACKING NEUTRON-CAPTURE ELEMENTS? EVIDENCE FROM STRONTIUM AND BARIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.

    2013-01-01

    The cosmic dispersion in the abundances of the heavy elements strontium and barium in halo stars is well known. Strontium and barium are detected in most cool, metal-poor giants, but are these elements always detectable? To identify stars that could be considered probable candidates for lacking these elements, I examine the stellar abundance data available in the literature for 1148 field stars and 226 stars in dwarf galaxies, 776 of which have metallicities lower than [Fe/H] <-2.0. Strontium or barium have been detected in all field, globular cluster, and dwarf galaxy environments studied. All upper limits are consistent with the lowest detected ratios of [Sr/H] and [Ba/H]. The frequent appearance of these elements raises the intriguing prospect that at least one kind of neutron-capture reaction operates as often as the nucleosynthesis mechanisms that produce lighter elements, such as magnesium, calcium, or iron, although the yields of heavy elements may be more variable.

  8. AES analysis of barium fluoride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashin, G. N.; Makhnjuk, V. I.; Rumjantseva, S. M.; Shchekochihin, Ju. M.

    1993-06-01

    AES analysis of thin films of metal fluorides is a difficult problem due to charging and decomposition of such films under electron bombardment. We have developed a simple algorithm for a reliable quantitative AES analysis of metal fluoride thin films (BaF 2 in our work). The relative AES sensitivity factors for barium and fluorine were determined from BaF 2 single-crystal samples. We have investigated the dependence of composition and stability of barium fluoride films on the substrate temperature during film growth. We found that the instability of BaF 2 films grown on GaAs substrates at high temperatures (> 525°C) is due to a loss of fluorine. Our results show that, under the optimal electron exposure conditions, AES can be used for a quantitative analysis of metal fluoride thin films.

  9. Radioactive Barium Ion Trap Based on Metal-Organic Framework for Efficient and Irreversible Removal of Barium from Nuclear Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yaguang; Huang, Hongliang; Liu, Dahuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2016-04-01

    Highly efficient and irreversible capture of radioactive barium from aqueous media remains a serious task for nuclear waste disposal and environmental protection. To address this task, here we propose a concept of barium ion trap based on metal-organic framework (MOF) with a strong barium-chelating group (sulfate and sulfonic acid group) in the pore structures of MOFs. The functionalized MOF-based ion traps can remove >90% of the barium within the first 5 min, and the removal efficiency reaches 99% after equilibrium. Remarkably, the sulfate-group-functionalized ion trap demonstrates a high barium uptake capacity of 131.1 mg g(-1), which surpasses most of the reported sorbents and can selectively capture barium from nuclear wastewater, whereas the sulfonic-acid-group-functionalized ion trap exhibits ultrafast kinetics with a kinetic rate constant k2 of 27.77 g mg(-1) min(-1), which is 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than existing sorbents. Both of the two MOF-based ion traps can capture barium irreversibly. Our work proposes a new strategy to design barium adsorbent materials and provides a new perspective for removing radioactive barium and other radionuclides from nuclear wastewater for environment remediation. Besides, the concrete mechanisms of barium-sorbent interactions are also demonstrated in this contribution.

  10. Oilfield scales: controls on precipitation and crystal morphology of barite (barium sulphate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, A. I. R.; Wogelius, R. A.; Vaughan, D. J.

    2003-04-01

    The precipitation and subsequent build up of barite (barium sulphate) inside extraction tubing presents a costly problem for off shore oil wells which use seawater to mobilize oil during hydrocarbon recovery. Mixing of reservoir formation water containing Ba2+ ions and seawater containing SO_42- ions results in barite precipitation within the reservoir well-bore region and piping. Great effort has been expended in designing strategies to minimize scale formation but details of the reaction mechanism and sensitivity to thermodynamic variables are poorly constrained. Furthermore, few detailed studies have been carried out under simulated field conditions. Hence an experimental programme was designed to study barite formation under environmentally relevant conditions with control of several system variables during the precipitation reaction. Synthetic sea-water and formation-water brines containing sodium sulphate and barium chloride, respectively, were mixed to induce BaSO_4 precipitation. Experiments were carried out at high temperature (100^oC) and high pressure (500 bars) in double rocking autoclave bombs. Barite formation as a function of the addition of calcium, magnesium, and a generic phosphonate based scale inhibitor was investigated whilst maintaining constant pH, temperature and ionic strength (0.5159). Additional experiments were performed at ambient conditions for comparison. Data concerning nucleation, growth rates, and crystal morphology were obtained. ICP-AES data from the supernatant product solutions showed considerable variation in quantity of barium sulphate precipitated as a function of the listed experimental variables. For example, ESEM analysis of barium sulphate crystals showed a dramatic shift in crystal habit from the typical tabular habit produced in control experiments; experiments performed in the presence of foreign cations produced more equant crystals, while those experiments completed in the presence of the phosphonate scale inhibitor

  11. Substituted barium ferrites; sources of anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrish, A. H.; Zhou, X. Z.; Yang, Zheng; Zeng, Hua-Xian

    1994-12-01

    The substituted barium ferrites BaFe12-2 xCo x Sn x O19 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.4) and BaFe1-2xCo x O19 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.9) have been studied. The site occupancies, as determined from Mössbauer spectra, have been used to interpret the changes in the magnetization and in the crystalline anisotropy.

  12. Growth of spherulites of strontium and barium sulfites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, T.; Koishi, M.

    1989-03-01

    The spherulites of SrSO 3 and BaSO 3 were synthesized in agar-agar gels (0-40°C). The reactants are sodium sulfite and the chloride of the respective metals. Each spherulite consists of fibrous crystals which are arranged minutely in a radial manner from the center. A linear relation was recognized between (mean diameter) 2 and reaction time in the same manner as the CaSO 3 · 0.5H 2O spherulite reported in our previous paper. The slopes of the lines, namely the growth rates of the spherulites, were greater in the order of calcium sulfite > strontium sulfite > barium sulfite. The ratio of (mean diameter) 2/time was dependent upon the concentration of the agar-agar gel (0.5%-2.0%) and the reaction temperature (0-40°C); the ratios decreased linearly with an increase of the gel concentration and increased with an increase of temperature.

  13. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  14. Creating unstable velocity-space distributions with barium injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongratz, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    Ion velocity-space distributions resulting from barium injections from orbiting spacecraft and shaped charges are discussed. Active experiments confirm that anomalous ionization processes may operate, but photoionization accounts for the production of the bulk of the barium ions. Pitch-angle diffusion and/or velocity-space diffusion may occur, but observations of barium ions moving upwards against gravity suggests that the ions retain a significant enough fraction of their initial perpendicular velocity to provide a mirror force. The barium ion plasmas should have a range of Alfven Mach numbers and plasma betas. Because the initial conditions can be predicted these active experiments should permit testing plasma instability hypotheses.

  15. 21 CFR 82.2051 - Lakes (Ext. D&C).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, talc, rosin, aluminum benzoate, calcium carbonate, or on any combination of... is a salt in which is combined the basic radical sodium, potassium, barium, or calcium; or (ii) a... color with the basic radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium, strontium, or zirconium....

  16. 21 CFR 82.2051 - Lakes (Ext. D&C).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, talc, rosin, aluminum benzoate, calcium carbonate, or on any combination of... is a salt in which is combined the basic radical sodium, potassium, barium, or calcium; or (ii) a... color with the basic radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium, strontium, or zirconium....

  17. 21 CFR 82.2051 - Lakes (Ext. D&C).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, talc, rosin, aluminum benzoate, calcium carbonate, or on any combination of... is a salt in which is combined the basic radical sodium, potassium, barium, or calcium; or (ii) a... color with the basic radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium, strontium, or zirconium....

  18. 21 CFR 82.2051 - Lakes (Ext. D&C).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, talc, rosin, aluminum benzoate, calcium carbonate, or on any combination of... is a salt in which is combined the basic radical sodium, potassium, barium, or calcium; or (ii) a... color with the basic radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium, strontium, or zirconium....

  19. 21 CFR 82.2051 - Lakes (Ext. D&C).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, talc, rosin, aluminum benzoate, calcium carbonate, or on any combination of... is a salt in which is combined the basic radical sodium, potassium, barium, or calcium; or (ii) a... color with the basic radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium, strontium, or zirconium....

  20. Europium-doped barium bromide iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Gundiah, Gautam; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Hollander, Fredrick J.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    2009-10-21

    Single crystals of Ba0.96Eu0.04BrI (barium europium bromide iodide) were grown by the Bridgman technique. The title compound adopts the ordered PbCl2 structure [Braekken (1932). Z. Kristallogr. 83, 222-282]. All atoms occupy the fourfold special positions (4c, site symmetry m) of the space group Pnma with a statistical distribution of Ba and Eu. They lie on the mirror planes, perpendicular to the b axis at y = +-0.25. Each cation is coordinated by nine anions in a tricapped trigonal prismatic arrangement.

  1. Short-cavity squeezing in barium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hope, D. M.; Bachor, H-A.; Manson, P. J.; Mcclelland, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Broadband phase sensitive noise and squeezing were experimentally observed in a system of barium atoms interacting with a single mode of a short optical cavity. Squeezing of 13 +/- 3 percent was observed. A maximum possible squeezing of 45 +/- 8 percent could be inferred for out experimental conditions, after correction for measured loss factors. Noise reductions below the quantum limit were found over a range of detection frequencies 60-170 MHz and were best for high cavity transmission and large optical depths. The amount of squeezing observed is consistent with theoretical predictions from a full quantum statistical model of the system.

  2. Calcium-dependent inactivation of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels in GH3 cells

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The inactivation of calcium channels in mammalian pituitary tumor cells (GH3) was studied with patch electrodes under voltage clamp in cell- free membrane patches and in dialyzed cells. The calcium current elicited by depolarization from a holding potential of -40 mV passed predominantly through one class of channels previously shown to be modulated by dihydropyridines and cAMP-dependent phosphorylation (Armstrong and Eckert, 1987). When exogenous calcium buffers were omitted from the pipette solution, the macroscopic calcium current through those channels inactivated with a half time of approximately 10 ms to a steady state level 40-75% smaller than the peak. Inactivation was also measured as the reduction in peak current during a test pulse that closely followed a prepulse. Inactivation was largely reduced or eliminated by (a) buffering free calcium in the pipette solution to less than 10(-8) M; (b) replacing extracellular calcium with barium; (c) increasing the prepulse voltage from +10 to +60 mV; or (d) increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP, either 'directly' with dibutyryl-cAMP or indirectly by activating adenylate cyclase with forskolin or vasoactive intestinal peptide. Thus, inactivation of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels in GH3 cells only occurs when membrane depolarization leads to calcium ion entry and intracellular accumulation. PMID:2849631

  3. Barium appendicitis: A single institution review in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Hideki; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Kubota, Tadao; Mizokami, Ken

    2016-01-01

    AIM To review clinical experience with barium appendicitis at a single institution. METHODS A retrospective review of patients admitted with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis, from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2015 was performed. Age, gender, computed tomography (CT) scan findings if available, past history of barium studies, pathology, and the presence of perforation or the development of complications were reviewed. If the CT scan revealed high density material in the appendix, the maximum CT scan radiodensity of the material is measured in Hounsfield units (HU). Barium appendicitis is defined as: (1) patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis; (2) the patient has a history of a prior barium study; and (3) the CT scan shows high density material in the appendix. Patients who meet all three criteria are considered to have barium appendicitis. RESULTS In total, 396 patients were admitted with the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in the study period. Of these, 12 patients (3.0%) met the definition of barium appendicitis. Of these 12 patients, the median CT scan radiodensity of material in the appendix was 10000.8 HU, ranging from 3066 to 23423 HU (± 6288.2). In contrast, the median CT scan radiodensity of fecaliths in the appendix, excluding patients with barium appendicitis, was 393.1 HU, ranging from 98 to 2151 HU (± 382.0). The CT scan radiodensity of material in the appendices of patients with barium appendicitis was significantly higher than in patients with nonbarium fecaliths (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION Barium appendicitis is not rare in Japan. Measurement of the CT scan radiodensity of material in the appendix may differentiate barium appendicitis from routine appendicitis. PMID:27721929

  4. Barium sulfate aspiration: Severe chemical pneumonia induced by a massive reflux of contrast medium during small bowel barium enema.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Ji; Zhou, Xiaowei; Dong, Hongmei; Zhou, Yiwu

    2015-08-01

    Barium contrast radiography is a conventional procedure aimed at revealing lesions of the alimentary tract using barium sulfate on X-ray irradiation. Although it is widely used in clinics, adverse effects and complications are observed, such as anaphylaxis, granuloma, fecalithes, abdomen-leaking, embolism, bacterial contamination, and aspiration. We report a case of death due to a massive barium sulfate aspiration resulted from an air-barium double contrast enema radiography. A 25-year-old female patient was hospitalized with symptoms of abdominal distention, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea for three days. A progressive respiratory distress presented only 1h after a small bowel air-barium double contrast enema. The patient died 11h later. The result of autopsy revealed the cause of death to be severe chemical pneumonitis induced by gastric fluid which was aspirated into her lungs. Barium sulfate is generally recognized to be chemically inert for the respiratory system, but a mixture of barium sulfate with gastric contents is fatal. Here we intend to suggest that, when determining the potential cause of death, medical examiners should consider a patient's status quo as well as the possible adverse effects and complications caused by the barium sulfate preparation during gastrointestinal radiography.

  5. Hydrolysis of aluminum dross material to achieve zero hazardous waste.

    PubMed

    David, E; Kopac, J

    2012-03-30

    A simple method with high efficiency for generating high pure hydrogen by hydrolysis in tap water of highly activated aluminum dross is established. Aluminum dross is activated by mechanically milling to particles of about 45 μm. This leads to removal of surface layer of the aluminum particles and creation of a fresh chemically active metal surface. In contact with water the hydrolysis reaction takes place and hydrogen is released. In this process a Zero Waste concept is achieved because the other product of reaction is aluminum oxide hydroxide (AlOOH), which is nature-friendly and can be used to make high quality refractory or calcium aluminate cement. For comparison we also used pure aluminum powder and alkaline tap water solution (NaOH, KOH) at a ratio similar to that of aluminum dross content. The rates of hydrogen generated in hydrolysis reaction of pure aluminum and aluminum dross have been found to be similar. As a result of the experimental setup, a hydrogen generator was designed and assembled. Hydrogen volume generated by hydrolysis reaction was measured. The experimental results obtained reveal that aluminum dross could be economically recycled by hydrolysis process with achieving zero hazardous aluminum dross waste and hydrogen generation. PMID:22326245

  6. Studies of aluminum in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lipman, J.J.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Jones, K.W.; Colowick, S.; Cholewa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of high aluminum concentrations in rat brains were studied using /sup 14/C autoradiography to measure the uptake of /sup 14/C 2-deoxy-D-glucose (/sup 14/C-2DG) and microbeam proton-induced x-ray emission (microPIXE) with a 20-..mu..m resolution to measure concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, potassium, and calcium. The aluminum was introduced intracisternally in the form of aluminum tartrate (Al-T) while control animals were given sodium tartrate (Na-T). The /sup 14/C was administered intravenously. The animals receiving Al-T developed seizure disorders and had pathological changes that included cerebral cortical atrophy. The results showed that there was a decreased uptake of /sup 14/C-2DG in cortical regions in which increased aluminum levels were measured, i.e., there is a correlation between the aluminum in the rat brain and decreased brain glucose metabolism. A minimum detection limit of about 16 ppM (mass fraction) or 3 x 10/sup 9/ Al atoms was obtained for Al under the conditions employed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Do all barium stars have a white dwarf companion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominy, J. F.; Lambert, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    International Ultraviolet Explorer short-wavelength, low-dispersion spectra were analyzed for four barium, two mild barium, and one R-type carbon star in order to test the hypothesis that the barium and related giants are produced by mass transfer from a companion now present as a white dwarf. An earlier tentative identification of a white dwarf companion to the mild barium star Zeta Cyg is confirmed. For the other stars, no ultraviolet excess attributable to a white dwarf is seen. Limits are set on the bolometric magnitude and age of a possible white dwarf companion. Since the barium stars do not have obvious progenitors among main-sequence and subgiant stars, mass transfer must be presumed to occur when the mass-gaining star is already on the giant branch. This restriction, and the white dwarf's minimum age, which is greater than 8 x 10 to the 8th yr, determined for several stars, effectively eliminates the hypothesis that mass transfer from an asymptotic giant branch star creates a barium star. Speculations are presented on alternative methods of producing a barium star in a binary system.

  8. Proton conductivity of potassium doped barium zirconates

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaoxiang; Tao Shanwen; Irvine, John T.S.

    2010-01-15

    Potassium doped barium zirconates have been synthesized by solid state reactions. It was found that the solubility limit of potassium on A-sites is between 5% and 10%. Introducing extra potassium leads to the formation of second phase or YSZ impurities. The water uptake of barium zirconates was increased even with 5% doping of potassium at the A-site. The sintering conditions and conductivity can be improved significantly by adding 1 wt% ZnO during material synthesis. The maximum solubility for yttrium at B-sites is around 15 at% after introducing 1 wt% zinc. The conductivity of Ba{sub 0.95}K{sub 0.05}Zr{sub 0.85}Y{sub 0.11}Zn{sub 0.04}O{sub 3-{delta}} at 600 deg. C is 2.2x10{sup -3} S/cm in wet 5% H{sub 2}. The activation energies for bulk and grain boundary are 0.29(2), 0.79(2) eV in wet 5% H{sub 2} and 0.31(1), 0.74(3) eV in dry 5% H{sub 2}. A power density of 7.7 mW/cm{sup 2} at 718 deg. C was observed when a 1 mm thick Ba{sub 0.95}K{sub 0.05}Zr{sub 0.85}Y{sub 0.11}Zn{sub 0.04}O{sub 3-{delta}} pellet was used as electrolyte and platinum electrodes. - Graphical abstract: Potassium doped barium zirconates have been synthesized by solid state reactions. It was found that the solubility limit of potassium on A-sites is between 5% and 10 %. The sintering conditions and conductivity can be improved significantly by adding 1 wt% ZnO during material synthesis. Five percent doping of potassium at A-site can double the total conductivity.

  9. Designed microstructures in textured barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, David Brian

    It is a fundamental principle of materials science that the microstructure of a material defines its properties and ultimately its performance for a given application. A prime example of this can be found in the large conch shell Strombus gigas, which has an intricate microstructure extending across five distinct length scales. This microstructure gives extraordinary damage tolerance to the shell. The structure of Strombus gigas cannot be replicated in a modern engineering ceramic with any existing processing technique, so new processing techniques must be developed to apply this structure to a model material. Barium hexaferrite was chosen as a model material to create microstructures reminiscent of Strombus gigas and evaluate its structure-property relations. This work describes novel processing methods to produce textured barium hexaferrite with no coupling between the sample geometry and the texture direction. This technique, combining magnetic field-assisted gelcasting with templated grain growth, also allows multilayer samples to be fabricated with different texture directions in adjacent layers. The effects of adding either B2O3 or excess BaCO 3 on the densification and grain growth of barium hexaferrite was studied. The texture produced using this technique was assessed using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These measurements showed peak textures as high as 60 MRD and sharp interfaces between layers cast with different texture directions. The effect of oxygen on the quality of gelcasting is also discussed, and it is shown that with proper mold design, it is possible to gelcast multiple layers with differing texture directions without delamination. Monolithic and multilayer samples were produced and tested in four point bending to measure the strength and work of fracture. Modulus measurements, made with the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique, show clear signs of microcracking in both the isotropic and textured samples

  10. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ... the body on a full or empty stomach. Calcium carbonate is less expensive. It is absorbed better by ...

  11. Metallurgical Properties and Phase Transformations of Barium-Strontium Modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, M. A.; Sulimova, I. S.; Rozhikhina, I. D.; Dmitrienko, V. I.; Horoshun, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    Metallurgical properties and phase transformations of barium-strontium modifier were tested in laboratory conditions resembling steel processing in furnace and ladle. When heating barium-strontium modifier start of melting, kinetics of decomposition, phase and structure transformation were studied. The concentrate under consideration has been revealed to be a complex mineral compound containing barytocalcite, calcite, calciostrontianite, dolomite and siderite. The reaction kinetics of decomposing mineral components of barium-strontium modifier to oxides does not considerably affect slag formation in conditions of out-of-furnace steel processing.

  12. A high-altitude barium radial injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T. J.; Deehr, C. S.; Romick, G. J.; Olson, J. V.; Roederer, J. G.; Sydora, R.

    1980-01-01

    A rocket launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, carried a new type of high-explosive barium shaped charge to 571 km, where detonation injected a thin disk of barium vapor with high velocity nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. The TV images of the injection are spectacular, revealing three major regimes of expanding plasma which showed early instabilities in the neutral gas. The most unusual effect of the injection is a peculiar rayed barium-ion structure lying in the injection plane and centered on a 5 km 'black hole' surrounding the injection point. Preliminary electrostatic computer simulations show a similar rayed development.

  13. Calcium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... as thyroid disease , parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , cancer, or malnutrition An ionized calcium test may be ordered when ... albumin , which can result from liver disease or malnutrition , both of which may result from alcoholism or ...

  14. Calcium Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Sarcopenia Skeletal Rare Disorders Data & Publications Facts and Statistics Vitamin D map Fracture Risk Map Hip Fracture ... Training Courses Working Groups Regional Audits Reports Facts and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What ...

  15. Phased surgical treatment of barium enema-induced rectal injury and retention of barium in the pelvic floor space

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; Xia, Ligang; Huang, Jun; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic injuries caused by barium enema are rarely reported. Following a phased surgical protocol for up to one year, we have successfully treated a patient with rectal injury and severe infection of the pelvic floor space complicated with retention of large amounts of barium and vaginal fistula. In this article, the phased surgery planning for the treatment of rectal injury complicated with vaginal fistula is discussed in terms of the pros and cons, and the observed effect and evolution of barium retained in the pelvic floor space are described. PMID:25405155

  16. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables.

  17. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables. PMID:26940168

  18. Calcium orthophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2011-01-01

    The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. This type of materials is of special significance for human beings, because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and antlers) and pathological (i.e., those appearing due to various diseases) calcified tissues of mammals. For example, atherosclerosis results in blood vessel blockage caused by a solid composite of cholesterol with calcium orthophosphates, while dental caries and osteoporosis mean a partial decalcification of teeth and bones, respectively, that results in replacement of a less soluble and harder biological apatite by more soluble and softer calcium hydrogenphosphates. Therefore, the processes of both normal and pathological calcifications are just an in vivo crystallization of calcium orthophosphates. Similarly, dental caries and osteoporosis might be considered an in vivo dissolution of calcium orthophosphates. Thus, calcium orthophosphates hold a great significance for humankind, and in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided. PMID:23507744

  19. Calculated emission rates for barium releases in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    The optical emissions from barium releases in space are caused by resonance and fluorescent scattering of sunlight. Emission rates for the dominant ion and neutral lines are calculated assuming the release to be optically thin and the barium to be in radiative equilibrium with the solar radiation. The solar spectrum has deep Fraunhofer absorption lines at the primary barium ion resonances. A velocity component toward or away from the sun will Doppler shift the emission lines relative to the absorption lines and the emission rates will increase many-fold over the rest value. The Doppler brightening is important in shaped charge or satellite releases where the barium is injected at high velocities. Emission rates as a function of velocity are calculated for the 4554, 4934, 5854, 6142 and 6497 A ion emission lines and the dominant neutral line at 5535 A. Results are presented for injection parallel to the ambient magnetic field, B, and for injection at an angle to B.

  20. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of making non-volatile digital memory devices of barium titanate, BaTiO3, that are integrated onto a silicon substrate with the required ferroelectric film produced by processing, compatible with silicon technology was examined.

  1. Barium stalactites: observations on their nature and significance.

    PubMed

    Aronchick, J; Laufer, I; Glick, S

    1983-11-01

    Stalactites--droplets of barium hanging from protrusions on the nondependent mucosal surface of the stomach and seen on double contrast studies--are described. Their importance in the diagnosis of polypoid lesions is shown.

  2. Aluminum and Young Artists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Thomas

    1980-01-01

    The author suggests a variety of ways in which aluminum and aluminum foil can be used in elementary and junior high art classes: relief drawing and rubbing; printing; repousse; sculpture; mobiles; foil sculpture; and three dimensional design. Sources of aluminum supplies are suggested. (SJL)

  3. Energetic Insight into the Formation of Solids from Aluminum Polyoxocations.

    PubMed

    Reusser, Dana; Casey, William H; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-08-01

    The ε-Keggin [AlO4Al12(OH)24(H2O)12](7+) ion (AlAl12(7+)) is a metastable precursor in the formation of aluminum oxyhydroxide solids. It also serves as a useful model for the chemistry of aluminous mineral surfaces. Herein we calculate the enthalpies of formation for this aqueous ion and its heterometal-substituted forms, GaAl12(7+) and GeAl12(8+), using solution calorimetry. Rather than measuring the enthalpies of the MAl12(7/8+) ions directly from solution hydrolysis, we measured the metathesis reaction of the crystallized forms with barium chloride creating an aqueous aluminum solution monospecific in MAl12(7/8+). Then, the contributions to the heat of formation from the crystallized forms were subtracted using referenced states. When comparing the aqueous AlAl12(7+) ion to solid aluminum (oxy)-hydroxide phases, we found that this ion lies closer in energy to solid phases than to aqueous aluminum monomers, thus explaining its role as a precursor to amorphous aluminum hydroxide phases. PMID:26129924

  4. Synthesis, photoluminescence and magnetic properties of barium vanadate nanoflowers

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jing; Hu, Chenguo; Xi, Yi; Peng, Chen; Wan, Buyong; He, Xiaoshan

    2011-06-15

    Graphical abstract: The flower-shaped barium vanadate was obtained for the first time. The photoluminescence and magnetic properties of the barium vanadate nanoflowers were investigated at room temperature. Research highlights: {yields} In the paper, the flower-shaped barium vanadate were obtained for the first time. The CHM method used here is new and simple for preparation of barium vanadate. {yields} The photoluminescence and magnetic properties of the barium vanadate nanoflowers were investigated at room temperature. The strong bluish-green emission was observed. {yields} The ferromagnetic behavior of the barium vanadate nanoflowers was found with saturation magnetization of about 83.50 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, coercivity of 18.89 Oe and remnant magnetization of 4.63 x 10{sup -3} emu/g. {yields} The mechanisms of PL and magnetic property of barium vanadate nanoflowers have been discussed. -- Abstract: The flower-shaped barium vanadate has been obtained by the composite hydroxide mediated (CHM) method from V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and BaCl{sub 2} at 200 {sup o}C for 13 h. XRD and XPS spectrum of the as-synthesized sample indicate it is hexagonal Ba{sub 3}V{sub 2}O{sub 8} with small amount of Ba{sub 3}VO{sub 4.8} coexistence. Scan electron microscope and transmission electron microscope display that the flower-shaped crystals are composed of nanosheets with thickness of {approx}20 nm. The UV-visible spectrum shows that the barium vanadate sample has two optical gaps (3.85 eV and 3.12 eV). Photoluminescence spectrum of the barium vanadate flowers exhibits a visible light emission centered at 492 and 525 nm which might be attributed to VO{sub 4} tetrahedron with T{sub d} symmetry in Ba{sub 3}V{sub 2}O{sub 8}. The ferromagnetic behavior of the barium vanadate nanoflowers has been found with saturation magnetization of about 83.50 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, coercivity of 18.89 Oe and remnant magnetization of 4.63 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, which is mainly due to the presence of a non

  5. Biocompatibility of Intracanal Medications Based on Calcium Hydroxide

    PubMed Central

    Andolfatto, Carolina; da Silva, Guilherme Ferreira; Cornélio, Ana Livia Gomes; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Tanomaru-Filho, Mario; Faria, Gisele; Bonetti-Filho, Idomeo; Cerri, Paulo Sérgio

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rat subcutaneous tissue reaction to calcium hydroxide-based intracanal medicaments, UltraCal XS (calcium hydroxide, barium sulphate, aqueous matrix), Hydropast (calcium hydroxide, barium sulphate, and propyleneglycol), and Calen (Calcium hydroxide, zinc oxide, colophony, and polyethyleneglycol), used as a control. Methods. Forty-eight rats (Rattus Norvegicus Holtzman) were distributed in three groups: Calen, UltraCal XS, and Hydropast. Polyethylene tubes filled with one of the medicaments were implanted in the dorsal subcutaneous. After 7 and 30 days, the implants were removed and the specimens were fixed and embedded in paraffin. Morphological and quantitative analyses were carried out in the HE-stained sections. The numerical density of inflammatory cells in the capsule was evaluated and statistical analyses were performed (P ≤ 0.05). Results. At 7 days, all materials induced an inflammatory reaction in the subcutaneous tissue adjacent to the implants. In all groups, a significant reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and giant cells was verified in the period of 30 days. Conclusion. These results indicate that the calcium hydroxide-based medicaments evaluated present biocompatibility similar to Calen. PMID:23320187

  6. A search for technetium (Tc II) in barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little-Marenin, Irene R.; Little, Stephen J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched without success for the lines of Tc II at 2647.02, 2610.00 and 2543.24 A in IUE spectra of the barium stars HR 5058, Omicron Vir, and Zeta Cap. The lack of Tc II implies that the observed s-process enhancements were produced more than half a million years ago and supports the suggestion that the spectral peculiarities of barium stars are probably related to the binary nature of the stars.

  7. 'Skidding' of the CRRES G-9 barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huba, J. D.; Mitchell, H. G.; Fedder, J. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    A simulation study and experimental data of the CRRES G-9 ionospheric barium release are presented. The simulation study is based on a 2D electrostatic code that incorporates time-dependent coupling to the background plasma. It is shown that the densest portion of the barium ion cloud 'skids' about 15 km within the first three seconds following the release, consistent with the optical data analyses.

  8. Fatal barium chloride poisoning: four cases report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ananda, Sunnassee; Shaohua, Zhu; Liang, Liu

    2013-06-01

    Barium is an alkaline earth metal which has a variety of uses including in the manufacturing industry and in medicine. However, adverse health effects and fatalities occur due to absorption of soluble barium compounds, notably the chloride, nitrate, and hydroxide, which are toxic to humans. Although rare, accidental and suicidal modes of poisoning are sporadically reported in the literature.We describe 4 cases of poisoning due to barium chloride in China. In witnessed cases, severe gastrointestinal symptoms, hypokalemia leading to muscle weakness, cardiac arrhythmias, and respiratory failure were noted. Autopsy showed some nonspecific but common findings, such as subendocardial hemorrhage in the ventricles, visceral petechiae, and fatty changes in the liver. Interestingly, microscopic examination showed degenerative changes and amorphous, flocculent foamy materials in the renal tubules. Toxicology was relevant for barium in blood and tissues. Three of the cases were accidental and 1 homicidal in nature. A round-up of relevant literature on fatal barium compounds poisoning is also provided. Forensic pathologists should be aware of the clinical presentations of barium compound poisoning and especially look for any evidence of hypokalemia. Still, postmortem toxicological and histological studies are essential for an accurate identification of the cause of death.

  9. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    A stable reference electrode for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na.sub.3 AlF.sub.6, wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution.

  10. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-08-16

    A stable reference electrode is described for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution. 1 fig.

  11. Relationship of aluminum to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Perl, D P

    1985-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive degenerative brain disease of unknown etiology, characterized by the development of large numbers of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques in the brain. Aluminum salts may be used experimentally to produce lesions which are similar, but not identical, to the neurofibrillary tangle. Although some studies have reported increased amounts of aluminum in the brains of Alzheimer's disease victims, these bulk analysis studies have been difficult to replicate and remain controversial. Using scanning electron microscopy with X-ray spectrometry, we have investigated this question on the cellular level. We have identified abnormal accumulations of aluminum within neurons derived from Alzheimer's disease patients containing neurofibrillary tangles. Similar accumulations have been detected in the numerous neurofibrillary tangle-bearing neurons seen in the brains of the indigenous native population of the island of Guam who suffer from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism with dementia. Epidemiologic evidence strongly suggests a causal role for local environmental conditions relating to availability of aluminum, calcium, and magnesium. In view of the fact that a major consequence of acid rain is the liberation of large amounts of aluminum in bioavailable forms, concerns are raised about possible human health risks of this environmental phenomenon.

