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Sample records for aluminum hydride phases

  1. Solid State NMR Studies of the Aluminum Hydride Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Son-Jong; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Graetz, Jason; Reilly, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Several solid state NMR techniques including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various AlH3 samples. MAS-NMR spectra for the 1H and 27Al nuclei have been obtained on a variety of AlH3 samples that include the (beta)- and (gamma)- phases as well as the most stable (alpha)-phase. While the dominant components in these NMR spectra correspond to the aluminum hydride phases, other species were found that include Al metal, molecular hydrogen (H2), as well as peaks that can be assigned to Al-O species in different configurations. The occurrence and concentration of these extraneous components are dependent upon the initial AlH3 phase composition and preparation procedures. Both the (beta)-AlH3 and (gamma)-AlH3 phases were found to generate substantial amounts of Al metal when the materials were stored at room temperature while the (alpha)-phase materials do not exhibit these changes.

  2. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOEpatents

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J.

    2009-04-21

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  3. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOEpatents

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  4. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  5. Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.

    SciTech Connect

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2005-11-01

    Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

  6. Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H. E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Li, Xiang; Kiran, Boggavarapu E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Kandalam, Anil K.

    2014-04-28

    Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, B{sub x}Al{sub y}H{sub z}{sup −}, were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms.

  7. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Aluminum Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wanseop; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Jaeyong

    2016-03-01

    Aluminum hydride (AlH3 or alane) is known to store maximum 10.1 wt.% of hydrogen at relatively low temperature (< 100 degrees C), which partially fulfills the U.S. department of energy requirements for gravimetric loading capacity. However, its detailed mechanisms of appearing of different phases, structural stability, and dynamics of hydrogen desorption are still not clear. To understand the desorption properties of hydrogen in alane, thermodynamically stable α-AlH3 was synthesized by employing an ethereal reaction method. The dependence of pathways on phase formation and the properties of hydrogen evolution were investigated, and the results were compared with the ones for γ-AlH3. It was found that γ-AlH3 requires 10 degrees C higher than that of γ-AlH3 to form, and its decomposition rate demonstrated enhanced endothermic stabilities. For desorption, all hydrogen atoms of alane evolved under an isothermal condition at 138 degrees C in less than 1 hour, and the sample completely transformed to pure aluminum. Our results show that the total amount of desorbed hydrogen from α-AlH3 exceeded 9.05 wt.%, with a possibility of further increase. Easy synthesis, thermal stability, and a large amount of hydrogen desorption of alane fulfill the requirements for light-weight hydrogen storage materials once the pathway of hydrogen cycling is provided. PMID:27455747

  8. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Aluminum Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wanseop; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Jaeyong

    2016-03-01

    Aluminum hydride (AlH3 or alane) is known to store maximum 10.1 wt.% of hydrogen at relatively low temperature (< 100 degrees C), which partially fulfills the U.S. department of energy requirements for gravimetric loading capacity. However, its detailed mechanisms of appearing of different phases, structural stability, and dynamics of hydrogen desorption are still not clear. To understand the desorption properties of hydrogen in alane, thermodynamically stable α-AlH3 was synthesized by employing an ethereal reaction method. The dependence of pathways on phase formation and the properties of hydrogen evolution were investigated, and the results were compared with the ones for γ-AlH3. It was found that γ-AlH3 requires 10 degrees C higher than that of γ-AlH3 to form, and its decomposition rate demonstrated enhanced endothermic stabilities. For desorption, all hydrogen atoms of alane evolved under an isothermal condition at 138 degrees C in less than 1 hour, and the sample completely transformed to pure aluminum. Our results show that the total amount of desorbed hydrogen from α-AlH3 exceeded 9.05 wt.%, with a possibility of further increase. Easy synthesis, thermal stability, and a large amount of hydrogen desorption of alane fulfill the requirements for light-weight hydrogen storage materials once the pathway of hydrogen cycling is provided.

  9. Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies on Titanium-doped Sodium Aluminum Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culnane, Lance F.

    Hydrogen fuel cells play an important role in today's diverse and blossoming alternative energy industry. One of the greatest technological barriers for vehicular applications is the storage of hydrogen (which is required to power hydrogen fuel cells). Storing hydrogen as a gas is not volume efficient, and storing it as a liquid is not cost effective, therefore solid-state storage of hydrogen, such as in metal hydrides offers the most potential for success since many metal hydrides have attractive qualities for hydrogen storage such as: high volumetric capacity, cost efficiency, weight efficiency, low refueling times, and most importantly, high safety. Unfortunately, a compound has not been discovered which contains all of the attractive hydrogen storage qualities for vehicular applications. Sodium aluminum hydride (NaAlH 4) is one of the few compounds which is close to meeting requirements for car manufacturers, and has perhaps been researched the most extensively out of all metal hydrides in the last 15 years. This arises from the remarkable discovery by Bogdanovic who found that doping NaAlH4 with Ti dopants enabled the reversible dehydrogenation and hydrogenation of NaAlH 4 at mild conditions. Various evidence and theories have been proposed to suggest explanations for the enhanced kinetic effect that Ti-doping and ball-milling provide. However, the research community has not reached a consensus as to the exact role of Ti-dopants. If the role of titanium in the NaAlH4 dehydrogenation/hydrogenation mechanism could be understood, then more attractive metal hydrides could be designed. To this end, we conducted Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) studies to explain the role of the Ti dopants. The first known thorough particle size analysis of the NaAlH4 system was conducted, as well as TEM-EELS (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy), TEM-EDS (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy), and in-situ imaging studies. Preparation methods were found to be important for the

  10. Aluminum-titanium hydride-boron carbide composite provides lightweight neutron shield material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poindexter, A. M.

    1967-01-01

    Inexpensive lightweight neutron shield material has high strength and ductility and withstands high internal heat generation rates without excessive thermal stress. This composite material combines structural and thermal properties of aluminum, neutron moderating properties of titanium hydride, and neutron absorbing characteristics of boron carbide.

  11. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE STORAGE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Zidan, R; Christopher Fewox, C; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B; Joshua Gray, J

    2009-01-09

    One of the challenges of implementing the hydrogen economy is finding a suitable solid H{sub 2} storage material. Aluminium (alane, AlH{sub 3}) hydride has been examined as a potential hydrogen storage material because of its high weight capacity, low discharge temperature, and volumetric density. Recycling the dehydride material has however precluded AlH{sub 3} from being implemented due to the large pressures required (>10{sup 5} bar H{sub 2} at 25 C) and the thermodynamic expense of chemical synthesis. A reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically using NaAlH{sub 4} in THF been successfully demonstrated. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum. To complete the cycle, the starting alanate can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride (NaH) This novel reversible cycle opens the door for alane to fuel the hydrogen economy.

  12. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Fewox, C; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B

    2008-12-31

    Hydrogen storage is one of the greatest challenges for implementing the ever sought hydrogen economy. Here we report a novel cycle to reversibly form high density hydrogen storage materials such as aluminium hydride. Aluminium hydride (AlH{sub 3}, alane) has a hydrogen storage capacity of 10.1 wt% H{sub 2}, 149 kg H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric density and can be discharged at low temperatures (< 100 C). However, alane has been precluded from use in hydrogen storage systems because of the lack of practical regeneration methods; the direct hydrogenation of aluminium to form AlH{sub 3} requires over 10{sup 5} bars of hydrogen pressure at room temperature and there are no cost effective synthetic means. Here we show an unprecedented reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically, using alkali alanates (e.g. NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}) in aprotic solvents. To complete the cycle, the starting alanates can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride being the other compound formed in the electrochemical cell. The process of forming NaAlH{sub 4} from NaH and Al is well established in both solid state and solution reactions. The use of adducting Lewis bases is an essential part of this cycle, in the isolation of alane from the mixtures of the electrochemical cell. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to pure, unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum.

  13. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Zidan, R; Christopher Fewox, C; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B; Joshua Gray, J

    2009-01-09

    Hydrogen storage is one of the challenges to be overcome for implementing the ever sought hydrogen economy. Here we report a novel cycle to reversibly form high density hydrogen storage materials such as aluminium hydride. Aluminium hydride (AlH{sub 3}, alane) has a hydrogen storage capacity of 10.1 wt% H{sub 2}, 149 kg H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric density and can be discharged at low temperatures (< 100 C). However, alane has been precluded from use in hydrogen storage systems because of the lack of practical regeneration methods. The direct hydrogenation of aluminium to form AlH{sub 3} requires over 10{sup 5} bars of hydrogen pressure at room temperature and there are no cost effective synthetic means. Here we show an unprecedented reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically, using alkali metal alanates (e.g. NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}) in aprotic solvents. To complete the cycle, the starting alanates can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride being the other compound formed in the electrochemical cell. The process of forming NaAlH{sub 4} from NaH and Al is well established in both solid state and solution reactions. The use of adducting Lewis bases is an essential part of this cycle, in the isolation of alane from the mixtures of the electrochemical cell. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to pure, unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum.

  14. Phase I. Lanthanum-based Start Materials for Hydride Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, K. A.; Schmidt, F. A.; Frerichs, A. E.; Ament, K. A.

    2013-08-20

    The purpose of Phase I of this work is to focus on developing a La-based start material for making nickel-metal (lanthanum)-hydride batteries based on our carbothermic-silicon process. The goal is to develop a protocol for the manufacture of (La1-xRx)(Ni1-yMy)(Siz), where R is a rare earth metal and M is a non-rare earth metal, to be utilized as the negative electrode in nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries.

  15. Hydride vapor phase epitaxy of AlN using a high temperature hot-wall reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Troy; Mayo, Ashley; Veisi, Zeinab; Lu, Peng; Schmitt, Jason

    2014-10-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) was grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The experiments utilized a two zone inductively heated hot-wall reactor. The surface morphology, crystal quality, and growth rate were investigated as a function of growth temperature in the range of 1450-1575 °C. AlN templates grown to a thickness of 1 μm were optimized with double axis X-ray diffraction (XRD) rocking curve full width half maximums (FWHMs) of 135″ for the (002) and 513″ for the (102).

  16. Micro-scale fracture experiments on zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, H.; Roberts, S. G.; Gong, J.

    2016-07-01

    Fracture properties of micro-scale zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries were studied using microcantilever testing methods. FIB-machined microcantilevers were milled on cross-sectional surfaces of hydrided samples, with the most highly-stressed regions within the δ-hydride film, within the α-Zr or along the Zr-hydride interface. Cantilevers were notched using the FIB and then tested in bending using a nanoindenter. Load-displacement results show that three types of cantilevers have distinct deformation properties. Zr cantilevers deformed plastically. Hydride cantilevers fractured after a small amount of plastic flow; the fracture toughness of the δ-hydride was found to be 3.3 ± 0.4 MPam1/2 and SEM examination showed transgranular cleavage on the fracture surfaces. Cantilevers notched at the Zr-hydride interface developed interfacial voids during loading, at loads considerably lower than that which initiate brittle fracture of hydrides.

  17. A quantitative phase field model for hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys: Part II. Modeling of temperature dependent hydride precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhihua; Hao, Mingjun; Guo, Xianghua; Tang, Guoyi; Shi, San-Qiang

    2015-04-01

    A quantitative free energy functional developed in Part I (Shi and Xiao, 2014 [1]) was applied to model temperature dependent δ-hydride precipitation in zirconium in real time and real length scale. At first, the effect of external tensile load on reorientation of δ-hydrides was calibrated against experimental observations, which provides a modification factor for the strain energy in free energy formulation. Then, two types of temperature-related problems were investigated. In the first type, the effect of temperature transient was studied by cooling the Zr-H system at different cooling rates from high temperature while an external tensile stress was maintained. At the end of temperature transients, the average hydride size as a function of cooling rate was compared to experimental data. In the second type, the effect of temperature gradients was studied in a one or two dimensional temperature field. Different boundary conditions were applied. The results show that the hydride precipitation concentrated in low temperature regions and that it eventually led to the formation of hydride blisters in zirconium. A brief discussion on how to implement the hysteresis of hydrogen solid solubility on hydride precipitation and dissolution in the developed phase field scheme is also presented.

  18. Modeling of Gallium Nitride Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A reactor model for the hydride vapor phase epitaxy of GaN is presented. The governing flow, energy, and species conservation equations are solved in two dimensions to examine the growth characteristics as a function of process variables and reactor geometry. The growth rate varies with GaCl composition but independent of NH3 and H2 flow rates. A change in carrier gas for Ga source from H2 to N2 affects the growth rate and uniformity for a fixed reactor configuration. The model predictions are in general agreement with observed experimental behavior.

  19. Gas phase contributions to topochemical hydride reduction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yoji; Li, Zhaofei; Hirai, Kei; Tassel, Cédric; Loyer, François; Ichikawa, Noriya; Abe, Naoyuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Shimakawa, Yuichi; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi; Takano, Mikio; Hernandez, Olivier J.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    Alkali and alkali earth hydrides have been used as solid state reductants recently to yield many interesting new oxygen-deficient transition metal oxides. These reactions have tacitly been assumed to be a solid phase reaction between the reductant and parent oxide. We have conducted a number of experiments with physical separation between the reductant and oxides, and find that in some cases reduction proceeds even when the reagents are physically separated, implying reactions with in-situ generated H2 and, to a lesser extent, getter mechanisms. Our findings change our understanding of these topochemical reactions, and should enhance the synthesis of additional new oxides and nanostructures.

  20. Crystal structure of the superconducting phase of sulfur hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einaga, Mari; Sakata, Masafumi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shimizu, Katsuya; Eremets, Mikhail I.; Drozdov, Alexander P.; Troyan, Ivan A.; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-09-01

    A superconducting critical temperature above 200 K has recently been discovered in H2S (or D2S) under high hydrostatic pressure. These measurements were interpreted in terms of a decomposition of these materials into elemental sulfur and a hydrogen-rich hydride that is responsible for the superconductivity, although direct experimental evidence for this mechanism has so far been lacking. Here we report the crystal structure of the superconducting phase of hydrogen sulfide (and deuterium sulfide) in the normal and superconducting states obtained by means of synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements, combined with electrical resistance measurements at both room and low temperatures. We find that the superconducting phase is mostly in good agreement with the theoretically predicted body-centred cubic (bcc) structure for H3S. The presence of elemental sulfur is also manifest in the X-ray diffraction patterns, thus proving the decomposition mechanism of H2S to H3S + S under pressure.

  1. Spontaneous formation of GaN/AlN core-shell nanowires on sapphire by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trassoudaine, Agnès; Roche, Elissa; Bougerol, Catherine; André, Yamina; Avit, Geoffrey; Monier, Guillaume; Ramdani, Mohammed Réda; Gil, Evelyne; Castelluci, Dominique; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.

    2016-11-01

    Spontaneous GaN/AlN core-shell nanowires with high crystal quality were synthesized on sapphire substrates by vapor-liquid-solid hydride vapor phase epitaxy (VLS-HVPE) without any voluntary aluminum source. Deposition of aluminum is difficult to achieve in this growth technique which uses metal-chloride gaseous precursors: the strong interaction between the AlCl gaseous molecules and the quartz reactor yields a huge parasitic nucleation on the walls of the reactor upstream the substrate. We open up an innovative method to produce GaN/AlN structures by HVPE, thanks to aluminum etching from the sapphire substrate followed by redeposition onto the sidewalls of the GaN core. The paper presents the structural characterization of GaN/AlN core-shell nanowires, speculates on the growth mechanism and discusses a model which describes this unexpected behavior.

  2. Hydriding process

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, J.W.; Taketani, H.

    1973-12-01

    BS>A method is described for hydriding a body of a Group IV-B metal, preferably zirconium, to produce a crack-free metal-hydride bedy of high hydrogen content by cooling the body at the beta to beta + delta boundary, without further addition of hydrogen, to precipitate a fine-grained delta-phase metal hydride in the beta + delta phase region and then resuming the hydriding, preferably preceded by a reheating step. (Official Gazette)

  3. Molecular aluminum hydrides identified by inelastic neutron scattering during H2 regeneration of catalyst-doped NaAlH4.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qi Jia; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Tsang, Shik Chi

    2006-01-19

    Catalyst-doped sodium aluminum hydrides have been intensively studied as solid hydrogen carriers for onboard proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Although the importance of catalyst choice in enhancing kinetics for both hydrogen uptake and release of this hydride material has long been recognized, the nature of the active species and the mechanism of catalytic action are unclear. We have shown by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy that a volatile molecular aluminum hydride is formed during the early stage of H2 regeneration of a depleted, catalyst-doped sodium aluminum hydride. Computational modeling of the INS spectra suggested the formation of AlH3 and oligomers (AlH3)n (Al2H6, Al3H9, and Al4H12 clusters), which are pertinent to the mechanism of hydrogen storage. This paper demonstrates, for the first time, the existence of these volatile species.

  4. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiHx, which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  5. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiH x , which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  6. Hydride-phase formation and its influence on fatigue crack propagationbehavior in a Zircaloy-4 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Elena; Choo, H.; Wang, G Y; Liaw, Peter K; Clausen, B; Brown, D. W.; Park, Jae-Sung; Rack, P. D.; Kenik, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    The hydride-phase formation and its influence on the fatigue behavior of a Zircaloy-4 alloy charged with hydrogen gas are investigated. First, the microstructure and fatigue crack propagation rate of the alloy in the as-received condition are studied. Second, the formation and homogeneous distribution of delta zirconium hydride ( -ZrH2) in the bulk, and its effect on the fatigue crack propagation rate are presented. The results show that in the presence of hydrides the zirconium alloy exhibits reduced toughness and enhanced crack growth rates. Finally, the influence of a pre-existing fatigue crack in the specimen and the subsequent hydride formation were investigated. The residual lattice strain profile around the fatigue crack tip was measured using neutron diffraction. The combined effects of residual strains and hydride precipitation on the fatigue behavior are discussed.

  7. Electronic structure and crystal phase stability of palladium hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Houari, Abdesalem; Matar, Samir F.; Eyert, Volker

    2014-11-07

    The results of electronic structure calculations for a variety of palladium hydrides are presented. The calculations are based on density functional theory and used different local and semilocal approximations. The thermodynamic stability of all structures as well as the electronic and chemical bonding properties are addressed. For the monohydride, taking into account the zero-point energy is important to identify the octahedral Pd-H arrangement with its larger voids and, hence, softer hydrogen vibrational modes as favorable over the tetrahedral arrangement as found in the zincblende and wurtzite structures. Stabilization of the rocksalt structure is due to strong bonding of the 4d and 1s orbitals, which form a characteristic split-off band separated from the main d-band group. Increased filling of the formerly pure d states of the metal causes strong reduction of the density of states at the Fermi energy, which undermines possible long-range ferromagnetic order otherwise favored by strong magnetovolume effects. For the dihydride, octahedral Pd-H arrangement as realized, e.g., in the pyrite structure turns out to be unstable against tetrahedral arrangement as found in the fluorite structure. Yet, from both heat of formation and chemical bonding considerations, the dihydride turns out to be less favorable than the monohydride. Finally, the vacancy ordered defect phase Pd{sub 3}H{sub 4} follows the general trend of favoring the octahedral arrangement of the rocksalt structure for Pd:H ratios less or equal to one.

  8. Phase transformations in ternary monotectic aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröbner, Joachim; Schmid-Fetzer, Rainer

    2005-09-01

    Monotectic aluminum alloys are of interest for the development of new alloys for technological applications such as self-lubricating bearings. In contrast to the well-known binary phase diagrams, many of the ternary systems are not well established. Moreover, in a ternary monotectic alloy one may encounter the four-phase equilibrium L‧+L″+solid1+solid2, whereas in a binary system only a three-phase equilibrium L‧+L″+solid1 is possible. This opens a window for generating entirely new monotectic microstructures. The basis for such developments is the knowledge of the ternary phase diagrams and the conditions under which such four-phase reactions or different extensions of the binary monotectic reactions may form. This work presents a systematic classification of monotectic ternary aluminum alloys, illustrated by real systems. The study employs thermodynamic calculations of the ternary phase diagrams.

  9. Lightweight hydride storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.

    1995-09-01

    The need for lightweight hydrides in vehicular applications has prompted considerable research into the use of magnesium and its alloys. Although this earlier work has provided some improved performance in operating temperature and pressure, substantial improvements are needed before these materials will significantly enhance the performance of an engineered system on a vehicle. We are extending the work of previous investigators on Mg alloys to reduce the operating temperature and hydride heat of formation in light weight materials. Two important results will be discussed in this paper: (1) a promising new alloy hydride was found which has better pressure-temperature characteristics than any previous Mg alloy and, (2) a new fabrication process for existing Mg alloys was developed and demonstrated. The new alloy hydride is composed of magnesium, aluminum and nickel. It has an equilibrium hydrogen overpressure of 1.3 atm. at 200{degrees}C and a storage capacity between 3 and 4 wt.% hydrogen. A hydrogen release rate of approximately 5 x 10{sup -4} moles-H{sub 2}/gm-min was measured at 200{degrees}C. The hydride heat of formation was found to be 13.5 - 14 kcal/mole-H{sub 2}, somewhat lower than Mg{sub 2}Ni. The new fabrication method takes advantage of the high vapor transport of magnesium. It was found that Mg{sub 2}Ni produced by our low temperature process was better than conventional materials because it was single phase (no Mg phase) and could be fabricated with very small particle sizes. Hydride measurements on this material showed faster kinetic response than conventional material. The technique could potentially be applied to in-situ hydride bed fabrication with improved packing density, release kinetics, thermal properties and mechanical stability.

  10. Phases in lanthanum-nickel-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    Lanthanum-nickel-aluminum (LANA) alloys will be used to pump, store and separate hydrogen isotopes in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF). The aluminum content (y) of the primary LaNi{sub 5}-phase is controlled to produce the desired pressure-temperature behavior for adsorption and desorption of hydrogen. However, secondary phases cause decreased capacity and some may cause undesirable retention of tritium. Twenty-three alloys purchased from Ergenics, Inc. for development of RTF processes have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) to determine the distributions and compositions of constituent phases. This memorandum reports the results of these characterization studies. Knowledge of the structural characteristics of these alloys is a useful first step in selecting materials for specific process development tests and in interpreting results of those tests. Once this information is coupled with data on hydrogen plateau pressures, retention and capacity, secondary phase limits for RTF alloys can be specified.

  11. Sapphire surface preparation and gallium nitride nucleation by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwikusuma, Fransiska

    The nucleation and initial growth of gallium nitride (GaN) films on sapphire substrates using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) technique depends on many factors including the chemical treatment of sapphire surface, nitridation, and the specific growth conditions. Liquid and gas phase treatments of the sapphire surface were systematically studied as a function of temperature and time. Phosphoric acid (H3PO4) etches sapphire preferentially at defect sites and resulted in pits formation on the surface, while etching in sulfuric acid (H2SO4) can produce a smooth, pit-free surface. Air-annealing the sapphire at 1400°C produces an atomically smooth surface consisting of a terrace-and-step structure. The mechanism of sapphire nitridation within the HVPE environment was elucidated. During nitridation, nitrogen is incorporated into the sapphire surface. The sapphire nitridation mechanism can be modeled as a diffusion couple of aluminum nitride (AlN) and aluminum oxide (Al2O 3), where N3- and O2- inter-diffuse in the 'rigid' Al3+ framework. Nitrogen diffuses into sapphire and substitutes for oxygen to bond with aluminum. The replaced oxygen diffuses out to the surface. The overall nitridation rate is controlled by the diffusion of oxygen. Sapphire surface treatments of air-annealing and liquid-based etchings have different effects on nitridation and HVPE GaN nucleation. Upon nitridation, the air-annealed sapphire has ˜1.5 times higher nitrogen content compared to liquid-based etchings. Nevertheless, the air-annealed sapphire yields the lowest density of GaN islands. Sapphire nitridation, which yields a thin AlN layer, results in the growth of higher GaN island densities with a smaller mosaic spread. Sapphire surface, which is etched in H2SO4 and then nitridated, produces a high density GaN islands resulting in improved-quality of thick GaN films. The nucleation and initial growth kinetics of GaN on sapphire grown by HVPE were investigated. As the growth temperature

  12. Phase Diagram and High-Temperature Superconductivity of Compressed Selenium Hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shoutao; Wang, Yanchao; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhong, Xin; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2015-10-01

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (Tc = 190 K) in sulfur hydrides at megabar pressures breaks the traditional belief on the Tc limit of 40 K for conventional superconductors, and opens up the doors in searching new high-temperature superconductors in compounds made up of light elements. Selenium is a sister and isoelectronic element of sulfur, with a larger atomic core and a weaker electronegativity. Whether selenium hydrides share similar high-temperature superconductivity remains elusive, but it is a subject of considerable interest. First-principles swarm structure predictions are performed in an effort to seek for energetically stable and metallic selenium hydrides at high pressures. We find the phase diagram of selenium hydrides is rather different from its sulfur analogy, which is indicated by the emergence of new phases and the change of relative stabilities. Three stable and metallic species with stoichiometries of HSe2, HSe and H3Se are identified above ~120 GPa and they all exhibit superconductive behaviors, of which the hydrogen-rich HSe and H3Se phases show high Tc in the range of 40-110 K. Our simulations established the high-temperature superconductive nature of selenium hydrides and provided useful route for experimental verification.

  13. Phase Diagram and High-Temperature Superconductivity of Compressed Selenium Hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shoutao; Wang, Yanchao; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhong, Xin; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (Tc = 190 K) in sulfur hydrides at megabar pressures breaks the traditional belief on the Tc limit of 40 K for conventional superconductors, and opens up the doors in searching new high-temperature superconductors in compounds made up of light elements. Selenium is a sister and isoelectronic element of sulfur, with a larger atomic core and a weaker electronegativity. Whether selenium hydrides share similar high-temperature superconductivity remains elusive, but it is a subject of considerable interest. First-principles swarm structure predictions are performed in an effort to seek for energetically stable and metallic selenium hydrides at high pressures. We find the phase diagram of selenium hydrides is rather different from its sulfur analogy, which is indicated by the emergence of new phases and the change of relative stabilities. Three stable and metallic species with stoichiometries of HSe2, HSe and H3Se are identified above ~120 GPa and they all exhibit superconductive behaviors, of which the hydrogen-rich HSe and H3Se phases show high Tc in the range of 40–110 K. Our simulations established the high-temperature superconductive nature of selenium hydrides and provided useful route for experimental verification. PMID:26490223

  14. Phase Diagram and High-Temperature Superconductivity of Compressed Selenium Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shoutao; Wang, Yanchao; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhong, Xin; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (Tc = 190 K) in sulfur hydrides at megabar pressures breaks the traditional belief on the Tc limit of 40 K for conventional superconductors, and opens up the doors in searching new high-temperature superconductors in compounds made up of light elements. Selenium is a sister and isoelectronic element of sulfur, with a larger atomic core and a weaker electronegativity. Whether selenium hydrides share similar high-temperature superconductivity remains elusive, but it is a subject of considerable interest. First-principles swarm structure predictions are performed in an effort to seek for energetically stable and metallic selenium hydrides at high pressures. We find the phase diagram of selenium hydrides is rather different from its sulfur analogy, which is indicated by the emergence of new phases and the change of relative stabilities. Three stable and metallic species with stoichiometries of HSe2, HSe and H3Se are identified above ~120 GPa and they all exhibit superconductive behaviors, of which the hydrogen-rich HSe and H3Se phases show high Tc in the range of 40-110 K. Our simulations established the high-temperature superconductive nature of selenium hydrides and provided useful route for experimental verification. PMID:26490223

  15. Method of production of pure hydrogen near room temperature from aluminum-based hydride materials

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Balema, Viktor P.

    2004-08-10

    The present invention provides a cost-effective method of producing pure hydrogen gas from hydride-based solid materials. The hydride-based solid material is mechanically processed in the presence of a catalyst to obtain pure gaseous hydrogen. Unlike previous methods, hydrogen may be obtained from the solid material without heating, and without the addition of a solvent during processing. The described method of hydrogen production is useful for energy conversion and production technologies that consume pure gaseous hydrogen as a fuel.

  16. Silica hydride intermediate for octadecylsilica and phenyl bonded phase preparation via heterogeneous hydrosilation in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Scully, N M; Ashu-Arrah, B A; Nagle, A P; Omamogho, J O; O'Sullivan, G P; Friebolin, V; Dietrich, B; Albert, K; Glennon, J D

    2011-04-15

    Investigations into the preparation of silica hydride intermediate in supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO(2)) that avoids the use of organic solvents such as toluene or dioxane are described. The effects of reaction temperature, pressure and time on the surface coverage of the supercritical fluid generated silica hydride intermediate were studied. Under optimised supercritical conditions of 120°C, 483 bar and 3 h reaction time, silica hydride (Si-H) conversion efficiencies of ca. 40% were achieved for the hydride intermediate prepared from a monofunctional silane reagent (dimethylmethoxysilane). Si-H conversion efficiencies (as determined from (29)Si CP-MAS NMR spectral analysis) for the hydride intermediate prepared from triethoxysilane (TES) in sc-CO(2) were found to be comparable to those obtained using a TES silanisation approach in an organic solvent. (13)C and (29)Si CP-MAS-NMR spectroscopy was employed to provide a complete structural assignment of the silica hydride intermediates. Furthermore, supercritical CO(2) was subsequently employed as a reaction medium for the heterogenous hydrosilation of silica hydride with octadecene and with styrene, in the presence of a free radical initiator. These supercritical fluid generated reversed-phase materials were prepared in a substantially reduced reaction time (3 h) compared to organic solvent based methods (100 h reaction time). Silica functionalisation in sc-CO(2) presents an efficient and clean alternative to organic solvent based methods for the preparation of important silica hydride intermediate and silica bonded stationary phases via a hydrosilation approach.

  17. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Inc developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.

  18. Hydride-Phase Formation and its Influence on Fatigue Crack Propagation Behavior in a Zircaloy-4 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garlea, Elena; Choo, Hahn; Wang, Gongyao Y.; Liaw, Peter K.; Clausen, Bjørn; Brown, Donald W.; Park, Jungwon; Rack, Philip D.; Kenik, Edward A.

    2010-11-01

    The hydride-phase formation and its influence on the fatigue behavior of a Zircaloy-4 alloy charged with hydrogen gas are investigated. First, the microstructure and fatigue crack propagation rate of the alloy in the as-received condition are studied. Second, the formation and homogeneous distribution of the delta zirconium hydride in the bulk and its effect on the fatigue crack propagation rate are presented. The results show that in the presence of hydrides, the zirconium alloy exhibits reduced toughness and enhanced crack growth rates. Finally, the influence of a preexisting fatigue crack in the specimen and the subsequent hydride formation are examined. The residual lattice strain profile around the fatigue crack tip is measured using neutron diffraction. It is observed that the combined effects of residual strains and hydride precipitation on the fatigue behavior are more severe leading to propagation of the crack under near threshold loading.

  19. Possible "Magnéli" Phases and Self-Alloying in the Superconducting Sulfur Hydride.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Ryosuke; Sano, Wataru; Arita, Ryotaro; Tsuneyuki, Shinji

    2016-08-12

    We theoretically give an infinite number of metastable crystal structures for the superconducting sulfur hydride H_{x}S under pressure. Previously predicted crystalline phases of H_{2}S and H_{3}S have been thought to have important roles for experimentally observed low and high T_{c}, respectively. The newly found structures are long-period modulated crystals where slablike H_{2}S and H_{3}S regions intergrow on a microscopic scale. The extremely small formation enthalpy for the H_{2}S-H_{3}S boundary indicated by first-principles calculations suggests possible alloying of these phases through the formation of local H_{3}S regions. The modulated structures and gradual alloying transformations between them not only explain the peculiar pressure dependence of T_{c} in sulfur hydride observed experimentally, but also could prevail in the experimental samples under various compression schemes. PMID:27563975

  20. Possible "Magnéli" Phases and Self-Alloying in the Superconducting Sulfur Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Ryosuke; Sano, Wataru; Arita, Ryotaro; Tsuneyuki, Shinji

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically give an infinite number of metastable crystal structures for the superconducting sulfur hydride HxS under pressure. Previously predicted crystalline phases of H2S and H3S have been thought to have important roles for experimentally observed low and high Tc, respectively. The newly found structures are long-period modulated crystals where slablike H2S and H3S regions intergrow on a microscopic scale. The extremely small formation enthalpy for the H2S -H3S boundary indicated by first-principles calculations suggests possible alloying of these phases through the formation of local H3S regions. The modulated structures and gradual alloying transformations between them not only explain the peculiar pressure dependence of Tc in sulfur hydride observed experimentally, but also could prevail in the experimental samples under various compression schemes.

  1. Underwater vapor phase burning of aluminum particles and on aluminum ignition during steam explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, M.

    1991-09-01

    Recently reported experimental studies on aluminum-water steam explosions indicate that there may be a critical metal temperature at which the process changes over from a physical explosion to one which is very violent and involves the rapid liberation of chemical energy. In this report we examine the hypothesis that vapor-phase burning of aluminum is a necessary condition for the occurrence of such ``ignition-type`` steam explosions. An available two-phase stagnation flow film-boiling model is used to calculate the steam flux to the vaporizing aluminum surface. Combining this calculation with the notion that there is an upper limit to the magnitude of the metal vaporization rate at which the reaction regime must change from vapor phase to surface burning, leads to prediction of the critical metal surface temperature below which vapor phase burning is impossible. The critical temperature is predicted for both the aluminum-water pre-mixture configuration in which coarse drops of aluminum are falling freely through water and for the finely-fragmented aluminum drops in the wake of the pressure shock that ``triggers`` the explosion. Vapor phase burning is predicted to be possible during the pre-mixture phase but not very likely during the trigger phase of a steam explosion. The implications of these findings in terms of the validity of the hypothesis that ignition may begin with the vapor phase burning of aluminum is discussed. Recently postulated, alternative mechanisms of underwater aluminum ignition are also discussed.

  2. Underwater vapor phase burning of aluminum particles and on aluminum ignition during steam explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, M. )

    1991-09-01

    Recently reported experimental studies on aluminum-water steam explosions indicate that there may be a critical metal temperature at which the process changes over from a physical explosion to one which is very violent and involves the rapid liberation of chemical energy. In this report we examine the hypothesis that vapor-phase burning of aluminum is a necessary condition for the occurrence of such ignition-type'' steam explosions. An available two-phase stagnation flow film-boiling model is used to calculate the steam flux to the vaporizing aluminum surface. Combining this calculation with the notion that there is an upper limit to the magnitude of the metal vaporization rate at which the reaction regime must change from vapor phase to surface burning, leads to prediction of the critical metal surface temperature below which vapor phase burning is impossible. The critical temperature is predicted for both the aluminum-water pre-mixture configuration in which coarse drops of aluminum are falling freely through water and for the finely-fragmented aluminum drops in the wake of the pressure shock that triggers'' the explosion. Vapor phase burning is predicted to be possible during the pre-mixture phase but not very likely during the trigger phase of a steam explosion. The implications of these findings in terms of the validity of the hypothesis that ignition may begin with the vapor phase burning of aluminum is discussed. Recently postulated, alternative mechanisms of underwater aluminum ignition are also discussed.

  3. The processing of aluminum gasarites via thermal decomposition of interstitial hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licavoli, Joseph J.

    Gasarite structures are a unique type of metallic foam containing tubular pores. The original methods for their production limited them to laboratory study despite appealing foam properties. Thermal decomposition processing of gasarites holds the potential to increase the application of gasarite foams in engineering design by removing several barriers to their industrial scale production. The following study characterized thermal decomposition gasarite processing both experimentally and theoretically. It was found that significant variation was inherent to this process therefore several modifications were necessary to produce gasarites using this method. Conventional means to increase porosity and enhance pore morphology were studied. Pore morphology was determined to be more easily replicated if pores were stabilized by alumina additions and powders were dispersed evenly. In order to better characterize processing, high temperature and high ramp rate thermal decomposition data were gathered. It was found that the high ramp rate thermal decomposition behavior of several hydrides was more rapid than hydride kinetics at low ramp rates. This data was then used to estimate the contribution of several pore formation mechanisms to the development of pore structure. It was found that gas-metal eutectic growth can only be a viable pore formation mode if non-equilibrium conditions persist. Bubble capture cannot be a dominant pore growth mode due to high bubble terminal velocities. Direct gas evolution appears to be the most likely pore formation mode due to high gas evolution rate from the decomposing particulate and microstructural pore growth trends. The overall process was evaluated for its economic viability. It was found that thermal decomposition has potential for industrialization, but further refinements are necessary in order for the process to be viable.

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LOCAL TITANIUM ENVIRONMENT IN DOPED SODIUM ALUMINUM HYDRIDE USING X-RAY ADSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY.

    SciTech Connect

    GRAETZ, J.; IGNATOV, A. YU; TYSON, T.A.; REILLY, J.J.; JOHNSON, J.

    2004-11-30

    Ti K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to explore the local titanium environment and valence in 2-4 mol% Ti-doped sodium alanate. An estimate of the oxidation state of the dopant, based upon known standards, revealed a zero-valent titanium atom. An analysis of the near-edge and extended fine structures indicates that the Ti does not enter substitutional or interstitial sites in the NaAlH{sub 4} lattice. Rather, the Ti is located on/near the surface and is coordinated by 10.2 {+-} 1 aluminum atoms with an interatomic distance of 2.82 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom}, similar to that of TiAl{sub 3}. The Fourier transformed EXAFS spectra reveals a lack of long-range order around the Ti dopant indicating that the Ti forms nano-clusters of TiAl{sub 3}. The similarity of the spectra in the hydrided and dehydrided samples suggests that the local Ti environment is nearly invariant during hydrogen cycling.

  5. Cationic aluminum hydride complexes: reactions of carbene-alane adducts with trityl-borate.

    PubMed

    Cao, Levy L; Daley, Erika; Johnstone, Timothy C; Stephan, Douglas W

    2016-04-18

    Reaction of (Idipp)AlH3 with [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4] in toluene affords the dimeric aluminum dication [((Idipp)AlH(μ-H))2][B(C6F5)4]22. In contrast, the reaction of (IBn)AlH3 with [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4] in bromobenzene gives a redistribution product, the salt of a monomeric dication [(IBn)2AlH][B(C6F5)4]24. PMID:27001908

  6. Multiphysics phase field modeling of hydrogen diffusion and delta-hydride precipitation in alpha-zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokisaari, Andrea M.

    Hydride precipitation in zirconium is a significant factor limiting the lifetime of nuclear fuel cladding, because hydride microstructures play a key role in the degradation of fuel cladding. However, the behavior of hydrogen in zirconium has typically been modeled using mean field approaches, which do not consider microstructural evolution. This thesis describes a quantitative microstructural evolution model for the alpha-zirconium/delta-hydride system and the associated numerical methods and algorithms that were developed. The multiphysics, phase field-based model incorporates CALPHAD free energy descriptions, linear elastic solid mechanics, and classical nucleation theory. A flexible simulation software implementing the model, Hyrax, is built on the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) finite element framework. Hyrax is open-source and freely available; moreover, the numerical methods and algorithms that have been developed are generalizable to other systems. The algorithms are described in detail, and verification studies for each are discussed. In addition, analyses of the sensitivity of the simulation results to the choice of numerical parameters are presented. For example, threshold values for the CALPHAD free energy algorithm and the use of mesh and time adaptivity when employing the nucleation algorithm are studied. Furthermore, preliminary insights into the nucleation behavior of delta-hydrides are described. These include a) the sensitivities of the nucleation rate to temperature, interfacial energy, composition and elastic energy, b) the spatial variation of the nucleation rate around a single precipitate, and c) the effect of interfacial energy and nucleation rate on the precipitate microstructure. Finally, several avenues for future work are discussed. Topics encompass the terminal solid solubility hysteresis of hydrogen in zirconium and the effects of the alpha/delta interfacial energy, as well as thermodiffusion, plasticity

  7. Superconductivity in metastable phases of phosphorus-hydride compounds under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Livas, José A.; Amsler, Maximilian; Heil, Christoph; Sanna, Antonio; Boeri, Lilia; Profeta, Gianni; Wolverton, Chris; Goedecker, Stefan; Gross, E. K. U.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen-rich compounds have been extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally in the quest for novel high-temperature superconductors. Reports on sulfur hydride attaining metallicity under pressure and exhibiting superconductivity at temperatures as high as 200 K have spurred an intense search for room-temperature superconductors in hydride materials. Recently, compressed phosphine was reported to metallize at pressures above 45 GPa, reaching a superconducting transition temperature (TC) of 100 K at 200 GPa. However, neither the exact composition nor the crystal structure of the superconducting phase have been conclusively determined. In this work, the phase diagram of PHn (n =1 ,2 ,3 ,4 ,5 ,6 ) was extensively explored by means of ab initio crystal structure predictions using the minima hopping method (MHM). The results do not support the existence of thermodynamically stable PHn compounds, which exhibit a tendency for elemental decomposition at high pressure even when vibrational contributions to the free energies are taken into account. Although the lowest energy phases of PH1 ,2 ,3 display TC's comparable to experiments, it remains uncertain if the measured values of TC can be fully attributed to a phase-pure compound of PHn.

  8. Verification and Validation Strategy for Implementation of Hybrid Potts-Phase Field Hydride Modeling Capability in MBM

    SciTech Connect

    Jason D. Hales; Veena Tikare

    2014-04-01

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) program has initiated a project to develop a hydride formation modeling tool using a hybrid Potts­phase field approach. The Potts model is incorporated in the SPPARKS code from Sandia National Laboratories. The phase field model is provided through MARMOT from Idaho National Laboratory.

  9. Metal hydride/chemical heat-pump development project. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Argabright, T.A.

    1982-02-01

    The metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two hydrides for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and/or cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. The system can thus be used with a variety of heat sources including waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. The conceptual design of the MHHP was developed. A national market survey including a study of applications and market sectors was conducted. The technical tasks including conceptual development, thermal and mechanical design, laboratory verification of design and material performance, cost analysis and the detailed design of the Engineering Development Test Unit (EDTU) were performed. As a result of the market study, the temperature upgrade cycle of the MHHP was chosen for development. Operating temperature ranges for the upgrader were selected to be from 70 to 110/sup 0/C (160 to 230/sup 0/F) for the source heat and 140 to 190/sup 0/C (280 to 375/sup 0/F) for the product heat. These ranges are applicable to many processes in industries such as food, textile, paper and pulp, and chemical. The hydride pair well suited for these temperatures is LaNi/sub 5//LaNi/sub 4/ /sub 5/Al/sub 0/ /sub 5/. The EDTU was designed for the upgrade cycle. It is a compact finned tube arrangement enclosed in a pressure vessel. This design incorporates high heat transfer and low thermal mass in a system which maximizes the coefficient of performance (COP). It will be constructed in Phase II. Continuation of this effort is recommended.

  10. Development of a gas-phase stereochemical protocol. Intrinsic diastereoselectivity in hydride reductions of cyclohexanones

    SciTech Connect

    Yeunghaw Ho; Squires, R.R. )

    1992-12-30

    A common feature of classical, intuitive models and modern molecular orbital-based theories for diastereoselectivity in ketone reduction reactions is an emphasis on the structural and electronic properties of the substrate, despite the fact that the stereochemical outcome of these reactions often displays marked sensitivity to the solvent and the type of counter-ion employed with ionic and polar reducing agents. One way to separate intrinsic and extrinsic effects on the stereochemistry of ketone reduction reactions is to examine them in the gas phase, where solvent and counterion effects are absent. The authors describe here an experimental method for distinguishing the diastereomeric products of gas-phase hydride reduction reactions, and its application in determining the intrinsic diastereoselectivity involved in reductions of alkyl-substituted cyclohexanones. 1 tab.

  11. Aluminum Foam-Phase Change Material Composites as Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung-tae; Herling, Darrell R.

    2007-04-07

    The effects of geometric parameters of open-cell aluminum foams on the performance of aluminum foam-phase change material (PCM) composites as heat sinks are investigated by experiments. Three types of open-cell aluminum 6061 foams with similar relative densities and different cell sizes are used. Paraffin is selected as the PCM due to its excellent thermal stability and ease of handling. The experimental results show that the performance of the heat sink is significantly affected by the surface area density of the aluminum foam. In general, as the surface area density of the foam increases, the performance of the heat sink is improved regardless of the current phase of the PCM.

  12. Uncovering the intrinsic size dependence of hydriding phase transformations in nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, Rizia; Hedges, Lester O.; Pint, Cary L.; Javey, Ali; Whitelam, Stephen; Urban, Jeffrey J.

    2013-10-01

    A quantitative understanding of nanocrystal phase transformations would enable more efficient energy conversion and catalysis, but has been hindered by difficulties in directly monitoring well-characterized nanoscale systems in reactive environments. We present a new in situ luminescence-based probe enabling direct quantification of nanocrystal phase transformations, applied here to the hydriding transformation of palladium nanocrystals. Our approach reveals the intrinsic kinetics and thermodynamics of nanocrystal phase transformations, eliminating complications of substrate strain, ligand effects and external signal transducers. Clear size-dependent trends emerge in nanocrystals long accepted to be bulk-like in behaviour. Statistical mechanical simulations show these trends to be a consequence of nanoconfinement of a thermally driven, first-order phase transition: near the phase boundary, critical nuclei of the new phase are comparable in size to the nanocrystal itself. Transformation rates are then unavoidably governed by nanocrystal dimensions. Our results provide a general framework for understanding how nanoconfinement fundamentally impacts broad classes of thermally driven solid-state phase transformations relevant to hydrogen storage, catalysis, batteries and fuel cells.

  13. Avalanching strain dynamics during the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ulvestad, A.; Welland, M. J.; Collins, S. S. E.; Harder, R.; Maxey, E.; Wingert, J.; Singer, A.; Hy, S.; Mulvaney, P.; Zapol, P.; Shpyrko, O. G.

    2015-12-11

    Phase transitions in reactive environments are crucially important in energy and information storage, catalysis and sensors. Nanostructuring active particles can yield faster charging/ discharging kinetics, increased lifespan and record catalytic activities. However, establishing the causal link between structure and function is challenging for nanoparticles, as ensemble measurements convolve intrinsic single-particle properties with sample diversity. Here we study the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanocubes in situ using coherent X-ray diffractive imaging. The phase transformation dynamics, which involve the nucleation and propagation of a hydrogen-rich region, are dependent on absolute time (aging) and involve intermittent dynamics (avalanching). A hydrogen-rich surface layer dominates the crystal strain in the hydrogen-poor phase, while strain inversion occurs at the cube corners in the hydrogen-rich phase. A three-dimensional phase-field model is used to interpret the experimental results. In conclusion, our experimental and theoretical approach provides a general framework for designing and optimizing phase transformations for single nanocrystals in reactive environments.

  14. Avalanching strain dynamics during the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Ulvestad, A.; Welland, M. J.; Collins, S. S. E.; Harder, R.; Maxey, E.; Wingert, J.; Singer, A.; Hy, S.; Mulvaney, P.; Zapol, P.; et al

    2015-12-11

    Phase transitions in reactive environments are crucially important in energy and information storage, catalysis and sensors. Nanostructuring active particles can yield faster charging/ discharging kinetics, increased lifespan and record catalytic activities. However, establishing the causal link between structure and function is challenging for nanoparticles, as ensemble measurements convolve intrinsic single-particle properties with sample diversity. Here we study the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanocubes in situ using coherent X-ray diffractive imaging. The phase transformation dynamics, which involve the nucleation and propagation of a hydrogen-rich region, are dependent on absolute time (aging) and involve intermittent dynamics (avalanching). A hydrogen-rich surfacemore » layer dominates the crystal strain in the hydrogen-poor phase, while strain inversion occurs at the cube corners in the hydrogen-rich phase. A three-dimensional phase-field model is used to interpret the experimental results. In conclusion, our experimental and theoretical approach provides a general framework for designing and optimizing phase transformations for single nanocrystals in reactive environments.« less

  15. Avalanching strain dynamics during the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ulvestad, A.; Welland, M. J.; Collins, S. S. E.; Harder, R.; Maxey, E.; Wingert, J.; Singer, A.; Hy, S.; Mulvaney, P.; Zapol, P.; Shpyrko, O. G.

    2015-01-01

    Phase transitions in reactive environments are crucially important in energy and information storage, catalysis and sensors. Nanostructuring active particles can yield faster charging/discharging kinetics, increased lifespan and record catalytic activities. However, establishing the causal link between structure and function is challenging for nanoparticles, as ensemble measurements convolve intrinsic single-particle properties with sample diversity. Here we study the hydriding phase transformation in individual palladium nanocubes in situ using coherent X-ray diffractive imaging. The phase transformation dynamics, which involve the nucleation and propagation of a hydrogen-rich region, are dependent on absolute time (aging) and involve intermittent dynamics (avalanching). A hydrogen-rich surface layer dominates the crystal strain in the hydrogen-poor phase, while strain inversion occurs at the cube corners in the hydrogen-rich phase. A three-dimensional phase-field model is used to interpret the experimental results. Our experimental and theoretical approach provides a general framework for designing and optimizing phase transformations for single nanocrystals in reactive environments. PMID:26655832

  16. CRADA (AL-C-2009-02) Final Report: Phase I. Lanthanum-based Start Materials for Hydride Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl; Schmidt, Frederick; Frerichs, A. E.; Ament, Katherine A.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of Phase I of this work is to focus on developing a La-based start material for making nickel-metal (lanthanum)-hydride batteries based on our carbothermic-silicon process. The goal is to develop a protocol for the manufacture of (La{sub 1-x}R{sub x})(Ni{sub 1-y}M{sub y})(Si{sub z}), where R is a rare earth metal and M is a non-rare earth metal, to be utilized as the negative electrode in nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries.

  17. Ab initio study of H and He migrations in β-phase Sc, Y, and Er hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ru-Cheng; Yang, Li; Dai, Yunya; Zhu, Zi Qiang; Peng, SM; Long, XG; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao

    2012-05-01

    Ab initio calculations based on the density functional theory have been performed to investigate the migrations of hydrogen (H) and helium (He) atoms in {beta}-phase scandium (Sc), yttrium (Y), and erbium (Er) hydrides with three different ratios of H to metal. The results show that the migration mechanisms of H and He atoms mainly depend on the crystal structures of hydrides, but their energy barriers are affected by the host-lattice in metal hydrides. The formation energies of octahedral-occupancy H (H{sub oct}) and tetrahedral vacancy (V{sub tet}) pairs are almost the same (about 1.2 eV). It is of interest to note that the migration barriers of H increase with increasing host-lattice atomic number. In addition, the results show that the favorable migration mechanism of He depends slightly on the V{sub tet} in the Sc hydride, but strongly on that in the Y and Er hydrides, which may account for different behaviours of initial He release from ScT{sub 2} and ErT{sub 2}.

  18. Nonpolar GaN grown on Si by hydride vapor phase epitaxy using anodized Al nanomask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, A. Y.; Markov, A. V.; Mezhennyi, M. V.; Govorkov, A. V.; Pavlov, V. F.; Smirnov, N. B.; Donskov, A. A.; D'yakonov, L. I.; Kozlova, Y. P.; Malakhov, S. S.; Yugova, T. G.; Osinsky, V. I.; Gorokh, G. G.; Lyahova, N. N.; Mityukhlyaev, V. B.; Pearton, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    GaN growth by the hydride vapor phase technique on (100) Si substrates masked by porous Al anodic oxide is described. The masks were prepared by vacuum deposition of Al with subsequent anodic oxidation in dilute sorrel acid. The grown GaN layer is nonpolar, with (112¯0) a-orientation and a full width at half maximum of the (112¯0) reflection below 500 arc sec and showing small anisotropy. This result is comparable with the results obtained for a-GaN growth using selective epitaxy or advanced buffer growth routines. Microcathodoluminescence spectra of the grown films confirm a low density of stacking faults. Possible growth mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Lattice dynamics and phase diagram of aluminum at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kudasov, Yu. B. Surdin, O. M.; Korshunov, A. S.; Pavlov, V. N.; Frolova, N. V.; Kuzin, R. S.

    2013-10-15

    The dispersion of phonons in the fcc, hcp, and bcc phases of aluminum is calculated at ultrahigh pressures by the method of small displacements in a supercell. The stability of the phonon subsystem is studied. The thermodynamic characteristics are calculated in the quasi-harmonic approximation, and a phase diagram of aluminum is plotted. As compared to the Debye model, the use of a phonon spectrum calculated in the quasi-harmonic approximation significantly broadens the hcp phase field and strongly shifts the phase boundary between the fcc and bcc phases. The normal isentrope is calculated at megabar pressures. It is shown to intersect the fcc-hcp and hcp-bcc phase boundaries. The sound velocity along the normal isentrope is calculated. It is shown to have a nonmonotonic character.

  20. Phases in lanthanum-nickel-aluminum alloys. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1992-08-01

    Lanthanum-nickel-aluminum (LANA) alloys will be used to pump, store and separate hydrogen isotopes in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF). The aluminum content (y) of the primary LaNi{sub 5}-phase is controlled to produce the desired pressure-temperature behavior for adsorption and desorption of hydrogen. However, secondary phases cause decreased capacity and some may cause undesirable retention of tritium. Twenty-three alloys purchased from Ergenics, Inc. for development of RTF processes have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) to determine the distributions and compositions of constituent phases. This memorandum reports the results of these characterization studies. Knowledge of the structural characteristics of these alloys is a useful first step in selecting materials for specific process development tests and in interpreting results of those tests. Once this information is coupled with data on hydrogen plateau pressures, retention and capacity, secondary phase limits for RTF alloys can be specified.

  1. Hysteresis in Metal Hydrides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Ted B., And Others

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a reproducible process where the irreversibility can be readily evaluated and provides a thermodynamic description of the important phenomenon of hysteresis. A metal hydride is used because hysteresis is observed during the formation and decomposition of the hydride phase. (RH)

  2. Determination of arsenic and selenium by hydride generation and headspace solid phase microextraction coupled with optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyburska, Anna; Jankowski, Krzysztof; Rodzik, Agnieszka

    2011-07-01

    A hydride generation headspace solid phase microextraction technique has been developed in combination with optical emission spectrometry for determination of total arsenic and selenium. Hydrides were generated in a 10 mL volume septum-sealed vial and subsequently collected onto a polydimethylsiloxane/Carboxen solid phase microextraction fiber from the headspace of sample solution. After completion of the sorption, the fiber was transferred into a thermal desorption unit and the analytes were vaporized and directly introduced into argon inductively coupled plasma or helium microwave induced plasma radiation source. Experimental conditions of hydride formation reaction as well as sorption and desorption of analytes have been optimized showing the significant effect of the type of the solid phase microextraction fiber coating, the sorption time and hydrochloric acid concentration of the sample solution on analytical characteristics of the method developed. The limits of detection of arsenic and selenium were 0.1 and 0.8 ng mL - 1 , respectively. The limit of detection of selenium could be improved further using biosorption with baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for analyte preconcentration. The technique was applied for the determination of total As and Se in real samples.

