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Sample records for aluminum weld strength

  1. Welding high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, P. G.; Hoppes, R. V.; Hasemeyer, E. A.; Masubuchi, K.

    1974-01-01

    Handbook has been published which integrates results of 19 research programs involving welding of high-strength aluminum alloys. Book introduces metallurgy and properties of aluminum alloys by discussing commercial alloys and heat treatments. Several current welding processes are reviewed such as gas tungsten-arc welding and gas metal-arc welding.

  2. U-Groove aluminum weld strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Vaughan, R.

    1996-01-01

    Though butt-welds are among the most preferred joining methods in aerostructures, their strength dependence on inelastic mechanics is generally the least understood. This study investigated experimental strain distributions across a thick aluminum U-grooved weld and identified two weld process considerations for improving the multipass weld strength. The extreme thermal expansion and contraction gradient of the fusion heat input across the groove tab thickness produces severe peaking, which induces bending under uniaxial loading. The filler strain-hardening decreased with increasing filler pass sequence, producing the weakest welds on the last pass side. Current welding schedules unknowingly compound these effects which reduce the weld strength. A depeaking index model was developed to select filler pass thicknesses, pass numbers, and sequences to improve depeaking in the welding process. The intent is to combine the strongest weld pass side with the peaking induced bending tension to provide a more uniform stress and stronger weld under axial tensile loading.

  3. U-groove aluminum weld strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Vaughan, R.

    1995-01-01

    Though butt-welds are among the most preferred joining methods in aerostructures, their strength dependence on inelastic mechanics is generally the least understood. This study investigated experimental strain distributions across a thick aluminum U-grooved weld and identified two weld process considerations for improving the multipass weld strength. The extreme thermal expansion and contraction gradient of the fusion heat input across the groove tab thickness produces severe peaking which induces bending under uniaxial loading. The filler strain-hardening deceased with increasing filler pass sequence, producing the weakest welds on the last pass side. Current welding schedules unknowingly compound these effects which reduce the weld strength. A de-peaking index model was developed to select filler pass thicknesses, pass numbers, and sequences to improve de-peaking in the welding process. Intent is to combine the strongest weld pass side with the peaking induced bending tension to provide a more uniform stress and stronger weld under axial tensile loading.

  4. U-Groove Aluminum Weld Strength Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Vaughan, R.

    1997-01-01

    Though butt-welds are among the most preferred joining methods in aerostructures, their strength dependence on inelastic mechanics is generally the least understood. This study investigated experimental strain distributions across a thick aluminum U-grooved weld and identified two weld process considerations for improving the multipass weld strength. One is the source of peaking in which the extreme thermal expansion and contraction gradient of the fusion heat input across the groove tab thickness produces severe angular distortion that induces bending under uniaxial loading. The other is the filler strain hardening decreasing with increasing filler pass sequences, producing the weakest welds on the last weld pass side. Both phenomena are governed by weld pass sequences. Many industrial welding schedules unknowingly compound these effects, which reduce the weld strength. A depeaking index model was developed to select filler pass thickness, pass numbers, and sequences to improve depeaking in the welding process. The result was to select the number and sequence of weld passes to reverse the peaking angle such as to combine the strongest weld pass side with the peaking induced bending tension component side to provide a more uniform stress and stronger weld under axial tensile loading.

  5. Welding high-strength aluminum alloys at the Paton Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchuk, Yatsenko, S.I.; Cherednichok, V.T.; Semenov, L.A. )

    1993-07-01

    The choice of the flash method for welding aluminum-alloy sections was governed first of all by the possibility of producing homogeneous-structure joints with the minimum amount of possible discontinuities and an insignificant metal strength loss in the welding zone. The aluminum alloy welding technology under consideration relies on the method of flash welding without using any protective atmospheres. The reason is first of all that a complex cross-sectional shape of workpieces being joined, their configuration and considerable overall dimensions make it difficult to use chambers of any type. Besides, conducted studies ascertained that in flash welding, in contrast to various fusion welding processes, the use of protective atmospheres or a vacuum is of little benefit. Here are the results of studying the specifics of thermal and electric processes in flashing, the physical features of weld joint formation, the basics of the welding technology, and the characteristics of the equipment.

  6. Corrosion Behavior of Friction Stir Welded High Strength Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-18

    Angelo Guinasso, " Stress Corrosion Susceptibility in 7050 -T751 Aluminum Following Friction Stir Welding", Proc. First Friction Stir Welding Symposium...potential of the nugget. Susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was evaluated using the slow strain rate (SSR) method described in ASTM Standards...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP015941 TITLE: Corrosion Behavior of Friction Stir Welded High Strength

  7. Weld geometry strength effect in 2219-T87 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Novak, H. L.; Mcilwain, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    A theory of the effect of geometry on the mechanical properties of a butt weld joint is worked out based upon the soft interlayer weld model. Tensile tests of 45 TIG butt welds and 6 EB beads-on-plate in 1/4-in. 2219-T87 aluminum plate made under a wide range of heat sink and power input conditions are analyzed using this theory. The analysis indicates that purely geometrical effects dominate in determining variations in weld joint strength with heat sink and power input. Variations in weld dimensions with cooling rate are significant as well as with power input. Weld size is suggested as a better indicator of the condition of a weld joint than energy input.

  8. Influence of Aluminum Content on Grain Refinement and Strength of AZ31 Magnesium GTA Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, N. Kishore; Cross, Carl E.

    2012-06-28

    The goal is to characterize the effect of Al content on AZ31 weld metal, the grain size and strength, and examine role of Al on grain refinement. The approach is to systematically vary the aluminum content of AZ31 weld metal, Measure average grain size in weld metal, and Measure cross-weld tensile properties and hardness. Conclusions are that: (1) increased Al content in AZ31 weld metal results in grain refinement Reason: higher undercooling during solidification; (2) weld metal grain refinement resulted in increased strength & hardness Reason: grain boundary strengthening; and (3) weld metal strength can be raised to wrought base metal levels.

  9. High-strength laser welding of aluminum-lithium scandium-doped alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malikov, A. G.; Ivanova, M. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    The work presents the experimental investigation of laser welding of an aluminum alloy (system Al-Mg-Li) and aluminum alloy (system Al-Cu-Li) doped with Sc. The influence of nano-structuring of the surface layer welded joint by cold plastic deformation on the strength properties of the welded joint is determined. It is founded that, regarding the deformation degree over the thickness, the varying value of the welded joint strength is different for these aluminum alloys. The strength of the plastically deformed welded joint, aluminum alloys of the Al-Mg-Li and Al-Cu-Li systems reached 0.95 and 0.6 of the base alloy strength, respectively.

  10. A hot-cracking mitigation technique for welding high-strength aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.P.; Dong, P.; Zhang, J.; Tian, X.

    2000-01-01

    A hot-cracking mitigation technique for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of high-strength aluminum alloy 2024 is presented. The proposed welding technique incorporates a trailing heat sink (an intense cooling source) with respect to the welding torch. The development of the mitigation technique was based on both detailed welding process simulation using advanced finite element techniques and systematic laboratory experiments. The finite element methods were used to investigate the detailed thermomechanical behavior of the weld metal that undergoes the brittle temperature range (BTR) during welding. As expected, a tensile deformation zone within the material BTR region was identified behind the weld pool under conventional GTA welding process conventional GTA welding process conditions for the aluminum alloy studied. To mitigate hot cracking, the tensile zone behind the weld pool must be eliminated or reduce to a satisfactory level if the weld metal hot ductility cannot be further improved. With detailed computational modeling, it was found that by the introduction of a trailing heat sink at some distance behind the welding arc, the tensile strain rate with respect to temperature in the zone encompassing the BTR region can be significantly reduced. A series of parametric studies were also conducted to derive optimal process parameters for the trailing heat sink. The experimental results confirmed the effectiveness of the trailing heat sink technique. With a proper implementation of the trailing heat sink method, hot cracking can be completely eliminated in welding aluminum alloy 2024 (AA 2024).

  11. Effects of Failure Modes on Strength of Aluminum Resistance Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Davies, Richard W.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Spinella, Donald J.

    2005-04-01

    This paper examines the effects of failure modes on the static strength and total energy absorption of aluminum spot-welded samples using experimental, statistical, and analytical approaches. The main failure modes for aluminum spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Two populations of aluminum spot welds were studied. Within each population, coupon configurations of lap shear, cross tension and coach peel were considered. Thirty replicate static strength tests were performed for each coupon configuration. The resulted peak load and energy absorption level associated with each failure mode was studied using statistical models. Next, an analytical model was developed to determine the failure mode of an aluminum resistance spot weld based on stress analysis. It is found that weld size, sheet thickness, and level of weld porosity and defects are the main factors determining the cross tension failure mode for an aluminum spot weld. The peak load and energy absorption levels for the cross tension and coach peel samples tested are found not to be very sensitive to the failure modes under static loading.