  12. Anastomotic stenosis of the descending colon caused by barium granuloma formation following barium peritonitis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Toshihiro; Tomizawa, Kenji; Hanaoka, Yutaka; Toda, Shigeo; Matoba, Shuichiro; Kuroyanagi, Hiroya; Oota, Yasunori

    2014-11-01

    Anastomotic stricture reportedly often recurs following barium peritonitis, regardless of whether the anastomotic diameter is initially sufficient. However, the causes of repetitive stricture have not been clarified. We report a case that suggests the pathophysiology of recurrent anastomotic strictures following barium peritonitis. The patient was a 39-year-old Japanese man with idiopathic perforation of the descending colon after undergoing an upper gastrointestinal barium contrast study. After emergency peritoneal lavage and diverting colostomy, created using the perforated region, the patient recovered uneventfully and 3 months later, the colostomy was closed and the perforated colon was resected. However, 7 months after colostomy closure, abdominal distention gradually developed, and colonoscopy revealed an anastomotic stricture. The patient was referred to our hospital where he underwent resection of the anastomotic stricture. The surgical specimen exhibited barium granulomas not only in the subserosa of the entire specimen, but also in the submucosa and lamina propria localized in the anastomotic site. These findings suggest that barium was embedded in the submucosa and lamina propria with manipulation of the stapled anastomosis and that the barium trapped in the anastomotic site caused persistent inflammation, resulting in an anastomotic stricture.

  13. The anisotropy of aluminum and aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosford, William F.

    2006-05-01

    The anisotropy of textured aluminum is approximated by a yield criterion with an exponent of eight. The use of this criterion in metal-forming analyses has improved the understanding of the formability of aluminum and other metals. The effect of anisotropy on the limiting drawing ratio in cupping is less than that expected from the quadratic Hill yield criterion and the effect of texture on forming limit diagrams is negligible. A method of predicting the effect of strain-path changes on forming limit curves of aluminum alloy sheets has proven to agree with experiments.

  14. Barium determination in gastric contents, blood and urine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in the case of oral barium chloride poisoning.

    PubMed

    Łukasik-Głębocka, Magdalena; Sommerfeld, Karina; Hanć, Anetta; Grzegorowski, Adam; Barałkiewicz, Danuta; Gaca, Michał; Zielińska-Psuja, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A serious case of barium intoxication from suicidal ingestion is reported. Oral barium chloride poisoning with hypokalemia, neuromuscular and cardiac toxicity, treated with intravenous potassium supplementation and hemodialysis, was confirmed by the determination of barium concentrations in gastric contents, blood, serum and urine using the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method. Barium concentrations in the analyzed specimens were 20.45 µg/L in serum, 150 µg/L in blood, 10,500 µg/L in urine and 63,500 µg/L in gastric contents. Results were compared with barium levels obtained from a non-intoxicated person.

  15. External cadmium and internal calcium block of single calcium channels in smooth muscle cells from rabbit mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Quayle, J M; Worley, J F; Standen, N B; Nelson, M T

    1989-11-01

    The patch clamp technique was used to record unitary currents through single calcium channels from smooth muscle cells of rabbit mesenteric arteries. The effects of external cadmium and cobalt and internal calcium, barium, cadmium, and magnesium on single channel currents were investigated with 80 mM barium as the charge carrier and Bay K 8644 to prolong openings. External cadmium shortened the mean open time of single Ca channels. Cadmium blocking and unblocking rate constants of 16.5 mM-1 ms-1 and 0.6 ms-1, respectively, were determined, corresponding to dissociation constant Kd of 36 microM at -20 mV. These results are very similar to those reported for cardiac muscle Ca channels (Lansman, J. B., P. Hess, and R. W. Tsien. 1986. J. Gen. Physiol. 88:321-347). In contrast, Cd2+ (01-10 mM), when applied to the internal surface of Ca channels in inside-out patches, did not affect the mean open time, mean unitary current, or the variance of the open channel current. Internal calcium induced a flickery block, with a Kd of 5.8 mM. Mean blocking and unblocking rate constants for calcium of 0.56 mM-1 ms-1 and 3.22 ms-1, respectively, were determined. Internal barium (8 mM) reduced the mean unitary current by 36%. We conclude that under our experimental conditions, the Ca channel is not symmetrical with respect to inorganic ion block and that intracellular calcium can modulate Ca channel currents via a low-affinity binding site. PMID:2481511

  16. External cadmium and internal calcium block of single calcium channels in smooth muscle cells from rabbit mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Quayle, J M; Worley, J F; Standen, N B; Nelson, M T

    1989-11-01

    The patch clamp technique was used to record unitary currents through single calcium channels from smooth muscle cells of rabbit mesenteric arteries. The effects of external cadmium and cobalt and internal calcium, barium, cadmium, and magnesium on single channel currents were investigated with 80 mM barium as the charge carrier and Bay K 8644 to prolong openings. External cadmium shortened the mean open time of single Ca channels. Cadmium blocking and unblocking rate constants of 16.5 mM-1 ms-1 and 0.6 ms-1, respectively, were determined, corresponding to dissociation constant Kd of 36 microM at -20 mV. These results are very similar to those reported for cardiac muscle Ca channels (Lansman, J. B., P. Hess, and R. W. Tsien. 1986. J. Gen. Physiol. 88:321-347). In contrast, Cd2+ (01-10 mM), when applied to the internal surface of Ca channels in inside-out patches, did not affect the mean open time, mean unitary current, or the variance of the open channel current. Internal calcium induced a flickery block, with a Kd of 5.8 mM. Mean blocking and unblocking rate constants for calcium of 0.56 mM-1 ms-1 and 3.22 ms-1, respectively, were determined. Internal barium (8 mM) reduced the mean unitary current by 36%. We conclude that under our experimental conditions, the Ca channel is not symmetrical with respect to inorganic ion block and that intracellular calcium can modulate Ca channel currents via a low-affinity binding site.

  17. Development of advanced barium ferrite tape media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Osamu; Oyanagi, Masahito; Morooka, Atsushi; Mori, Masahiko; Kurihashi, Yuich; Tada, Toshio; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    We developed an advanced particulate magnetic tape using fine barium ferrite (BaFe) particles for magnetic-tape storage systems. The new tape showed a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that was 3.5 dB higher than that of the commercially available BaFe tape used for the Linear Tape Open generation 6 tape-storage system, at a linear density of 300 kfci measured with a giant magnetoresistive head with a reader width of 0.45 μm. Such significant increase in SNR was achieved by reducing the magnetic particle volume from 1950 to 1350 nm3, while maintaining a sufficiently high thermal stability, improving the perpendicular squareness ratio from 0.66 to 0.83, and improving the surface roughness from 2.5 to 2.0 nm when measured by atomic force microscopy and from 2.4 to 0.9 nm when measured by optical interferometry. This paper describes the characteristics of the new BaFe particles and media, which are expected to be employed for future high-capacity linear-tape systems.

  18. Prospects for Barium Tagging in Gaseous Xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D.; Rollin, E.; Smith, J.; Mommers, A.; Ackerman, N.; Aharmim, B.; Auger, M.; Barbeau, P.S.; Benitez-Medina, C.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Cook, S.; Coppens, A.; Daniels, T.; DeVoe, R.; Dobi, A.; Dolinski, M.J.; Donato, K.; Fairbank, W., Jr.; Farine, J.; Giroux, G.; /Bern U., LHEP /Carleton U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Carleton U. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /SLAC /Indiana U. /Indiana U., CEEM /Korea U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Alabama U. /Colorado State U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /SLAC /Alabama U. /SLAC /Maryland U. /Moscow, ITEP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Maryland U. /Bern U., LHEP /Laurentian U. /SLAC /Maryland U.

    2012-05-03

    Tagging events with the coincident detection of a barium ion would greatly reduce the background for a neutrino-less double beta decay search in xenon. This paper describes progress towards realizing this goal. It outlines a source that can produce large quantities of Ba++ in gas, shows that this can be extracted to vacuum, and demonstrates a mechanism by which the Ba++ can be efficiently converted to Ba+ as required for laser identification. It is clear from this study that electrospray is a convenient mechanism for producing Ba++ is gas at atmospheric pressure. It is likely that the source will perform just as effectively at higher pressures. Even though the source region has water vapour and methanol vapour at the 0.3% level, there is no evidence for molecular formation. The use of TEA offers an effective method to achieve the charge state conversion. The overall design of the ion extraction from high pressure to vacuum is very similar to the scheme proposed for the final detector and this appears to work well although the efficiency is not yet determined.

  19. Coherent control of photoionization of atomic barium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Rekishu

    We present the results of our study on coherent control of photoionization of atomic barium. Our study focused on the understanding of the controllability, especially due to the effect of the coherent interaction between the atomic system and the laser field. The first half of the study investigates the mechanisms of the control behind the previously observed laser phase-insensitive product state control. The controllability of this excitation scheme, two-color two-photon resonantly enhanced excitation, was analyzed from two aspects, the role of ac Stark shift introduced by the strong laser field and the multi-pathway quantum mechanical interferences. We have analyzed the excitation scheme from the analysis of the photoelectron angular distribution measured using the excitation scheme and the monitoring of the intermediate state population. Analysis of the data as well as the numerical simulation showed clear understanding of the role of two mechanisms in the product state control reported. We also investigated the control of the phase lag during the product state control. We conducted the control of the phase lag in the study of asymmetric photoelectron angular distribution, which arises from the concurrent even-odd parity outgoing electron wave excitation. The phase lag was controlled in full range, 2pi, and the results were analyzed in terms of the role of autoionizing resonance structures as well as the nature of outgoing electron waves at different locations of the autoionizing resonances.

  20. Idiopathic calcinosis cutis in fingertip treated with occlusive dressing using aluminum foil: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuki; Nakamura, Toshiyasu; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Ikegami, Hiroyasu; Kameyama, Kaori; Takayama, Shinichiro

    2007-01-01

    Calcium deposition in the skin, known as calcinosis cutis, is an uncommon disorder caused by an abnormal deposit of calcium phosphate in the skin. We report a case of idiopathic calcinosis cutis in fingertip treated with surgical excision followed by the occlusive dressing using aluminum foil, and obtained significant pain relief and round-shaped fingertip which looked normal.

  1. Stimulation of sugar uptake and thymidine incorporation in mouse 3T3 cells by calcium phosphate and other extracellular particles.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D W; Colowick, S P

    1977-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the marked stimulation of sugar uptake and thymidine incorporation by addition of extra Ca2+ to stationary phase mouse 3T3 cells in culture is phosphate dependent and due to the action of the calcium phosphate precipitate formed in the medium. The cells are similarly stimulated by a variety of particulate materials, including calcium pyrophosphate, barium sulfate, kaolin, and polystrene beads. The precipitate effects on sugar uptake are of the same magnitude as those seen with certain hormones (insulin, epidermal growth factor) or with fresh 10% calf serum. The effect of barium sulfate on thymidine incorporation is also of the same magnitude as seen with these hormones, but much less than half that found with fresh calf serum. The stimulation by barium sulfate or hormones of thymidine incorporation is not phosphate dependent. PMID:202958

  2. Stimulation of sugar uptake and thymidine incorporation in mouse 3T3 cells by calcium phosphate and other extracellular particles.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D W; Colowick, S P

    1977-12-01

    Evidence is presented that the marked stimulation of sugar uptake and thymidine incorporation by addition of extra Ca2+ to stationary phase mouse 3T3 cells in culture is phosphate dependent and due to the action of the calcium phosphate precipitate formed in the medium. The cells are similarly stimulated by a variety of particulate materials, including calcium pyrophosphate, barium sulfate, kaolin, and polystrene beads. The precipitate effects on sugar uptake are of the same magnitude as those seen with certain hormones (insulin, epidermal growth factor) or with fresh 10% calf serum. The effect of barium sulfate on thymidine incorporation is also of the same magnitude as seen with these hormones, but much less than half that found with fresh calf serum. The stimulation by barium sulfate or hormones of thymidine incorporation is not phosphate dependent. PMID:202958

  3. Mononuclear barium diketonate polyamine adducts. Synthesis, structures, and use in MOCVD of barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, R.A.; Gordon, D.C.; Stauf, G.T.; Vaartstra, B.A.; Ostrander, R.L.; Rheingold, A.L.

    1994-11-01

    Mononuclear barium {beta}-diketonate Lewis base adducts have been synthesized by reaction of Ba(thd){sub 2} (thd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate) with polyamines 1,1,4,7,7-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (pmdt) and 1,1,4,7,10,10-hexamethyltriethylenetetramine (hmtt). The adducts [Ba(thd){sub 2}(pmdt)] (I) and [Ba(thd){sub 2}(hmtt)] (II) have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, elemental analyses and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound I crystallizes in the space group P2{sub 1}/c with a = 10.577(3) {angstrom}, b = 23.547(7) {angstrom}, c = 15.963(5) {angstrom}, {beta} = 105.21(2){degrees}, and Z = 4. Compound II crystallizes in the space group P2{sub 1}/c with a = 10.833(6) {angstrom}, b = 20.442(12) {angstrom}, c = 19.404(9) {angstrom}, {beta} = 104.35(4){degrees}, and Z = 4. The adducts are seven- and eight-coordinate, respectively, with all nitrogen atoms of the polyamine bound to a single barium center. Compound I has been used for thin-film growth of BaTiO{sub 3} which has revealed that, compared to Ba(thd){sub 2}(tetraglyme), the polyamine adduct allows a larger temperature window for effective vapor transport. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Get Enough Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  5. Calcium carbonate overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  6. Calcium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for calcium cyanide is included in th

  7. Effects of aluminum on the nervous system and its possible link with neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Masahiro

    2005-11-01

    Aluminum is environmentally abundant, but not an essential element. Aluminum has been associated with several neurodegenerative diseases, such as dialysis encephalopathy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinsonism dementia in the Kii peninsula and Guam, and in particular, Alzheimer's disease. Although this association remains controversial, there is increasing evidence which suggests the implication of metal homeostasis in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Aluminum, zinc, copper, and iron cause the conformational changes of Alzheimer's amyloid-beta protein. Al causes the accumulation of tau protein and amyloid-beta protein in experimental animals. Aluminum induces neuronal apoptosis in vivo as well as in vitro. Furthermore, a relationship between aluminum and the iron-homeostasis or calcium-homeostasis has been suggested. Based on these findings, the characteristics of aluminum neurotoxicity are reviewed, and the potential link between aluminum and neurodegenerative diseases is reconsidered.

  8. Aspects of aluminum toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, C.D.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R. )

    1990-06-01

    Aluminum is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. The widespread occurrence of aluminum, both in the environment and in foodstuffs, makes it virtually impossible for man to avoid exposure to this metal ion. Attention was first drawn to the potential role of aluminum as a toxic metal over 50 years ago, but was dismissed as a toxic agent as recently as 15 years ago. The accumulation of aluminum, in some patients with chronic renal failure, is associated with the development of toxic phenomena; dialysis encephalopathy, osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy, and an anemia. Aluminum accumulation also occurs in patients who are not on dialysis, predominantly infants and children with immature or impaired renal function. Aluminum has also been implicated as a toxic agent in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, Guamiam amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and parkinsonism-dementia. 119 references.

  9. Acceleration of barium ions near 8000 km above an aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T. J.; Wescott, E. M.; Foeppl, H.

    1984-01-01

    A barium shaped charge, named Limerick, was released from a rocket launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, on March 30, 1982, at 1033 UT. The release took place in a small auroral breakup. The jet of ionized barium reached an altitude of 8100 km 14.5 min after release, indicating that there were no parallel electric fields below this altitude. At 8100 km the jet appeared to stop. Analysis shows that the barium at this altitude was effectively removed from the tip. It is concluded that the barium was actually accelerated upward, resulting in a large decrease in the line-of-sight density and hence the optical intensity. The parallel electric potential in the acceleration region must have been greater than 1 kV over an altitude interval of less than 200 km. The acceleration region, although presumably auroral in origin, did not seem to be related to individual auroral structures, but appeared to be a large-scale horizontal structure. The perpendicular electric field below, as deduced from the drift of the barium, was temporally and spatially very uniform and showed no variation related to individual auroral structures passing through.

  10. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  11. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  12. The use of strontium and barium analyses for the reconstruction of the diet of the early medieval coastal population of Gdańsk (Poland): A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Szostek, Krzysztof; Głab, Henryk; Pudło, Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    Barium and strontium analyses yield an important perspective on temporal shifts in diet in relation to social and environmental circumstances. This research focuses on reconstructing dietary strategies of individuals in the early medieval (12-13th century) population of Gdańsk on the coast of the Baltic Sea. To describe these strategies where seafood rich in minerals was included in the diet, levels of strontium, barium, calcium and phosphorus were measured in first permanent molars of adult men and women whose remains were excavated from the churchyard in the city centre. Faunal remains from the excavation were analysed as an environmental background with respect to the content of the above-mentioned elements. The impact of diagenesis on the odontological material under study was also determined by an analysis of the soil derived from the grave and non-grave surroundings. For verification of diagenetic processes, the calcium/phosphorus index was used. Strontium, calcium, phosphorus and barium levels were determined with the spectrophotometric method using the latest generation plasma spectrophotometer Elan 6100 ICP-MS. From the results of the analysis of taphonomic parameters such as the soil pH, potential ion exchange in the grave surroundings and the Ca/P ratio, it can be inferred that diagenetic factors had little impact on the studied material. From this pilot study we can conclude that in the early Middle Ages in the Baltic Sea basin, seafood was included in the diet from early childhood and at the same time the diet contained calcium-rich milk products (also rich in minerals). The lack of sex differences may indicate the absence of a sex-specific nutritional strategy in childhood and early adolescence.

  13. Studies of hexacelsian and celsian barium aluminosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuo-Tong

    1998-09-01

    The first part of this work (chapter 3) describes the reaction paths leading to the formation of BaAlsb2Sisb2Osb8 (BAS) from a mixture of gamma-BaCOsb3,\\ alpha-Alsb2Osb3, and amorphous SiOsb2 powders. Heat treatments conducted from 600 to 1200sp°C in air were used to transform the powder mixtures into hexacelsian BAS. The phase evolution to BAS was examined by x-ray diffraction. Several experiments were designed to microscopically reproduce the solid-solid interfaces expected during the synthesis of BAS and enabled the author to describe the different stages of the reaction. There exist two reaction paths in formation of BAS in this study: (1) formation of a series of barium silicates leading to BaO*2SiOsb2 (BSsb2) which then reacts with Alsb2Osb3 to form BAS and (2) formation of BaO*Alsb2Osb3 (BA) which then reacts with SiOsb2 to form BAS. The kinetics of the latter is slower than that of the former because the reaction between BaO*Alsb2Osb3 and SiOsb2 to form BAS includes a bond breaking process. The second part (chapter 4) of this research was undertaken to study the role of additives on the kinetics of the transformation of hexacelsian to celsian. Pre-synthesized hexacelsian powders doped with various additives were heated at temperatures ranging from 850 to 1400sp°C for 4 hrs. Semi-quantitative analysis of XRD was used to determine the extent of the hexacelsian-to-celsian transformation. This work was extended further to investigate the mechanisms involved in the transformation. Defect structures developed in the additive-containing celsian provide insights about the sites occupied by the cations added. Experimental results indicate that the doping of ˜0.99A cations in promoting the conversion of hexacelsian to celsian is by forming an interstitial solid solution in hexacelsian and ˜0.66A cations form a substitutional solid solution. In a kinetic study on the CaO- or MgO-enhanced transformation, values of rate constant, k, and Avlami constant, n, at

  14. Nanopatterned barium titanate on block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tu

    This dissertation describes the synthesis, the characterization and the modeling of a triblock copolymer of polystyrene(PS)-polybutadiene(PB)-polystyrene(PS) monolayer thin film patterned with nanometer sized cubic BaTiO3 crystals, with a focus on the influence of length scales and the hierarchical structure on the ferroelectric properties of BaTiO3. BaTiO3, a dielectric and a ferroelectric, is used extensively in multilayer capacitors, thermistors and electrooptic devices. Its ferroelectric properties are known to be size dependent in the nanometer scale. To gain further insight into the fundamental characteristics of BaTiO3 in the nanometer scale, BaTiO3 is crystallized, for the first time, in a confined environment hosted by a PS-PB-PS triblock copolymer monolayer thin film with nanodomains of tunable geometry and size. The engineering of the PS-PB-PS triblock copolymer monolayer thin film includes fractionation, elimination of interfacial interaction, control of film thickness and minimization of pinholes. The resulting monolayer contains cylindrical PS nanodomains embedded in a PB matrix. The film thickness, the diameter of the PS domain and the domain center-to-domain center distance are 31 nm, 15 nm and 31 nm respectively. Cubic BaTiO3 nanoparticles having a narrow size distribution of 10 nm are formed and located predominantly within the PB matrices by three steps: epoxidation-hydroxylation, barium titanation and vapor-phase hydrothermal process. The volume fraction of BaTiO3 phase is 0.0113. The effective dielectric constant of the BaTiO3/PS-PB-PS composite monolayer is 5.5 +/- 2.5. With the assistance of dielectric mixing rules, the dielectric constant of the cubic BaTiO3 phase is determined to be 160. The relative low dielectric constant of the BaTiO3 phase is usually explained by the critical size above which BaTiO3 particles are tetragonal and ferroelectric and below which particles are cubic and non-ferroelectric. But, the inconsistency of the

  15. Rocket having barium release system to create ion clouds in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A chemical system for releasing a good yield of free barium atoms and barium ions to create ion clouds in the upper atmosphere and interplanetary space for the study of the geophysical properties of the medium is presented.

  16. Barium Depletion in the NSTAR Discharge Cathode After 30,000 Hours of Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of barium released by impregnant materials in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. Examinations of cathode inserts from long duration ion engine tests show deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of barium from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of barium transport in the insert plasma indicates that the barium partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant barium-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress barium loss in the upstream part of the insert. New measurements of the depth of barium depletion from a cathode insert operated for 30,352 hours reveal that barium loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis.

  17. Selectivity in biomineralization of barium and strontium.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Minna R; Wasserman, Brian; Finney, Lydia; McNulty, Ian; Legnini, Daniel; Vogt, Stefan; Joester, Derk

    2011-11-01

    The desmid green alga Closterium moniliferum belongs to a small number of organisms that form barite (BaSO(4)) or celestite (SrSO(4)) biominerals. The ability to sequester Sr in the presence of an excess of Ca is of considerable interest for the remediation of (90)Sr from the environment and nuclear waste. While most cells dynamically regulate the concentration of the second messenger Ca(2+) in the cytosol and various organelles, transport proteins rarely discriminate strongly between Ca, Sr, and Ba. Herein, we investigate how these ions are trafficked in C. moniliferum and how precipitation of (Ba,Sr)SO(4) crystals occurs in the terminal vacuoles. Towards this goal, we simultaneously visualize intracellular dynamics of multiple elements using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) of cryo-fixed/freeze-dried samples. We correlate the resulting elemental maps with ultrastructural information gleaned from freeze-fracture cryo-SEM of frozen-hydrated cells and use micro X-ray absorption near edge structure (micro-XANES) to determine sulfur speciation. We find that the kinetics of Sr uptake and efflux depend on external Ca concentrations, and Sr, Ba, and Ca show similar intracellular localization. A highly ion-selective cross-membrane transport step is not evident. Based on elevated levels of sulfate detected in the terminal vacuoles, we propose a "sulfate trap" model, where the presence of dissolved barium leads to preferential precipitation of (Ba,Sr)SO(4) due to its low solubility relative to SrSO(4) and CaSO(4). Engineering the sulfate concentration in the vacuole may thus be the most direct way to increase the Sr sequestered per cell, an important consideration in using desmids for phytoremediation of (90)Sr.

  18. Barium Levels in Soils and Centella asiatica

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Ghim Hock; Yap, Chee Kong; Mahmood, Maziah; Tan, Soon Guan; Hamzah, Suhaimi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, Centella asiatica and surface soils were collected from 12 sampling sites in Peninsular Malaysia, and the barium (Ba) concentrations were determined. The Ba concentration [μg/g dry weight (dw)] was 63.72 to 382.01 μg/g in soils while in C. asiatica, Ba concentrations ranged from 5.05 to 21.88 μg/g for roots, 3.31 to 11.22 μg/g for leaves and 2.37 to 6.14 μg/g for stems. In C. asiatica, Ba accumulation was found to be the highest in roots followed by leaves and stems. The correlation coefficients (r) of Ba between plants and soils were found to be significantly positively correlated, with the highest correlation being between roots-soils (r=0.922, p<005), followed by leaves-soils (r=0.890, p<005) and stems-soils (r=0.848, p<005). This indicates that these three parts of C. asiatica are good biomonitors of Ba pollution. For the transplantation study, four sites were selected as unpolluted [(Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM)], semi-polluted (Seri Kembangan and Balakong) and polluted sites (Juru). Based on the transplantation study under experimental field and laboratory conditions, Ba concentrations in C. asiatica were significantly (p<0.05) higher after three weeks of exposure at Seri Kembangan, Balakong and Juru. Thus, these experimental findings confirm that the leaves, stems and roots of C. asiatica can reflect the Ba levels in the soils where this plant is found. Three weeks after back transplantation to clean soils, the Ba levels in C. asiatica were still higher than the initial Ba level even though Ba elimination occurred. In conclusion, the leaves, stems and roots of C. asiatica are good biomonitors of Ba pollution. PMID:24575242

  19. Fabrication of Lotus-Type Porous Aluminum through Thermal Decomposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. Y.; Park, J. S.; Nakajima, H.

    2009-04-01

    Lotus-type porous aluminum with cylindrical pores was fabricated by unidirectional solidification through thermal decomposition of calcium hydroxide, sodium bicarbonate, or titanium hydride. The pore-forming gas decomposed from calcium hydroxide, sodium bicarbonate, and titanium hydride is identified as hydrogen. The elongated pores are evolved due to the solubility gap between liquid and solid when the melt dissolving hydrogen is solidified unidirectionally. The porosity of lotus aluminum is as high as 20 pct despite the type of the compounds. The pore size decreases and the pore density increases with increasing amount of calcium hydroxide, which is explained by an increase in the number of pore nucleation sites. The porosity and pore size in lotus aluminum fabricated using calcium hydroxide decrease with increasing argon pressure, which is explained by Boyle’s law. It is suggested that this fabrication method is simple and safe, which makes it superior to the conventional technique using high-pressure hydrogen gas.

  20. White dwarf kicks and implications for barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, R. G.; Church, R. P.; Dermine, T.

    The barium stars have caused much grief in the field of binary stellar evolution. They are often eccentric when they should be circular and are not found to have periods longer than 104 days even though wind accretion should still be efficient at such separations. We address both these problems by introducing a kick to white dwarfs when they are born, thus solving the eccentricity problem, and imposing strong orbital angular momentum loss to shrink barium-star binaries down to the observed periods. Whilst our angular momentum prescription is hard to justify for the barium stars it shows that strong angular momentum loss is necessary to reproduce the observed period-eccentricity distribution. We are investigating whether this can be obtained from a circumbinary disc.

  1. Prompt ionization in the CRIT II barium releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Liou, K.; Rau, D.

    1992-05-01

    Observations of electron and ion distributions inside a fast neutral barium jet in the ionosphere show significant fluxes within 4 km of release, presumably related to beam plasma instability processes involved in the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) effect. Electron fluxes exceeding 5 x 10 exp 12/sq cm-str-sec-keV were responsible for ionizing both the streaming barium and ambient oxygen. Resulting ion fluxes seem to be consistent with 1-2 percent ionization of the fast barium, as reported by optical observations, although the extended spatial distribution of the optically observed ions is difficult to reconcile with the in situ observations. When the perpendicular velocity of the neutrals falls below critical values, these processes shut off. Although these observations resemble the earlier Porcupine experimental results (Haerendel, 1982), theoretical understanding of the differences between these data and that of earlier negative experiments is still lacking.

  2. Multiphoton laser ionization for energy conversion in barium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Y.; Kokaj, J.; Afrousheh, K.; Mathew, J.; Nair, R.; Pichler, G.

    2013-03-01

    We have studied the ion detection of barium atoms in special heated ovens with a tungsten rod in the middle of the stainless steel tube. The tungsten rod was heated indirectly by the oven body heaters. A bias voltage between the cell body and the tungsten rod of 9 V was used to collect electrons, after the barium ions had been created. However, we could collect the electrons even without the bias voltage, although with ten times less efficiency. We studied the conditions for the successful bias-less thermionic signal detection using excimer/dye laser two-photon excitation of Rydberg states below and above the first ionization limit (two-photon wavelength at 475.79 nm). We employed a hot-pipe oven and heat-pipe oven (with inserted mesh) in order to generate different barium vapor distributions inside the oven. The thermionic signal increased by a factor of two under heat-pipe oven conditions.

  3. Investigation of barium sulfate deposition and precipitation using a novel approach

    SciTech Connect

    Morizot, A.P.; Neville, A.; Hodgkiess, T.

    1999-11-01

    One of the major recognized problems in the offshore oilfield production industry is the formation of mineral scale on the surface of production equipment in the pores of rock. The deposition of various type of scale in the oil and gas production operations is very common; these mainly include calcium carbonate, barium sulfate, calcium sulfate and strontium sulfate. This paper reports results of a study comparing the characteristics of mineral scale formation (BaSO{sub 4}) in a bulk solution and at a solid surface. An electrochemically-based technique, in which the scale was formed on a rotating disk electrode has been used in conjunction with assessment of bulk precipitation measurement. Results from this study have shown that the action of a commercial PolyPhosphinoCarboxylic Acid inhibitor is different in the bulk solution and at the surface. The addition of 25 ppm PPCA, although effective in retarding bulk precipitate formation, enhances the level of surface scaling. Practical implications resulting from these findings are discussed.

  4. Carbothermic Aluminum Production Using Scrap Aluminum As A Coolant

    DOEpatents

    LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2002-11-05

    A process for producing aluminum metal by carbothermic reduction of alumina ore. Alumina ore is heated in the presence of carbon at an elevated temperature to produce an aluminum metal body contaminated with about 10-30% by wt. aluminum carbide. Aluminum metal or aluminum alloy scrap then is added to bring the temperature to about 900-1000.degree. C. and precipitate out aluminum carbide. The precipitated aluminum carbide is filtered, decanted, or fluxed with salt to form a molten body having reduced aluminum carbide content.

  5. MTBE OXIDATION BY BIFUNCTIONAL ALUMINUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bifunctional aluminum, prepared by sulfating zero-valent aluminum with sulfuric acid, has a dual functionality of simultaneously decomposing both reductively- and oxidatively-degradable contaminants. In this work, the use of bifunctional aluminum for the degradation of methyl te...

  6. Compact pulse forming line using barium titanate ceramic material.

    PubMed

    Kumar Sharma, Surender; Deb, P; Shukla, R; Prabaharan, T; Shyam, A

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic material has very high relative permittivity, so compact pulse forming line can be made using these materials. Barium titanate (BaTiO(3)) has a relative permittivity of 1200 so it is used for making compact pulse forming line (PFL). Barium titanate also has piezoelectric effects so it cracks during high voltages discharges due to stresses developed in it. Barium titanate is mixed with rubber which absorbs the piezoelectric stresses when the PFL is charged and regain its original shape after the discharge. A composite mixture of barium titanate with the neoprene rubber is prepared. The relative permittivity of the composite mixture is measured to be 85. A coaxial pulse forming line of inner diameter 120 mm, outer diameter 240 mm, and length 350 mm is made and the composite mixture of barium titanate and neoprene rubber is filled between the inner and outer cylinders. The PFL is charged up to 120 kV and discharged into 5 Ω load. The voltage pulse of 70 kV, 21 ns is measured across the load. The conventional PFL is made up of oil or plastics dielectrics with the relative permittivity of 2-10 [D. R. Linde, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 90th ed. (CRC, 2009); Xia et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 086113 (2008); Yang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 43303 (2010)], which increases the length of PFL. We have reported the compactness in length achieved due to increase in relative permittivity of composite mixture by adding barium titanate in neoprene rubber. PMID:22129008

  7. DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF BARIUM ENEMA FINDINGS IN HIRSCHSPRUNG'S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    PEYVASTEH, Mehran; ASKARPOUR, Shahnam; OSTADIAN, Nasrollah; MOGHIMI, Mohammad-Reza; JAVAHERIZADEH, Hazhir

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Hirschsprung's disease is the most common cause of pediatric intestinal obstruction. Contrast enema is used for evaluation of the patients with its diagnosis. Aim: To evaluate sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of radiologic findings for diagnosis of Hirschsprung in patients underwent barium enema. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in Imam Khomeini Hospital for one year starting from 2012, April. Sixty patients were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were: neonates with failure to pass meconium, abdominal distention, and refractory constipation who failed to respond with medical treatment. Transitional zone, delay in barium evacuation after 24 h, rectosigmoid index (maximum with of the rectum divided by maximum with of the sigmoid; abnormal if <1), and irregularity of mucosa (jejunization) were evaluated in barium enema. Biopsy was obtained at three locations apart above dentate line. PPV, NPV, specificity , and sensitivity was calculated for each finding. Results: Mean age of the cases with Hirschsprung's disease and without was 17.90±18.29 months and 17.8±18.34 months respectively (p=0.983). It was confirmed in 30 (M=20, F=10) of cases. Failure to pass meconium was found in 21(70%) cases. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 90%, 80%, 81.8% and 88.8% respectively for transitional zone in barium enema. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 76.7%, 83.3%, 78.1% and 82.1% respectively for rectosigmoid index .Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 46.7%, 100%, 100% and 65.2% respectively for irregular contraction detected in barium enema. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 23.3%, 100%, 100% and 56.6% respectively for mucosal irregularity in barium enema. Conclusion: The most sensitive finding was transitional zone. The most specific findings were irregular contraction, mucosal irregularity, and followed by cobblestone appearance. PMID:27759777

  8. Compact pulse forming line using barium titanate ceramic material.

    PubMed

    Kumar Sharma, Surender; Deb, P; Shukla, R; Prabaharan, T; Shyam, A

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic material has very high relative permittivity, so compact pulse forming line can be made using these materials. Barium titanate (BaTiO(3)) has a relative permittivity of 1200 so it is used for making compact pulse forming line (PFL). Barium titanate also has piezoelectric effects so it cracks during high voltages discharges due to stresses developed in it. Barium titanate is mixed with rubber which absorbs the piezoelectric stresses when the PFL is charged and regain its original shape after the discharge. A composite mixture of barium titanate with the neoprene rubber is prepared. The relative permittivity of the composite mixture is measured to be 85. A coaxial pulse forming line of inner diameter 120 mm, outer diameter 240 mm, and length 350 mm is made and the composite mixture of barium titanate and neoprene rubber is filled between the inner and outer cylinders. The PFL is charged up to 120 kV and discharged into 5 Ω load. The voltage pulse of 70 kV, 21 ns is measured across the load. The conventional PFL is made up of oil or plastics dielectrics with the relative permittivity of 2-10 [D. R. Linde, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 90th ed. (CRC, 2009); Xia et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 086113 (2008); Yang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 43303 (2010)], which increases the length of PFL. We have reported the compactness in length achieved due to increase in relative permittivity of composite mixture by adding barium titanate in neoprene rubber.