  3. Identification of Si and O donors in hydride-vapor-phase epitaxial GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, W. J.; Freitas, J. A.; Braga, G. C. B.; Molnar, R. J.; Lee, S. K.; Lee, K. Y.; Song, I. J.

    2001-10-01

    Donor impurity excitation spectra in the infrared from two high-quality, not-intentionally doped, hydride-vapor-phase epitaxial GaN wafers are reported. Two previously observed shallow donors which we designate N1 and N2 were observed in both wafers. However, spectra of one wafer are dominated by N1 and spectra of the other by N2. A comparison of infrared and secondary ion mass spectroscopic data allows identification of N1 as Si and N2 as O. Silicon is the shallowest uncompensated donor in these samples with an activation energy of 30.18±0.1 meV in the freestanding Samsung wafer. The activation energy of O is found to be 33.20±0.1 meV. An unidentified third donor with an activation energy of 31.23±0.1 meV also was observed. Integrated absorption cross sections are found to be 8.5×10-14 cm for Si and 8.6×10-14 cm for O.

  4. Hydride vapor phase GaN films with reduced density of residual electrons and deep traps

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Govorkov, A. V.; Yugova, T. G.; Cox, H.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu.; Usikov, A. S.

    2014-05-14

    Electrical properties and deep electron and hole traps spectra are compared for undoped n-GaN films grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) in the regular process (standard HVPE samples) and in HVPE process optimized for decreasing the concentration of residual donor impurities (improved HVPE samples). It is shown that the residual donor density can be reduced by optimization from ∼10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} to (2–5) × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}. The density of deep hole traps and deep electron traps decreases with decreased donor density, so that the concentration of deep hole traps in the improved samples is reduced to ∼5 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3} versus 2.9 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} in the standard samples, with a similar decrease in the electron traps concentration.

  5. Hydride vapor phase epitaxy and characterization of high-quality ScN epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Yuichi; Víllora, Encarnación G.; Shimamura, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-01

    The heteroepitaxial growth of ScN films was investigated on various substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). Single crystalline mirror-like ScN(100) and ScN(110) layers were successfully deposited on r- and m-plane sapphire substrates, respectively. Homogeneous stoichiometric films (N/Sc ratio 1.01 ± 0.10) up to 40 μm in thickness were deposited. Their mosaicity drastically improved with increasing the film thickness. The band gap was determined by optical methods to be 2.06 eV. Impurity concentrations including H, C, O, Si, and Cl were investigated through energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry. As a result, it was found that the presence of impurities was efficiently suppressed in comparison with that of HVPE-grown ScN films reported in the past, which was possible thanks to the home-designed corrosion-free HVPE reactor. Room-temperature Hall measurements indicated that the residual free electron concentrations ranged between 1018-1020 cm-3, which was markedly lower than the reported values. The carrier mobility increased monotonically with the decreasing in carrier concentration, achieving the largest value ever reported, 284 cm2 V-1 s-1 at n = 3.7 × 1018 cm-3.

  6. Epitaxial growth of three dimensionally structured III-V photonic crystal via hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Qiye; Kim, Honggyu; Zhang, Runyu; Zuo, Jianmin; Braun, Paul V.; Sardela, Mauro; Balaji, Manavaimaran; Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Sun, Yan-Ting

    2015-12-14

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals are one class of materials where epitaxy, and the resultant attractive electronic properties, would enable new functionalities for optoelectronic devices. Here we utilize self-assembled colloidal templates to fabricate epitaxially grown single crystal 3D mesostructured Ga{sub x}In{sub 1−x}P (GaInP) semiconductor photonic crystals using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The epitaxial relationship between the 3D GaInP and the substrate is preserved during the growth through the complex geometry of the template as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. XRD reciprocal space mapping of the 3D epitaxial layer further demonstrates the film to be nearly fully relaxed with a negligible strain gradient. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reflection measurement indicates the optical properties of the photonic crystal which agree with finite difference time domain simulations. This work extends the scope of the very few known methods for the fabrication of epitaxial III-V 3D mesostructured materials to the well-developed HVPE technique.

  7. Phase Equilibria, Crystal Structure and Hydriding/Dehydriding Mechanism of Nd4Mg80Ni8 Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qun; Gu, Qin-Fen; Zhang, Jie-Yu; Chen, Shuang-Lin; Chou, Kuo-Chih; Li, Qian

    2015-10-01

    In order to find out the optimal composition of novel Nd-Mg-Ni alloys for hydrogen storage, the isothermal section of Nd-Mg-Ni system at 400 °C is established by examining the equilibrated alloys. A new ternary compound Nd4Mg80Ni8 is discovered in the Mg-rich corner. It has the crystal structure of space group I41/amd with lattice parameters of a = b = 11.2743(1) Å and c = 15.9170(2) Å, characterized by the synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXRD). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to investigate the microstructure of Nd4Mg80Ni8 and its hydrogen-induced microstructure evolution. The hydrogenation leads to Nd4Mg80Ni8 decomposing into NdH2.61-MgH2-Mg2NiH0.3 nanocomposites, where the high density phase boundaries provide a great deal of hydrogen atoms diffusion channels and nucleation sites of hydrides, which greatly enhances the hydriding/dehydriding (H/D) properties. The Nd4Mg80Ni8 exhibits a good cycle ability. The kinetic mechanisms of H/D reactions are studied by Real Physical Picture (RPP) model. The rate controlling steps are diffusion for hydriding reaction in the temperature range of 100 ~ 350 °C and surface penetration for dehydriding reaction at 291 ~ 347 °C. In-situ SR-PXRD results reveal the phase transformations of Mg to MgH2 and Mg2Ni to Mg2NiH4 as functions of hydrogen pressure and hydriding time.

  8. Phase Equilibria, Crystal Structure and Hydriding/Dehydriding Mechanism of Nd4Mg80Ni8 Compound

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qun; Gu, Qin-Fen; Zhang, Jie-Yu; Chen, Shuang-Lin; Chou, Kuo-Chih; Li, Qian

    2015-01-01

    In order to find out the optimal composition of novel Nd-Mg-Ni alloys for hydrogen storage, the isothermal section of Nd-Mg-Ni system at 400 °C is established by examining the equilibrated alloys. A new ternary compound Nd4Mg80Ni8 is discovered in the Mg-rich corner. It has the crystal structure of space group I41/amd with lattice parameters of a = b = 11.2743(1) Å and c = 15.9170(2) Å, characterized by the synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXRD). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to investigate the microstructure of Nd4Mg80Ni8 and its hydrogen-induced microstructure evolution. The hydrogenation leads to Nd4Mg80Ni8 decomposing into NdH2.61-MgH2-Mg2NiH0.3 nanocomposites, where the high density phase boundaries provide a great deal of hydrogen atoms diffusion channels and nucleation sites of hydrides, which greatly enhances the hydriding/dehydriding (H/D) properties. The Nd4Mg80Ni8 exhibits a good cycle ability. The kinetic mechanisms of H/D reactions are studied by Real Physical Picture (RPP) model. The rate controlling steps are diffusion for hydriding reaction in the temperature range of 100 ~ 350 °C and surface penetration for dehydriding reaction at 291 ~ 347 °C. In-situ SR-PXRD results reveal the phase transformations of Mg to MgH2 and Mg2Ni to Mg2NiH4 as functions of hydrogen pressure and hydriding time. PMID:26471964

  9. A phase-field model to study the effects of temperature change on shape evolution of γ-hydrides in zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bair, Jacob; Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Tonks, Michael

    2016-10-01

    A temperature-dependent phase-field model is developed to study the effects of temperature change on shape evolution of γ-hydrides in an α-zirconium matrix. To construct the temperature-dependent free energy functional of the phase-field model, Gibbs free energies of formation from previous experiments are employed, and one conserved and three non-conserved phase-field variables are used for hydrogen concentration and hydride orientations, respectively. The mixed order evolution equations of phase-field variables coupled with mechanical equilibrium equations are solved in a finite element framework. Results from isothermal simulations of seeded and random nucleation in single crystal α-zirconium matrix show that the thickness of non-equilibrium hydrides varies with temperature during evolution, and the hydrides are more rod-like (thinner) at higher temperatures and thicker at lower temperatures. Quench simulations with random nucleation indicate that the majority of precipitation occurs at early stages of quenching, but the size and shape of hydrides change as the temperature decreases. Simulations from random nucleation of hydrides in a polycrystalline α-zirconium matrix show a higher concentration of precipitates along high angle grain boundaries.

  10. Changes in Phase Composition of NaAlH{sub 4}+FeCl{sub 2} Complex Hydride Exposed to Air

    SciTech Connect

    Roupcova, P.; Schneeweiss, O.

    2010-07-13

    Phase composition in AlNaH{sub 4} doped with FeCl{sub 2} was studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction and stabilities in Ar and air were compared. The results show that the hydride disappeared during the exposition to air. The major sodium alanate hydride traps gaseous impurities and transforms to Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Al(OH){sub 3}.

  11. Hydride vapor phase epitaxy and characterization of high-quality ScN epilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, Yuichi Víllora, Encarnación G.; Shimamura, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-21

    The heteroepitaxial growth of ScN films was investigated on various substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). Single crystalline mirror-like ScN(100) and ScN(110) layers were successfully deposited on r- and m-plane sapphire substrates, respectively. Homogeneous stoichiometric films (N/Sc ratio 1.01 ± 0.10) up to 40 μm in thickness were deposited. Their mosaicity drastically improved with increasing the film thickness. The band gap was determined by optical methods to be 2.06 eV. Impurity concentrations including H, C, O, Si, and Cl were investigated through energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry. As a result, it was found that the presence of impurities was efficiently suppressed in comparison with that of HVPE-grown ScN films reported in the past, which was possible thanks to the home-designed corrosion-free HVPE reactor. Room-temperature Hall measurements indicated that the residual free electron concentrations ranged between 10{sup 18}–10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}, which was markedly lower than the reported values. The carrier mobility increased monotonically with the decreasing in carrier concentration, achieving the largest value ever reported, 284 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} at n = 3.7 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}.

  12. Planarization and Processing of Metamorphic Buffer Layers Grown by Hydride Vapor-Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zutter, Brian T.; Schulte, Kevin L.; Kim, Tae Wan; Mawst, Luke J.; Kuech, T. F.; Foran, Brendan; Sin, Yongkun

    2014-04-01

    Hydride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE) is a high-growth-rate, cost-effective means to grow epitaxial semiconductor material. Thick HVPE-based metamorphic buffer layers (MBLs) can serve as "pseudosubstrates" with controllable lattice parameter. In our structures, the indium content in In x Ga1- x As is gradually increased from zero to the final composition corresponding to the desired lattice constant, and then a thick (˜10 μm) constant-composition capping layer is grown. This thick capping layer promotes maximum strain relaxation while permitting use of polishing procedures to achieve surface planarity. Lattice-mismatched growth of MBLs invariably results in rough, cross-hatched surface morphology exhibiting up to 200 nm peak-to-valley roughness. This roughness can be eliminated by chemical mechanical planarization, thus creating a suitable surface for subsequent regrowth. Polishing of In x Ga1- x As is complicated by the sensitivity of the surface layer to the polishing parameters, particularly the applied pressure. Polishing at high applied pressure (12 psi) results in the formation of circular asperities hundreds of nanometers high and tens of microns in diameter. When lower applied pressure (4 psi) was used, the cross-hatching height of MBLs was lowered from 200 nm to <10 nm over a 350 μm lateral scale. The successfully planarized In0.20Ga0.80As MBLs were used as a substrate for a superlattice (SL) structure such as that used in quantum cascade lasers. Use of planarization before regrowth of the SL resulted in a reduction of the high-resolution x-ray diffraction peak full-width at half-maximum from 389″ to 159″.

  13. Polycrystalline indium phosphide on silicon by indium assisted growth in hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaferia, Wondwosen; Sun, Yan-Ting; Pietralunga, Silvia M.; Zani, Maurizio; Tagliaferri, Alberto; Lourdudoss, Sebastian

    2014-07-01

    Polycrystalline InP was grown on Si(001) and Si(111) substrates by using indium (In) metal as a starting material in hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) reactor. In metal was deposited on silicon substrates by thermal evaporation technique. The deposited In resulted in islands of different size and was found to be polycrystalline in nature. Different growth experiments of growing InP were performed, and the growth mechanism was investigated. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for morphological investigation, Scanning Auger microscopy for surface and compositional analyses, powder X-ray diffraction for crystallinity, and micro photoluminescence for optical quality assessment were conducted. It is shown that the growth starts first by phosphidisation of the In islands to InP followed by subsequent selective deposition of InP in HVPE regardless of the Si substrate orientation. Polycrystalline InP of large grain size is achieved and the growth rate as high as 21 μm/h is obtained on both substrates. Sulfur doping of the polycrystalline InP was investigated by growing alternating layers of sulfur doped and unintentionally doped InP for equal interval of time. These layers could be delineated by stain etching showing that enough amount of sulfur can be incorporated. Grains of large lateral dimension up to 3 μm polycrystalline InP on Si with good morphological and optical quality is obtained. The process is generic and it can also be applied for the growth of other polycrystalline III-V semiconductor layers on low cost and flexible substrates for solar cell applications.

  14. Polycrystalline indium phosphide on silicon by indium assisted growth in hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Metaferia, Wondwosen; Sun, Yan-Ting Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Pietralunga, Silvia M.; Zani, Maurizio; Tagliaferri, Alberto

    2014-07-21

    Polycrystalline InP was grown on Si(001) and Si(111) substrates by using indium (In) metal as a starting material in hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) reactor. In metal was deposited on silicon substrates by thermal evaporation technique. The deposited In resulted in islands of different size and was found to be polycrystalline in nature. Different growth experiments of growing InP were performed, and the growth mechanism was investigated. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for morphological investigation, Scanning Auger microscopy for surface and compositional analyses, powder X-ray diffraction for crystallinity, and micro photoluminescence for optical quality assessment were conducted. It is shown that the growth starts first by phosphidisation of the In islands to InP followed by subsequent selective deposition of InP in HVPE regardless of the Si substrate orientation. Polycrystalline InP of large grain size is achieved and the growth rate as high as 21 μm/h is obtained on both substrates. Sulfur doping of the polycrystalline InP was investigated by growing alternating layers of sulfur doped and unintentionally doped InP for equal interval of time. These layers could be delineated by stain etching showing that enough amount of sulfur can be incorporated. Grains of large lateral dimension up to 3 μm polycrystalline InP on Si with good morphological and optical quality is obtained. The process is generic and it can also be applied for the growth of other polycrystalline III–V semiconductor layers on low cost and flexible substrates for solar cell applications.

  15. Defect Analysis in III-V Semiconductor Thin Films Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Kevin Louis

    Hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) is an epitaxial growth technique renowned for its ability to grow III-V semiconductors at high growth rates using lower cost reagents compared to metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE), the current industry standard. Recent interest in III-V photovoltaics has led to increased attention on HVPE. While the technique came to maturity in the 70s, much is unknown about how defects incorporate in HVPE-grown materials. Further understanding of how defects incorporate in III-V materials grown by HVPE is necessary to facilitate wider adoption of the technique. This information would inform strategies for minimizing and eliminating defects in HVPE materials, allowing for the formation of high performance devices. This investigation presents a study of multiple defects in III-V semiconductors grown by HVPE in the context of specific device applications, spanning point defects comprised of individual atoms to extended defects which propagate throughout the crystal. The incorporation of the arsenic anti-site defect, AsGa, intrinsic point defect was studied in high growth rate GaAs layers with potential photovoltaic applications. Relationships between growth conditions and incorporation of AsGa in GaAs epilayers were determined. The incorporation of AsGa depended strongly on the growth conditions employed, and a model was developed to predict the concentration of anti-site defects as a function of those growth conditions. Dislocations and anti-phase domain boundaries (APDBs), two types of extended defects, were investigated in the heteroepitaxial GaAs/Ge system. It was found that the use of 6° miscut substrates and specific growth temperatures led to elimination of APDBs. Dislocation densities were reduced through the use of high growth temperatures. The third and final application investigated was the growth of InxGa1-xAs metamorphic buffer layers (MBLs) by HVPE. The relationships between the growth conditions and the alloy composition

  16. First Principles Studies of Phase Stability and Reaction Dynamics in Complex Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Mei-Yin

    2014-09-29

    Complex metal hydrides are believed to be one of the most promising materials for developing hydrogen storage systems that can operate under desirable conditions. At the same time, these are also a class of materials that exhibit intriguing properties. We have used state-of-the-art computational techniques to study the fundamental properties of these materials.

  17. Environmentally friendly method to grow wide-bandgap semiconductor aluminum nitride crystals: Elementary source vapor phase epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, PeiTsen; Funato, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) has attracted increasing interest as an optoelectronic material in the deep ultraviolet spectral range due to its wide bandgap of 6.0 eV (207 nm wavelength) at room temperature. Because AlN bulk single crystals are ideal device substrates for such applications, the crystal growth of bulky AlN has been extensively studied. Two growth methods seem especially promising: hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) and sublimation. However, the former requires hazardous gases such as hydrochloric acid and ammonia, while the latter needs extremely high growth temperatures around 2000 °C. Herein we propose a novel vapor-phase-epitaxy-based growth method for AlN that does not use toxic materials; the source precursors are elementary aluminum and nitrogen gas. To prepare our AlN, we constructed a new growth apparatus, which realizes growth of AlN single crystals at a rate of ~18 μm/h at 1550 °C using argon as the source transfer via the simple reaction Al + 1/2N2 → AlN. This growth rate is comparable to that by HVPE, and the growth temperature is much lower than that in sublimation. Thus, this study opens up a novel route to achieve environmentally friendly growth of AlN. PMID:26616203

  18. Environmentally friendly method to grow wide-bandgap semiconductor aluminum nitride crystals: Elementary source vapor phase epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Wu, PeiTsen; Funato, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Yoichi

    2015-11-30

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) has attracted increasing interest as an optoelectronic material in the deep ultraviolet spectral range due to its wide bandgap of 6.0 eV (207 nm wavelength) at room temperature. Because AlN bulk single crystals are ideal device substrates for such applications, the crystal growth of bulky AlN has been extensively studied. Two growth methods seem especially promising: hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) and sublimation. However, the former requires hazardous gases such as hydrochloric acid and ammonia, while the latter needs extremely high growth temperatures around 2000 °C. Herein we propose a novel vapor-phase-epitaxy-based growth method for AlN that does not use toxic materials; the source precursors are elementary aluminum and nitrogen gas. To prepare our AlN, we constructed a new growth apparatus, which realizes growth of AlN single crystals at a rate of ~18 μm/h at 1550 °C using argon as the source transfer via the simple reaction Al + 1/2N2 → AlN. This growth rate is comparable to that by HVPE, and the growth temperature is much lower than that in sublimation. Thus, this study opens up a novel route to achieve environmentally friendly growth of AlN.

  19. Environmentally friendly method to grow wide-bandgap semiconductor aluminum nitride crystals: Elementary source vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Peitsen; Funato, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Yoichi

    2015-11-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) has attracted increasing interest as an optoelectronic material in the deep ultraviolet spectral range due to its wide bandgap of 6.0 eV (207 nm wavelength) at room temperature. Because AlN bulk single crystals are ideal device substrates for such applications, the crystal growth of bulky AlN has been extensively studied. Two growth methods seem especially promising: hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) and sublimation. However, the former requires hazardous gases such as hydrochloric acid and ammonia, while the latter needs extremely high growth temperatures around 2000 °C. Herein we propose a novel vapor-phase-epitaxy-based growth method for AlN that does not use toxic materials; the source precursors are elementary aluminum and nitrogen gas. To prepare our AlN, we constructed a new growth apparatus, which realizes growth of AlN single crystals at a rate of ~18 μm/h at 1550 °C using argon as the source transfer via the simple reaction Al + 1/2N2 → AlN. This growth rate is comparable to that by HVPE, and the growth temperature is much lower than that in sublimation. Thus, this study opens up a novel route to achieve environmentally friendly growth of AlN.

  20. Environmentally friendly method to grow wide-bandgap semiconductor aluminum nitride crystals: Elementary source vapor phase epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Wu, PeiTsen; Funato, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) has attracted increasing interest as an optoelectronic material in the deep ultraviolet spectral range due to its wide bandgap of 6.0 eV (207 nm wavelength) at room temperature. Because AlN bulk single crystals are ideal device substrates for such applications, the crystal growth of bulky AlN has been extensively studied. Two growth methods seem especially promising: hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) and sublimation. However, the former requires hazardous gases such as hydrochloric acid and ammonia, while the latter needs extremely high growth temperatures around 2000 °C. Herein we propose a novel vapor-phase-epitaxy-based growth method for AlN that does not use toxic materials; the source precursors are elementary aluminum and nitrogen gas. To prepare our AlN, we constructed a new growth apparatus, which realizes growth of AlN single crystals at a rate of ~18 μm/h at 1550 °C using argon as the source transfer via the simple reaction Al + 1/2N2 → AlN. This growth rate is comparable to that by HVPE, and the growth temperature is much lower than that in sublimation. Thus, this study opens up a novel route to achieve environmentally friendly growth of AlN. PMID:26616203

  1. Ca2LiC3H: a new complex carbide hydride phase grown in metal flux.

    PubMed

    Lang, David A; Zaikina, Julia V; Lovingood, Derek D; Gedris, Thomas E; Latturner, Susan E

    2010-12-15

    The reaction of carbon and CaH2 in a calcium/lithium flux mixture produces crystals of the new compound Ca2LiC3H. This phase forms with a new structure type in tetragonal space group P4/mbm (a = 6.8236(1) Å, c = 3.7518(1) Å, Z = 2, R1 = 0.0151). This is a stuffed variant of the Cs2(NH2)N3 structure, containing hydride anions in octahedral sites; the structure determination by single-crystal X-ray diffraction surprisingly allowed the hydrogen to be detected. The Ca2LiC3H structure also features the rarely seen C3(4-) carbide anion; the protolysis reaction of this compound with ammonium chloride produces C3H4. The electronic properties of Ca2LiC3H were studied by quantum-chemical calculations including band structure and electron localization function (ELF) analysis; the phase is a charge-balanced semiconductor with a calculated band gap of 0.48 eV. This is in agreement with (7)Li, (13)C, and (1)H MAS NMR data, which show resonances in the ionic region instead of the Knight shifted region. ELF analysis of the theoretical nonhydrided Ca2LiC3 structure confirms the ability of these calculations to properly locate hydrides and supports the structural model based on X-ray diffraction data.

  2. Structural and morphological characteristics of planar (112¯0) a-plane gallium nitride grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskell, B. A.; Wu, F.; Matsuda, S.; Craven, M. D.; Fini, P. T.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, Shuji

    2003-08-01

    This letter discusses the structural and morphological characteristics of planar, nonpolar (112¯0) a-plane GaN films grown on (11¯02) r-plane sapphire by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. Specular films with thicknesses over 50 μm were grown, eliminating the severely faceted surfaces that have previously been observed for hydride vapor phase epitaxy-grown a-plane films. Internal cracks and crack healing, similar to that in c-plane GaN films, were observed. Atomic force microscopy revealed nanometer-scale pitting and steps on the film surfaces, with rms roughness of ˜2 nm. X-ray diffraction confirmed the films are solely a-plane oriented with on-axis (112¯0) and 30° off-axis (101¯0) rocking curve peak widths of 1040 and 3000 arcsec, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a typical basal plane stacking fault density of 4×105cm-1. The dislocation content of the films consisted of predominately edge component (bedge=±[0001]) threading dislocations with a density of 2×1010 cm-2, and mixed-character Shockley partial dislocations (b=1/3<11¯00>) with a density of 7×109 cm-2.

  3. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Aluminum Nitride Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Lottes, C. R.; Huertas, J. I.; Rosen, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to its combined properties of high electrical resistivity and high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN) is a highly desirable material for electronics applications. Methods are being sought for synthesis of unagglomerated, nanometer-sized powders of this material, prepared in such a way that they can be consolidated into solid compacts having minimal oxygen content. A procedure for synthesizing these powders through gas-phase combustion is described. This novel approach involves reacting AlCl3, NH3, and Na vapors. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations show that 100% yields can be obtained for these reactants with the products being AlN, NaCl, and H2. The NaCl by-product is used to coat the AlN particles in situ. The coating allows for control of AlN agglomeration and protects the powders from hydrolysis during post-flame handling. On the basis of thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, two different approaches were employed to produce the powder, in co-flow diffusion flame configurations. In the first approach, the three reactants were supplied in separate streams. In the second, the AlCl3 and NH3 were premixed with HCl and then reacted with Na vapor. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of as-produced powders show only NaCl for the first case and NaCl and AlN for the second. After annealing at 775 C tinder dynamic vacuum, the salt was removed and XRD spectra of powders from both approaches show only AlN. Aluminum metal was also produced in the co-flow flame by reacting AlCl3 with Na. XRD spectra of as-produced powders show the products to be only NaCl and elemental aluminum.

  4. In situ x-ray diffraction topography studies on the phase formation in thin yttrium hydride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remhof, A.; Song, G.; Sutter, C.; Labergerie, D.; Hübener, M.; Zabel, H.; Härtwig, J.

    2000-07-01

    Structural phase transitions in thin, epitaxial yttrium hydride films have been studied by means of synchrotron x-ray diffraction topography (XDT), complemented by atomic force microscopy and by measurements of the electrical resistance. Depending on the applied hydrogen pressure during the gas-phase loading experiments and the chosen temperature, different phases exhibiting different symmetries and electronic properties could be established. Despite the small scattering volume of the 200-nm-thick film, the phase nucleation, the spatial distribution of domains as well as the lateral hydrogen diffusion could be observed. Those experiments demonstrate the feasibility of XDT to study structural properties like the dynamics of phase transitions in thin epitaxially grown films on the nanometer scale. From the progression of the domain boundary between the YH2 and YH3 phase the hydrogen mobility was determined to 5×10-6 cm2/s at 300 °C. Comparing high-temperature topographies with room-temperature results confirms that the phase boundary is narrower at high temperatures. Finally resistance measurements of Y/Nb double layers with varying hydrogen concentration confirm clearly that the YH3 phase is insulating and that the resistance of the yttrium layer increases proportionally to the degree of YH3 phase precipitation. The layer system acts as a hydrogen concentration-dependent potentiometer and could be used as a hydrogen sensor.

  5. Aluminum-Containing Phases in Tank Waste: Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Shas Mattigod; D.T. Hobbs; D. M. Wellman; I. Aksay; D. M. Dabbs

    2006-06-01

    Aluminosilicate deposit buildup experienced during the tank waste volume-reduction process at the Savannah River Site (SRS) required an evaporator to be shut down in October 1999. Recent investigations illustrated the accumulation 7 wt% uranium, 3% was 235U and absent of neutron poisons, within these deposits and presented a criticality concern. The Waste Processing Technology Section of Westinghouse Savannah River Company at SRS is now collaborating with a team from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in efforts to identify the phases controlling uranium solubility and understand the conditions under which they precipitate.

  6. Metal hydride/chemical heat-pump development project, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argabright, T. A.

    1982-02-01

    The metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two hydrides for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and/or cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. The system can thus be used with a variety of heat sources including waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. The conceptual design of the MHHP was developed. A national market survey including a study of applications and market sectors was conducted. The technical tasks including conceptual development, thermal and mechanical design, laboratory verification of design and material performance, cost analysis and the detailed design of the Engineering Development Test Unit (EDTU) were performed. As a result of the market study, the temperature upgrade cycle of the MHHP was chosen for development. Operating temperature ranges for the upgrader were selected to be from 70 to 1100 C (160 to 2300 F) for the source heat and 140 to 1900 C (280 to 3750 F) for the product heat.

  7. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  8. Direct synthesis of catalyzed hydride compounds

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Karl J.; Majzoub, Eric

    2004-09-21

    A method is disclosed for directly preparing alkali metal aluminum hydrides such as NaAlH.sub.4 and Na.sub.3 AlH.sub.6 from either the alkali metal or its hydride, and aluminum. The hydride thus prepared is doped with a small portion of a transition metal catalyst compound, such as TiCl.sub.3, TiF.sub.3, or a mixture of these materials, in order to render them reversibly hydridable. The process provides for mechanically mixing the dry reagents under an inert atmosphere followed by charging the mixed materials with high pressure hydrogen while heating the mixture to about 125.degree. C. The method is relatively simple and inexpensive and provides reversible hydride compounds which are free of the usual contamination introduced by prior art wet chemical methods.

  9. Interstellar Hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerin, Maryvonne; Neufeld, David A.; Goicoechea, Javier R.

    2016-09-01

    Interstellar hydrides—that is, molecules containing a single heavy element atom with one or more hydrogen atoms—were among the first molecules detected outside the solar system. They lie at the root of interstellar chemistry, being among the first species to form in initially atomic gas, along with molecular hydrogen and its associated ions. Because the chemical pathways leading to the formation of interstellar hydrides are relatively simple, the analysis of the observed abundances is relatively straightforward and provides key information about the environments where hydrides are found. Recent years have seen rapid progress in our understanding of interstellar hydrides, thanks largely to FIR and submillimeter observations performed with the Herschel Space Observatory. In this review, we discuss observations of interstellar hydrides, along with the advanced modeling approaches that have been used to interpret them and the unique information that has thereby been obtained.

  10. Effect of copper and magnesium on the structure and the phase composition of boron/aluminum composite ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, N. A.; Samoshina, M. E.; Alabin, A. N.; Chervyakova, K. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The phase composition of aluminum Al-B-Cu-Mg alloys has been studied using calculations and experimental methods. Unlike copper, magnesium is shown to substitute aluminum in the AlB2 phase substantially. The use of Al-Cu-Mg alloys (duraluminums) as the matrix of boron/aluminum composite prepared by liquid-phase technologies is substantiated.

  11. First-principles investigations of aluminum hydrides: M{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} (M=Na,K)

    SciTech Connect

    Vajeeston, P.; Ravindran, P.; Kjekshus, A.; Fjellvaag, H.

    2005-03-01

    The structural stability of Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} and K{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} has been systematically investigated using accurate density-functional total-energy calculations. The experimentally known crystal structure of {alpha}-Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} is reproduced and {alpha}-K{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} is predicted to be isostructural ({alpha}-Na{sub 3}AlF{sub 6} type; space group P2{sub 1}/n). This structure contains a pseudo-face-centered-cubic Al sublattice and each Al atom is surrounded by distorted octahedra of hydrogen atoms with the long octahedral axis tilted from the [001] direction toward <111>. We predict that the {alpha} modifications will not be stable at higher pressures. On application of pressure to Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6}, the {alpha} phase transforms into a Cs{sub 3}NdCl{sub 6}-type structure at 19.8 GPa. Similarly {alpha}-K{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} transforms into two high-pressure forms: (1) {alpha} transforms to {beta} with Rb{sub 3}TlF{sub 6}-type structure at 53.4 GPa and (2) {beta} transforms to {gamma} with U{sub 3}ScS{sub 6}-type structure at 60.2 GPa.

  12. Hydride compositions

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Myung W.

    1995-01-01

    A composition for use in storing hydrogen, and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the hydrogen equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to hydrogen and then heating at a temperature below the softening temperature of any of the. constituents so that their chemical and structural integrity is preserved. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P.sub.H.sbsb.2 and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  13. Hydride compositions

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Myung, W.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed are a composition for use in storing hydrogen and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the H equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to H, and then heating below the softening temperature of any of the constituents. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P{sub H}{sub 2} and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  14. EFFECTS OF SURFACE AREA DENSITY OF ALUMINUM FOAMS ON THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF ALUMINUM FOAM-PHASE CHANGE MATERIAL COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung-tae; Herling, Darrell R.

    2007-07-01

    The effects of the surface area density of open-cell aluminum foams on the effective thermal conductivity of aluminum foam-phase change material (PCM) composites were investigated. Paraffin was selected as the PCM. The experimental results show that the effective thermal conductivity increases as the temperature increases. The experimental results suggest that the effective thermal conductivities can be different for different surface area densities of foams even though the relative densities of foams are similar. Therefore, for an accurate estimation of the effective thermal conductivity, a correlation including the surface area density effect is needed.

  15. Hydride Generation for Headspace Solid-Phase Extraction with CdTe Quantum Dots Immobilized on Paper for Sensitive Visual Detection of Selenium.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke; Xu, Kailai; Zhu, Wei; Yang, Lu; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2016-01-01

    A low-cost, simple, and highly selective analytical method was developed for sensitive visual detection of selenium in human urine both outdoors and at home, by coupling hydride generation with headspace solid-phase extraction using quantum dots (QDs) immobilized on paper. The visible fluorescence from the CdTe QDs immobilized on paper was quenched by H2Se from hydride generation reaction and headspace solid-phase extraction. The potential mechanism was investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as Density Functional Theory (DFT). Potential interferences from coexisting ions, particularly Ag(+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+), were eliminated. The selectivity was significantly increased because the selenium hydride was effectively separated from sample matrices by hydride generation. Moreover, due to the high sampling efficiency of hydride generation and headspace solid phase extraction, the sensitivity and the limit of detection (LOD) were significantly improved compared to conventional methods. A LOD of 0.1 μg L(-1) and a relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 7) of 2.4% at a concentration of 20 μg L(-1) were obtained when using a commercial spectrofluorometer as the detector. Furthermore, a visual assay based on the proposed method was developed for the detection of Se, 5 μg L(-1) of selenium in urine can be discriminated from the blank solution with the naked eye. The proposed method was validated by analysis of certified reference materials and human urine samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26631425

  16. Prediction of the zeta potentials and ionic descriptors of a silica hydride stationary phase with mobile phases of different pH and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Kulsing, Chadin; Yang, Yuanzhong; Matyska, Maria T; Pesek, Joseph J; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-02-15

    In this study, the zeta potentials of a silica hydride stationary phase (Diamond Hydride™) in the presence of different water-acetonitrile mixtures (from 0-80% (v/v) acetonitrile) of different ionic strengths (from 0-40mM) and pH values (from pH 3.0-7.0) have been investigated. Debye-Hückel theory was applied to explain the effect of changes in the pH and ionic strength of these aqueous media on the negative zeta potential of this stationary phase. The experimental zeta potentials of the Diamond Hydride™ particles as a function of acetonitrile content up to 50% (v/v) correlated (R(2)=0.998) with the predicted zeta potential values based on this established theory, when the values of the dissociation constant of all related species, as well as viscosity, dielectric constant and refractive index of the aqueous medium were taken into consideration. Further, the retention behavior of basic, acidic and neutral analytes was investigated under mobile phase conditions of higher pH and lower ionic strength. Under these conditions, the Diamond Hydride™ stationary phase surface became more negative, as assessed from the increasingly more negative zeta potentials, resulting in the ion exchange characteristics becoming more dominant and the basic analytes showing increasing retention. Ionic descriptors were derived from these chromatographic experiments based on the assumption that linear solvation energy relationships prevail. The results were compared with predicted ionic descriptors based on the different calculated zeta potential values resulting in an overall correlation of R(2)=0.888. These studies provide fundamental insights into the impact on the separation performance of changes in the zeta potential of the Diamond Hydride™ surface with the results relevant to other silica hydride and, potentially, to other types of stationary phase materials. PMID:25622609

  17. Prediction of the zeta potentials and ionic descriptors of a silica hydride stationary phase with mobile phases of different pH and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Kulsing, Chadin; Yang, Yuanzhong; Matyska, Maria T; Pesek, Joseph J; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-02-15

    In this study, the zeta potentials of a silica hydride stationary phase (Diamond Hydride™) in the presence of different water-acetonitrile mixtures (from 0-80% (v/v) acetonitrile) of different ionic strengths (from 0-40mM) and pH values (from pH 3.0-7.0) have been investigated. Debye-Hückel theory was applied to explain the effect of changes in the pH and ionic strength of these aqueous media on the negative zeta potential of this stationary phase. The experimental zeta potentials of the Diamond Hydride™ particles as a function of acetonitrile content up to 50% (v/v) correlated (R(2)=0.998) with the predicted zeta potential values based on this established theory, when the values of the dissociation constant of all related species, as well as viscosity, dielectric constant and refractive index of the aqueous medium were taken into consideration. Further, the retention behavior of basic, acidic and neutral analytes was investigated under mobile phase conditions of higher pH and lower ionic strength. Under these conditions, the Diamond Hydride™ stationary phase surface became more negative, as assessed from the increasingly more negative zeta potentials, resulting in the ion exchange characteristics becoming more dominant and the basic analytes showing increasing retention. Ionic descriptors were derived from these chromatographic experiments based on the assumption that linear solvation energy relationships prevail. The results were compared with predicted ionic descriptors based on the different calculated zeta potential values resulting in an overall correlation of R(2)=0.888. These studies provide fundamental insights into the impact on the separation performance of changes in the zeta potential of the Diamond Hydride™ surface with the results relevant to other silica hydride and, potentially, to other types of stationary phase materials.

  18. Determination of trace selenium in high purity tellurium by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry after solid phase extraction of a diaminobenzidine-selenium chelate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Wang; Ying, Zeng; Jinyong, Xu

    2016-09-01

    Macroporous adsorption resin was used as the sorbent for solid phase extraction and determination of the trace Se content in high purity tellurium prior to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry analysis. Selenium was converted into an organic Se chelate using 3,3‧-diaminobenzidine and was separated from the tellurium matrix by solid phase extraction. The resin was packed as a column for solid phase extraction. Under optimum conditions, trace Se can be quantitatively extracted and the tellurium matrix can be removed. The Se in the eluate was determined by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The limit of detection (3σ) of this method was 0.22 ng g- 1 and the relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 5) ranged from 2.0 to 2.5% for the three investigated tellurium samples. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the trace Se content in high purity tellurium samples.

  19. Solubility and Reaction Rates of Aluminum Solid Phases Under Geothermal Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Benezeth, P.; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.J.; Anovitz, L.M.

    2000-05-28

    Experimental studies involving equilibrium solubility and dissolution/precipitation rates were initiated on aluminum hydroxide phases prevalent under geothermal reservoir conditions. A large capacity, hydrogen-electrode concentration cell (HECC) was constructed specifically for this purpose.

  20. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Phases in Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Dabbs; Ilhan A. Aksay

    2005-01-12

    Aluminum-containing phases compose the bulk of solids precipitating during the processing of radioactive tank wastes. Processes designed to minimize the volume of high-level waste through conversion to glassy phases require transporting waste solutions near-saturated with aluminum-containing species from holding tank to processing center. The uncontrolled precipitation within transfer lines results in clogged pipes and lines and fouled ion exchangers, with the potential to shut down processing operations.

  1. Investigations on the phase equilibria of some hydride ion conducting electrolyte systems and their application for hydrogen monitoring in sodium coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Sujatha, K.; Nagaraj, S.; Mahendran, K. H.; Sridharan, R.; Periaswami, G.; Gnanasekaran, T.

    2005-09-01

    Electrochemical meters for measuring hydrogen levels in liquid sodium need thermodynamically stable hydride ion conducting electrolytes. In order to identify electrolytes that have high hydride ion conductivity, phase diagram of systems consisting of low melting compounds such as CaCl 2-LiCl, SrBr 2-LiBr, SrBr 2-SrHBr and CaBr 2-CaHBr were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and their phase diagrams established. Using these information and supplementary information on effects of addition of alkaline earth hydride to these systems, potential electrolytes were tested for their use in electrochemical meters. Meters were constructed using electrolytes with (i) 22mol%SrCl 2-12.2mol%CaCl 2-54.5mol%LiCl-11.3mol%CaHCl, (ii) 70mol%LiCl-16mol%CaHCl-14mol%CaCl 2 and (iii) 40mol%CaHBr-60mol%CaBr 2 compositions. Output of meters that had Li ions in liquid phase electrolyte showed non-linearity at low hydrogen levels. Output of meters using CaBr 2-40mol%CaHBr solid showed linearity in the concentration range of 50-250 ppb in sodium.

  2. Selective-area growth of GaN microrods on strain-induced templates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekhal, Kaddour; Bae, Si-Young; Lee, Ho-Jun; Mitsunari, Tadashi; Tamura, Akira; Deki, Manato; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the influence of parameters such as type of carrier gas and NH3/HCl flow ratio on the growth of vertical GaN microstructures by selective-area growth (SAG) hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). On various strain-induced templates such as GaN/sapphire, GaN/Si, and AlN/Si, regular arrays of Ga-polar GaN microrods were properly achieved by adjusting the growth parameters. The photoluminescence and micro-Raman measurements reveal not only the crystal quality of the GaN microrods but also strain distribution. These results will give insight into the control of the morphology of GaN microrods in terms of the strain induced from templates in SAG-HVPE. The precisely controlled arrays of GaN microrods can be used for next-generation light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by realizing InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs) with a radial structure.

  3. Ar{sup +}-irradiation-induced damage in hydride vapor-phase epitaxy GaN films

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Yoshitaka Ogawa, Daisuke; Nakamura, Keiji; Kawakami, Retsuo; Niibe, Masahito

    2015-07-15

    The authors have investigated the electrical characteristics of hydride vapor-phase epitaxy GaN films exposed to Ar{sup +} irradiation, employing Schottky barrier diodes. The Ar{sup +} irradiation tends to largely increase the effective carrier concentration in the near surface region of GaN up to ∼25 nm, due to the generation of donor-type N vacancy defects, compared to the original value before the irradiation. More interestingly, acceptor-type deep-level defects are found to be formed at ∼2.1, ∼2.9, and ∼3.2 eV below the conduction band in the subsequently deeper region, in which Ga vacancies introduced by the Ar{sup +} irradiation are considered to be in-diffused and immediately combined with hydrogen. These N vacancies and hydrogenated Ga vacancies formed are dominantly responsible for changing the depth profiles of the effective carrier concentration via the carrier generation, the carrier trapping, and/or carrier compensation.

  4. Electron Transport in a High Mobility Free-Standing GaN Substrate Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, L.; Kurdak, C.; Yun, F.; Morkoc, H.; Rode, D. L.; Tsen, K. T.; Park, S. S.; Lee, K. Y.

    2001-03-01

    We studied electron transport properties in a high quality free-standing GaN grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The GaN, with a thickness of more than 200 μm, was lifted off the sapphire substrate and mechanically polished. At room temperature the carrier density is 1.3x10^16cm-3 and the Hall mobility is 1200 cm^2/V-s, which is the highest reported electron mobility for GaN with a wurtzite structure. Transport properties are studied using a van der Pauw geometry in a temperature range of 20 to 300 K and in magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla. Electron mobility is found to increase at lower temperatures with a peak mobility of 7400 cm^2/V-s at 48 K. The carrier density decreases exponentially at temperatures below 80 K with an activation energy of 28 meV. The electron transport measurements were used to examine the contributions of different scattering mechanisms. Numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation was carried out, including non-parabolic conduction bands and wavefunction admixture, along with lattice scattering and ionized-impurity scattering. LO and TO phonon energies were determined by Raman spectroscopy.

  5. Hydride development for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Sandrock, G.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate improved hydride materials for hydrogen storage. The work currently is organized into four tasks: hydride development, bed fabrication, materials support for engineering systems, and IEA Annex 12 activities. At the present time, hydride development is focused on Mg alloys. These materials generally have higher weight densities for storing hydrogen than rare earth or transition metal alloys, but suffer from high operating temperatures, slow kinetic behavior and material stability. The authors approach is to study bulk alloy additions which increase equilibrium overpressure, in combination with stable surface alloy modification and particle size control to improve kinetic properties. This work attempts to build on the considerable previous research in this area, but examines specific alloy systems in greater detail, with attention to known phase properties and structures. The authors have found that specific phases can be produced which have significantly improved hydride properties compared to previous studies.

  6. Structural phase stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of alkali metal hydrides AMH4 (A=Li, Na; M=B, AL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, M.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.

    2016-01-01

    The structural stability of Alkali metal hydrides AMH4 (A=Li, Na; M=B, Al) is analyzed among the various crystal structures, namely hexagonal (P63mc), tetragonal (P42/nmc), tetragonal (P-421c), tetragonal (I41/a), orthorhombic (Pnma) and monoclinic (P21/c). It is observed that, orthorhombic (Pnma) phase is the most stable structure for LiBH4, monoclinic (P21/c) for LiAlH4, tetragonal (P42/nmc) for NaBH4 and tetragonal (I41/a) for NaAlH4 at normal pressure. Pressure induced structural phase transitions are observed in LiBH4, LiAlH4, NaBH4 and NaAlH4 at the pressures of 4 GPa, 36.1 GPa, 26.5 GPa and 46 GPa respectively. The electronic structure reveals that these metal hydrides are wide band gap insulators. The calculated elastic constants indicate that these metal hydrides are mechanically stable at normal pressure.

  7. Silica, hybrid silica, hydride silica and non-silica stationary phases for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Borges, Endler M

    2015-04-01

    Free silanols on the surface of silica are the "villains", which are responsible for detrimental interactions of those compounds and the stationary phase (i.e., bad peak shape, low efficiency) as well as low thermal and chemical stability. For these reasons, we began this review describing new silica and hybrid silica stationary phases, which have reduced and/or shielded silanols. At present, in liquid chromatography for the majority of analyses, reversed-phase liquid chromatography is the separation mode of choice. However, the needs for increased selectivity and increased retention of hydrophilic bases have substantially increased the interest in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). Therefore, stationary phases and this mode of separation are discussed. Then, non-silica stationary phases (i.e., zirconium oxide, titanium oxide, alumina and porous graphitized carbon), which afford increased thermal and chemical stability and also selectivity different from those obtained with silica and hybrid silica, are discussed. In addition, the use of these materials in HILIC is also reviewed.

  8. Bulk Hydrides and Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zirconium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulk, Eric F.

    Zirconium alloys are susceptible to engineering problems associated with the uptake of hydrogen throughout their design lifetime in nuclear reactors. Understanding of hydrogen embrittlement associated with the precipitation of brittle hydride phases and a sub-critical crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) is required to provide the engineering justifications for safe reactor operation. The nature of bulk zirconium hydrides at low concentrations (< 100 wt. ppm) is subject to several contradictory descriptions in the literature associated with the stability and metastability of gamma-phase zirconium hydride. Due to the differing volume expansions (12-17%) and crystallography between gamma and delta hydride phases, it is suggested that the matrix yield strength may have an effect on the phase stability. The present work indicated that although yield strength can shift the phase stability, other factors such as microstructure and phase distribution can be as or more important. This suggests that small material differences are the reason for the literature discrepancies. DHC is characterised by the repeated precipitation, growth, fracture of brittle hydride phases and subsequent crack arrest in the ductile metal. DHC growth is associated primarily the ability of hydrogen to diffuse under a stress induced chemical potential towards a stress raiser. Knowledge of the factors controlling DHC are paramount in being able to appropriately describe DHC for engineering purposes. Most studies characterise DHC upon cooling to the test temperature. DHC upon heating has not been extensively studied and the mechanism by which it occurs is somewhat controversial in the literature. This work shows that previous thermo-mechanical processing of hydrided zirconium can have a significant effect on the dissolution behaviour of the bulk hydride upon heating. DHC tests with gamma-quenched, furnace cooled-delta and reoriented bulk hydrides upon heating and DHC upon

  9. Mineral phases and mobility of trace metals in white aluminum precipitates found in acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeongkyoo

    2015-01-01

    The white aluminum precipitates (S1,S2,S4-1,S4-2) collected at three different locations affected by acid mine and rock drainage were studied to characterize the mineral phases and mobility of trace metals. Chemical analysis, XRD, SEM, NMR, and sequential extraction method were mainly used. XRD data showed that most white aluminum precipitates are amorphous with small amount of gypsum, which was also confirmed by SEM. The (27)Al MAS NMR spectra provide more detailed information on the local environments of aluminum in those samples. The samples collected at two locations (S3, and S4-1 and S4-2) contain 4-coordinated aluminum, suggesting that the samples contain a significant amount of amorphous phase from Al13-tridecamer. Chemical data of calcium and sulfur with (27)Al MAS NMR spectra suggest that the relative amounts of amorphous phase from Al13-tridecamer, hydrobasaluminite, aluminum hydroxide, and gypsum are different for each sample. Different amount of amorphous phase from Al13-tridecamer in those samples are probably caused by the different geochemical conditions and hydrolysis by aging in water. Sequential extraction results show that water soluble fraction and sorbed and exchangeable fraction of trace metals in sample collected as suspended particles (S1) are higher than other samples, and can affect the ecological system in waters by releasing aluminum and trace metals. These results suggest that careful characterization of white aluminum precipitates is needed to estimate the environmental effects of those precipitates in acid mine drainage. PMID:25213794

  10. Effective Thermal Conductivity of an Aluminum Foam + Water Two Phase System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskito, John

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the effect of volume fraction and pore size on the effective thermal conductivity of an aluminum foam and water system. Nine specimens of aluminum foam representing a matrix of three volume fractions (4-8% by vol.) and three pore sizes (2-4 mm) were tested with water to determine relationships to the effective thermal conductivity. It was determined that increases in volume fraction of the aluminum phase were correlated to increases in the effective thermal conductivity. It was not statistically possible to prove that changes in pore size of the aluminum foam correlated to changes in the effective thermal conductivity. However, interaction effects between the volume fraction and pore size of the foam were statistically significant. Ten theoretical models were selected from the published literature to compare against the experimental data. Models by Asaad, Hadley, and de Vries provided effective thermal conductivity predictions within a 95% confidence interval.

  11. Microstructure of surface cerium hydride growth sites

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, Martin; Knowles, John; Montgomery, Neil; Preuss, Michael

    2014-05-15

    Samples of cerium were exposed to hydrogen under controlled conditions causing cerium hydride sites to nucleate and grow on the surface. The hydriding rate was measured in situ, and the hydrides were characterised using secondary ion mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. The results show that the hydriding rate proceeded more quickly than earlier studies. Characterisation confirmed that the hydrogen is confined to the sites. The morphology of the hydrides was confirmed to be oblate, and stressed material was observed surrounding the hydride, in a number of cases lathlike features were observed surrounding the hydride sites laterally with cracking in the surface oxide above them. It is proposed that during growth the increased lattice parameter of the CeH{sub 2} induces a lateral compressive stress around the hydride, which relieves by the ca. 16% volume collapse of the γ-Ce to α-Ce pressure induced phase transition. Cracking of the surface oxide above the laths reduces the diffusion barrier to hydrogen reaching the metal/oxide interface surrounding the hydride site and contributes to the anisotropic growth of the hydrides.

  12. Open-Cell Aluminum Foams Filled With Phase Change Materials as Compact Heat Sinks

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung-tae; Herling, Darrell R.

    2006-11-01

    In many engineering applications, thermal management of electrical devices under cyclic temperature variations can be important for proper operation of the devices and for thermal safety. Open-cell aluminum foams filled with phase change materials (PCM) can be used as effective heat sinks through the use of the thermal conductivity of the foams and the latent heat of the PCM. The effects of geometric parameters of open-cell aluminum foams on the performance of aluminum foam-PCM heat sinks are investigated by experiments. Three types of open-cell aluminum 6061 foams with similar relative densities and different cell sizes are used as specimens. Paraffin is selected as the PCM due to its excellent thermal stability and ease of handling. During the experiment, a copper block, which simulates an electrical device under thermal load, is attached to the bottom surface of the specimen and heated by a hot plate until the temperature of the copper block reaches 100 C. Then the whole experimental set-up is removed from the hot plate and cooled. The temperature history of the copper block is measured as a function of time. The experimental results show that the aluminum foam-PCM heat sinks increase both the heating and cooling times of the copper block. Also, as the surface area per unit volume of the aluminum foam increases, both the heating and cooling times increase due to better utilization of the latent heat of the PCM. Finally, the experimental results indicate that the effect of the surface area per unit volume is more pronounced on the cooling time than on the heating time. The results of this investigation suggest that the surface area per unit volume of aluminum foams can be a major parameter in the design of aluminum foam-PCM heat sinks made of open-cell aluminum foams with similar relative densities.

  13. A model for arsenic anti-site incorporation in GaAs grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, K. L.; Kuech, T. F.

    2014-12-28

    GaAs growth by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) has regained interest as a potential route to low cost, high efficiency thin film photovoltaics. In order to attain the highest efficiencies, deep level defect incorporation in these materials must be understood and controlled. The arsenic anti-site defect, As{sub Ga} or EL2, is the predominant deep level defect in HVPE-grown GaAs. In the present study, the relationships between HVPE growth conditions and incorporation of EL2 in GaAs epilayers were determined. Epitaxial n-GaAs layers were grown under a wide range of deposition temperatures (T{sub D}) and gallium chloride partial pressures (P{sub GaCl}), and the EL2 concentration, [EL2], was determined by deep level transient spectroscopy. [EL2] agreed with equilibrium thermodynamic predictions in layers grown under conditions in which the growth rate, R{sub G}, was controlled by conditions near thermodynamic equilibrium. [EL2] fell below equilibrium levels when R{sub G} was controlled by surface kinetic processes, with the disparity increasing as R{sub G} decreased. The surface chemical composition during growth was determined to have a strong influence on EL2 incorporation. Under thermodynamically limited growth conditions, e.g., high T{sub D} and/or low P{sub GaCl}, the surface vacancy concentration was high and the bulk crystal was close to equilibrium with the vapor phase. Under kinetically limited growth conditions, e.g., low T{sub D} and/or high P{sub GaCl}, the surface attained a high GaCl coverage, blocking As adsorption. This competitive adsorption process reduced the growth rate and also limited the amount of arsenic that incorporated as As{sub Ga}. A defect incorporation model which accounted for the surface concentration of arsenic as a function of the growth conditions, was developed. This model was used to identify optimal growth parameters for the growth of thin films for photovoltaics, conditions in which a high growth rate and low [EL2] could be

  14. Quasi-transverse optical phonon mode in self-generated semipolar AlN grains embedded in c-oriented AlN matrix grown on sapphire using hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y. Y.; Zhou, T. F.; Zheng, S. N.; Liu, X. H.; Zhao, J. J.; Su, X. J.; Huang, J.; Qiu, Y. X.; Zhang, J. C.; Xu, K.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we present a microspectroscopic investigation on the quasi-transverse optical phonon modes Q(TO) in some self-generated aluminum nitride (AlN) grains grown on sapphire using hydride vapor phase epitaxy. Using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, these grains were confirmed to be embedded in (0001)-AlN (c-AlN) epitaxial matrix with an appearance plane of (10 1 ¯ 1 ) (s-plane). Two beam bright field images further showed that the AlN grains were free of dislocation. In-plane phonon anisotropy of the AlN grains was discussed in detail using angular-dependent polarized Raman spectroscopy. The dependence of pure Raman phonons intensity on rotation angle agrees well with the calculation. The Q(TO) phonon intensity exhibited similar behavior to that of A1(TO) phonon, which can be explained by Loudon's formula. However, the observed frequency fluctuation for the Q(TO) phonon differs from that of the pure phonon modes, which cannot be directly understood from the classic Loudon's formula. A modified Loudon's formula appropriate to non-normal incidence was presented to explain the observed Q(TO) phonon frequency fluctuation. Combining with the angular-dependent Raman spectra, we proposed that a small inclination of s-plane along with the various in-plane orientations in c-AlN matrix lead to the frequency fluctuation of Q(TO) in these embedded semipolar AlN grains.