  12. Towards the problem of forming full strength welded joints on aluminum alloy sheets. Part II: AA7475

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, Tatiana; Tarasov, Sergey; Eliseev, Alexander; Fortuna, Anastasiya

    2016-11-01

    The microstructural evolution in welded joint zones obtained both by friction stir welding and ultrasonic- assisted friction stir welding on dispersion hardened 7475 aluminum alloy has been examined together with the analysis of mechanical strength and microhardness. It was established that ultrasonic-assisted friction stir provided leveled microhardness profiles across the weld zones as well as higher joint strength as compared to those of standard friction stir welding.

  13. Change of Hot Cracking Susceptibility in Welding of High Strength Aluminum Alloy AA 7075

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, M.; Hofmann, K.; Mann, V.; Hugger, F.; Roth, S.; Schmidt, M.

    High strength aluminum alloys are known as hard to weld alloys due to their high hot crack susceptibility. However, they have high potential for applications in light weight constructions of automotive industry and therefore it is needed to increase weldability. One major issue is the high hot cracking susceptibility. Vaporization during laser beam welding leads to a change of concentration of the volatile elements magnesium and zinc. Hence, solidification range of the weld and therefore hot cracking susceptibility changes. Additionally, different welding velocities lead to changed solidification conditions with certain influence on hot cracking. This paper discusses the influence of energy per unit length during laser beam welding of AA 7075 on the change of element concentration in the weld seam and the resulting influence on hot cracking susceptibility. Therefore EDS-measurements of weld seams generated with different velocities are performed to determine the change of element concentration. These quantitative data is used to numerically calculate the solidification range in order to evaluate its influence on the hot cracking susceptibility. Besides that, relative hot crack length and mechanical properties are measured. The results increase knowledge about welding of high strength aluminum alloy AA 7075 and hence support further developing of the welding process.

  14. The Strength and Characteristics of VPPA Welded 2219-T87 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemian, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process and those factors that control the structure and properties of VPPA welded aluminum alloy 2219-T87 was conducted. The importance of joint preparation, alignment of parts and welding process variables are already established. Internal weld defects have been eliminated. However, a variation of properties was found to be due to the size variation of interdendritic particles in the fusion zone. These particles contribute to the void formation process, which controls the ultimate tensile strength of the welded alloy. A variation of 150 microns in particle size correlated with a 10 ksi variation of ultimate tensile strength. It was found that all fracture surfaces were of the dimple rupture type, with fracture initiating within the fusion zone.

  15. Developing an Empirical Relationship to Predict Tensile Strength of Friction Stir Welded AA2219 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Babu, S.

    2008-12-01

    AA2219 aluminum alloy (Al-Cu-Mn alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of lightweight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. Friction stir welding (FSW) process is an emerging solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded does not melt and recast. This process uses a nonconsumable tool to generate frictional heat in the abutting surfaces. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force, etc., and tool pin profile play a major role in deciding the joint strength. An attempt has been made to develop an empirical relationship between FSW variables to predict tensile strength of the friction stir welded AA2219 aluminum alloy. To obtain the desired strength, it is essential to have a complete control over the relevant process parameters to maximize the tensile strength on which the quality of a weldment is based. Therefore, it is very important to select and control the welding process parameter for obtaining maximum strength. To achieve this various prediction methods such as response surface method (RSM), analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student’s t-test, coefficient of determination, etc., can be applied to define the desired output variables through developing mathematical models to specify the relationship between the output parameters and input variables. Four factors, five levels central composite design have been used to minimize number of experimental conditions. The developed mathematical relationship can be effectively used to predict the tensile strength of FSW joints of AA2219 aluminum alloy at 95% confidence level.

  16. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Strength of Aluminum Extrusion Welding.

    PubMed

    Bingöl, Sedat; Bozacı, Atilla

    2015-07-17

    The quality of extrusion welding in the extruded hollow shapes is influenced significantly by the pressure and effective stress under which the material is being joined inside the welding chamber. However, extrusion welding was not accounted for in the past by the developers of finite element software packages. In this study, the strength of hollow extrusion profile with seam weld produced at different ram speeds was investigated experimentally and numerically. The experiments were performed on an extruded hollow aluminum profile which was suitable to obtain the tensile tests specimens from its seam weld's region at both parallel to extrusion direction and perpendicular to extrusion direction. A new numerical modeling approach, which was recently proposed in literature, was used for numerical analyses of the study. The simulation results performed at different ram speeds were compared with the experimental results, and a good agreement was obtained.

  17. Improved TIG weld joint strength in aluminum alloy 2219-T87 by filler metal substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. M.; Lovoy, C. V.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an investigation on weld joint characteristics of aluminum alloy 2219-T87 are given. Five different alloys were utilized as filler material. The mechanical properties of the joints were determined at ambient and cryogenic temperatures for weldments in the as-welded condition and also, for weldments after elevated temperature exposures. Other evaluations included hardness surveys, stress corrosion susceptibility, and to a limited extent, the internal metallurgical weld structures. The overall results indicate that M-943 filler weldments are superior in strength to weldments containing either the standard 2319 filler or fillers 2014, 2020, and a dual wire feed consisting of three parts 2319 and one part 5652. In addition, no deficiencies were evident in M-934 filler weldments with regard to ductility, joint strength after elevated temperature exposure, weld hardness, metallographic structures, or stress corrosion susceptibility.

  18. Weld bead reinforcement removal: A method of improving the strength and ductility of peaked welds in 2219-T87 aluminum alloy plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a study to determine the degree to which the ductility and tensile properties of peaked welds could be enhanced by removing the reinforcing bead and fairing the weld nugget into the adjacent parent metal are presented. The study employed 2219-T87 aluminum alloy plate, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, and 2319 filler wire. The study concluded that significant improvements in peak weld, ultimate strength, and ductility can be obtained through removal and fairing of the weld reinforcing bead. The specimens so treated and tested in this program exhibited ultimate strength improvements of 2 to 3 percent for peak angles of 5.8 to 10 degrees and 10 to 22 percent for welds with peak angles of 11.7 to 16.9 degrees. It was also determined that removal of the weld bead enhanced the ability of peaked welds to straighten when exposed to cyclic loading at stress levels above the yield strength.

  19. Neural Network Prediction of Aluminum-Lithium Weld Strengths from Acoustic Emission Amplitude Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Israel, Peggy L.; Knotts, Gregory L.

    1993-01-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) flaw growth activity was monitored in aluminum-lithium weld specimens from the onset tensile loading to failure. Data on actual ultimate strengths together with AE data from the beginning of loading up to 25 percent of the expected ultimate strength were used to train a backpropagation neural network to predict ultimate strengths. Architecturally, the fully interconnected network consisted of an input layer for the AE amplitude data, a hidden layer to accommodate failure mechanism mapping, and an output layer for ultimate strength prediction. The trained network was the applied to the prediction of ultimate strengths in the remaining six specimens. The worst case prediction error was found to be +2.6 percent.

  20. Neural network prediction of aluminum-lithium weld strengths from acoustic emission amplitude data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Eric V. K.; Israel, Peggy L.; Knotts, Gregory L.

    1993-09-01

    AE flaw growth activity was monitored in aluminum-lithium weld specimens from the onset of tensile loading to failure. Data on actual ultimate strengths together with AE data from the beginning of loading up to 25 percent of the expected ultimate strength were used to train a backpropagation neural network to predict ultimate strengths. Architecturally, the fully interconnected network consisted of an input layer for the AE amplitude data, a hidden layer to accommodate failure mechanism mapping, and an output layer for ultimate strength prediction. The trained network was then applied to the prediction of ultimate strengths in the remaining six specimens. The worst case prediction error was found to be +2.6 percent.

  1. Neural network prediction of aluminum-lithium weld strengths from acoustic emission amplitude data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric V. K.; Israel, Peggy L.; Knotts, Gregory L.

    1993-01-01

    AE flaw growth activity was monitored in aluminum-lithium weld specimens from the onset of tensile loading to failure. Data on actual ultimate strengths together with AE data from the beginning of loading up to 25 percent of the expected ultimate strength were used to train a backpropagation neural network to predict ultimate strengths. Architecturally, the fully interconnected network consisted of an input layer for the AE amplitude data, a hidden layer to accommodate failure mechanism mapping, and an output layer for ultimate strength prediction. The trained network was then applied to the prediction of ultimate strengths in the remaining six specimens. The worst case prediction error was found to be +2.6 percent.

  2. Neural network prediction of aluminum-lithium weld strengths from acoustic emission amplitude data

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, E.V.K. . Aerospace Engineering Dept.); Israel, P.L. . Computer Science Dept.); Knotts, G.L. )

    1993-09-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) flaw growth activity was monitored in aluminum-lithium weld specimens from the onset of tensile loading to failure. Data on actual ultimate strengths together with AE data from the beginning of loading up to 25 percent of the expected ultimate strength were used to train a backpropagation neural network to predict ultimate strengths. Architecturally, the fully interconnected network consisted of an input layer for the AE amplitude data, a hidden layer to accommodate failure mechanism mapping, and an output layer for ultimate strength prediction. The trained network was then applied to the prediction of ultimate strengths in the remaining six specimens. The worst case prediction error was found to be +2.6 percent.