  9. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182 Section 173.182 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or...

  10. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182 Section 173.182 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or...

  11. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182 Section 173.182 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  17. High energy density aluminum battery

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  18. Methods for producing monodispersed particles of barium titanate

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a low-temperature controlled method for producing high-quality, ultrafine monodispersed nanocrystalline microsphere powders of barium titanate and other pure or composite oxide materials having particles ranging from nanosized to micronsized particles. The method of the subject invention comprises a two-stage process. The first stage produces high quality monodispersed hydrous titania microsphere particles prepared by homogeneous precipitation via dielectric tuning in alcohol-water mixed solutions of inorganic salts. Titanium tetrachloride is used as an inorganic salt precursor material. The second stage converts the pure hydrous titania microsphere particles into crystalline barium titanate microsphere powders via low-temperature, hydrothermal reactions.

  19. Ionization and expansion of barium clouds in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, T.-Z.; Schunk, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    A recently envelope 3D model is used here to study the motion of the barium clouds released in the ionosphere, including the ionization stage. The ionization and the expansion of the barium clouds and the interaction between the clouds and the background ions are investigated using three simulations: a cloud without a directional velocity, a cloud with an initial velocity of 5 km/s across the B field, and a cloud with initial velocity components of 2 km/s both along and across the B field.

  20. Barium and antimony distributions on the hands of nonshooters.

    PubMed

    Havakost, D G; Peters, C A; Koons, R D

    1990-09-01

    Barium and antimony levels from selected areas of the left and right hands of 269 nonshooters provide a database for interpretation of gunshot residue swab analysis results. The database represents a variety of activities of individuals sampled by collectors throughout the United States. Nonshooting exposure to barium and antimony can generally be distinguished from firearms-associated exposure by considering the relative levels of the elements, location on the hands, and condition of the swabs. Consistent definition of sampling procedures and accurate analytical results make this database applicable for interpretation of data generated by most gunshot residue swab examiners. PMID:2230685

  1. Comparison of endoscopy and barium swallow with marshmallow in dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Somers, S; Stevenson, G W; Thompson, G

    1986-06-01

    Forty-four patients with dysphagia were examined both by endoscopy and by barium swallow with a marshmallow bolus. In these patients 36 stenoses were found: 34 by radiology and 30 by endoscopy. The radiologic criteria for stenosis included arrest of the marshmallow in a manner to support a column of barium and reproduction of the patient's symptoms at the time this occurred. Radiologic false negative findings were partly due to an inability by patients to swallow an adequate marshmallow bolus; endoscopic failures were associated with small endoscopes and mild stenoses.

  2. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1981-01-01

    The photoelectric effect in structures consisting of metal deposited barium titanate film silicon is described. A radio frequency sputtering technique is used to deposit ferroelectric barium titantate films on silicon and quartz. Film properties are measured and correlated with the photoelectric effect characteristics of the films. It was found that to obtain good quality pin hole free films, it is necessary to reduce the substrate temperature during the last part of the deposition. The switching ability of the device with internal applied voltage is improved when applied with a ferroelectric memory device.

  3. Comparision of Uptake Models for Strontium (Sr) and Barium (Ba) in Vine (Vitis vinifera L.) in Castilla-La Mancha (spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorós, José Angel; Pérez-de-los-Reyes, Caridad; García-Navarro, Francisco J.; Bravo, Sandra; Higueras, Pablo; Moreno, Marta

    2015-04-01

    Castilla-La Mancha is the biggest vine-growing region in the world (about 500,000 ha) and one of the most important in terms of production of wine. The soils diversity should induce differences in the uptake of mineral elements by the vineyard. Of over the regional vine extension, 101 plots were selected and analyzed soil samples from each of them, following the description by FAO procedures. Samples of leaves were also taken from each soil plot. We analyzed the contents of mineral elements in both soil and leaf, using the FRX technique. This paper is focused on the elements strontium and barium because they are the trace elements having a higher concentration in the soils of the region, with values in soil range from 22.3 mg•kg-1-3602.7 mg•kg-1 in strontium and from 65.4 mg•kg-1 to 469.3 mg•kg-1 in barium. The contents of both elements in leaves have ranged from 23.3 mg•kg-1 y 1084.5 mg•kg-1 for strontium, and between 3.86 mg•kg-1 and 235.0 mg•kg-1 for barium. The aim of this work is state the behaviour in the soil-plant system for both elements. For this study, different statistical adjustment models have been tested (linear, multiplicative, exponential and logarithmic). The results show that the values of "R" for strontium are higher than barium in all models. Samples have also been studied by soil order (classified according to the FAO criteria). In this case, significant correlation from strontium have been found in all soil orders, except in calcisols. Significant correlations for barium appear only in entisols and luvisols. In conclusion it can be seen how these two elements differ in their behaviour in the soil-plant system. In general, the concentration of strontium in the soil is better correlated with leaf content than barium in the same soil. We can suggest a greater facility for the absorption of strontium by the grapevine. In calcisols, bearing in mind the interference of calcium, this uptake does not present such a high correlation

  4. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust. PMID:24806729

  5. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis dead?

    PubMed

    Lidsky, Theodore I

    2014-05-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust.

  6. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are also…

  7. Aluminum space frame technology

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, S.

    1994-01-01

    This article examines the increased application of aluminum to the construction of automobile frames. The topics of the article include a joint venture between Audi and Alcoa, forms in which aluminum is used, new alloys and construction methods, meeting rigidity and safety levels, manufacturing techniques, the use of extrusions, die casting, joining techniques, and pollution control during manufacturing.

  8. Chemical abundance analysis of 19 barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guo-Chao; Liang, Yan-Chun; Spite, Monique; Chen, Yu-Qin; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Guo-Qing; Liu, Yu-Juan; Liu, Nian; Deng, Li-Cai; Spite, Francois; Hill, Vanessa; Zhang, Cai-Xia

    2016-01-01

    We aim at deriving accurate atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances of 19 barium (Ba) stars, including both strong and mild Ba stars, based on the high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution Echelle spectra obtained from the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The chemical abundances of the sample stars were obtained from an LTE, plane-parallel and line-blanketed atmospheric model by inputting the atmospheric parameters (effective temperatures Teff, surface gravities log g, metallicity [Fe/H] and microturbulence velocity ξt) and equivalent widths of stellar absorption lines. These samples of Ba stars are giants as indicated by atmospheric parameters, metallicities and kinematic analysis about UVW velocity. Chemical abundances of 17 elements were obtained for these Ba stars. Their Na, Al, α- and iron-peak elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni) are similar to the solar abundances. Our samples of Ba stars show obvious overabundances of neutron-capture (n-capture) process elements relative to the Sun. Their median abundances of [Ba/Fe], [La/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] are 0.54, 0.65 and 0.40, respectively. The Y I and Zr I abundances are lower than Ba, La and Eu, but higher than the α- and iron-peak elements for the strong Ba stars and similar to the iron-peak elements for the mild stars. There exists a positive correlation between Ba intensity and [Ba/Fe]. For the n-capture elements (Y, Zr, Ba, La), there is an anti-correlation between their [X/Fe] and [Fe/H]. We identify nine of our sample stars as strong Ba stars with [Ba/Fe] >0.6 where seven of them have Ba intensity Ba=2-5, one has Ba=1.5 and another one has Ba=1.0. The remaining ten stars are classified as mild Ba stars with 0.17<[Ba/Fe] <0.54.

  9. Aluminum structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, G.

    1996-05-01

    Extensive research by aluminum producers and automakers in the 1980s resulted in the development of technologies that enable building of aluminum cars that meet and exceed all the expectations of today`s drivers and passengers, yet weigh several hundred pounds less than their steel counterparts. The Acura NSX sports car, the Audi A8, and the Jaguar XJ220 have all been introduced. Ford has built 40 aluminum-intensive automobiles based on the Taurus/Sable for test purposes, and General Motors recently announced an aluminum-structured electric vehicle. The design flexibility that aluminum allows is shown by these examples. Each uses a somewhat different technology that is particularly suited to the vehicle and its market.

  10. The Aluminum Smelting Process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  11. The aluminum smelting process.

    PubMed

    Kvande, Halvor

    2014-05-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development.

  12. Releasing effects in flame photometry: Determination of calcium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinnin, J.I.

    1960-01-01

    Strontium, lanthanum, neodymium, samarium, and yttrium completely release the flame emission of calcium from the depressive effects of sulfate, phosphate, and aluminate. Magnesium, beryllium, barium, and scandium release most of the calcium emission. These cations, when present in high concentration, preferentially form compounds with the depressing anions when the solution is evaporated rapidly in the flame. The mechanism of the interference and releasing effects is explained on the basis of the chemical equilibria in the evaporating droplets of solution and is shown to depend upon the nature of the compounds present in the aqueous phase of the solution. The need for background correction techniques is stressed. The releasing effect is used in the determination of calcium in silicate rocks without the need for separations.

  13. Concentrations of lead, cadmium and barium in urban garden-grown vegetables: the impact of soil variables

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Murray B.; Shayler, Hannah A.; Spliethoff, Henry M.; Mitchell, Rebecca G.; Marquez-Bravo, Lydia G.; Ferenz, Gretchen S.; Russell-Anelli, Jonathan M.; Casey, Linda; Bachman, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Paired vegetable/soil samples from New York City and Buffalo, NY, gardens were analyzed for lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and barium (Ba). Vegetable aluminum (Al) was measured to assess soil adherence. Soil and vegetable metal concentrations did not correlate; vegetable concentrations varied by crop type. Pb was below health-based guidance values (EU standards) in virtually all fruits. 47% of root crops and 9% of leafy greens exceeded guidance values; over half the vegetables exceeded the 95th percentile of market-basket concentrations for Pb. Vegetable Pb correlated with Al; soil particle adherence/incorporation was more important than Pb uptake via roots. Cd was similar to market-basket concentrations and below guidance values in nearly all samples. Vegetable Ba was much higher than Pb or Cd, although soil Ba was lower than soil Pb. The poor relationship between vegetable and soil metal concentrations is attributable to particulate contamination of vegetables and soil characteristics that influence phytoavailability. PMID:25163429

  14. Concentrations of lead, cadmium and barium in urban garden-grown vegetables: the impact of soil variables.

    PubMed

    McBride, Murray B; Shayler, Hannah A; Spliethoff, Henry M; Mitchell, Rebecca G; Marquez-Bravo, Lydia G; Ferenz, Gretchen S; Russell-Anelli, Jonathan M; Casey, Linda; Bachman, Sharon

    2014-11-01

    Paired vegetable/soil samples from New York City and Buffalo, NY, gardens were analyzed for lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and barium (Ba). Vegetable aluminum (Al) was measured to assess soil adherence. Soil and vegetable metal concentrations did not correlate; vegetable concentrations varied by crop type. Pb was below health-based guidance values (EU standards) in virtually all fruits. 47% of root crops and 9% of leafy greens exceeded guidance values; over half the vegetables exceeded the 95th percentile of market-basket concentrations for Pb. Vegetable Pb correlated with Al; soil particle adherence/incorporation was more important than Pb uptake via roots. Cd was similar to market-basket concentrations and below guidance values in nearly all samples. Vegetable Ba was much higher than Pb or Cd, although soil Ba was lower than soil Pb. The poor relationship between vegetable and soil metal concentrations is attributable to particulate contamination of vegetables and soil characteristics that influence phytoavailability.

  15. Electrophoretic mobility shift in native gels indicates calcium-dependent structural changes of neuronal calcium sensor proteins.

    PubMed

    Viviano, Jeffrey; Krishnan, Anuradha; Wu, Hao; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2016-02-01

    In proteins of the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) family, changes in structure as well as function are brought about by the binding of calcium. In this article, we demonstrate that these structural changes, solely due to calcium binding, can be assessed through electrophoresis in native gels. The results demonstrate that the NCS proteins undergo ligand-dependent conformational changes that are detectable in native gels as a gradual decrease in mobility with increasing calcium but not other tested divalent cations such as magnesium, strontium, and barium. Surprisingly, such a gradual change over the entire tested range is exhibited only by the NCS proteins but not by other tested calcium-binding proteins such as calmodulin and S100B, indicating that the change in mobility may be linked to a unique NCS family feature--the calcium-myristoyl switch. Even within the NCS family, the changes in mobility are characteristic of the protein, indicating that the technique is sensitive to the individual features of the protein. Thus, electrophoretic mobility on native gels provides a simple and elegant method to investigate calcium (small ligand)-induced structural changes at least in the superfamily of NCS proteins.

  16. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling. Typically about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and replaced each day. To supply this amount, one would need to consume about 600 mg of calcium, since calcium is not very efficiently absorbed. Calcium ...

  17. PROPOSED ORAL REFERENCE DOSE (RFD) FOR BARIUM AND COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is a database of EPA's consensus opinion of the human health effects that may result from exposure to various substances found in the environment. A Toxicological Review and IRIS Summary were prepared for barium and compounds in 1998 ...

  18. Dynamics of a barium release in the magnetospheric tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Swenson, G. R.; Geller, S. P.; Doolittle, J. H.; Haerendel, G.

    1989-01-01

    The late time behavior of the May 13, 1985 magnetotail barium cloud is examined. The bulk dynamics of the cloud are studied based on triangulated data and data from Fabry-Perot Doppler velocity measurements. The changes in cloud morphology in relation to the in situ measurements made by the Ion Release Module satellite are discussed.

  19. Effects of light exposure on irradiated barium fluoride crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.; Mauger, G.J.

    1993-04-20

    Small barium fluoride crystals have been irradiated using cobalt-60 gamma rays under various illumination conditions to establish the effect of photo-bleaching of the radiation-induced color centers. This paper describes results of a few different experiments conducted at LLNL over the past few weeks.

  20. Synthesis of phase pure praseodymium barium copper iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Konne, Joshua L; Davis, Sean A; Glatzel, Stefan; Hall, Simon R

    2013-06-18

    The control of crystallization of praseodymium barium copper iron oxide, an intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell cathode material, has been demonstrated for the first time using a biotemplated sol-gel synthesis technique. The results obtained showed significant improvement in purity, synthesis time, surface area and simplicity over that previously reported.

  1. Noncollinear Optical Frequency Doubling in Strontium Barium Niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunyagi, Arthur R.; Ulex, Michael; Betzler, Klaus

    2003-06-01

    The observation of a novel noncollinear optical second-harmonic generation mechanism is reported. In strontium barium niobate crystals, a circular cone of second-harmonic light is generated when a fundamental beam of intensive laser light is directed along the crystallographic c axis. It can be shown that the effect is caused by the nonlinear polarization of antiparallel ordered ferroelectric microdomains.

  2. SEPARATION OF BARIUM VALUES FROM URANYL NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Tompkins, E.R.

    1959-02-24

    The separation of radioactive barium values from a uranyl nitrate solution of neutron-irradiated uranium is described. The 10 to 20% uranyl nitrate solution is passed through a flrst column of a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring the adsorption of barium and certain other cations. The loaded resin is first washed with dilute sulfuric acid to remove a portion of the other cations, and then wash with a citric acid solution at pH of 5 to 7 to recover the barium along with a lesser amount of the other cations. The PH of the resulting eluate is adjusted to about 2.3 to 3.5 and diluted prior to passing through a smaller second column of exchange resin. The loaded resin is first washed with a citric acid solution at a pH of 3 to elute undesired cations and then with citric acid solution at a pH of 6 to eluts the barium, which is substantially free of undesired cations.

  3. Clinical biochemistry of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    King, S.W.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R.

    1981-05-01

    Aluminum toxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of clinical disorders in patients with chronic renal failure on long-term intermittent hemodialysis treatment. The predominant disorders have been those involving either bone (osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy) or brain (dialysis encephalopathy). In nonuremic patients, an increased brain aluminum concentration has been implicated as a neurotoxic agent in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and was associated with experimental neurofibrillary degeneration in animals. The brain aluminum concentrations of patients dying with the syndrome of dialysis encephalopathy (dialysis dementia) are significantly higher than in dialyzed patients without the syndrome and in nondialyzed patients. Two potential sources for the increased tissue content of aluminum in patients on hemodialysis have been proposed: (1) intestinal absorption from aluminum containing phosphate-binding gels, and (2) transfer across the dialysis membrane from aluminum in the water used to prepare the dialysate. These findings, coupled with our everyday exposure to the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum in nature, have created concerns over the potential toxicity of this metal.

  4. Characterization of calcium oxalate defective (cod) 3 mutant from Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many plants invest a considerable amount of resources and energy into the formation of calcium oxalate crystals. Assigned roles for plant crystal formation include functions in defense, calcium regulation, and aluminum tolerance. From a human health standpoint, oxalate present in edible plant tiss...

  5. Preliminary study of the CRRES magnetospheric barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huba, J. D.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Lyon, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary theoretical and computational analyses of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) magnetospheric barium releases are presented. The focus of the studies is on the evolution of the diamagnetic cavity which is formed by the barium ions as they expand outward, and on the structuring of the density and magnetic field during the expansion phase of the releases. Two sets of simulation studies are discussed. The first set is based upon a 2D ideal MHD code and provides estimates of the time and length scales associated with the formation and collapse of the diamagnetic cavity. The second set uses a nonideal MHD code; specifically, the Hall term is included. This additional term is critical to the dynamics of sub-Alfvenic plasma expansions, such as the CRRES barium releases, because it leads to instability of the expanding plasma. Detailed simulations of the G4 and G10 releases were performed. In both cases the expanding plasma rapidly structured: the G4 release structured at time t less than about 3 s and developed scale sizes of about 1-2 km, while the G10 release structured at time t less than about 22 s and developed scale sizes of about 10-15 km. It is also found that the diamagnetic cavity size is reduced from those obtained from the ideal MHD results because of the structure. On the other hand, the structuring allows the formation of plasma blobs which appear to free stream across the magnetic field; thus, the barium plasma can propagate to larger distances traverse to the magnetic field than the case where no structuring occurs. Finally, a new normal mode of the system was discovered which may be excited at the leading edge of the expanding barium plasma.

  6. Radiotracer studies on calcium ion-selective electrode membranes based on poly(vinyl chloride) matrices.

    PubMed

    Craggs, A; Moody, G J; Thomas, J D; Willcox, A

    Radiotracer studies with (45)Ca and (36)Cl demonstrate that PVC matrix membranes containing Orion 92-20-02 liquid calcium ion-exchanger are permselective to counter-cations. Diffusion coefficients are quoted for the migration of (45)Ca between pairs of calcium solutions and are discussed in terms of solution concentration, membrane thickness and concentration level of sensor in the membrane. Migration of calcium ions from calcium chloride solution to a Group (II) metal chloride solution through a PVC membrane containing calcium liquid ion-exchanger is discussed in terms of solvent extraction and electrode selectivity coefficient parameters. Thus, magnesium, strontium and barium ions appear to inhibit migration through the membrane by their low affinity for the membrane liquid ion-exchanger sites, while the inhibition by beryllium ions is attributed to site blockage by the strong affinity of dialkylphosphate sites for beryllium.

  7. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  8. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  9. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  10. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  11. Calcium source (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  12. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  13. Walnut Hulls Clean Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colberg, W. R.; Gordon, G. H.; Jackson, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Hulls inflict minimal substrate damage. Walnut hulls found to be best abrasive for cleaning aluminum surfaces prior to painting. Samples blasted with walnut hulls showed no compressive stress of surface.

  14. Detecting the barium daughter in 136Xe 0-νββ decay using single-molecule fluorescence imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygren, David R.

    2015-11-01

    Single-molecule fluorescent imaging may provide an avenue to efficiently detect the Ba++ daughter atom in the decay 136Xe → Ba + 2e-, and, unambiguously associate the birth point in space within the electron trajectories of the decay event. Chelation of doubly-charged alkaline earth elements such as calcium and barium by certain precursor molecules converts the resulting complex from a non-fluorescent to a fluorescent state. Repeated photo-excitation of a single fluorescent complex reveals both presence and location with high precision. This technique, widespread now in biochemistry, biophysics and biology, may permit a similar discriminating response in a large high-pressure xenon gas TPC for the Ba++ ion from xenon double-beta decay. The TPC measures the event time and energy of the two nascent electrons, as well as topology and position in 3-D from their trajectories in the gas. Measurement of the 2-D location of the molecular ion after arrival at the cathode plane permits an association of ion with the event. Demonstration of an efficient, highly specific detection of the barium daughter would provide a long-sought pathway to a background-free result in the search for this decay mode, of central importance for determining the nature of the neutrino.

  15. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  16. CORROSION PROTECTION OF ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R.S.; Nelson, W.B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred. (D.C.W.)

  17. Light weight aluminum optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catura, R. C.; Vieira, J. R.

    1985-09-01

    Light weight mirror blanks were fabricated by dip-brazing a core of low mass aluminum foam material to thin face sheets of solid aluminum. The blanks weigh 40% of an equivalent size solid mirror and were diamond turned to provide reflective surfaces. Optical interferometry was used to assess their dimensional stability over 7 months. No changes in flatness are observed (to the sensitivity of the measurements of a half wavelength of red light).

  18. Results of critical velocity experiments with barium, strontium, and calcium releases from CRRES satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hampton, D. L.; Delamere, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) chemical release program in September 1990, two Ba and also one each Sr and Ca canisters of a boron-titanium thermite mixture, which vaporizes the element on ignition, were released near perigee after dusk in the South Pacific to study the critical velocity effect proposed by Alfven. The critical velocities of these three elements are 2.7, 3.5, and 5.4 km/s respectively, all well below the orbital velocity of 9.4 km/s. On September 10, 1990, a Sr and Ba pair (G-13, or critical ionization velocity (CIV) I) was released near Rarotonga at approximately 515 km altitude in a background electron density of 3.4 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. On September 14, 1990, G-14 or CIV II released a Ca and Ba pair west of New Caledonia near 595 km at an electron density of 1.5 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. Ions of all three elements were observed with low-light level imagers from two aircraft after they had transited up the magnetic field lines into the sunlight. Emissions from the spherically expanding neutral gas shells below the solar terminator, observed with cameras filtered for the Ba(+) ion line at 4554 A and also in unfiltered imagers for approximately 15 s after release, are probably due to excitation by hot electrons created in the CIV process. The ions created clearly lost much of their energy, which we now show can be explained by elastic collisions: Ba(+) + O. Inventories of the observed ions indicate yields of 0.15% and 1.84% for Ba in the first and second experiments, 0.02% for Sr and 0.27% for Ca. Ionization from all the releases continued along the satellite trajectory much longer (greater than 45 s) than expected for a CIV process. The ion production along the satellite track versus time typically shows a rapid rise to a peak in a few seconds followed by an exponential decrease to a level essentially constant rate. The characteristic distances for CIV I and II are 47 and 62 km, respectively. We interpret the early time rise and exponential fall to be due to CIV ionization, of 0.014% (CIV I) and 0.40% (CIV II) for the Ba releases. The later ions produced at a constant rate probably have origins from other such processes as stripping and associative ionization collisions with atmospheric constituents primarily O, and charge exchange with O(+), He(+), and H(+). We suggest that the much larger Ba ionization rate in CIV II than CIV I is due to the fact that the release occurred in the peak Ca density where hot electrons were already present.

  19. The Oxygen Isotope Effect in Praseodymium, Calcium, and Zinc Substituted Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soerensen, Georg Johannes

    The oxygen isotope effect in Pr, Ca, and Zn doped superconducting YBa_2Cu_3O_ {7-delta} was investigated. Pr and Ca substitute predominantly at the Y site while Zn goes into the Cu plane site. The shift in critical temperature (Delta T_{c}) between samples oxygenated in ^{18}O and ^{16}O was obtained via dc resistance measurements, and low field dc magnetization and ac susceptibility measurements in a SQUID magnetometer. Confirmation of the substitution of the oxygen was achieved with Raman and SIMS measurements. The Pr, Ca, and Zn substitutions change T _{c} of the superconductor in different ways. Increasing Pr concentration lowers T_ {c} and increases Delta T_{c} with the isotope coefficient, alpha , approaching 1/2. The addition of Ca reduces the size of both Delta T_ {c} and alpha . Both exhibit a small parabolic effect with increasing Ca substitution. An increase in Zn substitution lowers T _{c} but Delta T _{c} remains nearly constant, or perhaps gets slightly smaller, with alpha increasing to approximately 1/3. We find that there is a linear relationship between the width of the normal to superconducting transition and the size of Delta T_{c}. We believe that this dependency may be related to the sample quality. There does not appear to be a universal correlation between T_{c} and alpha , however, both are dependent on the number of mobile holes and our values do follow closely a universal relationship that has been proposed between these two quantities. We find that a modification to the BCS theory, involving a logarithmic Van Hove singularity in the density of states, does qualitatively fit the general trend of our data. More success is achieved with the use of Eliashberg type calculations in which the change in alpha and T_{c} can be made to resemble our data provided we use a pair-breaking mechanism as well as a modification of the Coulomb pseudopotential which includes an attractive electronic pairing interaction. Both models predict alpha to be a minimum at the maximum T_{c}, and as T_{c} decreases, alpha increases. Also common to both is the apparent dependence of both T_ {c} and alpha on the mobile hole concentration. This work shows that an isotope effect does exist in the high temperature superconductors and that large values of alpha comparable to those found in conventional superconductors exist. It is also evident from our results that the mobile hole concentration must play an important role in the mechanism for superconductivity in these materials.

  20. Electron Tunneling Studies of the Cuprate Superconductors Yttrium Barium Cuprate and Bismuth Strontium Calcium Cuprate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mark

    Electron tunneling has long been regarded as one of the best techniques to study the energy gap, excitation spectrum, and ground state structure of superconductors. This thesis reports on the results of various efforts to fabricate single particle tunneling and Josephson proximity devices on the "high-T_{rm c}" cuprate superconductors YBa_2Cu _3O_7 and Bi_2Sr_2CaCu _2O_8 for the purpose of measuring the microscopic superconducting properties of these materials. It is well known that the cuprate superconductors have many undesirable chemical properties that can degrade the quality of the samples, particularly near the surface. For this reason, several methods of constructing tunnel junctions, each aimed at getting around some of the more obvious material problems, will be described, and the resulting data presented. Particular emphasis and attention will be paid to those major features of the data that are reproducible independent of the method of junction construction. Much of the data presented do not much resemble the classical norms given by the standard Bardeen-Cooper -Schrieffer theory of superconductivity. These differences from classical behavior include an anomalously large ratio of the energy gap to the transition temperature 2 Delta/kT_{rm c} ~ 6 to 7, a background tunneling conductance that is at least partially a linear function of voltage bias, the presence of a large normal electron contribution to the single-particle spectrum and the Josephson effect well below T_{rm c}, and a prominent anisotropy in the Josephson coupling to a standard superconductor like Pb. In addition, there is evidence that the classical proximity effect model of the coupling between a cuprate superconductor and a good normal metal must undergo some alterations in order to describe the proximity effect between YBa_2 Cu_3O_7 and an inert metal overlayer such as Ag.

  1. Straczekite, a new calcium barium potassium vanadate mineral from Wilson Springs, Arkansas.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, H.T.; Nord, G.; Marinenko, J.; Milton, C.

    1984-01-01

    Straczekite occurs as a rare secondary mineral in fibrous seams, along with other V minerals (A.M. 64-713), in ore from the vanadium mine in Wilson Springs (formerly Potash Sulfur Springs), Garland County, Arkansas. It forms soft, thin laths of dark greenish black crystals up to 0.5 mm in length. Indexed XRD data are tabulated; strongest lines 3.486(100), 10.449(50), 1.8306(50), 1.9437(15) A; a 11.679, b 3.6608, c 10.636 A, beta 100.53o; space group C2/m, C2 or Cm. Chemical analysis gave V2O5 66.4, V2O4 15.3, Fe2O3 0.9, Na2O 0.4, K2O 1.8, CaO 2.5, BaO 5.5, H2O 7.2, = 100.0, leading to the formula (Ca0.39Ba0.31K0.33Na0.11)- 196(V4+1.59V5+6.31Fe3+0.10)O20.02(H2O)2.9; Dcalc. 3.21 g/cm3. A possible layer structure is discussed. The name is for J. A. Straczek, Chief Geologist at Union Carbide Corp.-R.A.H.

  2. Design, testing, fabrication and launch support of a liquid chemical barium release payload (utilizing the liquid fluorine-barium salt/hydrazine system)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    A payload was designed which included a cryogenic oxidizer tank, a fuel tank, and burner section. Release of 30 lb of chemicals was planned to occur in 2 seconds at the optimum oxidizer to fuel ratio. The chemicals consisted of 17 lb of liquid fluorine oxidizer and 13 lb of hydrazine-barium salt fuel mixture. The fuel mixture was 17% barium chloride, 16% barium nitrate, and 67% hydrazine, and contained 2.6 lb of available barium. Two significant problem areas were resolved during the program: explosive valve development and burner operation. The release payload was flight tested, from Wallops Island, Virginia. The release took place at an altitude of approximately 260 km. The release produced a luminous cloud which expanded very rapidly, disappearing to the human eye in about 20 seconds. Barium ion concentration slowly increased over a wide area of sky until measurements were discontinued at sunrise (about 30 minutes).

  3. Surface studies of barium and barium oxide on tungsten and its application to understanding the mechanism of operation of an impregnated tungsten cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R.

    1976-01-01

    Surface studies have been made of multilayer and monolayer films of barium and barium oxide on a tungsten substrate. The purpose of the investigation was to synthesize the surface conditions that exist on an activated impregnated tungsten cathode and obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of operation of such cathodes. The techniques employed in these measurements were Auger spectroscopy and work-function measurements. The results of this study show that the surface of an impregnated cathode is identical to that observed for a synthesized monolayer or partial monolayer of barium on oxidized tungsten by evaluating Auger spectra and work-function measurements. Data obtained from desorption studies of barium monolayers on a tungsten substrate in conjunction with Auger and work-function results have been interpreted to show that throughout most of its life an impreganated cathode has a partial monolayer, rather than a monolayer, of barium on its surface.

  4. Aequorin response facilitation and intracellular calcium accumulation in molluscan neurones

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen J.; Zucker, Robert S.