  15. High-quality, 2-inch-diameter m-plane GaN substrates grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy on acidic ammonothermal seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, Yusuke; Enatsu, Yuuki; Kubo, Shuichi; Ikeda, Hirotaka; Kurihara, Kaori; Matsumoto, Hajime; Nagao, Satoru; Mikawa, Yutaka; Fujito, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discusse the origin of basal-plane stacking faults (BSFs) generated in the homoepitaxial hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) growth of m-plane gallium nitride (GaN). We investigated the effects of seed quality, especially dislocation density, on BSF generation during homoepitaxy. The results clearly identify basal-plane dislocation in the seed as a cause of BSF generation. We realized high-quality m-plane GaN substrates with a 2-in. diameter using HVPE on low-dislocation-density m-plane seeds.

  16. Nitridation- and Buffer-Layer-Free Growth of [1100]-Oriented GaN Domains on m-Plane Sapphire Substrates by Using Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Yeonwoo; Lee, Sanghwa; Jue, Miyeon; Yoon, Hansub; Kim, Chinkyo

    2012-12-01

    Over a wide range of growth conditions, GaN domains were grown on bare m-plane sapphire substrates by using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE), and the relation between these growth conditions and three possible preferred crystallographic orientations ([1100], [1103], [1122]) of GaN domains was investigated. In contrast with the previous reports by other groups, our results revealed that preferentially [1100]-oriented GaN domains were grown without low-temperature nitridation or a buffer layer, and that the growth condition of preferentially [1100]-oriented GaN was insensitive to V/III ratio.

  17. Transfer of Amide and 2-Methoxyethoxy Groups and Sodium Encapsulation in the Reaction of TaCl3[N(TMS)2]2 with Sodium Bis(2-methoxyethoxy)aluminum Hydride: X-ray Structure of [NaAl{N(TMS)2}(OCH2CH2OMe)3]2

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shih-Huang Huang; Wang, Xiaoping; Richmond, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    The reaction between the tantalum compound TaCl3[N(TMS)2]2 and the hydridic reducing agent sodium bis(2-methoxyethoxy)aluminum hydride (Vitride) has been investigated in toluene solution at room temperature and found to afford the dimeric aluminate complex [NaAl{N(TMS)2}(OCH2CH2OMe)3]2 as the sole isolable product. The molecular structure of the product establishes the existence of a four-coordinate aluminum atom and the formal transfer of the 2-methoxyethoxy and bis(trimethylsilyl)amide groups to the aluminate product. The aggregation of two NaAl{N(TMS)2}(OCH2CH2OMe)3 units serves to bind the two sodium cations in a crown-ether fashion through six ancillary oxygen atoms.

  18. Ni/metal hydride secondary element

    DOEpatents

    Bauerlein, Peter

    2005-04-19

    A Ni/metal hydride secondary element having a positive nickel hydroxide electrode, a negative electrode having a hydrogen storage alloy, and an alkaline electrolyte, the positive electrode, provided with a three-dimensional metallic conductive structure, also contains an aluminum compound which is soluble in the electrolyte, in addition to nickel hydroxide and cobalt oxide. The aluminum compound is aluminum hydroxide and/or aluminum oxide, and the mass of the aluminum compound which is present in the positive bulk material mixture is 0.1 to 2% by weight relative to the mass of the nickel hydroxide which is present. In combination with aluminum hydroxide or aluminum oxide, the positive electrode further contains lanthanoid oxidic compounds Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, La.sub.2 O.sub.3 and Ca(OH).sub.2, as well as mixtures of these compounds.

  19. Mineral phases and metals in baghouse dust from secondary aluminum production

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse dust (BHD) is a solid waste generated by air pollution control systems during secondary aluminum processing (SAP). Management and disposal of BHD can be challenging in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 78...

  20. Planar gas chromatography column on aluminum plate with multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, I. A.; Platonov, V. I.; Pavelyev, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    The high selectivity of the adsorption layer for low-boiling alkanes is shown, the separation factor (α) couple iso-butane / butane is 1.9 at a column temperature of 50 °C.The paper presents sorption and selective properties of planar gas chromatography column on aluminum plate with multi-walled carbon nanotubes as the stationary phase.

  1. Evolution of Intermetallic Phases in Soldering of the Die Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jie; Wang, Xiaoming; DenOuden, Tony; Han, Qingyou

    2016-06-01

    Most die failures are resulted from chemical reactions of dies and molten aluminum in the die casting of aluminum. The formation of intermetallic phases between a steel die and molten aluminum is investigated by stationary immersion tests and compared to a real die casting process. Three intermetallic phases are identified in the stationary immersion tests: a composite layer and two compact layers. The composite layer is a mixture of α bcc, Al, and Si phases. The α bcc phase changes in morphology from rod-like to spherical shape, while the growth rate of the layer changes from parabolic to linear pattern with immersion time. The first compact layer forms rapidly after immersion and maintains a relatively constant thickness. The second compact layer forms after 4 hours of immersion and exhibits parabolic growth with immersion time. In comparison, only a composite layer and the first compact layer are observed in a real die casting process. The fresh molten aluminum of high growth rate washes away the second intermetallic layer easily.

  2. Comparison of the performance of different silica hydride particles for the solid-phase extraction of non-volatile analytes from dark chocolate with analysis by gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nolvachai, Yada; Kulsing, Chadin; Boysen, Reinhard I; Matyska, Maria T; Pesek, Joseph J; Marriott, Philip J; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-05-01

    The extraction capabilities of a Diamond Hydride™ phase, as well as silica hydride phases modified with bidentate octadecyl (BDC(18)), phenyl or cholesteryl groups, were evaluated for the analysis of fatty acids, amino acids, sugars and sterols in a dark chocolate extract. These batch adsorption performances were investigated using either methanol or aqueous methanol as the solvent. The compositions of the extracted fractions were assessed by gas chromatography interfaced with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-qMS). The batch binding propensities of the various compound classes with silica hydride particles modified with immobilised phenyl groups or larger ligands followed trends predicted from linear solvation energy relationships. Both prediction and experiment revealed that better extraction results could be obtained with the phenyl, BDC(18) and cholesteryl hydride particles for the major chocolate components. Based on these results, separations in micro-pipette tip format with these three types of stationary phase particles have been undertaken. PMID:25529702

  3. Hydride compressor

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James R.; Salzano, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Method of producing high energy pressurized gas working fluid power from a low energy, low temperature heat source, wherein the compression energy is gained by using the low energy heat source to desorb hydrogen gas from a metal hydride bed and the desorbed hydrogen for producing power is recycled to the bed, where it is re-adsorbed, with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source. In one embodiment, the adsorption-desorption cycle provides a chemical compressor that is powered by the low energy heat source, and the compressor is connected to a regenerative gas turbine having a high energy, high temperature heat source with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source.

  4. Pressureless Reaction Sintering of AlON using Aluminum Orthophosphate as a Transient Liquid Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Bakas; Henry Chu

    2009-01-01

    Use of aluminum oxynitride (AlON) in transparent armor systems has been difficult due to the expense and limitations of the processing methods currently necessary to achieve transparency. Development of a pressureless processing method based on direct reaction sintering of alumina and aluminum nitride powders would reduce costs and provide a more flexible and practical manufacturing method. It may be possible to develop such a processing method using liquid phase sintering; as long as the liquid phase does not remain in the final sample. AlPO4 forms a liquid phase with Al2O3 and AlN at the temperatures required to sinter AlON, and slowly decomposes into P2O5 and alumina. Therefore, it was investigated as a possible transient liquid phase for reaction-sintered AlON. Small compacts of alumina and aluminum nitride with up to of 15wt% AlPO4 additive were pressed and sintered. It was found that AlPO4 formed the requisite transient liquid phase, and it was possible to adjust the process to produce AlON samples with good transmission and densities of 3.66-3.67 g/cc. XRD confirmed the samples formed were AlON, with no trace of any remaining phosphate phases or excess alumina or aluminum nitride. Based on the results, it was concluded that AlPO4 could be utilized as a transient liquid phase to improve the density and transmission of AlON produced by pressureless reaction sintering.

  5. Mineral phases and metals in baghouse dust from secondary aluminum production.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Lan; El Badawy, Amro M; Arambewela, Mahendranath; Adkins, Renata; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2015-09-01

    Baghouse dust (BHD) is a solid waste generated by air pollution control systems during secondary aluminum processing (SAP). Management and disposal of BHD can be challenging in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 78 BHD samples collected from 13 different SAP facilities across the U.S. were investigated. The XRD semi-quantitative analysis of BHD samples suggests the presence of metallic aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride and its oxides, spinel, elpasolite as well as diaspora. BHD also contains halite, sylvite and fluorite, which are used as fluxes in SAP activities. Total aluminum (Al) in the BHD samples averaged 18% by weight. Elevated concentrations of trace metals (>100 μg L(-1) As; >1000 μg L(-1) Cu, Mn, Se, Pb, Mn and Zn) were also detected in the leachate. The U.S. toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that some samples leached above the toxicity limit for Cd, Pb and Se. Exceeding the TCLP limits in all sample is independent of facilities generating the BHD. From the metal content perspective only, it appears that BHD has a higher potential to exhibit toxicity characteristics than salt cake (the largest waste stream generated by SAP facilities). PMID:25898346

  6. Mineral phases and metals in baghouse dust from secondary aluminum production.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Lan; El Badawy, Amro M; Arambewela, Mahendranath; Adkins, Renata; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2015-09-01

    Baghouse dust (BHD) is a solid waste generated by air pollution control systems during secondary aluminum processing (SAP). Management and disposal of BHD can be challenging in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 78 BHD samples collected from 13 different SAP facilities across the U.S. were investigated. The XRD semi-quantitative analysis of BHD samples suggests the presence of metallic aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride and its oxides, spinel, elpasolite as well as diaspora. BHD also contains halite, sylvite and fluorite, which are used as fluxes in SAP activities. Total aluminum (Al) in the BHD samples averaged 18% by weight. Elevated concentrations of trace metals (>100 μg L(-1) As; >1000 μg L(-1) Cu, Mn, Se, Pb, Mn and Zn) were also detected in the leachate. The U.S. toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that some samples leached above the toxicity limit for Cd, Pb and Se. Exceeding the TCLP limits in all sample is independent of facilities generating the BHD. From the metal content perspective only, it appears that BHD has a higher potential to exhibit toxicity characteristics than salt cake (the largest waste stream generated by SAP facilities).

  7. Enhanced Cooper pairing versus suppressed phase coherence shaping the superconducting dome in coupled aluminum nanograins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pracht, Uwe S.; Bachar, Nimrod; Benfatto, Lara; Deutscher, Guy; Farber, Eli; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2016-03-01

    The development of the fundamental superconducting (SC) energy scales—the SC energy gap Δ and the superfluid stiffness J —of granular aluminum, i.e., thin films composed of coupled nanograins, is studied by means of optical THz spectroscopy. Starting from well-coupled grains, Δ grows as the grains are progressively decoupled, causing the unconventional increase of Tc with sample resistivity. When the grain coupling is suppressed further, Δ saturates while the critical temperature Tc decreases, concomitantly with a sharp decline of J , delimiting a SC dome in the phase diagram. This crossover to a phase-driven SC transition is accompanied by an optical gap surviving into the normal state above Tc. We demonstrate that granular aluminum is an ideal testbed to understand the interplay between quantum confinement and global SC phase coherence due to nanoinhomogeneity.

  8. Synthesis of hexagonal C14/C36 and cubic C15 ZrCr2 Laves phases and thermodynamic stability of their hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodega, J.; Fernández, J. F.; Leardini, F.; Ares, J. R.; Sánchez, C.

    2011-11-01

    ZrCr2 samples with well defined hexagonal (C14/C36) or cubic (C15) Laves phase structures have been synthesised by melting in an arc furnace followed by different treatments depending on the sample type. Hydrogen absorption capacity and thermodynamic stability of their respective hydrides have been investigated by solid-gas reaction. Pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) curves obtained for both structures at temperatures of 348, 373, 398 and 423 K, and H-pressures from 101 to 106 Pa, showed that the cubic phase is less stable than the hexagonal ones. This result was related to Miedema's rule of reversed stability and also correlated to the volume of the interstitial hole for hydrogen.

  9. Thick orientation-patterned growth of GaP on wafer-fused GaAs templates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy for frequency conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vangala, Shivashankar; Kimani, Martin; Peterson, Rita; Stites, Ron; Snure, Michael; Tassev, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Quasi-phase-matched (QPM) GaP layers up to 300 μm thick have been produced by low-pressure hydride vapor phase epitaxy (LP-HVPE) overgrowth on orientation-patterned GaAs (OPGaAs) templates fabricated using a wafer-fusion bonding technique. The growth on the OPGaAs templates resulted in up to 200 μm thick vertically propagating domains, with a total GaP thickness of 300 μm. The successful thick growth on OPGaAs templates is the first step towards solving the material problems associated with unreliable material quality of commercially available GaP wafers and making the whole process of designing QPM frequency conversion devices molecular beam epitaxy free and more cost-effective.

  10. GaAs Solar Cells Grown by Hydride Vapor-Phase Epitaxy and the Development of GaInP Cladding Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, John; Schulte, Kevin L.; Young, David L.; Haegel, Nancy M.; Ptak, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    The high cost of high-efficiency III-V photovoltaic devices currently limits them to niche markets. Hydride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE) growth of III-V materials recently reemerged as a low-cost, high-throughput alternative to conventional metal- organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) growth of high-efficiency solar cells. Previously, we demonstrated unpassivated HVPEgrown GaAs p-n junctions with good quantum efficiency and high open-circuit voltage (Voc). In this work, we demonstrate the growth of GaInPby HVPE for use as a high-quality surface passivation layer to GaAs solar cells. Solar cells grown with GaInP window layers show significantly improved quantum efficiency compared with unpassivated cells, increasing the short-circuit current (JSC) of these low-cost devices. These results show the potential of low-cost HVPE for the growth of high-quality III-V devices.

  11. Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

    1983-12-08

    The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  12. Use of a Novel Sub-2 µm Silica Hydride Vancomycin Stationary Phase in Nano-Liquid Chromatography. II. Separation of Derivatized Amino Acid Enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Silvia; Fanali, Chiara; Fanali, Salvatore

    2015-11-01

    A novel vancomycin silica hydride stationary phase was synthesized and the particles of 1.8 µm were packed into fused silica capillaries of 75 µm internal diameter (I.D.). The chiral stationary phase (CSP) was tested for the separation of some derivatized amino acid enantiomers by using nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC). Some experimental parameters such as the type and the content of organic modifier, the pH, and the concentration of the buffer added to the mobile phase were modified and the effect on enantioselectivity, retention time, and enantioresolution factor was studied. The separation of selected dansyl amino acids (Dns-AAs), e.g., Asp, Glu, Leu, and Phe in their enantiomers was initially achieved utilizing a mobile phase containing 85% (v/v) methanol (MeOH) and formate buffer measuring the enantioresolution factor and enantioselectivity in the range 1.74-4.17 and 1.39-1.59, respectively. Better results were obtained employing a more polar organic solvent as acetonitrile (ACN) in the mobile phase. Optimum results (Rs 1.41-6.09 and α 1.28-2.36) were obtained using a mobile phase containing formate buffer pH 2.5/water/MeOH/ACN 6:19:12.5:62.5 (v/v/v/v) in isocratic elution mode at flow rate of 130 nL/min.

  13. Synthesis and mechanical properties of two phase nanostructured aluminum based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajulapati, Koteswararao Venkata

    Nanostructured materials (<100 nm) exhibit novel and superior mechanical properties in comparison to their coarse grained counterparts. However the associated deformation mechanisms are poorly understood. Synthesizing bulk nanocrystalline materials to measure the meaningful/reasonable mechanical properties is still a grand challenge. Although there exist several experimental/theoretical studies on mechanical behavior of single phase materials, studies on the effect of a second phase (soft/hard) on the mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline materials are very limited. Therefore, the thrust of the current work is to synthesize bulk nanostructured two phase materials and to establish the influence of a second phase (soft/hard) on the mechanical properties of two phase materials benchmarked against the corresponding single phase material and to identify the governing mechanics of plasticity at the nano scale. Nanocrystalline aluminum was synthesized using ball milling at room temperature. The resultant powder material was consolidated to the bulk form using warm compaction and argon atmosphere and consolidation using high pressure torsion. The samples after high pressure torsion exhibited high end mechanical properties. The hardness of the nanostructured aluminum (of grain size 32 nm) was as high as 1200 MPa which is 6 times harder than its coarse grained counterpart. Nanocrystalline Al-W composites with varying compositions were synthesized. With the increased addition of W, the hardness of these nanocomposites was increased. This hardness trend followed the behavior predicted by the rule of mixtures based on the volume fractions of Al and W. With the addition of 4 atomic % of W, the strength of the nanocrystalline aluminum was elevated by 70%. Nanocrystalline Al-Pb composites were synthesized by two routes. In the first route, the room temperature ball milled samples were compacted at 573 K in an argon atmosphere. In the second route, the alloys were consolidated in

  14. Cross-stacked carbon nanotubes assisted self-separation of free-standing GaN substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tongbo; Yang, Jiankun; Wei, Yang; Huo, Ziqiang; Ji, Xiaoli; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-06-01

    We report a novel method to fabricate high quality 2-inch freestanding GaN substrate grown on cross-stacked carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs) coated sapphire by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). As nanoscale masks, these CSCNTs can help weaken the interface connection and release the compressive stress by forming voids during fast coalescence and also block the propagation of threading dislocations (TDs). During the cool-down process, thermal stress-induced cracks are initiated at the CSCNTs interface with the help of air voids and propagated all over the films which leads to full self-separation of FS-GaN substrate. Raman and photoluminescence spectra further reveal the stress relief and crystalline improvement of GaN with CSCNTs. It is expected that the efficient, low cost and mass-producible technique may enable new applications for CNTs in nitride optoelectronic fields.

  15. Study of the structural quality of GaN epitaxial layers obtained by hydride vapor phase epitaxy using a low-temperature buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogorohov, I. A.; Donskov, A. A.; Knyazev, S. N.; Kozlova, Yu. P.; Pavlov, V. F.; Yugova, T. G.

    2015-11-01

    The structural quality and surface morphology of low-temperature (LT) buffer layers after deposition and high-temperature (HT) annealing and HT GaN layers grown on LT buffer layers by hydride vapor phase epitaxy have been investigated. The HCl flow rate through the Ga source varied from 0.3 to 2 L/h, and the carrier gas N2 flow rate was either 18 or 60 L/h. It is established that the structural quality of LT GaN buffer is determined to a great extent by the HCl and N2 flow rates; the best results are obtained at HCl and N2 flow rates of 0.3 and 18 L/h, respectively. These GaN layers are characterized by a mirror surface and a rocking curve half-width of 360". It is suggested that the layer structure is improved due to the increase in the lateral growth rate.

  16. Structural and Optical Properties of Carbon-Doped AlN Substrates Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy Using AlN Substrates Prepared by Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Toru; Kubota, Yuki; Kinoshita, Toru; Kumagai, Yoshinao; Xie, Jinqiao; Collazo, Ramón; Murakami, Hisashi; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Koukitu, Akinori; Sitar, Zlatko

    2012-12-01

    Freestanding AlN substrates with various carbon (C) concentrations were prepared from C-doped thick layers grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) on bulk AlN substrates prepared by physical vapor transport (PVT). The structural properties of the AlN substrates up to a C concentration of 3×1019 cm-3 were the same as those of the nominally undoped substrates, while the absorption coefficient α at 265 nm was increased by C doping from 6.6 to 97 cm-1, when C concentration changed from <2×1017 to 1×1019 cm-3, respectively. Photoluminescence (PL) below 4.0 eV also increased by C doping.

  17. Preparation of Ag Schottky contacts on n-type GaN bulk crystals grown in nitrogen rich atmosphere by the hydride vapor phase epitaxy technique

    SciTech Connect

    Stübner, R. Kolkovsky, Vl.; Weber, J.; Leibiger, Gunnar; Habel, Frank

    2014-10-14

    Electrical properties of Schottky contacts on n-type GaN grown in nitrogen rich atmosphere with different N/Ga ratios by hydride vapor phase epitaxy were investigated. We show that tunneling of electrons from the conduction band of GaN to the metal is dominant in our samples. The quality of Schottky contacts does not only depend on surface preparation but also on the growth conditions of the crystals. Schottky contacts on these crystals show an increasing deterioration when higher N/Ga growth ratios are used. We correlate our results with the presence of negatively charged gallium vacancies in the samples. These charges compensate the positively charged donors and lead to a significant increase in series resistance.

  18. Cross-stacked carbon nanotubes assisted self-separation of free-standing GaN substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Tongbo; Yang, Jiankun; Wei, Yang; Huo, Ziqiang; Ji, Xiaoli; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel method to fabricate high quality 2-inch freestanding GaN substrate grown on cross-stacked carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs) coated sapphire by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). As nanoscale masks, these CSCNTs can help weaken the interface connection and release the compressive stress by forming voids during fast coalescence and also block the propagation of threading dislocations (TDs). During the cool-down process, thermal stress-induced cracks are initiated at the CSCNTs interface with the help of air voids and propagated all over the films which leads to full self-separation of FS-GaN substrate. Raman and photoluminescence spectra further reveal the stress relief and crystalline improvement of GaN with CSCNTs. It is expected that the efficient, low cost and mass-producible technique may enable new applications for CNTs in nitride optoelectronic fields. PMID:27340030

  19. Highly regioselective hydride transfer, oxidative dehydrogenation, and hydrogen-atom abstraction in the thermal gas-phase chemistry of [Zn(OH)](+)/C3H8.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Nan; Zhao, Hai-Tao; Li, Jilai; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2014-12-28

    The thermal reactions of [Zn(OH)](+) with C3H8 have been studied by means of gas-phase experiments and computational investigation. Two types of C-H bond activation are observed in the experiment, and pertinent mechanistic features include inter alia: (i) the metal center of [Zn(OH)](+) serves as active site in the hydride transfer to generate [i-C3H7](+) as major product, (ii) generally, a high regioselectivity is accompanied by remarkable chemoselectivity: for example, the activation of a methyl C-H bond results mainly in the formation of water and [Zn(C3,H7)](+). According to computational work, this ionic product corresponds to [HZn(CH3CH=CH2)](+). Attack of the zinc center at a secondary C-H bond leads preferentially to hydride transfer, thus giving rise to the generation of [i-C3H7](+); (iii) upon oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH), liberation of CH3CH2=CH2 occurs to produce [HZn(H2O)](+). Both, ODH as well as H2O loss proceed through the same intermediate which is characterized by the fact that a methylene hydrogen atom from the substrate is transferred to the zinc and one hydrogen atom from the methyl group to the OH group of [Zn(OH)](+). The combined experimental/computational gas-phase study of C-H bond activation by zinc hydroxide provides mechanistic insight into related zinc-catalyzed large-scale processes and identifies the crucial role that the Lewis-acid character of zinc plays. PMID:25230924

  20. PULSED EDDY CURRENT THICKNESS MEASUREMENT OF SELECTIVE PHASE CORROSION ON NICKEL ALUMINUM BRONZE VALVES

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, T. W.; Harlley, D.; Babbar, V. K.; Wannamaker, K.

    2010-02-22

    Nickel Aluminum Bronze (NAB) is a material with marine environment applications that under certain conditions can undergo selective phase corrosion (SPC). SPC involves the removal of minority elements while leaving behind a copper matrix. Pulsed eddy current (PEC) was evaluated for determination of SPC thickness on a NAB valve section with access from the surface corroded side. A primarily linear response of PEC amplitude, up to the maximum available SPC thickness of 4 mm was observed. The combination of reduced conductivity and permeability in the SPC phase relative to the base NAB was used to explain the observed sensitivity of PEC to SPC thickness variations.

  1. Development of anodes for aluminum/air batteries: Solution phase inhibition of corrosion: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; English, C.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1989-03-01

    Solution-phase inhibition is a promising strategy for controlling the corrosion of the aluminum fuel in alkaline aluminum/air batteries. Development of effective inhibitors would permit the use of scrap aluminum as fuel and thereby significantly improve the economics of the battery, because the cost of the fuel would have been partly or wholly defrayed by its previous use. In this study, we explored the discharge characteristics of aluminum in inhibited and uninhibited 4 M KOH at 50/degree/C and compared the performance of the fuel with that for two leading alloy fuels that had been evaluated in our previous work, Alloy BDW (Al-1Mg-0.1In-0.2Mn) and Alloy 21 (Al-0.2Ga-0.1In-0.1Tl). The inhibitors employed in this study, SnO/sub 3//sup 2/minus//, In(OH)/sub 3/, Ga(OH)/sub 4//sup /minus//, MnO/sub 4//sup 2/minus//, and binary combinations thereof, are either alloying elements of Alloys BDW and 21 or have been investigated previously. We found that potassium manganate and Na/sub 2/SnO/sub 3/ + In(OH)/sub 3/ are effective inhibitor systems. Particularly at high discharge rates, but at low discharge rates only manganate offers a significant advantage in coulombic efficiency over the uninhibited solution. Alloy BDW exhibits a very low open circuit (standby) corrosion rate, but its coulombic efficiency under discharge, as determined by delineating the particle anodic and cathodic reactions, was found to be no better than that of aluminum in the same uninhibited solution. Alloy 21 was found to exhibit a comparable performance to Alloy BDW under open circuit conditions and a much higher coulombic efficiency at low discharge rates, but the performance of this alloy under high discharge rate conditions was not determined. Alloy 21 has the significant disadvantage that it contains thallium. 36 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Silica Embedded Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.

    1998-08-01

    A method to produce silica embedded metal hydride was developed. The product is a composite in which metal hydride particles are embedded in a matrix of silica. The silica matrix is highly porous. Hydrogen gas can easily reach the embedded metal hydride particles. The pores are small so that the metal hydride particles cannot leave the matrix. The porous matrix also protects the metal hydride particles from larger and reactive molecules such as oxygen, since the larger gas molecules cannot pass through the small pores easily. Tests show that granules of this composite can absorb hydrogen readily and withstand many cycles without making fines.

  3. A theoretical evaluation of aluminum gel propellant two-phase flow losses on vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Donn C.; Turns, Stephen R.

    1993-01-01

    A one-dimensional model of a hydrocarbon/Al/O2(gaseous) fueled rocket combustion chamber was developed to study secondary atomization effects on propellant combustion. This chamber model was coupled with a two dimensional, two-phase flow nozzle code to estimate the two-phase flow losses associated with solid combustion products. Results indicate that moderate secondary atomization significantly reduces propellant burnout distance and Al2O3 particle size; however, secondary atomization provides only moderate decreases in two-phase flow induced I(sub sp) losses. Despite these two-phase flow losses, a simple mission study indicates that aluminum gel propellants may permit a greater maximum payload than the hydrocarbon/O2 bi-propellant combination for a vehicle of fixed propellant volume. Secondary atomization was also found to reduce radiation losses from the solid combustion products to the chamber walls, primarily through reductions in propellant burnout distance.

  4. A theoretical evaluation of aluminum gel propellant two-phase flow losses on vehicle performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Donn C.; Turns, Stephen R.

    1993-11-01

    A one-dimensional model of a hydrocarbon/Al/O2(gaseous) fueled rocket combustion chamber was developed to study secondary atomization effects on propellant combustion. This chamber model was coupled with a two dimensional, two-phase flow nozzle code to estimate the two-phase flow losses associated with solid combustion products. Results indicate that moderate secondary atomization significantly reduces propellant burnout distance and Al2O3 particle size; however, secondary atomization provides only moderate decreases in two-phase flow induced I(sub sp) losses. Despite these two-phase flow losses, a simple mission study indicates that aluminum gel propellants may permit a greater maximum payload than the hydrocarbon/O2 bi-propellant combination for a vehicle of fixed propellant volume. Secondary atomization was also found to reduce radiation losses from the solid combustion products to the chamber walls, primarily through reductions in propellant burnout distance.

  5. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption. PMID:19420657

  6. Characterization of hydrides and delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qiang

    This thesis tries to fill some of the missing gaps in the study of zirconium hydrides with state-of-art experiments, cutting edge tomographical technique, and a novel numerical algorithm. A new hydriding procedure is proposed. The new anode material and solution combination overcomes many drawbacks of the AECLRTM hydriding method and leads to superior hydriding result compared to the AECL RTM hydriding procedure. The DHC crack growth velocity of as-received Excel alloy and Zr-2.5Nb alloy together with several different heat treated Excel alloy samples are measured. While it already known that the DHC crack growth velocity increases with the increase of base metal strength, the finding that the transverse plane is the weaker plane for fatigue crack growth despite having higher resistance to DHC crack growth was unexpected. The morphologies of hydrides in a coarse grained Zircally-2 sample have been studied using synchrotron x-rays at ESRF with a new technique called Diffraction Contrast Tomography that uses simultaneous collection of tomographic data and diffraction data to determine the crystallographic orientation of crystallites (grains) in 3D. It has been previously limited to light metals such as Al or Mg (due to the use of low energy x-rays). Here we show the first DCT measurements using high energy x-rays (60 keV), allowing measurements in zirconium. A new algorithm of a computationally effcient way to characterize distributions of hydrides - in particular their orientation and/or connectivity - has been proposed. It is a modification of the standard Hough transform, which is an extension of the Hough transform widely used in the line detection of EBSD patterns. Finally, a basic model of hydrogen migration is built using ABAQUS RTM, which is a mature finite element package with tested modeling modules of a variety of physical laws. The coupling of hydrogen diffusion, lattice expansion, matrix deformation and phase transformation is investigated under

  7. Phase Transformations of α-Alumina Made from Waste Aluminum via a Precipitation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Matori, Khamirul Amin; Wah, Loy Chee; Hashim, Mansor; Ismail, Ismayadi; Zaid, Mohd Hafiz Mohd

    2012-01-01

    We report on a recycling project in which α-Al2O3 was produced from aluminum cans because no such work has been reported in literature. Heated aluminum cans were mixed with 8.0 M of H2SO4 solution to form an Al2(SO4)3 solution. The Al2(SO4)3 salt was contained in a white semi-liquid solution with excess H2SO4; some unreacted aluminum pieces were also present. The solution was filtered and mixed with ethanol in a ratio of 2:3, to form a white solid of Al2(SO4)3·18H2O. The Al2(SO4)3·18H2O was calcined in an electrical furnace for 3 h at temperatures of 400–1400 °C. The heating and cooling rates were 10 °C/min. XRD was used to investigate the phase changes at different temperatures and XRF was used to determine the elemental composition in the alumina produced. A series of different alumina compositions, made by repeated dehydration and desulfonation of the Al2(SO4)3·18H2O, is reported. All transitional alumina phases produced at low temperatures were converted to α-Al2O3 at high temperatures. The X-ray diffraction results indicated that the α-Al2O3 phase was realized when the calcination temperature was at 1200 °C or higher. PMID:23222685

  8. Phase transformations of α-alumina made from waste aluminum via a precipitation technique.

    PubMed

    Matori, Khamirul Amin; Wah, Loy Chee; Hashim, Mansor; Ismail, Ismayadi; Zaid, Mohd Hafiz Mohd

    2012-12-07

    We report on a recycling project in which α-Al(2)O(3) was produced from aluminum cans because no such work has been reported in literature. Heated aluminum cans were mixed with 8.0 M of H(2)SO(4) solution to form an Al(2)(SO(4))(3) solution. The Al(2)(SO(4))(3) salt was contained in a white semi-liquid solution with excess H(2)SO(4); some unreacted aluminum pieces were also present. The solution was filtered and mixed with ethanol in a ratio of 2:3, to form a white solid of Al(2)(SO(4))(3)·18H(2)O. The Al(2)(SO(4))(3)·18H(2)O was calcined in an electrical furnace for 3 h at temperatures of 400-1400 °C. The heating and cooling rates were 10 °C /min. XRD was used to investigate the phase changes at different temperatures and XRF was used to determine the elemental composition in the alumina produced. A series of different alumina compositions, made by repeated dehydration and desulfonation of the Al(2)(SO(4))(3)·18H(2)O, is reported. All transitional alumina phases produced at low temperatures were converted to α-Al(2)O(3) at high temperatures. The X-ray diffraction results indicated that the α-Al(2)O(3) phase was realized when the calcination temperature was at 1200 °C or higher.

  9. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 2 36-Inch Aluminum Tank Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA simulations of water landing impacts. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. EWIT Phase 2 featured a 36-inch aluminum tank head. The tank head was outfitted with one accelerometer, twelve pressure transducers, three string potentiometers, and four strain gages. The tank head was dropped from heights of 1 foot and 2 feet. The focus of this report is the correlation of analytical models against test data. As a measure of prediction accuracy, peak responses from the baseline LS-DYNA model were compared to peak responses from the tests.

  10. Cast B2-phase iron-aluminum alloys with improved fluidity

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Paris, Alan M.; Vought, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for iron aluminum alloys. A composition includes iron, aluminum and manganese. A method includes providing an alloy including iron, aluminum and manganese; and processing the alloy. The systems and methods provide advantages because additions of manganese to iron aluminum alloys dramatically increase the fluidity of the alloys prior to solidification during casting.

  11. Coral calcium hydride prevents hepatic steatosis in high fat diet-induced obese rats: A potent mitochondrial nutrient and phase II enzyme inducer.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chen; Wang, Yongyao; Zhu, Erkang; Yan, Chunhong; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Xiaojie; Qiu, Yingfeng; Shen, Hui; Sun, Xuejun; Feng, Zhihui; Liu, Jiankang; Long, Jiangang

    2016-03-01

    Diet-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by profound lipid accumulation and associated with an inflammatory response, oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that some mitochondrial nutrients effectively ameliorated high fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis and metabolic disorders. Molecular hydrogen in hydrogen-rich liquid or inhaling gas, which has been confirmed in scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing mitochondrial decay, improved metabolic syndrome in patients and animal models. Coral calcium hydride (CCH) is a new solid molecular hydrogen carrier made of coral calcium. However, whether and how CCH impacts HFD-induced hepatic steatosis remains uninvestigated. In the present study, we applied CCH to a HFD-induced NAFLD rat model for 13 weeks. We found that CCH durably generated hydrogen in vivo and in vitro. CCH treatment significantly reduced body weight gain, improved glucose and lipid metabolism and attenuated hepatic steatosis in HFD-induced obese rats with no influence on food and water intake. Moreover, CCH effectively improved HFD-induced hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced oxidative stress, and activated phase II enzymes. Our results suggest that CCH is an efficient hydrogen-rich agent, which could prevent HFD-induced NAFLD via activating phase II enzymes and improving mitochondrial function. PMID:26774456

  12. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Phases in Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbs, Daniel M.; Aksay, I.A.

    2005-12-01

    In the first phase of our study, we focused on the use of simple organics to raise the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in high alkaline aqueous solvents. In a limited survey of common organic acids, we determined that citric acid had the highest potential to achieve our goal. However, our subsequent investigation revealed that the citric acid appeared to play two roles in the solutions: first, raising the concentration of aluminum in highly alkaline solutions by breaking up or inhibiting ''seed'' polycations and thereby delaying the nucleation and growth of particles; and second, stabilizing nanometer-sized particles in suspension when nucleation did occur. The results of this work were recently published in Langmuir: D.M. Dabbs, U. Ramachandran, S. Lu, J. Liu, L.-Q. Wang, I.A. Aksay, ''Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid'' Langmuir, 21, 11690-11695 (2005). The second phase of our work involved the solvation of silicon, again in solutions of high alkalinity. Citric acid, due to its unfavorable pKa values, was not expected to be useful with silicon-containing solutions. Here, the use of polyols was determined to be effective in maintaining silicon-containing particles under high pH conditions but at smaller size with respect to standard suspensions of silicon-containing particles. There were a number of difficulties working with highly alkaline silicon-containing solutions, particularly in solutions at or near the saturation limit. Small deviations in pH resulted in particle formation or dissolution in the absence of the organic agents. One of the more significant observations was that the polyols appeared to stabilize small particles of silicon oxyhydroxides across a wider range of pH, albeit this was difficult to quantify due to the instability of the solutions.

  13. Nondestructive detection of an undesirable metallic phase, T.sub.1, during processing of aluminum-lithium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Buck, Otto; Bracci, David J.; Jiles, David C.; Brasche, Lisa J. H.; Shield, Jeffrey E.; Chumbley, Leonard S.

    1990-08-07

    A method is disclosed for detecting the T.sub.1 phase in aluminum-lithium alloys through simultaneous measurement of conductivity and hardness. In employing eddy current to measure conductivity, when the eddy current decreases with aging of the alloy, while the hardness of the material continues to increase, the presence of the T.sub.1 phase may be detected.

  14. Threshold for plasma phase transition of aluminum single crystal induced by hypervelocity impact

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming

    2015-12-15

    Molecular dynamics method is used to study the threshold for plasma phase transition of aluminum single crystal induced by hypervelocity impact. Two effective simulation methods, piston-driven method and multi-scale shock technique, are used to simulate the shock wave. The simulation results from the two methods agree well with the experimental data, indicating that the shock wave velocity is linearly dependent on the particle velocity. The atom is considered to be ionized if the increase of its internal energy is larger than the first ionization energy. The critical impact velocity for plasma phase transition is about 13.0 km/s, corresponding to the threshold of pressure and temperature which is about 220 GPa and 11.0 × 10{sup 3 }K on the shock Hugoniot, respectively.

  15. Approach to In- Situ Producing Reinforcing Phase Within an Active-Transient Liquid Phase Bond Seam for Aluminum Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Liao, Xianjin; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Linjie; Zhang, Jianxun

    2015-06-01

    To optimize the braze composition design route for aluminum matrix composite, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the transient liquid phase bond seam matrix, by adding active melting point increaser (MPI, e.g., Ti) together with general melting point depressant (MPD, e.g., Cu) into the interlayer, was demonstrated. For SiC p /A356 composite, by comparing the wettability, joint microstructure, joint shear strength, and fracture path for the developed Al-19Cu-1Ti, Al-19Cu, Al-33Cu-1Ti, Al-33Cu (wt pct), and commercial Cu foils as interlayer, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the bond seam by adding Ti was demonstrated. Especially for Al-19Cu-1Ti active braze, small and dispersed ternary aluminide of Al-Si-Ti phase was obtained within the bond seam as in situ reinforcement, leading to a favorable fracture path within SiC p /A356, not along the initial interface or within the bond seam. For the formation mechanism of the in situ reinforcing phase of MPI-containing intermetallic compound within the bond seam, a model of repeating concentration-precipitation-termination-engulfment during isothermal solidification is proposed.

  16. Phase III Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Utilized in Energy Efficient Aluminum Production Cells

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Christini; R.K. Dawless; S.P. Ray; D.A. Weirauch, Jr.

    2001-11-05

    During Phase I of the present program, Alcoa developed a commercial cell concept that has been estimated to save 30% of the energy required for aluminum smelting. Phase ii involved the construction of a pilot facility and operation of two pilots. Phase iii of the Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Program was aimed at bench experiments to permit the resolution of certain questions to be followed by three pilot cells. All of the milestones related to materials, in particular metal purity, were attained with distinct improvements over work in previous phases of the program. NiO additions to the ceramic phase and Ag additions to the Cu metal phase of the cermet improved corrosion resistance sufficiently that the bench scale pencil anodes met the purity milestones. Some excellent metal purity results have been obtained with anodes of the following composition: Further improvements in anode material composition appear to be dependent on a better understanding of oxide solubilities in molten cryolite. For that reason, work was commissioned with an outside consultant to model the MeO - cryolite systems. That work has led to a better understanding of which oxides can be used to substitute into the NiO-Fe2O3 ceramic phase to stabilize the ferrites and reduce their solubility in molten cryolite. An extensive number of vertical plate bench electrolysis cells were run to try to find conditions where high current efficiencies could be attained. TiB2-G plates were very inconsistent and led to poor wetting and drainage. Pure TiB2 did produce good current efficiencies at small overlaps (shadowing) between the anodes and cathodes. This bench work with vertical plate anodes and cathodes reinforced the importance of good cathode wetting to attain high current efficiencies. Because of those conclusions, new wetting work was commissioned and became a major component of the research during the third year of Phase III. While significant progress was made in several areas, much work needs to be

  17. Pole figure measurement of the initial growth of GaN nanoneedles on GaN/Si(111) by using hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Injun; Lee, Ha Young; Noh, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Hyung Soo; Yi, Sam Nyung; Jeon, Hunsoo; Shin, Min Jeong; Yu, Young Moon; Ha, Dong Han

    2016-09-01

    We report on crystallographic analyses of one-dimensional GaN nanoneedles grown on a n-GaN epilayer by using hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The nanoneedles were grown with a HCl:NH3 gas flow ratio of 1:38 at 600 °C. The growth time of the GaN nanoneedles affected their morphologies. As time progressed, GaN dots nucleated and then evolved as nanoneedles. The vertical growth rate of GaN nanoneedles was higher than the lateral growth rate under optimized growth conditions. X-ray pole figure measurements were carried out using a four-axis diffractometer. For the sample grown for 20 min, we obtained discrete patterns with six strong dots and weak dough-nut and cotton swab patterns, indicating that most of the nanoneedles were grown ideally, but partially, in the x- y plane with an azimuthal rotation angle ϕ = 15 ~ 45° rotated to the substrate, and a few GaN nanoneedles were tilted by ±4° or by more than 32° from the vertical c-axis.

  18. A reactive force field for lithium-aluminum silicates with applications to eucryptite phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Badri; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Kappes, Branden B.; Reimanis, Ivar E.; Ciobanu, Cristian V.

    2012-01-01

    We have parameterized a reactive force field (ReaxFF) for lithium-aluminum silicates using density functional theory (DFT) calculations of structural properties of a number of bulk phase oxides, silicates and aluminates, as well as of several representative clusters. The force field parameters optimized in this study were found to predict lattice parameters and heats of formation of selected condensed phases in excellent agreement with previous DFT calculations and with experiments. We have used the newly developed force field to study the eucryptite phases in terms of their thermodynamic stability and their elastic properties. We have found that (a) these ReaxFF parameters predict the correct order of stability of the three crystalline polymorphs of eucryptite, α, β and γ, and (b) that upon indentation, a new phase appears at applied pressures >=7 GPa. The high-pressure phase obtained upon indentation is amorphous, as illustrated by the radial distribution functions calculated for different pairs of elements. In terms of elastic properties analysis, we have determined the elements of the stiffness tensor for α- and β-eucryptite at the level of ReaxFF, and discussed the elastic anisotropy of these two polymorphs. Polycrystalline average properties of these eucryptite phases are also reported to serve as ReaxFF predictions of their elastic moduli (in the case of α-eucryptite), or as tests against values known from experiments or DFT calculations (β-eucrypite). The ReaxFF potential reported here can also describe well single-species systems (e.g. Li-metal, Al-metal and condensed phases of silicon), which makes it suitable for investigating structure and properties of suboxides, atomic-scale mechanisms responsible for phase transformations, as well as oxidation-reduction reactions.

  19. Hydridable material for the negative electrode in a nickel-metal hydride storage battery

    DOEpatents

    Knosp, Bernard; Bouet, Jacques; Jordy, Christian; Mimoun, Michel; Gicquel, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    A monophase hydridable material for the negative electrode of a nickel-metal hydride storage battery with a "Lave's phase" structure of hexagonal C14 type (MgZn.sub.2) has the general formula: Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x Ni.sub.a Mn.sub.b Al.sub.c Co.sub.d V.sub.e where ##EQU1##

  20. Single-Phase Rare-Earth Oxide/Aluminum Oxide Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, J. K. Richard; Abadie, John G.; Hixson, April D.; Nordine, Paul C.

    2006-01-01

    Glasses that comprise rare-earth oxides and aluminum oxide plus, optionally, lesser amounts of other oxides, have been invented. The other oxide(s) can include SiO2, B2O3, GeO2, and/or any of a variety of glass-forming oxides that have been used heretofore in making a variety of common and specialty glasses. The glasses of the invention can be manufactured in bulk single-phase forms to ensure near uniformity in optical and mechanical characteristics, as needed for such devices as optical amplifiers, lasers, and optical waveguides (including optical fibers). These glasses can also be formulated to have high indices of refraction, as needed in some of such devices.

  1. Mechanical behavior of shock-wave consolidated nano and micron-sized aluminum/silicon carbide and aluminum/aluminum oxide two-phase systems characterized by light and electron metallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba-Baena, Noe Gaudencio

    This dissertation reports the results of the exploratory study of two-phase systems consisting of 150 microm diameter aluminum powder mechanically mixed with 30 nm and 30 microm diameter SiC and Al2O3 powders (in volume fractions of 2, 4, and 21 percent). Powders were mechanically mixed and green compacted to ˜80% theorical density in a series of cylindrical fixtures (steel tubes). The compacted arrangements were explosively consolidated using ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) to form stacks of two-phase systems. As result, successfully consolidated cylindrical monoliths of 50 mm (height) x 32 mm (in diameter) were obtained. By taking advantage of the use of SWC (shock wave consolidation) and WEDM (wire-electric discharge machining), the heterogeneous systems were machined in a highly efficiency rate. The sample cuts used for characterization and mechanical properties testing, require the use of less that 10cc of each monolith, in consequence there was preserved an average of 60% of the obtained system monoliths. Consolidated test cylinders of the pure Al and two-phase composites were characterized by optical metallography and TEM. The light micrographs for the five explosively consolidated regimes: aluminum powder, nano and micron-sized Al/Al2O3 systems, and the nano and micron-sized Al/SiC systems exhibit similar ductility in the aluminum grains. Low volume fraction systems exhibit small agglomerations at the grain boundaries for the Al/Al2O3 system and the Al/SiC system reveal a well distributed phase at the grain boundaries. Large and partially bonded agglomerations were observable in the nano-sized high volume fraction (21%) systems, while the micron-sized Al/ceramic systems exhibit homogeneous distribution along the aluminum phase grains. TEM images showed the shock-induced dislocation cell structure, which has partially recrystallized to form a nano grain structure in the consolidated aluminum powder. Furthermore, the SiC nano-agglomerates appeared to have

  2. Chemistry of intermetallic hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    Certain intermetallic hydrides are safe, convenient and inexpensive hydrogen storage compounds. A particular advantage of such compounds is the ease with which their properties can be modified by small changes in alloy composition or preparation. This quality can be exploited to optimize their storage properties for particular applications, e.g. as intermetallic hydride electrodes in batteries. We will be concerned herein with the more important aspects of the thermodynamic and structural principles which regulate the behavior of intermetallic hydrogen systems and then illustrate their application using the archetype hydrides of LaNi5, FeTi and Mg alloys. The practical utility of these classes of materials will be briefly noted.

  3. Process for production of a metal hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-12

    A process for production of a metal hydride compound MH.sub.x, wherein x is one or two and M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg. The process comprises combining a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.xM with aluminum, hydrogen and at least one metal selected from among titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula MH.sub.x. R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group. A mole ratio of aluminum to (R.sup.1O).sub.xM is from 0.1:1 to 1:1. The catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum.

  4. Compression and phase diagram of lithium hydrides at elevated pressures and temperatures by first-principles calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang M.; Chen, Xiang R.; Wu, Qiang; Geng, Hua Y.; Yan, Xiao Z.; Wang, Yi X.; Wang, Zi W.

    2016-09-01

    High pressure and high temperature properties of AB (A  =  6Li, 7Li; B  =  H, D, T) are comprehensively investigated with first-principles methods. It is found that H‑sublattice features in the low-pressure electronic structure near the Fermi level of LiH are shifted to that dominated by the Li+ sublattice under compression. The lattice dynamics are studied in quasi-harmonic approximation, from which the phonon contribution to the free energy and the isotopic effects are accurately modelled with the aid of a parameterized double-Debye model. The equation of state (EOS) obtained matches perfectly with available static experimental data. The calculated principal Hugoniot is also in accordance with that derived from shock wave experiments. Using the calculated principal Hugoniot and the previous theoretical melting curve, we predict a shock melting point at 56 GPa and 1923 K. In order to establish the phase diagram for LiH, the phase boundaries between the B1 and B2 solid phases are explored. The B1–B2-liquid triple point is determined at about 241 GPa and 2413 K. The remarkable shift in the phase boundaries with isotopic effect and temperature reveal the significant role played by lattice vibrations. Furthermore, the Hugoniot of the static-dynamic coupling compression is assessed. Our EOS suggests that a precompression of the sample to 50 GPa will allow the shock Hugoniot to pass through the triple point and enter the B2 solid phase. This transition leads to a discontinuity with 4.6% volume collapse—about four times greater than the same B1–B2 transition at zero temperature.

  5. Compression and phase diagram of lithium hydrides at elevated pressures and temperatures by first-principles calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang M.; Chen, Xiang R.; Wu, Qiang; Geng, Hua Y.; Yan, Xiao Z.; Wang, Yi X.; Wang, Zi W.

    2016-09-01

    High pressure and high temperature properties of AB (A  =  6Li, 7Li; B  =  H, D, T) are comprehensively investigated with first-principles methods. It is found that H-sublattice features in the low-pressure electronic structure near the Fermi level of LiH are shifted to that dominated by the Li+ sublattice under compression. The lattice dynamics are studied in quasi-harmonic approximation, from which the phonon contribution to the free energy and the isotopic effects are accurately modelled with the aid of a parameterized double-Debye model. The equation of state (EOS) obtained matches perfectly with available static experimental data. The calculated principal Hugoniot is also in accordance with that derived from shock wave experiments. Using the calculated principal Hugoniot and the previous theoretical melting curve, we predict a shock melting point at 56 GPa and 1923 K. In order to establish the phase diagram for LiH, the phase boundaries between the B1 and B2 solid phases are explored. The B1-B2-liquid triple point is determined at about 241 GPa and 2413 K. The remarkable shift in the phase boundaries with isotopic effect and temperature reveal the significant role played by lattice vibrations. Furthermore, the Hugoniot of the static-dynamic coupling compression is assessed. Our EOS suggests that a precompression of the sample to 50 GPa will allow the shock Hugoniot to pass through the triple point and enter the B2 solid phase. This transition leads to a discontinuity with 4.6% volume collapse—about four times greater than the same B1-B2 transition at zero temperature.

  6. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  7. Eggshell membrane-based solid-phase extraction combined with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry for trace arsenic(V) in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjiang; Wang, Weidong; Li, Lu; Huang, Yuming; Cao, Jia

    2010-03-15

    The eggshell membrane (ESM) contains several surface functional groups such as amines, amides and carboxylic groups with potential as SPE adsorbent for the retention of target species of interest. In this paper, the potential use of ESM, a typical biomaterial, as solid-phase extraction (SPE) adsorbent is evaluated for analysis of trace arsenic(V) in environmental water samples in combination with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). In order to obtain the satisfactory recovery of arsenic(V), various parameters including the desorption and enrichment conditions such as pH, the flow rate and the volume of sample solution, the amount of ESM and the content of sodium chloride were systematically optimized and the effects of co-existed ions were also investigated in detail. Under the optimal conditions, arsenic(V) could be easily extracted by the ESM packed cartridge and the breakthrough adsorption capacity was found to be 3.9 microg g(-1). The favorable limit of detection (LOD) for arsenic(V) was found to be 0.001 microg L(-1) with an enrichment factor of 33.3, and the relative standard deviations (R.S.Ds) was 2.1% for 0.6 microg L(-1) arsenic (n=11). The reproducibility among columns was satisfactory (R.S.D. among columns is less than 5%). The proposed method has been successfully applied to analysis of arsenic(V) in aqueous environmental samples, which suggests the ESM can be an excellent SPE adsorbent for arsenic(V) pretreatment and enrichment from real water samples.

  8. On-line electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction of inorganic selenium followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asiabi, Hamid; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram; Shamsayei, Maryam; Safari, Meysam; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2016-05-30

    In this work, for the first time, a rapid, simple and sensitive microextraction procedure is demonstrated for the matrix separation, preconcentration and determination of inorganic selenium species in water samples using an electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction (EC-in-tube SPME) followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). In this approach, in which EC-in-tube SPME and HG-AAS system were combined, the total analysis time, was decreased and the accuracy, repeatability and sensitivity were increased. In addition, to increases extraction efficiency, a novel nanostructured composite coating consisting of polypyrrole (PPy) doped with ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) was prepared on the inner surface of a stainless-steel tube by a facile electrodeposition method. To evaluate the offered setup and the new PPy-EGDMA coating, it was used to extract inorganic selenium species in water samples. Extraction of inorganic selenium species was carried out by applying a positive potential through the inner surface of coated in-tube under flow conditions. Under the optimized conditions, selenium was detected in amounts as small as 4.0 parts per trillion. The method showed good linearity in the range of 0.012-200 ng mL(-1), with coefficients of determination better than 0.9996. The intra- and inter-assay precisions (RSD%, n = 5) were in the range of 2.0-2.5% and 2.7-3.2%, respectively. The validated method was successfully applied for the analysis of inorganic selenium species in some water samples and satisfactory results were obtained.