  3. Identifying Combination of Friction Stir Welding Parameters to Maximize Strength of Lap Joints of AA2014-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendrana, C.; Srinivasan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balaji, H.; Selvaraj, P.

    2017-01-01

    AA2014 aluminum alloy (Al-Cu alloy) has been widely utilized in fabrication of lightweight structures like aircraft structures, demanding high strength to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. The fusion welding of these alloys will lead to solidification problems such as hot cracking. Friction stir welding is a new solid state welding process, in which the material being welded does not melt and recast. Lot of research works have been carried out by many researchers to optimize process parameters and establish empirical relationships to predict tensile strength of friction stir welded butt joints of aluminum alloys. However, very few investigations have been carried out on friction stir welded lap joints of aluminum alloys. Hence, in this investigation, an attempt has been made to optimize friction stir lap welding (FSLW) parameters to attain maximum tensile strength using statistical tools such as design of experiment (DoE), analysis of variance (ANOVA), response graph and contour plots. By this method, it is found that maximum tensile shear fracture load of 12.76 kN can be achieved if a joint is made using tool rotational speed of 900 rpm, welding speed of 110 mm/min, tool shoulder diameter of 12 mm and tool tilt angle of 1.5°.

  4. Study of mechanical joint strength of aluminum alloy 7075-T6 and dual phase steel 980 welded by friction bit joining and weld-bonding under corrosion medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu; Miles, Michael; Song, Guang-Ling; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-30

    We have employed a unique solid-sate joining process, called friction bit joining (FBJ), to spot weld aluminum alloy (AA) 7075-T6 and dual phase (DP) 980 steel. Static joint strength was studied in the lap shear tension configuration. In addition, weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) joints were studied in order to evaluate the ability of adhesive to mitigate the impact of corrosion on joint properties. Accelerated laboratory cyclic corrosion tests were carried out for both FBJ only and weld-bonding joints. Furthermore, the FBJ only joints that emerged from corrosion testing had lap shear failure loads that were significantly lower than freshly prepared joints. However, weld-bonding specimens retained more than 80% of the lap shear failure load of the freshly prepared weld-bonding specimens. Moreover, examination of joint cross sections confirmed that the presence of adhesive in the weld-bonding joints mitigated the effect of the corrosion environment, compared to FBJ only joints.

  5. Effects of porosity on weld-joint tensile strength of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1974-01-01

    Tensile properties in defect-free weldments of aluminum alloys 2014-T6 and 2219-T87 (sheet and plate) are shown to be related to the level or concentration of induced simulated porosity. The scatter diagram shows that the ultimate tensile strength of the weldments displays the most pronounced linear relationship with the level of porosity. The relationships between yield strength or elongation and porosity are either trivial or inconsequential in the lower and intermediate levels of porosity content. In highly concentrated levels of porosity, both yield strength and elongation values decrease markedly. Correlation coefficients were obtained by simple straight line regression analysis between the variables of ultimate tensile strength and pore level. The coefficients were greater, indicating a better correlation, using a pore area accumulation concept or pore volume accumulation than the accumulation of the pore diameters. These relationships provide a useful tool for assessing the existing aerospace radiographic acceptance standards with respect to permissible porosity. In addition, these relationships, in combination with known design load requirements, will serve as an engineering guideline in determining when a weld repair is necessary based on accumulative pore level as detected by radiographic techniques.

  6. Welding of aluminum with linear ribbon explosives.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    A small-scale simplified, parallel plate process of welding aluminum with very small quantities of lead-sheathed linear ribbon RDX explosive is described. The results of the welding of five different alloys, obtained by using this technique, show that the weld strengths are up to 90% of the parent metal tensile strength.

  7. Optimizing friction stir welding parameters to maximize tensile strength of AA2219 aluminum alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, S.; Elangovan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balasubramanian, M.

    2009-04-01

    AA2219 aluminium alloy (Al-Cu-Mn alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of lightweight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. In contrast to the fusion welding processes that are routinely used for joining structural aluminium alloys, the friction stir welding (FSW) process is an emerging solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded does not melt and recast. This process uses a non-consumable tool to generate frictional heat in the abutting surfaces. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force etc., and the tool pin profile play a major role in determining the joint strength. An attempt has been made here to develop a mathematical model to predict the tensile strength of friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy by incorporating FSW process parameters. A central composite design with four factors and five levels has been used to minimize the number of experimental conditions. The response surface method (RSM) has been used to develop the model. The developed mathematical model has been optimized using the Hooke and Jeeves search technique to maximize the tensile strength of the friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy joints.

  8. Study of mechanical joint strength of aluminum alloy 7075-T6 and dual phase steel 980 welded by friction bit joining and weld-bonding under corrosion medium

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu; ...

    2014-12-30

    We have employed a unique solid-sate joining process, called friction bit joining (FBJ), to spot weld aluminum alloy (AA) 7075-T6 and dual phase (DP) 980 steel. Static joint strength was studied in the lap shear tension configuration. In addition, weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) joints were studied in order to evaluate the ability of adhesive to mitigate the impact of corrosion on joint properties. Accelerated laboratory cyclic corrosion tests were carried out for both FBJ only and weld-bonding joints. Furthermore, the FBJ only joints that emerged from corrosion testing had lap shear failure loads that were significantly lower than freshly preparedmore » joints. However, weld-bonding specimens retained more than 80% of the lap shear failure load of the freshly prepared weld-bonding specimens. Moreover, examination of joint cross sections confirmed that the presence of adhesive in the weld-bonding joints mitigated the effect of the corrosion environment, compared to FBJ only joints.« less

  9. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  10. Ultrasonic Spot Welding of Aluminum to High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel: Microstructure, Tensile and Fatigue Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, V. K.; Bhole, S. D.; Chen, D. L.

    2014-04-01

    The structural applications of lightweight aluminum alloys inevitably involve dissimilar welding with steels and the related durability issues. This study was aimed at evaluating the microstructural change, lap shear tensile load, and fatigue resistance of dissimilar ultrasonic spot-welded joints of aluminum-to-galvanized high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel. Two non-uniform layers were identified in between Al and HSLA steel via SEM/EDS and XRD. One was an Al-Zn eutectic layer and the other was a thin (<2 μm) layer of intermetallic compound (IMC) of Al and Fe in the nugget zone. The lap shear tensile testing gave a maximum load of 3.7 kN and the sample failed initially in between the Al-Zn eutectic film and Al-Fe IMC, and afterward from the region containing Al on both matching fracture surfaces. The fatigue test results showed a fatigue limit of about 0.5 kN (at 1 × 107 cycles). The maximum cyclic stress at which transition of the fatigue fracture from transverse through-thickness crack growth mode to the interfacial failure mode occurs increases with increasing energy input.

  11. Laser welding of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K.H.; Sabo, K.R.; Sanders, P.G.; Spawr, W.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recent interest in reducing the weight of automobiles to increase fuel mileage has focused attention on the use of aluminum and associated joining technologies. Laser beam welding is one of the more promising methods for high speed welding of aluminum. Consequently, substantial effort has been expended in attempting to develop a robust laser beam welding process. Early results have not been very consistent in the process requirements but more definitive data has been produced recently. This paper reviews the process parameters needed to obtain consistent laser welds on 5,000 series aluminum alloys and discusses the research necessary to make laser processing of aluminum a reality for automotive applications.

  12. Forming Limits of Weld Metal in Aluminum Alloys and Advanced High-Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Smith, Mark T.; Grant, Glenn J.; Davies, Richard W.

    2010-10-25

    This work characterizes the mechanical properties of DP600 laser welded TWBs (1 mm-1.5 mm) near and in the weld, as well as their limits of formability. The approach uses simple uniaxial experiments to measure the variability in the forming limits of the weld region, and uses a theoretical forming limit diagram calculation to establish a probabilistic distribution of weld region imperfection using an M-K method approach

  13. FRICTION-STIR-LAP-WELDS OF AA6111 ALUMINUM ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    Yadava, Manasij; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Chen, Y. L.; Gayden, X.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2007-01-09

    Lap joints of 1 mm thick AA6111 aluminum sheets were made by friction stir welding, using robotic and conventional machines. Welds were made for advancing as well as retreating side loading. Thinning in welds was quantified. Lap shear test of welds was conducted in as-welded and paint-baked conditions. Conventional machine welds showed less thinning and better strength than robotic machine welds. Process forces in conventional machine welding were higher. Paint bake treatment improved the weld strength; but the improvement varied with process parameters. Advancing side loaded welds achieved higher strength than the retreating side loaded welds. Fracture location was found to occur on the loaded side of the weld and along the thinning defect.