    1980-01-01

    1. When molluscan neural somata are filled with the calcium-indicating photo-protein aequorin and subjected to a 1 Hz train of depolarizing pulses (0·3 sec duration to + 15 mV) under voltage clamp, the successive photo-emissions due to calcium influx facilitate. The origin of this phenomenon was investigated in identified neurones from the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. Since outward currents inactivate cumulatively in successive pulses, the effective depolarization increases due to a series resistance error. Elimination of this error by electronic compensation or pharmacological block of outward current reduced aequorin response facilitation by only about 30%, on the average. 3. When voltage-dependent sodium and potassium currents are blocked in tetraethylammonium (TEA)-substituted zero-sodium sea water, the remaining inward calcium currents display no facilitation. On the contrary, a slow decline during a pulse and a slight progressive depression in successive pulses are observed. Barium-substitution for calcium in the same medium eliminates a small residual potassium current insensitive to external TEA. The remaining inward barium currents also display depression instead of facilitation. 4. A non-pharmacological separation of calcium current was accomplished by measuring tail currents at the potassium equilibrium potential following depolarizing pulses. Calcium tail currents activate rapidly and then decline gradually and incompletely as depolarizing pulse duration is lengthened. Tail currents also show no evidence of facilitation; there is instead a slight depression of currents after successive pulses. 5. Increments of optical absorbance in neurones filled with the calcium-sensitive dye arsenazo III show a depression rather than facilitation to successive depolarizations in a train. The time course of these absorbance signals is consistent with the time-dependent depression of calcium current. 6. Calibration of arsenazo III response amplitude

  5. Aluminum, parathyroid hormone, and osteomalacia

    SciTech Connect

    Burnatowska-Hledin, M.A.; Kaiser, L.; Mayor, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Aluminum exposure in man is unavoidable. The occurrence of dialysis dementia, vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia, and hypochromic microcytic anemia in dialysis patients underscores the potential for aluminum toxicity. Although exposure via dialysate and hyperalimentation leads to significant tissue aluminum accumulation, the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum and the severe pathology associated with large aluminum burdens suggest that smaller exposures via the gastrointestinal tract and lungs could represent an important, though largely unrecognized, public health problem. It is clear that some aluminum absorption occurs with the ingestion of small amounts of aluminum in the diet and medicines, and even greater aluminum absorption is seen in individuals consuming large amounts of aluminum present in antacids. Aluminum absorption is enhanced in the presence of elevated circulating parathyroid hormone. In addition, elevated PTH leads to the preferential deposition of aluminum in brain and bone. Consequently, PTH is likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of toxicities in those organs. PTH excess also seems to lead to the deposition of aluminum in the parathyroid gland. The in vitro demonstration that aluminum inhibits parathyroid hormone release is consistent with the findings of a euparathyroid state in dialysis patients with aluminum related vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia. Nevertheless, it seems likely that hyperparathyroidism is at least initially involved in the pathogenesis of aluminum neurotoxicity and osteomalacia; the increases in tissue aluminum stores are followed by suppression of parathyroid hormone release, which is required for the evolution of osteomalacia. Impaired renal function is not a prerequisite for increased tissue aluminum burdens, nor for aluminum-related organ toxicity. Consequently, it is likely that these diseases will be observed in populations other than those with chronic renal disease.

  6. Observations and theory of the AMPTE magnetotail barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Roussel-Dupre, R. A.; Pongratz, M. B.; Haerendel, G.; Valenzuela, A.

    1987-01-01

    The barium releases in the magnetotail during the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) operation were monitored by ground-based imagers and by instruments on the Ion Release Module. After each release, the data show the formation of a structured diamagnetic cavity. The cavity grows until the dynamic pressure of the expanding ions balances the magnetic pressure on its surface. The magnetic field inside the cavity is zero. The barium ions collect on the surface of the cavity, producing a shell. Plasma irregularities form along magnetic field lines draped over the surface of the cavity. The scale size of the irregularities is nearly equal to the thickness of the shell. The evolution and structuring of the diamagnetic cavity are modeled using magnetohydrodynamics theory.

  7. Relationship of pheasant occurrence to barium in Illinois soils.

    PubMed

    Jones, R L

    1992-04-01

    Distribution of the ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) is nearly co-extensive with the boundary of Wisconsinan glaciation; this is an area of base-rich soils that are mostly developed in calcareous tills. Anderson and Stewart (1973) speculated that barium in the diet might be a factor limiting the pheasant establishment in habitats adjacent to areas of long-term sustaining populations in Illinois. Total Ba was calculated for soils of 74 conterminous counties for which there were pheasant population data. Barium over the range of about 480 to 700 mg kg(-1) soil was unrelated to pheasant occurrence or to population indeces. The selective eating of iron-manganese concretions that are enriched in Ba might present a unique pathway for Ba loading.

  8. Barium titanate nanoparticles: promising multitasking vectors in nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Genchi, Giada Graziana; Marino, Attilio; Rocca, Antonella; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2016-06-10

    Ceramic materials based on perovskite-like oxides have traditionally been the object of intense interest for their applicability in electrical and electronic devices. Due to its high dielectric constant and piezoelectric features, barium titanate (BaTiO3) is probably one of the most studied compounds of this family. Recently, an increasing number of studies have been focused on the exploitation of barium titanate nanoparticles (BTNPs) in the biomedical field, owing to the high biocompatibility of BTNPs and their peculiar non-linear optical properties that have encouraged their use as nanocarriers for drug delivery and as label-free imaging probes. In this review, we summarize all the recent findings about these 'smart' nanoparticles, including the latest, most promising potential as nanotransducers for cell stimulation.

  9. Barium titanate nanoparticles: promising multitasking vectors in nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziana Genchi, Giada; Marino, Attilio; Rocca, Antonella; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2016-06-01

    Ceramic materials based on perovskite-like oxides have traditionally been the object of intense interest for their applicability in electrical and electronic devices. Due to its high dielectric constant and piezoelectric features, barium titanate (BaTiO3) is probably one of the most studied compounds of this family. Recently, an increasing number of studies have been focused on the exploitation of barium titanate nanoparticles (BTNPs) in the biomedical field, owing to the high biocompatibility of BTNPs and their peculiar non-linear optical properties that have encouraged their use as nanocarriers for drug delivery and as label-free imaging probes. In this review, we summarize all the recent findings about these ‘smart’ nanoparticles, including the latest, most promising potential as nanotransducers for cell stimulation.

  10. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ferroelectric films of barium titanate were synthesized on silicon and quartz substrates, and the photoelectric effect in the structure consisting of metal deposited ferroelectric barium titanate film silicon was studied. A photovoltage with polarity that depends on the direction of the remanent polarization was observed. The deposition of BaTiO3 on silicon and fused quartz substrates was accomplished by an rf sputtering technique. A series of experiments to study the growth of ferroelectric BaTiO3 films on single crystal silicon and fused quartz substrates were conducted. The ferroelectric character in these films was found on the basis of evidence from the polarization electric field hysteresis loops, capacitance voltage and capacitance temperature techniques and from X-ray diffraction studies.

  11. NASA/Max Planck Institute Barium Ion Cloud Project.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brence, W. A.; Carr, R. E.; Gerlach, J. C.; Neuss, H.

    1973-01-01

    NASA and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE), Munich, Germany, conducted a cooperative experiment involving the release and study of a barium cloud at 31,500 km altitude near the equatorial plane. The release was made near local magnetic midnight on Sept. 21, 1971. The MPE-built spacecraft contained a canister of 16 kg of Ba CuO mixture, a two-axis magnetometer, and other payload instrumentation. The objectives of the experiment were to investigate the interaction of the ionized barium cloud with the ambient medium and to deduce the properties of electric fields in the proximity of the release. An overview of the project is given to briefly summarize the organization, responsibilities, objectives, instrumentation, and operational aspects of the project.

  12. Barium titanate nanoparticles: promising multitasking vectors in nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Genchi, Giada Graziana; Marino, Attilio; Rocca, Antonella; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2016-06-10

    Ceramic materials based on perovskite-like oxides have traditionally been the object of intense interest for their applicability in electrical and electronic devices. Due to its high dielectric constant and piezoelectric features, barium titanate (BaTiO3) is probably one of the most studied compounds of this family. Recently, an increasing number of studies have been focused on the exploitation of barium titanate nanoparticles (BTNPs) in the biomedical field, owing to the high biocompatibility of BTNPs and their peculiar non-linear optical properties that have encouraged their use as nanocarriers for drug delivery and as label-free imaging probes. In this review, we summarize all the recent findings about these 'smart' nanoparticles, including the latest, most promising potential as nanotransducers for cell stimulation. PMID:27145888

  13. The Skylab barium plasma injection experiments. I - Convection observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Peek, H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Two barium-plasma injection experiments were carried out during magnetically active periods in conjunction with the Skylab 3 mission. The high-explosive shaped charges were launched near dawn on November 27 and December 4, 1973, UT. In both cases, the AE index was near 400 gammas, and extensive pulsating auroras covered the sky. The first experiment, Skylab Alpha, occurred in the waning phase of a 1000-gamma substorm, and the second, Skylab Beta, occurred in the expansive phase of an 800-gamma substorm. In both, the convection was generally magnetically eastward, with 100-km-level electric fields near 40 mV/m. However, in the Alpha experiment the observed orientation of the barium flux tube fit theoretical field lines having no parallel current, but the Beta flux-tube orientation indicated a substantial upward parallel sheet current.

  14. Numerical simulation of a radially injected barium cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, D. W.; Wescott, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrostatic two-dimensional numerical simulations of a radially symmetric barium injection experiment demonstrate that ions created by solar UV irradiation are electrostatically bound to the electrons which remain tied to the field lines on which they are created. Two possible instabilities are identified, but neither of them causes the barium plasma cloud to polarize in a way that would permit the plasma to keep up with the neutrals. In a second model, the velocity of the neutrals is allowed to be a function of the azimuthal angle. Here, a portion of the cloud does polarize in a way that allows a portion of the plasma to detach and move outward at the approximate speed of the neutrals. No rapid detachment is found when only the density of the neutrals is given an azimuthal asymmetry.

  15. Determination of micro amounts of iron, aluminum, and alkaline earth metals in silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirata, H.; Arai, M.

    1978-01-01

    A colorimetric method for analysis of micro components in silicon carbide used as the raw material for varistors is described. The microcomponents analyzed included iron soluble in hydrochloric acid, iron, aluminum, calcium and magnesium. Samples were analyzed by the method, and the results for iron and aluminum agreed well with the N.B.S. standard values and the values obtained by the other company. The method can therefore be applied to the analysis of actual samples.

  16. Barium borohydride chlorides: synthesis, crystal structures and thermal properties.

    PubMed

    Grube, Elisabeth; Olesen, Cathrine H; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Jensen, Torben R

    2016-05-10

    Here we report the synthesis, mechanism of formation, characterization and thermal decomposition of new barium borohydride chlorides prepared by mechanochemistry and thermal treatment of MBH4-BaCl2, M = Li, Na or K in ratios 1 : 1 and 1 : 2. Initially, orthorhombic barium chloride, o-BaCl2 transforms into o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.15. Excess LiBH4 leads to continued anion substitution and a phase transformation into hexagonal barium borohydride chloride h-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, which accommodates higher amounts of borohydride, possibly x ∼ 0.85 and resembles h-BaCl2. Thus, two solid solutions are in equilibrium during mechano-chemical treatment of LiBH4-BaCl2 (1 : 1) whereas LiBH4-BaCl2 (2 : 1) converts to h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15. Upon thermal treatment at T > ∼200 °C, h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15 transforms into another orthorhombic barium borohydride chloride compound, o-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15, which is structurally similar to o-BaBr2. The samples with M = Na and K have lower reactivity and form o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.1 and a solid solution of sodium chloride dissolved in solid sodium borohydride, Na(BH4)1-xClx, x = 0.07. The new compounds and reaction mechanisms are investigated by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mass spectroscopy (MS) and temperature programmed photographic analysis (TPPA).

  17. Synthesis and characterization of barium ferrite–silica nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-González, M.A.; Mendoza-Suárez, G.; Padmasree, K.P.

    2013-10-15

    In this work, we prepared barium ferrite-silica (BaM-SiO{sub 2}) nanocomposites of different molar ratios by high-energy ball milling, followed by heat-treatment at different temperatures. The microstructure, morphology and magnetic properties were characterized for different synthesis conditions by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The results indicate that 15 h of milling was enough to avoid the generation of hematite phase and to get a good dispersion of barium ferrite particles in the ceramic matrix. For milling periods beyond 15 h and heat treatment above 900 °C, the XRD patterns showed the presence of hematite phase caused by the decomposition of BaM. The agglomerate size observed through SEM analysis was around 150 nm with a good BaM dispersion into the SiO{sub 2} matrix. The highest saturation magnetization (Ms) value obtained was 43 emu/g and the corresponding coercivity (Hc) value of 3.4 kOe for the composition 60BaM-40SiO{sub 2} milled for 15 h and heat treated at 900 °C. This coercivity value is acceptable for the application in magnetic recording media. Highlights: • Barium ferrite–silica nanocomposites were prepared by high energy ball milling. • Optimal processing time is 15 h milling and heat treatment at 900 °C. • This is enough to avoid the generation of hematite phase. • Obtain good dispersion of barium ferrite particles in the ceramic matrix • Above this processing time shows the presence of increased amount of hematite.

  18. Occurrence of aluminum in chloride cells of Perla marginata (Plecoptera) after exposure to low pH and elevated aluminum concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Guerold, F.; Giamberini, L.; Pihan, J.C.; Tourmann, J.L.; Kaufmann, R.

    1995-04-01

    As a consequence of acid depositions on poorly buffered catchments underlain by hard rocks, aluminum is mobilized and transported from terrestrial systems to the aquatic environment. Loss of fishes has been related to low pH and elevated aluminum concentrations in surface waters which present a low ionic content especially during acid stress such as snowmelt and heavy rainfalls. Among the causes of fish population decline in acid waters, aluminum is considered a toxic cofactor. Different studies have clearly shown that aluminum is accumulated in different organs such as kidneys, liver and gills. Research on fish has demonstrated that aluminum may be toxic, but the toxicity is markedly influenced by the pH, organic compounds and calcium content of the water. Field surveys have shown clearly that macroinvertebrates are also affected by surface-water acidification. However, little is know about the possible effects of aluminum on aquatic invertebrates and, particularly, on aquatic insects exposed to acidic conditions. Hall et al. have shown that the whole-body concentration of aluminum decreases in blackflies and mayflies transplated from neutral water to acid water. Similar results have been reported for Daphnia and chironomid. On the contrary, Ormerod et al. demonstrated the absence of relationship between water pH and insect aluminum concentrations. When aluminum occurs in aquatic insects, it has been shown that it is primarily adsorbed on the external surface and/or accumulates in gut contents. To our knowledge, the subcellular location as well as the toxicity of aluminum to acid-sensitive aquatic insects remains unclear and existing hypotheses are often based on research on fish. In this content the purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of aluminum at a subcellular level in the acid-sensitive species of stonefly, Perla marginata, after exposure to low pH and elevated aluminum concentrations. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Barium thiolates and selenolates: syntheses and structural principles.

    PubMed

    Ruhlandt-Senge, K; Englich, U

    2000-11-17

    The synthesis and structural characterization of a family of barium thiolates and selenolates is described. The thiolates were synthesized by metallation of thiols, the selenolates by reductive insertion of the metal into the selenium-selenium bond of diorganodiselenides. Both reaction sequences were carried out by using barium metal dissolved in ammonia; this afforded barium thiolates and selenolates in good yield and purity. The structural principles displayed in the target compounds span a wide range of solid-state formulations, including monomeric and dimeric species, and separated ion triples, namely [Ba(thf)4(SMes*)2] (1; Mes* = 2,4,6-tBU3C6H2), [Ba(thf)4(SeMes*)2] (2), [Ba([18]crown-6)(hmpa)2][(SeMes*)2] (3), the dimeric [(Ba(py)3(thf)(SeTrip)2)2] (4; py = pyridine, Trip = 2,4.6-iPr3C6H2), and [Ba([18]crown-6)(SeTrip)2] (5). The full range of association modes is completed by [Ba([18]crown-6)(hmpa)SMes*][SMes*] (6) communicated earlier by this group. In the solid state, this compound displays an intermediate ion coordination mode: one anion is bound to the metal, while the second one is unassociated. Together these compounds provide structural information about all three different association modes for alkaline earth metal derivatives. This collection of structural data allows important conclusions about the influence of solvation and ligation on structural trends.

  20. The Tordo 1 polar cusp barium plasma injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Jeffries, R. A.; Roach, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    In January 1975, two barium plasma injection experiments were carried out with rockets launched into the upper atmosphere where field lines from the dayside cusp region intersect the ionosphere. The Tordo 1 experiment took place near the beginning of a worldwide magnetic storm. It became a polar cap experiment almost immediately as convection perpendicular to the magnetic field moved the fluorescent plasma jet away from the cusp across the polar cap in an antisunward direction. Convection across the polar cap with an average velocity of more than 1 km/s was observed for nearly 40 min until the barium flux tubes encountered large electron fields associated with a poleward bulge of the auroral oval near Greenland. Prior to the encounter with the aurora near Greenland there is evidence of upward acceleration of the barium ions while they were in the polar cap. The three-dimensional observations of the plasma orientation and motion give an insight into convection from the cusp region across the polar cap, the orientation of the polar cap magnetic field lines out to several earth radii, the causes of polar cap magnetic perturbations, and parallel acceleration processes.

  1. Remobilization of barium in continental margin sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, James; Berelson, William M.; Klinkhammer, Gary P.; Kilgore, Tammy E.; Hammond, Douglas E.

    1994-11-01

    The rate of Ba release from California continental margin sediments has been measured, using an in situ benthic flux chamber, and the range of values (25-50 nmol cm -2 y -1) is larger than any previously published benthic flux estimate for this element. The magnitude of the Ba flux suggests that a significant fraction of the Ba raining from the euphotic zone is recycled at the seafloor. Ba:Si regeneration ratios from these margin sediments increase with depth, demonstrating that Ba is decoupled from Si during the earliest stages of diagenesis. On the other hand, Ba regeneration rates and CaCO 3 dissolution rates covary; the coupling between these two constituents is supported by the observation that the Ba: CaCO 3 dissolution flux ratio (1.7 ± 0.4 × 10 -3) is independent of bottomwater depth—even in sediments underlying the oxygen minimum zone along the continental margin. Furthermore, this flux ratio is consistent with both the water column Ba:alkalinity ratio for the world's ocean, as well as the Ba:CaCO 3 ratio in sediment-trap solid phases from the Equatorial Pacific (1.1-2.2 × 10 -3). However, the constancy of the Ba:alkalinity ratio over geologic time remains in question, because the mechanism that controls this relationship remains a mystery. Our flux measurements suggest that diagenesis does not significantly influence the Ba:Ca ratio in the upper 0.5 mm of Pacific sediments, thereby supporting the idea of using the Ba concentration in surface-dwelling benthic forams as a proxy for deep-water chemical conditions ( LEA and BOYLE, 1989, 1990). On the other hand, we predict that if a foraminifer lives 0.5 mm or more below this interface, then diagenetic effects could influence the Ba:Ca ratio that foram species would record. The carrier phase of the particulate Ba reactive during early diagenesis does not appear to be organic matter, oxyhydroxides, or calcium carbonate, but rather a mineral phase related to marine barite or perhaps celestite.

  2. A Case of Recurrent Renal Aluminum Hydroxide Stone

    PubMed Central

    Cakıroglu, Basri; Dogan, Akif Nuri; Tas, Tuncay; Gozukucuk, Ramazan; Uyanik, Bekir Sami

    2014-01-01

    Renal stone disease is characterized by the differences depending on the age, gender, and the geographic location of the patients. Seventy-five percent of the renal stone components is the calcium (Ca). The most common type of the stones is the Ca oxalate stones, while Ca phosphate, uric acid, struvite, and sistine stones are more rarely reported. Other than these types, triamterene, adenosine, silica, indinavir, and ephedrine stones are also reported in the literature as case reports. However, to the best of our knowledge, aluminum hydroxide stones was not reported reported before. Herein we will report a 38-years-old woman with the history of recurrent renal colic disease whose renal stone was determined as aluminum hydroxide stone in type. Aluminum mineral may be considered in the formation of kidney stones as it is widely used in the field of healthcare and cosmetics. PMID:25013740

  3. Safety evaluation of dietary aluminum.

    PubMed

    Soni, M G; White, S M; Flamm, W G; Burdock, G A

    2001-02-01

    Aluminum is a nonessential metal to which humans are frequently exposed. Aluminum in the food supply comes from natural sources, water used in food preparation, food ingredients, and utensils used during food preparations. The amount of aluminum in the diet is small, compared with the amount of aluminum in antacids and some buffered analgesics. The healthy human body has effective barriers (skin, lungs, gastrointestinal tract) to reduce the systemic absorption of aluminum ingested from water, foods, drugs, and air. The small amount of aluminum (<1%) that is systemically absorbed is excreted principally in the urine and, to a lesser extent, in the feces. No reports of dietary aluminum toxicity to healthy individuals exist in the literature. Aluminum can be neurotoxic, when injected directly into the brains of animals and when accidentally introduced into human brains (by dialysis or shrapnel). A study from Canada reports cognitive and other neurological deficits among groups of workers occupationally exposed to dust containing high levels of aluminum. While the precise pathogenic role of aluminum in Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains to be defined, present data do not support a causative role for aluminum in AD. High intake of aluminum from antacid for gastrointestinal ailments has not been reported to cause any adverse effects and has not been correlated with neurotoxicity or AD. Foods and food ingredients are generally the major dietary sources of aluminum in the United States. Cooking in aluminum utensils often results in statistically significant, but relatively small, increases in aluminum content of food. Common aluminum-containing food ingredients are used mainly as preservatives, coloring agents, leavening agents, anticaking agents, etc. Safety evaluation and approval of these ingredients by the Food and Drug Administration indicate that these aluminum-containing compounds are safe for use in foods.

  4. Elemental Content of Calcium Oxalate Stones from a Canine Model of Urinary Stone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Killilea, David W.; Westropp, Jodi L.; Shiraki, Ryoji; Mellema, Matthew; Larsen, Jennifer; Kahn, Arnold J.; Kapahi, Pankaj; Chi, Thomas; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common types of urinary stones formed in humans and some other mammals is composed of calcium oxalate in ordered hydrated crystals. Many studies have reported a range of metals other than calcium in human stones, but few have looked at stones from animal models such as the dog. Therefore, we determined the elemental profile of canine calcium oxalate urinary stones and compared it to reported values from human stones. The content of 19 elements spanning 7-orders of magnitude was quantified in calcium oxalate stones from 53 dogs. The elemental profile of the canine stones was highly overlapping with human stones, indicating similar inorganic composition. Correlation and cluster analysis was then performed on the elemental profile from canine stones to evaluate associations between the elements and test for potential subgrouping based on elemental content. No correlations were observed with the most abundant metal calcium. However, magnesium and sulfur content correlated with the mineral hydration form, while phosphorous and zinc content correlated with the neuter status of the dog. Inter-elemental correlation analysis indicated strong associations between barium, phosphorous, and zinc content. Additionally, cluster analysis revealed subgroups within the stones that were also based primarily on barium, phosphorous, and zinc. These data support the use of the dog as a model to study the effects of trace metal homeostasis in urinary stone disease. PMID:26066810

  5. Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are antacids used together to relieve heartburn, acid indigestion, and upset stomach. They ... They combine with stomach acid and neutralize it. Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are available without a prescription. ...

  6. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOEpatents

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J.

    2009-04-21

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  7. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOEpatents

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  8. BARIUM SULPHATE ABSORPTION AND THE SERUM DIAGNOSIS OF SYPHILIS.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-02-01

    The so-called syphilitic antibodies can be removed from a serum by means of absorption with barium sulphate. The removal is due either to an adsorption or a mechanical absorption. The activity of the syphilitic antibodies is thereby unimpaired. The readiness with which the absorption is accomplished with barium sulphate varies considerably with different syphilitic sera. That barium sulphate exerts the same absorbing effect upon non-syphilitic serum components is made evident by the interfering property which the latter manifest in the absorption experiment of the syphilitic antibodies. The selective removal of the serum components, other than the syphilitic antibodies, by means of barium sulphate absorption is, therefore, impossible. On the other hand, a partial removal of these components, with but little removal of the syphilitic antibodies, may be effected when the content of a given serum is poor in syphilitic antibodies and comparatively rich in the indifferent serum components. But this is impossible if the conditions are reversed. The main reasons why some negative syphilitic sera may be so modified by the barium sulphate treatment as to give positive reactions, are explained below, but these apply only to those methods in which inactivated serum is employed. The inactivation reduces the antibody content to about one-fourth to one-fifth of the original. When the serum is very rich in antibodies, this does not affect the result of the fixation test. But when the amount of the antibodies is small, the process of inactivation creates conditions quite unexpected. It may produce such a condition that a given amount of the serum contains, after inactivation, only one or two antibody units, while the other serum components remain undiminished. Here one must not lose sight of the vital fact that these apparently indifferent serum constituents are not at all indifferent in the fixation processes. They may possess affinities which are similar to those of complement

  9. Crystal structure of complex natural aluminum magnesium calcium iron oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Aksenov, S. M.; Verin, I. A.

    2010-07-01

    The structure of a new natural oxide found near the Tashelga River (Eastern Siberia) was studied by X-ray diffraction. The pseudo-orthorhombic unit cell parameters are a = 5.6973(1) Å, b = 17.1823(4) Å, c = 23.5718(5) Å, β = 90°, sp. gr. Pc. The structure was refined to R = 0.0516 based on 4773 reflections with | F| > 7σ( F) taking into account the twin plane perpendicular to the z axis (the twin components are 0.47 and 0.53). The crystal-chemical formula ( Z = 4) is Ca2Mg{2/IV}Fe{2/(2+)IV}[Al{14/VI}O31(OH)][Al{2/IV}O][AlIV]ALIV(OH)], where the Roman numerals designate the coordination of the atoms. The structure of the mineral is based on wide ribbons of edge-sharing Al octahedra (an integral part of the spinel layer). The ribbons run along the shortest x axis and are inclined to the y and z axes. The adjacent ribbons are shifted with respect to each other along the y axis, resulting in the formation of step-like layers in which the two-ribbon thickness alternates with the three-ribbon thickness. Additional Al octahedra and Mg and Fe2+ tetrahedra are located between the ribbons. The layers are linked together to form a three-dimensional framework by Al tetrahedra, Ca polyhedra, and hydrogen bonds with the participation of OH groups.

  10. Crystal structure of complex natural aluminum magnesium calcium iron oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K. Aksenov, S. M.; Verin, I. A.

    2010-07-15

    The structure of a new natural oxide found near the Tashelga River (Eastern Siberia) was studied by X-ray diffraction. The pseudo-orthorhombic unit cell parameters are a = 5.6973(1) A, b = 17.1823(4) A, c = 23.5718(5) A, {beta} = 90{sup o}, sp. gr. Pc. The structure was refined to R = 0.0516 based on 4773 reflections with vertical bar F vertical bar > 7{sigma}(F) taking into account the twin plane perpendicular to the z axis (the twin components are 0.47 and 0.53). The crystal-chemical formula (Z = 4) is Ca{sub 2}Mg{sub 2}{sup IV}Fe{sub 2}{sup (2+)IV}[Al{sub 14}{sup VI}O{sub 31}(OH)][Al{sub 2}{sup IV}O][Al{sup IV}]AL{sup IV}(OH)], where the Roman numerals designate the coordination of the atoms. The structure of the mineral is based on wide ribbons of edge-sharing Al octahedra (an integral part of the spinel layer). The ribbons run along the shortest x axis and are inclined to the y and z axes. The adjacent ribbons are shifted with respect to each other along the y axis, resulting in the formation of step-like layers in which the two-ribbon thickness alternates with the three-ribbon thickness. Additional Al octahedra and Mg and Fe{sup 2+} tetrahedra are located between the ribbons. The layers are linked together to form a three-dimensional framework by Al tetrahedra, Ca polyhedra, and hydrogen bonds with the participation of OH groups.

  11. PROCESS FOR REMOVING ALUMINUM COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Flox, J.

    1959-07-01

    A process is presented for removing aluminum jackets or cans from uranium slugs. This is accomplished by immersing the aluminum coated uranium slugs in an aqueous solution of 9 to 20% sodium hydroxide and 35 to 12% sodium nitrate to selectively dissolve the aluminum coating, the amount of solution being such as to obtain a molar ratio of sodium hydroxide to aluminum of at least

  12. Drinking water aluminum and bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Reiber, S.H.; Kukull, W.; Standish-Lee, P.

    1995-05-01

    This article discusses chemical considerations relative to aluminum uptake in the body and reviews aluminum concentrations, species, and distribution in natural and treated waters. The issues of bioavailability and the likelihood that aluminum in drinking water is more readily assimilated than other forms of aluminum is reviewed and rejected based on issues of solubility and likely chemical transformations that take place in the human gut.

  13. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  14. Contribution of calcium oxalate to soil-exchangeable calcium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition and repeated biomass harvest have decreased soil calcium (Ca) availability in many temperate forests worldwide, yet existing methods for assessing available soil Ca do not fully characterize soil Ca forms. To account for discrepancies in ecosystem Ca budgets, it has been hypothesized that the highly insoluble biomineral Ca oxalate might represent an additional soil Ca pool that is not detected in standard measures of soil-exchangeable Ca. We asked whether several standard method extractants for soil-exchangeable Ca could also access Ca held in Ca oxalate crystals using spike recovery tests in both pure solutions and soil extractions. In solutions of the extractants ammonium chloride, ammonium acetate, and barium chloride, we observed 2% to 104% dissolution of Ca oxalate crystals, with dissolution increasing with both solution molarity and ionic potential of cation extractant. In spike recovery tests using a low-Ca soil, we estimate that 1 M ammonium acetate extraction dissolved sufficient Ca oxalate to contribute an additional 52% to standard measurements of soil-exchangeable Ca. However, in a high-Ca soil, the amount of Ca oxalate spike that would dissolve in 1 M ammonium acetate extraction was difficult to detect against the large pool of exchangeable Ca. We conclude that Ca oxalate can contribute substantially to standard estimates of soil-exchangeable Ca in acid forest soils with low soil-exchangeable Ca. Consequently, measures of exchangeable Ca are unlikely to fully resolve discrepancies in ecosystem Ca mass balance unless the contribution of Ca oxalate to exchangeable Ca is also assessed.

  15. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  16. Aluminum Corrosion and Turbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, F.B.

    2003-03-10

    Aluminum corrosion and turbidity formation in reactors correlate with fuel sheath temperature. To further substantiate this correlation, discharged fuel elements from R-3, P-2 and K-2 cycles were examined for extent of corrosion and evidence of breaking off of the oxide film. This report discusses this study.

  17. Aluminum-ferricyanide battery

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, C.; Licht, S.L.

    1993-11-29

    A battery capable of producing high current densities with high charge capacity is described which includes an aluminum anode, a ferricyanide electrolyte and a second electrode capable of reducing ferricyanide electrolyte which is either dissolved in an alkaline solution or alkaline seawater solution. The performance of the battery is enhanced by high temperature and high electrolyte flow rates.

  18. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  19. Fluxless aluminum brazing

    DOEpatents

    Werner, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    This invention relates to a fluxless brazing alloy for use in forming brazed composites made from members of aluminum and its alloys. The brazing alloy consists of 35-55% Al, 10--20% Si, 25-60% Ge; 65-88% Al, 2-20% Si, 2--18% In; 65--80% Al, 15-- 25% Si, 5- 15% Y. (0fficial Gazette)

  20. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  1. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

  2. A review of the health impacts of barium from natural and anthropogenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Julia; Darrah, Thomas H; Miller, Richard K; Lyerly, H Kim; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-08-01

    There is an increasing public awareness of the relatively new and expanded industrial barium uses which are potential sources of human exposure (e.g., a shale gas development that causes an increased awareness of environmental exposures to barium). However, absorption of barium in exposed humans and a full spectrum of its health effects, especially among chronically exposed to moderate and low doses of barium populations, remain unclear. We suggest a systematic literature review (from 1875 to 2014) on environmental distribution of barium, its bioaccumulation, and potential and proven health impacts (in animal models and humans) to provide the information that can be used for optimization of future experimental and epidemiological studies and developing of mitigative and preventive strategies to minimize negative health effects in exposed populations. The potential health effects of barium exposure are largely based on animal studies, while epidemiological data for humans, specifically for chronic low-level exposures, are sparse. The reported health effects include cardiovascular and kidney diseases, metabolic, neurological, and mental disorders. Age, race, dietary patterns, behavioral risks (e.g., smoking), use of medications (those that interfere with absorbed barium in human organism), and specific physiological status (e.g., pregnancy) can modify barium effects on human health. Identifying, evaluating, and predicting the health effects of chronic low-level and moderate-level barium exposures in humans is challenging: Future research is needed to develop an understanding of barium bioaccumulation in order to mitigate its potential health impacts in various exposured populations. Further, while occupationally exposed at-risk populations exist, it is also important to identify potentially vulnerable subgroups among non-occupationally exposed populations (e.g., elderly, pregnant women, children) who are at higher risk of barium exposure from drinking water and food.

  3. Mesoporous aluminum phosphite

    SciTech Connect

    El Haskouri, Jamal; Perez-Cabero, Monica; Guillem, Carmen; Latorre, Julio; Beltran, Aurelio; Beltran, Daniel; Amoros, Pedro

    2009-08-15

    High surface area pure mesoporous aluminum-phosphorus oxide-based derivatives have been synthesized through an S{sup +}I{sup -} surfactant-assisted cooperative mechanism by means of a one-pot preparative procedure from aqueous solution and starting from aluminum atrane complexes and phosphoric and/or phosphorous acids. A soft chemical extraction procedure allows opening the pore system of the parent as-prepared materials by exchanging the surfactant without mesostructure collapse. The nature of the pore wall can be modulated from mesoporous aluminum phosphate (ALPO) up to total incorporation of phosphite entities (mesoporous aluminum phosphite), which results in a gradual evolution of the acidic properties of the final materials. While phosphate groups in ALPO act as network building blocks (bridging Al atoms), the phosphite entities become basically attached to the pore surface, what gives practically empty channels. The mesoporous nature of the final materials is confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms. The materials present regular unimodal pore systems whose order decreases as the phosphite content increases. NMR spectroscopic results confirm the incorporation of oxo-phosphorus entities to the framework of these materials and also provide us useful information concerning the mechanism through which they are formed. - Abstract: TEM image of the mesoporous aluminum phosphite showing the hexagonal disordered pore array that is generated by using surfactant micelles as template. Also a scheme emphasizing the presence of an alumina-rich core and an ALPO-like pore surface is presented.