  9. On-line electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction of inorganic selenium followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asiabi, Hamid; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram; Shamsayei, Maryam; Safari, Meysam; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2016-05-30

    In this work, for the first time, a rapid, simple and sensitive microextraction procedure is demonstrated for the matrix separation, preconcentration and determination of inorganic selenium species in water samples using an electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction (EC-in-tube SPME) followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). In this approach, in which EC-in-tube SPME and HG-AAS system were combined, the total analysis time, was decreased and the accuracy, repeatability and sensitivity were increased. In addition, to increases extraction efficiency, a novel nanostructured composite coating consisting of polypyrrole (PPy) doped with ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) was prepared on the inner surface of a stainless-steel tube by a facile electrodeposition method. To evaluate the offered setup and the new PPy-EGDMA coating, it was used to extract inorganic selenium species in water samples. Extraction of inorganic selenium species was carried out by applying a positive potential through the inner surface of coated in-tube under flow conditions. Under the optimized conditions, selenium was detected in amounts as small as 4.0 parts per trillion. The method showed good linearity in the range of 0.012-200 ng mL(-1), with coefficients of determination better than 0.9996. The intra- and inter-assay precisions (RSD%, n = 5) were in the range of 2.0-2.5% and 2.7-3.2%, respectively. The validated method was successfully applied for the analysis of inorganic selenium species in some water samples and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:27154830

  10. Hydride generation coupled to microfunnel-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction for the determination of arsenic with UV-Vis spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Hashemniaye-Torshizi, Reihaneh; Ashraf, Narges; Arbab-Zavar, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-12-01

    In this research, a microfunnel-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction technique has been used in combination with hydride generation to determine arsenic (As) by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The method is based on the reduction of As to arsine (AsH3) in acidic media by sodium tetrahydroborate (NaBH4) followed by its subsequent reaction with silver diethyldithiocarbamate (AgDDC) to give an absorbing complex at 510 nm. The complexing reagent (AgDDC) has been dissolved in a 1:1 (by the volume ratio) mixture of chloroform/chlorobenzene microdroplet and exposed to the generated gaseous arsine via a reversed microfunnel in the headspace of the sample solution. Several operating parameters affecting the performance of the method have been examined and optimized. Acetonitrile solvent has been added to the working samples as a sensitivity enhancement agent. Under the optimized operating conditions, the detection limit has been measured to be 0.2 ng mL(-1) (based on 3sb/m criterion, n b = 8), and the calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.5-12 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation for eight replicate measurements was 1.9 %. Also, the effects of several potential interferences have been studied. The accuracy of the method was validated through the analysis of JR-1 geological standard reference material. The method has been successfully applied for the determination of arsenic in raw and spiked soft drink and water samples with the recoveries that ranged from 91 to 106 %.

  11. Synthesis, structure and gas-phase reactivity of the mixed silver hydride borohydride nanocluster [Ag3(μ3-H)(μ3-BH4)L(Ph)3]BF4 (L(Ph) = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane).

    PubMed

    Zavras, Athanasios; Ariafard, Alireza; Khairallah, George N; White, Jonathan M; Mulder, Roger J; Canty, Allan J; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2015-11-21

    Borohydrides react with silver salts to give products that span multiple scales ranging from discrete mononuclear compounds through to silver nanoparticles and colloids. The cluster cations [Ag3(H)(BH4)L3](+) are observed upon electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of solutions containing sodium borohydride, silver(I) tetrafluoroborate and bis(dimethylphosphino)methane (L(Me)) or bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (L(Ph)). By adding NaBH4 to an acetonitrile solution of AgBF4 and L(Ph), cooled to ca. -10 °C, we have been able to isolate the first mixed silver hydride borohydride nanocluster, [Ag3(μ3-H)(μ3-BH4)L(Ph)3]BF4, and structurally characterise it via X-ray crystallography. Combined gas-phase experiments (L(Me) and L(Ph)) and DFT calculations (L(Me)) reveal how loss of a ligand from the cationic complexes [Ag3(H)(BH4)L3](+) provides a change in geometry that facilitates subsequent loss of BH3 to produce the dihydride clusters, [Ag3(H)2Ln](+) (n = 1 and 2). Together with the results of previous studies (Girod et al., Chem. - Eur. J., 2014, 20, 16626), this provides a direct link between mixed silver hydride/borohydride nanoclusters, silver hydride nanoclusters, and silver nanoclusters.

  12. Aluminum Nitride Micro-Channels Grown via Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy for MEMs Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rodak, L.E.; Kuchibhatla, S.; Famouri, P.; Ting, L.; Korakakis, D.

    2008-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a promising material for a number of applications due to its temperature and chemical stability. Furthermore, AlN maintains its piezoelectric properties at higher temperatures than more commonly used materials, such as Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) [1, 2], making AlN attractive for high temperature micro and nanoelectromechanical (MEMs and NEMs) applications including, but not limited to, high temperature sensors and actuators, micro-channels for fuel cell applications, and micromechanical resonators. This work presents a novel AlN micro-channel fabrication technique using Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). AlN easily nucleates on dielectric surfaces due to the large sticking coefficient and short diffusion length of the aluminum species resulting in a high quality polycrystalline growth on typical mask materials, such as silicon dioxide and silicon nitride [3,4]. The fabrication process introduced involves partially masking a substrate with a silicon dioxide striped pattern and then growing AlN via MOVPE simultaneously on the dielectric mask and exposed substrate. A buffered oxide etch is then used to remove the underlying silicon dioxide and leave a free standing AlN micro-channel. The width of the channel has been varied from 5 ìm to 110 ìm and the height of the air gap from 130 nm to 800 nm indicating the stability of the structure. Furthermore, this versatile process has been performed on (111) silicon, c-plane sapphire, and gallium nitride epilayers on sapphire substrates. Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction (RHEED), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and Raman measurements have been taken on channels grown on each substrate and indicate that the substrate is influencing the growth of the AlN micro-channels on the SiO2 sacrificial layer.

  13. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 3 Plunge Depth of a 36-Inch Aluminum Tank Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA water landing simulations. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. Phase 3 featured a composite tank head that was tested at a range of heights to verify the ability to predict structural failure of composites. To support planning for Phase 3, a test series was conducted with an aluminum tank head dropped from heights of 2, 6, 10, and 12 feet to verify that the test article would not impact the bottom of the test pool. This report focuses on the comparisons of the measured plunge depths to LS-DYNA predictions. The results for the tank head model demonstrated the following. 1. LS-DYNA provides accurate predictions for peak accelerations. 2. LS-DYNA consistently under-predicts plunge depth. An allowance of at least 20% should be added to the LS-DYNA predictions. 3. The LS-DYNA predictions for plunge depth are relatively insensitive to the fluid-structure coupling stiffness.

  14. Spin Forming Aluminum Crew Module (CM) Metallic Aft Pressure Vessel Bulkhead (APVBH) - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.; Torres, Pablo D.; McGill, Preston B.; Tayon, Wesley A.; Bennett, Jay E.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the Orion crew module (CM) aft pressure vessel bulkhead. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) alloy 2219 aft bulkhead resulting in the elimination of the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify CM fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design. Phase I (NASA TM-2014-218163, (1)) of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece CM forward pressure vessel bulkhead. The MPCV Program and Lockheed Martin (LM) recently made two critical decisions relative to the NESC Phase I work scope: (1) LM selected the spin forming process to manufacture a singlepiece aft bulkhead for the Orion CM, and (2) the aft bulkhead will be manufactured from Al 2219. Based on the Program's new emphasis related to the spin forming process, the NESC was asked to conduct a Phase II assessment to assist in the LM manufacture of the aft bulkhead and to conduct a feasibility study into spin forming the Orion CM cone. This activity was approved on June 19, 2013. Dr. Robert Piascik, NASA Technical Fellow for Materials at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), was selected to lead this assessment. The project plan was approved by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Review Board (NRB) on July 18, 2013. The primary stakeholders for this assessment are the NASA and LM MPCV Program offices. Additional benefactors are commercial launch providers developing CM concepts.

  15. Spin Forming Aluminum Crew Module (CM) Metallic Aft Pressure Vessel Bulkhead (APVBH) - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.; Torres, Pablo D.; McGill, Preston B.; Tayon, Wesley A.; Bennett, Jay E.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the Orion crew module (CM) aft pressure vessel bulkhead. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) alloy 2219 aft bulkhead resulting in the elimination of the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify CM fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design. Phase I (NASA TM-2014-218163 (1)) of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece CM forward pressure vessel bulkhead. The Orion MPCV Program and Lockheed Martin (LM) recently made two critical decisions relative to the NESC Phase I work scope: (1) LM selected the spin forming process to manufacture a single-piece aft bulkhead for the Orion CM, and (2) the aft bulkhead will be manufactured from Al 2219. Based on the Program's new emphasis related to the spin forming process, the NESC was asked to conduct a Phase II assessment to assist in the LM manufacture of the aft bulkhead and to conduct a feasibility study into spin forming the Orion CM cone. This activity was approved on June 19, 2013. Dr. Robert Piascik, NASA Technical Fellow for Materials at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), was selected to lead this assessment. The project plan was approved by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Review Board (NRB) on July 18, 2013. The primary stakeholders for this assessment were the NASA and LM MPCV Program offices. Additional benefactors are commercial launch providers developing CM concepts.

  16. Process for massively hydriding zirconium--uranium fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Katz, N.H.

    1973-12-01

    A method is described of hydriding uranium-zirconium alloy by heating the alloy in a vacuum, introducing hydrogen and maintaining an elevated temperature until occurrence of the beta--delta phase transformation and isobarically cooling the composition. (Official Gazette)

  17. Development of gallium nitride-based ultraviolet and visible light-emitting diodes using hydride vapor-phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabalu, Jasper Sicat

    Much of the work done on ultraviolet (UV) and visible III-Nitrides-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) involves growth by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). In this dissertation, the growth, development, and fabrication of III-Nitrides-based UV and visible LEDs with very high photon conversion and extraction efficiencies using hydride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE) and radio frequency (rf) plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) is presented. High-power electrically-pumped UV-LEDs based on GaN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) emitting at 340 nm and 350 nm have been fabricated in a flip-chip configuration and evaluated. Under pulsed operation, UV-LEDs emitting at 340 nm have output powers that saturate, due to device heating, at approximately 3 mW. Devices emitting at 350 nm show DC operation output powers as high as 4.5 mW under 200 mA drive current. These results were found to be equivalent with those of UV-LEDs produced by the MOCVD and HVPE methods. The concept of using textured MQWs on UV-LED structures was tested by optical pumping of GaN/AlGaN MQWs grown on textured GaN templates. Results show highly enhanced (>700 times) blue-shifted photoluminescence (PL) at 360 nm compared to similarly produced MQWs on smooth GaN templates whose PL emission is red-shifted. These results are attributed partly to enhancement in light extraction efficiency (LEE) and partly to enhancement in internal quantum efficiency (IQE). The origin of the increase in IQE is partly due to reduction of the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) on QW-planes not perpendicular to the polarization direction and partly due to charge redistribution in the QWs caused by the polarization component parallel to the planes of the QWs. Similar studies have been done for visible LEDs using InGaN/GaN MQWs. Growth of LED structures on textured GaN templates employing textured MQW-active regions resulted in the production of dichromatic (430 nm and 530 nm) phosphorless white LEDs with

  18. Nanoindentation measurements of the mechanical properties of zirconium matrix and hydrides in unirradiated pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rico, A.; Martin-Rengel, M. A.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Gomez-Sanchez, F. J.

    2014-09-01

    It is well known that the mechanical properties of the nuclear fuel cladding may be affected by the presence of hydrides. The average mechanical properties of hydrided cladding have been extensively investigated from a macroscopic point of view. In addition, the mechanical and fracture properties of bulk hydride samples fabricated from zirconium plates have also been reported. In this paper, Young's modulus, hardness and yield stress are measured for each phase, namely zirconium hydrides and matrix, of pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding. To this end, nanoindentation tests were performed on ZIRLO samples in as-received state, on a hydride blister and in samples with 150 and 1200 ppm of hydrogen homogeneously distributed along the hoop direction of the cladding. The results show that the measured mechanical properties of the zirconium hydrides and ZIRLO matrix (Young's modulus, hardness and yield stress) are rather similar. From the experimental data, the hydride volume fraction in the cladding samples with 150 and 1200 ppm was estimated and the average mechanical properties were calculated by means of the rule of mixtures. These values were compared with those obtained from ring compression tests. Good agreement between the results obtained by both methods was found.

  19. Hydrated hydride anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Myoung; Kim, Dongwook; Singh, N. Jiten; Kołaski, Maciej; Kim, Kwang S.

    2007-10-01

    On the basis of density functional theory (DFT) and high level ab initio theory, we report the structures, binding energies, thermodynamic quantities, IR spectra, and electronic properties of the hydride anion hydrated by up to six water molecules. Ground state DFT molecular dynamics simulations (based on the Born-Oppenheimer potential surface) show that as the temperature increases, the surface-bound hydride anion changes to the internally bound structure. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are also carried out for the spectral analysis of the monohydrated hydride. Excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the photoinduced charge-transfer-to-solvent phenomena are accompanied by the formation of the excess electron-water clusters and the detachment of the H radical from the clusters. The dynamics of the detachment process of a hydrogen radical upon the excitation is discussed.

  20. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

    1986-08-27

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  1. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K.; Bystroff, Roman I.; Miller, Dale E.

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  2. Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis C. Kunerth

    2014-09-01

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone, M4FT-14IN0805023, Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides, under Work Package Number FT-14IN080502. During service, zirconium alloy fuel cladding will degrade via corrosion/oxidation. Hydrogen, a byproduct of the oxidation process, will be absorbed into the cladding and eventually form hydrides due to low hydrogen solubility limits. The hydride phase is detrimental to the mechanical properties of the cladding and therefore it is important to be able to detect and characterize the presence of this constituent within the cladding. Presently, hydrides are evaluated using destructive examination. If nondestructive evaluation techniques can be used to detect and characterize the hydrides, the potential exists to significantly increase test sample coverage while reducing evaluation time and cost. To demonstrate the viability this approach, an initial evaluation of eddy current and ultrasonic techniques were performed to demonstrate the basic ability to these techniques to detect hydrides or their effects on the microstructure. Conventional continuous wave eddy current techniques were applied to zirconium based cladding test samples thermally processed with hydrogen gas to promote the absorption of hydrogen and subsequent formation of hydrides. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that eddy current inspection approaches have the potential to detect both the physical damage induced by hydrides, e.g. blisters and cracking, as well as the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates on the electrical properties of the zirconium alloy. Similarly, measurements of ultrasonic wave velocities indicate changes in the elastic properties resulting from the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates as well as changes in geometry in regions of severe degradation. However, for both approaches, the signal responses intended to make the desired measurement incorporate a number of contributing

  3. System integration and demonstration of adhesive bonded high temperature aluminum alloys for aerospace structure, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falcone, Anthony; Laakso, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive bonding materials and processes were evaluated for assembly of future high-temperature aluminum alloy structural components such as may be used in high-speed civil transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. A number of candidate high-temperature adhesives were selected and screening tests were conducted using single lap shear specimens. The selected adhesives were then used to bond sandwich (titanium core) test specimens, adhesive toughness test specimens, and isothermally aged lap shear specimens. Moderate-to-high lap shear strengths were obtained from bonded high-temperature aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced (SiC(sub p)) aluminum specimens. Shear strengths typically exceeded 3500 to 4000 lb/in(sup 2) and flatwise tensile strengths exceeded 750 lb/in(sup 2) even at elevated temperatures (300 F) using a bismaleimide adhesive. All faceskin-to-core bonds displayed excellent tear strength. The existing production phosphoric acid anodize surface preparation process developed at Boeing was used, and gave good performance with all of the aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced aluminum alloys investigated. The results of this program support using bonded assemblies of high-temperature aluminum components in applications where bonding is often used (e.g., secondary structures and tear stoppers).

  4. Fabrication of lotus-type porous copper through thermal decomposition of titanium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, T.; Nakajima, H.

    2009-05-01

    Lotus-type porous copper was fabricated by unidirectional solidification through thermal decomposition of titanium hydride. Effects of additive method and additive amount of titanium hydride on pore formation were investigated. The porosity of lotus copper depends on additive method and additive amount of titanium hydride. The pore formation effectively occurs in the method that titanium hydride decomposes in molten copper. For all the additive methods of titanium hydride, the porosity increases and pore diameter does not change with increasing additive amount of titanium hydride. While, for adding large amount of titanium hydride, the porosity became constant. This is because hydrogen solubility in liquid phase does not change owing to bubbling of hydrogen gas.

  5. Structural Characterization of Metal Hydrides for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Lyci

    Hydrogen can be an unlimited source of clean energy for future because of its very high energy density compared to the conventional fuels like gasoline. An efficient and safer way of storing hydrogen is in metals and alloys as hydrides. Light metal hydrides, alanates and borohydrides have very good hydrogen storage capacity, but high operation temperatures hinder their application. Improvement of thermodynamic properties of these hydrides is important for their commercial use as a source of energy. Application of pressure on materials can have influence on their properties favoring hydrogen storage. Hydrogen desorption in many complex hydrides occurs above the transition temperature. Therefore, it is important to study the physical properties of the hydride compounds at ambient and high pressure and/or high temperature conditions, which can assist in the design of suitable storage materials with desired thermodynamic properties. The high pressure-temperature phase diagram, thermal expansion and compressibility have only been evaluated for a limited number of hydrides so far. This situation serves as a main motivation for studying such properties of a number of technologically important hydrides. Focus of this dissertation was on X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy studies of Mg2FeH6, Ca(BH4) 2, Mg(BH4)2, NaBH4, NaAlH4, LiAlH4, LiNH2BH3 and mixture of MgH 2 with AlH3 or Si, at different conditions of pressure and temperature, to obtain their bulk modulus and thermal expansion coefficient. These data are potential source of information regarding inter-atomic forces and also serve as a basis for developing theoretical models. Some high pressure phases were identified for the complex hydrides in this study which may have better hydrogen storage properties than the ambient phase. The results showed that the highly compressible B-H or Al-H bonds and the associated bond disordering under pressure is responsible for phase transitions observed in brorohydrides or

  6. Growth of polar and non-polar nitride semiconductor quasi-substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy for the development of optoelectronic devices by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldawer, Adam Lyle

    The family of nitride semiconductors has had a profound influence on the development of optoelectronics for a large variety of applications. However, as of yet there are no native substrates commercially available that are grown by liquid phase methods as with Si and GaAs. As a result, the majority of electronic and optoelectronic devices are grown heteroepitaxially on sapphire and SiC. This PhD research addresses both the development of polar and non-polar GaN and AIN templates by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE) on sapphire and SiC substrates, as well as the growth and characterization of optoelectronic devices on these templates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Polar and non-polar GaN templates have been grown in a vertical HVPE reactor on the C- and R-planes of sapphire respectively. The growth conditions have been optimized to allow the formation for thick (50um) GaN templates without cracks. These templates were characterized structurally by studying their surface morphologies by SEM and AFM, and their structure through XRD and TEM. The polar C-plane GaN templates were found to be atomically smooth. However, the surface morphology of the non-polar GaN films grown on the R-plane of sapphire were found to have a facetted surface morphology, with the facets intersecting at 120° angles. This surface morphology reflects an equilibrium growth, since the A-plane of GaN grows faster than the M-planes of GaN due to the lower atomic density of the plane. For the development of deep-UV optoelectronics, it is required to grow AIGaN quantum wells on AIN templates. However, since AIN is a high melting point material, such templates have to be grown at higher temperatures, close to half the melting point of the material (1500 °C). As these temperatures cannot be easily obtained by traditional furnace heating, an HVPE reactor has been designed to heat the substrate inductively to these temperatures. This apparatus has been used to grow high-quality, transparent AIN films

  7. Preliminary results on the determination of ultratrace amounts of cadmium in tea samples using a flow injection on-line solid phase extraction separation and preconcentration technique to couple with a sequential injection hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duan, Taicheng; Song, Xuejie; Jin, Dan; Li, Hongfei; Xu, Jingwei; Chen, Hangting

    2005-10-31

    In this work, a method was developed for determination of ultra-trace levels of Cd in tea samples by atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A flow injection solid phase extraction (FI-SPE) separation and preconcentration technique, to on-line couple with a sequential injection hydride generation (SI-HG) technique is employed in this study. Cd was preconcentrated on the SPE column, which was made from a neutral extractant named Cyanex 923, while other matrix ions or interfering ions were completely or mostly separated off. Conditions for the SPE separation and preconcentration, as well as conditions for the HG technique, were studied. Due to the separation of interfering elements, Cd hydride generation efficiency could be greatly enhanced with the sole presence of Co(2+) with a concentration of 200mugL(-1), which is much lower than those in other works previously reported. Interferences on both the Cd separation and preconcentration, and Cd hydride generation (HG) were investigated; it showed that both the separation and preconcentration system, and the HG system had a strong anti-interference ability. The SPE column could be repeatedly used at least 400 times, a R.S.D. of 0.97% was obtained for 6 measurements of Cd with 0.2mugL(-1) and a correlation coefficiency of 1.0000 was obtained for the measurement of a series of solutions with Cd concentrations from 0.1 to 2mugL(-1). The method has a low detection limit of 10.8ngL(-1) for a 25mL solution and was successfully validated by using two tea standard reference materials (GBW08513 and GBW07605).

  8. Spray forming -- Aluminum: Third annual report (Phase 2). Technical progress -- Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kozarek, R.L.

    1998-04-20

    Commercial production of aluminum sheet and plate by spray atomization and deposition is a potentially attractive manufacturing alternative to conventional ingot metallurgy/hot-milling and to continuous casting processes because of reduced energy requirements and reduced cost. To realize the full potential of the technology, the Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa), under contract by the US Department of Energy, is investigating currently available state-of-the-art atomization devices to develop nozzle design concepts whose spray characteristics are tailored for continuous sheet production. This third technical progress report will summarize research and development work conducted during the period 1997 October through 1998 March. Included are the latest optimization work on the Alcoa III nozzle, results of spray forming runs with 6111 aluminum alloy and preliminary rolling trials of 6111 deposits.

  9. Fabrication and Structure Characterization of Alumina-Aluminum Interpenetrating Phase Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolata, Anna J.

    2016-01-01

    Alumina-Aluminum composites with interpenetrating networks structure belong to advanced materials with potentially better properties when compared with composites reinforced by particles or fibers. The paper presents the experimental results of fabrication and structure characterization of Al matrix composites locally reinforced via Al2O3 ceramic foam. The composites were obtained using centrifugal infiltration of porous ceramics by liquid aluminum alloy. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM + EDS) and x-ray tomography were used to determine the structure of foams and composites especially in reinforced areas. The quality of castings, degree of pore filling in ceramic foams by Al alloy, and microstructure in area of interface were assessed.

  10. Fabrication and Structure Characterization of Alumina-Aluminum Interpenetrating Phase Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolata, Anna J.

    2016-08-01

    Alumina-Aluminum composites with interpenetrating networks structure belong to advanced materials with potentially better properties when compared with composites reinforced by particles or fibers. The paper presents the experimental results of fabrication and structure characterization of Al matrix composites locally reinforced via Al2O3 ceramic foam. The composites were obtained using centrifugal infiltration of porous ceramics by liquid aluminum alloy. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM + EDS) and x-ray tomography were used to determine the structure of foams and composites especially in reinforced areas. The quality of castings, degree of pore filling in ceramic foams by Al alloy, and microstructure in area of interface were assessed.

  11. Hydride structures in Ti-aluminides subjected to high temperature and hydrogen pressure charging conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legzdina, D.; Robertson, I. M.; Birnbaum, H. K.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution and chemistry of hydrides produced in single and dual phase alloys with a composition near TiAl have been investigated by using a combination of TEM and X-ray diffraction techniques. The alloys were exposed at 650 C to 13.8 MPa of gaseous H2 for 100 h. In the single-phase gamma alloy, large hydrides preferentially nucleated on the grain boundaries and matrix dislocations and a population of small hydrides was distributed throughout the matrix. X-ray and electron diffraction patterns from these hydrides indicated that they have an fcc structure with a lattice parameter of 0.45 nm. EDAX analysis of the hydrides showed that they were enriched in Ti. The hydrides were mostly removed by vacuum annealing at 800 C for 24 h. On dissolution of the hydrides, the chemistry of hydride-free regions of the grain boundary returned to the matrix composition, suggesting that Ti segregation accompanied the hydride formation rather than Ti enrichment causing the formation of the hydride.

  12. A spectral effect on phase evolution in neutron-irradiated aluminum?

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.

    1994-12-31

    It is proposed that the spatial distribution of transmutation-produced silicon precipitates formed in aluminum by capture of thermal neutrons is systematically modified by the fast neutron portion of the spectrum, and the tensile strength is altered accordingly. The concept is used to rationalize some previously erratic tensile data.

  13. Electrochemical process and production of novel complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2013-06-25

    A process of using an electrochemical cell to generate aluminum hydride (AlH.sub.3) is provided. The electrolytic cell uses a polar solvent to solubilize NaAlH.sub.4. The resulting electrochemical process results in the formation of AlH.sub.3. The AlH.sub.3 can be recovered and used as a source of hydrogen for the automotive industry. The resulting spent aluminum can be regenerated into NaAlH.sub.4 as part of a closed loop process of AlH.sub.3 generation.

  14. Flow in a metal hydride chromatographic column

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    The flow of hydrogen isotopes in a metal hydride chromatographic column is calculated by a one-dimensional finite difference method. The Ergun equation is used to define the gas flow; and equilibrium pressure isotherms are used to define the column holdup. Solid phase loadings are shown to move as a wave front on absorption, but remain more uniform on desorption. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  16. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, Moshe; Gruen, Dieter M.; Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Sheft, Irving

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  17. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  18. Heteroepitaxial growth of GaN on various powder compounds (AlN, LaN, TiN, NbN, ZrN, ZrB 2 , VN, BeO) by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinsub; Ha, Jun-Seok; Hong, Soon-Ku; Lee, Seog Woo; Cho, Meoung Whan; Yao, Takafumi; Lee, Hae Woo; Lee, Sang Hwa; Lee, Sung-Keun; Lee, Hyo-Jong

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the nucleation and growth behavior of GaN on various powders by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. In relative comparison, the nucleation tendency of GaN on each powder can be summarized as AlN > LaN, TiN, NbN > ZrN > ZrB2 > VN, BeO, indicating that the number of nucleation sites increased from right to left. LaN and NbN have not yet been reported as buffer materials for GaN growth. Of these, NbN is expected to be a good buffer material because the interatomic distance on the NbN (111) plane has only 2% difference from that on the GaN (0001) plane.

  19. 17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING SYSTEM WAS PART OF THE FAST ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS. (11/11/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  20. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  1. Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.

    1994-01-01

    A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

  2. Measurement and modeling of strain fields in zirconium hydrides precipitated at a stress concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Gregory B.; Kerr, Matthew; Daymond, Mark R.

    2012-10-23

    Hydrogen adsorption into zirconium, as a result of corrosion in aqueous environments, leads to the precipitation of a secondary brittle hydride phase. These hydrides tend to first form at stress concentrations such as fretting flaws or cracks in engineering components, potentially degrading the structural integrity of the component. One mechanism for component failure is a slow crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC), where hydride fracture occurs followed by crack arrest in the ductile zirconium matrix. The current work employs both an experimental and a modeling approach to better characterize the effects and behavior of hydride precipitation at such stress concentrations. Strains around stress concentrations containing hydrides were mapped using High Energy X-ray Diffraction (HEXRD). These studies highlighted important differences in the behavior of the hydride phase and the surrounding zirconium matrix, as well as the strain associated with the precipitation of the hydride. A finite element model was also developed and compared to the X-ray strain mapping results. This model provided greater insight into details that could not be obtained directly from the experimental approaches, as well as providing a framework for future modeling to predict the effects of hydride precipitation under varied conditions.

  3. Phase Transformation Behavior of Medium Manganese Steels with 3 Wt Pct Aluminum and 3 Wt Pct Silicon During Intercritical Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Binhan; Fazeli, Fateh; Scott, Colin; Yue, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Medium manganese steels alloyed with sufficient aluminum and silicon amounts contain high fractions of retained austenite adjustable to various transformation-induced plasticity/twinning-induced plasticity effects, in addition to a reduced density suitable for lightweight vehicle body-in-white assemblies. Two hot rolled medium manganese steels containing 3 wt pct aluminum and 3 wt pct silicon were subjected to different annealing treatments in the present study. The evolution of the microstructure in terms of austenite transformation upon reheating and the subsequent austenite decomposition during quenching was investigated. Manganese content of the steels prevailed the microstructural response. The microstructure of the leaner alloy with 7 wt pct Mn (7Mn) was substantially influenced by the annealing temperature, including the variation of phase constituents, the morphology and composition of intercritical austenite, the Ms temperature and the retained austenite fraction. In contrast, the richer variant 10 wt pct Mn steel (10Mn) exhibited a substantially stable ferrite-austenite duplex phase microstructure containing a fixed amount of retained austenite which was found to be independent of the variations of intercritical annealing temperature. Austenite formation from hot band ferrite-pearlite/bainite mixtures was very rapid during annealing at 1273 K (1000 °C), regardless of Mn contents. Austenite growth was believed to be controlled at early stages by carbon diffusion following pearlite/bainite dissolution. The redistribution of Mn in ferrite and particularly in austenite at later stages was too subtle to result in a measureable change in austenite fraction. Further, the hot band microstructure of both steels contained a large fraction of coarse-grained δ-ferrite, which remained almost unchanged during intercritical annealing. A recently developed thermodynamic database was evaluated using the experimental data. The new database achieved a better agreement

  4. Phase Transformation Behavior of Medium Manganese Steels with 3 Wt Pct Aluminum and 3 Wt Pct Silicon During Intercritical Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Binhan; Fazeli, Fateh; Scott, Colin; Yue, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    Medium manganese steels alloyed with sufficient aluminum and silicon amounts contain high fractions of retained austenite adjustable to various transformation-induced plasticity/twinning-induced plasticity effects, in addition to a reduced density suitable for lightweight vehicle body-in-white assemblies. Two hot rolled medium manganese steels containing 3 wt pct aluminum and 3 wt pct silicon were subjected to different annealing treatments in the present study. The evolution of the microstructure in terms of austenite transformation upon reheating and the subsequent austenite decomposition during quenching was investigated. Manganese content of the steels prevailed the microstructural response. The microstructure of the leaner alloy with 7 wt pct Mn (7Mn) was substantially influenced by the annealing temperature, including the variation of phase constituents, the morphology and composition of intercritical austenite, the Ms temperature and the retained austenite fraction. In contrast, the richer variant 10 wt pct Mn steel (10Mn) exhibited a substantially stable ferrite-austenite duplex phase microstructure containing a fixed amount of retained austenite which was found to be independent of the variations of intercritical annealing temperature. Austenite formation from hot band ferrite-pearlite/bainite mixtures was very rapid during annealing at 1273 K (1000 °C), regardless of Mn contents. Austenite growth was believed to be controlled at early stages by carbon diffusion following pearlite/bainite dissolution. The redistribution of Mn in ferrite and particularly in austenite at later stages was too subtle to result in a measureable change in austenite fraction. Further, the hot band microstructure of both steels contained a large fraction of coarse-grained δ-ferrite, which remained almost unchanged during intercritical annealing. A recently developed thermodynamic database was evaluated using the experimental data. The new database achieved a better agreement

  5. A study of advanced magnesium-based hydride and development of a metal hydride thermal battery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chengshang

    Metal hydrides are a group of important materials known as energy carriers for renewable energy and thermal energy storage. A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides is studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilizes a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The hot hydride that is identified and developed is catalyzed MgH2 due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics. TiV0.62Mn1.5, TiMn2, and LaNi5 alloys are selected as the matching cold hydride. A systematic experimental survey is carried out in this study to compare a wide range of additives including transitions metals, transition metal oxides, hydrides, intermetallic compounds, and carbon materials, with respect to their effects on dehydrogenation properties of MgH2. The results show that additives such as Ti and V-based metals, hydride, and certain intermetallic compounds have strong catalytic effects. Solid solution alloys of magnesium are exploited as a way to destabilize magnesium hydride thermodynamically. Various elements are alloyed with magnesium to form solid solutions, including indium and aluminum. Thermodynamic properties of the reactions between the magnesium solid solution alloys and hydrogen are investigated, showing that all the solid solution alloys that are investigated in this work have higher equilibrium hydrogen pressures than that of pure magnesium. Cyclic stability of catalyzed MgH2 is characterized and analyzed using a PCT Sievert-type apparatus. Three systems, including MgH2-TiH 2, MgH2-TiMn2, and MgH2-VTiCr, are examined. The hydrogenating and dehydrogenating kinetics at 300°C are stable after 100 cycles. However, the low temperature (25°C to 150°C) hydrogenation kinetics suffer a severe degradation during hydrogen cycling. Further experiments confirm that the low temperature kinetic degradation can be mainly related the extended hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions. Proof

  6. Energy Efficient Aluminum Production - Pilot-Scale Cell Tests - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Christini

    1999-12-30

    A cermet anode that produces oxygen and a cathode material that is wetted by aluminum can provide a dimensionally stable inter-electrode distance in the Hall-Heroult cell. This can be used to greatly improve the energy and/or productivity efficiencies. The concept, which was developed and tested, uses a system of vertically interleaved anodes and cathodes. The major advantage of this concept is the significant increase in electrochemical surface area compared to a horizontal orientation of anode and cathode that is presently used in the Hall-Heroult process. This creates an additional advantage for energy reduction of 1.3 kWh/lb or a 20% productivity improvement. The voltages obtained in an optimized cell test met the energy objectives of the project for at least two weeks. An acceptable current efficiency was never proven, however, during either pilot scale or bench scale tests with the vertical plate configuration. This must be done before a vertical cell can be considered viab le. Anode corrosion rate must be reduced by at least a factor of three in order to produce commercial purity aluminum. It is recommended that extensive theoretical and bench scale investigations be done to improve anode materials and to demonstrate acceptable current efficiencies in a vertical plate cell before pilot scale work is continued.

  7. Zirconium hydrides and Fe redistribution in Zr-2.5%Nb alloy under ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrees, Y.; Yao, Z.; Cui, J.; Shek, G. K.; Daymond, M. R.

    2016-11-01

    Zr-2.5%Nb alloy is used to fabricate the pressure tubes of the CANDU reactor. The pressure tube is the primary pressure boundary for coolant in the CANDU design and is susceptible to delayed hydride cracking, reduction in fracture toughness upon hydride precipitation and potentially hydride blister formation. The morphology and nature of hydrides in Zr-2.5%Nb with 100 wppm hydrogen has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The effect of hydrides on heavy ion irradiation induced decomposition of the β phase has been reported. STEM-EDX mapping was employed to investigate the distribution of alloying elements. The results show that hydrides are present in the form of stacks of different sizes, with length scales from nano- to micro-meters. Heavy ion irradiation experiments at 250 °C on as-received and hydrided Zr-2.5%Nb alloy, show interesting effects of hydrogen on the irradiation induced redistribution of Fe. It was found that Fe is widely redistributed from the β phase into the α phase in the as-received material, however, the loss of Fe from the β phase and subsequent precipitation is retarded in the hydrided material. This preliminary work will further the current understanding of microstructural evolution of Zr based alloys in the presence of hydrogen.

  8. Development of metal hydride composites

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J.W.

    1992-12-01

    Most of current hydride technology at Savannah River Site is based on beds of metal hydride powders; the expansion upon hydridation and the cycling results in continued breakdown into finer particles. Goal is to develop a composite which will contain the fines in a dimensionally stable matrix, for use in processes which require a stable gas flow through a hydride bed. Metal hydride composites would benefit the advanced Thermal Cycling Absorption process (hydrogen isotope separation), and the Replacement Tritium Facility (storage, pumping, compression, purification of hydrogen isotopes). These composites were fabricated by cold compaction of a mixture of metal hydride granules and coarse copper powder; the porosity in the granules was introduced by means of ammonium carbonate. The composite pellets were cycled 138 times in hydrogen with the loss of LANA0.75 (LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75}) limited to the surface. Vacuum sintering can provide additional strength at the edges. Without a coating, the metal hydride particles exposed at the pellet surface can be removed by cycling several times in hydrogen.

  9. METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN COMPRESSORS: A REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman Jr, Robert C; Yartys, Dr. Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Dr. Michael V; Pollet, Dr. B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is an efficient and reliable method allowing a conversion of energy from heat into a compressed hydrogen gas. The most important component of such a thermal engine the metal hydride material itself should possess several material features in order to achieve an efficient performance in the hydrogen compression. Apart from the hydrogen storage characteristics important for every solid H storage material (e.g. gravimetric and volumetric efficiency of H storage, hydrogen sorption kinetics and effective thermal conductivity), the thermodynamics of the metal-hydrogen systems is of primary importance resulting in a temperature dependence of the absorption/desorption pressures). Several specific features should be optimized to govern the performance of the MH-compressors including synchronisation of the pressure plateaus for multi-stage compressors, reduction of slope of the isotherms and hysteresis, increase of cycling stability and life time, together with challenges in system design associated with volume expansion of the metal matrix during the hydrogenation. The present review summarises numerous papers and patent literature dealing with MH hydrogen compression technology. The review considers (a) fundamental aspects of materials development with a focus on structure and phase equilibria in the metal-hydrogen systems suitable for the hydrogen compression; and (b) applied aspects, including their consideration from the applied thermodynamic viewpoint, system design features and performances of the metal hydride compressors and major applications.

  10. Calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate "cement" phases and rare Ca-zeolite association at Colle Fabbri, Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoppa, F.; Scordari, F.; Mesto, E.; Sharygin, V. V.; Bortolozzi, G.

    2010-06-01

    Very high temperature, Ca-rich alkaline magma intruded an argillite formation at Colle Fabbri, Central Italy, producing cordierite-tridymite metamorphism in the country rocks. An intense Ba-rich sulphate-carbonate-alkaline hydrothermal plume produced a zone of mineralization several meters thick around the igneous body. Reaction of hydrothermal fluids with country rocks formed calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH), i.e., tobermorite-afwillite-jennite; calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate (CASH) — "cement" phases - i.e., thaumasite, strätlingite and an ettringite-like phase and several different species of zeolites: chabazite-Ca, willhendersonite, gismon-dine, three phases bearing Ca with the same or perhaps lower symmetry of phillipsite-Ca, levyne-Ca and the Ca-rich analogue of merlinoite. In addition, apophyllite-(KF) and/or apophyllite-(KOH), Ca-Ba-carbonates, portlandite and sulphates were present. A new polymorph from the pyrrhotite group, containing three layers of sphalerite-type structure in the unit cell, is reported for the first time. Such a complex association is unique. Most of these minerals are specifically related to hydration processes of: (1) pyrometamorphic metacarbonate/metapelitic rocks (natural analogues of cement clinkers); (2) mineralization between intrusive stocks and slates; and (3) high-calcium, alkaline igneous rocks such as melilitites and foidites as well as carbonatites. The Colle Fabbri outcrop offers an opportunity to study in situ complex crystalline overgrowth and specific crystal chemistry in mineral phases formed in igneous to hydrothermal conditions.

  11. Initial report on molecular modeling of metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, K.A.; Wolf, R.J.

    1990-12-01

    Metal hydrides are for hydrogen/tritium storage and handling. Examples of such metals and metal alloys include palladium (Pd) and lanthanum-nickel-aluminum (LaNiAl). These materials have the unique properties of being hydrogen/tritium sponges''. (1) Metal hydrides absorb enormous quantities of hydrogen/tritium, where the hydrogen density is much larger than in liquid hydrogen. There is a unique problem that develops in tritium storage, mainly due to its radioactive decay into helium. Helium is inert (i.e., non-reactive due to its closed shell electronic structure) and tends to remain in the hydride once it forms there. A clear understanding of such a phenomenon (and how to minimize it and possibly get rid of it) is the foundation of our current work. Our main focus is to fundamentally understand hydrogen/tritium behavior and interactions in these metals, so that we can design better and more efficient tritium handling materials and facilities. As a by-product of this work, we will able to apply our state-of-the-art techniques to study other problems involving hydrogen/tritium and helium in SRS materials. Examples include hydrogen and helium interactions in lithium-aluminum reactor targets, tritium reservoirs, and stainless steel reactor tanks. 2 tabs., 4 figs., 10 refs.

  12. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  13. Multidimensional simulations of hydrides during fuel rod lifecycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    In light water reactor fuel rods, waterside corrosion of zirconium-alloy cladding introduces hydrogen into the cladding, where it is slightly soluble. When the solubility limit is reached, the hydrogen precipitates into crystals of zirconium hydride which decrease the ductility of the cladding and may lead to cladding failure during dry storage or transportation events. The distribution of the hydride phase and the orientation of the crystals depend on the history of the spatial temperature and stress profiles in the cladding. In this work, we have expanded the existing hydride modeling capability in the BISON fuel performance code with the goal of predicting both global and local effects on the radial, azimuthal and axial distribution of the hydride phase. We compare results from 1D simulations to published experimental data. We demonstrate the new capability by simulating in 2D a fuel rod throughout a lifecycle that includes irradiation, short-term storage in the spent fuel pool, drying, and interim storage in a dry cask. Using the 2D simulations, we present qualitative predictions of the effects of the inter-pellet gap and the drying conditions on the growth of a hydride rim.

  14. Phase composition and structure of aluminum Al-Cu-Si-Sn-Pb alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, N. A.; Stolyarova, O. O.; Murav'eva, T. I.; Zagorskii, D. L.

    2016-06-01

    The structure and phase composition of cast and heat treated Al-Cu-Si-Sn-Pb alloys containing 6 wt % Sn, 2 wt % Pb, 0-4 wt % Cu, 0-10 wt % Si have been studied using calculations and experimental methods. Polythermal and isothermal sections are reported, which indicate the existence of two liquid phases. It was found that the low-melting phase is inhomogeneous and consists of individual leadand tin-based particles.

  15. Modeling of gamma/gamma-prime phase equilibrium in the nickel-aluminum system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, J. M.; Barefoot, J. R.; Jarrett, R. N.; Tien, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model is proposed for the determination of phase equilibrium in alloys, taking into consideration dissimilar lattice parameters. Volume-dependent pair interactions are introduced by means of phenomenological Lennard-Jones potentials and the configurational entropy of the system is treated in the tetrahedron approximation of the cluster variation method. The model is applied to the superalloy-relevant, nickel-rich, gamma/gamma-prime phase region of the Ni-Al phase diagram. The model predicts reasonable values for the lattice parameters and the enthalpy of formation as a function of composition, and the calculated phase diagram closely approximates the experimental diagram.

  16. Vapor liquid solid-hydride vapor phase epitaxy (VLS-HVPE) growth of ultra-long defect-free GaAs nanowires: Ab initio simulations supporting center nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    André, Yamina Lekhal, Kaddour; Hoggan, Philip; Avit, Geoffrey; Réda Ramdani, M.; Monier, Guillaume; Colas, David; Ajib, Rabih; Castelluci, Dominique; Gil, Evelyne; Cadiz, Fabian; Rowe, Alistair; Paget, Daniel; Petit, Elodie; Leroux, Christine; Trassoudaine, Agnès

    2014-05-21

    High aspect ratio, rod-like and single crystal phase GaAs nanowires (NWs) were grown by gold catalyst-assisted hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). High resolution transmission electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy revealed polytypism-free zinc blende (ZB) NWs over lengths of several tens of micrometers for a mean diameter of 50 nm. Micro-photoluminescence studies of individual NWs showed linewidths smaller than those reported elsewhere which is consistent with the crystalline quality of the NWs. HVPE makes use of chloride growth precursors GaCl of which high decomposition frequency after adsorption onto the liquid droplet catalysts, favors a direct and rapid introduction of the Ga atoms from the vapor phase into the droplets. High influxes of Ga and As species then yield high axial growth rate of more than 100 μm/h. The diffusion of the Ga atoms in the liquid droplet towards the interface between the liquid and the solid nanowire was investigated by using density functional theory calculations. The diffusion coefficient of Ga atoms was estimated to be 3 × 10{sup −9} m{sup 2}/s. The fast diffusion of Ga in the droplet favors nucleation at the liquid-solid line interface at the center of the NW. This is further evidence, provided by an alternative epitaxial method with respect to metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy, of the current assumption which states that this type of nucleation should always lead to the formation of the ZB cubic phase.

  17. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  18. Aluminum-centered tetrahedron-octahedron transition in advancing Al-Sb-Te phase change properties.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mengjiao; Ding, Keyuan; Rao, Feng; Li, Xianbin; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2015-02-24

    Group IIIA elements, Al, Ga, or In, etc., doped Sb-Te materials have proven good phase change properties, especially the superior data retention ability over popular Ge2Sb2Te5, while their phase transition mechanisms are rarely investigated. In this paper, aiming at the phase transition of Al-Sb-Te materials, we reveal a dominant rule of local structure changes around the Al atoms based on ab initio simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance evidences. By comparing the local chemical environments around Al atoms in respective amorphous and crystalline Al-Sb-Te phases, we believe that Al-centered motifs undergo reversible tetrahedron-octahedron reconfigurations in phase transition process. Such Al-centered local structure rearrangements significantly enhance thermal stability of amorphous phase compared to that of undoped Sb-Te materials, and facilitate a low-energy amorphization due to the weak links among Al-centered and Sb-centered octahedrons. Our studies may provide a useful reference to further understand the underlying physics and optimize performances of all IIIA metal doped Sb-Te phase change materials, prompting the development of NOR/NAND Flash-like phase change memory technology.

  19. Aluminum-Centered Tetrahedron-Octahedron Transition in Advancing Al-Sb-Te Phase Change Properties

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Mengjiao; Ding, Keyuan; Rao, Feng; Li, Xianbin; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2015-01-01

    Group IIIA elements, Al, Ga, or In, etc., doped Sb-Te materials have proven good phase change properties, especially the superior data retention ability over popular Ge2Sb2Te5, while their phase transition mechanisms are rarely investigated. In this paper, aiming at the phase transition of Al-Sb-Te materials, we reveal a dominant rule of local structure changes around the Al atoms based on ab initio simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance evidences. By comparing the local chemical environments around Al atoms in respective amorphous and crystalline Al-Sb-Te phases, we believe that Al-centered motifs undergo reversible tetrahedron-octahedron reconfigurations in phase transition process. Such Al-centered local structure rearrangements significantly enhance thermal stability of amorphous phase compared to that of undoped Sb-Te materials, and facilitate a low-energy amorphization due to the weak links among Al-centered and Sb-centered octahedrons. Our studies may provide a useful reference to further understand the underlying physics and optimize performances of all IIIA metal doped Sb-Te phase change materials, prompting the development of NOR/NAND Flash-like phase change memory technology. PMID:25709082

  20. A twist on facial selectivity of hydride reductions of cyclic ketones: twist-boat conformers in cyclohexanone, piperidone, and tropinone reactions.

    PubMed

    Neufeldt, Sharon R; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Comins, Daniel L; Houk, K N

    2014-12-01

    The role of twist-boat conformers of cyclohexanones in hydride reductions was explored. The hydride reductions of a cis-2,6-disubstituted N-acylpiperidone, an N-acyltropinone, and tert-butylcyclohexanone by lithium aluminum hydride and by a bulky borohydride reagent were investigated computationally and compared to experiment. Our results indicate that in certain cases, factors such as substrate conformation, nucleophile bulkiness, and remote steric features can affect stereoselectivity in ways that are difficult to predict by the general Felkin-Anh model. In particular, we have calculated that a twist-boat conformation is relevant to the reactivity and facial selectivity of hydride reduction of cis-2,6-disubstituted N-acylpiperidones with a small hydride reagent (LiAlH4) but not with a bulky hydride (lithium triisopropylborohydride).

  1. Low density metal hydride foams

    DOEpatents

    Maienschein, Jon L.; Barry, Patrick E.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam.

  2. Development of a Two-Phase Model for the Hot Deformation of Highly-Alloyed Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    A. J. Beaudoin; J. A. Dantzig; I. M. Robertson; B. E. Gore; S. F. Harnish; H. A. Padilla

    2005-10-31

    Conventional processing methods for highly alloyed aluminum consist of ingot casting, followed by hot rolling and thermal treatments. Defects result in lost productivity and wasted energy through the need to remelt and reprocess the material. This research centers on developing a fundamental understanding for deformation of wrought 705X series alloys, a key alloy system used in structural airframe applications. The development of damage at grain boundaries is characterized through a novel test that provides initiation of failure while preserving a controlled deformation response. Data from these mechanical tests are linked to computer simulations of the hot rolling process through a critical measure of damage. Transmission electron microscopy provides fundamental insight into deformation at these high working temperatures, and--in a novel link between microscale and macroscale response--the evolution of microstructure (crystallographic orientation) provides feedback for tuning of friction in the hot rolling process. The key product of this research is a modeling framework for the analysis of industrial hot rolling.

  3. Shock-Induced Structural Phase Transition, Plasticity, and Brittle Cracks in Aluminum Nitride Ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Branicio, Paulo S.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2006-02-17

    Atomistic mechanisms of fracture accompanying structural phase transformation (SPT) in AlN ceramic under hypervelocity impact are investigated using a 209x10{sup 6} atom molecular-dynamics simulation. The shock wave generated by the impact splits into an elastic wave and a slower SPT wave that transforms the wurtzite structure into the rocksalt phase. The interaction between the reflected elastic wave and the SPT wave front generates nanovoids and dislocations into the wurtzite phase. Nanovoids coalesce into mode I cracks while dislocations give rise to kink bands and mode II cracking.

  4. Spin Forming of an Aluminum 2219-T6 Aft Bulkhead for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle: Phase II Supplemental Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Squire, Michael D.; Domack, Marcia S.; Hoffman, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the aft bulkhead of the pressure vessel. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) 2219 aft bulkhead which will eliminate the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design that will reduce vehicle weight by eliminating welds. Phase I of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece forward pressure vessel bulkhead from aluminum-lithium 2195.

  5. Low oxidation state aluminum-containing cluster anions: Cp∗AlnH-, n = 1-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Ganteför, Gerd; Eichhorn, Bryan; Mayo, Dennis; Sawyer, William H.; Gill, Ann F.; Kandalam, Anil K.; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Bowen, Kit

    2016-08-01

    Three new, low oxidation state, aluminum-containing cluster anions, Cp*AlnH-, n = 1-3, were prepared via reactions between aluminum hydride cluster anions, AlnHm-, and Cp*H ligands. These were characterized by mass spectrometry, anion photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory based calculations. Agreement between the experimentally and theoretically determined vertical detachment energies and adiabatic detachment energies validated the computed geometrical structures. Reactions between aluminum hydride cluster anions and ligands provide a new avenue for discovering low oxidation state, ligated aluminum clusters.

  6. Physics of hydride fueled PWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganda, Francesco

    The first part of the work presents the neutronic results of a detailed and comprehensive study of the feasibility of using hydride fuel in pressurized water reactors (PWR). The primary hydride fuel examined is U-ZrH1.6 having 45w/o uranium: two acceptable design approaches were identified: (1) use of erbium as a burnable poison; (2) replacement of a fraction of the ZrH1.6 by thorium hydride along with addition of some IFBA. The replacement of 25 v/o of ZrH 1.6 by ThH2 along with use of IFBA was identified as the preferred design approach as it gives a slight cycle length gain whereas use of erbium burnable poison results in a cycle length penalty. The feasibility of a single recycling plutonium in PWR in the form of U-PuH2-ZrH1.6 has also been assessed. This fuel was found superior to MOX in terms of the TRU fractional transmutation---53% for U-PuH2-ZrH1.6 versus 29% for MOX---and proliferation resistance. A thorough investigation of physics characteristics of hydride fuels has been performed to understand the reasons of the trends in the reactivity coefficients. The second part of this work assessed the feasibility of multi-recycling plutonium in PWR using hydride fuel. It was found that the fertile-free hydride fuel PuH2-ZrH1.6, enables multi-recycling of Pu in PWR an unlimited number of times. This unique feature of hydride fuels is due to the incorporation of a significant fraction of the hydrogen moderator in the fuel, thereby mitigating the effect of spectrum hardening due to coolant voiding accidents. An equivalent oxide fuel PuO2-ZrO2 was investigated as well and found to enable up to 10 recycles. The feasibility of recycling Pu and all the TRU using hydride fuels were investigated as well. It was found that hydride fuels allow recycling of Pu+Np at least 6 times. If it was desired to recycle all the TRU in PWR using hydrides, the number of possible recycles is limited to 3; the limit is imposed by positive large void reactivity feedback.

  7. Transient Liquid-Phase Diffusion Bonding of Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite Using a Mixed Cu-Ni Powder Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Joydeep; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2012-07-01

    In the present study, the transient liquid-phase diffusion bonding of an aluminum metal matrix composite (6061-15 wt.% SiCp) has been investigated for the first time using a mixed Cu-Ni powder interlayer at 560 °C, 0.2 MPa, for different holding times up to 6 h. The microstructure of the isothermally solidified zone contains equilibrium precipitate CuAl2, metastable precipitate Al9Ni2 in the matrix of α-solid solution along with the reinforcement particles (SiC). On the other hand, the microstructure of the central bond zone consists of equilibrium phases such as NiAl3, Al7Cu4Ni and α-solid solution along with SiC particles (without any segregation) and the presence of microporosities. During shear test, the crack originates from microporosities and propagates along the interphase interfaces resulting in poor bond strength for lower holding times. As the bonding time increases, with continual diffusion, the structural heterogeneity is diminished, and the microporosities are eliminated at the central bond zone. Accordingly, after 6-h holding, the microstructure of the central bond zone mainly consists of NiAl3 without any visible microporosity. This provides a joint efficiency of 84% with failure primarily occurring through decohesion at the SiC particle/matrix interface.

  8. Monomolecular layers and thin films of silane coupling agents by vapor-phase adsorption on oxidized aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, D.G.; Bein, T.

    1992-08-06

    Thin films of tetraethoxysilane [TEOS], (3-bromopropyl)trimethoxysilane [BPS], trimethoxyvinylsilane [VS], and 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate [TPM] on oxidized aluminum surfaces have been investigated by reflection-absorption FTIR spectroscopy, ellipsometry, contact angle, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. Gravimetric measurements with the QCM can reveal quantitative aspects of adsorption and film formation, even for films as thin as monolayers. Adsorption of these silane coupling agents from solution typically produces multilayer films. Vapor-phase adsorption of TEOS and TPM at room temperature results in monomolecular layers. The coupling agents VS and BPS require additional heating after the vapor-phase adsorption to initiate the hydrolysis and condensation reactions necessary for the surface attachment, which produces one to three layers. For vapor adsorbed films a packing density of 4-7 molecules/nm{sup 2} was found. The data strongly suggest that the organic moieties in several of these films have a preferential orientation on the surface; they can be viewed as two-dimensional, oligomeric siloxane networks with oriented organic chains. Subsequent heating of TPM films results in structural rearrangements; heating of TEOS results in complete condensation to SiO{sub 2} films. 43 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Ab Initio Thermochemistry and Elastic Properties of Alkaline Earth Hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hector, Louis, Jr.; Herbst, Jan; Wolf, Walter; Saxe, Paul

    2006-03-01

    In addition to comprising a scientifically interesting class of materials, the binary alkaline earth hydrides are important components of hydrogen sorption/desorption reactions. Of critical importance for predicting the thermodynamic stability of hydrides is the enthalpy of hydride formation, δH, which links the temperature and pressure of hydrogen sorption via the van't Hoff relation. We compare LDA and GGA predictions of the heats of formation and elastic properties of alkaline earth metals and their binary hydrides BeH2, MgH2, CaH2, SrH2, and BaH2 using a plane wave density functional method. Phonon calculations using the direct method enabled prediction of the zero point energies of each material and the 0K and 298K heats of formation. We also computed the 0K and 298K cohesive energies for the alkaline earth metals. Born effective charge tensors were computed via the Berry phase method and enabled prediction of the phonon dispersion curves with LO/TO zone center splittings. It was found that the LO/TO splittings have no effect on the computed zero point energies and heats of formation. The elastic constants were computed with a least squares fitting method using a set of sequentially-applied strains to improve the accuracy of each calculation. Comparison of results from the least squares methodology with prior results using the Hartree-Fock method suggest that the former is substantially more accurate for predicting hydride elastic properties.