  14. Effect of Multi-repair Welding on Fatigue Performance of Aluminum Alloy Profile Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, You-De; Shi, Chun-Yuan; Tian, Hong-Lei

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum alloy profile has been widely used in the manufacture of the rail vehicles. But it's necessary for the repair welding of the welded joints to be conducted because some defects exist in the weld such as porosity, inclusions and incomplete penetrations in the welding processes. In this paper, the influence of the multi-repair welding of 6005A aluminum alloy profile butt welded joints on the fatigue performance are investigated based on the results of fatigue tests. The parameters of curves and the fatigue strength of the welded joints are calculated, and Goodman fatigue limit diagram is also obtained. The results show that fatigue strength of aluminum alloy profile butt welded joints, in condition of 107 cycle life, meet the standard requirement for the as-welded, repair welded state one time or two times respectively.

  15. Spot welding of steel and aluminum using insert sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Oikawa, H.; Saito, T.; Yoshimura, T.

    1994-12-31

    Automobile industries have been increasingly interested in the use of aluminum and thus joining of steel and aluminum becomes of importance. The joining of the two types of metal raises a problem of brittle welds caused by the formation of intermetallic compounds. The authors solved the problem by using an insert sheet. This paper deals with the resistance spot welding of steel and aluminum sheets using insert sheets. The insert sheet used in the present development was a steel/aluminum clad sheet of the 0.8 mm thickness with 50% steel and 50% aluminum. The clad sheet was produced by warm rolling of steel and aluminum with a direct resistance heating process. Steel to be warm rolled was of EDDQ of the 0.4 mm thickness and aluminum was of JIS A1050 of 0.6 mm thickness. The mechanical properties of the insert clad sheets were in between those of the steel sheets and the aluminum sheets, while the clad sheets showed much better formability than the aluminum sheets. Resistance spot welding was conducted for 0.8 mm thick EDDQ steel sheets and 1.0 mm thick aluminum alloy (AL-5.5%Mg) sheets under the welding force of 1.96 kN, welding current ranging between 4.2 and 20.1 kA, and welding time from 0.5 to 10 cycles. The steel was spot welded to the steel side of the insert sheet while the aluminum was welded to the aluminum side. What the authors investigated were the applicable welding current range, nugget diameter, tensile shear strength, U-tension strength, and macro- and microstructures. In conclusion, steel sheets can be spot welded to aluminum sheets without difficulty by using clad sheets as insert materials while the strength level of the dissimilar metal spot welds is close to that of aluminum joints.

  16. Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing: Weld Optimization for Aluminum 6061, Development of Scarf Joints for Aluminum Sheet Metal, and Joining of High Strength Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolcott, Paul J.

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a low temperature, solid-state manufacturing process that enables the creation of layered, solid metal structures with designed anisotropies and embedded materials. As a low temperature process, UAM enables the creation of active composites containing smart materials, components with embedded sensors, thermal management devices, and many others. The focus of this work is on the improvement and characterization of UAM aluminum structures, advancing the capabilities of ultrasonic joining into sheet geometries, and examination of dissimilar material joints using the technology. Optimized process parameters for Al 6061 were identified via a design of experiments study indicating a weld amplitude of 32.8 synum and a weld speed of 200 in/min as optimal. Weld force and temperature were not significant within the levels studied. A methodology of creating large scale builds is proposed, including a prescribed random stacking sequence and overlap of 0.0035 in. (0.0889 mm) for foils to minimize voids and maximize mechanical strength. Utilization of heat treatments is shown to significantly increase mechanical properties of UAM builds, within 90% of bulk material. The applied loads during the UAM process were investigated to determine the stress fields and plastic deformation induced during the process. Modeling of the contact mechanics via Hertzian contact equations shows that significant stress is applied via sonotrode contact in the process. Contact modeling using finite element analysis (FEA), including plasticity, indicates that 5000 N normal loads result in plastic deformation in bulk aluminum foil, while at 3000 N no plastic deformation occurs. FEA studies on the applied loads during the process, specifically a 3000 N normal force and 2000 N shear force, show that high stresses and plastic deformation occur at the edges of a welded foil, and base of the UAM build. Microstructural investigations of heat treated foils confirms

  17. Shear strength of fillet welds in aluminum alloy 2219. [for use on the solid rocket motor and external tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1978-01-01

    Fillet size is discussed in terms of theoretical or design dimensions versus as-welded dimensions, drawing attention to the inherent conservatism in the design load sustaining capabilities of fillet welds. Emphasis is placed on components for the solid rocket motor, external tank, and other aerospace applications. Problems associated with inspection of fillet welds are addresses and a comparison is drawn between defect counts obtained by radiographic inspection and by visual examination of the fracture plane. Fillet weld quality is related linearly to ultimate shear strength. Correlation coefficients are obtained by simple straight line regression analysis between the variables of ultimate shear strength and accumulative discontinuity summation. Shear strength allowables are found to be equivalent to 57 percent of butt weld A allowables (F sub tu.)

  18. Mechanical properties of laser welded aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, D.M.; Mazumder, J.

    1996-12-31

    The demand for lighter weight vehicles has prompted accelerated development in processing aluminum alloys for automobile structural applications. One of the current research initiatives centers on laser beam welding of aluminum alloys. Autogenous butt welds have been performed on Al 3003, 5754, 6111, and 6061-T6 plates with a 6 kW CO2 laser. For 6061, tensile data indicate about 60% of the base metal strength was attained in the as-welded condition, with a brittle fracture occurring through the weld. A post-weld heat treatment to the T6 condition resulted in a recovery of original ultimate tensile strengths, although these also failed in the weld. Hardness measurements of the post-weld T6 reveal a uniform hardness across the HAZ and fusion zone that is comparable to the original hardness. All 3003 welds fractured in the parent material in a ductile fashion. A high quality bead was consistently achieved with the 3003 alloy, whereas the other alloys demonstrated bead irregularities. SEM photographs reveal large, spherical pores, suggesting that they were formed by gas entrapment rather than by shrinkage.

  19. Properties of welded joints in laser welding of aeronautic aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The work presents the experimental investigation of the laser welding of the aluminum-lithium alloys (system Al-Mg-Li) and aluminum alloy (system Al-Cu-Li) doped with Sc. The influence of the nano-structuring of the surface layer welded joint by the cold plastic deformation method on the strength properties of the welded joint is determined. It is founded that, regarding the deformation degree over the thickness, the varying value of the welded joint strength is different for these aluminum alloys.

  20. Small-scale explosive welding of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Welding technique uses very small quantities of explosive ribbon to accomplish small-scale lap-welding of aluminum plates. Technique can perform small controlled welding with no length limitations and requires minimal protective shielding.

  1. Tests show that aluminum welds are improved by bead removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, D. W.

    1967-01-01

    Tests with 2218-T87 aluminum alloy plate indicate improvements in strength, ductility, fatigue properties, and burst pressure result when one or both of the top and bottom weld beads are removed. There is, however, a drop in yield strength. The consistency of test data is considerably improved by weld bead removal.

  2. Particulate and gaseous emissions when welding aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Cole, Homer; Epstein, Seymour; Peace, Jon

    2007-09-01

    Fabrication and repair of aluminum components and structures commonly involves the use of electric arc welding. The interaction of the arc and the metal being welded generates ultraviolet radiation, metallic oxides, fumes, and gases. Aluminum is seldom used as the pure metal but is often alloyed with other metals to improve strength and other physical properties. Therefore, the exact composition of any emissions will depend on the welding process and the particular aluminum alloy being welded. To quantify such emissions, The Aluminum Association sponsored several studies to characterize arc welding emissions by the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes for various combinations of base and filler alloys. In all cases, the tests were conducted under conditions that could be found in a production weld shop without forced ventilation. The concentrations of each analyte that a welder could be exposed to were greatly affected by the welding process, the composition of the base and filler alloys, the position of the welder, and the welding helmet. The results obtained can be used by employers to identify and control potential hazards associated with the welding of aluminum alloys and can provide the basis for hazard communication to employees involved in the welding of these alloys.

  3. REAL TIME ULTRASONIC ALUMINUM SPOT WELD MONITORING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Regalado, W. Perez; Chertov, A. M.; Maev, R. Gr.

    2010-02-22

    Aluminum alloys pose several properties that make them one of the most popular engineering materials: they have excellent corrosion resistance, and high weight-to-strength ratio. Resistance spot welding of aluminum alloys is widely used today but oxide film and aluminum thermal and electrical properties make spot welding a difficult task. Electrode degradation due to pitting, alloying and mushrooming decreases the weld quality and adjustment of parameters like current and force is required. To realize these adjustments and ensure weld quality, a tool to measure weld quality in real time is required. In this paper, a real time ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation system for aluminum spot welds is presented. The system is able to monitor nugget growth while the spot weld is being made. This is achieved by interpreting the echoes of an ultrasound transducer located in one of the welding electrodes. The transducer receives and transmits an ultrasound signal at different times during the welding cycle. Valuable information of the weld quality is embedded in this signal. The system is able to determine the weld nugget diameter by measuring the delays of the ultrasound signals received during the complete welding cycle. The article presents the system performance on aluminum alloy AA6022.