  4. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT WITH SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  5. SOLDERING OF ALUMINUM BASE METALS

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1958-02-25

    This patent deals with the soldering of aluminum to metals of different types, such as copper, brass, and iron. This is accomplished by heating the aluminum metal to be soldered to slightly above 30 deg C, rubbing a small amount of metallic gallium into the part of the surface to be soldered, whereby an aluminum--gallium alloy forms on the surface, and then heating the aluminum piece to the melting point of lead--tin soft solder, applying lead--tin soft solder to this alloyed surface, and combining the aluminum with the other metal to which it is to be soldered.

  6. Calcium and Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your weekly shopping list. Produce Serving Size Estimated Calcium* Collard greens, frozen 8 oz 360 mg ... Oranges 1 whole 55 mg Seafood Serving Size Estimated Calcium* Sardines, canned with bones 3 oz 325 ...

  7. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  8. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... only gets the calcium it needs through the food you eat, or from supplements. If you do ... materials it needs to build bones. High-calcium foods include: Milk Cheese Ice cream Leafy green vegetables, ...

  9. Strain engineered barium strontium titanate for tunable thin film resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Khassaf, H.; Khakpash, N.; Sun, F.; Sbrockey, N. M.; Tompa, G. S.; Kalkur, T. S.; Alpay, S. P.

    2014-05-19

    Piezoelectric properties of epitaxial (001) barium strontium titanate (BST) films are computed as functions of composition, misfit strain, and temperature using a non-linear thermodynamic model. Results show that through adjusting in-plane strains, a highly adaptive rhombohedral ferroelectric phase can be stabilized at room temperature with outstanding piezoelectric response exceeding those of lead based piezoceramics. Furthermore, by adjusting the composition and the in-plane misfit, an electrically tunable piezoelectric response can be obtained in the paraelectric state. These findings indicate that strain engineered BST films can be utilized in the development of electrically tunable and switchable surface and bulk acoustic wave resonators.

  10. Enhanced flexoelectricity through residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, Lauren M. Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-07

    Residual ferroelectricity is observed in barium strontium titanate ceramics over 30 °C above the global phase transition temperature, in the same temperature range in which anomalously large flexoelectric coefficients are reported. The application of a strain gradient leads to strain gradient-induced poling or flexoelectric poling. This was observed by the development of a remanent polarization in flexoelectric measurements, an induced d{sub 33} piezoelectric response even after the strain gradient was removed, and the production of an internal bias of 9 kV m{sup −1}. It is concluded that residual ferroelectric response considerably enhances the observed flexoelectric response.

  11. Ferroelectric phase transition of individual barium titanate nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanier, Jonathan E.; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Yun, Wan Soo; Park, Hongkun

    2003-03-01

    Ferroelectric phase transition temperatures (T_c) of individual, single-crystalline barium titanate (BaTiO_3) nanowires are measured as a function of nanowire diameter, and the results are analyzed using a theoretical model based on the Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire theory. The measurements show that Tc is depressed as the nanowire diameter gets smaller, approaching room temperature when the diameter reaches 3 nm. The theoretical analysis reproduces the scaling relation between the Tc depression and nanowire diameter and provides information about the stability difference between the surface and bulk polarization. This work is supported by NSF.

  12. The barium ion jet experiments of the Porcupine project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, G.

    1980-06-01

    The injection of a barium plasma from a sounding rocket by the shaped charge technique offers several possibilities that cannot be achieved by conventional releases. This is due to high initial velocities of the atoms of up to 14 km/sec. Most of the the applications are related to the great heights that the ions can reach, but some depend directly on the initial momentum. Typical applications are: tracing at high altitudes, modifications, and alternate Ionization processes. Project Porcupine contributions in this field are summarized.

  13. Nanodielectric system for cryogenic applications: Barium titanate filled polyvinyl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Duckworth, Robert C

    2008-01-01

    In the current study the focus is on dielectric properties (as a function of frequency and temperature) of a polymeric composite system composed of polyvinyl alcohol and barium titanate nano powder. In the investigations, the temperature range is between 50-295 K, and the frequency range is between $20\\ \\hertz-1\\ \\mega\\hertz$. Polarization and conduction processes are investigated in the linear regime. Dielectric breakdown strengths of samples are also reported. The materials presented have potential to be implemented in cryogenic capacitor or field grading applications.

  14. Radium and barium in the Amazon River system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.S.; Edmond, J.M.

    1984-03-20

    Data for /sup 226/Ra and /sup 228/Ra in the Amazon River system show that the activity of each radium isotope is strongly correlated with barium concentrations. Two trends are apparent, one for rivers which drain shield areas and another for all other rivers. These data suggest that there has been extensive fractionation of U, Th, and Ba during weathering in the Amazon basin. The /sup 226/Ra data fit a flux model for the major ions indicating that /sup 226/Ra behaves conservatively along the main channel of the Amazon River.

  15. CNO and F abundances in the barium star HD 123396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves-Brito, A.; Karakas, A. I.; Yong, D.; Meléndez, J.; Vásquez, S.

    2011-12-01

    Context. Barium stars are moderately rare, chemically peculiar objects, which are believed to be the result of the pollution of an otherwise normal star by material from an evolved companion on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Aims: We aim to derive carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine abundances for the first time from the infrared spectra of the barium red giant star HD 123396 to quantitatively test AGB nucleosynthesis models for producing barium stars via mass accretion. Methods: High-resolution and high S/N infrared spectra were obtained using the Phoenix spectrograph mounted at the Gemini South telescope. The abundances were obtained through spectrum synthesis of individual atomic and molecular lines, using the MOOG stellar line analysis program, together with Kurucz's stellar atmosphere models. The analysis was classical, using 1D stellar models and spectral synthesis under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. Results: We confirm that HD 123396 is a metal-deficient barium star ([Fe/H] = -1.05), with A(C) = 7.88, A(N) = 6.65, A(O) = 7.93, and A(Na) = 5.28 on a logarithmic scale where A(H) = 12, leading to [(C+N)/Fe] ≈ 0.5. The A(CNO) group, as well as the A(Na) abundances, is in excellent agreement with those previously derived for this star using high-resolution optical data. We also found A(F) = 4.16, which implies [F/O] = 0.39, a value that is substantially higher than the F abundances measured in globular clusters of a similar metallicity, noting that there are no F measurements in field stars of comparable metallicity. Conclusions: The observed abundance pattern of the light elements (CNO, F, and Na) recovered here as well as the heavy elements (s-process) studied elsewhere suggest that the surface composition of HD 123396 is well fitted by the predicted abundance pattern of a 1.5 M⊙ AGB model star with Z = 0.001. Thus, the AGB mass transfer hypothesis offers a quantitatively viable framework.

  16. Growth of strontium barium niobate: the liquidus solidus phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulex, Michael; Pankrath, Rainer; Betzler, Klaus

    2004-10-01

    The liquidus-solidus phase diagram of strontium barium niobate, Sr xBa 1Nb 2O 6, is determined over the whole existence region of the tetragonal phase. For this purpose, single crystals of various compositions within this range were grown. The compositions of the melts and the grown crystals as well as the corresponding liquidus temperatures were accurately determined. The tetragonal phase was found to exist from a lower limit with the crystal composition x=0.26 to an upper limit of x=0.87. The respective liquidus temperatures vary between 1452 and 1492C.

  17. The effect of barium on perceptions of taste intensity and palatability

    PubMed Central

    Dietsch, Angela M.; Solomon, Nancy Pearl; Steele, Catriona M.; Pelletier, Cathy A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Barium may affect the perception of taste intensity and palatability. Such differences are important considerations in the selection of dysphagia assessment strategies and interpretation of results. Methods Eighty healthy women grouped by age (younger, older) and genetic taste status (supertaster, non-taster) rated intensity and palatability for seven tastants prepared in deionized water with and without 40% w/v barium: non-carbonated and carbonated water, diluted ethanol, and high concentrations of citric acid (sour), sodium chloride (salty), caffeine (bitter) and sucrose (sweet). Mixed model analyses explored the effects of barium, taster status, and age on perceived taste intensity and acceptability of stimuli. Results Barium was associated with lower taste intensity ratings for sweet, salty, and bitter tastants, higher taste intensity in carbonated water, and lower palatability in water, sweet, sour, and carbonated water. Older subjects reported lower palatability (all barium samples, sour) and higher taste intensity scores (ethanol, sweet, sour) compared to younger subjects. Supertasters reported higher taste intensity (ethanol, sweet, sour, salty, bitter) and lower palatability (ethanol, salty, bitter) than non-tasters. Refusal rates were highest for younger subjects and supertasters, and for barium (regardless of tastant), bitter, and ethanol. Conclusions Barium suppressed the perceived intensity of some tastes and reduced palatability. These effects are more pronounced in older subjects and supertasters, but younger supertasters are least likely to tolerate trials of barium and strong tastant solutions. PMID:24037100

  18. 75 FR 36629 - Barium Chloride From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... Five-year (``Sunset'') Review, 74 FR 31412 (July 1, 2009). As a result of its review, the Department... Barium Chloride From China, 75 FR 33824 (June 15, 2010), and Barium Chloride from China (Inv. No. 731-TA... Commerce. DATES: Effective Date: June 28, 2010. SUMMARY: As a result of the determinations by...

  19. The effect of barium on perceptions of taste intensity and palatability.

    PubMed

    Dietsch, Angela M; Solomon, Nancy Pearl; Steele, Catriona M; Pelletier, Cathy A

    2014-02-01

    Barium may affect the perception of taste intensity and palatability. Such differences are important considerations in the selection of dysphagia assessment strategies and interpretation of results. Eighty healthy women grouped by age (younger, older) and genetic taste status (supertaster, nontaster) rated intensity and palatability for seven tastants prepared in deionized water with and without 40 % w/v barium: noncarbonated and carbonated water, diluted ethanol, and high concentrations of citric acid (sour), sodium chloride (salty), caffeine (bitter), and sucrose (sweet). Mixed-model analyses explored the effects of barium, taster status, and age on perceived taste intensity and acceptability of stimuli. Barium was associated with lower taste intensity ratings for sweet, salty, and bitter tastants, higher taste intensity in carbonated water, and lower palatability in water, sweet, sour, and carbonated water. Older subjects reported lower palatability (all barium samples, sour) and higher taste intensity scores (ethanol, sweet, sour) compared to younger subjects. Supertasters reported higher taste intensity (ethanol, sweet, sour, salty, bitter) and lower palatability (ethanol, salty, bitter) than nontasters. Refusal rates were highest for younger subjects and supertasters, and for barium (regardless of tastant), bitter, and ethanol. Barium suppressed the perceived intensity of some tastes and reduced palatability. These effects are more pronounced in older subjects and supertasters, but younger supertasters are least likely to tolerate trials of barium and strong tastant solutions. PMID:24037100

  20. Calcium and Mitosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  1. Evidence against barium in the mushroom Trogia venenata as a cause of sudden unexpected deaths in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Yanchun; Wu, Gang; Feng, Bang; Yoell, Shanze; Yu, Zefen; Zhang, Keqin; Xu, Jianping

    2012-12-01

    This study examined barium concentrations in the mushroom Trogia venenata, the leading culprit for sudden unexpected deaths in Yunnan, southwest China. We found that barium concentrations in T. venenata from Yunnan were low and comparable to other foods, inconsistent with barium concentrations in this mushroom as a significant contributor to these deaths.

  2. Occultation of the ATS-3 satellite by the AVEFRIA barium ion cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Simons, D.J.; Pongratz, M.B.; Clynch, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    During the AVEFRIA DOS barium release experiment, sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Defense Nuclear Agency in May 1978, the line of sight from one of the ground observation stations to the ATS-3 satellite was occulted by the barium ion cloud for a period of approximately five minutes. Optical measurements of the structured barium ion cloud were made with intensified cameras using the 455.4-nm wavelength fluorescent ion line. These measurements have been related to barium ion column density. During the occultation, the amplitude scintillations of the 136.47-MHz signal from the ATS-3 satellite were monitored. The optical measurements have been used to correlate the barium column density with the total electron content measurements and to calculate the scintillation index, S/sub 4/, and the two dimensional intensity pattern for comparison with the measured amplitude scintillations.

  3. Centrifugal Jet Spinning for Highly Efficient and Large-scale Fabrication of Barium Titanate Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Liyun; Kotha, Shiva P.

    2014-01-01

    The centrifugal jet spinning (CJS) method has been developed to enable large-scale synthesis of barium titanate nanofibers. Barium titanate nanofibers with fiber diameters down to 50 nm and grain sizes around 25 nm were prepared with CJS by spinning a sol-gel solution of barium titanate and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) with subsequent heat treatment at 850 °C. XRD and FTIR analysis demonstrated high purity and tetragonal perovskite structured barium titanate nanofibers. SEM and TEM images confirm the continuous high aspect ratio structure of barium titanate nanofibers after heat treatment. It is demonstrated that the CJS technique offers a highly efficient method for large-scale fabrication of ceramic nanofibers at production rates of up to 0.3 gram/minute. PMID:24563566

  4. Calcium-bismuth electrodes for large-scale energy storage (liquid metal batteries)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H; Boysen, DA; Ouchi, T; Sadoway, DR

    2013-11-01

    Calcium is an attractive electrode material for use in grid-scale electrochemical energy storage due to its low electronegativity, earth abundance, and low cost. The feasibility of combining a liquid Ca-Bi positive electrode with a molten salt electrolyte for use in liquid metal batteries at 500-700 degrees C was investigated. Exhibiting excellent reversibility up to current densities of 200 mA cm(-2), the calcium bismuth liquid alloy system is a promising positive electrode candidate for liquid metal batteries. The measurement of low self-discharge current suggests that the solubility of calcium metal in molten salt electrolytes can be sufficiently suppressed to yield high coulombic efficiencies >98%. The mechanisms giving rise to Ca-Bi electrode overpotentials were investigated in terms of associated charge transfer and mass transport resistances. The formation of low density Ca11Bi10 intermetallics at the electrode electrolyte interface limited the calcium deposition rate capability of the electrodes; however, the co-deposition of barium into bismuth from barium-containing molten salts suppressed Ca-Bi intermetallic formation thereby improving the discharge capacity. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Calcium-bismuth electrodes for large-scale energy storage (liquid metal batteries)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hojong; Boysen, Dane A.; Ouchi, Takanari; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2013-11-01

    Calcium is an attractive electrode material for use in grid-scale electrochemical energy storage due to its low electronegativity, earth abundance, and low cost. The feasibility of combining a liquid Ca-Bi positive electrode with a molten salt electrolyte for use in liquid metal batteries at 500-700 °C was investigated. Exhibiting excellent reversibility up to current densities of 200 mA cm-2, the calcium-bismuth liquid alloy system is a promising positive electrode candidate for liquid metal batteries. The measurement of low self-discharge current suggests that the solubility of calcium metal in molten salt electrolytes can be sufficiently suppressed to yield high coulombic efficiencies >98%. The mechanisms giving rise to Ca-Bi electrode overpotentials were investigated in terms of associated charge transfer and mass transport resistances. The formation of low density Ca11Bi10 intermetallics at the electrode-electrolyte interface limited the calcium deposition rate capability of the electrodes; however, the co-deposition of barium into bismuth from barium-containing molten salts suppressed Ca-Bi intermetallic formation thereby improving the discharge capacity.

  6. Dissolution of Barium from Barite in Sewage Sludges and Cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, F.; Pepi, M.; Burrini, D.; Kniewald, G.; Scali, D.; Lanciotti, E.

    1996-01-01

    High concentrations of total barium, ranging from 0.42 to 1.58 mg(middot)g(sup-1) (dry weight) were found in sludges of two sewage treatment plants near Florence, Italy. Barium concentrations in the suspended matter decreased as redox potential values changed from negative to positive. An anoxic sewage sludge sample was aerated, and 30% of the total barium was removed in 24 h. To demonstrate that barium was solubilized from barite by sulfate-reducing bacteria, a strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used to study the solubilization of barium from barite under laboratory conditions. During cell growth with different concentrations of barite from 0.01 to 0.3 g(middot)liter(sup-1) (the latter is the MIC) as the only source of sulfates in the cultures, the D. desulfuricans strain accumulated barium up to 0.58 (mu)g(middot)mg(sup-1) (dry weight). Three times the quantity of barium was dissolved by bacteria than in the uninoculated medium (control). The unexpectedly low concentration of soluble barium (1.2 mg of Ba(middot)liter(sup-1)) with respect to the quantity expected (109 mg of Ba(middot)liter(sup-1)), calculated on the basis of the free H(inf2)S evolved from the dissimilatory reduction of sulfate from barite, was probably due to the formation of other barium compounds, such as witherite (BaCO(inf3)) and the transient species barium sulfide (BaS). The D. desulfuricans strain, growing on barite, formed visible aggregates. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that aggregates consisted of bacteria and barite. After 3 days of incubation, several autofluorescent crystals surrounded by a dissolution halo were observed. The crystals were identified as BaS by comparison with the commercial compound. PMID:16535353

  7. Aluminum permanganate battery

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, C.; Licht, S.L.

    1993-11-30

    A battery is provided comprising an aluminum anode, an aqueous solution of permanganate as the cathodic species and a second electrode capable of reducing permanganate. Such a battery system is characterized by its high energy density and low polarization losses when operating at high temperatures in a strong caustic electrolyte, i.e., high concentration of hydroxyl ions. A variety of anode and electrocatalyst materials are suitable for the efficient oxidation-reduction process and are elucidated.

  8. Improved cryogenic aluminum mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukobratovich, Daniel; Don, Ken; Sumner, Richard E.

    1998-09-01

    Optical surface deformation of metal mirrors used at cryogenic temperatures is reduced through the use of a new process of plating amorphous aluminum on aluminum. The AlumiPlateTM process (produced by AlumiPlate, Inc. in Minneapolis, MN) plates a layer of 99.9+% high purity aluminum about 125 micrometers thick atop the substrate. Very good surface finishes are produced by direct diamond turning of the plating, with some samples below 40 angstroms RMS. Optical testing of a 175-mm diameter, 550-mm optical radius of curvature 6061-T651/AlumiPlateTM aluminum sphere was performed at 65 K to determine cryogenic optical surface figure stability. In five cycles from 300 to 65 K, an average optical surface change of 0.047 wave RMS (1 wave equals 633 nm) was observed. A total optical figure change of 0.03 wave RMS at 65 K was observed from the first to last cycle. The cause of this relatively small long-term change is not yet determined. The test mirror is bi-concave, with a semi- kinematic toroidal mount, and is machined from the axis of a billet. An `uphill quench' heat treatment consisting of five cycles from liquid nitrogen to boiling water temperatures is used to minimize residual stress in the test mirror. Initial diamond turning of the mirror by the Optical Filter Corp., Keene, NH, produced a 300 K unmounted optical surface figure of 0.380 wave peak-to-valley and 0.059 wave RMS. A second effort at diamond turning by II-VI, Inc., Saxonburg, PA produced a 300 K optical figure of 0.443 wave peak-to-valley and 0.066 wave RMS, with a surface roughness varying from 29 to 42 angstroms.

  9. Impairment of ciprofloxacin absorption by calcium polycarbophil.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ryuji; Ueno, Kazuyuki; Imano, Hideki; Kawai, Masayuki; Kuwahara, Shiro; Tsuchishita, Yoshimasa; Yonezawa, Emi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2002-07-01

    The effect of calcium polycarbophil on the absorption of ciprofloxacin, a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, was evaluated in an in vitro and in vivo study. In the in vitro study, the release of ciprofloxacin from the cellulose membrane in the presence or absence of metal cations was measured using the dissolution test procedure. In the in vivo study, male ST Wistar rats and male volunteers were employed. First, 20 mg/kg of ciprofloxacin alone (Rat Study 1) or 20 mg/kg of ciprofloxacin in combination with 64 mg/kg of calcium chloride (Rat Study 2) was administered orally to 3 rats. Second, a volunteer study was employed and a randomized crossover design with twophases was used. In onephase, volunteers received 400 mg of ciprofloxacin alone (Study 1); in the other phase, they received 400 mg of ciprofloxacin and 1200 mg of fine calcium polycarbophil granules concomitantly (Study 2). The plasma and serum concentrations of ciprofloxacin were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The release of ciprofloxacin from the cellulose membrane in the presence of aluminum, calcium, or iron ions was slower than that in the absence of these metal ions. The AUC0-4 and Cmax in Rat Study 2 were lower than those respective values in Rat Study 1. AUC0-4 was approximately 60% lower in Rat Study 2 than Rat Study 1. In the volunteer study, the AUC0-12 and Cmax in Study 2 were lower than those respective values in Study 1. In particular, AUC0-12 was approximately 50% lowerin Study 2 than in Study 1. These findings suggest that when ciprofloxacin and calcium polycarbophil were coadministered concomitantly, a decrease of ciprofloxacin absorption was observed, and this action was caused by the formation of chelate complexes. Therefore, it seems clear that we should avoid the concomitant administration of ciprofloxacin and calcium polycarbophil.

  10. Plasma waves associated with the first AMPTE magnetotail barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Anderson, R. R.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Luehr, H.; Haerendel, G.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma waves observed during the March 21, 1985, AMPTE magnetotail barium release are described. Electron plasma oscillations provided local measurements of the plasma density during both the expansion and decay phases. Immediately after the explosion, the electron density reached a peak of about 400,000/cu cm, and then started decreasing approximately as t to the -2.4 as the cloud expanded. About 6 minutes after the explosion, the electron density suddenly began to increase, reached a secondary peak of about 240/cu cm, and then slowly decayed down to the preevent level over a period of about 15 minutes. The density increase is believed to be caused by the collapse of the ion cloud into the diamagnetic cavity created by the initial expansion. The plasma wave intensities observed during the entire event were quite low. In the diamagnetic cavity, electrostatic emissions were observed near the barium ion plasma frequency, and in another band at lower frequencies. A broadband burst of electrostatic noise was also observed at the boundary of the diamagnetic cavity. Except for electron plasma oscillations, no significant wave activity was observed outside of the diamagnetic cavity.

  11. Results of magnetospheric barium ion cloud experiment of 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, D.; Fricke, C. L.; Long, S. A. T.

    1975-01-01

    The barium ion cloud experiment involved the release of about 2 kg of barium at an altitude of 31 482 km, a latitude of 6.926 N., and a longitude of 74.395 W. Significant erosion of plasma from the main ion core occurred during the initial phase of the ion cloud expansion. From the motion of the outermost striational filaments, the electric field components were determined to be 0.19 mV/m in the westerly direction and 0.68 mV/m in the inward direction. The differences between these components and those measured from balloons flown in the proximity of the extremity of the field line through the release point implied the existence of potential gradients along the magnetic field lines. The deceleration of the main core was greater than theoretically predicted. This was attributed to the formation of a polarization wake, resulting in an increase of the area of interaction and resistive dissipation at ionospheric levels. The actual orientation of the magnetic field line through the release point differed by about 10.5 deg from that predicted by magnetic field models that did not include the effect of ring current.

  12. Proton trapping in yttrium-doped barium zirconate.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Blanc, Frédéric; Okuyama, Yuji; Buannic, Lucienne; Lucio-Vega, Juan C; Grey, Clare P; Haile, Sossina M

    2013-07-01

    The environmental benefits of fuel cells have been increasingly appreciated in recent years. Among candidate electrolytes for solid-oxide fuel cells, yttrium-doped barium zirconate has garnered attention because of its high proton conductivity, particularly in the intermediate-temperature region targeted for cost-effective solid-oxide fuel cell operation, and its excellent chemical stability. However, fundamental questions surrounding the defect chemistry and macroscopic proton transport mechanism of this material remain, especially in regard to the possible role of proton trapping. Here we show, through a combined thermogravimetric and a.c. impedance study, that macroscopic proton transport in yttrium-doped barium zirconate is limited by proton-dopant association (proton trapping). Protons must overcome the association energy, 29 kJ mol(-1), as well as the general activation energy, 16 kJ mol(-1), to achieve long-range transport. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies show the presence of two types of proton environment above room temperature, reflecting differences in proton-dopant configurations. This insight motivates efforts to identify suitable alternative dopants with reduced association energies as a route to higher conductivities. PMID:23666383

  13. Proton trapping in yttrium-doped barium zirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Blanc, Frédéric; Okuyama, Yuji; Buannic, Lucienne; Lucio-Vega, Juan C.; Grey, Clare P.; Haile, Sossina M.

    2013-07-01

    The environmental benefits of fuel cells have been increasingly appreciated in recent years. Among candidate electrolytes for solid-oxide fuel cells, yttrium-doped barium zirconate has garnered attention because of its high proton conductivity, particularly in the intermediate-temperature region targeted for cost-effective solid-oxide fuel cell operation, and its excellent chemical stability. However, fundamental questions surrounding the defect chemistry and macroscopic proton transport mechanism of this material remain, especially in regard to the possible role of proton trapping. Here we show, through a combined thermogravimetric and a.c. impedance study, that macroscopic proton transport in yttrium-doped barium zirconate is limited by proton-dopant association (proton trapping). Protons must overcome the association energy, 29 kJ mol-1, as well as the general activation energy, 16 kJ mol-1, to achieve long-range transport. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies show the presence of two types of proton environment above room temperature, reflecting differences in proton-dopant configurations. This insight motivates efforts to identify suitable alternative dopants with reduced association energies as a route to higher conductivities.

  14. Barium titanate core – gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatments

    PubMed Central

    FarrokhTakin, Elmira; Ciofani, Gianni; Puleo, Gian Luigi; de Vito, Giuseppe; Filippeschi, Carlo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Piazza, Vincenzo; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-01-01

    The development of new tools and devices to aid in treating cancer is a hot topic in biomedical research. The practice of using heat (hyperthermia) to treat cancerous lesions has a long history dating back to ancient Greece. With deeper knowledge of the factors that cause cancer and the transmissive window of cells and tissues in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, hyperthermia applications have been able to incorporate the use of lasers. Photothermal therapy has been introduced as a selective and noninvasive treatment for cancer, in which exogenous photothermal agents are exploited to achieve the selective destruction of cancer cells. In this manuscript, we propose applications of barium titanate core–gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatment against cancer cells. We explored the effect of increasing concentrations of these nanoshells (0–100 μg/mL) on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, testing the internalization and intrinsic toxicity and validating the hyperthermic functionality of the particles through near infrared (NIR) laser-induced thermoablation experiments. No significant changes were observed in cell viability up to nanoparticle concentrations of 50 μg/mL. Experiments upon stimulation with an NIR laser revealed the ability of the nanoshells to destroy human neuroblastoma cells. On the basis of these findings, barium titanate core–gold shell nanoparticles resulted in being suitable for hyperthermia treatment, and our results represent a promising first step for subsequent investigations on their applicability in clinical practice. PMID:23847415

  15. Multi-colony calibrations of coral Ba/Ca with a contemporaneous in situ seawater barium record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaVigne, Michèle; Grottoli, Andréa G.; Palardy, James E.; Sherrell, Robert M.

    2016-04-01

    The coral skeleton barium to calcium ratio (Ba/Cacoral), a proxy for seawater barium concentrations (BaSW), has been interpreted as a tracer of upwelling based on the characteristic "nutrient like" depth profile of BaSW. However, in some tropical regions, such as the Gulf of Panamá, substantial influence of terrestrial runoff inputs and differences between the vertical distribution of BaSW and that of the major nutrients (nitrate and phosphate) in the upper water column can complicate the interpretation of Ba/Cacoral as an upwelled nutrient proxy. In the Gulf of Panamá, contemporaneous Ba/Cacoral records from multiple colonies of Porites lobata, Pavona gigantea, and Pavona clavus corals record a nearly twofold change in surface water BaSW as a 20-70% increase in skeletal Ba/Ca with excellent correlation among Ba/Ca records from co-located colonies (r = 0.86-0.99). These results provide, for the first time, an absolute calibration of the coral Ba proxy with a contemporaneous BaSW record. Compiling the Ba/Cacoral records from three co-located colonies of each species into taxon-specific composite regressions reveals strong statistically significant correlations with the BaSW time-series record (p < 0.001). Differences among taxa in regression slope, y-intercept, and average distribution coefficient, as well as a demonstration of the application of the P. clavus calibration to a previously published Ba/Cacoral record, emphasize the necessity of using taxon-specific calibrations to reconstruct changes in BaSW with accuracy. These results support the application of Ba/Cacoral to reconstruct past changes in absolute BaSW concentrations, adding an important tool to the collection of geochemical proxies for reconstructing surface ocean biogeochemical processes in the past.

  16. Mitochondria: the calcium connection.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Laura; Drago, Ilaria; Zampese, Enrico; Pozzan, Tullio

    2010-01-01

    Calcium handling by mitochondria is a key feature in cell life. It is involved in energy production for cell activity, in buffering and shaping cytosolic calcium rises and also in determining cell fate by triggering or preventing apoptosis. Both mitochondria and the mechanisms involved in the control of calcium homeostasis have been extensively studied, but they still provide researchers with long-standing or even new challenges. Technical improvements in the tools employed for the investigation of calcium dynamics have been-and are still-opening new perspectives in this field, and more prominently for mitochondria. In this review we present a state-of-the-art toolkit for calcium measurements, with major emphasis on the advantages of genetically encoded indicators. These indicators can be efficiently and selectively targeted to specific cellular sub-compartments, allowing previously unavailable high-definition calcium dynamic studies. We also summarize the main features of cellular and, in more detail, mitochondrial calcium handling, especially focusing on the latest breakthroughs in the field, such as the recent direct characterization of the calcium microdomains that occur on the mitochondrial surface upon cellular stimulation. Additionally, we provide a major example of the key role played by calcium in patho-physiology by briefly describing the extensively reported-albeit highly controversial-alterations of calcium homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease, casting lights on the possible alterations in mitochondrial calcium handling in this pathology.

  17. Liquid-Phase Processing of Barium Titanate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David Thomas

    Processing of thin films introduces strict limits on the thermal budget due to substrate stability and thermal expansion mismatch stresses. Barium titanate serves as a model system for the difficulty in producing high quality thin films because of sensitivity to stress, scale, and crystal quality. Thermal budget restriction leads to reduced crystal quality, density, and grain growth, depressing ferroelectric and nonlinear dielectric properties. Processing of barium titanate is typically performed at temperatures hundreds of degrees above compatibility with metalized substrates. In particular integration with silicon and other low thermal expansion substrates is desirable for reductions in costs and wider availability of technologies. In bulk metal and ceramic systems, sintering behavior has been encouraged by the addition of a liquid forming second phase, improving kinetics and promoting densification and grain growth at lower temperatures. This approach is also widespread in the multilayer ceramic capacitor industry. However only limited exploration of flux processing with refractory thin films has been performed despite offering improved dielectric properties for barium titanate films at lower temperatures. This dissertation explores physical vapor deposition of barium titanate thin films with addition of liquid forming fluxes. Flux systems studied include BaO-B2O3, Bi2O3-BaB2O 4, BaO-V2O5, CuO-BaO-B2O3, and BaO-B2O3 modified by Al, Si, V, and Li. Additions of BaO-B2O3 leads to densification and an increase in average grain size from 50 nm to over 300 nm after annealing at 900 °C. The ability to tune permittivity of the material improved from 20% to 70%. Development of high quality films enables engineering of ferroelectric phase stability using residual thermal expansion mismatch in polycrystalline films. The observed shifts to TC match thermodynamic calculations, expected strain from the thermal expansion coefficients, as well as x-ray diffract measurements

  18. Calcium signaling and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2014-08-01

    Calcium signaling is involved in a multitude of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. Over the last decade, it has been increasingly recognized as an important factor in epileptogenesis, and it is becoming obvious that the excess synchronization of neurons that is characteristic for seizures can be linked to various calcium signaling pathways. These include immediate effects on membrane excitability by calcium influx through ion channels as well as delayed mechanisms that act through G-protein coupled pathways. Calcium signaling is able to cause hyperexcitability either by direct modulation of neuronal activity or indirectly through calcium-dependent gliotransmission. Furthermore, feedback mechanisms between mitochondrial calcium signaling and reactive oxygen species are able to cause neuronal cell death and seizures. Unravelling the complexity of calcium signaling in epileptogenesis is a daunting task, but it includes the promise to uncover formerly unknown targets for the development of new antiepileptic drugs.