  10. Novel phases of lithium-aluminum binaries from first-principles structural search

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento-Pérez, Rafael; Cerqueira, Tiago F. T.; Botti, Silvana; Marques, Miguel A. L.; Valencia-Jaime, Irais; Amsler, Maximilian; Goedecker, Stefan; Romero, Aldo H.

    2015-01-14

    Intermetallic Li–Al compounds are on the one hand key materials for light-weight engineering, and on the other hand, they have been proposed for high-capacity electrodes for Li batteries. We determine from first-principles the phase diagram of Li–Al binary crystals using the minima hopping structural prediction method. Beside reproducing the experimentally reported phases (LiAl, Li{sub 3}Al{sub 2}, Li{sub 9}Al{sub 4}, LiAl{sub 3}, and Li{sub 2}Al), we unveil a structural variety larger than expected by discovering six unreported binary phases likely to be thermodynamically stable. Finally, we discuss the behavior of the elastic constants and of the electric potential profile of all Li–Al stable compounds as a function of their stoichiometry.

  11. Hydrogen storage in fullerenes and in an organic hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.C.; Murphy, R.W.; Chen, F.C.; Loutfy, R.O.; Veksler, E.; Li, W.

    1998-05-29

    While the authors have demonstrated the importance and usefulness of thermal management to the hydrogen storage in fullerenes, their recent effort has concentrated on materials improvement and physical model development. In this paper, they report the results of this effort as follows: (1) Liquid phase hydrogenation of fullerenes indicated that more than 6 wt% capacity can be obtained at 180 C, 350--400 psi; (2) Dehydrogenation of fullerenes hydrides below 225 C was demonstrated using an Ir-based P-C-P pincer complex catalyst; (3) Cyclic hydrogenation and dehydrogenation tests of an organic hydride at 7 wt% capacity were conducted at 180--260 C; and (4) Physical models developed for fullerenes were determined to be applicable to this organic hydride (with much smaller activation energies).

  12. Electronic and optical characteristics of an m-plane GaN single crystal grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy on a GaN seed synthesized by the ammonothermal method using an acidic mineralizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Kazunobu; Tsukada, Yusuke; Furukawa, Erika; Saito, Makoto; Mikawa, Yutaka; Kubo, Shuichi; Ikeda, Hirotaka; Fujito, Kenji; Uedono, Akira; Chichibu, Shigefusa F.

    2016-05-01

    Fundamental electronic and optical properties of a low-resistivity m-plane GaN single crystal, which was grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy on a bulk GaN seed crystal synthesized by the ammonothermal method in supercritical ammonia using an acidic mineralizer, were investigated. The threading dislocation and basal-plane staking-fault densities of the crystal were around 104 cm-2 and less than 100 cm-1, respectively. Oxygen doping achieved a high electron concentration of 4 × 1018 cm-3 at room temperature. Accordingly, a photoluminescence (PL) band originating from the recombination of hot carriers was observed at low temperatures, even under weak excitation conditions. The simultaneous realization of low-level incorporation of Ga vacancies (VGa) less than 1016 cm-3 was confirmed by using the positron annihilation technique. Consistent with our long-standing claim that VGa complexes are the major nonradiative recombination centers in GaN, the fast-component PL lifetime of the near-band-edge emission at room temperature longer than 2 ns was achieved.

  13. Determination of As(III) and As(V) species in some natural water and food samples by solid-phase extraction on Streptococcus pyogenes immobilized on Sepabeads SP 70 and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Uluozlu, Ozgur Dogan; Tuzen, Mustafa; Mendil, Durali; Soylak, Mustafa

    2010-05-01

    The speciation of arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) by using Streptococcus pyogenes immobilized on Sepabeads SP 70 resin has been investigated with solid-phase extraction method. The arsenic levels were determined hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) in sample solutions. The procedure presented based on quantitative recoveries of As(III) as >95%. Also the As(V) recoveries were obtained as <5% using the presented method. After reduction of As(V) by using KI and ascorbic acid and waiting 1h later, the system was applied to determination of total arsenic. As(V) was found as the difference between the total As and As(III) content. Various experimental parameters such as pH, amount of microorganism, sample volume, etc. were investigated. The capacity of biosorbent for arsenic(III) was calculated as 7.3 mg/g. The preconcentration factor was found as 36. The relative standard deviation was calculated below 8%. Limit of detection was calculated as 13 ng/L. The validation of the presented procedure was tested by analysis of standard reference materials (NIST SRM 1568a Rice floor and GBW 07605 Tea) and obtained fairly compatible results. The procedure was also successfully applied to arsenic speciation and determination of some natural water and food samples.

  14. Preparation and structural characterization of two new phases of aluminum trifluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Herron, N.; Thorn, D.L.; Harlow, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    When certain salts, R{sup +}AlF{sub 4}{sup -} are heated in flowing nitrogen, the equivalent of R{sub +}F{sup -} is lost at temperatures <500 {degrees}C, leaving microcrystalline AlF{sub 3}. This transformation proceeds via an intermediate material of formula HAlF{sub 4} when R{sup +} = pyridineH{sup +} or occurs in a single step when, e.g., R{sup +} = an organic cation such as N(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup +}. In each case a different, metastable phase of AlF{sub 3} is produced and their structures, both based on corner-shared octahedra of [AlF{sub 6}], are delineated using powder diffraction (X-ray and neutron) techniques. When HAlF{sub 4} is an intermediate, the ultimate {eta}-AlF{sub 3} phase has a structure identical to pyrochlore materials of formulae FeF{sub 3} and AlF{sub x}(OH){sub 3-x}. When there is no discrete intermediate, the ultimate {theta}-AlF{sub 3} phase has a structure which has now also been reported by Bentrup et al. During attempts to crystallize HAlF{sub 4} from formamide, a new {beta}-phase of NH{sub 4}AlF{sub 4} was isolated and characterized by powder diffraction as a layered material having NH{sub 4}{sup +} ions between fluoroaluminate sheets and with connectivity within the sheets identical to the {beta}-phase of RbAlF{sub 4}. The sheet structure loses NH{sub 4}F when pyrolyzed, producing yet another new phase, k-AlF{sub 3}, which retains the connectivity of the layers from the precursor and simply fuses these layers together in a pseudotopotactic transformation. The resultant structure is closely related to that of the hypothetical end member of the tetragonal tungsten bronzes such as K{sub x}WO{sub 3} when x = 0. All three new phases contain [Al-F-Al] rings which dictate a limited nanoporosity and all convert irreversibly to the thermodynamically stable {alpha}-AlF{sub 3} form at temperatures between {approximately}450 and {approximately}650 {degrees}C. 16 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. High-temperature oxidation behavior of two-phase iron-manganese-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.Y.; Lee, C.L.; Kao, C.H.; Perng, T.P.

    2000-04-01

    Oxidation behavior of two series of two-phase Fe-Mn-Al alloys in air up to 800 C was investigated. For the first series of alloys with various ratios of ferrite-austenite, the oxidation resistance of these alloys increased as the ferrite content increased. Two layers of oxide were formed mainly on the austenite grains, and oxidation in the ferrite phase was much less severe. The other layer of the scale on austenite was enriched with Mn and Fe, while Al was concentrated in the inner layer. For the second series of alloys with nearly the same contents of ferrite and C but various contents of Cr, the addition of Cr changed the oxidation characteristics and increased the oxidation resistance. Cr assisted the formation of a dense film of alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to prevent further oxidation.

  16. Photochemistry of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Perutz, Robin N; Procacci, Barbara

    2016-08-10

    Photochemical reactivity associated with metal-hydrogen bonds is widespread among metal hydride complexes and has played a critical part in opening up C-H bond activation. It has been exploited to design different types of photocatalytic reactions and to obtain NMR spectra of dilute solutions with a single pulse of an NMR spectrometer. Because photolysis can be performed on fast time scales and at low temperature, metal-hydride photochemistry has enabled determination of the molecular structure and rates of reaction of highly reactive intermediates. We identify five characteristic photoprocesses of metal monohydride complexes associated with the M-H bond, of which the most widespread are M-H homolysis and R-H reductive elimination. For metal dihydride complexes, the dominant photoprocess is reductive elimination of H2. Dihydrogen complexes typically lose H2 photochemically. The majority of photochemical reactions are likely to be dissociative, but hydride complexes may be designed with equilibrated excited states that undergo different photochemical reactions, including proton transfer or hydride transfer. The photochemical mechanisms of a few reactions have been analyzed by computational methods, including quantum dynamics. A section on specialist methods (time-resolved spectroscopy, matrix isolation, NMR, and computational methods) and a survey of transition metal hydride photochemistry organized by transition metal group complete the Review.

  17. Method of producing a chemical hydride

    DOEpatents

    Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Wendt, Kraig M.

    2007-11-13

    A method of producing a chemical hydride is described and which includes selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of a hydrocarbon; and reacting the composition with the source of the hydrocarbon to generate a chemical hydride.

  18. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Leslie D.

    1982-01-01

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  19. Structural and optical properties of ε-phase tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum crystals prepared by using physical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wanfeng; Pang, Zhiyong; Zhao, Yu; Jiang, Feng; Yuan, Huimin; Song, Hui; Han, Shenghao

    2014-10-01

    Crystals of ε-phase tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (ε-Alq3) were prepared by using physical vapor deposition (PVD) method in a double zone tube furnace. The structural properties of the ε-Alq3 crystals were investigated by using an X-ray single crystal diffractometer (XSCD) and a high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM). Large straight steps were observed from the side face of the pine needle-like crystals. The straight steps are parallel with each other like terraces and the widths of the steps are fixed, indicating that the ε-Alq3 crystals may have layered structures. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra at different temperatures (7 K, 66 K, 220 K, 300 K and 350 K) and the absorption spectrum were also investigated. The optical band gap of the ε-Alq3 crystals was calculated to be about 2.82 eV. This value is a little larger than that of amorphous mer-Alq3 (about 2.7 eV), indicating a minimizing of impurities, grain boundaries and defects.

  20. Comparative Studies of Silicon Dissolution in Molten Aluminum Under Different Flow Conditions, Part I: Single-Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed Ahmadi, Mehran; Argyropoulos, Stavros A.; Bussmann, Markus; Doutre, Don

    2015-02-01

    This manuscript presents research work related to the assimilation of Silicon (Si) in molten Aluminum (Al) under natural and forced convection conditions. The effects of impurity levels of solid Si, Al bath temperature, and fluid flow conditions were investigated. It was found that a polycrystalline metallurgical grade Si (MGSi) with higher levels of impurities dissolved more slowly than high purity polycrystalline MGSi, which showed a similar dissolution rate to monocrystalline electronic grade Si. For high-purity Si cylinders, the experimental data under natural convection conditions exhibit good agreement with a correlation for vertical cylinders: overline{Sh} = ( 0. 1 1 {{to}}0.129)(Gr_m Sc)^{1/3} . Under forced convection conditions, by rotating the molten Al, the mass transfer rate increased at higher liquid velocities, implying that the dissolution process is controlled by liquid phase diffusion. When the forced convection prevails, the experimental data are well predicted by a correlation for vertical cylinders in cross flow: overline{Sh} = 0.3 + {0.62{Re}^{1/2} Sc^{1/3} }/{[ {1 + (0.4/Sc)^{2/3 } ]^{1/4} }}[ {1 + ( {{Re} /282000} )^{5/8} } ]^{4/5} . Finally, at lower velocities of liquid Al, the combined effect of natural and forced convection must be considered, and a correlation is proposed based on the buoyancy force normal to the direction of the flow.

  1. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  2. Aluminum nitride electro-optic phase shifter for backend integration on silicon.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shiyang; Lo, Guo-Qiang

    2016-06-13

    An AlN electro-optic phase shifter with a parallel plate capacitor structure is fabricated on Si using the back-end complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, which is feasible for multilayer photonics integration. The modulation efficiency (Vπ⋅Lπ product) measured from the fabricated waveguide-ring resonators and Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) modulators near the 1550-nm wavelength is ∼240 V⋅cm for the transverse electric (TE) mode and ∼320 V⋅cm for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode, from which the Pockels coefficient of the deposited AlN is deduced to be ∼1.0 pm/V for both TE and TM modes. The methods for further modulation efficiency improvement are addressed.

  3. The effect of stress state on zirconium hydride reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut Nedim

    correlating the finite element stress-state results with the spatial distribution of hydride microstructures observed within the optical micrographs for each sample. Experiments showed that the hydride reorientation was enhanced as the stress biaxiality increased. The threshold stress decreased from 150 MPa to 80 MPa when stress biaxiality ratio increased from uniaxial tension to near-equibiaxial tension. This behavior was also predicted by classical nucleation theory based on the Gibbs free energy of transformation being assisted by the far-field stress. An analysis of in situ X-ray diffraction data obtained during a thermo-mechanical cycle typical of vacuum drying showed a complex lattice-spacing behavior of the hydride phase during the dissolution and precipitation. The in-plane hydrides showed bilinear lattice expansion during heating with the intrinsic thermal expansion rate of the hydrides being observed only at elevated temperatures as they dissolve. For radial hydrides that precipitate during cooling under stress, the spacing of the close-packed {111} planes oriented normal to the maximum applied stress was permanently higher than the corresponding {111} plane spacing in the other directions. This behavior is believed to be a result of a complex stress state within the precipitating plate-like hydrides that induces a strain component within the hydrides normal to its "plate" face (i.e., the applied stress direction) that exceeds the lattice spacing strains in the other directions. During heat-up, the lattice spacing of these same "plate" planes actually contract due to the reversion of the stress state within the plate-like hydrides as they dissolve. The presence of radial hydrides and their connectivity with in-plane hydrides was shown to increase the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature during tensile testing. This behavior can be understood in terms of the role of radial hydrides in promoting the initiation of a long crack that subsequently propagates under

  4. A multiphysics phase field model on melting and kinetic superheating of aluminum nanolayer and nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yong Seok

    It has been found during the last decade that a nanoscale melting of metal has very distinctive features compared to its microscale counterpart. It has been observed that a highly non-equilibrium state can result in extreme superheating of a solid state, which cannot be explained well by thermodynamic theories based on equilibrium or nucleation. An endeavor to find the superheating limit and mechanisms of melting and superheating becomes more complicated when various physical phenomena are involved at the similar scales. The main goal of this research is to establish a multiphysics model and to reveal the mechanism of melting and kinetic superheating of a metal nanostructure at high heating rates. The model includes elastodynamics, a fast heating of metal considering a delayed heat transfer between electron gas and lattice phonon and couplings among physical phenomena, and phase transformation incorporated with thermal fluctuation. The model successfully reproduces two independent experiments and several novel nanoscale physical phenomena are discovered. For example, the depression of the melting temperature of Al nanolayer under plane stress condition, the threshold heating rate, 1011 K/s, for kinetic superheating, a large temperature drop in a 5 nm collision region of the two solid-melt interfaces, and a strong effect of geometry on kinetic superheating in Al core-shell nanostructure at high heating rate.

  5. Transient-liquid-phase (TLP) bonding of aluminum trioxide using niobium-based multilayer interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung Moo

    Transient-liquid-phase (TLP) bonding was used to join high-strength, high-purity Al2O3 ceramic. This method uses a multilayer interlayer (B/A/B sandwich structure), which forms thin transient-liquid layers between the Al2O3 and the refractory core layer (A), then isothermally solidifies through a diffusive mechanism. The presence of thin liquid layers allow interfacial gaps and voids to be filled, while allowing bonding times comparable to those used for conventional brazing. It was shown that TLP bonding produces high-strength joints with re-melt temperatures that are significantly higher than the bonding temperatures used. This study explores the interrelationships between the processing conditions, fracture strengths of the joints, wetting behavior of the TLP, and the diffusion/isothermal solidification kinetics. In particular, when Ni/Nb/Ni interlayers were utilized, four-point bend tests revealed that the fracture strengths of the joints matched those of the monolithic Al2O3, even after a 5-min holding time at 1400°C, the bonding temperature. The resulting interlayer consists of >99% Nb, which has a melting point >2000°C. Sessile-drop wetting experiments revealed that the Ni-Nb liquid alloy formed during bonding exhibits relatively low contact angles (≈90°) on Al2O3, which enables the formation of nearly flaw-free interfaces. An analytical diffusion calculation model was also used to describe the isothermal-solidification and homogenization kinetics, and will be used in future studies to aid new interlayer designs.

  6. Transient liquid phase bonding of titanium-aluminum-niobium-chromium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tao

    The research work presented in this study is mainly about the joining of Ti-48 at. % Al-2 at. % Nb-2 at. % Cr alloys with transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding technology. The TLP bonding technology that has been used in this project includes narrow-gap TLP bonding and wide-gap TLP bonding. Copper has been selected as the melting point depressant (MPD) for the bonding. Thin pure copper films are used for the narrow-gap TLP bonding and the composite interlayers made of 48-2-2 + Cu powders are used for the wide-gap TLP bonding. Different types of composite interlayers, including pre-sintered, manually deposited and automatically deposited composite interlayers have been used to make joints. The comparisons between the joints with all these different composite interlayers are drawn and the results suggest that all these interlayers could make sound bonds with suitable process conditions. The microstructures of the bonds, identified using light, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy, are correlated with their mechanical properties. The mechanical tests include shear test, four point bend test and tensile test. The joints made with thin copper films usually have some excessive Cu-riched intermetallic at the bond line and the mechanical testing shows poor bonding strength. However, some joints made on Gleeble---1500 with very thin copper film (5 mum) could have some fairly high strength. The as-bonded wide-gap joints sometimes have some Cu-rich intermetallic compounds at the bond line and also have a finer microstructure than that of the substrates. These fine grains at the bond line come from the 48-2-2 powder particles in the composite interlayers. However, a fully lamellar microstructure could be formed at the bond line after post-bond heat treatment at 1350°C for 1 hour. The mechanical testing results show the strengths of the joints are quite similar to that of the bulk 48-2-2 alloys at both of the room and elevated temperature (700°). The post

  7. Addressing the Limit of Detectability of Residual Oxide Discontinuities in Friction Stir Butt Welds of Aluminum using Phased Array Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, P. H.

    2008-01-01

    This activity seeks to estimate a theoretical upper bound of detectability for a layer of oxide embedded in a friction stir weld in aluminum. The oxide is theoretically modeled as an ideal planar layer of aluminum oxide, oriented normal to an interrogating ultrasound beam. Experimentally-measured grain scattering level is used to represent the practical noise floor. Echoes from naturally-occurring oxides will necessarily fall below this theoretical limit, and must be above the measurement noise to be potentially detectable.

  8. Optimization of o-phtaldialdehyde/2-mercaptoethanol postcolumn reaction for the hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography determination of memantine utilizing a silica hydride stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Douša, Michal; Pivoňková, Veronika; Sýkora, David

    2016-08-01

    A rapid procedure for the determination of memantine based on hydrophilic interaction chromatography with fluorescence detection was developed. Fluorescence detection after postcolumn derivatization with o-phtaldialdehyde/2-mercaptoethanol was performed at excitation and emission wavelengths of 345 and 450 nm, respectively. The postcolumn reaction conditions such as reaction temperature, derivatization reagent flow rate, and reagents concentration were studied due to steric hindrance of amino group of memantine. The derivatization reaction was applied for the hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography method which was based on Cogent Silica-C stationary phase with a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of 10 mmol/L citric acid and 10 mmol/L o-phosphoric acid (pH 6.0) with acetonitrile using an isocratic composition of 2:8 v/v. The benefit of the reported approach consists in a simple sample pretreatment and a quick and sensitive hydrophilic interaction chromatography method. The developed method was validated in terms of linearity, accuracy, precision, and selectivity according to the International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines. The developed method was successfully applied for the analysis of commercial memantine tablets.

  9. Selective aluminum dissolution as a means to observe the microstructure of nanocrystalline intermetallic phases from Al-Fe-Cr-Ti-Ce rapidly solidified alloy.

    PubMed

    Michalcová, Alena; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Novák, Pavel

    2013-02-01

    Rapidly solidified aluminum alloys are promising materials with very fine microstructure. The microscopy observation of these materials is complicated due to overlay of fcc-Al matrix and different intermetallic phases. A possible way to solve this problem is to dissolve the Al matrix. By this process powder formed by single intermetallic phase particles is obtained. In this paper a new aqueous based dissolving agent for Al-based alloy is presented. The influence of oxidation agent (FeCl(3)) concentration on quality of extraction process was studied. PMID:23177792

  10. Low oxidation state aluminum-containing cluster anions: Cp(∗)AlnH(-), n = 1-3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxing; Ganteför, Gerd; Eichhorn, Bryan; Mayo, Dennis; Sawyer, William H; Gill, Ann F; Kandalam, Anil K; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Bowen, Kit

    2016-08-21

    Three new, low oxidation state, aluminum-containing cluster anions, Cp*AlnH(-), n = 1-3, were prepared via reactions between aluminum hydride cluster anions, AlnHm (-), and Cp*H ligands. These were characterized by mass spectrometry, anion photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory based calculations. Agreement between the experimentally and theoretically determined vertical detachment energies and adiabatic detachment energies validated the computed geometrical structures. Reactions between aluminum hydride cluster anions and ligands provide a new avenue for discovering low oxidation state, ligated aluminum clusters. PMID:27544103

  11. Homogeneous hydride formation path in α-Zr: Molecular dynamics simulations with the charge-optimized many-body potential

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Bai, Xian-Ming; Yu, Jianguo; Tonks, Michael R.; Noordhoek, Mark J.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2016-06-01

    A formation path for homogeneous γ hydride formation in hcp α-Zr, from solid solution to the ζ and then the γ hydride, was demonstrated using molecular static calculations and molecular dynamic simulations with the charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potential. Hydrogen has limited solubility in α-Zr. Once the solubility limit is exceeded, the stability of solid solution gives way to that of coherent hydride phases such as the ζ hydride by planar precipitation of hydrogen. At finite temperatures, the ζ hydride goes through a partial hcp-fcc transformation via 1/3 <1¯100> slip on the basal plane, and transforms into a mixture of γmore » hydride and α-Zr. In the ζ hydride, slip on the basal plane is favored thermodynamically with negligible barrier, and is therefore feasible at finite temperatures without mechanical loading. The transformation process involves slips of three equivalent shear partials, in contrast to that proposed in the literature where only a single shear partial was involved. The adoption of multiple slip partials minimizes the macroscopic shape change of embedded hydride clusters and the shear strain accumulation in the matrix, and thus reduces the overall barrier needed for homogeneous γ hydride formation. In conclusion, this formation path requires finite temperatures for hydrogen diffusion without mechanical loading. Therefore, it should be effective at the cladding operating conditions.« less

  12. Formation and physical properties of uranium hydride under conditions relevant to metallic fuel and nuclear waste storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Robin; Godfrey, Hugh; Broan, Chris; Goddard, Dave; Woodhouse, Guy; Durham, Peter; Diggle, Andrew; Bradshaw, John

    2016-08-01

    The formation of uranium hydride is recognised as a hazard during the storage of uranium metal owing to its potentially pyrophoric properties. This study has assessed the influence of water vapour on the potential for uranium hydride to form at low temperatures and shows that it increases the duration of the induction period but does not necessarily prevent uranium hydride formation and also does not significantly change the reaction rate with hydrogen. It is further shown that the α-UH3 fraction in the uranium hydride gradually increases at decreasing temperatures and is likely to be the dominant phase formed under typical storage conditions. Particle morphology and specific surface area of uranium hydride prepared between 30 °C and 200 °C have also been characterised but show only modest variation compared with the phase composition.

  13. Aluminum Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  14. Effects of the group V/III ratio and a gan inter-layer on the crystal quality of InN grown by using the hydride vapor-phase epitaxy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Ju-Hyung; Wang, Juan; Lee, Won-Jae; Choi, Young-Jun; Lee, Hae-Yong; Kim, Jung-Gon; Harima, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    The hydride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE) method was used to deposit high-quality InN layers on GaN inter-layer/sapphire (0001) structures that had been fabricated by using either the HVPE method or the metal-organic chemical-phase deposition (MOCVD) method. The effects of the group V/III ratio and different GaN inter-layers on the crystal quality of the InN layers were systemically investigated. The InN layer grown at a low Group V/III ratio revealed a high crystal quality with a two-dimensional (2D) growth mode. Also, the 110.7-nm-thick InN layer grown by using HVPE on a GaN inter-layer/sapphire (0001) substrate structure that had been fabricated by using MOCVD had a high crystal quality, with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the InN X-ray diffraction (XRD) peak being about 844 arcsec, and a smooth surface with an atomic force microscopy (AFM) roughness of about 0.07 nm. On the other hand, the 145.7-nm-thick InN layer grown by using HVPE on a GaN inter-layer/sapphire (0001) substrate structure that had been fabricated by using the HVPE method had a lower crystal quality, a FWHM value for the InN (0002) peak of about 2772 arcsec, and a surface roughness of about 3.73 nm. In addition, the peak of the E2 (high) phonon mode for the 110.7-nm-thick InN layer grown by using HVPE on a GaN inter-layer/sapphire (0001) structure that had been fabricated by using MOCVD was detected at 491 cm -1 and had a FWHM of 9.9 cm-1. As a result, InN layers grown by using HVPE on GaN inter-layer/sapphire (0001) substrate structures fabricated by using MOCVD have a high crystal quality and a reduced Raman value, which agrees well with the results of the XRD analysis.

  15. Sensitive determination of As (III) and As (V) by magnetic solid phase extraction with Fe@polyethyleneimine in combination with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Zheng, Zhenwen; Xiao, Junping; Fan, Huili

    2016-08-15

    The magnetic nanomaterial Fe@polyethyleneimine (Fe@PEI) was successfully synthesized and used as an effective adsorbent material for magnetic solid phase extraction(MSPE) of As(III) and As(V) from water samples. Fe@SiO2 nanoparticles were prepared by one pot synthetic method using a borohydride reduction method, then modified with (3-chloropropyl)trimethoxysilane to obtain Fe@SiO2-Cl by chloropropylation, which was reacted with PEI to achieve Fe@polyethyleneimine (Fe@PEI). The microstructure and morphology of Fe@PEI were characterized by transmission electron microscoscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimental results showed that Fe@PEI demonstrated excellent adsorption for As(III) and As(V). Based on this fact, the determination method for these two arsenic species earned good limits of detection (LODs) of 0.002μgL(-1) and wide calibration curves in the concentration range from 0.008 to 0.2μgL(-1). The precisions of As (III) and As (V)were 1.95% and 2.55% (RSD, n=6), respectively. The proposed method was validated with real samples and the spiked recoveries were in the range of 82.7-98.3% and the accuracies were in the range of 2-13.3%. The results demonstrated that the developed MSPE method had good advantages such as simplicity, rapid separation, low cost, easy to reuse and high-quality analytical performances, which made it attractive for rapid and efficient extraction of inorganic arsenic species in the environmental water samples. PMID:27260453

  16. On the Chemistry of Hydrides of N Atoms and O+ Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Zainab; Viti, Serena; Williams, David A.

    2016-08-01

    Previous work by various authors has suggested that the detection by Herschel/HIFI of nitrogen hydrides along the low-density lines of sight toward G10.6-0.4 (W31C) cannot be accounted for by gas-phase chemical models. In this paper we investigate the role of surface reactions on dust grains in diffuse regions, and we find that formation of the hydrides by surface reactions on dust grains with efficiency comparable to that for H2 formation reconciles models with observations of nitrogen hydrides. However, similar surface reactions do not contribute significantly to the hydrides of O+ ions detected by Herschel/HIFI that are present along many sight lines in the Galaxy. The O+ hydrides can be accounted for by conventional gas-phase chemistry either in diffuse clouds of very low density with normal cosmic-ray fluxes or in somewhat denser diffuse clouds with high cosmic-ray fluxes. Hydride chemistry in dense dark clouds appears to be dominated by gas-phase ion-molecule reactions.

  17. On the Chemistry of Hydrides of N Atoms and O+ Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Zainab; Viti, Serena; Williams, David A.

    2016-08-01

    Previous work by various authors has suggested that the detection by Herschel/HIFI of nitrogen hydrides along the low-density lines of sight toward G10.6-0.4 (W31C) cannot be accounted for by gas-phase chemical models. In this paper we investigate the role of surface reactions on dust grains in diffuse regions, and we find that formation of the hydrides by surface reactions on dust grains with efficiency comparable to that for H2 formation reconciles models with observations of nitrogen hydrides. However, similar surface reactions do not contribute significantly to the hydrides of O+ ions detected by Herschel/HIFI that are present along many sight lines in the Galaxy. The O+ hydrides can be accounted for by conventional gas-phase chemistry either in diffuse clouds of very low density with normal cosmic-ray fluxes or in somewhat denser diffuse clouds with high cosmic-ray fluxes. Hydride chemistry in dense dark clouds appears to be dominated by gas-phase ion–molecule reactions.

  18. Process for production of an aluminum hydride compound

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Miller, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2013-08-06

    A compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y, wherein R.sup.1 is phenyl substituted by at least one of: (i) an alkoxy group having from one to six carbon atoms; and (ii) an alkyl group having from three to twelve carbon atoms; wherein M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg; and y is one or two.

  19. Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

  20. Metal hydride composition and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Congdon, James W.

    1995-01-01

    A dimensionally stable hydride composition and a method for making such a composition. The composition is made by forming particles of a metal hydride into porous granules, mixing the granules with a matrix material, forming the mixture into pellets, and sintering the pellets in the absence of oxygen. The ratio of matrix material to hydride is preferably between approximately 2:1 and 4:1 by volume. The porous structure of the granules accommodates the expansion that occurs when the metal hydride particles absorb hydrogen. The porous matrix allows the flow of hydrogen therethrough to contact the hydride particles, yet supports the granules and contains the hydride fines that result from repeated absorption/desorption cycles.

  1. PROCESS OF ELECTROPLATING METALS WITH ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Schickner, W.C.

    1960-04-26

    A process of electroplating aluminum on metals from a nonaqueous bath and a novel method of pretreating or conditioning the metal prior to electrodeposition of the aluminum are given. The process of this invention, as applied by way of example to the plating of uranium, comprises the steps of plating the uranium with the barrier inetal, immersing the barrier-coated uranium in fatty acid, and electrolyzing a water-free diethyl ether solution of aluminum chloride and lithium hydride while making the uranium the cathode until an aluminum deposit of the desired thickness has been formed. According to another preferred embodiment the barrier-coated uranium is immersed in an isopropyl alcohol solution of sterato chromic chloride prior to the fatty acid treatment of this invention.

  2. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  3. Ten degree Kelvin hydride refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A compact hydride absorption refrigeration system with few moving parts for 10 Kelvin operation is disclosed and comprises liquid hydrogen producing means in combination with means for solidifying and subliming the liquid hydrogen produced. The liquid hydrogen is sublimed at about 10 Kelvin. By using a symmetrical all hydrogen redundant loop system, a 10 Kelvin refrigeration system can be operated for many years with only a fraction of the power required for prior art systems.

  4. Hydrogen /Hydride/-air secondary battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarradin, J.; Bronoel, G.; Percheron-Guegan, A.; Achard, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    The use of metal hydrides as negative electrodes in a hydrogen-air secondary battery seems promising. However, in an unpressurized cell, more stable hydrides that LaNi5H6 must be selected. Partial substitutions of nickel by aluminium or manganese increase the stability of hydrides. Combined with an air reversible electrode, a specific energy close to 100 Wh/kg can be expected.

  5. Inhibited solid propellant composition containing beryllium hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An object of this invention is to provide a composition of beryllium hydride and carboxy-terminated polybutadiene which is stable. Another object of this invention is to provide a method for inhibiting the reactivity of beryllium hydride toward carboxy-terminated polybutadiene. It was found that a small amount of lecithin inhibits the reaction of beryllium hydride with the acid groups in carboxy terminated polybutadiene.

  6. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, L.D.

    1980-03-13

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator was designed to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  7. Multi-stage hydride-hydrogen compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golben, P. M.

    A 4-stage metal hydride/hydrogen compressor that uses low temperature hot water (75 C) as its energy source has been built and tested. The compressor utilizes a new hydride heat exchanger technique that has achieved fast cycling time (with 20 C cooling water) on the order of 1 min. This refinement substantially decreases the size, weight and cost of the unit when compared to previous hydride compressors or even conventional mechanical diaphragm compressors.

  8. Inert blanketing of a hydride bed using typical grade protium

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    2015-03-15

    This paper describes the impact of 500 ppm (0.05%) impurities in protium on the absorption rate of a 9.66 kg LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA0.75) metal hydride bed. The presence of 500 ppm or less inerts (i.e. non-hydrogen isotopes) can significantly impact hydrogen bed absorption rates. The impact on reducing absorption rates is significantly greater than predicted assuming uniform temperature, pressure, and compositions throughout the bed. Possible explanations are discussed. One possibility considered was the feed gas contained impurity levels higher than 500 ppm. It was shown that a level of 5000 ppm of inerts would have been necessary to fit the experimental result so this possibility wa dismissed. Another possibility is that the impurities in the protium supply reacted with the hydride material and partially poisoned the hydride. If the hydride were poisoned with CO or another impurity, the removal of the over-pressure gas in the bed would not be expected to allow the hydride loading of the bed to continue as the experimental results showed, so this possibility was also dismissed. The last possibility questions the validity of the calculations. It is assumed in all the calculations that the gas phase composition, temperature, and pressure are uniform throughout the bed. These assumptions are less valid for large beds where there can be large temperature, pressure, and composition gradients throughout the bed. Eventually the impact of 0.05% inerts in protium on bed absorption rate is shown and explained in terms of an increase in inert partial pressure as the bed was loaded.

  9. Aluminum and aluminum alloys as sources of hydrogen for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Lluís; Macanás, Jorge; Muñoz, Maria; Casado, Juan

    Production of hydrogen using aluminum and aluminum alloys with aqueous alkaline solutions is studied. This process is based on aluminum corrosion, consuming only water and aluminum which are cheaper raw materials than other compounds used for in situ hydrogen generation, such as chemical hydrides. In principle, this method does not consume alkali because the aluminate salts produced in the hydrogen generation undergo a decomposition reaction that regenerates the alkali. As a consequence, this process could be a feasible alternative for hydrogen production to supply fuel cells. Preliminary results showed that an increase of base concentration and working solution temperature produced an increase of hydrogen production rate using pure aluminum. Furthermore, an improvement of hydrogen production rates and yields was observed varying aluminum alloys composition and increasing their reactive surface, with interesting results for Al/Si and Al/Co alloys. The development of this idea could improve yields and reduce costs in power units based on fuel cells which use hydrides as raw material for hydrogen production.

  10. Effects of outgassing of loader chamber walls on hydriding of thin films for commercial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Provo, James L.

    2014-07-01

    An important aspect of understanding industrial processing is to know the characteristics of the materials used in such processes. A study was performed to determine the effects of hydriding chamber material on the degree of hydriding for the commercial production of thin film hydride targets for various research universities, commercial companies, and government national laboratories. The goal was to increase the degree of hydriding of various thin film hydrides and to study the vacuum environment during air-exposure hydriding. For this purpose, dynamic residual gas analysis during deuterium gas hydride processing was utilized with erbium thin films, employing a special set-up for direct dynamic hydride gas sampling during processing at elevated temperature and full loading gas pressure. Complete process data for (1) a copper–(1.83 wt. %)beryllium wet hydrogen fired passivated (600 °C–1 h) externally heated pipe hydriding chamber are reported. Dynamic residual gas analysis comparisons during hydriding are presented for hydriding chambers made from (2) alumina (99.8 wt. %), (3) copper (with an interior aluminum coating ∼10 k Å thick, and (4) for a stainless-steel air-fired passivated (900 °C–1 h) chamber. Dynamic data with deuterium gas in the chamber at the hydriding temperature (450 °C) showed the presence and growth of water vapor (D{sub 2}O) and related mixed ion species(H{sub 2}O{sup +}, HDO{sup +}, D{sub 2}O{sup +}, and OD{sup +}) from hydrogen isotope exchange reactions during the 1 h process time. Peaks at mass-to-charge ratios (i.e., m/e) of 12(C{sup +}), 16(CD{sub 2}{sup +}), 17(CHD{sub 2}{sup +}), and 18(CD{sub 3}{sup +}, OD{sup +}) increased for approximately the first half hour of a 1 h hydriding process and then approach steady state. Mass-to-charge peaks at 19(HDO{sup +}) and 20(D{sub 2}O{sup +}) continue to increase throughout the process cycle. Using the m/e = 20 (D{sub 2}O{sup +}) peak intensity from chamber (1

  11. Thermodynamic Hydricity of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Wiedner, Eric S; Chambers, Matthew B; Pitman, Catherine L; Bullock, R Morris; Miller, Alexander J M; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-08-10

    Transition metal hydrides play a critical role in stoichiometric and catalytic transformations. Knowledge of free energies for cleaving metal hydride bonds enables the prediction of chemical reactivity, such as for the bond-forming and bond-breaking events that occur in a catalytic reaction. Thermodynamic hydricity is the free energy required to cleave an M-H bond to generate a hydride ion (H(-)). Three primary methods have been developed for hydricity determination: the hydride transfer method establishes hydride transfer equilibrium with a hydride donor/acceptor pair of known hydricity, the H2 heterolysis method involves measuring the equilibrium of heterolytic cleavage of H2 in the presence of a base, and the potential-pKa method considers stepwise transfer of a proton and two electrons to give a net hydride transfer. Using these methods, over 100 thermodynamic hydricity values for transition metal hydrides have been determined in acetonitrile or water. In acetonitrile, the hydricity of metal hydrides spans a range of more than 50 kcal/mol. Methods for using hydricity values to predict chemical reactivity are also discussed, including organic transformations, the reduction of CO2, and the production and oxidation of hydrogen. PMID:27483171

  12. Fundamental experiments on hydride reorientation in zircaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, Kimberly B.

    In the current study, an in-situ X-ray diffraction technique using synchrotron radiation was used to follow directly the kinetics of hydride dissolution and precipitation during thermomechanical cycles. This technique was combined with conventional microscopy (optical, SEM and TEM) to gain an overall understanding of the process of hydride reorientation. Thus this part of the study emphasized the time-dependent nature of the process, studying large volume of hydrides in the material. In addition, a micro-diffraction technique was also used to study the spatial distribution of hydrides near stress concentrations. This part of the study emphasized the spatial variation of hydride characteristics such as strain and morphology. Hydrided samples in the shape of tensile dog-bones were used in the time-dependent part of the study. Compact tension specimens were used during the spatial dependence part of the study. The hydride elastic strains from peak shift and size and strain broadening were studied as a function of time for precipitating hydrides. The hydrides precipitate in a very compressed state of stress, as measured by the shift in lattice spacing. As precipitation proceeds the average shift decreases, indicating average stress is reduced, likely due to plastic deformation and morphology changes. When nucleation ends the hydrides follow the zirconium matrix thermal contraction. When stress is applied below the threshold stress for reorientation, hydrides first nucleate in a very compressed state similar to that of unstressed hydrides. After reducing the average strain similarly to unstressed hydrides, the average hydride strain reaches a constant value during cool-down to room temperature. This could be due to a greater ease of deforming the matrix due to the applied far-field strain which would compensate for the strains due to thermal contraction. Finally when hydrides reorient, the average hydride strains become tensile during the first precipitation regime and

  13. Aluminum Fixed Point: Impact of the Time Spent in the Liquid Phase on the Liquid-Solid Transition and Obviousness of the Pollution of the Ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaot, E.; Martin, C.

    2011-08-01

    In order to improve the uncertainty on the aluminum fixed point, a study was launched by Laboratoire Commun de Métrologie LNE-CNAM in the frame of the EURAMET Project 732 "Toward more accurate temperature fixed points" (coordinating laboratory: France, 17 partner countries). An earlier study completed in this laboratory showed that in regular realization of the melting-freezing plateaus, there is no diffusion of impurities in the thickness of the ingot, or the diffusion is excessively slow and cannot allow a uniform distribution of the impurities. On the other hand, it is frequently noticed that the experimental conditions before the freezing plateau have an impact on its characteristics (value, slope,…). Up to now, no systematic study was performed on the influence of this parameter. So, the objective of the task started recently in this laboratory is to investigate the influence of the time spent in the liquid phase on the phase transition. As a final result, it is demonstrated that in order to reach the equilibrium of the concentration of impurities, it is necessary to ensure that the metal remains in the liquid phase at least 24 h before initiating the freeze. At the end of the process, the aluminum ingot was chemically analyzed. The analyses reveal large contaminations of the surface of the ingot (sodium, sulfur, and phosphorus). One of the important outputs of this study is that the conditions of usage of the cells should be given important attention since large contaminations can be brought by the furnace.

  14. The Effect of Nanosized Pb Liquid Phase on the Damping Behavior in Aluminum Matrix Composite Based on the 2024Al-BaPbO3 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, G. H.; Geng, L.; Wu, H.; Zheng, Z. Z.; Meng, Q. C.

    2016-03-01

    An aluminum matrix composite containing nanosized Pb particles was fabricated by a powder metallurgy technique based on the 2024Al-BaPbO3 system. The composite exhibited a high and broad damping peak at the melting temperature range of nanosized Pb particles. The increase in value and breadth of the damping peak was attributed to the dislocation damping of the interfacial matrix close to the nanosized Pb liquid phase. The damping peak is expected to be enhanced by further refining the Pb particle size.

  15. Dissolution and Separation of Aluminum and Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Mattus, Catherine H.

    2015-12-19

    The selection of an aluminum alloy for target irradiation affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the dissolver, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. Aluminosilicate dissolution presents challenges in a number of different areas, metals extraction from minerals, flyash treatment, and separations from aluminum alloys. We present experimental work that attempts to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as a function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. Our data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.

  16. Dissolution and Separation of Aluminum and Aluminosilicates

    DOE PAGES

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Mattus, Catherine H.

    2015-12-19

    The selection of an aluminum alloy for target irradiation affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the dissolver, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. Aluminosilicate dissolution presents challenges in a number of different areas, metals extraction from minerals, flyash treatment, and separations from aluminum alloys. We present experimental work that attempts to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as amore » function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. Our data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.« less

  17. Erbium hydride thermal desorption : controlling kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2007-08-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report show that hydride film processing parameters directly impact thermal stability. Issues to be addressed include desorption kinetics for dihydrides and trihydrides, and the effect of film growth parameters, loading parameters, and substrate selection on desorption kinetics.

  18. Development of a rapid and sensitive method for the determination of aluminum by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography using a fluorescence detector.

    PubMed

    Heena; Kumar, Rajesh; Rani, Susheela; Malik, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This study represents a new analytical high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detector method for the determination of Al(III) as Al(III) complex with 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid in a tap water sample and a coke sample. A micellar liquid chromatographic method is proposed for the determination of aluminum metal in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, a cationic surfactant (0.05 M) used for the solubilization of the aluminum complex. The influence of pH and ligand concentration on the formation of the complex was studied by adding a small amount of 0.1 M sodium hydroxide. The metal chelate was detected at λEx 410 nm and λEm 510 nm. This method eliminates the need for addition of reagent or organic modifier to the mobile phase. The complex was analyzed using an Ascentis Express C18 column and a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile, methanol and water (55 : 30 : 15). Under the optimized conditions, the linear range was 1-200 µg L(-1) and the limit of detection was 0.05 µg L(-1). The method showed a good detector response over the range of interest and was successfully applied for the determination of trace Al(III) in canned coke and water samples containing excess of Mg(II), Ca(II) and other matrices.

  19. Zirconium hydride containing explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds which when subjected to an energy fluence of 1000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less is capable of releasing free radicals each having a molecular weight between 1 and 120. Exemplary donor additives are dibasic acids, polyamines and metal hydrides.

  20. Draft of M2 Report on Integration of the Hybrid Hydride Model into INL's MBM Framework for Review

    SciTech Connect

    Tikare, Veena; Weck, Philippe F.; Schultz, Peter A.; Clark, Blythe; Glazoff, Michael; Homer, Eric

    2014-07-01

    This report documents the development, demonstration and validation of a mesoscale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} precipitation in the cladding of used nuclear fuels that may occur during long-term dry storage. While the Zr-based claddings are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service, in the reactor by a process commonly termed ‘hydrogen pick-up’. The precipitation and growth of zirconium hydrides during dry storage is one of the most likely fuel rod integrity failure mechanisms either by embrittlement or delayed hydride cracking of the cladding. While the phenomenon is well documented and identified as a potential key failure mechanism during long-term dry storage (NUREG/CR-7116), the ability to actually predict the formation of hydrides is poor. The model being documented in this work is a computational capability for the prediction of hydride formation in different claddings of used nuclear fuels. This work supports the Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign in assessing the structural engineering performance of the cladding during and after long-term dry storage. This document demonstrates a basic hydride precipitation model that is built on a recently developed hybrid Potts-phase field model that combines elements of Potts-Monte Carlo and the phase-field models. The model capabilities are demonstrated along with the incorporation of the starting microstructure, thermodynamics of the Zr-H system and the hydride formation mechanism.

  1. Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Niemann, Michael U.; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2012-04-10

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  2. Cyclopentadiene-mediated hydride transfer from rhodium complexes.

    PubMed

    Pitman, C L; Finster, O N L; Miller, A J M

    2016-07-12

    Attempts to generate a proposed rhodium hydride catalytic intermediate instead resulted in isolation of (Cp*H)Rh(bpy)Cl (1), a pentamethylcyclopentadiene complex, formed by C-H bond-forming reductive elimination from the fleeting rhodium hydride. The hydride transfer ability of diene 1 was explored through thermochemistry and hydride transfer reactions, including the reduction of NAD(+). PMID:26949917

  3. A study of environmental characterization of conventional and advanced aluminum alloys for selection and design. Phase 1: Literature review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprowls, D. O.

    1984-01-01

    A review of the literature is presented with the objectives of identifying relationships between various accelerated stress corrosion testing techniques, and for determining the combination of test methods best suited to selection and design of high strength aluminum alloys. The following areas are reviewed: status of stress-corrosion test standards, the influence of mechanical and environmental factors on stress corrosion testing, correlation of accelerated test data with in-service experience, and procedures used to avoid stress corrosion problems in service. Promising areas for further work are identified.

  4. Gas-Phase Partial Oxidation of Lignin to Carboxylic Acids over Vanadium Pyrophosphate and Aluminum-Vanadium-Molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Samira; Boffito, Daria C; Patience, Gregory S

    2015-10-26

    Lignin is a complex polymer that is a potential feedstock for aromatic compounds and carboxylic acids by cleaving the β-O-4 and 5-5' linkages. In this work, a syringe pump atomizes an alkaline solution of lignin into a catalytic fluidized bed operating above 600 K. The vanadium heterogeneous catalysts convert all the lignin into carboxylic acids (up to 25 % selectivity), coke, carbon oxides, and hydrogen. Aluminum-vanadium-molybdenum mostly produced lactic acid (together with formic acid, acrylic acid, and maleic anhydride), whereas the vanadium pyrophosphate catalyst produced more maleic anhydride.

  5. Synthesis of super-dense phase of aluminum under extreme pressure and temperature conditions created by femtosecond laser pulses in sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Mizeikis, Vygantas; Vailionis, Arturas; Gamaly, Eugene G.; Yang, Wenge; Rode, Andrei V.; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2012-06-26

    We describe synthesis of a new super-dense phase of aluminum under extreme pressure and temperature conditions created by laser-induced microexplosions in sapphire. Micro explosions in sub-micrometer sized regions of sapphire were induced by tightly-focused femtosecond laser pulses with a temporal length of {approx} 100 fs and an energy of {approx} 100 nJ. Fast, explosive expansion of photogenerated high-density plasma created strong heating and pressure transients with peak temperature and pressure of {approx} 105 K and 10 TPa, respectively. Partial decomposition of sapphire in the shock-compressed sapphire led to formation of nanocrystalline bcc-Al phase, which is different from ambient fcc-Al phase, and was permanently preserved by fast quenching. The existence of super-dense bcc-Al phase was confirmed using X-ray diffraction technique. This is the first observation of bcc-Al phase, which so far has been only predicted theoretically, and a demonstration that laser-induced micro explosions technique enables simple, safe and cost-efficient access to extreme pressures and temperatures without the tediousness typical to traditional techniques that use diamond anvil cells, gas guns, explosives, or megajoule-class lasers.

  6. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Aymard, Luc; Oumellal, Yassine; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH) with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g(-1) at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li(+)/Li(0)) and the lowest electrode polarization (<0.2 V) for conversion materials. Conversion process reaction mechanisms with lithium are subsequently detailed for MgH2, TiH2, complex hydrides Mg2MH x and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MH x + xLi(+) + xe(-) in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths-involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content-were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to

  7. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Oumellal, Yassine; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Summary The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH) with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g−1 at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li+/Li0) and the lowest electrode polarization (<0.2 V) for conversion materials. Conversion process reaction mechanisms with lithium are subsequently detailed for MgH2, TiH2, complex hydrides Mg2MHx and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MHx + xLi+ + xe− in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths—involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content—were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to

  8. Studies of gas phase reactions, nucleation and growth mechanisms of plasma promoted chemical vapor deposition of aluminum using dimethylethylamine alane as source percursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Andreas H.

    The work presented herein focuses on the use of plasma promoted chemical vapor deposition (PPCVD) of aluminum (Al) using dimethylethylamine alane (DMEAA) as source precursor to provide an integrated, low temperature alternative to currently employed Al deposition methods in ultra large sale integration ULSI multilevel metal wiring schemes. In this respect, key findings are reported and discussed from critical scientific and technical aspects of an research and development effort, which was successfully executed to identify a viable Al CVD deposition process. In this respect, advanced atomic scale analytical techniques were successfully employed to characterize the PPCVD deposition process at the molecular level, and document the dependence of film's structural and compositional properties on key process parameters. This led to the development and optimization of a PPCVD Al process for ULSI applications. In addition, gas phase quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was employed to study the gas phase evolution during TCVD and PPCVD in order to gain a thorough understanding of the potential chemical and physical reactions that could occur in the gas phase and derive corresponding optimized reaction pathways for both CVD processes. Key reaction mechanisms involved in thermal and plasma promoted CVD as a function of processing parameters were investigated, including the role of hydrogen plasma in providing an efficient pathway to aluminum nucleation and growth. The resulting reaction mechanisms were then employed to identify the most likely precursor decomposition pathways and explore relevant implications for thermal and plasma promoted CVD Al. Furthermore, the nucleation and growth of Al in both TCVD and PPCVD were thoroughly characterized. Time evolution studies were carried out employing a variety of relevant liners and seed layers under selected surface chemical states. The surface morphology of the resulting films were analyzed by means of scanning probe microscopy

  9. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R.; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-01-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0 ∼ 300 GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n = 2–4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6 K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1 K at 81 GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2. PMID:26626579

  10. Hydride heat pump with heat regenerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative hydride heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system. A series of at least four canisters containing a lower temperature performing hydride and a series of at least four canisters containing a higher temperature performing hydride is provided. Each canister contains a heat conductive passageway through which a heat transfer fluid is circulated so that sensible heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  11. Chemical trend of pressure-induced metallization in alkaline earth hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sijia; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2010-09-02

    The pressure-induced metallization of alkaline earth hydrides was systematically investigated using ab initio methods. While BeH{sub 2} and MgH{sub 2} present different semimetallic phases, CaH{sub 2}, SrH{sub 2}, and BaH{sub 2} share the same metallic phase (P6/mmm). The metallization pressure shows an attractive decrease with each increment of metal radius, and this trend is well correlated with both the electronegativity of alkaline earth metals and the band gap of alkaline earth hydrides at ambient pressure. Our results are consistent with current experimental data, and the obtained trend has significant implications for designing and engineering metallic hydrides for energy applications.

  12. Study of mechanical joint strength of aluminum alloy 7075-T6 and dual phase steel 980 welded by friction bit joining and weld-bonding under corrosion medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu; Miles, Michael; Song, Guang-Ling; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-30

    We have employed a unique solid-sate joining process, called friction bit joining (FBJ), to spot weld aluminum alloy (AA) 7075-T6 and dual phase (DP) 980 steel. Static joint strength was studied in the lap shear tension configuration. In addition, weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) joints were studied in order to evaluate the ability of adhesive to mitigate the impact of corrosion on joint properties. Accelerated laboratory cyclic corrosion tests were carried out for both FBJ only and weld-bonding joints. Furthermore, the FBJ only joints that emerged from corrosion testing had lap shear failure loads that were significantly lower than freshly prepared joints. However, weld-bonding specimens retained more than 80% of the lap shear failure load of the freshly prepared weld-bonding specimens. Moreover, examination of joint cross sections confirmed that the presence of adhesive in the weld-bonding joints mitigated the effect of the corrosion environment, compared to FBJ only joints.

  13. Effect of aluminum alloying on the structure, the phase composition, and the thermoelastic martensitic transformations in ternary Ni-Mn-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belosludtseva, E. S.; Kuranova, N. N.; Kourov, N. I.; Pushin, V. G.; Stukalov, V. Yu.; Uksusnikov, A. N.

    2015-07-01

    The properties, the martensitic transformation, and the structure of Ni50Mn50 - x Al x ( x = 5, 10, 18, 20, 22, 24, 25) alloys are studied by electrical resistivity measurements, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction over wide temperature and composition ranges. It is found that, as the aluminum content increases, the martensite transformation temperature decreases significantly and the structure of martensite changes. Complex multilayer (10 M, 14 M) martensite phases are detected in the ternary alloys. Martensite is shown to have a predominant morphology in the form of hierarchic packets of thin coherent plates of nanoand submicrocrystalline crystallites, which have plane habit boundaries close to {110} B2 and are pairwise twinned along one of the 24 equivalent systems of twinning shear.