  4. Microhardness, strength and strain field characterization of self-reacting friction stir and plug welds of dissimilar aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Karla Renee

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential advantages for aerospace and automotive industries dealing with light alloys. Self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW) is one variation of the FSW process being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for use in the fabrication of propellant tanks. Friction plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential SR-FSW. This work reports on material properties and strain patterns developed in a SR-FSW with a friction plug weld. Specifically, this study examines the behavior of a SR-FSW formed between an AA2014-T6 plate on the advancing side and an AA2219-T87 plate on the retreating side and a SR-FSW (AA2014-T6 to AA2219-T87) with a 2219-T87 plug weld. This study presents the results of a characterization of the micro-hardness, joint strength, and strain field characterization of SR-FSW and FPW joints tested at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. The initial weld microstructure analysis showed a nugget region with fine grains and a displaced weld seam from the advancing side past the thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) into the nugget region. The displaced material shared the same hardness as the parent material. Dynamic recrystallization was observed in the SR-FSW zone and the displaced weld seam region. The welds revealed a fine grain structure in the SR-FSW zone with a sharp demarcation seen on the advancing side and fairly diffuse flow observed on the retreating side. The parent material hardness is 145 HV700g with a drop in hardness starting at the HAZ to 130 HV700g. The hardness further drops in the TMAZ to118 HV700g with an increase representing a dispersed interface of AA2014-T6 material to 135 HV700g. The hardness then drops significantly within the nugget region to 85 HV700g followed by an increase through the retreating side TMAZ into the HAZ to 135 HV 700g. There was a sharp increase in the hardness value within

  5. Influences of post weld heat treatment on tensile strength and microstructure characteristics of friction stir welded butt joints of AA2014-T6 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, C.; Srinivasan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balaji, H.; Selvaraj, P.

    2016-08-01

    Friction stir welded (FSWed) joints of aluminum alloys exhibited a hardness drop in both the advancing side (AS) and retreating side (RS) of the thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) due to the thermal cycle involved in the FSW process. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to overcome this problem by post weld heat treatment (PWHT) methods. FSW butt (FSWB) joints of Al-Cu (AA2014-T6) alloy were PWHT by two methods such as simple artificial aging (AA) and solution treatment followed by artificial aging (STA). Of these two treatments, STA was found to be more beneficial than the simple aging treatment to improve the tensile properties of the FSW joints of AA2014 aluminum alloy.

  6. Weld Repair of Thin Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld repairing of thin aluminum sheets now possible, using niobium shield and copper heat sinks. Refractory niobium shield protects aluminum adjacent to hole, while copper heat sinks help conduct heat away from repair site. Technique limits tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding bombardment zone to melt area, leaving surrounding areas around weld unaffected. Used successfully to repair aluminum cold plates on Space Shuttle, Commercial applications, especially in sealing fractures, dents, and holes in thin aluminum face sheets or clad brazing sheet in cold plates, heat exchangers, coolers, and Solar panels. While particularly suited to thin aluminum sheet, this process also used in thicker aluminum material to prevent surface damage near weld area.

  7. Towards the problem of forming full strength welded joints on aluminum alloy sheets. Part I: AA2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, Sergey; Eliseev, Alexander; Kalashnikova, Tatiana; Kolubaev, Evgeny

    2016-11-01

    This work shows the microstructural evolution of solid solution grains and secondary phase precipitates in the stirring zones of ultrasonic-assisted friction stir welding (UAFSW) and standard friction stir welding (FSW). As shown, fine spherical AlMgCu precipitates dominate in FSW stirring zone whereas nanosized Al2MgCu (S-phase) platelets ones are the main finding in UAFSW sample. The mechanical strength of AA2024 is provided by precipitation of coherent intermetallic S-phase particles. The dominating amount of S-phase precipitates in UAFSW sample provided the ultimate stress level close to that of the base metal, i.e. 402 MPa as compared to 302 MPa of FSW sample. These values constituted 93 and 85%, respectively, of the base metal strength.

  8. Aluminum alloy welding and stress-corrosion testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, W.G.; Jimenez, E.

    1981-04-01

    The weldability, strength, and corrosion resistance of four 5XXX aluminum alloys electron beam welded to 6061-T6 aluminum alloy without a filler metal were evaluated. Adding filler metal raises weld energy requirements and makes the process more difficult to control. In this study, instead of using a filler metal, a high-magnesium 5XXX alloy was welded to the 6061 alloy. The four 5XXX alloys used (5456-H321, 5052-H34, 5086-H323, and 5083-H32) were selected for their high magnesium content which reduces weld crack sensitivity.

  9. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  10. Effect of Weld Characteristic on Mechanical Strength of Laser-Arc Hybrid-Welded Al-Mg-Si-Mn Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Gao, Ming; Jiang, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-11-01

    Laser-arc hybrid welding (LAHW) was employed to improve the tensile properties of the joints of 8-mm-thick Al-Mg-Si-Mn alloy (AA6082) using Al-5Mg filler wire. The weld microstructures were examined by scanning electron microscope, electron backscattered diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy in detail. The LAHW joints with pore-free and high-tensile performances were obtained. The strength enhancement of the fusion zone and heat-affected zone in the LAHW joint was mainly attributed to the grain refinement strengthening and the precipitation strengthening, respectively. The microstructure characteristics were related to the effects of laser-arc interaction on the energy transfer within the molten pool. The arc caused the majority of laser energy to dissipate out of the keyhole, and then it reduced the heat input. The lower heat input refined the grain size, weakened the overaging effect, and thus improved the tensile strength.

  11. Theoretical Model of the Effect of Crack Tip Blunting on the Ultimate Tensile Strength of Welds in 2219-T87 Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beil, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical model representing blunting of a crack tip radius through diffusion of vacancies is presented. The model serves as the basis for a computer program which calculates changes, due to successive weld heat passes, in the ultimate tensile strength of 2219-T81 aluminum. In order for the model to yield changes of the same order in the ultimate tensile strength as that observed experimentally, a crack tip radius of the order of .001 microns is required. Such sharp cracks could arise in the fusion zone of a weld from shrinkage cavities or decohered phase boundaries between dendrites and the eutectic phase, or, possibly, from plastic deformation due to thermal stresses encountered during the welding process. Microstructural observations up to X2000 (resolution of about .1 micron) did not, in the fusion zone, show structural details which changed significantly under the influence of a heat pass, with the exception of possible small changes in the configuration of the interdendritic eutectic and in porosity build-up in the remelt zone.

  12. Interpretation of aluminum-alloy weld radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duren, P. C.; Risch, E. R.

    1971-01-01

    Report proposes radiographic terminology standardization which allows scientific interpretation of radiographic films to replace dependence on individual judgement and experience. Report includes over 50 photographic pages where radiographs of aluminum welds with defects are compared with prepared weld sections photomacrographs.

  13. Nd:YAG laser welding aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, E. Jr.

    1992-02-01

    Autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding wrought 4047, 1100, 3003, 2219, 5052, 5086, 5456, and 6061 and cast A356 aluminum alloys to cast A356 aluminum alloy in restrained annular weld joints was investigated. The welds were 12.7 mm (0.375 in.) and 9.5 mm (0.375 in.) diameter with approximately 0.30 mm (0.012 in.) penetration. This investigation determined 4047 aluminum alloy to be the optimum alloy for autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding to cast A356 aluminum alloy. This report describes the investigation and its results.

  14. Microstructure analysis in friction welding of copper and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo, A. G. Wahyu; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.

    2016-04-01

    The Friction welding is a welding method with utilizing heat generated due to friction. Surfaces of two materials to be joined, one rotates the other being idle, is contacted by a pressure force. Friction on the second contact surface is done continuously so that the heat generated by the continuous friction will continue to rise. With the heat and the pressure force on the second surface to the second meeting of the material reaches its melting temperature then there is the process of welding. This paper examines the influence of the pressure force, rotational speed and contact time on friction welding of Aluminum (Al) and Copper (Cu) to the quality of welded joints. Friction welding process is performed on a friction welding machine that is equipped with the loading mechanism. The parameters used are the pressure force, rotational speed and friction time. Determination of the quality of welding is done by testing the tensile strength, hardness, and micro structure on the weld joint areas. The results showed that the friction welding quality is very good, this is evidenced by the results of a tensile strength test where the fault occurs outside the weld joint and increased violence in the weld joint. On the results visually cuts the welding area did not reveal any porosity so that it can be concluded that each metal contacts have melted perfectly and produce a connection with good quality.

  15. Filler wire for aluminum alloys and method of welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Jr., Gerald W. O. (Inventor); Cho, Alex (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A weld filler wire chemistry has been developed for fusion welding 2195 aluminum-lithium. The weld filler wire chemistry is an aluminum-copper based alloy containing high additions of titanium and zirconium. The additions of titanium and zirconium reduce the crack susceptibility of aluminum alloy welds while producing good weld mechanical properties. The addition of silver further improves the weld properties of the weld filler wire. The reduced weld crack susceptibility enhances the repair weldability, including when planishing is required.