  19. Aluminum Carbothermic Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Marshall J.

    2005-03-31

    This report documents the non-proprietary research and development conducted on the Aluminum Carbothermic Technology (ACT) project from contract inception on July 01, 2000 to termination on December 31, 2004. The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new carbothermic process for producing commercial grade aluminum, designated as the ''Advanced Reactor Process'' (ARP). The scope of the program ranged from fundamental research through small scale laboratory experiments (65 kW power input) to larger scale test modules at up to 1600 kW power input. The tasks included work on four components of the process, Stages 1 and 2 of the reactor, vapor recovery and metal alloy decarbonization; development of computer models; and economic analyses of capital and operating costs. Justification for developing a new, carbothermic route to aluminum production is defined by the potential benefits in reduced energy, lower costs and more favorable environmental characteristics than the conventional Hall-Heroult process presently used by the industry. The estimated metrics for these advantages include energy rates at approximately 10 kWh/kg Al (versus over 13 kWh/kg Al for Hall-Heroult), capital costs as low as $1250 per MTY (versus 4,000 per MTY for Hall-Heroult), operating cost reductions of over 10%, and up to 37% reduction in CO2 emissions for fossil-fuel power plants. Realization of these benefits would be critical to sustaining the US aluminum industries position as a global leader in primary aluminum production. One very attractive incentive for ARP is its perceived ability to cost effectively produce metal over a range of smelter sizes, not feasible for Hall-Heroult plants which must be large, 240,000 TPY or more, to be economical. Lower capacity stand alone carbothermic smelters could be utilized to supply molten metal at fabrication facilities similar to the mini-mill concept employed by the steel industry. Major

  20. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  1. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  2. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  3. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  4. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  5. Cathodic phenomena in aluminum electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouteillon, J.; Poignet, J. C.; Rameau, J. J.

    1993-02-01

    Although aluminum is one of the world's highest production-volume primary metals, it is particularly costly to produce for a variety of factors, not the least of which are the expenses associated with electrolytic reduction. Based on the scale of global aluminum processing, even minor improvements in the electrowinning technology can result in significant savings of resources. Thus, from this perspective, the following reviews recent studies of cathodic phenomena in aluminum electrowinning.

  6. Quasicrystalline particulate reinforced aluminum composite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.E.; Biner, S.B.; Sordelet, D.J.; Unal, O.

    1997-07-01

    Particulate reinforced aluminum and aluminum alloy composites are rapidly emerging as new commercial materials for aerospace, automotive, electronic packaging and other high performance applications. However, their low processing ductility and difficulty in recyclability have been the key concern. In this study, two composite systems having the same aluminum alloy matrix, one reinforced with quasicrystals and the other reinforced with the conventional SiC reinforcements were produced with identical processing routes. Their processing characteristics and tensile mechanical properties were compared.

  7. Aluminum-lithium for aerospace

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, P.S.; Wolf, G.J.

    1996-10-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys were developed primarily to reduce the weight of aircraft and aerospace structures. Lithium is the lightest metallic element, and each 1% of lithium added to aluminum reduces alloy density by about 3% and increases modulus by about 5%. Though lithium has a solubility limit of 4.2% in aluminum, the amount of lithium ranges between 1 and 3% in commercial alloys. Aluminum-lithium alloys are most often selected for aerospace components because of their low density, high strength, and high specific modulus. However, other applications now exploit their excellent fatigue resistance and cryogenic toughness.

  8. Mineral of the month: aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plunkert, Patricia A.

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum is the second most abundant metallic element in Earth’s crust after silicon. Even so, it is a comparatively new industrial metal that has been produced in commercial quantities for little more than 100 years. Aluminum is lightweight, ductile, malleable and corrosion resistant, and is a good conductor of heat and electricity. Weighing about one-third as much as steel or copper per unit of volume, aluminum is used more than any other metal except iron. Aluminum can be fabricated into desired forms and shapes by every major metalworking technique to add to its versatility.

  9. [Concentrations of fluorine, aluminum and magnesium in some structures of the central nervous system of rats exposed to aluminum and fluorine in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Lubkowska, Anna; Chlubek, Dariusz; Machoy-Mokrzyńska, Anna; Noceń, Iwona; Zyluk, Beata; Nowacki, Przemysław

    2004-01-01

    Fluorine and aluminum are able to pass through the blood-brain barrier and accumulate in the central nervous system (CNS) of exposed animals. Chronic intoxication is accompanied by behavioral disorders, degenerative changes, and abnormalities of aerobic metabolism of the neurons. Awareness of the role of aluminum in Alzheimer's disease stems from epidemiological studies demonstrating increased prevalence of this condition in areas with relatively high content of aluminum in drinking water. The uptake of aluminum in the gastrointestinal tract is decreased in the presence of iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphate, or fluoride. Many magnesium-containing enzymes are affected by aluminum, which is able to replace magnesium and thus reduce their activity. The purpose of this study was to determine the concentrations of fluorine, aluminum, and magnesium in some structures of the CNS of rats exposed to fluorine and aluminum in water. Our material consisted of 64 Wistar rats divided into eight equal groups. Groups I, II and III were female rats exposed, respectively, to 100 ppm fluorine ions, 300 ppm aluminum ions or both at same doses alternating every second day. Groups IA, IIA and IIIA consisted of male rats exposed like the respective female groups. Control groups K1--females and K2--males received distilled water ad libitum. Exposure lasted 31 days whereupon the animals were anesthetized with ketamine and sacrificed. The brain was collected and the cerebellum, brain cortex, and hippocampus were isolated. Concentrations of fluorine, aluminum, and magnesium were measured with prior mineralization of wet tissues in a microwave oven. Fluorine concentrations were determined with a potentiometric method and ion-selective electrode. Aluminum was measured with ICP (inductively coupled plasma) and magnesium with ASA (atomic absorption spectrometry). The highest concentrations of fluorine were observed in rats exposed to fluorine only. The same pattern was true for aluminum. Groups

  10. Smoking, calcium, calcium antagonists, and aging.

    PubMed

    Nicita-Mauro, V

    1990-01-01

    Aging is characterized, besides other changes, by a progressive increase in calcium content in the arterial wall, which is enhanced by diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, arterial hypertension, and tabagism. As to tabagism, experiments in animals have shown that nicotine can increase calcium content of the arterial wall, and clinical studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoking induces peripheral vasoconstriction, with consequent increase in blood pressure levels. In order to study the role of calcium ions in the pathogenesis of the vasoconstrictive lesions caused by "acute" smoking, the author has studied the peripheral vascular effects of the calcium-channel antagonist nifedipine, a dihydropyridine derivative, and calcitonin, a hypocalcemizing hormone which possess vasoactive actions on 12 elderly regular smokers (mean age 65.8 years). The results demonstrated that both nifedipine (10 mg sublingually 20 min before smoking) and salmon calcitonin (100 MRC U/daily intramuscularly for three days) are able to prevent peripheral vasoconstriction evaluated by Doppler velocimetry, as well as the increase of blood pressure induced by smoking. On the basis of our results, the author proposes that cigarette smoking-induced vasoconstriction is a calcium-mediated process, which can be hindered by drugs with calcium antagonist action. PMID:2226675

  11. Bio-based barium alginate film: Preparation, flame retardancy and thermal degradation behavior.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Chuan-Jie; Zhao, Jin-Chao; Guo, Yi; Zhu, Ping; Wang, De-Yi

    2016-03-30

    A bio-based barium alginate film was prepared via a facile ionic exchange and casting approach. Its flammability, thermal degradation and pyrolysis behaviors, thermal degradation mechanism were studied systemically by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning (UL-94), microscale combustion calorimetry (MCC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). It showed that barium alginate film had much higher LOI value (52.0%) than that of sodium alginate film (24.5%). Moreover, barium alginate film passed the UL-94 V-0 rating, while the sodium alginate film showed no classification. Importantly, peak of heat release rate (PHRR) of barium alginate film in MCC test was much lower than that of sodium alginate film, suggested that introduction of barium ion into alginate film significantly decreased release of combustible gases. TG-FTIR and Py-GC-MS results indicated that barium alginate produced much less flammable products than that of sodium alginate in whole thermal degradation procedure. Finally, a possible degradation mechanism of barium alginate had been proposed.

  12. Bio-based barium alginate film: Preparation, flame retardancy and thermal degradation behavior.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Chuan-Jie; Zhao, Jin-Chao; Guo, Yi; Zhu, Ping; Wang, De-Yi

    2016-03-30

    A bio-based barium alginate film was prepared via a facile ionic exchange and casting approach. Its flammability, thermal degradation and pyrolysis behaviors, thermal degradation mechanism were studied systemically by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning (UL-94), microscale combustion calorimetry (MCC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). It showed that barium alginate film had much higher LOI value (52.0%) than that of sodium alginate film (24.5%). Moreover, barium alginate film passed the UL-94 V-0 rating, while the sodium alginate film showed no classification. Importantly, peak of heat release rate (PHRR) of barium alginate film in MCC test was much lower than that of sodium alginate film, suggested that introduction of barium ion into alginate film significantly decreased release of combustible gases. TG-FTIR and Py-GC-MS results indicated that barium alginate produced much less flammable products than that of sodium alginate in whole thermal degradation procedure. Finally, a possible degradation mechanism of barium alginate had been proposed. PMID:26794953

  13. Fabrication and characterization of cerium-doped barium titanate inverse opal by sol-gel method

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Yi; Zhu Yihua Yang Xiaoling; Li Chunzhong; Zhou Jinghong

    2007-01-15

    Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a polystyrene (PS) opal. This procedure involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template followed by hydrolytic polycondensation of the precursors to amorphous barium titanate and removal of the PS opal by calcination. The morphologies of opal and inverse opal were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The pores were characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation showed the doping structure of cerium, barium and titanium. And powder X-ray diffraction allows one to observe the influence of doping degree on the grain size. The lattice parameters, crystal size and lattice strain were calculated by the Rietveld refinement method. The synthesis of cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opals provides an opportunity to electrically and optically engineer the photonic band structure and the possibility of developing tunable three-dimensional photonic crystal devices. - Graphical abstract: Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate acid contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a PS opal, which involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template and removal of the PS opal by calcination.

  14. The Evolving Mixture of Barium Isotopes in Milky Way Halo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Zareen; Kirby, E. N.; Guhathakurta, P.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals in stars form through one of two types of neutron capture processes: the rapid r-process or slower s-process. The fraction of odd and even barium isotopes in stars can indicate which process predominantly contributed to a star’s heavy metals, since odd barium isotopes predominantly form through the r-process and even barium isotopes through the s-process. The “stellar model” predicts that older stars contain comparable amounts of odd and even barium isotopes, while the “classical model” states that they almost exclusively contain odd isotopes. This study investigated these competing models by analyzing high-resolution spectra of twelve Milky Way stars. These spectra were analyzed for the first time in this study. To quantify r- and s-process enrichment, we measured the odd barium isotope fraction in the stars by fitting models to the stars’ spectra. Generating models involved measuring the stars’ Doppler shift, resolution, and barium abundance. To reduce error margins we optimized resolution and barium abundance measurements by enhancing existing techniques through several rounds of revisions. Our results support the stellar model of heavy metal enrichment, and our proposed optimizations will enable future researchers to obtain a deeper understanding of chemical enrichment in the Universe. This research was supported by the Science Internship Program at the University of California Santa Cruz, Lick Observatory, and the National Science Foundation.

  15. Magnetic properties of Ni substituted Y-type barium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Mi Hee; Kim, Chul Sung

    2014-05-07

    Y-type barium hexaferrite is attractive material for various applications, such as high frequency antennas and RF devices, because of its interesting magnetic properties. Especially, Ni substituted Y- type hexaferrites have higher magnetic ordering temperature than other Y-type. We have investigated macroscopic and microscopic properties of Y-type barium hexaferrite. Ba{sub 2}Co{sub 2−x}Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} (x = 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) samples are prepared by solid-state reaction method and studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy, as well as a network analyzer for high frequency characteristics. The XRD pattern is analyzed by Rietveld refinement method and confirms the hexagonal structure with R-3m. The hysteresis curve shows ferrimagnetic behavior. Saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) decreases with Ni contents. Ni{sup 2+}, which preferentially occupies the octahedral site with up-spin sub-lattice, has smaller spin value S of 1 than Co{sup 2+} having S = 3/2. The zero-field-cooled (ZFC) measurement of Ba{sub 2}Co{sub 1.5}Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} shows that Curie and spin transition temperatures are found to be 718 K and 209 K, respectively. The Curie temperature T{sub C} is increased with Ni contents, while T{sub S} is decreased with Ni. The Mössbauer spectra were measured at various temperatures and fitted by using a least-squares method with six sextet of six Lorentzian lines for Fe sites, corresponding to the 3b{sub VI}, 6c{sub IV}*, 6c{sub VI}, 18h{sub VI}, 6c{sub IV}, and 3a{sub IV} sites at below T{sub C}. From Mössbauer measurements, we confirmed the spin state of Fe ion to be Fe{sup 3+} and obtained the isomer shift (δ), magnetic hyperfine field (H{sub hf}), and the occupancy ratio of Fe ions at six sub-lattices. The complex permeability and permittivity are measured between 100 MHz and 4 GHz, suggesting that Y-type barium hexaferrite is promising for antenna

  16. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  17. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-01

    Metallic aluminum may be produced by the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ at 700 to 800/sup 0/C in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  18. Characterization of ultradispersed aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R.L.; Maienschein, J.L.; Swansiger, R.W.; Garcia, F.; Darling, D.H.

    1994-12-08

    Samples of ultradispersed Al were received, which were produced by electrically exploding Al wires in argon. These samples comprised very small particles that were not significantly oxidized and that were stable in air. Particle morphology were studied with SE, micropycnometry, and gas adsorption surface area. Composition were determined using various techniques, as were thermal stability and reaction exotherms. The inexplicable reports of an Al-Ar compound and of an exothermic reaction were not confirmed. The material is a stable, nonoxidized, small-particle, highly reactive form of aluminum that is of interest in energetic materials formulations.

  19. Aluminum nitride grating couplers.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Siddhartha; Doerr, Christopher R; Piazza, Gianluca

    2012-06-10

    Grating couplers in sputtered aluminum nitride, a piezoelectric material with low loss in the C band, are demonstrated. Gratings and a waveguide micromachined on a silicon wafer with 600 nm minimum feature size were defined in a single lithography step without partial etching. Silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) was used for cladding layers. Peak coupling efficiency of -6.6 dB and a 1 dB bandwidth of 60 nm have been measured. This demonstration of wire waveguides and wideband grating couplers in a material that also has piezoelectric and elasto-optic properties will enable new functions for integrated photonics and optomechanics.

  20. Imaging diagnosis--duodenobiliary reflux of barium sulfate during esophagogastrography in a dog.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Layla; Sharma, Ajay; Secrest, Scott

    2015-01-01

    A 4-year-old Australian cattle dog presented for regurgitation, 2 months after duodenal resection and anastomosis for a perforated duodenal ulcer. Duodenobiliary reflux of barium sulfate suspension was detected during fluoroscopic esophagogastrography. Follow-up radiography 2 hours later demonstrated persistence of the barium in the gallbladder and biliary tree. Ultrasonography showed an open sphincter of Oddi but no other morphological abnormalities with the gallbladder or biliary system. No side effects or bloodwork abnormalities were noted. This is the first case report of duodenobiliary reflux of barium in a dog. The pathophysiology of this phenomenon and its incidence and significance in human medicine are discussed.

  1. Using Barium Ions for Heavy-Atom Derivatization and Phasing of Xylanse ll from Trichoderma longibrachiatum

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseeva,N.; Allaire, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the use of barium chloride to produce a heavy-atom derivative of xylanase II crystals from Trichoderma longibrachiatum, which was obtained either by cocrystallization or soaking. SAD phasing led to interpretable electron-density maps that allowed unambiguous chain tracing. In the best case, with a data set collected at 9.5 keV, 88% of the residues were built, with 83% of the side chains assigned. The barium ions are found to mainly interact with main-chain carbonyl groups and water molecules. It is suggested that barium ions could also be used as a potential anomalous scatterer in the quick cryosoaking procedure for phasing.

  2. Optical-induced absorption tunability of Barium Strontium Titanate film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chunya; Ji, Jie; Yue, Jin; Rao, Yunkun; Yao, Gang; Li, Dan; Zeng, Ying; Li, Renkui; Xiao, Longsheng; Liu, Xinxing; Yao, Jianquan; Ling, Furi

    2016-10-01

    The absorption tunability of 100 nm thickness of ferroelectric Barium Strontium Titanate (Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3) thin films with different densities of pumped optical field is measured by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in the range of 0.2 THz - 1.2 THz at 19 °C. Experimental results show that the absorption coefficient of BST film is approximately at 5000 cm-1-20000 cm-1 in the range of 0.2 THz - 1.2 THz and the absorption coefficient reached up to 16% when we applied the optical field up to 600 mW. The theoretical calculations reveal that increasing photoexcitation fluences is responsible for the increasing of transmission change in the conduction current density cause the absorption coefficient varied.

  3. Impact of vanadium ions in barium borate glass.

    PubMed

    Abdelghany, A M; Hammad, Ahmed H

    2015-02-25

    Combined optical and infrared spectral measurements of prepared barium borate glasses containing different concentrations of V2O5 were carried out. Vanadium containing glasses exhibit extended UV-visible (UV/Vis.) bands when compared with base binary borate glass. UV/Vis. spectrum shows the presence of an unsymmetrical strong UV broad band centered at 214 nm attributed to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities within the raw materials used for the preparation of such glass. The calculated direct and indirect optical band gaps are found to decrease with increasing the vanadium content (2.9:137 for indirect and 3.99:2.01 for direct transition). This change was discussed in terms of structural changes in the glass network. Infrared absorption spectra of the glasses reveal the appearance of both triangular and tetrahedral borate units. Electron spin resonance analyses indicate the presence of unpaired species in sufficient quantity to be identified and to confirm the spectral data.

  4. Dielectric behavior of barium modified strontium bismuth titanate ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, P.; Badapanda, T.; Anwar, S.; Panigrahi, S.

    2014-04-24

    Barium Modified Strontium Bismuth Titanate(SBT) ceramic with general formula Sr1−xBaxBi4Ti4O15 is prepared by solid state reaction route. The structural analysis of the ceramics was done by X-ray diffraction technique. The X-ray patterns show that all the compositions are of single phase with orthorhombic structure. The temperature dependent dielectric behavior shows that the transition temperature decreases with Ba content but the maximum dielectric constant increases. The decreases of the transition with increase in Ba{sup 2+} ion, may be due to the decrease of orthorhombicity by the incorporation of Ba{sup 2+} ion in SBT lattice.

  5. Dynamics of the CRRES barium releases in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Mende, S. B.; Geller, S. P.; Miller, M.; Hoffman, R. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Pongratz, M.; Meredith, N. P.; Anderson, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) G-2, G-3, and G-4 ionized and neutral barium cloud positions are triangulated from ground-based optical data. From the time history of the ionized cloud motion perpendicular to the magnetic field, the late time coupling of the ionized cloud with the collisionless ambient plasma in the magnetosphere is investigated for each of the releases. The coupling of the ionized clouds with the ambient medium is quantitatively consistent with predictions from theory in that the coupling time increases with increasing distance from the Earth. Quantitative comparison with simple theory for the couping time also yields reasonable agreement. Other effects not predicted by the theory are discussed in the context of the observations.

  6. Study on a flexoelectric microphone using barium strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, S. R.; Huang, W. B.; Zhang, S. J.; Yuan, F. G.; Jiang, X. N.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a flexoelectric microphone was, for the first time, designed and fabricated in a bridge structure using barium strontium titanate (Ba0.65Sr0.35TiO3) ceramic and tested afterwards. The prototyped flexoelectric microphone consists of a 1.5 mm  ×  768 μm  ×  50 μm BST bridge structure and a silicon substrate with a cavity. The sensitivity and resonance frequency were designed to be 0.92 pC/Pa and 98.67 kHz, respectively. The signal to noise ratio was measured to be 74 dB. The results demonstrate that the flexoelectric microphone possesses high sensitivity and a wide working frequency range simultaneously, suggesting that flexoelectricity could be an excellent alternative sensing mechanism for microphone applications.

  7. Synthesis, microstructure and dielectric properties of zirconium doped barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rohtash; Asokan, K.; Patnaik, S.; Birajdar, Balaji

    2016-05-01

    We report on synthesis, microstructural and relaxor ferroelectric properties of Zirconium(Zr) doped Barium Titanate (BT) samples with general formula Ba(Ti1-xZrx)O3 (x=0.20, 0.35). These lead-free ceramics were prepared by solid state reaction route. The phase transition behavior and temperature dependent dielectric properties and composition dependent ferroelectric properties were investigated. XRD analysis at room temperature confirms phase purity of the samples. SEM observations revealed retarded grain growth with increasing Zr mole fraction. Dielectric properties of BZT ceramics is influenced significantly by small addition of Zr mole fraction. With increasing Zr mole fraction, dielectric constant decreases while FWHM and frequency dispersion increases. Polarization vs electric field hysteresis measurements reveal ferroelectric relaxor phase at room temperature. The advantages of such substitution maneuvering towards optimizing ferroelectric properties of BaTiO3 are discussed.

  8. Synthesis and optical study of barium magnesium aluminate blue phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Jeet, Suninder Pandey, O. P.; Sharma, Manoj

    2015-05-15

    Europium doped barium magnesium aluminate (BaMgAl{sub 10}O{sub 17}:Eu{sup 2+}) phosphor was prepared via solution combustion method at 550°C using urea as a fuel. Morphological and optical properties of the prepared sample was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). XRD result showed the formation of pure phase BaMgAl{sub 10}O{sub 17}(JCPDS 26-0163) along with an additional phase BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}(JCPDS 01-082-1350). TEM image indicated the formation of faceted particles with average particle size 40 nm. From PL spectra, a broad emission band obtained at about 450 nm attributes to 4f{sup 6} 5d → 4f{sup 7} transition of Eu{sup 2+} which lies in the blue region of the visible spectrum.

  9. Barium titanate nanocomposite capacitor FY09 year end report.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Tyler E.; DiAntonio, Christopher Brian; Yang, Pin; Chavez, Tom P.; Winter, Michael R.; Monson, Todd C.; Roesler, Alexander William; Fellows, Benjamin D.

    2009-11-01

    This late start RTBF project started the development of barium titanate (BTO)/glass nanocomposite capacitors for future and emerging energy storage applications. The long term goal of this work is to decrease the size, weight, and cost of ceramic capacitors while increasing their reliability. Ceramic-based nanocomposites have the potential to yield materials with enhanced permittivity, breakdown strength (BDS), and reduced strain, which can increase the energy density of capacitors and increase their shot life. Composites of BTO in glass will limit grain growth during device fabrication (preserving nanoparticle grain size and enhanced properties), resulting in devices with improved density, permittivity, BDS, and shot life. BTO will eliminate the issues associated with Pb toxicity and volatility as well as the variation in energy storage vs. temperature of PZT based devices. During the last six months of FY09 this work focused on developing syntheses for BTO nanoparticles and firing profiles for sintering BTO/glass composite capacitors.

  10. A buffer gas cooled beam of barium monohydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Geoffrey; Tarallo, Marco; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2016-05-01

    Significant advances in direct laser cooling of diatomic molecules have opened up a wide array of molecular species to precision studies spanning many-body physics, quantum collisions and ultracold dissociation. We present a cryogenic beam source of barium monohydride (BaH), and study laser ablation of solid precursor targets as well as helium buffer gas cooling dynamics. Additionally, we cover progress towards a molecular magneto-optical trap, with spectroscopic studies of relevant cooling transitions in the B2 Σ <--X2 Σ manifold in laser ablated molecules, including resolution of hyperfine structure and precision measurements of the vibrational Frank-Condon factors. Finally, we examine the feasibility of photo dissociation of trapped BaH molecules to yield optically accessible samples of ultracold hydrogen.

  11. Gamma radiation induced darkening in barium gallo-germanate glass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Heng, Xiaobo; Tang, Guowu; Zhu, Tingting; Sun, Min; Shan, Xiujie; Wen, Xin; Guo, Jingyuan; Qian, Qi; Yang, Zhongmin

    2016-05-01

    Barium gallo-germanate (BGG) glass is an important glass matrix material used for mid-infrared transmission and mid-infrared fiber laser. In this study, we investigated the γ-ray irradiation induced darkening effect of BGG glass. Optical transmittance spectra, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and thermoluminescence (TL) spectra were employed to investigate the γ-ray irradiation induced defects. Two kinds of Ge-related defects in the irradiated BGG glass, named Ge-related non-bridging oxygen hole center (Ge-NBOHC) and Ge-related electron centers (GEC), were verified. In addition, the absorption bands of the two defects have been separated and the peak absorptivity of Ge-NBOHC and GEC defects is at 375 nm and 315 nm, respectively. PMID:27137531

  12. Pulsating aurora induced by upper atmospheric barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deehr, C.; Romick, G.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reports the apparent generation of pulsating aurora by explosive releases of barium vapor near 250 km altitude. This effect occurred only when the explosions were in the path of precipitating electrons associated with the visible aurora. Each explosive charge was a standard 1.5 kg thermite mixture of Ba and CuO with an excess of Ba metal which was vaporized and dispersed by the thermite explosion. Traces of Sr, Na, and Li were added to some of the charges, and monitoring was achieved by ground-based spectrophotometric observations. On March 28, 1976, an increase in emission at 5577 A and at 4278 A was observed in association with the first two bursts, these emissions pulsating with roughly a 10 sec period for approximately 60 to 100 sec after the burst.

  13. Semiclassical analysis of perturbed two-electron states in barium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Kenneth A.

    Recent semiclassical studies of atomic spectra allow new insight into their electron dynamics. The semiclassical closed orbit theory demonstrates the influence of classical orbits in atomic photoabsorption spectra, and has been successfully used for one-electron alkali atoms. Atomic states with one highly-excited electron are known as Rydberg states. If an atom has two valence electrons, and the electrons are treated as independent of each other, then the atom will also have states with two excited electrons. The electrons are not actually independent, so these two different configurations will interact in an atom. If some of the "singly-excited" states occur near the energy of a "doubly-excited" state, then the resulting "perturbed states" are shifted from their hydrogenic positions and have several unusual properties not accounted for by closed orbit theory. We report the first use of closed orbit theory to describe the photoabsorption of perturbed two-electron atomic states. The experimental photoabsorption for two series of perturbed states in barium were measured as a function of electric field. A new extension of semiclassical closed orbit theory was found for perturbed states, using an energy-dependent quantum defect to account for the second valence electron. Scaled energy spectroscopy measurements, a successful analysis technique for one-electron atoms, proved unhelpful when studying perturbed barium states. This demonstrated that perturbed atoms have an important electron-electron interaction term in their Hamiltonian with non-alkali scaling. Our photoabsorption calculations for hydrogen, sodium and cesium verified our experimental calibration and our analysis of atomic core effects. We also show the mathematical equivalence of closed orbit theory and quantum defect theory for modeling the photoabsorption of perturbed atomic states in a field-free environment.

  14. Detection of the White Dwarf Companions of Barium Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, C. J.; Griffin, E.; McGahee, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    The Barium dwarfs are chemically peculiar F- and G-type stars that show enhanced abundances of s-process elements such as strontium and barium. They are believed to have derived their chemical peculiarities via mass transfer from a former AGB companion, now a white dwarf. These WD companions should be detectable in the far-ultraviolet if their effective temperatures exceed 10,000K. However, despite dedicated IUE searches, no WD companion has been directly detected. We have observed 4 Ba dwarfs with the GALEX ultraviolet space telescope (2 newly discovered Ba dwarfs have archival observations), and report here on the first unequivocal direct detection of a WD companion of a Ba dwarf, HD 15306, the hottest Ba dwarf known (F4 V). This WD companion is detected through a clear far-ultraviolet excess. Detection of the putative WD companions of the other observed Ba dwarfs is somewhat more problematical, as those stars have cooler effective temperatures and chromospheric activity can significantly affect their FUV fluxes. The disentanglement of WD FUV fluxes from FUV emission due to chromospheric activity requires comparison of the observed Ba dwarfs with F- and G-type dwarfs with archival GALEX photometry. We have selected a set of 68 F- and G-type dwarfs from the NStars program (Gray et al. 2003, 2006) that have good quality archival GALEX photometry and show a wide range of chromospheric activity. A comparison of these stars with the 5 remaining GALEX-observed Ba dwarfs suggests that one and perhaps two of these Ba dwarfs have detectable WD companions.

  15. Brillouin function characteristics for La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chuanjian E-mail: ksun@uestc.edu.cn; Yu, Zhong; Sun, Ke E-mail: ksun@uestc.edu.cn; Guo, Rongdi; Jiang, Xiaona; Lan, Zhongwen; Yang, Yan

    2015-09-14

    La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites with the chemical formula of Ba{sub 1−x}La{sub x}Fe{sub 12−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 19} (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5), prepared by a conventional ceramic method, were systematically investigated by Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction patterns, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The result manifests that all the compounds are crystallized in magnetoplumbite hexagonal structure. Trivalent cobalt ions prevailingly occupy the 2a, 4f{sub 1}, and 12k sites. According to Néel model of collinear-spin ferrimagnetism, the molecular-field coefficients ω{sub bf2}, ω{sub kf1}, ω{sub af1}, ω{sub kf2}, and ω{sub bk} of La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites have been calculated using the nonlinear fitting method, and the magnetic moment of five sublattices (2a, 2b, 4f{sub 1}, 4f{sub 2}, and 12k) versus temperature T has been also investigated. The fitting results are coincided well with the experimental data. Moreover, with the increase of La-Co substitution amount x, the molecular-field coefficients ω{sub bf2} and ω{sub af1} decrease constantly, while the molecular-field coefficients ω{sub kf1}, ω{sub kf2}, and ω{sub bk} show a slight change.

  16. Barium and carbon fluxes in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Helmuth; Shadwick, Elizabeth; Dehairs, Frank; Lansard, Bruno; Mucci, Alfonso; Navez, Jacques; Gratton, Yves; Prowe, Friederike; Chierici, Melissa; Fransson, Agneta; Papakyriakou, Tim N.; Sternberg, Erika; Miller, Lisa A.; Tremblay, Jean-ÉRic; Monnin, Christophe

    2011-09-01

    The seasonal and spatial variability of dissolved Barium (Ba) in the Amundsen Gulf, southeastern Beaufort Sea, was monitored over a full year from September 2007 to September 2008. Dissolved Ba displays a nutrient-type behavior: the maximum water column concentration is located below the surface layer. The highest Ba concentrations are typically observed at river mouths, the lowest concentrations are found in water masses of Atlantic origin. Barium concentrations decrease eastward through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Barite (BaSO4) saturation is reached at the maximum dissolved Ba concentrations in the subsurface layer, whereas the rest of the water column is undersaturated. A three end-member mixing model comprising freshwater from sea-ice melt and rivers, as well as upper halocline water, is used to establish their relative contributions to the Ba concentrations in the upper water column of the Amundsen Gulf. Based on water column and riverine Ba contributions, we assess the depletion of dissolved Ba by formation and sinking of biologically bound Ba (bio-Ba), from which we derive an estimate of the carbon export production. In the upper 50 m of the water column of the Amundsen Gulf, riverine Ba accounts for up to 15% of the available dissolved Ba inventory, of which up to 20% is depleted by bio-Ba formation and export. Since riverine inputs and Ba export occur concurrently, the seasonal variability of dissolved Ba in the upper water column is moderate. Assuming a fixed organic carbon to bio-Ba flux ratio, carbon export out of the surface layer is estimated at 1.8 ± 0.45 mol C m-2 yr-1. Finally, we propose a climatological carbon budget for the Amundsen Gulf based on recent literature data and our findings, the latter bridging the surface and subsurface water carbon cycles.

  17. Barium and Carbon fluxes in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, H.; Shadwick, E. H.; Woule Ebongue, V.; Lansard, B.; Navez, J.; Gratton, Y.; Prowe, F.; Mucci, A.; Chierici, M.; Fransson, A.; Papakyriakou, T. N.; Sternberg, E.; Miller, L. A.

    2010-12-01

    The seasonal and spatial variability of dissolved Barium (Ba) in the Amundsen Gulf, southeastern Beaufort Sea, was monitored over a full year from September 2007 to September 2008. Barium displays a nutrient-type behavior with the highest concentrations observed at river mouths. The water column maximum is located at the base of the surface layer with lower concentrations above and below. The lowest concentrations are found in water masses of Atlantic origin, and Ba concentrations decrease eastward through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. A three end-member mixing model comprising fresh water from sea-ice melt and rivers, as well as upper halocline water, was used to establish their relative contributions to the surface waters of the Amundsen Gulf. Based on water column and riverine Ba contributions, we assess the Ba depletion by particle sinking and subsequently estimate the carbon export production. In the upper 50 m of the water column of Amundsen Gulf, riverine Ba accounts for up to 15% of the dissolved Ba inventory, whereas up to 20% of the dissolved Ba inventory is depleted by barite (BaSO4) formation and export. Since riverine inputs and Ba export occur concurrently, the seasonal variability of dissolved Ba is moderate. Assuming a fixed organic carbon to barite flux ratio, carbon export out of the surface layer is estimated at 2 mol C m-2 yr-1. Finally, we propose a climatological carbon budget for the Amundsen Gulf based on recent literature data and our findings, the latter bridging the surface and subsurface water carbon cycles. This work is a contribution to the Canadian IPY programs CFL and GEOTRACES, to ArcticNet as well as to the IGBP/IHDP core project LOICZ.