  14. Aluminum Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents three problems based on the price of aluminum designed to encourage students to be cooperative and to use an investigative approach to learning. Students collect and synthesize information, analyze results, and draw conclusions. (AIM)

  15. Formation and superconductivity of hydrides under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duck Young; Scheicher, Ralph H.; Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2011-03-01

    Hydrogen is the lightest and smallest element in the periodic table. Despite its simplest electronic structure, enormous complexity can arise when hydrogen participates in the formation of solids. Pressure as a controllable parameter can provide an excellent platform to investigate novel physics of hydrides because it can induce structural transformation and even changes in stoichiometry accompanied with phenomena such as metallization and superconductivity. In this presentation, we will briefly overview contemporary high-pressure research on hydrides and show our most recent results on predicting crystal structures of metal hydrides under pressure using ab initio random structure searching. Our findings allow for a better understanding of pressure-induced metallization/superconductivity in hydrides which can help to shed light on recent observations of pressure-induced metallization and superconductivity in hydrogen-rich materials. Wenner-Gren Foundations and VR in Sweden, The Royal Society in UK.

  16. Sealed aerospace metal-hydride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine

    1992-01-01

    Nickel metal hydride and silver metal hydride batteries are being developed for aerospace applications. There is a growing market for smaller, lower cost satellites which require higher energy density power sources than aerospace nickel-cadmium at a lower cost than space nickel-hydrogen. These include small LEO satellites, tactical military satellites and satellite constellation programs such as Iridium and Brilliant Pebbles. Small satellites typically do not have the spacecraft volume or the budget required for nickel-hydrogen batteries. NiCd's do not have adequate energy density as well as other problems such as overcharge capability and memory effort. Metal hydride batteries provide the ideal solution for these applications. Metal hydride batteries offer a number of advantages over other aerospace battery systems.

  17. Method of forming metal hydride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The substrate to be coated (which may be of metal, glass or the like) is cleaned, both chemically and by off-sputtering in a vacuum chamber. In an ultra-high vacuum system, vapor deposition by a sublimator or vaporizer coats a cooled shroud disposed around the substrate with a thin film of hydride forming metal which getters any contaminant gas molecules. A shutter is then opened to allow hydride forming metal to be deposited as a film or coating on the substrate. After the hydride forming metal coating is formed, deuterium or other hydrogen isotopes are bled into the vacuum system and diffused into the metal film or coating to form a hydride of metal film. Higher substrate temperatures and pressures may be used if various parameters are appropriately adjusted.

  18. A classical but new kinetic equation for hydride transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Deng, Fei-Huang; Yang, Jin-Dong; Li, Xiu-Tao; Chen, Qiang; Lei, Nan-Ping; Meng, Fan-Kun; Zhao, Xiao-Peng; Han, Su-Hui; Hao, Er-Jun; Mu, Yuan-Yuan

    2013-09-28

    A classical but new kinetic equation to estimate activation energies of various hydride transfer reactions was developed according to transition state theory using the Morse-type free energy curves of hydride donors to release a hydride anion and hydride acceptors to capture a hydride anion and by which the activation energies of 187 typical hydride self-exchange reactions and more than thirty thousand hydride cross transfer reactions in acetonitrile were safely estimated in this work. Since the development of the kinetic equation is only on the basis of the related chemical bond changes of the hydride transfer reactants, the kinetic equation should be also suitable for proton transfer reactions, hydrogen atom transfer reactions and all the other chemical reactions involved with breaking and formation of chemical bonds. One of the most important contributions of this work is to have achieved the perfect unity of the kinetic equation and thermodynamic equation for hydride transfer reactions.

  19. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AA1235 Aluminum Foil Stocks Produced Directly from Electrolytic Aluminum Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanqing; Yu, Kun; Wen, Li; Yao, Sujuan; Dai, Yilong; Wang, Zhifeng

    2016-02-01

    A new process is developed to obtain high-quality AA1235 aluminum foil stocks and to replace the traditional manufacture process. During the new manufacture process, AA1235 aluminum sheets are twin-roll casted directly through electrolytic aluminum melt (EAM), and subsequently the sheets are processed into aluminum foil stocks by cold rolling and annealing. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the AA1235 aluminum sheets produced through such new process are investigated in each state by optimal microscope, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, orientation imaging microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, etc. The results show that compared with the traditional AA1235 aluminum foil stocks produced through re-melted aluminum melt (RAM), the amount of impurities is decreased in the EAM aluminum foil stocks. The EAM aluminum foil stock obtains less β-FeSiAl5 phases, but more α-Fe2SiAl8 phases. The elongation of EAM aluminum foil stocks is improved significantly owing to more cubic orientation. Especially, the elongation value of the EAM aluminum foil stocks is approximately 25 pct higher than that of the RAM aluminum foil stocks. As a result, the EAM aluminum foil stocks are at an advantage in increasing the processing performance for the aluminum foils during subsequent processes.

  20. Metastable Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    DOE PAGES

    Graetz, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of using hydrogen as a reliable energy carrier for both stationary and mobile applications has gained renewed interest in recent years due to improvements in high temperature fuel cells and a reduction in hydrogen production costs. However, a number of challenges remain and new media are needed that are capable of safely storing hydrogen with high gravimetric and volumetric densities. Metal hydrides and complex metal hydrides offer some hope of overcoming these challenges; however, many of the high capacity “reversible” hydrides exhibit a large endothermic decomposition enthalpy making it difficult to release the hydrogen at low temperatures. Onmore » the other hand, the metastable hydrides are characterized by a low reaction enthalpy and a decomposition reaction that is thermodynamically favorable under ambient conditions. The rapid, low temperature hydrogen evolution rates that can be achieved with these materials offer much promise for mobile PEM fuel cell applications. However, a critical challenge exists to develop new methods to regenerate these hydrides directly from the reactants and hydrogen gas. This spotlight paper presents an overview of some of the metastable metal hydrides for hydrogen storage and a few new approaches being investigated to address the key challenges associated with these materials.« less

  1. Zinc-Bismuth and Aluminum-Indium Monotectic Alloy-Based Fixed-Point Cells with Double Phase Transition for In Situ Calibration of Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Dave; Kodwani, Darsh

    2015-11-01

    Re-calibration of a thermocouple after it has been installed in a process is often not practical. In situ monitoring of performance is desirable and can be done with built-in reference standards based on melting or freezing phase transitions. Binary alloys with a monotectic reaction frequently have two invariant melt/freeze phase transitions taking place in the same material over a range of compositions. This makes them potentially well suited to be in situ temperature calibration artifacts, enabling correction for thermocouple drift without the need to disturb the thermocouple. A zinc-bismuth fixed-point cell was constructed and has been shown to be stable with two well-defined melting plateaus at nominally 255°C and 415°C. Two miniature fixed-point cells (each designed to be permanently installed with a thermocouple) based on zinc-bismuth and aluminum-indium alloys were made. Measurements have shown that the phase transitions can be identified despite the small quantity of metals used and that the alloys were sufficiently stable to have the potential to provide improved long-term confidence in process control and monitoring.

  2. Metastable phases in the aluminum-germanium alloy system: Synthesis by mechanical alloying and pressure induced transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Yvon, P.

    1994-01-01

    Al and Ge form a simple equilibrium eutectic with limited mutual solubility and no intermetallic intermediate phases. We used a regular solution approach to model effects of pressure on Al-Ge. Effects of pressure are to extend solubility of Ge in Al, to displace the eutectic composition towards the Ge rich side, and to slightly decrease the eutectic temperature. We designed thermobaric treatments to induce crystal-to-glass transformations in fine grain mixtures of Al and Ge. We used Merrill-Bassett diamond anvil cells to perform experiments at high pressures. We built an x-ray apparatus to determine the structure of alloys at pressure and from cryogenic temperatures to 400C. Two-phase Al-Ge samples with fine microstructures were prepared by splat-quenching and mechanical alloying. We observed a crystal-to-glass transformation at about 80 kbar. The amorphous phase formed was metastable at ambient temperature after pressure release. This was confirmed by TEM. The amorphous phase obtained by pressurization was found to have a liquid-like structure and was metallic. In the TEM samples we also observed the presence of a second amorphous phase formed upon release of the pressure. This second phase had a tetrahedrally-bonded continuous random network structure, similar to that of semi-conducting amorphous germanium.

  3. Hydride formation thermodynamics and hysteresis in individual Pd nanocrystals with different size and shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syrenova, Svetlana; Wadell, Carl; Nugroho, Ferry A. A.; Gschneidtner, Tina A.; Diaz Fernandez, Yuri A.; Nalin, Giammarco; Świtlik, Dominika; Westerlund, Fredrik; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Zhdanov, Vladimir P.; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles may depend on their size and shape and are traditionally assessed in ensemble-level experiments, which accordingly may be plagued by averaging effects. These effects can be eliminated in single-nanoparticle experiments. Using plasmonic nanospectroscopy, we present a comprehensive study of hydride formation thermodynamics in individual Pd nanocrystals of different size and shape, and find corresponding enthalpies and entropies to be nearly size- and shape-independent. The hysteresis observed is significantly wider than in bulk, with details depending on the specifics of individual nanoparticles. Generally, the absorption branch of the hysteresis loop is size-dependent in the sub-30 nm regime, whereas desorption is size- and shape-independent. The former is consistent with a coherent phase transition during hydride formation, influenced kinetically by the specifics of nucleation, whereas the latter implies that hydride decomposition either occurs incoherently or via different kinetic pathways.

  4. Raman Spectroscopy as a Probe of Surface Oxides and Hydrides on Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    J. Zasadzinski, B. Albee, S. Bishnoi, C. Cao, G. Ciovati, L.D. Cooley, D.C. Ford, Th. Proslier

    2011-07-01

    Raman microscopy/spectroscopy has been used in conjunction with AFM, tunneling and magnetic susceptibility to identify surface oxides and hydrides on annealed, recrystallized foils of high purity Nb and on single crystals of cavity grade Nb. Cold worked regions of the Nb foil as well as rough regions near grain boundaries showed clear evidence of ordered hydride phases which were identified by VASP phonon calculations. Cold worked regions also displayed enhanced surface paramagnetism. Surface enhanced Raman spectra have also been obtained using 1.0 nm Au depositon. The SERS spectra reveal hydride molecular species which are not observable by conventional Raman. These results indicate that Raman is a useful probe of Nb surfaces relevant for cavity performance

  5. Anomalies in vibrational spectra of hydrides of the VA group elements in the condensed state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabiev, Shavkat S.; Sennikov, Petr G.

    2000-12-01

    The results of a study of vibrational spectra of volatile hydrides of the VA group elements of periods 2 - 4 in the liquid state and in solutions of liquefied noble gases have been generalized and analyzed over wide frequency and temperature ranges. A number of anomalies have been revealed in the spectra of these hydrides that manifest themselves through an unusual behavior of band intensities of basic, composite vibrations and overtones on a transition from the gas phase to the condensed state, and dependences of spectroscopic and dynamic parameters as well as a non- coincidence of the line maxima in isotropic and anisotropic Raman spectra ((delta) v equals vaniso-viso) on the temperature of liquid hydrides. Mechanisms of intermolecular interactions in these liquids are discussed with the use of the as-obtained data on the intensity, frequency and shape of vibrational band contours.

  6. Hydride formation thermodynamics and hysteresis in individual Pd nanocrystals with different size and shape.

    PubMed

    Syrenova, Svetlana; Wadell, Carl; Nugroho, Ferry A A; Gschneidtner, Tina A; Diaz Fernandez, Yuri A; Nalin, Giammarco; Świtlik, Dominika; Westerlund, Fredrik; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles may depend on their size and shape and are traditionally assessed in ensemble-level experiments, which accordingly may be plagued by averaging effects. These effects can be eliminated in single-nanoparticle experiments. Using plasmonic nanospectroscopy, we present a comprehensive study of hydride formation thermodynamics in individual Pd nanocrystals of different size and shape, and find corresponding enthalpies and entropies to be nearly size- and shape-independent. The hysteresis observed is significantly wider than in bulk, with details depending on the specifics of individual nanoparticles. Generally, the absorption branch of the hysteresis loop is size-dependent in the sub-30 nm regime, whereas desorption is size- and shape-independent. The former is consistent with a coherent phase transition during hydride formation, influenced kinetically by the specifics of nucleation, whereas the latter implies that hydride decomposition either occurs incoherently or via different kinetic pathways.

  7. Phase-dependent interference between frequency doubled comb lines in a χ(2) phase-matched aluminum nitride microring.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hojoong; Guo, Xiang; Zhu, Na; Papp, Scott B; Diddams, Scott A; Tang, Hong X

    2016-08-15

    Nonlinear optical conversion with frequency combs is important for self-referencing and for generating shorter wavelength combs. Here we demonstrate efficient frequency comb doubling through the combination of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) of an input comb with a high Q, phase-matched χ(2) microring resonator. Phase coherence of the SHG and SFG nonlinear conversion processes is confirmed by sinusoidal phase-dependent interference between frequency doubled comb lines.

  8. Silico-ferrite of Calcium and Aluminum (SFCA) Iron Ore Sinter Bonding Phases: New Insights into Their Formation During Heating and Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2012-12-01

    The formation of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter phases during heating and cooling of synthetic iron ore sinter mixtures in the range 298 K to 1623 K (25 °C to 1350 °C) and at oxygen partial pressure of 5 × 10-3 atm has been characterized using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. SFCA and SFCA-I are the key bonding phases in iron ore sinter, and an improved understanding of their formation mechanisms may lead to improved efficiency of industrial sintering processes. During heating, SFCA-I formation at 1327 K to 1392 K (1054 °C to 1119 °C) (depending on composition) was associated with the reaction of Fe2O3, 2CaO·Fe2O3, and SiO2. SFCA formation (1380 K to 1437 K [1107 °C to 1164 °C]) was associated with the reaction of CaO·Fe2O3, SiO2, and a phase with average composition 49.60, 9.09, 0.14, 7.93, and 32.15 wt pct Fe, Ca, Si, Al, and O, respectively. Increasing Al2O3 concentration in the starting sinter mixture increased the temperature range over which SFCA-I was stable before the formation of SFCA, and it stabilized SFCA to a higher temperature before it melted to form a Fe3O4 + melt phase assemblage (1486 K to 1581 K [1213 °C to 1308 °C]). During cooling, the first phase to crystallize from the melt (1452 K to 1561 K [1179 °C to 1288 °C]) was an Fe-rich phase, similar in composition to SFCA-I, and it had an average composition 58.88, 6.89, 0.82, 3.00, and 31.68 wt pct Fe, Ca, Si, Al, and O, respectively. At lower temperatures (1418 K to 1543 K [1145 °C to 1270 °C]), this phase reacted with melt to form SFCA. Increasing Al2O3 increased the temperature at which crystallization of the Fe-rich phase occurred, increased the temperature at which crystallization of SFCA occurred, and suppressed the formation of Fe2O3 (1358 K to 1418 K [1085 °C to 1145 °C]) to lower temperatures.

  9. Technical Status Report on the Effect of Phosphate and Aluminum on the Development of Amorphous Phase Separation in Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A.D.

    1998-11-03

    The objective of the Tank Focus Area ''Optimize Waste Loading'' task is to enhance the definition of the acceptable processing window for high-level waste vitrification plants. One possible manner in which the acceptable processing window may be enhanced is by reducing the uncertainty of various compositional/property models through a specifically defined experimental plan. A reduction in model uncertainty can reduce limitations on current acceptance constraints and may allow for a larger processing or operational window. Enhanced composition/property model predictions coupled with an increased waste loading may decrease the processing time and waste glass disposal costs (i.e., overall lifecycle costs). One of the compositional/property models currently being evaluated by the Tanks Focus Area is related to the development of amorphous phase separation in multi-component borosilicate glasses.Described in this report is the current status for evaluating the effect of phosphorus and alumina on both simple sodium borosilicate and high-level waste glasses on the formation of amorphous phase separation. The goal of this subtask is to increase the understanding of the formation of phase separation by adding significant amounts (3-5 wt. percent) of phosphorus and alumina to well-characterized glasses. Additional scope includes evaluating the effects of thermal history on the formation of amorphous phase separation and durability of select glasses.The development of data, understanding, and quantitative description for composition and kinetic effects on the development of amorphous phase separation will continue in FY99. This effort will provide insight into the compositional and thermal effects on phase stability and will lead to a better understanding of the methods used to predict the development of amorphous phase separation in HLW glasses.

  10. Thin-film metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The goal of the medieval alchemist, the chemical transformation of common metals into nobel metals, will forever be a dream. However, key characteristics of metals, such as their electronic band structure and, consequently, their electric, magnetic and optical properties, can be tailored by controlled hydrogen doping. Due to their morphology and well-defined geometry with flat, coplanar surfaces/interfaces, novel phenomena may be observed in thin films. Prominent examples are the eye-catching hydrogen switchable mirror effect, the visualization of solid-state diffusion and the formation of complex surface morphologies. Thin films do not suffer as much from embrittlement and/or decrepitation as bulk materials, allowing the study of cyclic absorption and desorption. Therefore, thin-metal hydride films are used as model systems to study metal-insulator transitions, for high throughput combinatorial research or they may be used as indicator layers to study hydrogen diffusion. They can be found in technological applications as hydrogen sensors, in electrochromic and thermochromic devices. In this review, we discuss the effect of hydrogen loading of thin niobium and yttrium films as archetypical examples of a transition metal and a rare earth metal, respectively. Our focus thereby lies on the hydrogen induced changes of the electronic structure and the morphology of the thin films, their optical properties, the visualization and the control of hydrogen diffusion and on the study of surface phenomena and catalysis.

  11. The study of aluminum loss and consequent phase transformation in heat-treated acid-leached kaolin

    SciTech Connect

    Foo, Choo Thye; Mahmood, Che Seman; Mohd Salleh, Mohamad Amran

    2011-04-15

    This study investigates the effect of Al leaching during Fe removal from kaolin to mullite. Heat-treated kaolin was obtained by heating natural kaolin at 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 and 900 deg. C. The heat-treated kaolin was then leached at 100 deg. C with 4 M, 3 M, 2 M, 1 M, 0.2 M solution of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 0.2 M solution of oxalic acid. The dried samples were sintered to 1300 deg. C for 4 h at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min{sup -1}. X-ray diffractometry and differential thermal analysis were used to study the phase transformation of kaolin to mullite. It was found that 700 deg. C is the optimum preheat-treatment temperature to leach out Fe and also Al for both types of the acids used. The majority of the 4 M sulfuric acid-treated kaolins formed the cristobalite phase when sintered. On the other hand, 1 M, 0.2 M sulfuric acid and 0.2 M oxalic acid leached heat-treated kaolin formed mullite and quartz phase after sintering. - Research Highlights: {yields} Preheat-treatment of kaolin improves the leachability of unwanted iron. {yields} The optimum preheat-treatment temperature is 700 deg. C. {yields} Sintered 4 M sulfuric acid-treated kaolin majorly formed the cristobalite phase. {yields} Sintered 0.2 M oxalic acid-treated kaolin formed lesser amorphous silicate phase.

  12. The potential pyrophoricity of BMI-SPEC and aluminum plate spent fuels retrieved from underwater storage

    SciTech Connect

    Ebner, M.A.

    1996-08-01

    Physical/chemical factors in U metal and hydride combustion, particularly pyrophoricity in ambient environment, were evaluated for BMI-SPEC and UAl{sub x} plate fuels. Some metal fuels may be highly reactive (spontaneously igniting in air) due to high specific surface area, high decay heat, or a high U hydride content from corrosion during underwater storage. However, for the BMI-SPEC and the aluminum plate fuels, this reactivity is too low to present a realistic threat of uncontrolled spontaneous combustion at ambient conditions. While residual U hydride is expected in these corroded fuels, the hydride levels are expected to be too low and the configuration too unfavorable to ignite the fuel meat when the fuels are retrieved from the basin and dried. Furthermore the composition and microstructure of the UAl{sub x} fuels further mitigate that risk.

  13. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don; Harmon, Laurel

    2011-02-14

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 LiAlH4Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the

  14. Can hydridic-to-protonic hydrogen bonds catalyze hydride transfers in biological systems?

    PubMed

    Marincean, Simona; Jackson, James E

    2010-12-30

    Catalysis of hydride transfer by hydridic-to-protonic hydrogen (HHH) bonding in α-hydroxy carbonyl isomerization reactions was examined computationally in the lithium salts of 7-substituted endo-3-hydroxybicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-en-2-ones. The barrier for intramolecular hydride transfer in the parent system was calculated to be 17.2 kcal/mol. Traditional proton donors, such as OH and NH(3)(+), stabilized the metal cation-bridged transition state by 1.4 and 3.3 kcal/mol, respectively. Moreover, among the conformers of the OH systems, the one in which the proton donor is able to interact with the migrating hydride (H(m)) has an activation barrier lower by 1.3 and 1.7 kcal/mol than the other possible OH conformers. By contrast, the presence of an electronegative group such as F, which disfavors the migration electronically by opposing development of hydridic charge, destabilizes the hydride migration by 1.5 kcal/mol relative to the epimeric exo system. In both ground and transition states the H(m)···H distance decreased with increasing acidity of the proton donor, reaching a minimum of 1.58 Å at the transition state for NH(3)(+). Both Mulliken and NPA charges show enhancement of negative character of the migrating hydride in the cases in which HHH bonding is possible. PMID:21141894

  15. Aluminum phosphide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Aluminum phosphide ; CASRN 20859 - 73 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  16. Detection of first-order liquid/liquid phase transitions in yttrium oxide-aluminum oxide melts.

    PubMed

    Greaves, G N; Wilding, M C; Fearn, S; Langstaff, D; Kargl, F; Cox, S; Van, Q Vu; Majérus, O; Benmore, C J; Weber, R; Martin, C M; Hennet, L

    2008-10-24

    We combine small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) with aerodynamic levitation techniques to study in situ phase transitions in the liquid state under contactless conditions. At very high temperatures, yttria-alumina melts show a first-order transition, previously inferred from phase separation in quenched glasses. We show how the transition coincides with a narrow and reversible maximum in SAXS indicative of liquid unmixing on the nanoscale, combined with an abrupt realignment in WAXS features related to reversible shifts in polyhedral packing on the atomic scale. We also observed a rotary action in the suspended supercooled drop driven by repetitive transitions (a polyamorphic rotor) from which the reversible changes in molar volume (1.2 +/- 0.2 cubic centimeters) and entropy (19 +/- 4 joules mole(-1) kelvin(-1)) can be estimated. PMID:18948535

  17. A 100-kW three-phase ac plasma furnace for spheroidization of aluminum silicate particles

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, D.; Bonet, C.; Chauvin, G.; Geinaert, G.; Mathieu, A.C.; Millet, J.

    1981-06-01

    A 100-kW three-phase ac plasma furnace with sheathed copper electrodes (sheathing gas: air) is presented. It is used for spheroidizing ''chamotte'' (refractory-fired clay) particles having a smooth, pore-free surface. A simple, one-dimensional numerical model for the heat transfer to the particles explains the maximum processing rate and the detrimental influence of an inhomogeneous particle size distribution.

  18. 49 CFR 173.311 - Metal hydride storage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Metal hydride storage systems. 173.311 Section 173... systems. The following packing instruction is applicable to transportable UN Metal hydride storage systems... maximum developed pressure not exceeding 25 MPa. Metal hydride storage systems must be...

  19. Nanoscale studies of the early stages of phase separation in model nickel-aluminum-chromium-X superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth-Morrison, Christopher

    The phase separation of model Ni-Al-Cr-X alloys is studied at the nanoscale employing atom-probe tomography (APT), electron microscopy and first-principles calculations. A comparison of the kinetic pathways resulting from the formation of coherent gamma'-precipitates in two Ni-Al-Cr alloys, Ni-7.5 Al-8.5 Cr and Ni-5.2 Al-14.2 Cr at.%, with similar gamma'-precipitate volume fractions at 873 K, is performed. The morphologies of the gamma'-precipitates of the alloys are similar, though the degrees of gamma'-precipitate coagulation and coalescence differ. Quantification within the framework of classical nucleation theory reveals that differences in the chemical driving forces for phase decomposition result in differences in the nucleation behavior of the two alloys. The temporal evolution of the gamma'-precipitate average radii and the gamma-matrix supersaturations follow the predictions of classical coarsening models. The compositional trajectories of the gamma-matrix phases of the alloys are found to follow approximately the equilibrium tie-lines, while the trajectories of the gamma'-precipitates do not, resulting in significant differences in the partitioning ratios of the solute elements. Phase separation in a Ni-6.5 Al-9.5 Cr at.% alloy aged at 873 K occurs in four distinct regimes: (i) quasi-stationary-state gamma' (L12)-precipitate nucleation; (ii) concomitant precipitate nucleation, growth, and coagulation and coalescence; (iii) concurrent growth and coarsening, wherein coarsening occurs via both gamma'-precipitate coagulation and coalescence and by the classical evaporation-condensation mechanism; and (iv) quasi-stationary-state coarsening of gamma'-precipitates, once the equilibrium volume fraction of precipitates is achieved. The predictions of classical nucleation and growth models are not validated experimentally, likely due to the complexity of the atomistic kinetic pathways involved in precipitation. During coarsening, the temporal evolution of the gamma

  20. Mathematical modeling of the nickel/metal hydride battery system

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, B K

    1995-09-01

    A group of compounds referred to as metal hydrides, when used as electrode materials, is a less toxic alternative to the cadmium hydroxide electrode found in nickel/cadmium secondary battery systems. For this and other reasons, the nickel/metal hydride battery system is becoming a popular rechargeable battery for electric vehicle and consumer electronics applications. A model of this battery system is presented. Specifically the metal hydride material, LaNi{sub 5}H{sub 6}, is chosen for investigation due to the wealth of information available in the literature on this compound. The model results are compared to experiments found in the literature. Fundamental analyses as well as engineering optimizations are performed from the results of the battery model. In order to examine diffusion limitations in the nickel oxide electrode, a ``pseudo 2-D model`` is developed. This model allows for the theoretical examination of the effects of a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the state of charge of the active material. It is found using present data from the literature that diffusion in the solid phase is usually not an important limitation in the nickel oxide electrode. This finding is contrary to the conclusions reached by other authors. Although diffusion in the nickel oxide active material is treated rigorously with the pseudo 2-D model, a general methodology is presented for determining the best constant diffusion coefficient to use in a standard one-dimensional battery model. The diffusion coefficients determined by this method are shown to be able to partially capture the behavior that results from a diffusion coefficient that varies with the state of charge of the active material.

  1. Improvement in thallium hydride generation using iodide and Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Picón, David; Carrero, Pablo; Valero, Maribel; de Peña, Yaneira Petit; Gutiérrez, Luís

    2015-05-01

    A continuous flow hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (CF-HG-AAS) system was used to study the enhancement effect of different substances for conventional chemical HG of thallium. At room temperature, the acidified sample solution containing the respective enhancement reagent merged with the aqueous NaBH4 solution. The generated thallium hydride was stripped from the eluent solution by the addition of a nitrogen flow and thereafter the bulk phases were separated in a gas-liquid separator. The main factors under study were concentration and type of enhancement reagent (Te, iodide added as KI, Rhodamine B, malachite green and crystal violet) and acid (HCl, H2SO4 or HNO3). Other parameters affecting the thallium hydride generation, such as: NaBH4 concentration, carrier gas flow rate, length of reaction-mixing coil and reagents flow rates, were studied and optimized. Among the enhancement reagents tested, the combination of Rhodamine B and iodide produced the best results. A linear response was obtained between the detection limit (LOD (3σ)) of 1.5μg L(-1) and 1000μg L(-1). The RSD% (n=10) for a solution containing 15μg L(-1) of Tl was 2.9%. The recoveries of thallium in environmental water samples by spiking the samples with 10 and 20µg L(-1) of Tl were in the 97.0-102.5% range. The accuracy for Tl determination was further confirmed by the analysis of a water standard reference material (1643e form NIST, USA). Finally, it was demonstrated that malachite green and crystal violet showed similar enhancement effect like Rhodamine B for thallium HG.

  2. Improvement in thallium hydride generation using iodide and Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Picón, David; Carrero, Pablo; Valero, Maribel; de Peña, Yaneira Petit; Gutiérrez, Luís

    2015-05-01

    A continuous flow hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (CF-HG-AAS) system was used to study the enhancement effect of different substances for conventional chemical HG of thallium. At room temperature, the acidified sample solution containing the respective enhancement reagent merged with the aqueous NaBH4 solution. The generated thallium hydride was stripped from the eluent solution by the addition of a nitrogen flow and thereafter the bulk phases were separated in a gas-liquid separator. The main factors under study were concentration and type of enhancement reagent (Te, iodide added as KI, Rhodamine B, malachite green and crystal violet) and acid (HCl, H2SO4 or HNO3). Other parameters affecting the thallium hydride generation, such as: NaBH4 concentration, carrier gas flow rate, length of reaction-mixing coil and reagents flow rates, were studied and optimized. Among the enhancement reagents tested, the combination of Rhodamine B and iodide produced the best results. A linear response was obtained between the detection limit (LOD (3σ)) of 1.5μg L(-1) and 1000μg L(-1). The RSD% (n=10) for a solution containing 15μg L(-1) of Tl was 2.9%. The recoveries of thallium in environmental water samples by spiking the samples with 10 and 20µg L(-1) of Tl were in the 97.0-102.5% range. The accuracy for Tl determination was further confirmed by the analysis of a water standard reference material (1643e form NIST, USA). Finally, it was demonstrated that malachite green and crystal violet showed similar enhancement effect like Rhodamine B for thallium HG. PMID:25702995

  3. Decarbonization process for carbothermically produced aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Bruno, Marshall J.; Carkin, Gerald E.; DeYoung, David H.; Dunlap, Sr., Ronald M.

    2015-06-30

    A method of recovering aluminum is provided. An alloy melt having Al.sub.4C.sub.3 and aluminum is provided. This mixture is cooled and then a sufficient amount of a finely dispersed gas is added to the alloy melt at a temperature of about 700.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. The aluminum recovered is a decarbonized carbothermically produced aluminum where the step of adding a sufficient amount of the finely dispersed gas effects separation of the aluminum from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates by flotation, resulting in two phases with the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates being the upper layer and the decarbonized aluminum being the lower layer. The aluminum is then recovered from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates through decanting.

  4. Atomistic potentials for palladium-silver hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, L. M.; Wong, B. M.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Zhou, X. W.

    2013-06-01

    New embedded-atom method potentials for the ternary palladium-silver-hydrogen system are developed by extending a previously developed palladium-hydrogen potential. The ternary potentials accurately capture the heat of mixing and structural properties associated with solid solution alloys of palladium-silver. Stable hydrides are produced with properties that smoothly transition across the compositions. Additions of silver to palladium are predicted to alter the properties of the hydrides by decreasing the miscibility gap and increasing the likelihood of hydrogen atoms occupying tetrahedral interstitial sites over octahedral interstitial sites.

  5. Study of mechanical joint strength of aluminum alloy 7075-T6 and dual phase steel 980 welded by friction bit joining and weld-bonding under corrosion medium

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu; Miles, Michael; Song, Guang-Ling; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-30

    We have employed a unique solid-sate joining process, called friction bit joining (FBJ), to spot weld aluminum alloy (AA) 7075-T6 and dual phase (DP) 980 steel. Static joint strength was studied in the lap shear tension configuration. In addition, weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) joints were studied in order to evaluate the ability of adhesive to mitigate the impact of corrosion on joint properties. Accelerated laboratory cyclic corrosion tests were carried out for both FBJ only and weld-bonding joints. Furthermore, the FBJ only joints that emerged from corrosion testing had lap shear failure loads that were significantly lower than freshly preparedmore » joints. However, weld-bonding specimens retained more than 80% of the lap shear failure load of the freshly prepared weld-bonding specimens. Moreover, examination of joint cross sections confirmed that the presence of adhesive in the weld-bonding joints mitigated the effect of the corrosion environment, compared to FBJ only joints.« less

  6. Nickel-aluminum layered double hydroxide as a nanosorbent for selective solid-phase extraction and spectrofluorometric determination of salicylic acid in pharmaceutical and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Abdolmohammad-Zadeh, H; Kohansal, S; Sadeghi, G H

    2011-04-15

    The nickel-aluminum layered double hydroxide (Ni-Al LDH) was synthesized by a simple co-precipitation method and used as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbent for separation and pre-concentration of trace levels of salicylic acid (SA) from aqueous solutions. Extraction of analyte is based on the adsorption of salicylate ions on the Ni-Al (NO(3)(-)) LDH and/or their exchanging with LDH interlayer NO(3)(-) ions. The retained analyte on the LDH was stripped by 3 mol L(-1) NaOH solution and its concentration was subsequently determined spectrofluorometrically at λ(em)=400 nm with excitation at λ(ex)=270 nm. Various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of SA on the Ni-Al (NO(3)(-)) LDH, such as pH, amount of nano-sorbent, sample loading flow rate, elution conditions, sample volume and matrix effects were investigated. In the optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection (3s) and enrichment factor were 0.12 μg L(-1) and 40, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for six replicate determinations of 10 μg L(-1) SA was 2.3%. The calibration graph using the pre-concentration system was linear in the range of 0.3-45 μg L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9985. The optimized method was successfully applied to the determination of SA in blood serum, willow leaf and aspirin tablet.

  7. Vapor-phase polymerization of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) on commercial carbon coated aluminum foil as enhanced electrodes for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Linyue; Skorenko, Kenneth H.; Faucett, Austin C.; Boyer, Steven M.; Liu, Jian; Mativetsky, Jeffrey M.; Bernier, William E.; Jones, Wayne E.

    2015-11-01

    Laminar composite electrodes are prepared for application in supercapacitors using a catalyzed vapor-phase polymerization (VPP) of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) on the surface of commercial carbon coated aluminum foil. These highly electrically conducting polymer films provide for rapid and stable power storage per gram at room temperature. The chemical composition, surface morphology and electrical properties are characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and conducting atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). A series of electrical measurements including cyclic voltammetry (CV), charge-discharge (CD) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are also used to evaluate electrical performance. The processing temperature of VPP shows a significant effect on PEDOT morphology, the degree of orientation and its electrical properties. The relatively high temperature leads to high specific area and large conductive domains of PEDOT layer which benefits the capacitive behavior greatly according to the data presented. Since the substrate is already highly conductive, the PEDOT based composite can be used as electrode materials directly without adding current collector. By this simple and efficient process, PEDOT based composites exhibit specific capacitance up to 134 F g-1 with the polymerization temperature of 110 °C.

  8. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition

    DOEpatents

    Vandergrift, G.F. III; Krumpelt, M.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-10-08

    A process is described for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  9. 1. VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE HYDRIDE PROCESSING LABORATORY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE HYDRIDE PROCESSING LABORATORY. OPERATIONS IN THE GLOVE BOX IN THE BACKGROUND OF THE PHOTOGRAPH INCLUDED HYDRIDING OF PLUTONIUM AND HYDRIDE SEPARATION. IN THE FOREGROUND, THE VACUUM MONITOR CONTROL PANEL MEASURED TEMPERATURES WITHIN THE GLOVEBOX. THE CENTER CONTROL PANEL REGULATED THE FURNACE INSIDE THE GLOVE BOX USED IN THE HYDRIDING PROCESSES. THIS EQUIPMENT WAS ESSENTIAL TO THE HYDRIDING PROCESS, AS WELL AS OTHER GLOVE BOX OPERATIONS. - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Laboratory, North-central section of industrial area at 79 Drive, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  10. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan F.; Yu, Conrad

    2006-10-17

    Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

  11. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Jankowski, Alan F [Livermore, CA; Yu, Conrad [Antioch, CA

    2009-05-05

    Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

  12. Nickel-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxide Coating on the Surface of Conductive Substrates by Liquid Phase Deposition.

    PubMed

    Maki, Hideshi; Takigawa, Masashi; Mizuhata, Minoru

    2015-08-12

    The direct synthesis of the adhered Ni-Al LDH thin film onto the surface of electrically conductive substrates by the liquid phase deposition (LPD) reaction is carried out for the development of the positive electrode. The complexation and solution equilibria of the dissolved species in the LPD reaction have been clarified by a theoretical approach, and the LPD reaction conditions for the Ni-Al LDH depositions are shown to be optimized by controlling the fluoride ion concentration and the pH of the LPD reaction solutions. The yields of metal oxides and hydroxides by the LPD method are very sensitive to the supersaturation state of the hydroxide in the reaction solution. The surfaces of conductive substrates are completely covered by the minute mesh-like Ni-Al LDH thin film; furthermore, there is no gap between the surfaces of conductive substrates and the deposited Ni-Al LDH thin film. The active material layer thickness was able to be controlled within the range from 100 nm to 1 μm by the LPD reaction time. The high-crystallinity and the arbitrary-thickness thin films on the conductive substrate surface will be beneficial for the interface control of charge transfer reaction fields and the internal resistance reduction of various secondary batteries.

  13. CATALYST ACTIVITY MAINTENANCE FOR THE LIQUID PHASE SYNTHESIS GAS-TO-DIMETHYL ETHER PROCESS PART II: DEVELOPMENT OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE AS THE DEHYDRATION CATALYST FOR THE SINGLE-STEP LIQUID PHASE SYNGAS-TO-DME PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang-Dong Peng

    2002-05-01

    At the heart of the single-step liquid phase syngas-to-DME process (LPDME{trademark}) is a catalyst system that can be active as well as stable. In the Alternative Fuels I program, a dual-catalyst system containing a Cu-based commercial methanol synthesis catalyst (BASF S3-86) and a commercial dehydration material ({gamma}-alumina) was demonstrated. It provided the productivity and selectivity expected from the LPDME process. However, the catalyst system deactivated too rapidly to warrant a viable commercial process [1]. The mechanistic investigation in the early part of the DOE's Alternative Fuels II program revealed that the accelerated catalyst deactivation under LPDME conditions is due to detrimental interaction between the methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst [2,3]. The interaction was attributed to migration of Cu- and/or Zn-containing species from the synthesis catalyst to the dehydration catalyst. Identification of a dehydration catalyst that did not lead to this detrimental interaction while retaining adequate dehydration activity was elusive. Twenty-nine different dehydration materials were tested, but none showed the desired performance [2]. The search came to a turning point when aluminum phosphate was tested. This amorphous material is prepared by precipitating a solution containing Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with NH{sub 4}OH, followed by washing, drying and calcination. The aluminum phosphate catalyst has adequate dehydration activity and good stability. It can co-exist with the Cu-based methanol synthesis catalyst without negatively affecting the latter catalyst's stability. This report documents the details of the development of this catalyst. These include initial leads, efforts in improving activity and stability, investigation and development of the best preparation parameters and procedures, mechanistic understanding and resulting preparation guidelines, and the accomplishments of this work.

  14. Fabrication of Lotus-Type Porous Aluminum through Thermal Decomposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. Y.; Park, J. S.; Nakajima, H.

    2009-04-01

    Lotus-type porous aluminum with cylindrical pores was fabricated by unidirectional solidification through thermal decomposition of calcium hydroxide, sodium bicarbonate, or titanium hydride. The pore-forming gas decomposed from calcium hydroxide, sodium bicarbonate, and titanium hydride is identified as hydrogen. The elongated pores are evolved due to the solubility gap between liquid and solid when the melt dissolving hydrogen is solidified unidirectionally. The porosity of lotus aluminum is as high as 20 pct despite the type of the compounds. The pore size decreases and the pore density increases with increasing amount of calcium hydroxide, which is explained by an increase in the number of pore nucleation sites. The porosity and pore size in lotus aluminum fabricated using calcium hydroxide decrease with increasing argon pressure, which is explained by Boyle’s law. It is suggested that this fabrication method is simple and safe, which makes it superior to the conventional technique using high-pressure hydrogen gas.

  15. Coupled phase field, heat conduction, and elastodynamic simulations of kinetic superheating and nanoscale melting of aluminum nanolayer irradiated by picosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Seok; Levitas, Valery I

    2015-12-21

    An advanced continuum model for nanoscale melting and kinetic superheating of an aluminum nanolayer irradiated by a picosecond laser is formulated. Barrierless nucleation of surface premelting and melting occurs, followed by a propagation of two solid-melt interfaces toward each other and their collision. For a slow heating rate of Q = 0.015 K ps(-1) melting occurs at the equilibrium melting temperature under uniaxial strain conditions T = 898.1 K (i.e., below equilibrium melting temperature Teq = 933.67 K) and corresponding biaxial stresses, which relax during melting. For a high heating rate of Q = 0.99-84 K ps(-1), melting occurs significantly above Teq. Surprisingly, an increase in heating rate leads to temperature reduction at the 3 nm wide moving interfaces due to fast absorption of the heat of fusion. A significant, rapid temperature drop (100-500 K, even below melting temperature) at the very end of melting is revealed, which is caused by the collision of two finite-width interfaces and accelerated melting in about the 5 nm zone. For Q = 25-84 K ps(-1), standing elastic stress waves are observed in a solid with nodal points at the moving solid-melt interfaces, which, however, do not have a profound effect on melting time or temperatures. When surface melting is suppressed, barrierless bulk melting occurs in the entire sample, and elastodynamic effects are more important. Good correspondence with published, experimentally-determined melting time is found for a broad range of heating rates. Similar approaches can be applied to study various phase transformations in different materials and nanostructures under high heating rates.

  16. Coupled phase field, heat conduction, and elastodynamic simulations of kinetic superheating and nanoscale melting of aluminum nanolayer irradiated by picosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Seok; Levitas, Valery I

    2015-12-21

    An advanced continuum model for nanoscale melting and kinetic superheating of an aluminum nanolayer irradiated by a picosecond laser is formulated. Barrierless nucleation of surface premelting and melting occurs, followed by a propagation of two solid-melt interfaces toward each other and their collision. For a slow heating rate of Q = 0.015 K ps(-1) melting occurs at the equilibrium melting temperature under uniaxial strain conditions T = 898.1 K (i.e., below equilibrium melting temperature Teq = 933.67 K) and corresponding biaxial stresses, which relax during melting. For a high heating rate of Q = 0.99-84 K ps(-1), melting occurs significantly above Teq. Surprisingly, an increase in heating rate leads to temperature reduction at the 3 nm wide moving interfaces due to fast absorption of the heat of fusion. A significant, rapid temperature drop (100-500 K, even below melting temperature) at the very end of melting is revealed, which is caused by the collision of two finite-width interfaces and accelerated melting in about the 5 nm zone. For Q = 25-84 K ps(-1), standing elastic stress waves are observed in a solid with nodal points at the moving solid-melt interfaces, which, however, do not have a profound effect on melting time or temperatures. When surface melting is suppressed, barrierless bulk melting occurs in the entire sample, and elastodynamic effects are more important. Good correspondence with published, experimentally-determined melting time is found for a broad range of heating rates. Similar approaches can be applied to study various phase transformations in different materials and nanostructures under high heating rates. PMID:26561920

  17. Evaluated the adverse effects of cadmium and aluminum via drinking water to kidney disease patients: Application of a novel solid phase microextraction method.

    PubMed

    Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Naeemullah; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Mohammad Balal; Arain, Salma Aslam

    2016-04-01

    In present study aluminum (Al) and cadmium (Cd) were determined in ground water samples and assesses human health risks associated with elevated concentrations of toxic metals in dissolved form, using a novel solid phase microextraction (SPμE). Ground water sample (n=200) and biological sample (blood) of patients having chronic kidney disorders (CKD) along with healthy control subjects of same area (southern part of Pakistan) were collected. A simple system, including the micropipette tip packed with modified ionic liquid-activated carbon cloth (IL-ACC) coated with 8-hydroxyqunilone (8-HQ) attached to syringe. The analytes in water and acid digested blood samples were manually drawn for 2-10 cycles (drawing/discharging) at different pH range. The analytes sorbed on coated ACC were then desorbed with 2.0molL(-1) HNO3 in ethanol by drawing/discharging cycles for 1-5 times. The concentration of extracted analytes was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency of Cd and Al, were optimized. The Al and Cd concentrations in groundwater were found to be elevated than recommended limits by the World Health Organization. The urinary N-acetyl-h-glucosaminidase values were significantly higher in CKD patients as compared to refrent subjects (p<0.001). The significant variation in levels of Cd and Al were observed in blood samples of CKD patients than referents subjects (p<0.01). The strong positive correlation among Al and Cd levels in groundwater versus blood samples of CKD patients (r=0.82-0.85) p<0.01) was observed than those values calculated for referent subjects (r=0.425-0.536).

  18. Evaluated the adverse effects of cadmium and aluminum via drinking water to kidney disease patients: Application of a novel solid phase microextraction method.

    PubMed

    Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Naeemullah; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Mohammad Balal; Arain, Salma Aslam

    2016-04-01

    In present study aluminum (Al) and cadmium (Cd) were determined in ground water samples and assesses human health risks associated with elevated concentrations of toxic metals in dissolved form, using a novel solid phase microextraction (SPμE). Ground water sample (n=200) and biological sample (blood) of patients having chronic kidney disorders (CKD) along with healthy control subjects of same area (southern part of Pakistan) were collected. A simple system, including the micropipette tip packed with modified ionic liquid-activated carbon cloth (IL-ACC) coated with 8-hydroxyqunilone (8-HQ) attached to syringe. The analytes in water and acid digested blood samples were manually drawn for 2-10 cycles (drawing/discharging) at different pH range. The analytes sorbed on coated ACC were then desorbed with 2.0molL(-1) HNO3 in ethanol by drawing/discharging cycles for 1-5 times. The concentration of extracted analytes was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency of Cd and Al, were optimized. The Al and Cd concentrations in groundwater were found to be elevated than recommended limits by the World Health Organization. The urinary N-acetyl-h-glucosaminidase values were significantly higher in CKD patients as compared to refrent subjects (p<0.001). The significant variation in levels of Cd and Al were observed in blood samples of CKD patients than referents subjects (p<0.01). The strong positive correlation among Al and Cd levels in groundwater versus blood samples of CKD patients (r=0.82-0.85) p<0.01) was observed than those values calculated for referent subjects (r=0.425-0.536). PMID:27037653

  19. Aluminum-stabilized NB3SN superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Scanlan, Ronald M.

    1988-01-01

    An aluminum-stabilized Nb.sub.3 Sn superconductor and process for producing same, utilizing ultrapure aluminum. Ductile components are co-drawn with aluminum to produce a conductor suitable for winding magnets. After winding, the conductor is heated to convert it to the brittle Nb.sub.3 Sn superconductor phase, using a temperature high enough to perform the transformation but still below the melting point of the aluminum. This results in reaction of substantially all of the niobium, while providing stabilization and react-in-place features which are beneficial in the fabrication of magnets utilizing superconducting materials.

  20. Catalyzed light hydride nanomaterials embedded in a micro-channels hydrogen storage container.

    PubMed

    Dehouche, Zahir; Peretti, Hernán A; Yoo, Yeong; Belkacemi, Khaled; Goyette, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Activated alloys synthesized by arc-melting were examined as catalysts for improving the hydrogen sorption characteristics of nanostructured magnesium hydride, proposed as a reversible hydrogen storage material. The MgH(2)-catalyst absorbing materials were prepared by ball milling of pure MgH(2) with hydrided Zr(47)Ni(53), Zr(9)Ni(11), and other alloys investigated. The nanostructured MgH(2)-intermetallic systems were tested at 250 degrees C and catalyst addition of eutectoid Zr(47)Ni(53) resulted in the fastest desorption time and highest initial desorption rate. The catalyzed Mg-hydride with activated Zr(9)Ni(11) and Zr(7)Ni(10) phases showed fast desorption kinetics. Moreover, the results demonstrated that the composition of dispersed Zr(x)Ni(y)catalysts has a strong influence on the amount of accumulated hydrogen and desorption rate of Mg-nanocomposite. Part two covers advanced micro-channels hydrogen storage module design based on the results of semi-empirical computer simulations of heat and mass transfers in the container. The micro-channels reservoir concept offers many advantages over the conventional metal hydride hydrogen storage system. It is a micro-structured system that can pack a lot of power into a small space and dissipate effectively the heat of the sorption reactions. This review summarizes recent patents related to CNTS.

  1. Development of encapsulated lithium hydride thermal energy storage for space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.G.; Foote, J.P.; Olszewski, M.

    1987-12-01

    Inclusion of thermal energy storage in a pulsed space power supply will reduce the mass of the heat rejection system. In this mode, waste heat generated during the brief high-power burst operation is placed in the thermal store; later, the heat in the store is dissipated to space via the radiator over the much longer nonoperational period of the orbit. Thus, the radiator required is of significantly smaller capacity. Scoping analysis indicates that use of lithium hydride as the thermal storage medium results in system mass reduction benefits for burst periods as long as 800 s. A candidate design for the thermal energy storage component utilizes lithium hydride encapsulated in either 304L stainless steel or molybdenum in a packed-bed configuration with a lithium or sodium-potassium (NaK) heat transport fluid. Key issues associated with the system design include phase-change induced stresses in the shell, lithium hydride and shell compatibility, lithium hydride dissociation and hydrogen loss from the system, void presence and movement associated with the melt-freeze process, and heat transfer limitations on obtaining the desired energy storage density. 58 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Scattering influences in quantitative fission neutron radiography for the in situ analysis of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börries, S.; Metz, O.; Pranzas, P. K.; Bücherl, T.; Söllradl, S.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A.

    2015-10-01

    In situ neutron radiography allows for the time-resolved study of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides. However, for a precise quantitative investigation of a time-dependent hydrogen content within a host material, an exact knowledge of the corresponding attenuation coefficient is necessary. Additionally, the effect of scattering has to be considered as it is known to violate Beer's law, which is used to determine the amount of hydrogen from a measured intensity distribution. Within this study, we used a metal hydride inside two different hydrogen storage tanks as host systems, consisting of steel and aluminum. The neutron beam attenuation by hydrogen was investigated in these two different setups during the hydrogen absorption process. A linear correlation to the amount of absorbed hydrogen was found, allowing for a readily quantitative investigation. Further, an analysis of scattering contributions on the measured intensity distributions was performed and is described in detail.

  3. Aluminum based metal-organic framework-polymer monolith in solid-phase microextraction of penicillins in river water and milk samples.

    PubMed

    Lirio, Stephen; Liu, Wan-Ling; Lin, Chen-Lan; Lin, Chia-Her; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2016-01-01

    In this study, aluminum based metal-organic framework (Al-MOF)-organic polymer monoliths were prepared via microwave-assisted polymerization of ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA), butyl methacrylate (BMA) with different weight percentages of Al-MOF (MIL-53; 37.5-62.5%) and subsequently utilized as sorbent in solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of penicillins (penicillin G, penicillin V, oxacillin, cloxacillin, dicloxacillin, nafcillin). The Al-MOF-polymer was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) to clarify the retained crystalline structure well as the homogeneous dispersion of Al-MOF (MIL-53) in polymer monolith. The developed Al-MOF-polymer (MIL-53) monolithic column was evaluated according to its extraction recovery of penicillins. Several parameters affecting the extraction recoveries of penicillins using fabricated Al-MOF-polymer (MIL-53) monolithic column including different MIL-53 weight percentages, column length, pH, desorption solvent, and mobile phase flow rate were investigated. For comparison, different Al-based MOFs (MIL-68, CYCU-4 and DUT-5) were fabricated using the optimized condition for MIL-53-polymer (sample matrix at pH 3, 200μL desorption volume using methanol, 37.5% of MOF, 4-cm column length at 0.100mLmin(-1) flow rate). Among all the Al-MOF-polymers, MIL-53(Al)-polymer still afforded the best extraction recovery for penicillins ranging from 90.5 to 95.7% for intra-day with less than 3.5% relative standard deviations (RSDs) and inter-day precision were in the range of 90.7-97.6% with less than 4.2% RSDs. Meanwhile, the recoveries for column-to-column were in the range of 89.5-93.5% (<3.4% RSDs) while 88.5-90.5% (<5.8% RSDs) for batch-to-batch (n=3). Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detections were in the range of 0.06-0.26μgL(-1) and limit of quantifications between 0.20 and 0.87

  4. Aluminum based metal-organic framework-polymer monolith in solid-phase microextraction of penicillins in river water and milk samples.

    PubMed

    Lirio, Stephen; Liu, Wan-Ling; Lin, Chen-Lan; Lin, Chia-Her; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2016-01-01

    In this study, aluminum based metal-organic framework (Al-MOF)-organic polymer monoliths were prepared via microwave-assisted polymerization of ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA), butyl methacrylate (BMA) with different weight percentages of Al-MOF (MIL-53; 37.5-62.5%) and subsequently utilized as sorbent in solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of penicillins (penicillin G, penicillin V, oxacillin, cloxacillin, dicloxacillin, nafcillin). The Al-MOF-polymer was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) to clarify the retained crystalline structure well as the homogeneous dispersion of Al-MOF (MIL-53) in polymer monolith. The developed Al-MOF-polymer (MIL-53) monolithic column was evaluated according to its extraction recovery of penicillins. Several parameters affecting the extraction recoveries of penicillins using fabricated Al-MOF-polymer (MIL-53) monolithic column including different MIL-53 weight percentages, column length, pH, desorption solvent, and mobile phase flow rate were investigated. For comparison, different Al-based MOFs (MIL-68, CYCU-4 and DUT-5) were fabricated using the optimized condition for MIL-53-polymer (sample matrix at pH 3, 200μL desorption volume using methanol, 37.5% of MOF, 4-cm column length at 0.100mLmin(-1) flow rate). Among all the Al-MOF-polymers, MIL-53(Al)-polymer still afforded the best extraction recovery for penicillins ranging from 90.5 to 95.7% for intra-day with less than 3.5% relative standard deviations (RSDs) and inter-day precision were in the range of 90.7-97.6% with less than 4.2% RSDs. Meanwhile, the recoveries for column-to-column were in the range of 89.5-93.5% (<3.4% RSDs) while 88.5-90.5% (<5.8% RSDs) for batch-to-batch (n=3). Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detections were in the range of 0.06-0.26μgL(-1) and limit of quantifications between 0.20 and 0.87

  5. LaNi5 hydride cryogenic refrigerator test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A complete LaNi5 hydrogen absorption cryogenic refrigerator system was developed. The system uses low temperature waste heat of approximately 100 C as a power source, and has no moving parts other than self operating valves. The cycle continues automatically by an electronic sequencing timing mechanism for the three compressors which are phased such that a constant supply of high pressure hydrogen gas is provided. It is indicated that with a fully clean hydrogen system, hundreds of thousand cycles should be attainable, even though some degradation may eventually occur. Simple vacuum reactivation of the hydride of moving parts, other than self operating, long life valves, the refrigerators predicted life is extremely long.