  16. Technology of welding aluminum alloys-III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. R.; Kor, L. J.; Oleksiak, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    Control of porosity in weld beads was major objective in development of aluminum welding program. Porosity, most difficult defect to control, is caused by hydrogen gas unable to escape during solidification. Hard tooling allows hotter bead than free-fall tooling so hydrogen bubbles can boil out instead of forming pores. Welding position, moisture, and cleanliness are other important factors in control of porosity.

  17. Technology of welding aluminum alloys-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. R.; Korb, L. J.; Oleksiak, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    Systems approach to high-quality aluminum welding uses square-butt joints, kept away from sharp contour changes. Intersecting welds are configured for T-type intersections rather than crossovers. Differences in panel thickness are accommodated with transition step areas where thickness increases or decreases within weld, but never at intersection.

  18. Properties of VPPA-Welded 2219-T87 Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W.; Jemian, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    Metallurgical properties and effects of welding described. Report describes investigation of welding of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy by variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) process. Research was to determine highest strength attainable with this alloy and process and to estimate changes in weld properties caused by variations of process controls. Alloy 2219 strong and heat treatable and retains structural integrity up to 600 degrees F (316 degress C). Is principal structural alloy of Space Shuttle external tank. VPPA process offers many advantages and replaces tungsten/inert-gas process used. In over 24,000 in. (610 m) of welds on tank, there has been no internal defect requiring manual repair.

  19. Friction-Stir Welding of Aluminum For the Space Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Clyde S.; Smelser, Jerry W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center is developing and characterizing the friction stir welding process for the Space Shuttle and other space programs. This revolutionary process, invented and patented by The Weld Institute in England, offers tremendous advantages for joining aluminum for high performance applications. It is particularly suited for advanced aluminum-lithium alloys, such as 2195, the primary structural alloy used in the External Tank. The friction stir welding process joins metals with minimal heat input, resulting in high-strength joints with high ductility. It is a simple process to demonstrate using a common milling machine for sample parts, but relatively expensive to implement on large-scale hardware, due to the high cost of tooling needed to handle the high forging pressures characteristic of the process. Recent developments at the Marshall Space Flight Center have demonstrated friction stir welding on linear joints up to 5 meters (15 ft.), with material thickness ranging between 2.5 mm and 16.5 mm (0.100" to 0.650"). High efficiency weld joints have been produced in aluminum from the 2000, 5000, and 6000 series alloy systems. A "retractable pin tool" system was patented by MSFC that allows use of friction stir welding for joints with changing material thickness, and with less rigid tooling than previously considered. This presentation will describe the details of alloys welded to-date and technical advances under development at MSFC. These developments could have substantial benefit to industrial applications for welding aluminum.

  20. Friction-Stir Welding of Aluminum For the Space Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Clyde S.; Smelser, Jerry W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center is developing and characterizing the friction stir welding process for the Space Shuttle and other space programs. This revolutionary process, invented and patented by The Weld Institute in England, offers tremendous advantages for joining aluminum for high performance applications. It is particularly suited for advanced aluminum-lithium alloys, such as 2195, the primary structural alloy used in the External Tank. The friction stir welding process joins metals with minimal heat input, resulting in high-strength joints with high ductility. It is a simple process to demonstrate using a common milling machine for sample parts, but relatively expensive to implement on large-scale hardware, due to the high cost of tooling needed to handle the high forging pressures characteristic of the process. Recent developments at the Marshall Space Flight Center have demonstrated friction stir welding on linear joints up to 5 meters (15 ft.), with material thickness ranging between 2.5 mm and 16.5 mm (0.100" to 0.650"). High efficiency weld joints have been produced in aluminum from the 2000, 5000, and 6000 series alloy systems. A "retractable pin tool" system was patented by MSFC that allows use of friction stir welding for joints with changing material thickness, and with less rigid tooling than previously considered. This presentation will describe the details of alloys welded to-date and technical advances under development at MSFC. These developments could have substantial benefit to industrial applications for welding aluminum.

  1. Development in characterization of resistance spot welding of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, M.; Osman, K.A.; Boomer, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Automotive interest in aluminum is growing rapidly in Europe and North America. Resistance spot-welding and weld-bonding will be key techniques in the volume production of aluminum vehicles. As part of the Alcan program to fully understand and characterize the spot-welding of aluminum, it was necessary to develop a custom data a cquisition system. This can measure important electrical and mechanical process variables in real-time during the spot-welding process. The data acquisition system developed can be used to monitor both single-phase AC and medium frequency (MF)(DC) (inverter) welding systems. it can log data including current, voltage, dynamic resistance, electrode displacement, and electrode force at rates of up to 150 KHz. An acquisition and analysis system has been developed that is capable of extracting spot weld signatures from logged process data. No single-process parameter has been found which can be used to predict weld quality for aluminum. Multiple linear regression methods, based on a number of spot-welding process data, can predict nugget diameter and static strength.

  2. Laser beam welding of 5182 aluminum alloys sheet.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K. H.; Sabo, K. R.; Altshuller, B.; Wilkinson, T. L.; Albright, C. E.; Technology Development; Alcan International Limited; Reynolds Metals Co.; Ohio State Univ.

    1999-06-01

    Conditions were determined for consistent coupling of a CO{sub 2} laser beam to weld 5182 aluminum alloy sheet. Full penetration butt and bead-on-plate welds on 0.8 and 1.8 mm sheets were performed. Process conditions examined included beam mode, spot size and irradiance, shielding gas flow, and edge quality and fitup. The observed weld quality variations with the different process parameters were consistent with physical phenomena and a threshold irradiance model. Optimal conditions were determined for obtaining consistent welds on 5182 alloy sheets. Formability and tensile tests were performed on the welded samples. All test failures occurred in the fusion zone. Reduction in formability and tensile strength of the welded samples are discussed with respect to weld profiles and process parameters.

  3. Hybrid manufacturing processes for fusion welding and friction stir welding of aerospace grade aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gegesky, Megan Alexandra

    Friction stir welding and processing can provide for joints in aerospace grade aluminum alloys that have preferable material properties as compared to fusion welding techniques. Aerospace grade aluminum alloys such as AA2024-T3 and AA7075-T6 are considered non-weldable by traditional fusion welding techniques. Improved mechanical properties over previously used techniques are usually preferable for aerospace applications. Therefore, by combining traditional fusion welding and friction stir processing techniques, it could be plausible to create more difficult geometries in manufactured parts instead of using traditional techniques. While this combination of fusion welding and friction stir processing is not a new technology, its introduction to aerospace grade aluminum alloys as well as non-weldable alloys, is new. This is brought about by a lowered required clamping force required by adding a fusion weld before a friction stir processing technique. The changes in properties associated with joining techniques include: microstructural changes, changes in hardness, tensile strength, and corrosion resistance. This thesis illustrates these changes for the non-weldable AA2024-T351 and AA7075-T651 as well as the weldable alloy AA5052-H32. The microhardness, tensile strength and corrosion resistance of the four processing states: base material, fusion welded material, friction stir welded material, and friction stir processed fusion welded material is studied. The plausibility of this hybrid process for the three different materials is characterized, as well as plausible applications for this joining technique.

  4. Welding the four most popular aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, B.

    1994-02-01

    The fact that business is good in aluminum welding is a sure sign that more manufacturers and fabricators are using GMA and GTA welding to build new products out of this lightweight nonferrous metal. Among the most widely specified weldable grades are Alloys 6061, 5083, 5052 and 5454. A rundown on these four alloys, including properties and selected applications, is provided. Any company working with aluminum for the first time needs to know something about these four alloys. Alloys of copper-magnesium-silicon combination, of which 6061 is one, are heat-treatable. The three 5XXX series alloys, on the other hand, are nonheat-treatable. According to P.B. Dickerson, consultant, Lower Burrell, Pa., 5083, because of its high magnesium content, is the easiest of the four alloys to arc weld. Dickerson put the cut-off point in weldability at 3.5% magnesium. To prevent cracking, he added, both 6061 and 5052 require much more filler metal than do the other two alloys. Alloy 6061 consists of 0.25Cu, 0.6Si, 1.0Mg, and 0.20Cr. The main applications for 6061 aluminum are structural, architectural, automotive, railway, marine and pipe. It has good formability, weldability, corrosion resistance and strength. Although the 6XXX series alloys are prone to hot cracking, this condition can be readily overcome by correct choice of joint design and electrode. The most popular temper for 6061 is T6, although the -T651, -T4, and -F temper are also popular. The -T651 temper is like a -T6 temper, only it has received some final stretch hardening. The -T4 temper has been solution heat-treated and quenched. The -F temper is in the as-fabricated condition.