  18. The Benefits of Aluminum Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyal, R. C.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses benefits of aluminum windows for college construction and renovation projects, including that aluminum is the most successfully recycled material, that it meets architectural glass deflection standards, that it has positive thermal energy performance, and that it is a preferred exterior surface. (EV)

  19. Lost-Soap Aluminum Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihalow, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Lost-wax casting in sterling silver is a costly experience for the average high school student. However, this jewelry process can be learned at no cost if scrap aluminum is used instead of silver, and soap bars are used instead of wax. This lost-soap aluminum casting process is described. (Author/KC)

  20. Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide - 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1999-01-01

    The 1990 U.S. Bureau of Mines publication, Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide, has been updated and is now available. The 1998 USGS edition of Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide is published in two parts. Part I—Detail contains information on individual primary smelter capacity, location, ownership, sources of energy, and other miscellaneous information. Part II—Summary summarizes the capacity data by country

  1. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor; Herranz, Sonia; Urraca, Javier; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Avella-Oliver, Miquel; Maquieira, Ángel; Puchades, Rosa

    2015-07-09

    Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (bio)sensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (bio)sensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation--which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA) immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports--the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs.

  2. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor; Herranz, Sonia; Urraca, Javier; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Avella-Oliver, Miquel; Maquieira, Ángel; Puchades, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (bio)sensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (bio)sensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation—which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA) immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports—the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs. PMID:26184330

  3. [Growth and metabolism of calcium in rats chronically poisoned with aluminium hydroxide].

    PubMed

    Mahieu, S; Calvo, M L; Millen, N; Gonzalez, M; Contini, M C

    1998-01-01

    The effects of aluminum on growth have been studied in rats chronically poisoned with aluminum hydroxide (80 mg/kg b.w.-i.p.-three times a week, during 6 months) and in control rats, between 3 and 26 weeks of age. The growth data was evaluated according to Parks 'theory of feeding an growth. At the end of the poisoning period, the calcium metabolism was studied through a balance of calcium and the determination of bone Ca++ accretion and resorption rates with the aid of 45Ca++. The parathyroid glands function was studied using an indirect method. Treated rats showed a significant decrease in asymptotic weights and in the initial efficiency of food conversion into biomass regarding controls. No differences were observed in food intake between both group. Aluminum affected neither the peak growth rate nor the time necessary to attain maturity. The calcium balance in treated rats was significantly less than in the control group. This was accompanied by a significant increase in the calcium excreted by faces, caused perhaps by a less intestinal absorption. An important amount of aluminum on the surface of the trabecular bone and a reduction in the skeletal Ca++ mass, was observed in all treated rats. Nevertheless there are no differences in the latter when expressed for 100 g of body weight. The rate of skeletal Ca++ accretion was found to be significantly decreased in treated group with respect to controls, without any changes in the bone Ca resorption rate. The reduction in bone turnover revealed by the decrease of Vo+/Vo- was accompanied by less recovery velocity of calcemia in the aluminum treated group, being indirectly related to the parathyroid gland response to calcium depletion. In the model that we studied the decreased bone turnover could have been caused by deposits of aluminum in bone; however there could exist associated factors such as dysfunction in the secretion of PTH, or less affinity between its receptors at the bone level. PMID:9504191

  4. [Growth and metabolism of calcium in rats chronically poisoned with aluminium hydroxide].

    PubMed

    Mahieu, S; Calvo, M L; Millen, N; Gonzalez, M; Contini, M C

    1998-01-01

    The effects of aluminum on growth have been studied in rats chronically poisoned with aluminum hydroxide (80 mg/kg b.w.-i.p.-three times a week, during 6 months) and in control rats, between 3 and 26 weeks of age. The growth data was evaluated according to Parks 'theory of feeding an growth. At the end of the poisoning period, the calcium metabolism was studied through a balance of calcium and the determination of bone Ca++ accretion and resorption rates with the aid of 45Ca++. The parathyroid glands function was studied using an indirect method. Treated rats showed a significant decrease in asymptotic weights and in the initial efficiency of food conversion into biomass regarding controls. No differences were observed in food intake between both group. Aluminum affected neither the peak growth rate nor the time necessary to attain maturity. The calcium balance in treated rats was significantly less than in the control group. This was accompanied by a significant increase in the calcium excreted by faces, caused perhaps by a less intestinal absorption. An important amount of aluminum on the surface of the trabecular bone and a reduction in the skeletal Ca++ mass, was observed in all treated rats. Nevertheless there are no differences in the latter when expressed for 100 g of body weight. The rate of skeletal Ca++ accretion was found to be significantly decreased in treated group with respect to controls, without any changes in the bone Ca resorption rate. The reduction in bone turnover revealed by the decrease of Vo+/Vo- was accompanied by less recovery velocity of calcemia in the aluminum treated group, being indirectly related to the parathyroid gland response to calcium depletion. In the model that we studied the decreased bone turnover could have been caused by deposits of aluminum in bone; however there could exist associated factors such as dysfunction in the secretion of PTH, or less affinity between its receptors at the bone level.

  5. In vitro adsorption of aluminum by an edible biopolymer poly(γ-glutamic acid).

    PubMed

    Rajan, Yesudoss Christu; Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Chen, Bing Huei

    2014-05-21

    Accumulation of aluminum in human has been reported to be associated with dementia, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The objectives of this study were to evaluate an edible biopolymer poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) for aluminum removal efficiency under in vitro conditions as affected by pH, contact time, aluminum concentration, temperature, ionic strength, and essential metals in both aqueous aluminum solution and simulated gastrointestinal fluid (GIF). A low aluminum adsorption occurred at pH 1.5-2.5, followed by a maximum adsorption at pH 3.0-4.0 and precipitating thereafter as aluminum hydroxide at pH > 4. Adsorption was extremely fast with 81-96% of total adsorption being attained within 1 min, reaching equilibrium in 5-10 min. Kinetic data at low (10 mg/L) and high (50 mg/L) concentrations were well described by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models, respectively. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms at different temperatures were precisely fitted by both Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson models with the maximum adsorption capacities at 25, 37, and 50 °C being 35.85, 38.68, and 44.23 mg/g, respectively. Thermodynamic calculations suggested endothermic and spontaneous nature of aluminum adsorption by γ-PGA with increased randomness at the solid/solution interface. Variation in ionic strengths did not alter the adsorption capacity, however, the incorporation of essential metals significantly reduced the aluminum adsorption by following the order copper > iron > zinc > calcium > potassium. Compared to aqueous solution, the aluminum adsorption from simulated GIF was high at all studied pH (1-4) with Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity being 49.43 mg/g at 37 °C and pH 4. The outcome of this study suggests that γ-PGA could be used as a safe detoxifying agent for aluminum. PMID:24799126

  6. In vitro adsorption of aluminum by an edible biopolymer poly(γ-glutamic acid).

    PubMed

    Rajan, Yesudoss Christu; Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Chen, Bing Huei

    2014-05-21

    Accumulation of aluminum in human has been reported to be associated with dementia, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The objectives of this study were to evaluate an edible biopolymer poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) for aluminum removal efficiency under in vitro conditions as affected by pH, contact time, aluminum concentration, temperature, ionic strength, and essential metals in both aqueous aluminum solution and simulated gastrointestinal fluid (GIF). A low aluminum adsorption occurred at pH 1.5-2.5, followed by a maximum adsorption at pH 3.0-4.0 and precipitating thereafter as aluminum hydroxide at pH > 4. Adsorption was extremely fast with 81-96% of total adsorption being attained within 1 min, reaching equilibrium in 5-10 min. Kinetic data at low (10 mg/L) and high (50 mg/L) concentrations were well described by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models, respectively. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms at different temperatures were precisely fitted by both Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson models with the maximum adsorption capacities at 25, 37, and 50 °C being 35.85, 38.68, and 44.23 mg/g, respectively. Thermodynamic calculations suggested endothermic and spontaneous nature of aluminum adsorption by γ-PGA with increased randomness at the solid/solution interface. Variation in ionic strengths did not alter the adsorption capacity, however, the incorporation of essential metals significantly reduced the aluminum adsorption by following the order copper > iron > zinc > calcium > potassium. Compared to aqueous solution, the aluminum adsorption from simulated GIF was high at all studied pH (1-4) with Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity being 49.43 mg/g at 37 °C and pH 4. The outcome of this study suggests that γ-PGA could be used as a safe detoxifying agent for aluminum.

  7. The Effects of Different Precursor Milling Processes on the Phase Evolution of Nanocrystalline Barium Hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataie, A.; Sheikhi-Moghaddam, K.; Kashani-Bozorg, S. F.; Sargheini, J.

    2010-03-01

    Nano-crystalline barium hexaferrite was synthesized using a coupled mechano-chemical processing (co-precipitation/mechanical milling); initially co-precipitated product prepared from aqueous solutions of iron and barium chlorides with a Fe/Ba molar ratio of 11 was mechanically milled employing two different milling processes (low energy jar mill and high energy planetary mill). The non-milled and milled co-precipitated materials were then annealed at various temperatures. The thermal properties, phase composition and morphology of samples were investigated. XRD and DTA/TGA results showed that formation of barium hexaferrite occurs at relatively low temperature using planetary milling technique. Also, no BaFe2O4 (intermediate non magnetic phase) was detected by XRD in the milled products. SEM studies exhibited that the mean particle size of barium hexaferrite dramatically increases with increasing annealing temperature from 700 to 1100° C.

  8. Severe acute cholangitis after endoscopic sphincterotomy induced by barium examination: A case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Wu, Ya-Guang; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Su, Zhong-Xue; Xu, Jian; Xian, Guo-Zhe; Wu, Shuo-Dong

    2012-10-21

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) is considered as a possible etiological factor for severe cholangitis. We herein report a case of severe cholangitis after endoscopic sphincterotomy induced by barium examination. An adult male patient presented with epigastric pain was diagnosed as having choledocholithiasis by ultrasonography. EST was performed and the stone was completely cleaned. Barium examination was done 3 d after EST and severe cholangitis appeared 4 h later. The patient was recovered after treated with tienam for 4 d. Barium examination may induce severe cholangitis in patients after EST, although rare, barium examination should be chosen cautiously. Cautions should be also used when EST is performed in patients younger than 50 years to avoid the damage to the sphincter of Oddi.

  9. Numberical simulation of the effects of radially injected barium plasma in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The morphology of the ion cloud in the radial shaped charge barium injection was studied. The shape of the ion cloud that remains after the explosive products and neutral barium clears away was examined. The ion cloud which has the configuration of a rimless wagon wheel is shown. The major features are the 2.5 km radius black hole in the center of the cloud, the surrounding ring of barium ion and the spokes of barium ionization radiating away from the center. The cloud shows no evolution after it emerges from the neutral debris and it is concluded that it is formed within 5 seconds of the event. A numerical model is used to calculate the motion of ions and electrons subject to the electrostatic and lorenz forces.

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of the orbital elements and abundances of barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei-Bin; Niu, Ping; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Jun-Hong; Peng, Qiu-He

    2003-07-01

    We have carried out a series of Monte Carlo simulations to study the distributions of the orbital elements of normal red giant binary systems and barium stars with the wind accretion model under the condition of total angular momentum conservation. Since barium star systems have evolved from normal red giant binary systems, their distributions of orbital eccentricities and periods exhibit the characteristics of the final orbits of binaries after mass accretion. Our calculations show that in the process of wind accretion and in the mass-losing stage, the system gets bigger, and its orbital period increases, while the orbital eccentricity does not vary much. This can explain the various features in the distributions of the orbital elements of normal red giant binary systems and barium stars, as well as features in the distribution of the heavy-element abundances of barium stars.

  11. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  12. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  13. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  14. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  15. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  16. The value of the preoperative barium-enema examination in the assessment of pelvic masses

    SciTech Connect

    Gedgaudas, R.K.; Kelvin, F.M.; Thompson, W.M.; Rice, R.P.

    1983-03-01

    The value of the barium-enema examination in the assessment of pelvic masses was studied in 44 patients. Findings from those barium-enema examinations and from pathological specimens from 37 patients who had malignant tumors and seven patients who had endometriosis were retrospectively analyzed to determine if the barium-enema examination is useful in differentiating extrinsic lesions with and without invasion of the colon. None of the 12 patients who had extrinsic lesions had any of the criteria that indicated bowel-wall invasion. These criteria included fixation and serrations of the bowel wall in all patients with invasion, and ulceration and fistulizaton in those patients who had complete transmural invasion. In patients with pelvic masses, the preoperative barium-enema examination may be useful to the surgeon in planning surgery and in preparing the patient for the possibility of partial colectomy or colostomy.

  17. A review of environmental characteristics and health effects of barium in public water supplies.

    PubMed

    Kojola, W H; Brenniman, G R; Carnow, B W

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive review is made of sources, occurrence, removal, health effects and water quality standard of barium in public drinking water supplies. The primary source of naturally occurring barium in drinking water results from the leaching and eroding of this metal from sedimentary rocks into the aquifers of ground water. It is a localized problem in several areas of the United States. The removal of barium from drinking water appears to be most efficiently accomplished utilizing ion exchange softening. Health effects studies are based primarily on animal experimentation. Such effects include stimulation of smooth, striated, and cardiac muscle, elevation of blood pressure, initiation of catecholamine release, rapid and preferential deposition in bone, and excretion principally in the feces. Humans over 60 years of age appear to be at high risk to developing cardiac arrhythmias following the barium enema. The current United States drinking water standard of 1.0 mg/l is based on several faulty assumptions and should be critically reevaluated.

  18. Elevated Z line: a new sign of Barrett's esophagus on double-contrast barium esophagograms.

    PubMed

    Levine, Marc S; Ahmad, Nuzhat A; Rubesin, Stephen E

    2015-01-01

    We describe an elevated Z line as a new radiographic sign of Barrett's esophagus characterized by a transversely oriented, zigzagging, barium-etched line extending completely across the circumference of the midesophagus. An elevated Z line is rarely seen in other patients, so this finding should be highly suggestive of Barrett's esophagus on double-contrast barium esophagograms. If the patient is a potential candidate for surveillance, endoscopy and biopsy should be performed to confirm the presence of Barrett's esophagus.

  19. Photoemission studies with barium and LaB6 photocathodes and polarized laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, M. E.; Kwon, S. I.; Young, A. T.; Leung, K. N.; Kim, K.-J.

    1994-11-01

    In this paper, presented is a work on the optimization of the performance of barium photocathodes. Studies on the dependence of the quantum yield on the polarization and angle of incidence of the laser beam are conducted. Moreover, studies on single crystal LaB6 photocathodes are reported. This material possesses a lower quantum yield than barium, but chemically it is much less reactive and have a very good thermionic emission characteristics.

  20. Calculations of energy levels and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Ginges, J. S. M.

    2006-03-15

    We use the configuration-interaction method and many-body perturbation theory to perform accurate calculations of energy levels, transition amplitudes, and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium. Calculations for radium are needed for the planning of measurements of parity- and time-invariance-violating effects which are strongly enhanced in this atom. Calculations for barium are used to control the accuracy of the calculations.

  1. Barium isotopes in Allende meteorite: evidence against an extinct superheavy element

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.S.; Anders, E.; Shimamura, T.; Lugmair, G.W.

    1983-12-02

    Carbon and chromite fractions from the Allende meteorite that contain isotopically anomalous xenon-131 to xenon-136 (carbonaceous chondrite fission or CCF xenon) at up to 5 x 10/sup 11/ atoms per gram show no detectable isotopic anomalies in barium-130 to barium-138. This rules out the possibility that the CCF xenon was formed by in situ fission of an extinct superheavy element. Apparently the CCF xenon and its carbonaceous carrier are relics from stellar nucleosynthesis.

  2. Barium isotopes in allende meteorite: evidence against an extinct superheavy element.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R S; Anders, E; Shimamura, T; Lugmair, G W

    1983-12-01

    Carbon and chromite fractions from the Allende meteorite that contain isotopically anomalous xenon-131 to xenon-136 (carbonaceous chondrite fission or CCF xenon) at up to 5 x 10(11) atoms per gram show no detectable isotopic anomalies in barium-130 to barium-138. This rules out the possibility that the CCF xenon was formed by in situ fission of an extinct superheavy element. Apparently the CCF xenon and its carbonaceous carrier are relics from stellar nucleosynthesis.

  3. Comparison of the reflectance characteristics of polytetrafluoroethylene and barium sulfate paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, C. L.; Schutt, J. B.; Shai, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of the directional reflectance measurements taken on two tetrafluorethylene (TFE) paints formulated with silicone binders. Both paints are found to be more Lambertian than barium sulfate paint and pressed powder, although the pigment to binder ratios for barium sulfate and TFE paints are about 133 and 3.3 to 1, respectively. The TFE paints exhibit total visible reflectances above 90 percent and offer surfaces that are not significantly affected by water.

  4. Barium isotopes in Allende meteorite - Evidence against an extinct superheavy element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.; Shimamura, T.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon and chromite fractions from the Allende meteorite that contain isotopically anomalous xenon-131 to xenon-136 (carbonaceous chondrite fission or CCF xenon) at up to 5 x 10 to the 11th atoms per gram show no detectable isotopic anomalies in barium-130 to barium-138. This rules out the possibility that the CCF xenon was formed by in situ fission of an extinct superheavy element. Apparently the CCF xenon and its carbonaceous carrier are relics from stellar nucleosynthesis.

  5. Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Ganteför, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H. E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan W.; Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P.; Kandalam, Anil K. E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Kiran, Boggavarapu E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu

    2014-02-07

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodium–aluminum cluster anions, Na{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup −}, were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams.

  6. Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Ganteför, Gerd; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan W.; Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P.; Kandalam, Anil K.; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Bowen, Kit H.

    2014-02-01

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodium-aluminum cluster anions, NamAln-, were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams.

  7. Calcium hydroxyapatite fillers.

    PubMed

    Tansavatdi, Kristina; Mangat, Devinder S

    2011-12-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite fillers have unique advantages over other fillers in regards to duration of action and volume of product required for augmentation, especially in the midface and lower face. In this article, we describe our experience with calcium hydroxyapatite fillers and compare them with other available filler products.

  8. Aluminum anode for aluminum-air battery - Part I: Influence of aluminum purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Joo; Park, In-Jun; Lee, Hyeok-Jae; Kim, Jung-Gu

    2015-03-01

    2N5 commercial grade aluminum (99.5% purity) leads to the lower aluminum-air battery performances than 4N high pure grade aluminum (99.99% purity) due to impurities itself and formed impurity complex layer which contained Fe, Si, Cu and others. The impurity complex layer of 2N5 grade Al declines the battery voltage on standby status. It also depletes discharge current and battery efficiency at 1.0 V which is general operating voltage of aluminum-air battery. However, the impurity complex layer of 2N5 grade Al is dissolved with decreasing discharge voltage to 0.8 V. This phenomenon leads to improvement of discharge current density and battery efficiency by reducing self-corrosion reaction. This study demonstrates the possibility of use of 2N5 grade Al which is cheaper than 4N grade Al as the anode for aluminum-air battery.

  9. Aluminum plasmonic photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qi; Wang, Chenxi; Huang, Hao; Li, Wan; Du, Deyang; Han, Di; Qiu, Teng; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of photocatalytic processes is dictated largely by plasmonic materials with the capability to enhance light absorption as well as the energy conversion efficiency. Herein, we demonstrate how to improve the plasmonic photocatalytic properties of TiO2/Al nano-void arrays by overlapping the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes with the TiO2 band gap. The plasmonic TiO2/Al arrays exhibit superior photocatalytic activity boasting an enhancement of 7.2 folds. The underlying mechanisms concerning the radiative energy transfer and interface energy transfer processes are discussed. Both processes occur at the TiO2/Al interface and their contributions to photocatalysis are evaluated. The results are important to the optimization of aluminum plasmonic materials in photocatalytic applications. PMID:26497411

  10. Barium swallow study in routine clinical practice: a prospective study in patients with chronic cough*,**

    PubMed Central

    Nin, Carlos Shuler; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Paludo, Artur de Oliveira; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Hochhegger, Daniela Reis; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the routine use of barium swallow study in patients with chronic cough. METHODS: Between October of 2011 and March of 2012, 95 consecutive patients submitted to chest X-ray due to chronic cough (duration > 8 weeks) were included in the study. For study purposes, additional images were obtained immediately after the oral administration of 5 mL of a 5% barium sulfate suspension. Two radiologists systematically evaluated all of the images in order to identify any pathological changes. Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test for categorical data were used in the comparisons. RESULTS: The images taken immediately after barium swallow revealed significant pathological conditions that were potentially related to chronic cough in 12 (12.6%) of the 95 patients. These conditions, which included diaphragmatic hiatal hernia, esophageal neoplasm, achalasia, esophageal diverticulum, and abnormal esophageal dilatation, were not detected on the images taken without contrast. After appropriate treatment, the symptoms disappeared in 11 (91.6%) of the patients, whereas the treatment was ineffective in 1 (8.4%). We observed no complications related to barium swallow, such as contrast aspiration. CONCLUSIONS: Barium swallow improved the detection of significant radiographic findings related to chronic cough in 11.5% of patients. These initial findings suggest that the routine use of barium swallow can significantly increase the sensitivity of chest X-rays in the detection of chronic cough-related etiologies. PMID:24473762

  11. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  12. Aluminum toxicity. Hematological effects.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, S; del Carmen Contini, M; Gonzalez, M; Millen, N; Elias, M M

    2000-01-01

    Sequential effects of intoxication with aluminum hydroxide (Al) (80 mg/Kg body weight, i.p., three times a week), were studied on rats from weaning and up to 28 weeks. The study was carried out on hematological and iron metabolism-related parameters on peripheral blood, at the end of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th months of exposure. As it was described that hematotoxic effects of Al are mainly seen together with high levels of uremia, renal function was measured at the same periods. The animals treated developed a microcytosis and was accompanied by a decrease in mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH). Significantly lower red blood cell counts (RBC million/microl) were found in rats treated during the 1st month. These values matched those obtained for control rats during the 2nd month. From the 3rd month onwards, a significant increase was observed as compared to control groups, and the following values were obtained by the 6th month: (T) 10.0 +/- 0.3 versus (C) 8.7 +/- 0.2 (million/microl). Both MCH and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were found to be significantly lower in groups treated from the 2nd month. At the end of the 6th month the following values were found: MCH (T) 13.3 +/- 0.1 versus (C) 16.9 +/- 0.3 (pg); MCV (T) 42.1 +/- 0.7 versus (C) 51.8 +/- 0.9 (fl). Al was found responsible for lower serum iron concentration levels and in the percentage of transferrin saturation. Thus, although microcytic anemia constitutes an evidence of chronic aluminum exposure, prolonged exposure could lead to a recovery of hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration values with an increase in red cell number. Nevertheless, both microcytosis and the decrease of MCH would persist. These modifications took place without changes being observed in the renal function during the observation period. PMID:10643868

  13. Aluminum toxicity. Hematological effects.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, S; del Carmen Contini, M; Gonzalez, M; Millen, N; Elias, M M

    2000-01-01

    Sequential effects of intoxication with aluminum hydroxide (Al) (80 mg/Kg body weight, i.p., three times a week), were studied on rats from weaning and up to 28 weeks. The study was carried out on hematological and iron metabolism-related parameters on peripheral blood, at the end of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th months of exposure. As it was described that hematotoxic effects of Al are mainly seen together with high levels of uremia, renal function was measured at the same periods. The animals treated developed a microcytosis and was accompanied by a decrease in mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH). Significantly lower red blood cell counts (RBC million/microl) were found in rats treated during the 1st month. These values matched those obtained for control rats during the 2nd month. From the 3rd month onwards, a significant increase was observed as compared to control groups, and the following values were obtained by the 6th month: (T) 10.0 +/- 0.3 versus (C) 8.7 +/- 0.2 (million/microl). Both MCH and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were found to be significantly lower in groups treated from the 2nd month. At the end of the 6th month the following values were found: MCH (T) 13.3 +/- 0.1 versus (C) 16.9 +/- 0.3 (pg); MCV (T) 42.1 +/- 0.7 versus (C) 51.8 +/- 0.9 (fl). Al was found responsible for lower serum iron concentration levels and in the percentage of transferrin saturation. Thus, although microcytic anemia constitutes an evidence of chronic aluminum exposure, prolonged exposure could lead to a recovery of hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration values with an increase in red cell number. Nevertheless, both microcytosis and the decrease of MCH would persist. These modifications took place without changes being observed in the renal function during the observation period.

  14. Releasing-addition method for the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, J.J.

    1963-01-01

    Study of the interferences of silica and sulfate in the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters has led to the development of a method requiring no prior chemical separations. The interference effects of silica, sulfate, potassium, sodium, aluminum, and phosphate are overcome by an addition technique coupled with the use of magnesium as a releasing agent. ?? 1963.

  15. Subsurface Aluminum Nitride Formation in Iron-Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott, June H.

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels containing higher amounts of aluminum than conventional steels are ideal for structural automotive parts due to their mechanical properties. However, the aluminum tends to react with any processing environment at high temperatures and therefore presents significant challenges during manufacturing. One such challenge occurs during secondary cooling, reheating, and hot-rolling and is caused by a reaction with nitrogen-rich atmospheres wherein subsurface aluminum nitride forms in addition to internal and external oxides. The nitrides are detrimental to mechanical properties and cause surface cracks. It is important to understand how these nitrides and oxides form and their consequences for the quality of steel products. This study looks at model iron-aluminum (up to 8 wt.% aluminum) alloys and uses confocal laser scanning microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy to study the effect of various conditions on the growth and development of these precipitates in a subsurface oxygen-depleted region. By using model alloys and controlling the experimental atmosphere, this study is able to understand some of the more fundamental materials science behind aluminum nitride formation in aluminum-rich iron alloys and the relationship between internal nitride and oxide precipitation and external oxide scale morphology and composition. The iron-aluminum alloys were heated in N2 atmospheres containing oxygen impurities. It was found that nitrides formed when bulk aluminum content was below 8 wt.% when oxygen was sufficiently depleted due to the internal oxidation. In the samples containing 1 wt.% aluminum, the depth of the internal oxide and nitride zones were in agreement with a diffusion-based model. Increasing aluminum content to 3 and 5 wt% had the effects of modifying the surface-oxide scale composition and increasing its continuity

  16. Aluminum-air battery crystallizer

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1987-01-01

    A prototype crystallizer system for the aluminum-air battery operated reliably through simulated startup and shutdown cycles and met its design objectives. The crystallizer system allows for crystallization and removal of the aluminum hydroxide reaction product; it is required to allow steady-state and long-term operation of the aluminum-air battery. The system has to minimize volume and maintain low turbulence and shear to minimize secondary nucleation and energy consumption while enhancing agglomeration. A lamella crystallizer satisfies system constraints.

  17. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  18. Calcium and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Nordin, B E

    1997-01-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient that is involved in most metabolic processes and the phosphate salts of which provide mechanical rigidity to the bones and teeth, where 99% of the body's calcium resides. The calcium in the skeleton has the additional role of acting as a reserve supply of calcium to meet the body's metabolic needs in states of calcium deficiency. Calcium deficiency is easily induced because of the obligatory losses of calcium via the bowel, kidneys, and skin. In growing animals, it may impair growth, delay consolidation of the skeleton, and in certain circumstances give rise to rickets but the latter is more often due to deficiency of vitamin D. In adult animals, calcium deficiency causes mobilization of bone and leads sooner or later to osteoporosis, i.e., a reduction in the "amount of bone in the bone" or apparent bone density. The effects of calcium deficiency and oophorectomy (ovariectomy) are additive. In humans, osteoporosis is a common feature of aging. Loss of bone starts in women at the time of the menopause and in men at about age 55 and leads to an increase in fracture rates in both sexes. Individual fracture risk is inversely related to bone density, which in turn is determined by the density achieved at maturity (peak bone density) and the subsequent rate of bone loss. At issue is whether either or both of these variables is related to calcium intake. The calcium requirement of adults may be defined as the mean calcium intake needed to preserve calcium balance, i.e., to meet the significant obligatory losses of calcium through the gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, and skin. The calcium allowance is the higher intake recommended for a population to allow for individual variation in the requirement. The mean requirement defined in this way, calculated from balance studies, is about 20 mmol (800 mg) a day on Western diets, implying an allowance of 25 mmol (1000 mg) or more. Corresponding requirements and allowances have been calculated for

  19. Supramolecular curcumin-barium prodrugs for formulating with ceramic particles.

    PubMed

    Kamalasanan, Kaladhar; Anupriya; Deepa, M K; Sharma, Chandra P

    2014-10-01

    A simple and stable curcumin-ceramic combined formulation was developed with an aim to improve curcumin stability and release profile in the presence of reactive ceramic particles for potential dental and orthopedic applications. For that, curcumin was complexed with barium (Ba(2+)) to prepare curcumin-barium (BaCur) complex. Upon removal of the unbound curcumin and Ba(2+) by dialysis, a water-soluble BaCur complex was obtained. The complex was showing [M+1](+) peak at 10,000-20,000 with multiple fractionation peaks of MALDI-TOF-MS studies, showed that the complex was a supramolecular multimer. The (1)H NMR and FTIR studies revealed that, divalent Ba(2+) interacted predominantly through di-phenolic groups of curcumin to form an end-to-end complex resulted in supramolecular multimer. The overall crystallinity of the BaCur was lower than curcumin as per XRD analysis. The complexation of Ba(2+) to curcumin did not degrade curcumin as per HPLC studies. The fluorescence spectrum was blue shifted upon Ba(2+) complexation with curcumin. Monodisperse nanoparticles with size less than 200dnm was formed, out of the supramolecular complex upon dialysis, as per DLS, and upon loading into pluronic micelles the size was remaining in similar order of magnitude as per DLS and AFM studies. Stability of the curcumin was improved greater than 50% after complexation with Ba(2+) as per UV/Vis spectroscopy. Loading of the supramloecular nanoparticles into pluronic micelles had further improved the stability of curcumin to approx. 70% in water. These BaCur supramolecule nanoparticles can be considered as a new class of prodrugs with improved solubility and stability. Subsequently, ceramic nanoparticles with varying chemical composition were prepared for changing the material surface reactivity in terms of the increase in, degradability, surface pH and protein adsorption. Further, these ceramic particles were combined with curcumin prodrug formulations and optimized the curcumin release

  20. Defect Chemistry and Microstructure of Complex Perovskite Barium Zinc Niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ping

    1991-02-01

    This dissertation presents a systematic study of the characterization of the phase transitions, microstructures, defects and transport properties of undoped and doped complex perovskite barium zinc niobate (BZN). Complex perovskite BZN is a paraelectric material while its parent material barium titanate is ferroelectric. With codoping of (Zn + 2Nb) into Ti site, BaTiO_3 shows three distinguished features. First, the Curie temperature is lowered; second, the three phase transitions (cubic-tetragonal-orthorhombic-rhombohedral) coalesce; and lastly, the transition becomes diffuse showing a typical 2nd order phase transition compared with 1st order in undoped BaTiO_3. Complex microchemical ordering is another characteristic of BZN. Stoichiometric BZN shows a mixture of two types of ordering schemes. 1:1, 1:2 ordered microdomains and the disordered matrix co-exist. The 1:1 type ordering involves an internal charge imbalance which inhibits the growth of 1:1 type of ordered microdomains. The 1:2 type ordering is consistent with the chemical composition of BZN. These ordering patterns can be modified by either adjustment of the Zn/Nb ratio or by doping. The defect structure of the stoichiometric BZN is closely related to that of BaTiO_3. Stoichiometric BZN is an insulator with wide band gap (~ 3.70 eV). Undoped BZN has a high oxygen vacancy concentration which comes from three possible sources, such as unavoidable acceptor impurities, due to their natural abundance, Zn/Nb ratio uncertainty due to processing limitations, and high temperature ZnO loss due to sintering process. The oxygen vacancy concentration for undoped BZN lays in the neighborhood of 1500 ppm (atm.). The compensation defects for various dopants have also been identified. Both electrons and holes conduct by a small polaron mechanism. Various thermodynamic parameters, such as enthalpies of oxidation and reduction, mass action constants for intrinsic electronic disorder, oxidation and reduction have been

  1. [Calcium and health].