  6. METHOD OF FABRICATING A URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, I.F.; Goeddel, W.V.

    1960-03-22

    A method is described of evenly dispersing uranlum metal in a zirconium hydride moderator to produce a fuel element for nuclear reactors. According to the invention enriched uranium hydride and zirconium hydride powders of 200 mesh particle size are thoroughly admixed to form a mixture containing 0.1 to 3% by weight of U/sup 235/ hydride. The mixed powders are placed in a die and pressed at 100 tons per square inch at room temperature. The resultant compacts are heated in a vacuum to 300 deg C, whereby the uranium hydride deoomposes into uranium metal and hydrogen gas. The escaping hydrogen gas forms a porous matrix of zirconium hydride, with uramum metal evenly dispersed therethrough. The advantage of the invention is that the porosity and uranium distribution of the final fuel element can be more closely determined and controlled than was possible using prior methods of producing such fuel ele- ments.

  7. Dissipative hydride precipitates in superconducting niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L.D.; Ciovati, G.; Wu, G.; /Argonne

    2011-10-01

    We report the first direct observation of the microstructural features exhibiting RF losses at high surface magnetic fields of above 100 mT in field emission free superconducting niobium cavities. The lossy areas were identified by advanced thermometry. Surface investigations using different techniques were carried out on cutout samples from lossy areas and showed the presence of dendritic niobium hydrides. This finding has possible implications to the mechanisms of RF losses in superconducting niobium at all field levels.

  8. Nickel metal hydride LEO cycle testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, Eric

    1995-01-01

    The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is working to characterize aerospace AB5 Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) cells. The cells are being evaluated in terms of storage, low earth orbit (LEO) cycling, and response to parametric testing (high rate charge and discharge, charge retention, pulse current ability, etc.). Cells manufactured by Eagle Picher are the subjects of the evaluation. There is speculation that NiMH cells may become direct replacements for current Nickel Cadmium cells in the near future.

  9. Pressure and high-Tc superconductivity in sulfur hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Gor’kov, Lev P.; Kresin, Vladimir Z.

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses fundamentals of record-TC superconductivity discovered under high pressure in sulfur hydride. The rapid increase of TC with pressure in the vicinity of Pcr ≈ 123GPa is interpreted as the fingerprint of a first-order structural transition. Based on the cubic symmetry of the high-TC phase, it is argued that the lower-TC phase has a different periodicity, possibly related to an instability with a commensurate structural vector. In addition to the acoustic branches, the phonon spectrum of H3S contains hydrogen modes with much higher frequencies. Because of the complex spectrum, usual methods of calculating TC are here inapplicable. A modified approach is formulated and shown to provide realistic values for TC and to determine the relative contributions of optical and acoustic branches. The isotope effect (change of TC upon Deuterium for Hydrogen substitution) originates from high frequency phonons and differs in the two phases. The decrease of TC following its maximum in the high-TC phase is a sign of intermixing with pairing at hole-like pockets which arise in the energy spectrum of the cubic phase at the structural transition. On-pockets pairing leads to the appearance of a second gap and is remarkable for its non-adiabatic regime: hydrogen mode frequencies are comparable to the Fermi energy. PMID:27167334

  10. Pressure and high-Tc superconductivity in sulfur hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gor’Kov, Lev P.; Kresin, Vladimir Z.

    2016-05-01

    The paper discusses fundamentals of record-TC superconductivity discovered under high pressure in sulfur hydride. The rapid increase of TC with pressure in the vicinity of Pcr ≈ 123GPa is interpreted as the fingerprint of a first-order structural transition. Based on the cubic symmetry of the high-TC phase, it is argued that the lower-TC phase has a different periodicity, possibly related to an instability with a commensurate structural vector. In addition to the acoustic branches, the phonon spectrum of H3S contains hydrogen modes with much higher frequencies. Because of the complex spectrum, usual methods of calculating TC are here inapplicable. A modified approach is formulated and shown to provide realistic values for TC and to determine the relative contributions of optical and acoustic branches. The isotope effect (change of TC upon Deuterium for Hydrogen substitution) originates from high frequency phonons and differs in the two phases. The decrease of TC following its maximum in the high-TC phase is a sign of intermixing with pairing at hole-like pockets which arise in the energy spectrum of the cubic phase at the structural transition. On-pockets pairing leads to the appearance of a second gap and is remarkable for its non-adiabatic regime: hydrogen mode frequencies are comparable to the Fermi energy.

  11. HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    K. McCoy

    2000-12-12

    The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation.

  12. Density Functional Screening of Metal Hydride Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Karl; Alapati, Sudhakar; Dai, Bing; Kim, Ki-Chul; Sholl, David

    2008-03-01

    The on-board storage of hydrogen is one of the most vexing problems associated with the development of viable fuel cell vehicles. Hydrides of period 2 or 3 metals can store hydrogen at high gravimetric and volumetric densities. However, existing hydrides either have unacceptable thermodynamics or kinetics. New materials for hydrogen storage are therefore needed. We demonstrate how first principles density functional theory (DFT) can be used to screen potential candidate materials for hydrogen storage. We have used DFT calculations in conjunction with a free energy analysis to screen over a million reactions involving 212 known compounds. This approach has identified several interesting reaction schemes that have not yet been explored experimentally. We have computed the phonon density of states and used this information to predict the van't Hoff plots for some of the most promising candidate reactions identified though our modeling. We have also examined the thermodynamics of thin films and nanoparticles for selected metal hydrides by accounting for the surface energies of the films or nanoparticles.

  13. Synthesis and structural study of Ti-rich Mg-Ti hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Kohta; Kim, Hyunjeong; Sakaki, Kouji; Page, Katharine; Hayashi, Shigenobu; Nakamura, Yumiko; Akiba, Etsuo

    2014-02-26

    MgxTi1-x (x = 0.15, 0.25, 0.35) alloys were synthesized by means of ball milling. Under a hydrogen pressure of 8 MPa at 423 K these Mg–Ti alloys formed a hydride phase with a face centered cubic (FCC) structure. The hydride for x = 0.25 consisted of single Mg0.25Ti0.75H1.62 FCC phase but TiH2 and MgH2 phases were also formed in the hydrides for x = 0.15 and 0.35, respectively. X-ray diffraction patterns and the atomic pair distribution function indicated that numbers of stacking faults were introduced. There was no sign of segregation between Mg and Ti in Mg0.25Ti0.75H1.62. Electronic structure of Mg0.25Ti0.75H1.62 was different from those of MgH2 and TiH2, which was demonstrated by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance. This strongly suggested that stable Mg–Ti hydride phase was formed in the metal composition of Mg0.25Ti0.75 without disproportion into MgH2 and TiH2.

  14. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x} (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  15. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi[sub 5-x]Al[sub x] (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  16. Fe induced hydride formation in ZrPd2

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Michele; Gupta, Raju; Singh, David J

    2008-01-01

    We show via first-principles calculations that the electronic structure of ZrPd{sub 2}, which does not form a hydride, can be modified by partial substitution of Fe for Pd, leading to a material that forms a hydride. We also show that PdZr{sub 2}, which forms a very stable hydride, can also be modified by Fe addition to lower the enthalpy of hydride formation. These results are explained in terms of electronic structure, specifically electronegativity, charge transfer, and s-d bonding, and clearly have implications in the search of new materials for hydrogen storage.

  17. Storing hydrogen in the form of light alloy hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, E.; Gillerm, C.

    1981-01-01

    Different hydrides are investigated to find a system with a sufficiently high storage density (at least 3%). The formation of hydrides with light alloys is examined. Reaction kinetics for hydride formation were defined and applied to the systems Mg-Al-H, Mg-Al-Cu-H, Ti-Al-H, Ti-Al-Cu-H, and Ti-Al-Ni-H. Results indicate that the addition of Al destabilizes MgH2 and TiH2 hydrides while having only a limited effect on the storage density.

  18. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING URANIUM-HYDRIDE COMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Wellborn, W.; Armstrong, J.R.

    1959-03-10

    A method and apparatus are presented for making compacts of pyrophoric hydrides in a continuous operation out of contact with air. It is particularly useful for the preparation of a canned compact of uranium hydride possessing high density and purity. The metallic uranium is enclosed in a container, positioned in a die body evacuated and nvert the uranium to the hydride is admitted and the container sealed. Heat is applied to bring about the formation of the hydride, following which compression is used to form the compact sealed in a container ready for use.

  19. Microstructural studies and crystallographic orientation of different zones and δ-hydrides in resistance welded Zircaloy-4 sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiran Kumar, N. A. P.; Szpunar, Jerzy. A.; He, Zhang

    2011-07-01

    The cold worked stress relieved (CWSR) Zircaloy-4 sheet used as endplate in nuclear fuel bundle is resistance welded with an endcap in argon environment. Later the welded sample is hydrided in a gaseous atmosphere at 400 °C. Optical microscopy (OM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to examine the morphology and crystal orientation of the hydrides. The microstructural changes in different areas of the weld zone, heat affected zone (HAZ) and the as-received zone were analyzed using EBSD technique. Optical examination showed complete random morphological orientation of hydrides and predominantly basket-weave structure in the weld zone, with very few colonies of parallel plate structures. Variant selection for α-phase formation inside prior β-grains was identified at the weld centre. As we move from the weld centre to the as-received zone, the variant selection is found to be less probable. The δ-hydride platelets at the weld zone were always found to be growing perpendicular to the α-colonies having angular difference of 60-63° and follow (0 0 0 1) α-Zr//{1 1 1}δ-ZrH 1.5 orientation relationship with the zirconium matrix. Proposed description of complex distribution of hydrides and alloy microstructure at the weld and heat affected zone will contribute to a better understanding of mechanisms of failure of fuel cladding in various types of nuclear reactors.

  20. Aluminum Target Dissolution in Support of the Pu-238 Program

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Mattus, Catherine H

    2014-09-01

    Selection of an aluminum alloy for target cladding affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the caustic dissolution step, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. We present a study to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal alloy, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as a function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. These data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Temperature logging during the transients has been investigated as a means to generate kinetic and mass transport data on the dissolution process. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.

  1. Topotactic Solid-State Metal Hydride Reductions of Sr2MnO4.

    PubMed

    Hernden, Bradley C; Lussier, Joey A; Bieringer, Mario

    2015-05-01

    We report novel details regarding the reactivity and mechanism of the solid-state topotactic reduction of Sr2MnO4 using a series of solid-state metal hydrides. Comprehensive details describing the active reducing species are reported and comments on the reductive mechanism are provided, where it is shown that more than one electron is being donated by H(-). Commonly used solid-state hydrides LiH, NaH, and CaH2, were characterized in terms of reducing power. In addition the unexplored solid-state hydrides MgH2, SrH2, and BaH2 are evaluated as potential solid-state reductants and characterized in terms of their reductive reactivities. These 6 group I and II metal hydrides show the following trend in terms of reactivity: MgH2 < SrH2 < LiH ≈ CaH2 ≈ BaH2 < NaH. The order of the reductants are discussed in terms of metal electronegativity and bond strengths. NaH and the novel use of SrH2 allowed for targeted synthesis of reduced Sr2MnO(4-x) (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.37) phases. The enhanced control during synthesis demonstrated by this soft chemistry approach has allowed for a more comprehensive and systematic evaluation of Sr2MnO(4-x) phases than previously reported phases prepared by high temperature methods. Sr2MnO3.63(1) has for the first time been shown to be monoclinic by powder X-ray diffraction and the oxidative monoclinic to tetragonal transition occurs at 450 °C. PMID:25894860

  2. Di-hydrogen contact induced lattice instabilities and structural dynamics in complex hydride perovskites.

    PubMed

    Schouwink, P; Hagemann, H; Embs, J P; D'Anna, V; Černý, R

    2015-07-01

    The structural phase transitions occurring in a series of perovskite-type complex hydrides based on the tetrahydroborate anion BH4(-) are investigated by means of in situ synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, thermal methods and ab initio calculations in the solid state. Structural dynamics of the BH4 anion are followed with quasi-elastic neutron scattering. We show that unexpected temperature-induced lattice instabilities in perovskite-type ACa(BH4)3 (A = K, Rb, Cs) have their origin in close hydridic di-hydrogen contacts. The rich lattice dynamics lead to coupling between internal B-H vibrations and phonons, resulting in distortions in the high-temperature polymorph that are identical in symmetry to well-known instabilities in oxide perovskites, generally condensing at lower temperatures. It is found that anion-substitution BH4(-) <-> (X = Halide) can relax distortions in ACa(BH4)3 by eliminating coulomb repulsive H(-)···H(-) effects. The interesting nature of phase transition in ACa(BH4)3 enters an unexplored field of weak interactions in ceramic-like host lattices and is the principal motivation for this study. Close di-hydrogen contacts suggest new concepts to tailor crystal symmetries in complex hydride perovskites in the future. PMID:26076047

  3. Metal hydride preheater for the M2 diesel burner. Final report, September 1992--October 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstmann, J.; Golben, M.

    1999-03-01

    This report describes the results of a Phase 1 Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) project to demonstrate the feasibility of preheating the catalytic generator of the M2 diesel burner using a metal hydride preheater. Preliminary testing of an electrically heated generator showed that the originally proposed concept of preheating the catalytic generator of the burner would have resulted in excessive weight for the hydride system. An alternate approach of preheating only the 'superheater,' and using it to vaporize the fuel at start-up, was implemented instead. This resulted in an extremely compact and lightweight burner system that ignited cleanly an rapidly. The Phase 1 results indicate that the 'hydride superheater' is an effective means of obtaining clean ignition of a diesel cook stove burner. Furthermore, the resulting burner is considerably smaller and lighter than the M2 burner. Additional work is required to optimize the designs of the preheater and the superheater, to scale-up the capacity of the burner and to develop practical burner controls.

  4. Method of making crack-free zirconium hydride

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, Richard W.

    1980-01-01

    Crack-free hydrides of zirconium and zirconium-uranium alloys are produced by alloying the zirconium or zirconium-uranium alloy with beryllium, or nickel, or beryllium and scandium, or nickel and scandium, or beryllium and nickel, or beryllium, nickel and scandium and thereafter hydriding.

  5. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    DOE PAGES

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, ormore » during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.« less

  6. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  7. High energy density battery based on complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-26

    A battery and process of operating a battery system is provided using high hydrogen capacity complex hydrides in an organic non-aqueous solvent that allows the transport of hydride ions such as AlH.sub.4.sup.- and metal ions during respective discharging and charging steps.

  8. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, or during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.

  9. High-pressure chemistry of hydrogen in metals: in situ study of iron hydride.

    PubMed

    Badding, J V; Hemley, R J; Mao, H K

    1991-07-26

    Optical observations and x-ray diffraction measurements of the reaction between iron and hydrogen at high pressure to form iron hydride are described. The reaction is associated with a sudden pressure-induced expansion at 3.5 gigapascals of iron samples immersed in fluid hydrogen. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements carried out to 62 gigapascals demonstrate that iron hydride has a double hexagonal close-packed structure, a cell volume up to 17% larger than pure iron, and a stoichiometry close to FeH. These results greatly extend the pressure range over which the technologically important iron-hydrogen phase diagram has been characterized and have implications for problems ranging from hydrogen degradation and embrittlement of ferrous metals to the presence of hydrogen in Earth's metallic core.

  10. Modular hydride beds for mobile applications

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.

    1997-08-01

    Design, construction, initial testing and simple thermal modeling of modular, metal hydride beds have been completed. Originally designed for supplying hydrogen to a fuel cell on a mobile vehicle, the complete bed design consists of 8 modules and is intended for use on the Palm Desert Vehicle (PDV) under development at the Schatz Energy Center, Humbolt State University. Each module contains approximately 2 kg of a commercially available, low temperature, hydride-forming metal alloy. Waste heat from the fuel cell in the form of heated water is used to desorb hydrogen from the alloy for supplying feed hydrogen to the fuel cell. In order to help determine the performance of such a modular bed system, six modules were constructed and tested. The design and construction of the modules is described in detail. Initial testing of the modules both individually and as a group showed that each module can store {approximately} 30 g of hydrogen (at 165 PSIA fill pressure, 17 C), could be filled with hydrogen in 6 minutes at a nominal, 75 standard liters/min (slm) fueling rate, and could supply hydrogen during desorption at rates of 25 slm, the maximum anticipated hydrogen fuel cell input requirement. Tests made of 5 modules as a group indicated that the behavior of the group run in parallel both in fueling and gas delivery could be directly predicted from the corresponding, single module characteristics by using an appropriate scaling factor. Simple thermal modeling of a module as an array of cylindrical, hydride-filled tubes was performed. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with experimental data.

  11. NMR study of hydrogen diffusion in zirconium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Korn, C.; Goren, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear-magnetic-resonance method was used to study the diffusion of hydrogen in zirconium hydride by measuring the temperature dependence of T/sub 1/ in a temperature range where the major relaxation mechanism was due to hydrogen diffusion. The samples investigated were ZrH/sub 1.588/, ZrH/sub 1.629/, ZrH/sub 1.684/, ZrH/sub 1.736/, ZrH/sub 1.815/, ZrH/sub 1.910/, and ZrH/sub 1.960/. These spanned both the cubic and tetragonal phases. The activation energy was found to be independent of hydrogen concentration in the cubic phase with E/sub a/ = 13.4 +- 0.4 kcal/mol and a preexponential factor given by A = (1/2)(2-x)(45 +- 10) x 10/sup 12/ Hz. In the tetragonal phase the activation energy of the bulk of the hydrogen increased modestly with concentration. In addition, it was discovered that a new very fast hydrogen channel was created by the tetragonality for approx.3% of the hydrogen. They jump with a preexponential factor that is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than that of the rest of the hydrogen. A comparison was also made between the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound, the Barton-Sholl, and the Bustard theories for nuclear magnetic relaxation due to diffusion.

  12. NMR study of hydrogen diffusion in zirconium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, C.; Goren, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear-magnetic-resonance method was used to study the diffusion of hydrogen in zirconium hydride by measuring the temperature dependence of T1 in a temperature range where the major relaxation mechanism was due to hydrogen diffusion. The samples investigated were ZrH1.588, ZrH1.629, ZrH1.684, ZrH1.736, ZrH1.815, ZrH1.910, and ZrH1.960. These spanned both the cubic and tetragonal phases. The activation energy was found to be independent of hydrogen concentration in the cubic phase with Ea=13.4+/-0.4 kcal/mol and a preexponential factor given by A=(1/2)(2-x)(45+/-10)×1012 Hz. In the tetragonal phase the activation energy of the bulk of the hydrogen increased modestly with concentration. In addition, it was discovered that a new very fast hydrogen channel was created by the tetragonality for ~3% of the hydrogen. They jump with a preexponential factor that is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than that of the rest of the hydrogen. A comparison was also made between the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound, the Barton-Sholl, and the Bustard theories for nuclear magnetic relaxation due to diffusion.

  13. Highly Concentrated Palladium Hydrides/Deuterides; Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios

    2013-11-26

    Accomplishments are reported in these areas: tight-binding molecular dynamics study of palladium; First-principles calculations and tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations of the palladium-hydrogen system; tight-binding studies of bulk properties and hydrogen vacancies in KBH{sub 4}; tight-binding study of boron structures; development of angular dependent potentials for Pd-H; and density functional and tight-binding calculations for the light-hydrides NaAlH4 and NaBH4

  14. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan F.; Yu, Conrad

    2010-08-10

    An apparatus having a first substrate having (1) a cavity, (2) one or more resistive heaters, and (3) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen; a second substrate having (1) an outlet valve comprising a pressure relief structure and (2) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen, wherein said second substrate is coupled to said first substrate forming a sealed volume in said cavity; a metal hydride material contained within said cavity; and a gas distribution system formed by coupling a microfluidic interconnect to said pressure relief structure. Additional apparatuses and methods are also disclosed.

  15. Development of nickel-metal hydride cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwajima, Saburo; Kamimori, Nolimits; Nakatani, Kensuke; Yano, Yoshiaki

    1993-01-01

    National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has conducted the research and development (R&D) of battery cells for space use. A new R&D program about a Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) cell for space use from this year, based on good results in evaluations of commercial Ni-MH cells in Tsukuba Space Center (TKSC), was started. The results of those commercial Ni-MH cell's evaluations and recent status about the development of Ni-MH cells for space use are described.

  16. Metal hydrides for concentrating solar thermal power energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Paskevicius, M.; Humphries, T. D.; Felderhoff, M.; Capurso, G.; Bellosta von Colbe, J.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Ward, P. A.; Teprovich, J. A.; Corgnale, C.; Zidan, R.; Grant, D. M.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    The development of alternative methods for thermal energy storage is important for improving the efficiency and decreasing the cost of concentrating solar thermal power. We focus on the underlying technology that allows metal hydrides to function as thermal energy storage (TES) systems and highlight the current state-of-the-art materials that can operate at temperatures as low as room temperature and as high as 1100 °C. The potential of metal hydrides for thermal storage is explored, while current knowledge gaps about hydride properties, such as hydride thermodynamics, intrinsic kinetics and cyclic stability, are identified. The engineering challenges associated with utilising metal hydrides for high-temperature TES are also addressed.

  17. Porous metal hydride composite and preparation and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, W.A.; Olsen, C.E.

    1980-03-12

    A composite formed from large pieces of aggregate formed from (1) metal hydride (or hydride-former) powder and (2) either metal powder or plastic powder or both is prepared. The composite has large macroscopic interconnected pores (much larger than the sizes of the powders which are used) and will have a very fast heat transfer rate and low windage loss. It will be useful, for example, in heat engines, hydrogen storage devices, and refrigerator components which depend for their utility upon both a fast rate of hydriding and dehydriding. Additionally, a method of preparing the composite and a method of increasing the rates of hydriding and dehydriding of metal hydrides are also given.

  18. Porous metal hydride composite and preparation and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, William A.; Olsen, Clayton E.

    1982-01-01

    A composite formed from large pieces of aggregate formed from (1) metal hydride (or hydride-former) powder and (2) either metal powder or plastic powder or both is prepared. The composite has large macroscopic interconnected pores (much larger than the sizes of the powders which are used) and will have a very fast heat transfer rate and low windage loss. It will be useful, for example, in heat engines, hydrogen storage devices, and refrigerator components which depend for their utility upon both a fast rate of hydriding and dehydriding. Additionally, a method of preparing the composite and a method of increasing the rates of hydriding and dehydriding of metal hydrides are also given.

  19. Recent advances in metal hydrides for clean energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2013-06-01

    Metal hydrides are a fascinating class of materials that can be utilized for a surprising variety of clean energy applications, including smart solar collectors, smart windows, sensors, thermal energy storage, and batteries, in addition to their traditional application for hydrogen storage. Over the past decade, research on metal hydrides for hydrogen storage increased due to global governmental incentives and an increased focus on hydrogen storage research for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operation. Tremendous progress has been made in so-called complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage applications with the discovery of many new hydrides containing covalently bound complex anions. Many of these materials have applications beyond hydrogen storage and are being investigated for lithium-ion battery separator and anode materials. In this issue of MRS Bulletin , we present the state of the art of key evolving metal-hydride-based clean energy technologies with an outlook toward future needs.

  20. Alloying of aluminum-beryllium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanova, L. V.; Ilyushin, V. N.

    2013-01-01

    The existing phase diagrams of Al-Be- X alloys, where X is an alloying element, are analyzed. Element X is noted to poorly dissolve in both aluminum and beryllium. It is shown that the absence of intermetallic compounds in the Al-Be system affects the phase equilibria in an Al-Be- X system. Possible phase equilibria involving phases based on aluminum, beryllium, and intermetallic compounds are proposed, and the types of strengthening of Al-Be alloys by an addition of a third element are classified.

  1. A model to describe the mechanical behavior and the ductile failure of hydrided Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings between 25 °C and 480 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Saux, M.; Besson, J.; Carassou, S.

    2015-11-01

    A model is proposed to describe the mechanical behavior and the ductile failure at 25, 350 and 480 °C of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes, as-received and hydrided up to 1200 wt. ppm (circumferential hydrides). The model is based on the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model extended to account for plastic anisotropy and viscoplasticity. The model considers damage nucleation by both hydride cracking and debonding of the interface between the Laves phase precipitates and the matrix. The damage nucleation rate due to hydride cracking is directly deduced from quantitative microstructural observations. The other model parameters are identified from several experimental tests. Finite element simulations of axial tension, hoop tension, expansion due to compression and hoop plane strain tension experiments are performed to assess the model prediction capability. The calibrated model satisfactorily reproduces the effects of hydrogen and temperature on both the viscoplastic and the failure properties of the material. The results suggest that damage is anisotropic and influenced by the stress state for the non-hydrided or moderately hydrided material and becomes more isotropic for high hydrogen contents.

  2. Inert anodes for aluminum smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Weyand, J.D.; Ray, S.P.; Baker, F.W.; DeYoung, D.H.; Tarcy, G.P.

    1986-02-01

    The use of nonconsumable or inert anodes for replacement of consumable carbon anodes in Hall electrolysis cells for the production of aluminum has been a technical and commercial goal of the aluminum industry for many decades. This report summarizes the technical success realized in the development of an inert anode that can be used to produce aluminum of acceptable metal purity in small scale Hall electrolysis cells. The inert anode material developed consists of a cermet composition containing the phases: copper, nickel ferrite and nickel oxide. This anode material has an electrical conductivity comparable to anode carbon used in Hall cells, i.e., 150 ohm {sup {minus}1}cm{sup {minus}1}. Metal purity of 99.5 percent aluminum has been produced using this material. The copper metal alloy present in the anode is not removed by anodic dissolution as does occur with cermet anodes containing a metallic nickel alloy. Solubility of the oxide phases in the cryolite electrolyte is reduced by: (1) saturated concentration of alumina, (2) high nickel oxide content in the NiO-NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} composition, (3) lowest possible cell operating temperature, (4) additions of alkaline or alkaline earth fluorides to the bath to reduce solubilities of the anode components, and (5) avoiding bath contaminants such as silica. Dissolution rate measurements indicate first-order kinetics and that the rate limiting step for dissolution is mass transport controlled. 105 refs., 234 figs., 73 tabs.

  3. SYNTHESIS OF METAL HYDRIDES BY MECHANICAL ALLOYING IN AN ATTRITOR MILL: FY06 STATUS REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K

    2006-11-30

    Hydridable metal alloys are used at the Savannah River Site to process tritium. The goal of this work was to develop a mechanical alloying process as a low-cost option to produce these alloys on-site. High-speed milling at elevated temperatures has the potential to significantly reduce the time and cost of the mechanical alloying process. It was demonstrated that elemental metal powders can be alloyed in an attritor mill under argon. In order to form LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} from elemental metals it was found that lanthanum and nickel must be alloyed prior to adding aluminum. It was also demonstrated that metal powders could be alloyed in the high-speed attritor with the temperature in the mill equilibrating at {approx}220 C. Optimization of the process parameters will require additional testing.

  4. Hydriding and dehydriding characteristics of LiBH{sub 4} and transition metals-added magnesium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Myoung Youp; Kwak, Young Jun; Lee, Seong Ho; Park, Hye Ryoung

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Hydriding reaction curves under 12 bar H{sub 2}, and dehydriding reaction curves under 1.0 bar H{sub 2}, at 593 K at the 1st cycle for MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti and MgH{sub 2}. Highlights: ► Addition of Ni, LiBH{sub 4}, and Ti to MgH{sub 2} to increase reaction rates. ► Sample preparation by reactive mechanical grinding. ► At n = 2, the sample absorbed 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H{sub 2}. ► Analysis of rate-controlling step for dehydriding of the sample at n = 3. - Abstract: In this study, MgH{sub 2} was used as a starting material instead of Mg. Ni, Ti, and LiBH{sub 4} with a high hydrogen-storage capacity of 18.4 wt% were added. A sample with a composition of MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti was prepared by reactive mechanical grinding. The activation of MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti was completed after the first hydriding–dehydrding cycle. The hydriding rate decreases as the temperature increases due to the decrease in the driving force for the hydriding reaction. At the 1st cycle, the sample desorbs 1.45 wt% H for 10 min, 2.54 wt% H for 20 min, 3.13 wt% H for 30 min, and 3.40 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 1.0 bar H{sub 2}. At the 2nd cycle, the sample absorbs 3.84 wt% H for 5 min, 3.96 wt% H for 10 min, and 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H{sub 2}. MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti after reactive mechanical grinding contained MgH{sub 2}, Mg, Ni, TiH{sub 1.924}, and MgO phases. The reactive mechanical grinding of Mg with Ni, LiBH{sub 4}, and Ti is considered to create defects on the surface and in the interior of Mg (to facilitate nucleation), and to reduce the particle size of Mg (to shorten diffusion distances of hydrogen atoms). The formation of Mg{sub 2}Ni during hydriding–dehydriding cycling increases the hydriding and dehydriding rates of the sample.

  5. Electrolytic production of high purity aluminum using inert anodes

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua; Weirauch, Jr., Douglas A.

    2001-01-01

    A method of producing commercial purity aluminum in an electrolytic reduction cell comprising inert anodes is disclosed. The method produces aluminum having acceptable levels of Fe, Cu and Ni impurities. The inert anodes used in the process preferably comprise a cermet material comprising ceramic oxide phase portions and metal phase portions.

  6. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ≥ 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ≥ 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space

  7. Synthesis and Hydride Transfer Reactions of Cobalt and Nickel Hydride Complexes to BX3 Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Michael T.; Potter, Robert G.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.

    2011-12-05

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H{sub 2} gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe){sub 2}, dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane) was capable of reducing a variety of BX{sub 3} compounds having hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to HA of BEt{sub 3}. This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, (HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +}), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities ({Delta}G{sub H{sup -}}{sup o}) of HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX{sub 3} compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX{sub 3} compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe){sub 2} was observed to transfer H{sup -} to BX{sub 3} compounds with X = H, OC{sub 6}F{sub 5} and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh){sub 3} is accompanied by formation of (BH{sub 3}){sub 2}-dmpe and (BH{sub 2}SPh){sub 2}-dmpe products that follow from reduction of multiple BSPh bonds and loss of a dmpe ligand from Co. Reactions between HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and B(SPh){sub 3} in the presence of triethylamine result in formation of Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh and Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 3} with no loss of dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} with B(SPh){sub 3} under analogous conditions give Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe){sub 2}(SPh)]{sup +}. The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe){sub 2} (dedpe = diethyldiphenyl(phosphino)ethane) from H{sub 2} and a base is also discussed; including the formation of an uncommon trans

  8. Aluminum and Young Artists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Thomas

    1980-01-01

    The author suggests a variety of ways in which aluminum and aluminum foil can be used in elementary and junior high art classes: relief drawing and rubbing; printing; repousse; sculpture; mobiles; foil sculpture; and three dimensional design. Sources of aluminum supplies are suggested. (SJL)

  9. Fracture Resistance of a Zirconium Alloy with Reoriented Hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.; He, Xihua; Pan, Yi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Zirconium alloy cladding materials typically contain circumferential hydrides that may be reoriented to align along the radial direction when the cladding tubes are heated above and then cooled below the solvus temperature. The objectives of this study were to investigate the critical stress levels required to cause hydride reorientation (HRT) and to characterize the fracture resistance of Zircaloy-2 after hydride reorientation. HRT heat-treatment was performed on hydrogen-charged Zircaloy-2 specimens at 593 K (320 °C) or 623 K (350 °C) for 1 to 2 hours, followed by cooling to 473 K (200 °C). Fracture testing was conducted on hydride-reoriented three-point bend specimens at 473 K (200 °C) using an in situ loading stage inside a scanning electron microscope. Direct observations indicated that the reoriented hydrides, which ranged from ≈1 to 22 μm in lengths, were more prone to fracture at larger sizes (>10 μm) compared to smaller sizes (<0.5 μm). The reoriented hydrides reduced fracture resistance through a void nucleation, growth, and coalescence process at the crack tip. The resulting crack-resistance curves for Zircaloy-2 with reoriented hydrides decrease from 38 to 21 MPa(m)1/2 with increasing hydrogen contents from 51 to 1265 wt ppm hydrogen.

  10. Catalysis by aluminum(III) complexes of non-innocent ligands.

    PubMed

    Berben, Louise A

    2015-02-01

    Non-Innocent ligand complexes of aluminum are described in this Concept article, beginning with a discussion of their synthesis, and then structural and electronic characterization. The main focus concerns the ability of the ligands in these complexes to mediate proton transfer reactions. As examples, aluminum-ligand cooperation in the activation of polar bonds is described, as is the importance of hydrogen bonding to stabilization of a transition state for β-hydride abstraction. Taken together these reactions enable catalytic processes such as the dehydrogenation of formic acid. PMID:25429760

  11. Analysis of Ni-HYDRIDE Thin Film after Surface Plasmon Generation by Laser Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violante, V.; Castagna, E.; Sibilia, C.; Paoloni, S.; Sarto, F.

    2005-12-01

    A nickel hydride thin film was studied by the attenuated total reflection method. The differences in behavior between a "black" film, and a pure nickel film "blank," are shown. The black nickel hydride film has been obtained by a short electrolysis with 1 M Li2SO4 electrolyte in light water, A shift in the minimum of the observed reflected light occurs, together with a change in the minimum shape (i.e. its half-height width increases). These two phenomenon are due to the change in the electronic band structure of the metal induced by electrons added to the lattice by hydrogen. The change of the electronic structure, revealed by the laser coupling conditions, leads us to consider that a hydride phase was created. Both the blank (not hydrogenated) and black (hydrogenated) specimens were taken under He-Ne laser beam at the reflectance minimum angle for about three hours. A SIMS analysis was also implemented to reveal differences in the isotopic composition of Cu, as marker element between the blank and black films, in order to study the coupled effect of electrolysis and plasmon-polariton excitation on LENR processes in condensed matter.

  12. A generic statistical model of hydride formation in a random alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2016-09-01

    Hydride formation in metals (e.g. in Pd), accompanied by a hysteresis loop in the absorption isotherms, is one of the generic examples of first-order phase transitions (FOPTs). During the last decade, the corresponding experimental studies, driven by applications related to hydrogen storage, have shifted towards metal particles sized from a few nanometers to micrometers in general and to alloyed particles of these sizes in particular. The understanding of hydride formation in alloys is, however, still far from complete. Herein, a statistical model of hydride formation in a random alloy is presented. The model is focused on the situation when this process is favorable in metal 1 (e.g. Pd) and shows what may happen when atoms of metal 2 make it less favorable due to decrease of the hydrogen binding energy and/or attractive hydrogen-hydrogen (H-H) interaction. Random distribution of metal atoms is taken explicitly into account. The attractive H-H interaction, including its dependence on fraction of metal 2 in the alloy, is described at the mean-field level. With increasing fraction of the latter metal, the critical temperature is found to decrease linearly or nonlinearly depending on the values of the model parameters. If the decrease of the hydrogen binding energy with increasing number of nearest-neighbor (nn) atoms of metal 2 is appreciable, the model predicts up to three hysteresis loops.

  13. Proton and hydride transfers in solution: hybrid QMmm/MM free energy perturbation study

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, L. Lawrence |; Bash, P.A.; Kerell, A.D., Jr

    1996-03-01

    A hybrid quantum and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy perturbation (FEP) method is implemented in the context of molecular dynamics (MD). The semiempirical quantum mechanical (QM) Hamiltonian (Austin Model 1) represents solute molecules, and the molecular mechanical (MM) CHARMM force field describes the water solvent. The QM/MM FEP method is used to calculate the free energy changes in aqueous solution for (1) a proton transfer from methanol to imidazole and (2) a hydride transfer from methoxide to nicotinamide. The QM/MM interaction energies between the solute and solvent arc calibrated to emulate the solute-solvent interaction energies determined at the Hartee-Fock 6-31G(d) level of ab initio theory. The free energy changes for the proton and hydride transfers are calculated to be 15.1 and {minus}6.3 kcal/mol, respectively, which compare favorably with the corresponding experimental values of 12.9 and {minus}7.4 kcal/mol. An estimate of the reliability of the calculations is obtained through the computation of the forward (15.1 and {minus}6.3 kcal/mol) and backward ({minus}14.1 and 9.1 kcal/mol)free energy changes. The reasonable correspondence between these two independent calculations suggests that adequate phase space sampling is obtained along the reaction pathways chosen to transform the proton and hydride systems between their respective reactant and product states.

  14. Molecular rare-earth-metal hydrides in non-cyclopentadienyl environments.

    PubMed

    Fegler, Waldemar; Venugopal, Ajay; Kramer, Mathias; Okuda, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Molecular hydrides of the rare-earth metals play an important role as homogeneous catalysts and as counterparts of solid-state interstitial hydrides. Structurally well-characterized non-metallocene-type hydride complexes allow the study of elementary reactions that occur at rare-earth-metal centers and of catalytic reactions involving bonds between rare-earth metals and hydrides. In addition to neutral hydrides, cationic derivatives have now become available.

  15. Alloys for hydrogen storage in nickel/hydrogen and nickel/metal hydride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anani, Anaba; Visintin, Arnaldo; Petrov, Konstantin; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Reilly, James J.; Johnson, John R.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Desch, Paul B.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, there has been an ongoing collaboration among the authors in the three laboratories to (1) prepare alloys of the AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) types, using arc-melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques; (2) examine their physico-chemical characteristics (morphology, composition); (3) determine the hydrogen absorption/desorption behavior (pressure-composition isotherms as a function of temperature); and (4) evaluate their performance characteristics as hydride electrodes (charge/discharge, capacity retention, cycle life, high rate capability). The work carried out on representative AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) type modified alloys (by partial substitution or with small additives of other elements) is presented. The purpose of the modification was to optimize the thermodynamics and kinetics of the hydriding/dehydriding reactions and enhance the stabilities of the alloys for the desired battery applications. The results of our collaboration, to date, demonstrate that (1) alloys prepared by arc melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques exhibit similar morphology, composition and hydriding/dehydriding characteristics; (2) alloys with the appropriate small amounts of substituent or additive elements: (1) retain the single phase structure, (2) improve the hydriding/dehydriding reactions for the battery applications, and (3) enhance the stability in the battery environment; and (3) the AB(sub 2) type alloys exhibit higher energy densities than the AB(sub 5) type alloys but the state-of-the-art, commercialized batteries are predominantly manufactured using Ab(sub 5) type alloys.

  16. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  17. Finite difference program for calculating hydride bed wall temperature profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-10-29

    A QuickBASIC finite difference program was written for calculating one dimensional temperature profiles in up to two media with flat, cylindrical, or spherical geometries. The development of the program was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the Tritium metal hydrides beds for thermal fatigue analysis. The purpose of this report is to document the equations and the computer program used to calculate transient wall temperatures in stainless steel hydride vessels. The development of the computer code was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydrides beds in the Tritium Facility for thermal fatigue analysis.

  18. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    A stable reference electrode for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na.sub.3 AlF.sub.6, wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution.

  19. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-08-16

    A stable reference electrode is described for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution. 1 fig.

  20. The low current domain of the aluminum/sulfur battery

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, S.; Hwang, J.; Light, T.S.; Dillon, R.

    1997-03-01

    A variety of factors including solution-phase modification, aluminum composition, temperature, and anolyte volume, modify anodic behavior in the approach to the low current density domain of the aluminum/sulfur battery. A relatively low level [0.4% Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} by weight in the anolyte] of mercury provides an amalgam film on the aluminum anode which minimizes the parasitic chemical consumption of aluminum anode which aluminum, providing anodic faradaic efficiencies in excess of 80%. Anodic overpotential losses are high for aluminum immersed in mercury-containing electrolytes. However, at lower current densities, their absolute magnitude is several hundred millivolts or smaller and does not substantially impair the cell potential. Aluminum/sulfur battery discharge times up to several hundred hours are demonstrated for 0.2 mA/cm{sup 2} current density cells.

  1. Laser reflection from oxide-coated aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of reflection from an oxide-coated metal is combined with experimentally measured parameters of aluminum to produce useful amplitude and phase shift information applicable to the concentration and direction of laser light. Amplitude and phase are plotted vs angle of incidence for several important laser wavelengths in the near UV, visible, and IR spectral regions.

  2. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition and process for electrolysis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vandegrift, George F.; Krumpelt, Michael; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1983-01-01

    A process for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  3. Novel Hydride Transfer Catalysis for Carbohydrate Conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, John E.; Brown, Heather M.; Appel, Aaron M.; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2008-04-03

    5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), an important versatile sugar derivative has been synthesized from glucose using catalytic amounts of CrCl2 in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidizolium chloride. Glycerol and glyceraldehyde were tested as sugar model compounds. Glycerol is unreactive and does not interfere with glucose conversion. Glyceraldehyde is reactive and does interfere with glucose conversion in competitive experiments. MnCl2 or FeCl2 catalyze dehydration of glyceraldehyde dimer to form compound I, a cyclic hemiacetal with an exocyclic double bond. Upon aqueous work-up I forms pyruvaldehyde. CrCl2 or VCl3 further catalyze a hydride transfer of I to form lactide. Upon aqueous work-up lactide is converted to lactic acid.

  4. Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asquith, J. G.; Mason, D. G.; Stamp, S.

    1972-01-01

    The Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor being designed and fabricated at Atomics International is intended for a wide range of potential applications. Throughout the program a series of reactor designs have been evaluated to establish the unique requirements imposed by coupling with various power conversion systems and for specific applications. Current design and development emphasis is upon a 100 kilowatt thermal reactor for application in a 5 kwe thermoelectric space power generating system, which is scheduled to be fabricated and ground tested in the mid 70s. The reactor design considerations reviewed in this paper will be discussed in the context of this 100 kwt reactor and a 300 kwt reactor previously designed for larger power demand applications.

  5. The anisotropy of aluminum and aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosford, William F.

    2006-05-01

    The anisotropy of textured aluminum is approximated by a yield criterion with an exponent of eight. The use of this criterion in metal-forming analyses has improved the understanding of the formability of aluminum and other metals. The effect of anisotropy on the limiting drawing ratio in cupping is less than that expected from the quadratic Hill yield criterion and the effect of texture on forming limit diagrams is negligible. A method of predicting the effect of strain-path changes on forming limit curves of aluminum alloy sheets has proven to agree with experiments.

  6. Insight into the kinetics and thermodynamics of the hydride transfer reactions between quinones and lumiflavin: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Clorice R; Jaglinski, Tanner C; Kastenschmidt, Ashly M; Song, Eun H; Gross, Adam K; Krause, Alyssa J; Gollmar, Jonathan M; Meise, Kristin J; Stenerson, Zachary S; Weibel, Tyler J; Dison, Andrew; Finnegan, Mackenzie R; Griesi, Daniel S; Heltne, Michael D; Hughes, Tom G; Hunt, Connor D; Jansen, Kayla A; Xiong, Adam H; Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-09-01

    The kinetics and equilibrium of the hydride transfer reaction between lumiflavin and a number of substituted quinones was studied using density functional theory. The impact of electron withdrawing/donating substituents on the redox potentials of quinones was studied. In addition, the role of these substituents on the kinetics of the hydride transfer reaction with lumiflavin was investigated in detail under the transition state (TS) theory assumption. The hydride transfer reactions were found to be more favorable for an electron-withdrawing substituent. The activation barrier exhibited a quadratic relationship with the driving force of these reactions as derived under the formalism of modified Marcus theory. The present study found a significant extent of electron delocalization in the TS that is stabilized by enhanced electrostatic, polarization, and exchange interactions. Analysis of geometry, bond-orders, and energetics revealed a predominant parallel (Leffler-Hammond) effect on the TS. Closer scrutiny reveals that electron-withdrawing substituents, although located on the acceptor ring, reduce the N-H bond order of the donor fragment in the precursor complex. Carried out in the gas-phase, this is the first ever report of a theoretical study of flavin's hydride transfer reactions with quinones, providing an unfiltered view of the electronic effect on the nuclear reorganization of donor-acceptor complexes.

  7. Insight into the kinetics and thermodynamics of the hydride transfer reactions between quinones and lumiflavin: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Clorice R; Jaglinski, Tanner C; Kastenschmidt, Ashly M; Song, Eun H; Gross, Adam K; Krause, Alyssa J; Gollmar, Jonathan M; Meise, Kristin J; Stenerson, Zachary S; Weibel, Tyler J; Dison, Andrew; Finnegan, Mackenzie R; Griesi, Daniel S; Heltne, Michael D; Hughes, Tom G; Hunt, Connor D; Jansen, Kayla A; Xiong, Adam H; Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-09-01

    The kinetics and equilibrium of the hydride transfer reaction between lumiflavin and a number of substituted quinones was studied using density functional theory. The impact of electron withdrawing/donating substituents on the redox potentials of quinones was studied. In addition, the role of these substituents on the kinetics of the hydride transfer reaction with lumiflavin was investigated in detail under the transition state (TS) theory assumption. The hydride transfer reactions were found to be more favorable for an electron-withdrawing substituent. The activation barrier exhibited a quadratic relationship with the driving force of these reactions as derived under the formalism of modified Marcus theory. The present study found a significant extent of electron delocalization in the TS that is stabilized by enhanced electrostatic, polarization, and exchange interactions. Analysis of geometry, bond-orders, and energetics revealed a predominant parallel (Leffler-Hammond) effect on the TS. Closer scrutiny reveals that electron-withdrawing substituents, although located on the acceptor ring, reduce the N-H bond order of the donor fragment in the precursor complex. Carried out in the gas-phase, this is the first ever report of a theoretical study of flavin's hydride transfer reactions with quinones, providing an unfiltered view of the electronic effect on the nuclear reorganization of donor-acceptor complexes. PMID:27491848

  8. THE HYDROLYSIS AND OXIDATION BEHAVIOR OF LITHIUM BOROHYDRIDE AND MAGNESIUM HYDRIDE DETERMINED BY CALORIMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, K; Donald Anton, D; Joshua Gray, J; Bruce Hardy, B

    2008-03-13

    Lithium borohydride, magnesium hydride and the 2:1 'destabilized' ball milled mixtures (2LiBH{sub 4}:MgH{sub 2}) underwent liquid phase hydrolysis, gas phase hydrolysis and air oxidation reactions monitored by isothermal calorimetry. The experimentally determined heats of reaction and resulting products were compared with those theoretically predicted using thermodynamic databases. Results showed a discrepancy between the predicted and observed hydrolysis and oxidation products due to both kinetic limitations and to the significant amorphous character of observed reaction products. Gas phase and liquid phase hydrolysis were the dominant reactions in 2LiBH{sub 4}:MgH{sub 2} with approximately the same total energy release and reaction products; liquid phase hydrolysis displayed the maximum heat flow for likely environmental exposure with a peak energy release of 6 (mW/mg).

  9. Self-Consistent-Field Calculation on Lithium Hydride for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rioux, Frank; Harriss, Donald K.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a self-consistent-field-linear combination of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital calculation on the valence electrons of lithium hydride using the method of Roothaan. This description is intended for undergraduate physics students.

  10. Precipitation of hydrides in high purity niobium after different treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Barkov, F.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Grassellino, A.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation of lossy non-superconducting niobium hydrides represents a known problem for high purity niobium in superconducting applications. Using cryogenic optical and laser confocal scanning microscopy we have directly observed surface precipitation and evolution of niobium hydrides in samples after different treatments used for superconducting RF cavities for particle acceleration. Precipitation is shown to occur throughout the sample volume, and the growth of hydrides is well described by the fast diffusion-controlled process in which almost all hydrogen is precipitated at $T=140$~K within $\\sim30$~min. 120$^{\\circ}$C baking and mechanical deformation are found to affect hydride precipitation through their influence on the number of nucleation and trapping centers.

  11. Life test results of hydride compressors for cryogenic refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.; Golben, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    A development status assessment is made, from the viewpoint of system durability, for the hydride compressors used in such cryogenic refrigerators as that of the JPL, which has operated at 29 K for 500 hours and at lower temperatures for over 1000. Attention is given to a novel hydride compressor unit which has operated through 35,000 cycles and exhibits negligible degradation of check valves, hydride particle size, and expansion valves. The power requirement for liquid hydrogen cooling can be halved through the use of recuperative hot water heating methods, making this system comparable in power use to liquid hydrogen refrigeration systems operating on electricity. Due to the lack of moving parts in hydride refrigerator designs, potential service lifetimes of many years, and perhaps decades, are being projected.

  12. Nonaqueous actinide hydride dissolution and production of actinide $beta$- diketonates

    DOEpatents

    Crisler, L.R.

    1975-11-11

    Actinide beta-diketonate complex molecular compounds are produced by reacting a beta-diketone compound with a hydride of the actinide material in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and methanol. (auth)

  13. Solid-state gadolinium{endash}magnesium hydride optical switch

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, R.; Rubin, M.; Richardson, T.; OBrien, N.; Chen, Y.

    1999-09-01

    The optical switching properties of gadolinium{endash}magnesium hydride have been demonstrated in a solid-state electrochromic device. With positive polarization of the hydride electrode, the visible reflectance approaches 35{percent} with virtually zero transmission, while with negative polarization, the visible transmission exceeds 25{percent} at 650 nm. The switching is reversible, with intermediate optical properties between the transparent and reflecting states. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Development of the Low-Pressure Hydride/Dehydride Process

    SciTech Connect

    Rueben L. Gutierrez

    2001-04-01

    The low-pressure hydride/dehydride process was developed from the need to recover thin-film coatings of plutonium metal from the inner walls of an isotope separation chamber located at Los Alamos and to improve the safety operation of a hydride recovery process using hydrogen at a pressure of 0.7 atm at Rocky Flats. This process is now the heart of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) project.

  15. Ab-Initio Study of the Group 2 Hydride Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Joe P.; Wright, Timothy G.; Manship, Daniel R.

    2013-06-01

    The beryllium hydride (BeH)- dimer has recently been shown to be surprisingly strongly bound, with an electronic structure which is highly dependent on internuclear separation. At the equilibrium distance, the negative charge is to be found on the beryllium atom, despite the higher electronegativity of the hydrogen. The current study expands this investigation to the other Group 2 hydrides, and attempts to explain these effects. M. Verdicchio, G. L. Bendazzoli, S. Evangelisti, T. Leininger J. Phys. Chem. A, 117, 192, (2013)

  16. Method of selective reduction of polyhalosilanes with alkyltin hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, Kenneth G.; D'Errico, John J.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to the selective and stepwise reduction of polyhalosilanes by reacting at room temperature or below with alkyltin hydrides without the use of free radical intermediates. Alkyltin hydrides selectively and stepwise reduce the Si--Br, Si--Cl, or Si--I bonds while leaving intact any Si--F bonds. When two or more different halogens are present on the polyhalosilane, the halogen with the highest atomic weight is preferentially reduced.

  17. Method of selective reduction of halodisilanes with alkyltin hydrides

    DOEpatents

    D'Errico, John J.; Sharp, Kenneth G.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to the selective and sequential reduction of halodisilanes by reacting these compounds at room temperature or below with trialkyltin hydrides or dialkyltin dihydrides without the use of free radical intermediates. The alkyltin hydrides selectively and sequentially reduce the Si-Cl, Si-Br or Si-I bonds while leaving intact the Si-Si and Si-F bonds present.

  18. Effect of the order of deposition of the active components on the structure, phase composition, and activity of aluminum-nickel-molybdenum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Surin, S.A.; Chukin, G.D.; Sidel'kovskaya, V.G.; Sharzov, I.I.; Melamud, V.E.; Yaroshenko, L.B.; Nefedov, B.K.

    1988-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy, diffuse reflection electron spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study the effect of the impregnation method and roasting temperature on the nature of the compounds formed in aluminum-nickel-molybdenum catalysts and the distribution of elements in the catalyst granule. Impregnation of the support by salts of hydrogenating metals largely gives surface molybdenum poly compounds with the inclusion of nickel, which interact weakly with the support. Upon an increase in the roasting temperature, the interaction of molybdenum and nickel with the support becomes more significant. The order of the deposition of the hydrogenating metals affects the distribution of elements in the catalyst granule and the composition of the surface nickel and molybdenum compounds.

  19. A study of environmental characterization of conventional and advanced aluminum alloys for selection and design. Phase 2: The breaking load test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Bucci, R. J.; Ponchel, B. M.; Brazill, R. L.; Bretz, P. E.

    1984-01-01

    A technique is demonstrated for accelerated stress corrosion testing of high strength aluminum alloys. The method offers better precision and shorter exposure times than traditional pass fail procedures. The approach uses data from tension tests performed on replicate groups of smooth specimens after various lengths of exposure to static stress. The breaking strength measures degradation in the test specimen load carrying ability due to the environmental attack. Analysis of breaking load data by extreme value statistics enables the calculation of survival probabilities and a statistically defined threshold stress applicable to the specific test conditions. A fracture mechanics model is given which quantifies depth of attack in the stress corroded specimen by an effective flaw size calculated from the breaking stress and the material strength and fracture toughness properties. Comparisons are made with experimental results from three tempers of 7075 alloy plate tested by the breaking load method and by traditional tests of statistically loaded smooth tension bars and conventional precracked specimens.

  20. Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2013-09-30

    The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

  1. AIR PASSIVATION OF METAL HYDRIDE BEDS FOR WASTE DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J; R. H. Hsu, R

    2007-07-02

    Metal hydride beds offer compact, safe storage of tritium. After metal hydride beds have reached the end of their useful life, the beds will replaced with new beds and the old beds prepared for disposal. One acceptance criteria for hydride bed waste disposal is that the material inside the bed not be pyrophoric. To determine the pyrophoric nature of spent metal hydride beds, controlled air ingress tests were performed. A simple gas handling manifold fitted with pressure transducers and a calibrated volume were used to introduce controlled quantities of air into a metal hydride bed and the bed temperature rise monitored for reactivity with the air. A desorbed, 4.4 kg titanium prototype hydride storage vessel (HSV) produced a 4.4 C internal temperature rise upon the first air exposure cycle and a 0.1 C temperature rise upon a second air exposure. A total of 346 scc air was consumed by the bed (0.08 scc per gram Ti). A desorbed, 9.66 kg LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} prototype storage bed experienced larger temperature rises over successive cycles of air ingress and evacuation. The cycles were performed over a period of days with the bed effectively passivated after the 12th cycle. Nine to ten STP-L of air reacted with the bed producing both oxidized metal and water.