  5. Ultrasonic Real-Time Quality Monitoring Of Aluminum Spot Weld Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Regalado, Waldo Josue

    The real-time ultrasonic spot weld monitoring system, introduced by our research group, has been designed for the unsupervised quality characterization of the spot welding process. It comprises the ultrasonic transducer (probe) built into one of the welding electrodes and an electronics hardware unit which gathers information from the transducer, performs real-time weld quality characterization and communicates with the robot programmable logic controller (PLC). The system has been fully developed for the inspection of spot welds manufactured in steel alloys, and has been mainly applied in the automotive industry. In recent years, a variety of materials have been introduced to the automotive industry. These include high strength steels, magnesium alloys, and aluminum alloys. Aluminum alloys have been of particular interest due to their high strength-to-weight ratio. Resistance spot welding requirements for aluminum vary greatly from those of steel. Additionally, the oxide film formed on the aluminum surface increases the heat generation between the copper electrodes and the aluminum plates leading to accelerated electrode deterioration. Preliminary studies showed that the real-time quality inspection system was not able to monitor spot welds manufactured with aluminum. The extensive experimental research, finite element modelling of the aluminum welding process and finite difference modeling of the acoustic wave propagation through the aluminum spot welds presented in this dissertation, revealed that the thermodynamics and hence the acoustic wave propagation through an aluminum and a steel spot weld differ significantly. For this reason, the hardware requirements and the algorithms developed to determine the welds quality from the ultrasonic data used on steel, no longer apply on aluminum spot welds. After updating the system and designing the required algorithms, parameters such as liquid nugget penetration and nugget diameter were available in the ultrasonic data

  6. Plasma ARC keyhole welding of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fostervoll, H.

    1993-02-01

    An increasing and more advanced use of aluminum as a construction material make higher demands to the effectiveness and quality in aluminum joining. Furthermore, if the advantages of aluminum shall be exploited in the best possible way, it is necessary to use the best processes available for the certain application. Today, the most widely used processes of aluminum welding are gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Plasma arc welding (PAW) is another interesting process, which is rather newly adopted for aluminum welding. However, up to now the use is limited and most of the users are within the space industry in USA (NASA); also the new space industry in Europe has adopted the process. The reason for the great interest for PAW in the space industry is, according to NASA, higher weld quality and less repair costs, less heat distortion, and less groove preparations costs. Of these reasons, PAW should also be of interest for the aluminum industry in Scandinavia. The aim of the project is to focus on the possibilities and to some extent testing the PAW process.

  7. Ultrasonic butt welding of aluminum, aluminum alloy and stainless steel plate specimens.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Hidai, Kazuaki; Hasegawa, Atsushi; Kanai, Ryoichi; Matsuura, Hisanori; Matsushima, Kaoru; Ueoka, Tetsugi

    2002-05-01

    Welding characteristics of aluminum, aluminum alloy and stainless steel plate specimens of 6.0 mm thickness by a 15 kHz ultrasonic butt welding system were studied. There are no detailed welding condition data of these specimens although the joining of these materials are required due to anticorrosive and high strength characteristics for not only large specimens but small electronic parts especially. These specimens of 6.0 mm thickness were welded end to end using a 15 kHz ultrasonic butt welding equipment with a vibration source using eight bolt-clamped Langevin type PZT transducers and a 50 kW static induction thyristor power amplifier. The stainless steel plate specimens electrolytically polished were joined with welding strength almost equal to the material strength under rather large vibration amplitude of 25 microm (peak-to-zero value), static pressure 70 MPa and welding time of 1.0-3.0 s. The hardness of stainless steel specimen adjacent to a welding surface increased about 20% by ultrasonic vibration.

  8. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an Ultrasonic Spot Welded Aluminum Alloy: The Effect of Welding Energy.

    PubMed

    Peng, He; Chen, Daolun; Jiang, Xianquan

    2017-04-25

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the microstructures, tensile lap shear strength, and fatigue resistance of 6022-T43 aluminum alloy joints welded via a solid-state welding technique-ultrasonic spot welding (USW)-at different energy levels. An ultra-fine necklace-like equiaxed grain structure is observed along the weld line due to the occurrence of dynamic crystallization, with smaller grain sizes at lower levels of welding energy. The tensile lap shear strength, failure energy, and critical stress intensity of the welded joints first increase, reach their maximum values, and then decrease with increasing welding energy. The tensile lap shear failure mode changes from interfacial fracture at lower energy levels, to nugget pull-out at intermediate optimal energy levels, and to transverse through-thickness (TTT) crack growth at higher energy levels. The fatigue life is longer for the joints welded at an energy of 1400 J than 2000 J at higher cyclic loading levels. The fatigue failure mode changes from nugget pull-out to TTT crack growth with decreasing cyclic loading for the joints welded at 1400 J, while TTT crack growth mode remains at all cyclic loading levels for the joints welded at 2000 J. Fatigue crack basically initiates from the nugget edge, and propagates with "river-flow" patterns and characteristic fatigue striations.

  9. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an Ultrasonic Spot Welded Aluminum Alloy: The Effect of Welding Energy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, He; Chen, Daolun; Jiang, Xianquan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the microstructures, tensile lap shear strength, and fatigue resistance of 6022-T43 aluminum alloy joints welded via a solid-state welding technique–ultrasonic spot welding (USW)–at different energy levels. An ultra-fine necklace-like equiaxed grain structure is observed along the weld line due to the occurrence of dynamic crystallization, with smaller grain sizes at lower levels of welding energy. The tensile lap shear strength, failure energy, and critical stress intensity of the welded joints first increase, reach their maximum values, and then decrease with increasing welding energy. The tensile lap shear failure mode changes from interfacial fracture at lower energy levels, to nugget pull-out at intermediate optimal energy levels, and to transverse through-thickness (TTT) crack growth at higher energy levels. The fatigue life is longer for the joints welded at an energy of 1400 J than 2000 J at higher cyclic loading levels. The fatigue failure mode changes from nugget pull-out to TTT crack growth with decreasing cyclic loading for the joints welded at 1400 J, while TTT crack growth mode remains at all cyclic loading levels for the joints welded at 2000 J. Fatigue crack basically initiates from the nugget edge, and propagates with “river-flow” patterns and characteristic fatigue striations. PMID:28772809

  10. Weld repair method for aluminum lithium seam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, William Floyd (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel John (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium plates are butt-welded by juxtaposing the plates and making a preliminary weld from the rear or root side of the seam. An initial weld is then made from the face side of the seam, which may cause a defect in the root portion. A full-size X-ray is made and overlain over the seam to identify the defects. The defect is removed from the root side, and rewelded. Material is then removed from the face side, and the cavity is rewelded. The procedure repeats, alternating from the root side to the face side, until the weld is sound.

  11. Heat Treatment of Friction-Stir-Welded 7050 Aluminum Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petter, George E.; Figert, John D.; Rybicki, Daniel J.; Burns, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    A method of heat treatment has been developed to reverse some of the deleterious effects of friction stir welding of plates of aluminum alloy 7050. This alloy is considered unweldable by arc and high-energy-density beam fusion welding processes. The alloy can be friction stir welded, but as-welded workpieces exhibit low ductility, low tensile and yield strengths, and low resistance to stress corrosion cracking. Heat treatment according to the present method increases tensile and yield strengths, and minimizes or eliminates stress corrosion cracking. It also increases ductility. This method of heat treatment is a superior alternative to a specification-required heat treatment that caused the formation of large columnar grains, which are undesired. Workpieces subjected to the prior heat treatment exhibited elongations <2 percent, and standard three-point bend specimens shattered. The development of the present heat treatment method was guided partly by the principles that (1) by minimizing grain sizes and relieving deformation stresses, one can minimize or eliminate stress corrosion cracking and (2) the key to maximizing strength and eliminating residual stresses is to perform post-weld solution heating for as long a time as possible while incurring little or no development of large columnar grains in friction stir weld nuggets. It is necessary to perform some of the solution heat treatment (to soften the alloy and improve machine welding parameters) before welding. The following is an example of thickness- dependent pre- and post-weld heat treatments according to the present method: For plates 0.270 in. (approx.6.86 mm) thick milled from plates 4.5 in. (114.3 mm) thick, perform pre-weld solution heating at 890 F (477 C) for 1 hour, then cool in air. After friction stir welding, perform solution heating for 10 minutes, quench, hold at room temperature for 96 hours, then age at 250 F (121 C) for 5 hours followed by 325 F (163 C) for 27 hours.

  12. Influences of post-weld heat treatment on tensile properties of friction stir-welded AA6061 aluminum alloy joints

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2008-09-15

    This paper reports on studies of the influences of various post-weld heat treatment procedures on tensile properties of friction stir-welded AA6061 aluminum alloy joints. Rolled plates of 6-mm thick AA6061 aluminum alloy were used to fabricate the joints. Solution treatment, an artificial aging treatment and a combination of both were given to the welded joints. Tensile properties such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and joint efficiency were evaluated. Microstructures of the welded joints were analyzed using optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A simple artificial aging treatment was found to be more beneficial than other treatment methods to enhance the tensile properties of the friction stir-welded AA6061 aluminum alloy joints.