    PubMed

    Ortega Anta, Rosa M; Jiménez Ortega, Ana I; López-Sobaler, Ana M

    2015-04-07

    An adequate intake of calcium is only not limited to avoid the risk of osteoporosis and its benefits in longterm bone health, but also it has been linked to protection against various major diseases, such as hypertension, cancer, kidney stones, insulin resistance, diabetes... and several investigations suggest its importance in preventing and controlling obesity. Studies conducted in Spanish representative samples show that a high percentage of adults and children (> 75%) don't achieve the recommended intake of calcium. Moreover, are growing trends among the population suggesting that calcium intake and dairy consumption (main food source of the mineral) are high, and even excessive, in many individuals. This misconception results in that the calcium intake is increasingly far from the recommended one. The maximum tolerable intake of the mineral is fixed at 2.500 mg/day, but this intake is unusual, and it's more disturbing and frequent, to find intakes below the recommended calcium intakes (1.000 and 1.200 mg/day in adults, men and women, respectively). Data from different studies highlight the risk of an inadequate calcium intake and the damages that may affect the health in a long term. It is not about transmitting indiscriminate guidelines in order to increase the intake of calcium / dairy, but the recommended intakes must be met to achieve both the nutritional and health benefits. Also activities for demystification of misconceptions are need, increasingly frequent, that may impair health population.

  2. The determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks by flame photometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Henry

    1956-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks using the Beckman flame photometer, with photomultiplier attachement. The sample is dissolved in hydrofluoric, nitric, and perchloric acids, the hydrofluoric and nitric acids are expelled, a radiation buffer consisting of aluminum, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphoric acid, and nitric acid is added, and the solution is atomized in an oxy-hydrogen flame with an instrument setting of 554 mµ. Measurements are made by comparison against calcium standards, prepared in the same manner, in the 0 to 50 ppm range. The suppression of calcium emission by aluminum and phosphate was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. This addition almost completely restores the standard curve obtained from a solution of calcium nitrate. Interference was noted when the iron concentration in the aspirated solution (including the iron from the buffer) exceeded 100 ppm iron. Other common rock-forming elements did not interfere. The results obtained by this procedure are within ± 2 percent of the calcium oxide values obtained by other methods in the range 1 to 95 percent calcium oxide. In the 0 to 1 percent calcium oxide range the method compares favorably with standard methods.

  3. [Study on the Influence of Mineralizer on the Preparation of Calcium Aluminates Based on Infrared Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Wang, Liang; Zheng, Huai-li; Chen, Wei; Tang, Xiao-min; Shang, Juan-fang; Qian, Li

    2015-05-01

    In this study, effect of mineralizer on the structure and spectraproperties of calcium aluminates formation was extensively studied. Medium or low-grade bauxite and calcium carbonate were used as raw material and mineralizer CaF2 as additive. Calcium aluminates can be obtained after mixing fully, calcination and grinding. The prepared calcium aluminates can be directly used for the production of polyaluminiumchloride (PAC), polymeric aluminum sulfate, sodium aluminate and some other water treatment agents. The calcium aluminates preparation technology was optimized by investigating the mass ratio of raw materials (bauxiteand calcium carbonate) and mineralizer CaF2 dosage. The structure and spectra properties of bauxite and calcium aluminates were characterized by Fourier transform infrared(FTIR) spectroscopy analysis and the mineralization mechanism of the mineralizer was studied. FTIR spectra indicated that the addition of mineralizer promoted the decomposition and transformation of the diaspore, gibbsite and kaolinite, the decomposition of calcium carbonate, and more adequately reaction between bauxite and calcium carbonate. In addition, not only Ca in calcium carbonate and Si in bauxite were more readily reacted, but also Si-O, Si-O-Al and Al-Si bonds in the bauxite were more fractured which contributed to the release of Al in bauxite, and therefore, the dissolution rate of Al2O3 could be improved. The dissolution rate of Al2O3 can be promoted effectively when the mineralizer CaF2 was added in a mass ratio amount of 3%. And the mineralizer CaF2 cannot be fully functioned, when its dosage was in a mass percent of 1. 5%. Low-grade bauxite was easier to sinter for the preparation of calcium aluminates comparing with the highgrade one. The optimum material ratio for the preparation of calcium aluminates calcium at 1 250 °C was the mass ratio between bauxite and calcium carbonate of 1 : 0. 6 and mineralizer CaF2 mass ratio percent of 3%. PMID:26415430

  4. Active experiments in space in conjunction with Skylab. [barium plasma injection experiment and magnetic storm of March 7, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two papers are presented which relate to the Skylab barium shaped charge experiments. The first describes the L=6.6 OOSIK barium plasma injection experiment and magnetic storm of March 7, 1972. Rocket payload, instrumentation, data reduction methods, geophysical environment at the time of the experiment, and results are given. The second paper presents the observation of an auroral Birkeland current which developed from the distortion of a barium plasma jet during the above experiment.

  5. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT OF CENTER WITH TOP OF SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  6. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium...

  10. Fatal encephalopathy after otoneurosurgery procedure with an aluminum-containing biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Hantson, P; Mahieu, P; Gersdorff, M; Sindic, C; Lauwerys, R

    1995-01-01

    Refractory status epilepticus was observed in two patients who underwent vestibular neurectomy. We investigated the relationship with the use of an aluminum containing bone cement during the procedure. Two patients developed focal and thereafter generalized seizures in the late postoperative period of vestibular neurectomy (respectively after 42 and 35 days). A cement (1 g aluminum-calcium fluorosilicate) was used during the procedure to bridge bone defects. Both patients presented cerebrospinal fluid fistula. Investigations excluded common etiologies, in particular infections, and a toxic origin was suspected. Aluminum concentration was determined repeatedly in serum urine, cerebrospinal fluid and retroauricular fistula. The highest aluminum values were respectively in case 1 and 2, 112 and 63 micrograms/L for the cerebrospinal fluid, 495 and 1440 micrograms/L for the fistula, 4.4 and 4.4 micrograms/L in serum. Desferrioxamine was used as chelating agent and aluminum elimination was analyzed in the urine. Status epilepticus became refractory to intensive care therapy. The patients never recovered normal consciousness. Case 1 died 143 days after the procedure and case 2 at 80 days from brain failure. Brain post-mortem examination was obtained in Case 2. Brain aluminum concentration was 2.5 micrograms/g (wet weight) (0.85 micrograms/g in a control non exposed cadaver). The cement (0.2 g) was incubated in vitro (16 h-37 degrees C) with the cerebrospinal fluid of a control patient (cerebrospinal fluid aluminum 8 micrograms/L): aluminum concentration reached 2750 micrograms/L. A close contact between an aluminum containing cement and the cerebrospinal fluid may have resulted in encephalopathy and fatal status epilepticus in these two patients.

  11. Electrolyte treatment for aluminum reduction

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2002-01-01

    A method of treating an electrolyte for use in the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum employing an anode and a cathode, the alumina dissolved in the electrolyte, the treating improving wetting of the cathode with molten aluminum during electrolysis. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten electrolyte comprised of ALF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF and LiF, and treating the electrolyte by providing therein 0.004 to 0.2 wt. % of a transition metal or transition metal compound for improved wettability of the cathode with molten aluminum during subsequent electrolysis to reduce alumina to aluminum.

  12. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  13. Barium from a mini r-process in supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymann, D.

    1983-04-01

    McCulloch and Wasserburg (1978) have reported nonlinear isotopic anomalies in barium for two Ca-Al-rich inclusions of the Allende carbonaceous chondrite, known as EK-1-4-1 and C-1. In an attempt to account for these anomalies, it has been proposed that Ba from an r-process of nucleosynthesis, containing Ba-135 and Ba-137, was injected into the primeval color system but was not totally homogenized. Questions arise in connection with the relations of Xe isotopes in carbonaceous chondrites. This has prompted Heymann and Dziczkaniec (1979, 1980, 1981) to study the formation of r-Xe, r-Kr, and r-Te by the mini r-process which is thought to occur in the O, Ne-rich shells of Type II supernovae. Lee et al. (1979) have studied the formation of r-Ba, r-Nd, and r-Sm by the same process. Certain differences regarding the approaches used by Lee et al. and by Heymann and Dziczkaniec make it necessary to restudy the work of Lee et al. Attention is given to the survival probabilities of nuclear species of interest, taking into accounts the elements Cs, Ba, I, and Xe.

  14. Barium from a mini r-process in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.

    1983-01-01

    McCulloch and Wasserburg (1978) have reported nonlinear isotopic anomalies in barium for two Ca-Al-rich inclusions of the Allende carbonaceous chondrite, known as EK-1-4-1 and C-1. In an attempt to account for these anomalies, it has been proposed that Ba from an r-process of nucleosynthesis, containing Ba-135 and Ba-137, was injected into the primeval color system but was not totally homogenized. Questions arise in connection with the relations of Xe isotopes in carbonaceous chondrites. This has prompted Heymann and Dziczkaniec (1979, 1980, 1981) to study the formation of r-Xe, r-Kr, and r-Te by the mini r-process which is thought to occur in the O, Ne-rich shells of Type II supernovae. Lee et al. (1979) have studied the formation of r-Ba, r-Nd, and r-Sm by the same process. Certain differences regarding the approaches used by Lee et al. and by Heymann and Dziczkaniec make it necessary to restudy the work of Lee et al. Attention is given to the survival probabilities of nuclear species of interest, taking into accounts the elements Cs, Ba, I, and Xe.

  15. Thin film barium strontium titanate ferroelectric varactors for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Hailing; Spatz, Devin; Wang, Shu; Shin, Eunsung; Subramanyam, Guru

    2015-11-01

    Analog phase shifters are investigated with a periodic structure that includes Barium Strontium Titanate ferroelectric thin film varactors in shunt or serial connection to the coplanar waveguide transmission line. The phase shift is achieved by applying a DC bias to the varactors and changing the reactance in the circuit. The goal of this paper is to characterize the shunt capacitive varactors regarding the voltage dependence of the capacitance, loss tangent, and insertion losses at different bias voltages. Quality factor analysis is also conducted taking the parasitic effects into account. Repeated measurements show that the capacitance of a single cell is tuned from 0.8pF to 0.2pF under a DC bias of 0-10V while the loss tangent is kept under 0.01 in the frequency range of 0-40GHz. Insertion loss is tuned from -4dB to less than -0.6dB from 0 to 10V with a Figure of Merit of 14 degrees/dB at 10GHz and the total quality factor of the unit cell is around 6.7 to 10 at 10GHz with matched port impedance. By cascading 10-25 single unit cells, the phase shift is expected to reach 360 degrees with minimum insertion loss.

  16. Two new barium sulfonates with pillared layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Li, Li; Ma, Jian-Fang; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Ji-Cheng

    2006-05-01

    The reactions of BaCl 2·2H 2O with NaHL a and K 3L b (H 2L a=4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid, H 3L b=4-hydroxy-5-nitro-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid) gave two pillared layered coordination polymers: Ba(HL a)(Cl) 1 and KBaL b(H 2O) 32, respectively. The crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction method and refined by full-matrix least-squares methods to R=0.0509 and wR=0.1216 using 1455 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 1; and R=0.0288 and wR=0.0727 using 2661 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 2. The interesting feature of compound 1 is the coordination actions of chloride anions, which help to form the polymeric layers by bridging barium cations. In compound 2 the Lb3- anion acts as an unusual dodecadente ligand to form a coordination polymer with pillared layered structure.

  17. Two new barium sulfonates with pillared layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Li, Li; Ma, Jian-Fang; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Ji-Cheng

    2006-08-01

    The reactions of BaCl 2·2H 2O with NaHL a and K 3L b (H 2L a=4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid, H 3L b=4-hydroxy-5-nitro-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid) gave two pillared layered coordination polymers: Ba(HL a)(Cl) 1 and KBaL b(H 2O) 32, respectively. The crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction method and refined by full-matrix least-squares methods to R=0.0509 and wR=0.1216 using 1455 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 1; and R=0.0288 and wR=0.0727 using 2661 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 2. The interesting feature of compound 1 is the coordination actions of chloride anions, which help to form the polymeric layers by bridging barium cations. In compound 2 the Lb3- anion acts as an unusual dodecadente ligand to form a coordination polymer with pillared layered structure.

  18. Electrical properties of lanthanum doped barium titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Vijatovic Petrovic, M.M.; Bobic, J.D.; Ramoska, T.; Banys, J.; Stojanovic, B.D.

    2011-10-15

    Pure and lanthanum doped barium titanate (BT) ceramics were prepared by sintering pellets at 1300 deg. C for 8 h, obtained from nanopowders synthesized by the polymeric precursor method. XRD results showed formation of a tetragonal structure. The presence of dopants changed the tetragonal structure to pseudo-cubic. The polygonal grain size was reduced up to 300 nm with addition of lanthanum as a donor dopant. Determined dielectric properties revealed that lanthanum modified BT ceramics possessed a diffused ferroelectric character in comparison with pure BT that is a classical ferroelectric material. In doped BT phase transition temperatures were shifted to lower temperatures and dielectric constant values were much higher than in pure BT. A modified Currie Weiss law was used to explore the connection between the doping level and degree of diffuseness of phase transitions. Impedance spectroscopy measurements were carried out at different temperatures in order to investigate electrical resistivity of materials and appearance of a PTCR effect. - Highlights: {yields} Pure and lanthanum doped BaTiO{sub 3} were prepared by polymeric precursors method. {yields} Change of structure from tetragonal to pseudo-cubic. {yields} Lanthanum as a donor dopant influenced on change of ferro-para phase transition. {yields} The diffuseness factor indicated the formation of diffuse ferroelectric material. {yields} Lanthanum affected on PTCR effect appearance in BT ceramics.

  19. Thermoelectric Properties of Barium Plumbate Doped by Alkaline Earth Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eufrasio, Andreza; Bhatta, Rudra; Pegg, Ian; Dutta, Biprodas

    Ceramic oxides are now being considered as a new class of thermoelectric materials because of their high stability at elevated temperatures. Such materials are especially suitable for use as prospective thermoelectric power generators because high temperatures are encountered in such operations. The present investigation uses barium plumbate (BaPbO3) as the starting material, the thermoelectric properties of which have been altered by judicious cation substitutions. BaPbO3 is known to exhibit metallic properties which may turn semiconducting as a result of compositional changes without precipitating a separate phase and/or altering the basic perovskite crystal structure. Perovskite structures are noted for their large interstitial spaces which can accommodate a large variety of ``impurity'' ions. As BaPbO3 has high electrical conductivity, σ = 2.43x105Ω-1 m-1 at room temperature, its thermopower, S, is relatively low, 23 μV/K, as expected. With a thermal conductivity, k, of 4.83Wm-1K-1, the figure of merit (ZT =S2 σ Tk-1) of BaPbO3 is only 0.01 at T = 300K. The objective of this investigation is to study the variation of thermoelectric properties of BaPbO3 as Ba and Pb ions are systematically substituted by alkaline earth ions.

  20. Properties of barium strontium titanate at millimeter wave frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, Nurul; Free, Charles

    2015-04-24

    The trend towards using higher millimetre-wave frequencies for communication systems has created a need for accurate characterization of materials to be used at these frequencies. Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) is a ferroelectric material whose permittivity is known to change as a function of applied electric field and have found varieties of application in electronic and communication field. In this work, new data on the properties of BST characterize using the free space technique at frequencies between 145 GHz and 155 GHz for both thick film and bulk samples are presented. The measurement data provided useful information on effective permittivity and loss tangent for all the BST samples. Data on the material transmission, reflection properties as well as loss will also be presented. The outcome of the work shows through practical measurement, that BST has a high permittivity with moderate losses and the results also shows that BST has suitable properties to be used as RAM for high frequency application.

  1. Review on dielectric properties of rare earth doped barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Fatin Adila; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat; Idris, Mohd Sobri

    2016-07-01

    Rare earth doped Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) were studied due to high permittivity, excellent electrical properties and have wide usage in various applications. This paper reviewed on the electrical properties of RE doped BaTiO3 (RE: Lanthanum (La), Erbium (Er), Samarium (Sm), Neodymium (Nd), Cerium (Ce)), processing method, phase transition occurred and solid solution range for complete study. Most of the RE doped BaTiO3 downshifted the Curie temperature (TC). Transition temperature also known as Curie temperature, TC where the ceramics had a transition from ferroelectric to a paraelectric phase. In this review, the dielectric constant of La-doped BaTiO3, Er-doped BaTiO3, Sm-doped BaTiO3, Nd-doped BaTiO3 and Ce-doped BaTiO3 had been proved to increase and the transition temperature or also known as TC also lowered down to room temperature as for all the RE doped BaTiO3 except for Er-doped BaTiO3.

  2. Hydrogen diffusion in lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvine, K. J.; Vijayakumar, M.; Bowden, M. E.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Pitman, S. G.

    2012-08-01

    Hydrogen is a potential clean-burning, next-generation fuel for vehicle and stationary power. Unfortunately, hydrogen is also well known to have serious materials compatibility issues in metals, polymers, and ceramics. Piezoelectric actuator materials proposed for low-cost, high efficiency high-pressure hydrogen internal combustion engines (HICE) are known to degrade rapidly in hydrogen. This limits their potential use and poses challenges for HICE. Hydrogen-induced degradation of piezoelectrics is also an issue for low-pressure hydrogen passivation in ferroelectric random access memory. Currently, there is a lack of data in the literature on hydrogen species diffusion in piezoelectrics in the temperature range appropriate for the HICE as charged via a gaseous route. We present 1HNMR quantification of the local hydrogen species diffusion within lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate on samples charged by exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen ˜32 MPa. Results are discussed in context of theoretically predicted interstitial hydrogen lattice sites and aqueous charging experiments from existing literature.

  3. Nanoscale inhomogeneities in yttrium-barium-copper-oxide (YBCO) superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Zahirul; Sinha, S. K.; Lang, J. C.; Liu, X.; Haskel, D.; Moss, S. C.; Srajer, G.; Veal, B. W.; Wermeille, D.; Lee, D. R.; Haeffner, D. R.; Welp, U.; Wochner, P.

    2004-03-01

    X-ray diffraction studies at the Advanced Photon Source reveal that nanoscale inhomogeneities, electronic or structural in origin, form in yttrium-barium-copper-oxide (YBa_2Cu_3O_6+x) superconductors and coexist with the superconducting (SC) state. Diffuse scattering from these inhomogeneous superstructures is due to atomic displacements with respect to equilibrium lattice sites (Z. Islam et al. Phys. Rev. B 66, 92501 (2002)), that are characterized by a wavevector of the form q=(q_x,0,0), where qx varies with hole doping from 2 unit cells (along shorter Cu-O-Cu direction) for very low doping to 4 unit cells at optimal doping. Interestingly, while these superstructures are 3-dimensionally ordered when the SC state is weakened (e.g., at x=0.4), as the doping increases, they become quasi 1D with correlation lengths comparable to SC coherence lengths in these cuprates. Recent first-principles calculations (D. de Fontaine et al., to be published) for the x=0.63 compound show that atomic displacements consistent with experimental data can be the result of ordering of O vacancies in YBCO. Models for various superstructures and their role in the phase diagram will be discussed.

  4. Electromagnetic properties and microwave absorbing characteristics of doped barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, A.; Hossienpour, A.; Morisako, A.; Saatchi, A.; Salehi, M.

    2006-07-01

    M-type barium hexaferrite BaFe 12-x(Mn 0.5Cu 0.5Ti) x/2O 19 ( x varying from 0 to 3 in steps of 1) have been synthesized by the usual ceramic sintering method. The ferrite powders possess hexagonal shape and are well separated from one another. The powder of these ferrites were mixed with polyvinylchloride plasticizer to be converted in to a microwave absorbing composite. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), ac susceptometer, vibrating sample magnetometer, and vector network analyzer were used to analyze its structure, electromagnetic and microwave absorption properties. The results showed that, the magnetoplumbite structures for all the samples have been formed. The sample having higher magnetic susceptibility and coercivity exhibits a larger microwave absorbing ability. Also, the present investigation demonstrates that microwave absorber using BaFe 12-x (Mn 0.5Cu 0.5Ti) x/2O 19 ( x=2 and 3)/polyvinylchloride can be fabricated for the applications over 15 GHz, with reflection loss more than -25 dB for specific frequencies, by controlling the molar ratio of the substituted ions.

  5. Abundance analysis of s-process enhanced barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanta, Upakul; Karinkuzhi, Drisya; Goswami, Aruna; Duorah, Kalpana

    2016-08-01

    Detailed chemical composition studies of stars with enhanced abundances of neutron-capture elements can provide observational constraints for neutron-capture nucleosynthesis studies and clues for understanding their contribution to the Galactic chemical enrichment. We present abundance results from high-resolution spectral analyses of a sample of four chemically peculiar stars characterized by s-process enhancement. High-Resolution spectra (R ˜42000) of these objects spanning a wavelength range from 4000 to 6800 Å, are taken from the ELODIE archive. We have estimated the stellar atmospheric parameters, the effective temperature Teff, the surface gravity log g, and metallicity [Fe/H] from local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis using model atmospheres. We report estimates of elemental abundances for several neutron-capture elements, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Dy. While HD 49641 and HD 58368 show [Ba/Fe] ≥ 1.16 the other two objects HD 119650 and HD 191010 are found to be mild barium stars with [Ba/Fe] ˜ 0.4. The derived abundances of the elements are interpreted on the basis of existing theories for understanding their origin and evolution.

  6. Hydrogen diffusion in lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, K. J.; Vijayakumar, M.; Bowden, M. E.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Pitman, S. G.

    2012-08-28

    Hydrogen is a potential clean-burning, next-generation fuel for vehicle and stationary power. Unfortunately, hydrogen is also well known to have serious materials compatibility issues in metals, polymers, and ceramics. Piezoelectric actuator materials proposed for low-cost, high efficiency high-pressure hydrogen internal combustion engines (HICE) are known to degrade rapidly in hydrogen. This limits their potential use and poses challenges for HICE. Hydrogen-induced degradation of piezoelectrics is also an issue for low-pressure hydrogen passivation in ferroelectric random access memory. Currently, there is a lack of data in the literature on hydrogen species diffusion in piezoelectrics in the temperature range appropriate for the HICE as charged via a gaseous route. We present 1HNMR quantification of the local hydrogen species diffusion within lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate on samples charged by exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen ~32 MPa. We discuss results in the context of theoretically predicted interstitial hydrogen lattice sites and aqueous charging experiments from existing literature.

  7. Barium in landscape components of the western Transbaikal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashin, V. K.

    2015-10-01

    Barium concentrations in parent materials, soils, and plants of the forest-steppe, steppe, and dry steppe landscapes of the Transbaikal region have been studied. The average concentration of this element in rocks and soils of this region exceeds its clarke by 1.8-2.1 times. A positive correlation between the contents of Ba in soils, soil-forming rocks, and plants has been found. The concentration of Ba in soils does not correlate with the soil pH and humus content. Distribution patterns of Ba in the soil profiles have been characterized. With respect to the coefficient of the biological uptake by plants, Ba is assigned to the group of low accumulation (0.55-0.65) for mineral soils and of strong accumulation (6.0) for alluvial bog soils. Average concentrations of Ba in the steppe, meadow, and cultivated vegetation of the region are 1.9-2.3 times higher in comparison with the average concentration of this element in plants of the continents. The biological migration of Ba is most active in meadow landscapes, whereas steppe landscapes are characterized by the least active biological migration of this element.

  8. A Virtual Aluminum Reduction Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Zhou, Chenn Q.; Wu, Bing; Li, Jie

    2013-11-01

    The most important component in the aluminum industry is the aluminum reduction cell; it has received considerable interests and resources to conduct research to improve its productivity and energy efficiency. The current study focused on the integration of numerical simulation data and virtual reality technology to create a scientifically and practically realistic virtual aluminum reduction cell by presenting complex cell structures and physical-chemical phenomena. The multiphysical field simulation models were first built and solved in ANSYS software (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA, USA). Then, the methodology of combining the simulation results with virtual reality was introduced, and a virtual aluminum reduction cell was created. The demonstration showed that a computer-based world could be created in which people who are not analysis experts can see the detailed cell structure in a context that they can understand easily. With the application of the virtual aluminum reduction cell, even people who are familiar with aluminum reduction cell operations can gain insights that make it possible to understand the root causes of observed problems and plan design changes in much less time.

  9. Barium inhibits arsenic-mediated apoptotic cell death in human squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Ichiro; Uemura, Noriyuki; Nizam, Saika; Khalequzzaman, Md; Thang, Nguyen D; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Akhand, Anwarul A; Shekhar, Hossain U; Nakajima, Tamie; Kato, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Our fieldwork showed more than 1 μM (145.1 μg/L) barium in about 3 μM (210.7 μg/L) arsenic-polluted drinking well water (n = 72) in cancer-prone areas in Bangladesh, while the mean concentrations of nine other elements in the water were less than 3 μg/L. The types of cancer include squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We hypothesized that barium modulates arsenic-mediated biological effects, and we examined the effect of barium (1 μM) on arsenic (3 μM)-mediated apoptotic cell death of human HSC-5 and A431 SCC cells in vitro. Arsenic promoted SCC apoptosis with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK1/2 and caspase-3 activation (apoptotic pathway). In contrast, arsenic also inhibited SCC apoptosis with increased NF-κB activity and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) expression level and decreased JNK activity (antiapoptotic pathway). These results suggest that arsenic bidirectionally promotes apoptotic and antiapoptotic pathways in SCC cells. Interestingly, barium in the presence of arsenic increased NF-κB activity and XIAP expression and decreased JNK activity without affecting ROS production, resulting in the inhibition of the arsenic-mediated apoptotic pathway. Since the anticancer effect of arsenic is mainly dependent on cancer apoptosis, barium-mediated inhibition of arsenic-induced apoptosis may promote progression of SCC in patients in Bangladesh who keep drinking barium and arsenic-polluted water after the development of cancer. Thus, we newly showed that barium in the presence of arsenic might inhibit arsenic-mediated cancer apoptosis with the modulation of the balance between arsenic-mediated promotive and suppressive apoptotic pathways.

  10. Parenteral drug products containing aluminum as an ingredient or a contaminant: Response to Food and Drug Administration notice of intent and request for information. ASCN/A. S. P. E. N. Working Group on Standards for Aluminum Content of Parenteral Nutrition Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    Aluminum remains a significant contaminant of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions and may be elevated in bone, urine, and plasma of infants receiving TPN. Aluminum accumulation in tissues of uremic patients and adult TPN patients has been associated with low-turnover bone disease. Furthermore, aluminum has also been linked with encephalopathy and anemia in uremic patients and with hepatic cholestasis in experimental animals. Because of the toxic effects of aluminum, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently published a notice of intent to set an upper limit of 25 micrograms/L for aluminum in large-volume parenterals and to require manufacturers of small-volume parenterals, such as calcium and phosphate salts, to measure aluminum content and note this content on the package label. The ASCN/A.S.P.E.N. Working Group on Standards for Aluminum Content of Parenteral Nutrition Solutions supports these intentions and further urges the FDA to require that cumulative aluminum intake in terms of safe, unsafe, and toxic quantities of aluminum per kilogram be made known to physicians and pharmacists preparing the TPN solutions, to ensure that manufacturers use appropriate control procedures in aluminum measurements, and to employ a standard unit of aluminum measurement.

  11. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  12. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Goldschlager N. Cardiovascular toxicology. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management ... SD. Calcium channel antagonists. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management ...

  13. Calcium blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... failure Low blood level of albumin Liver disease Magnesium deficiency Pancreatitis Vitamin D deficiency ... PA: Elsevier; 2013:chap 66. Leone KA. Calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus. In: Adams JG, ed. Emergency Medicine: ...

  14. Anodized aluminum on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1993-01-01

    A compilation of reported analyses and results obtained for anodized aluminum flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was prepared. Chromic acid, sulfuric acid, and dyed sulfuric acid anodized surfaces were exposed to the space environment. The vast majority of the anodized surface on LDEF was chromic acid anodize because of its selection as a thermal control coating for use on the spacecraft primary structure, trays, tray clamps, and space end thermal covers. Reports indicate that the chromic acid anodize was stable in solar absorptance and thermal emittance, but that contamination effects caused increases in absorptance on surfaces exposed to low atomic oxygen fluences. There were some discrepancies, however, in that some chromic acid anodized specimens exhibited significant increases in absorptance. Sulfuric acid anodized surfaces also appeared stable, although very little surface area was available for evaluation. One type of dyed sulfuric acid anodize was assessed as an optical baffle coating and was observed to have improved infrared absorptance characteristics with exposure on LDEF.

  15. Cement-mortar pipes as a source of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Berend, K.; Trouwborst, T.

    1999-07-01

    In 1996 in Curacao, acute aluminum (Al) intoxication sickened patients in a dialysis center that used tap water to prepare dialysate. The mortality rate was 32%. A new factory-lined cement-mortar water distribution pipe had recently been installed. It is known that substantial amounts of barium, cadmium, and chromium can leach from cement-mortar linings. This article shows that high concentrations of Al can leach from cement mortars for at least two years in soft, aggressive water. The newly installed pipe, cement containing four times as much Al as usual, corrosive water, the high pH and temperature of the water, long residence time, and perhaps the corrosion inhibitor polyphosphate may have promoted this leaching. Certification of cements used to line water pipes is warranted. Central water treatment plants must distribute noncorrosive water, especially plants that use membrane desalination or other reverse osmosis or nanofiltration processes. Dialysis units should be promptly informed of any impending change in water treatment that might increase the Al content of tap water and also of any accidental pollution of the water distributed. Dialysis centers should always practice extended purification of tap water used for dialysate. Although Al as a risk factor for Alzheimer`s disease in the general population is still debated, there is no doubt that Al causes dialysis encephalopathy.

  16. Commonwealth Aluminum: Manufacturer Conducts Plant-Wide Energy Assessments at Two Aluminum Sheet Production Operations;

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-04-01

    DOE Industrial Technologies Program case study describes the savings possible if Commonwealth Aluminum (now Aleris Rolled Products) makes improvements noted in energy assessments at two aluminum mills.

  17. Commonwealth Aluminum: Manufacturer Conducts Plant-Wide Energy Assessments at Two Aluminum Sheet Production Operations

    SciTech Connect

    2006-04-01

    DOE Industrial Technologies Program case study describes the savings possible if Commonwealth Aluminum (now Aleris Rolled Products) makes improvements noted in energy assessments at two aluminum mills.

  18. Low-aluminum content iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    The low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum program deals with the development of a Fe-Al alloy with aluminum content such as a produce the minimum environmental effect at room temperature. The FAPY is an Fe-16 at. % Al-based alloy developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as the highest aluminum-containing alloy with essentially no environmental effect. The chemical composition for FAPY in weight percent is: aluminum = 8.46, chromium = 5.50, zirconium = 0.20, carbon = 0.03, molybdenum = 2.00, yttrium = 0.10 and iron = 83.71. The ignots of the alloy can be hot worked by extrusion, forging, and rolling processes. The hot-worked cast structure can be cold worked with intermediate anneals at 800{degrees}C. Typical room-temperature ductility of the fine-grained wrought structure is 20 to 25% for this alloy. In contrast to the wrought structure, the cast ductility at room temperature is approximately 1% with a transition temperature of approximately 100 to 150{degrees}C, above which ductility values exceed 20%. The alloy has been melted and processed into bar, sheet, and foil. The alloy has also been cast into slabs, step-blocks of varying thicknesses, and shapes. The purpose of this section is to describe the welding response of cast slabs of three different thicknesses of FAPY alloy. Tensile, creep, and Charpy-impact data of the welded plates are also presented.

  19. Assessing the health risks of aluminum.

    PubMed

    Orme, J; Ohanian, E V

    1990-03-01

    Aluminum is a ubiquitous substance with over 4,000 uses. Aluminum, as aluminum sulfate, is commonly used in the United States as a coagulant in the treatment of drinking water. For many years aluminum was not considered to be toxic to humans. However, reports associating aluminum with several skeletal and neurological disorders in humans suggest that exposure to aluminum may pose a health hazard. In 1983 the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced plans to regulate a number of substances, including aluminum, in drinking water. Aluminum was considered because of its occurrence and apparent toxicity. Upon further evaluation of the health effects data the EPA proposed not to regulate aluminum as a result of the uncertainty of the toxicity of ingested aluminum. Putative causal associations between aluminum exposure and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease have yet to be substantiated. Although several issues regarding the toxicity of ingested aluminum are unresolved, aluminum has been specified in the 1986 Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act, as one of 83 substances in drinking water to be regulated by 1989. Additional data are needed before the potential risk of aluminum can be assessed; therefore the EPA has deferred possible regulation until 1991. PMID:24202565

  20. High pressure–low temperature phase diagram of barium: Simplicity versus complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Desgreniers, Serge; Tse, John S.; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2015-11-30

    Barium holds a distinctive position among all elements studied upon densification. Indeed, it was the first example shown to violate the long-standing notion that high compression of simple metals should preserve or yield close-packed structures. From modest pressure conditions at room temperature, barium transforms at higher pressures from its simple structures to the extraordinarily complex atomic arrangements of the incommensurate and self-hosting Ba-IV phases. By a detailed mapping of the pressure/temperature structures of barium, we demonstrate the existence of another crystalline arrangement of barium, Ba-VI, at low temperature and high pressure. The simple structure of Ba-VI is unlike that of complex Ba-IV, the phase encountered in a similar pressure range at room temperature. First-principles calculations predict Ba-VI to be stable at high pressure and superconductive. The results illustrate the complexity of the low temperature-high pressure phase diagram of barium and the significant effect of temperature on structural phase transformations.