  2. Novel fuel cell stack with coupled metal hydride containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhixiang; Li, Yan; Bu, Qingyuan; Guzy, Christopher J.; Li, Qi; Chen, Weirong; Wang, Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Air-cooled, self-humidifying hydrogen fuel cells are often used for backup and portable power sources, with a metal hydride used as the hydrogen storage material. To provide a stable hydrogen flow to the fuel cell stack, heat must be provided to the metal hydride. Conventionally, the heat released from the exothermic reaction of hydrogen and oxygen in the fuel cell stack to the exhaust air is used to heat a separate metal hydride container. In this case, the heat is only partially used instead of being more closely coupled because of the heat transfer resistances in the system. To achieve better heat integration, a novel scheme is proposed whereby hydrogen storage and single fuel cells are more closely coupled. Based on this idea, metal hydride containers in the form of cooling plates were assembled between each pair of cells in the stack so that the heat could be directly transferred to a metal hydride container of much larger surface-to-volume ratio than conventional separate containers. A heat coupled fuel cell portable power source with 10 cells and 11 metal hydride containers was constructed and the experimental results show that this scheme is beneficial for the heat management of fuel cell stack.

  3. Aluminum plasmonic multicolor meta-hologram.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Wei; Chen, Wei Ting; Tsai, Wei-Yi; Wu, Pin Chieh; Wang, Chih-Ming; Sun, Greg; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-05-13

    We report a phase-modulated multicolor meta-hologram (MCMH) that is polarization-dependent and capable of producing images in three primary colors. The MCMH structure is made of aluminum nanorods that are arranged in a two-dimensional array of pixels with surface plasmon resonances in red, green, and blue. The aluminum nanorod array is patterned on a 30 nm thick SiO2 spacer layer sputtered on top of a 130 nm thick aluminum mirror. With proper design of the structure, we obtain resonances of narrow bandwidths to allow for implementation of the multicolor scheme. Taking into account of the wavelength dependence of the diffraction angle, we can project images to specific locations with predetermined size and order. With tuning of aluminum nanorod size, we demonstrate that the image color can be continuously varied across the visible spectrum.

  4. Aluminum plasmonic multicolor meta-hologram.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Wei; Chen, Wei Ting; Tsai, Wei-Yi; Wu, Pin Chieh; Wang, Chih-Ming; Sun, Greg; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-05-13

    We report a phase-modulated multicolor meta-hologram (MCMH) that is polarization-dependent and capable of producing images in three primary colors. The MCMH structure is made of aluminum nanorods that are arranged in a two-dimensional array of pixels with surface plasmon resonances in red, green, and blue. The aluminum nanorod array is patterned on a 30 nm thick SiO2 spacer layer sputtered on top of a 130 nm thick aluminum mirror. With proper design of the structure, we obtain resonances of narrow bandwidths to allow for implementation of the multicolor scheme. Taking into account of the wavelength dependence of the diffraction angle, we can project images to specific locations with predetermined size and order. With tuning of aluminum nanorod size, we demonstrate that the image color can be continuously varied across the visible spectrum. PMID:25844757

  5. Terminal Hydride in [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Model Has Lower Potential for H2 Production Than the Isomeric Bridging Hydride

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Bryan E.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    Protonation of the symmetrical tetraphosphine complexes Fe2(S2CnH2n)(CO)2(dppv)2 afforded the corresponding terminal hydrides, establishing that even symmetrical diiron(I) dithiolates undergo protonation at terminal sites. The terminal hydride [HFe2(S2C3H6)(CO)2(dppv)2]+ was found to catalyze proton reduction at potentials 200 mV milder than the isomeric bridging hydride, thereby establishing a thermodynamic advantage for catalysis operating via terminal hydride. The azadithiolate protonates to afford, [Fe2[(SCH2)2NH2](CO)2(dppv)2]+, [HFe2[(SCH2)2NH](CO)2−(dppv)2]+, and [HFe2[(SCH2)2NH2](CO)2(dppv)2]2+, depending on conditions. PMID:18333613

  6. Amorphization of Hydrided Fe2Er-SINGLE-CRYSTALS Triggered by a Lattice Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fecht, H. J.; Fu, Z.

    Specific heat measurements at constant concentration of hydrided, initially single-crystalline Fe2Er powder samples exhibit a lambda-type anomaly during the transition from the crystalline to the amorphous state. The logarithmic temperature-dependence of the specific heat results from local fluctuations in the crystalline phase, rather than thermally activated lattice defects. This is suggestive of an instability underlying the “melting” transition to a glass that has been predicted if vitrification occurs in the vicinity of the extrapolated triple point between crystal, liquid and glass.

  7. Aspects of aluminum toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, C.D.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R. )

    1990-06-01

    Aluminum is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. The widespread occurrence of aluminum, both in the environment and in foodstuffs, makes it virtually impossible for man to avoid exposure to this metal ion. Attention was first drawn to the potential role of aluminum as a toxic metal over 50 years ago, but was dismissed as a toxic agent as recently as 15 years ago. The accumulation of aluminum, in some patients with chronic renal failure, is associated with the development of toxic phenomena; dialysis encephalopathy, osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy, and an anemia. Aluminum accumulation also occurs in patients who are not on dialysis, predominantly infants and children with immature or impaired renal function. Aluminum has also been implicated as a toxic agent in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, Guamiam amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and parkinsonism-dementia. 119 references.

  8. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  9. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  10. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  11. Preparing TiNiNb shape memory alloy powders by hydriding-dehydriding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yang; Cui, Lishan; Jiang, Xiaohua; Guo, Fangmin; Liu, Yinong; Hao, Shijie

    2016-07-01

    High-quality TiNiNb shape memory alloy (SMA) powders were prepared by hydrogenation of cold-worked TiNiNb SMA wire composed of amorphous and nancrystalline microstructure, by mechanical pulverization and vacuum dehydrogenation. It is revealed that abundant structural defects introduced by cold-work greatly promoted hydrogen diffusion, which significantly decreased hydriding temperature and shortened hydriding time. After hydrogenation, the hydrogenated sample composed of TiNiH and NbH with high brittleness can be easily ground into ultra-fine powers. The TiNiNb powers obtained by following vacuum dehydrogenation exhibit almost the same reversible phase transformation behavior as that of the original TiNiNb SMA before cold-work. Moreover, a TiNiNb part was obtained by hot-pressure sintering the hydrogenated powders, where sintering and dehydrogenation are carried out in one single step. The sintered TiNiNb part shows most the same reversible phase transformation behaviors as that of the original TiNiNb SMA and there is no visible additional brittle phase appearance.

  12. Carbothermic Aluminum Production Using Scrap Aluminum As A Coolant

    DOEpatents

    LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2002-11-05

    A process for producing aluminum metal by carbothermic reduction of alumina ore. Alumina ore is heated in the presence of carbon at an elevated temperature to produce an aluminum metal body contaminated with about 10-30% by wt. aluminum carbide. Aluminum metal or aluminum alloy scrap then is added to bring the temperature to about 900-1000.degree. C. and precipitate out aluminum carbide. The precipitated aluminum carbide is filtered, decanted, or fluxed with salt to form a molten body having reduced aluminum carbide content.

  13. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-07-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  14. MTBE OXIDATION BY BIFUNCTIONAL ALUMINUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bifunctional aluminum, prepared by sulfating zero-valent aluminum with sulfuric acid, has a dual functionality of simultaneously decomposing both reductively- and oxidatively-degradable contaminants. In this work, the use of bifunctional aluminum for the degradation of methyl te...

  15. Reduction of CO2 to methanol catalyzed by a biomimetic organo-hydride produced from pyridine.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chern-Hooi; Holder, Aaron M; Hynes, James T; Musgrave, Charles B

    2014-11-12

    We use quantum chemical calculations to elucidate a viable mechanism for pyridine-catalyzed reduction of CO2 to methanol involving homogeneous catalytic steps. The first phase of the catalytic cycle involves generation of the key catalytic agent, 1,2-dihydropyridine (PyH2). First, pyridine (Py) undergoes a H(+) transfer (PT) to form pyridinium (PyH(+)), followed by an e(-) transfer (ET) to produce pyridinium radical (PyH(0)). Examples of systems to effect this ET to populate PyH(+)'s LUMO (E(0)(calc) ∼ -1.3 V vs SCE) to form the solution phase PyH(0) via highly reducing electrons include the photoelectrochemical p-GaP system (E(CBM) ∼ -1.5 V vs SCE at pH 5) and the photochemical [Ru(phen)3](2+)/ascorbate system. We predict that PyH(0) undergoes further PT-ET steps to form the key closed-shell, dearomatized (PyH2) species (with the PT capable of being assisted by a negatively biased cathode). Our proposed sequential PT-ET-PT-ET mechanism for transforming Py into PyH2 is analogous to that described in the formation of related dihydropyridines. Because it is driven by its proclivity to regain aromaticity, PyH2 is a potent recyclable organo-hydride donor that mimics important aspects of the role of NADPH in the formation of C-H bonds in the photosynthetic CO2 reduction process. In particular, in the second phase of the catalytic cycle, which involves three separate reduction steps, we predict that the PyH2/Py redox couple is kinetically and thermodynamically competent in catalytically effecting hydride and proton transfers (the latter often mediated by a proton relay chain) to CO2 and its two succeeding intermediates, namely, formic acid and formaldehyde, to ultimately form CH3OH. The hydride and proton transfers for the first of these reduction steps, the homogeneous reduction of CO2, are sequential in nature (in which the formate to formic acid protonation can be assisted by a negatively biased cathode). In contrast, these transfers are coupled in each of the two

  16. Aluminum-stabilized Nb[sub 3]Sn superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Scanlan, R.M.

    1988-05-10

    Disclosed are an aluminum-stabilized Nb[sub 3]Sn superconductor and process for producing same, utilizing ultrapure aluminum. Ductile components are co-drawn with aluminum to produce a conductor suitable for winding magnets. After winding, the conductor is heated to convert it to the brittle Nb[sub 3]Sn superconductor phase, using a temperature high enough to perform the transformation but still below the melting point of the aluminum. This results in reaction of substantially all of the niobium, while providing stabilization and react-in-place features which are beneficial in the fabrication of magnets utilizing superconducting materials. 4 figs.

  17. Joining of parts via magnetic heating of metal aluminum powders

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Ian

    2013-05-21

    A method of joining at least two parts includes steps of dispersing a joining material comprising a multi-phase magnetic metal-aluminum powder at an interface between the at least two parts to be joined and applying an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The AMF has a magnetic field strength and frequency suitable for inducing magnetic hysteresis losses in the metal-aluminum powder and is applied for a period that raises temperature of the metal-aluminum powder to an exothermic transformation temperature. At the exothermic transformation temperature, the metal-aluminum powder melts and resolidifies as a metal aluminide solid having a non-magnetic configuration.

  18. Aluminum-stabilized Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Scanlan, R.M.

    1984-02-10

    This patent discloses an aluminum-stabilized Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor and process for producing same, utilizing ultrapure aluminum. Ductile components are co-drawn with aluminum to produce a conductor suitable for winding magnets. After winding, the conductor is heated to convert it to the brittle Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor phase, using a temperature high enough to perform the transformation but still below the melting point of the aluminum. This results in reaction of substantially all of the niobium, while providing stabilization and react-in-place features which are beneficial in the fabrication of magnets utilizing superconducting materials.

  19. Aluminum nitrate recrystallization and recovery from liquid extraction raffinates

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Huxtable, W.P.

    1991-09-01

    The solid sludges resulting form biodenitrification of discarded aluminum nitrate are the largest Y-12 Plant process solid waste. Aluminum nitrate feedstocks also represent a major plant materials cost. The chemical constraints on aluminum nitrate recycle were investigated to determine the feasibility of increasing recycle while maintaining acceptable aluminum nitrate purity. Reported phase behavior of analogous systems, together with bench research, indicated that it would be possible to raise the recycle rate from 35% to between 70 and 90% by successive concentration and recrystallization of the mother liquor. A full scale pilot test successfully confirmed the ability to obtain 70% recycle in existing process equipment.

  20. Fatigue crack growth in lithium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Subcritical fatigue crack growth, from cyclic tensile loading, was demonstrated in warm pressed Polycrystalline lithium hydride. Experiments were performed with cyclic tension-tension crack opening (mode I) loads applied to a pre-cracked compact type specimen in an argon environment at a temperature of 21C (70F). The fatigue crack growth was found to occur between 7.56 {times} 10{sup {minus}ll} M/cycle (2.98 {times} l0{sup {minus}9} in/cycle) and 2.35 {times} l0{sup {minus}8} m/cycle (9.24{times}10{sup {minus}7} in/cycle) for a range of stress intensity factors between 1.04 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (0.95 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in) and 1.49 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (1.36 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in). The rate of fatigue crack growth from cyclic tensile loading was found to be in excess of crack growth from sustained loading at an equivalent stress intensity factor. Furthermore, a fatigue threshold was not evident from the acquired data.

  1. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described. PMID:26828562

  2. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  3. Hydrides in Space: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, D. C.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Bergin, E. A.; Falgarone, E.; Gerin, M.; Roueff, E.

    2009-12-01

    One of the central questions of modern astrophysics concerns the life cycle of molecules in the Universe—from the diffuse interstellar medium to planetary systems—and the chemical pathways leading from simple atoms and diatomic molecules to complex organic species. In the past two decades, the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) has contributed a number of key discoveries on these topics. Light hydrides are of particular interest for astrochemistry, as the basic building blocks of the chemical networks in both diffuse and dense clouds. Ongoing and planned submillimeter wide-field continuum surveys will yield hundreds of potential galactic targets suitable for detailed spectroscopic follow-ups. Recent advances in detector and digital spectrometer technologies promise to truly revolutionize further the field of high-resolution submillimeter spectroscopy and its application to the study of the life cycle of molecules. This will greatly improve our understanding of astrochemistry, astrobiology, the origin of life on Earth, and allow assessing the possibilities of life in other planetary systems.

  4. High energy density aluminum battery

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  5. Evaluation of Al3Mg2 precipitates and Mn-rich phase in aluminum-magnesium alloy based on scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yakun; Cullen, David A; Kar, Soumya; Free, Michael P; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to observe intergranular and intragranular -phase (Al3Mg2) formation and growth in as-received sample and long-term (~ 1 year) thermally treated samples of 5083-H131 alloy. Rod-shaped and equiaxed particles rich in Mn, Fe, and Cr were present in the as-received and heat treated samples. The -phase precipitated along grain boundaries as well as around and between preexisting Mn-Fe-Cr rich particles. The measured thickness of -phase along grain boundaries was lower than Zener Hillert diffusion model predicted value and the potential reasons were theoretically analyzed. Dislocation networks, grain boundaries, and different preexisting particles were observed to contribute to Mg diffusion and -phase precipitation.

  6. Lithium-aluminum-iron electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1979-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary electrochemical cell. The cell also includes an electrolyte with lithium ions such as a molten salt of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides that can be used in high-temperature cells. The cell's positive electrode contains a a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent in an alloy of aluminum-iron. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, aluminum and iron are formed. The lithium within the intermetallic phase of Al.sub.5 Fe.sub.2 exhibits increased activity over that of lithium within a lithium-aluminum alloy to provide an increased cell potential of up to about 0.25 volt.

  7. Lithium-aluminum-magnesium electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Melendres, Carlos A.; Siegel, Stanley

    1978-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary, high-temperature electrochemical cell. The cell also includes a molten salt electrolyte of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides and a positive electrode including a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent and a magnesium-aluminum alloy as a structural matrix. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, magnesium, and aluminum are formed but the electrode composition in both its charged and discharged state remains substantially free of the alpha lithium-aluminum phase and exhibits good structural integrity.

  8. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust. PMID:24806729

  9. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis dead?

    PubMed

    Lidsky, Theodore I

    2014-05-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust.

  10. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are also…

  11. Aluminum space frame technology

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, S.

    1994-01-01

    This article examines the increased application of aluminum to the construction of automobile frames. The topics of the article include a joint venture between Audi and Alcoa, forms in which aluminum is used, new alloys and construction methods, meeting rigidity and safety levels, manufacturing techniques, the use of extrusions, die casting, joining techniques, and pollution control during manufacturing.

  12. Aluminum-lithium target behavior

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, W.R.

    1989-10-01

    Information on physical properties and irradiation behavior of aluminum-lithium target alloys employed for the production of tritium in Savannah River reactors has been reviewed to support development of technology for the New Production Reactor (NPR). Phase compositions and microstructures, thermal conductivity, mechanical properties, and constituent diffusion phenomena of the alloys, established in prior site studies, are presented. Irradiation behavior, including distributions of product tritium and helium and related exposure limits due to swelling and cracking of the target alloys is discussed, along with gas release processes occurring during subsequent product recovery operations. The property review supports designation of the aluminum-lithium alloys as ideally well-suited target materials for low-temperature, tritium-producing reactors, demonstrated over 35 years of Savannah River reactor operation. Low temperature irradiation and reaction with lithium in the alloy promotes tritium retention during reactor exposure, and the aluminum provides a matrix from which the product is readily recovered on heating following irradiation. 33 refs., 26 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Hydrogen storage as a hydride. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    These citations from the international literature concern the storage of hydrogen in various metal hydrides. Binary and intermetallic hydrides are considered. Specific alloys discussed are iron titanium, lanthanium nickel, magnesium copper and magnesium nickel among others.

  14. Aluminum structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, G.

    1996-05-01

    Extensive research by aluminum producers and automakers in the 1980s resulted in the development of technologies that enable building of aluminum cars that meet and exceed all the expectations of today`s drivers and passengers, yet weigh several hundred pounds less than their steel counterparts. The Acura NSX sports car, the Audi A8, and the Jaguar XJ220 have all been introduced. Ford has built 40 aluminum-intensive automobiles based on the Taurus/Sable for test purposes, and General Motors recently announced an aluminum-structured electric vehicle. The design flexibility that aluminum allows is shown by these examples. Each uses a somewhat different technology that is particularly suited to the vehicle and its market.

  15. The Aluminum Smelting Process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  16. The aluminum smelting process.

    PubMed

    Kvande, Halvor

    2014-05-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development.

  17. Sodium-based hydrides for thermal energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Humphries, T. D.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    Concentrating solar-thermal power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) represents an attractive alternative to conventional fossil fuels for base-load power generation. Sodium alanate (NaAlH4) is a well-known sodium-based complex metal hydride but, more recently, high-temperature sodium-based complex metal hydrides have been considered for TES. This review considers the current state of the art for NaH, NaMgH3- x F x , Na-based transition metal hydrides, NaBH4 and Na3AlH6 for TES and heat pumping applications. These metal hydrides have a number of advantages over other classes of heat storage materials such as high thermal energy storage capacity, low volume, relatively low cost and a wide range of operating temperatures (100 °C to more than 650 °C). Potential safety issues associated with the use of high-temperature sodium-based hydrides are also addressed.

  18. Technical Status Report on the Effect of Phosphate and Aluminum on the Development of Amorphous Phase Separation in Sodium Borosilicate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A.D.

    1998-12-03

    The objective of the Tank Focus Area ''Optimize Waste Loading'' task is to enhance the definition of the acceptable processing window for high-level waste vitrification plants. One possible manner in which the acceptable processing window may be enhanced is by reducing the uncertainty of various compositional/property models through a specifically defined experimental plan. A reduction in model uncertainty can reduce limitations on current acceptance constraints and may allow for a larger processing or operational window. Enhanced composition/property model predictions coupled with an increased waste loading may decrease the processing time and waste glass disposal costs (i.e., overall lifecycle costs). One of the compositional/property models currently being evaluated by the Tanks Focus Area is related to the development of amorphous phase separation in multi-component borosilicate glasses.Described in this report is the current status for evaluating the effect of phosphorus and alumina on both simple sodium borosilicate and high-level waste glasses on the formation of amorphous phase separation. The goal of this subtask is to increase the understanding of the formation of phase separation by adding significant amounts (3-5 wt. percent) of phosphorus and alumina to well-characterized glasses. Additional scope includes evaluating the effects of thermal history on the formation of amorphous phase separation and durability of select glasses.The development of data, understanding, and quantitative description for composition and kinetic effects on the development of amorphous phase separation will continue in FY99. This effort will provide insight into the compositional and thermal effects on phase stability and will lead to a better understanding of the methods used to predict the development of amorphous phase separation in HLW glasses.

  19. Characterization and high throughput analysis of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcelo, Steven James

    Efficient hydrogen storage is required for fuel cell vehicles to be competitive with those driven by internal combustion engines. Current methods of storage such as compressed gas and liquid hydrogen cannot meet this standard, so novel hydrogen storage materials such as metal hydrides are required. No simple metal hydride meets the required specifications. Research is required to find new materials or improve existing materials. This thesis describes the research practices necessary to achieve legitimate and repeatable results in laboratories across the world. Examples of experiments using these techniques are presented, such as a high throughput technique to optimize materials systems with up to three components such as calcium borohydride with titanium catalyst and magnesium hydride with nickel and aluminum as destabilizing elements and catalysts. Thin films composed of gradients of each material were deposited by sputtering, creating a single thin film sample covering all potential material combinations. Optical properties of the samples under hydrogen pressure were monitored to identify the regions with largest and fastest hydrogen uptake. In the Ca-B-Ti system, titanium did not sufficiently catalyze the borohydride formation reaction at low temperature. Substantial hydrogen uptake was shown in the Mg-Ni region of the Mg-Ni-Al films. Al did not participate in the reaction at low temperature. Further investigation of the role of catalysts and destabilizing elements in improving hydrogen storage performance through X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy measurements of the Mg-Ni system during hydrogenation is presented. Typical X-ray spectroscopy measurements use a synchrotron radiation source and require ultra high vacuum conditions. For these experiments we designed a chamber which can be inserted into a vacuum chamber allowing in situ measurements of a sample under hydrogen pressure, providing information on the role of Ni in hydrogen absorption of Mg

  20. Electrochemical and chemical routes to hydride loss from an iridium dihydride.

    PubMed

    Walden, A G; Kumar, A; Lease, N; Goldman, A S; Miller, A J M

    2016-06-14

    With a view towards replacing sacrificial hydrogen acceptors in alkane dehydrogenation catalysis, electrochemical methods for oxidative activation of a pincer-ligated iridium hydride intermediate were explored. A 1H(+)/2e(-) oxidation process was observed in THF solvent, with net hydride loss leading to a reactive cationic intermediate that can be trapped by chloride. Analogous reactivity was observed with the concerted hydride transfer reagent Ph3C(+), connecting chemical and electrochemical hydride loss pathways. PMID:26979786

  1. Effect of trace elements vanadium and nickel on iron intermetallic phases formation and distribution in DC cast 5xxx series aluminum ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaofeng

    AA5657 alloy is one of the important members of 5xxx-series alloys. It has application in many fields as packing, electricity, architectural, and printing. These applications require high quality surface finishing, and the alloy ingots require homogeneous microstructure. In the industry of DC (direct-chill) casting of 1xxx and 5xxx-series aluminium ingots, there exist different cooling rates from the casting surface to the ingot center. Thus, different Fe intermetallic phases such as AlmFe, Al6Fe, alpha-AlFeSi and Al3Fe can form preferentially in different positions of the ingot. The Fe intermetallic phase transition in DC casting ingot may cause microstructure inhomogeneities, which in turn cause the so called fir-tree zones (FTZs) in the ingots as well as streaks and bands on the Al sheets. Nowadays, with the increase of impurity in aluminium smelting raw materials (coke, alumina, etc.), the levels of trace elements present in the primary metal is gradually increasing. The impact of this increase on the aluminium transformation process and the final products is uncertain. Thus, there is a clear need to better understand these impacts, which will allow identifying ways to mitigate the negative impacts. The study presented in this thesis was performed on AA5657 alloys to study the effect of trace elements V and Ni on Fe intermetallic phases formation and distribution. A slice of AA1050 alloy ingot with visible FTZs was also studied to characterize the Fe intermetallic phases transition across the FTZs. A DC simulator was built in the lab, which can reproduce the solidification conditions in the sub-surface regions of industry ingots. The methods for the characterization of Fe intermetallic particles were developed in this research. AlmFe, Al6Fe, alpha-AlFeSi and alpha-Al3Fe intermetallic phases were successfully identified by using Deep-etching method, EDS and EBSD technique in combination. Quantitative analysis of the Fe intermetallic particles was carried out by

  2. Buckyball-, carbon nanotube-, graphite-, and graphene-enhanced dehydrogenation of lithium aluminum hydride.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Ping; Jiang, De-hao; Lee, Sheng-Long; Horng, Jain-Long; Ger, Ming-Der; Chang, Jeng-Kuei

    2013-10-01

    Compared to C60, carbon nanotubes, and graphite, graphene more effectively lowers the dehydrogenation temperature and improves the dehydrogenation kinetics of LiAlH4. With 15 wt% graphene incorporation, the initial hydrogen release temperature is ~80 °C (60 °C lower than that of pristine LiAlH4). PMID:23958824

  3. Two-Dimensional Boron Hydride Sheets: High Stability, Massless Dirac Fermions, and Excellent Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yalong; Ma, Fengxian; Bell, John; Bilic, Ante; Du, Aijun

    2016-08-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) boron sheets have been successfully synthesized in recent experiments, however, some important issues remain, including the dynamical instability, high energy, and the active surface of the sheets. In an attempt to stabilize 2D boron layers, we have used density functional theory and global minimum search with the particle-swarm optimization method to predict four stable 2D boron hydride layers, namely the C2/m, Pbcm, Cmmm, and Pmmn sheets. The vibrational normal mode calculations reveal all these structures are dynamically stable, indicating potential for successful experimental synthesis. The calculated Young's modulus indicates a high mechanical strength for the C2/m and Pbcm phases. Most importantly, the C2/m, Pbcm, and Pmmn structures exhibit Dirac cones with massless Dirac fermions and the Fermi velocities for the Pbcm and Cmmm structures are even higher than that of graphene. The Cmmm phase is reported as the first discovery of Dirac ring material among boron-based 2D structures. The unique electronic structure of the 2D boron hydride sheets makes them ideal for nanoelectronics applications. PMID:27460282

  4. Integrating hydrogen generation and storage in a novel compact electrochemical system based on metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel, C. M.; Fernandes, V. R.; Slavkov, Y.; Bozukov, L.

    The development of efficient and reliable energy storage systems based on hydrogen technology represents a challenge to seasonal storage based on renewable hydrogen. State of the art renewable energy generation systems include separate units such as electrolyzer, hydrogen storage vessel and a fuel cell system for the conversion of H 2 back into electricity, when required. In this work, a novel electrochemical system has been developed which integrates hydrogen production, storage and compression in only one device, at relatively low cost and high efficiency. The developed prototype comprises a six-electrode cell assembly using an AB 5-type metal hydride and Ni plates as counter electrodes, in a 35-wt% KOH solution. Metal hydride electrodes with chemical composition LaNi 4.3Co 0.4Al 0.3 were prepared by high frequency vacuum melting followed by high temperature annealing. X-ray phase analysis showed typical hexagonal structure and no traces of other intermetallic compounds belonging to the La-Ni phase diagram. Thermodynamic study has been performed in a Sieverts type of apparatus produced by Labtech Int. During cycling, the charging/discharging process was studied in situ using a gas chromatograph from Agilent. It is anticipated that the device will be integrated as a combined hydrogen generator and storage unit in a stand-alone system associated to a 1-kW fuel cell.

  5. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Patrick L.

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  6. Iron Hydride Detection and Intramolecular Hydride Transfer in a Synthetic Model of Mono-Iron Hydrogenase with a CNS Chelate.

    PubMed

    Durgaprasad, Gummadi; Xie, Zhu-Lin; Rose, Michael J

    2016-01-19

    We report the identification and reactivity of an iron hydride species in a synthetic model complex of monoiron hydrogenase. The hydride complex is derived from a phosphine-free CNS chelate that includes a Fe-C(NH)(═O) bond (carbamoyl) as a mimic of the active site iron acyl. The reaction of [((O═)C(HN)N(py)S(Me))Fe(CO)2(Br)] (1) with NaHBEt3 generates the iron hydride intermediate [((O═)C(HN)N(py)S(Me))Fe(H)(CO)2] (2; δFe-H = -5.08 ppm). Above -40 °C, the hydride species extrudes CH3S(-) via intramolecular hydride transfer, which is stoichiometrically trapped in the structurally characterized dimer μ2-(CH3S)2-[((O═)C(HN)N(Ph))Fe(CO)2]2 (3). Alternately, when activated by base ((t)BuOK), 1 undergoes desulfurization to form a cyclometalated species, [((O═)C(NH)NC(Ph))Fe(CO)2] (5); derivatization of 5 with PPh3 affords the structurally characterized species [((O═)C(NH)NC)Fe(CO)(PPh3)2] (6), indicating complex 6 as the common intermediate along each pathway of desulfurization.

  7. Investigation of metal hydride materials as hydrogen reservoirs for metal-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONISCHAK

    1976-01-01

    The performance and suitability of various metal hydride materials were examined for use as possible hydrogen storage reservoirs for secondary metal-hydrogen batteries. Lanthanum pentanickel hydride appears as a probable candidate in terms of stable hydrogen supply under feasible thermal conditions. A kinetic model describing the decomposition rate data of the hydride has been developed.

  8. The coordination chemistry of organo-hydride donors: new prospects for efficient multi-electron reduction.

    PubMed

    McSkimming, Alex; Colbran, Stephen B

    2013-06-21

    In biological reduction processes the dihydronicotinamides NAD(P)H often transfer hydride to an unsaturated substrate bound within an enzyme active site. In many cases, metal ions in the active site bind, polarize and thereby activate the substrate to direct attack by hydride from NAD(P)H cofactor. This review looks more widely at the metal coordination chemistry of organic donors of hydride ion--organo-hydrides--such as dihydronicotinamides, other dihydropyridines including Hantzsch's ester and dihydroacridine derivatives, those derived from five-membered heterocycles including the benzimidazolines and benzoxazolines, and all-aliphatic hydride donors such as hexadiene and hexadienyl anion derivatives. The hydride donor properties--hydricities--of organo-hydrides and how these are affected by metal ions are discussed. The coordination chemistry of organo-hydrides is critically surveyed and the use of metal-organo-hydride systems in electrochemically-, photochemically- and chemically-driven reductions of unsaturated organic and inorganic (e.g. carbon dioxide) substrates is highlighted. The sustainable electrocatalytic, photochemical or chemical regeneration of organo-hydrides such as NAD(P)H, including for driving enzyme-catalysed reactions, is summarised and opportunities for development are indicated. Finally, new prospects are identified for metal-organo-hydride systems as catalysts for organic transformations involving 'hydride-borrowing' and for sustainable multi-electron reductions of unsaturated organic and inorganic substrates directly driven by electricity or light or by renewable reductants such as formate/formic acid. PMID:23507957

  9. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: Recent advances and future prospects

    DOE PAGES

    Bowman, Jr., Robert C.; Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo V.; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman

    2016-03-17

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the metal hydrides. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modeling of a two-stage compressor aimed at both describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, but, also, on their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS andmore » the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the metal hydride compression in the overall development of the hydrogen driven energy systems. Lastly, the work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.« less

  10. CO2 hydrogenation on a metal hydride surface.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke; Borgschulte, Andreas; Ferri, Davide; Bielmann, Michael; Crivello, Jean-Claude; Wiedenmann, Daniel; Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena; Rossbach, Peggy; Lu, Ye; Remhof, Arndt; Züttel, Andreas

    2012-04-28

    The catalytic hydrogenation of CO(2) at the surface of a metal hydride and the corresponding surface segregation were investigated. The surface processes on Mg(2)NiH(4) were analyzed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and mass spectrometry (MS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). CO(2) hydrogenation on the hydride surface during hydrogen desorption was analyzed by catalytic activity measurement with a flow reactor, a gas chromatograph (GC) and MS. We conclude that for the CO(2) methanation reaction, the dissociation of H(2) molecules at the surface is not the rate controlling step but the dissociative adsorption of CO(2) molecules on the hydride surface. PMID:22433948

  11. A new heat storage system using metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, S.; Kawamura, M.; Ishido, Y.; Akiba, E.; Higano, S.

    The development of a prototype chemical heat storage system, designed for the accumulation of fairly high temperature (300 - 400 C) waste heat, and called the Hydriding Heat Storage system is presented. Mg2Ni hydride is used as the high temperature heat storing medium, and LaNi5H6 is used as a reservoir for the hydrogen released from the heat storing medium. The system has been in development since 1976, and a 2000 kcal heat capacity prototype system is to be completed by 1982. Basic investigations, i.e., reaction kinetics of absorption and desorption, and heat transfer characteristics of the hydride and/or the metal powder packed bed, are described.

  12. Clinical biochemistry of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    King, S.W.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R.

    1981-05-01

    Aluminum toxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of clinical disorders in patients with chronic renal failure on long-term intermittent hemodialysis treatment. The predominant disorders have been those involving either bone (osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy) or brain (dialysis encephalopathy). In nonuremic patients, an increased brain aluminum concentration has been implicated as a neurotoxic agent in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and was associated with experimental neurofibrillary degeneration in animals. The brain aluminum concentrations of patients dying with the syndrome of dialysis encephalopathy (dialysis dementia) are significantly higher than in dialyzed patients without the syndrome and in nondialyzed patients. Two potential sources for the increased tissue content of aluminum in patients on hemodialysis have been proposed: (1) intestinal absorption from aluminum containing phosphate-binding gels, and (2) transfer across the dialysis membrane from aluminum in the water used to prepare the dialysate. These findings, coupled with our everyday exposure to the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum in nature, have created concerns over the potential toxicity of this metal.

  13. Thermodynamic integration based on classical atomistic simulations to determine the Gibbs energy of condensed phases: Calculation of the aluminum-zirconium system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J.-P.; Gheribi, A. E.; Chartrand, P.

    2012-12-01

    In this work, an in silico procedure to generate a fully coherent set of thermodynamic properties obtained from classical molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations is proposed. The procedure is applied to the Al-Zr system because of its importance in the development of high strength Al-Li alloys and of bulk metallic glasses. Cohesive energies of the studied condensed phases of the Al-Zr system (the liquid phase, the fcc solid solution, and various orthorhombic stoichiometric compounds) are calculated using the modified embedded atom model (MEAM) in the second-nearest-neighbor formalism (2NN). The Al-Zr MEAM-2NN potential is parameterized in this work using ab initio and experimental data found in the literature for the AlZr3-L12 structure, while its predictive ability is confirmed for several other solid structures and for the liquid phase. The thermodynamic integration (TI) method is implemented in a general MC algorithm in order to evaluate the absolute Gibbs energy of the liquid and the fcc solutions. The entropy of mixing calculated from the TI method, combined to the enthalpy of mixing and the heat capacity data generated from MD/MC simulations performed in the isobaric-isothermal/canonical (NPT/NVT) ensembles are used to parameterize the Gibbs energy function of all the condensed phases in the Al-rich side of the Al-Zr system in a CALculation of PHAse Diagrams (CALPHAD) approach. The modified quasichemical model in the pair approximation (MQMPA) and the cluster variation method (CVM) in the tetrahedron approximation are used to define the Gibbs energy of the liquid and the fcc solid solution respectively for their entire range of composition. Thermodynamic and structural data generated from our MD/MC simulations are used as input data to parameterize these thermodynamic models. A detailed analysis of the validity and transferability of the Al-Zr MEAM-2NN potential is presented throughout our work by comparing the predicted properties obtained

  14. Ab-initio study of transition metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Ramesh; Shukla, Seema Dwivedi, Shalini Sharma, Yamini

    2014-04-24

    We have performed ab initio self consistent calculations based on Full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method to investigate the optical and thermal properties of yttrium hydrides. From the band structure and density of states, the optical absorption spectra and specific heats have been calculated. The band structure of Yttrium metal changes dramatically due to hybridization of Y sp orbitals with H s orbitals and there is a net charge transfer from metal to hydrogen site. The electrical resistivity and specific heats of yttrium hydrides are lowered but the thermal conductivity is slightly enhanced due to increase in scattering from hydrogen sites.

  15. METHOD OF PREPARING SINTERED ZIRCONIUM METAL FROM ITS HYDRIDES

    DOEpatents

    Angier, R.P.

    1958-02-11

    The invention relates to the preparation of metal shapes from zirconium hydride by powder metallurgical techniques. The zirconium hydride powder which is to be used for this purpose can be prepared by rendering massive pieces of crystal bar zirconium friable by heat treatment in purified hydrogen. This any then be ground into powder and powder can be handled in the air without danger of it igniting. It may then be compacted in the normal manner by being piaced in a die. The compact is sintered under vacuum conditions preferably at a temperature ranging from 1200 to 1300 deg C and for periods of one to three hours.

  16. Hydride Reduction by a Sodium Hydride–Iodide Composite

    PubMed Central

    Too, Pei Chui; Chan, Guo Hao; Tnay, Ya Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sodium hydride (NaH) is widely used as a Brønsted base in chemical synthesis and reacts with various Brønsted acids, whereas it rarely behaves as a reducing reagent through delivery of the hydride to polar π electrophiles. This study presents a series of reduction reactions of nitriles, amides, and imines as enabled by NaH in the presence of LiI or NaI. This remarkably simple protocol endows NaH with unprecedented and unique hydride‐donor chemical reactivity. PMID:26878823

  17. Copper(I)-Catalyzed Allylic Substitutions with a Hydride Nucleophile.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T N Thanh; Thiel, Niklas O; Pape, Felix; Teichert, Johannes F

    2016-05-20

    An easily accessible copper(I)/N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex enables a regioselective hydride transfer to allylic bromides, an allylic reduction. The resulting aryl- and alkyl-substituted branched α-olefins, which are valuable building blocks for synthesis, are obtained in good yields and regioselectivity. A commercially available silane, (TMSO)2Si(Me)H, is employed as hydride source. This protocol offers a unified alternative to the established metal-catalyzed allylic substitutions with carbon nucleophiles, as no adaption of the catalyst to the nature of the nucleophile is required. PMID:27151495

  18. Method for preparing hydride configurations and reactive metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Silver, G.L.

    1984-05-18

    A method for preparing reactive metal surfaces, particularly uranium surfaces is disclosed, whereby the metal is immediately reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure. The metal surfaces are first pretreated by exposure to an acid which forms an adherent hydride-bearing composition on the metal surface. Subsequent heating of the pretreated metal at a temperature sufficient to decompose the hydride coating in vacuum or inert gas renders the metal surface instantaneously reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure.

  19. Mn in misch-metal based superlattice metal hydride alloy - Part 1 structural, hydrogen storage and electrochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, K.; Wong, D. F.; Wang, L.; Nei, J.; Ouchi, T.; Yasuoka, S.

    2015-03-01

    The structural, gaseous phase hydrogen storage, and electrochemical properties of a series of Mn-modified misch-metal based superlattice metal hydride alloys were investigated in part one of this two-part series of papers. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that these alloys are all multi-phased compositions with different abundances of AB2, AB3, A2B7, AB4, and AB5 phases. Substitution of Ni in the B-site by Mn promotes AB5 phase formation and decreases both gaseous phase and electrochemical capacities due to the reduction in the abundance of main hexagonal A2B7 phase. AC impedance and magnetic susceptibility measurement were employed to characterize the surface of Mn-free and Mn-modified alloys and show deterioration in surface catalytic ability as the Mn-content increases. Mn-modification adversely affected misch-metal based superlattice metal hydride alloy properties such as phase homogeneity, capacity, cycle stability, high-rate performance, and surface reaction.

  20. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  1. A coupled transport and solid mechanics formulation with improved reaction kinetics parameters for modeling oxidation and decomposition in a uranium hydride bed.

    SciTech Connect

    Salloum, Maher N.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of reacting flows in porous media has become particularly important with the increased interest in hydrogen solid-storage beds. An advanced type of storage bed has been proposed that utilizes oxidation of uranium hydride to heat and decompose the hydride, releasing the hydrogen. To reduce the cost and time required to develop these systems experimentally, a valid computational model is required that simulates the reaction of uranium hydride and oxygen gas in a hydrogen storage bed using multiphysics finite element modeling. This SAND report discusses the advancements made in FY12 (since our last SAND report SAND2011-6939) to the model developed as a part of an ASC-P&EM project to address the shortcomings of the previous model. The model considers chemical reactions, heat transport, and mass transport within a hydride bed. Previously, the time-varying permeability and porosity were considered uniform. This led to discrepancies between the simulated results and experimental measurements. In this work, the effects of non-uniform changes in permeability and porosity due to phase and thermal expansion are accounted for. These expansions result in mechanical stresses that lead to bed deformation. To describe this, a simplified solid mechanics model for the local variation of permeability and porosity as a function of the local bed deformation is developed. By using this solid mechanics model, the agreement between our reacting bed model and the experimental data is improved. Additionally, more accurate uranium hydride oxidation kinetics parameters are obtained by fitting the experimental results from a pure uranium hydride oxidation measurement to the ones obtained from the coupled transport-solid mechanics model. Finally, the coupled transport-solid mechanics model governing equations and boundary conditions are summarized and recommendations are made for further development of ARIA and other Sandia codes in order for them to sufficiently implement the model.

  2. Exploring "aerogen-hydride" interactions between ZOF2 (Z = Kr, Xe) and metal hydrides: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a new σ-hole interaction formed between ZOF2 (Z = Kr and Xe) as the Lewis acid and a series of metal-hydrides HMX (M = Be, Mg, Zn and X = H, F, CN, CH3) is reported. The nature of this interaction, called "aerogen-hydride" interaction, is unveiled by molecular electrostatic potential, non-covalent interaction, quantum theory of atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. Our results indicate that the aerogen-hydride interactions are quite strong and can be comparable in strength to other σ-hole bonds. An important charge-transfer interaction is also associated with the formation of OF2Z⋯HMX complexes.

  3. Hydride Properties and IRON-57 Mossbauer Effect Studies in TITANIUM(COPPER(1-Y)IRON(Y)) Intermetallic Compounds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Ahmad

    1987-12-01

    The hydrogen absorption properties of the Ti(Cu _{rm 1-y}Fe _{rm y}) (0 <=q y <=q 1) intermetallic compound were systematically investigated. X-ray diffraction data indicated that the intermetallic compound adopted the gammaTiCu structure for 0 <=q y <=q.1 and crystallized in the TiFe structure for.5 <=q y <=q 1. A mixture of these two phases was observed for 0.1 < y <.5. The lattice parameters for the pure intermetallic compounds and hydrided samples were measured. The heat of hydride formation, DeltaH, as a function of Fe content was determined from pressure-composition isotherms and the Van't Hoff relation. In the composition range 0 <=q y <=q.1 the value of DeltaH varied from -74.3 kJ (mole H_{2 })^{-1} to -59.1 kJ (mole H_{2})^{ -1}. For.5 <=q y <=q 1 it went from -49.5 kJ (mole H_{2})^{-1} to -27.3 kJ (mole H_ {2})^{-1}. We have found that DeltaH values derived from a model proposed by Shilov et al. for calculating DeltaH of the multicomponent hydrides were in good agreement with the experimental data by about 3%. Other properties of the hydride such as hydrogen storage capacity and hysteresis effect were also found to be y dependent. Systematic ^{57}Fe Mossbauer effect studies were also carried out in the intermetallic compound and hydride systems with the emphasis on the isomer shift measurements. The total s-electron densities at the Fe nucleus (|psi_{ rm s}({rm o})|^ {2}) increases when the Fe content y decreases in the pure intermetallic compounds. | psi_{rm s}({rm o })|^{2} decreases with the introduction of the hydrogen. In the hydride system |psi_{rm s}({rm o})|^{2 } was found to be y independent. Interpretation of the data was based on the changes in | psi_{rm s}({rm o })|^{2} due to expansion and contraction of the host lattice and the electronic structure differences. The decrease in | psi_{rm s}({rm o })|^{2} due to the hydrogenation in the TiCu-like hydride (0 <=q y <=q.1) could be accounted for by the volume effect only. For TiFe-like hydride

  4. High conductivity, low cost aluminum composite for thermal management

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, J.L.

    1997-04-01

    In order to produce an inexpensive packaging material that exhibits high thermal conductivity and low CTE, Technical Research Associates, Inc. (TRA) has shown in Phase I the feasibility of incorporating natural flake graphite in an aluminum matrix. TRA has developed a proprietary coating technique where graphite flakes have been coated with a thin layer of molybdenum/molybdenum carbide (approximately 0.2 microns). This barrier coating can protect the graphite flake from chemical reaction and high temperature degradation in molten aluminum silicon alloys. Methods to successfully vacuum infiltrate coated flake with molten aluminum alloys were developed. The resulted metal matrix composites exhibited lower CTE than aluminum metal. The CTE of the composites were significantly lower than aluminum and its alloys. The CTE can potentially be tailored for specific applications. The in plane thermal conductivity was higher than the aluminum matrix alloy. The thermal conductivity and CTE of the composite may be significantly improved by improving the bond strength of the molybdenum coating on the graphite flake. The flake can potentially be incorporated in the molten aluminum and pressure die cast to align the flakes within the aluminum matrix. By preferentially aligning high conductivity graphite flakes within a plane or direction, the thermal conductivity of the resulting composite will be above pure aluminum in the alignment direction.

  5. System for exchange of hydrogen between liquid and solid phases

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, James J.; Grohse, Edward W.; Johnson, John R.; Winsche, deceased, Warren E.

    1988-01-01

    The reversible reaction M+x/2 H.sub.2 .rarw..fwdarw.MH.sub.x, wherein M is a reversible metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH.sub.x in the presence of H.sub.2, generally used to store and recall H.sub.2, is found to proceed under an inert liquid, thereby reducing contamination, providing better temperature control, providing in situ mobility of the reactants, and increasing flexibility in process design. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to a temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H.sub.2, to store hydrogen and to release previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H.sub.2 through the liquid is dependent upon the H.sub.2 pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the actual H.sub.2 pressure is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particles. When the actual pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  6. System for exchange of hydrogen between liquid and solid phases

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Johnson, J.R.; Winsche, W.E.

    1985-02-22

    The reversible reaction M + x/2 H/sub 2/ reversible MH/sub x/, wherein M is a reversible metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under an inert liquid, thereby reducing contamination, providing better temperature control, providing in situ mobility of the reactants, and increasing flexibility in process design. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to a temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen and to release previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the actual H/sub 2/ pressure is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the actual pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  7. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  8. Walnut Hulls Clean Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colberg, W. R.; Gordon, G. H.; Jackson, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Hulls inflict minimal substrate damage. Walnut hulls found to be best abrasive for cleaning aluminum surfaces prior to painting. Samples blasted with walnut hulls showed no compressive stress of surface.

  9. Experimental design and simulation of a metal hydride hydrogen storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadre, Sarang Ajit

    Metal hydrides, as a hydrogen storage medium, have been under consideration for many years because they have the ability to store hydrogen reversibly in the solid state at relatively low pressures and ambient temperatures. The utility of metal hydrides as a hydrogen storage medium was demonstrated recently by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) in an on-board hydrogen storage system for a hybrid electric bus project. The complex geometry and the intricate design of the SRTC bed presents quite a challenge to the development of a mathematical model that can be used for design and optimization. In a new approach introduced here, the reversible reaction kinetics and the empirical Van't Hoff relationship used in a typical reactor model are replaced by a solid phase diffusion equation and one of the two semi-empirical equilibrium P-C-T relationships based on modified virial and composite Langmuir isotherm expressions. Starting with the simplest mathematical formulation, which resulted in an analytical expression, various models were developed and successively improved by relaxing certain assumptions, eventually resulting in the most rigorous model yet developed for this system. All of these models were calibrated using experimental pressure and temperature histories obtained from a bench scale hydrogen storage test facility. The heat and mass transfer coefficients or the thermal conductivity were the only adjustable parameters in these models. A design of experiments approach was also used for studying the effect of various factors on the performance of this bench scale hydrogen storage unit. Overall, the results of this study demonstrated that even a fairly simple numerical model could do a reasonable job in predicting the discharge behavior of a fairly complicated, metal hydride hydrogen storage bed over a wide range of operating conditions. The more rigorous 2-D model gave considerable insight into the dynamics of the hydrogen discharge process from an

  10. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  11. CORROSION PROTECTION OF ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R.S.; Nelson, W.B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred. (D.C.W.)

  12. Light weight aluminum optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catura, R. C.; Vieira, J. R.

    1985-09-01

    Light weight mirror blanks were fabricated by dip-brazing a core of low mass aluminum foam material to thin face sheets of solid aluminum. The blanks weigh 40% of an equivalent size solid mirror and were diamond turned to provide reflective surfaces. Optical interferometry was used to assess their dimensional stability over 7 months. No changes in flatness are observed (to the sensitivity of the measurements of a half wavelength of red light).

  13. Mechanism of the α-to-β phase transformation in the LaNi5-H2 system

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, E. MacA.; Blach, T. P.; Pitt, M. P.; Cookson, D. J.

    2014-09-24

    High-energy synchrotron in situ X-ray powder diffraction has been used to elucidate the mechanism of the hydriding phase transformation in a LaNi5 model hydrogen storage intermetallic in real time. The transformation proceeds at 10 ºC via the transient growth of an interfacial phase, the {gamma} phase, with lattice parameters intermediate between those of the α (dilute solid solution) and β (concentrated hydride) phases. The γ phase forms to partially accommodate the 24% change in unit cell volume between the α and β phases during hydriding and dehydriding. The α, γ and β phases coexist at the nanoscopic level.

  14. Different failure modes for V-containing and V-free AB2 metal hydride alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, K.; Wong, D. F.; Yasuoka, S.; Ishida, J.; Nei, J.; Koch, J.

    2014-04-01

    Failure modes of a V-containing and a V-free AB2 Laves phase-based metal hydride alloy were studied by the combination of X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscope, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, Soxhlet extraction, and magnetic susceptibility measurement. Cells with the V-containing alloy exhibited less capacity degradation up until venting occurred in the cells, after which the capacity rapidly degraded. Cells with the V-free alloy remained linear in capacity degradation throughout the cycle life test. The failure mechanism for the V-containing alloy is related to the formation of an oxide layer that penetrates deeper into the alloy particles due to high V leaching and impedes gas recombination, while the failure mechanism for the V-free alloy is related to the continuous pulverization of the main AB2 phase.

  15. Uranium Hydride Nucleation Kinetics: Effects of Oxide Thickness and Vacuum Outgassing

    SciTech Connect

    David F. Teter; Robert J. Hanrahan; Christopher J. Wetteland

    2001-03-01

    Many factors such as impurities in the oxide and metal, microstructure, gas impurities, and oxide thickness may influence the rate and location of the nucleation of hydride on uranium. This work has concentrated on isolating one of these variables, the oxide thickness, and measuring the effect of the oxide thickness on uranium hydride nucleation. Uranium samples, all from the same lot, were prepared with different oxide thicknesses. The oxide thickness was measured using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy. Oxidized uranium samples were then exposed to ultra-high purity hydrogen gas under constant volume conditions. Decreases in pressure indicated hydrogen uptake by the sample. The time for hydride nucleation--as well as the maximum hydriding rate--was then calculated from the measured decreases in pressure. The time to nucleate a hydride was found to increase whereas the maximum hydriding rate was found to decrease with increasing oxide thickness. The density of hydride pits also decreased with increasing oxide thickness. The observed results support the argument that the nucleation of hydride is controlled somewhat by diffusion of hydrogen through the oxide layer. Vacuum outgassing of samples, thereby removing the oxide impurities and keeping the oxide thickness constant, dramatically decreased the nucleation time and increased the maximum hydriding rate. Again, this is consistent with hydrogen diffusion through the oxide controlling the nucleation of hydride. Impurities in the oxide layer can decrease the diffusivity of hydrogen and therefore delay the nucleation of uranium hydride.

  16. Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite

    DOEpatents

    Congdon, James W.

    2009-03-17

    An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

  17. Catalytic arene hydrogenation using early transition metal hydride compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, I.P.

    1993-03-15

    Progress was achieved in four areas: development of surface supported Group 5 metal organometallic compounds for catalytic arene hydrogenation, isolation and reactivity of possible intermediates in catalytic arene hydrogenation, synthesis and characterization of new d[sup 0]-metal hydride compounds, and stoichiometric reactivity of d[sup 0] metal hydrido, aryloxide compounds. (DLC)

  18. Structure Properties of Ternary Hydrides Ni3AlHx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi-wei; Zhang, Wen-qing; Chen, Nan-xian

    1996-09-01

    The structure properties of the ternary hydrides Ni3AlHx are studied by use of the interatomic pair potentials obtained from the first principles electronic structure calculation and Chen-Mobius 3-dimensional lattice inversion method. The heat of formation and volume expansion of the hydrogenized systems are investigated.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID STATE HYDRIDE MATERIALS: MODELING AND TESTING FOR AIR AND WATER EXPOSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Anton, D.; James, C.; Cortes-Concepcion, J.; Tamburello, D.; Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

    2010-05-18

    To make commercially acceptable condensed phase hydrogen storage systems, it is important to understand quantitatively the risks involved in using these materials. A rigorous set of environmental reactivity tests have been developed based on modified testing procedures codified by the United Nations for the transportation of dangerous goods. Potential hydrogen storage material, 2LiBH4{center_dot}MgH2 and NH3BH3, have been tested using these modified procedures to evaluate the relative risks of these materials coming in contact with the environment in hypothetical accident scenarios. It is apparent that an ignition event will only occur if both a flammable concentration of hydrogen and sufficient thermal energy were available to ignite the hydrogen gas mixture. In order to predict hydride behavior for hypothesized accident scenarios, an idealized finite element model was developed for dispersed hydride from a breached system. Empirical thermodynamic calculations based on precise calorimetric experiments were performed in order to quantify the energy and hydrogen release rates and to quantify the reaction products resulting from water and air exposure. Both thermal and compositional predictions were made with identification of potential ignition event scenarios.

  20. Superconductivity in compressed sulfur hydride: Dependences on pressure, composition, and crystal structure from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Ryosuke

    The recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in sulfur hydride under extreme pressure has broken the long-standing record of superconducting transition temperature (Tc) in the Hg-cuprate. According to the isotope effect measurement and theoretical calculations, the superconducting transition is mainly ascribed to the conventional phonon-mediated pairing interaction. It is, however, not enough for understanding the high-Tc superconductivity in the sulfur hydride. To elucidate various possible effects on Tc with accuracy, we have analyzed Tc with first-principles methods without any empirical parameters. First, for various pressures and theoretically proposed crystal structures, we calculated Tc with the density functional theory for superconductors (SCDFT) to examine which structure(s) can explain experimentally measured Tc data [Akashi et al., PRB 91, 224513 (2015)]. We next solved the Eliashberg equations without introducing the renormalized Coulomb parameter mu*, which is the Green-function-based counterpart of the SCDFT, and evaluated the effects of rapidly varying electron density of states, atomic zero-point motion, and phonon anharmonic corrections on Tc [Sano et al., in preparation]. In the talk, we review these results and discuss the dominant factors for the Tc and their relation to the experimental results. We also report some crystal structures that we recently found with first-principles calculations, which could have a key role for the pressure-induced transformation to the high-Tc phase.