  13. Fabrication of Aluminum Foam/Dense Steel Composite by Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Koyama, Shinji; Hasegawa, Makoto; Utsunomiya, Takao

    2010-09-01

    Aluminum foam/dense steel composites were fabricated by friction stir welding (FSW). It is expected that both mixing a blowing agent into aluminum and bonding the aluminum precursor to steel can be conducted simultaneously by FSW. It was shown that although heat treatment of the precursor evolved a brittle intermetallic compound layer, the bonding strength of the interface consisting of the intermetallic compound layer was relatively high compared with the fracture strength of the aluminum foam itself.

  14. Multi-Response Optimization of Friction-Stir-Welded AA1100 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajakumar, S.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2012-06-01

    AA1100 aluminum alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures. Friction stir welding process (FSW) is an emerging solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded does not melt and recast. The process and tool parameters of FSW play a major role in deciding the joint characteristics. In this research, the relationships between the FSW parameters (rotational speed, welding speed, axial force, shoulder diameter, pin diameter, and tool hardness) and the responses (tensile strength, hardness, and corrosion rate) were established. The optimal welding conditions to maximize the tensile strength and minimize the corrosion rate were identified for AA1100 aluminum alloy and reported here.

  15. Effect of Post-weld Thermal Treatment on Mechanical Properties of Welded Aluminum-Alloy Engine Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M. S.; Towsif, A.; Reaz Ahmed, S.

    2017-08-01

    The effect of post-weld thermal treatment has been investigated experimentally in an attempt to improve the mechanical properties of welded aluminum-alloy engine head. Welding of the locally damaged engine head is performed using two different filler metals—one is the commercial aluminum filler and the other base metal itself. Mechanical properties of the repaired engine head are analyzed before and after applying the thermal treatment in terms of measured values of micro-hardness, tensile strength, yield strength, percentage elongation at different zones of the welded samples. In order to realize the effect, microstructures of different welded samples are also observed through optical and scanning electron microscopes. Results of the present investigation show that the thermal treatment significantly improves the mechanical properties as well as microstructure of the welded region of Al-alloy engine head, especially those obtained by using the base filler metal.

  16. Laser-welded Dissimilar Steel-aluminum Seams for Automotive Lightweight Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimek, M.; Springer, A.; Kaierle, S.; Kracht, D.; Wesling, V.

    By reducing vehicle weight, a significant increase in fuel efficiency and consequently a reduction in CO 2 emissions can be achieved. Currently a high interest in the production of hybrid weld seams between steel and aluminum exists. Previous methods as laser brazing are possible only by using fluxes and additional materials. Laser welding can be used to join steel and aluminum without the use of additives. With a low penetration depth increases in tensile strength can be achieved. Recent results from laser welded overlap seams show that there is no compromise in strength by decreasing penetration depth in the aluminum.

  17. Microhardness Testing of Aluminum Alloy Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohanon, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    A weld is made when two pieces of metal are united or fused together using heat or pressure, and sometimes both. There are several different types of welds, each having their own unique properties and microstructure. Strength is a property normally used in deciding which kind of weld is suitable for a certain metal or joint. Depending on the weld process used and the heat required for that process, the weld and the heat-affected zone undergo microstructural changes resulting in stronger or weaker areas. The heat-affected zone (HAZ) is the region that has experienced enough heat to cause solid-state microstructural changes, but not enough to melt the material. This area is located between the parent material and the weld, with the grain structure growing as it progresses respectively. The optimal weld would have a short HAZ and a small fluctuation in strength from parent metal to weld. To determine the strength of the weld and decide whether it is suitable for the specific joint certain properties are looked at, among these are ultimate tensile strength, 0.2% offset yield strength and hardness. Ultimate tensile strength gives the maximum load the metal can stand while the offset yield strength gives the amount of stress the metal can take before it is 0.2% longer than it was originally. Both of these are good tests, but they both require breaking or deforming the sample in some way. Hardness testing, however, provides an objective evaluation of weld strengths, and also the difference or variation in strength across the weld and HAZ which is difficult to do with tensile testing. Hardness is the resistance to permanent or plastic deformation and can be taken at any desired point on the specimen. With hardness testing, it is possible to test from parent metal to weld and see the difference in strength as you progress from parent material to weld. Hardness around grain boundaries and flaws in the material will show how these affect the strength of the metal while still

  18. A study on friction stir welding of 12mm thick aluminum alloy plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepati Anil; Biswas, Pankaj; Tikader, Sujoy; Mahapatra, M. M.; Mandal, N. R.

    2013-12-01

    Most of the investigations regarding friction stir welding (FSW) of aluminum alloy plates have been limited to about 5 to 6 mm thick plates. In prior work conducted the various aspects concerning the process parameters and the FSW tool geometry were studied utilizing friction stir welding of 12 mm thick commercial grade aluminum alloy. Two different simple-to-manufacture tool geometries were used. The effect of varying welding parameters and dwell time of FSW tool on mechanical properties and weld quality was examined. It was observed that in order to achieve a defect free welding on such thick aluminum alloy plates, tool having trapezoidal pin geometry was suitable. Adequate tensile strength and ductility can be achieved utilizing a combination of high tool rotational speed of about 2000 r/min and low speed of welding around 28 mm/min. At very low and high dwell time the ductility of welded joints are reduced significantly.

  19. Friction Pull Plug Welding in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, Shane A.; Bradford, Vann

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently invested much time and effort into the process development of Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW). FPPW, is a welding process similar to Friction Push Plug Welding in that, there is a small rotating part (plug) being spun and simultaneously pulled (forged) into a larger part. These two processes differ, in that push plug welding requires an internal reaction support, while pull plug welding reacts to the load externally. FPPW was originally conceived as a post proof repair technique for the Space Shuttle fs External Tank. FPPW was easily selected as the primary weld process used to close out the termination hole on the Constellation Program's ARES I Upper Stage circumferential Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). The versatility of FPPW allows it to also be used as a repair technique for both SR-FSW and Conventional Friction Stir Welds. To date, all MSFC led development has been concentrated on aluminum alloys (2195, 2219, and 2014). Much work has been done to fully understand and characterize the process's limitations. A heavy emphasis has been spent on plug design, to match the various weldland thicknesses and alloy combinations. This presentation will summarize these development efforts including weld parameter development, process control, parameter sensitivity studies, plug repair techniques, material properties including tensile, fracture and failure analysis.

  20. Modeling aluminum-lithium alloy welding characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a finite element model of the heat-affected zone in the vicinity of a weld line on a plate in order to determine an accurate plastic strain history. The resulting plastic strain increments calculated by the finite element program were then to be used to calculate the measure of damage D. It was hoped to determine the effects of varying welding parameters, such as beam power, efficiency, and weld speed, and the effect of different material properties on the occurrence of microfissuring. The results were to be compared first to the previous analysis of Inconel 718, and then extended to aluminum 2195.

  1. Explosive welding technique for joining aluminum and steel tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    Silver sheet is wrapped around aluminum portion of joint. Mylar powder box is wrapped over silver sheet. Explosion welds silver to aluminum. Stainless-steel tube is placed over silver-aluminum interface. Mylar powder box, covered with Mylar tape, is wrapped around steel member. Explosion welds steel to silver-aluminum interface.

  2. FRICTION STIR SPOT WELDING OF 6016 ALUMINUM ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Rajiv S.; Webb, S.; Freeney, T. A.; Chen, Y. L.; Gayden, X.; Grant, Glenn J.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2007-01-08

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) of 6016 aluminum alloy was evaluated with conventional pin tool and new off-center feature tools. The off-center feature tool provides significant control over the joint area. The tool rotation rate was varied between 1000 and 2500 rpm. Maximum failure strength was observed in the tool rotation range of 1200-1500 rpm. The results are interpreted in the context of material flow in the joint and influence of thermal input on microstructural changes. The off-center feature tool concept opens up new possibilities for plunge-type friction stir spot welding.

  3. Aluminum welding fume-induced pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Hull, Mindy J; Abraham, Jerrold L

    2002-08-01

    Chronic exposure to high concentrations of fumes during aluminum arc welding causes a severe pneumoconiosis characterized by diffuse pulmonary accumulation of aluminum metal and a corresponding reduction in lung function. Aluminum fume-induced pneumoconiosis is a rarely reported entity, of which the true incidence is unknown. We report the clinical, radiographic, microscopic, and microanalytic results of 2 coworkers, employed by the same aluminum shipbuilding facility, who died of complications from this disease. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of the exogenous particle content in the lung tissue of these cases revealed the highest concentrations of aluminum particles (average of 9.26 billion aluminum particles per cm(3) of lung tissue) among the 812 similar analyses in our pneumoconiosis database. One patient had an original clinical diagnosis of sarcoidosis but no evidence of granulomatous inflammation. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  4. FRICTION STIR LAP WELDING OF ALUMINUM - POLYMER USING SCRIBE TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2015-02-16

    Friction Stir Scribe (FSS) technology is a relatively new variant of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) which enables lap joining of dissimilar material with very different melting points and different high temperature flow behaviors. The cutter scribe attached at the tip of FSW tool pin effectively cuts the high melting point material such that a mechanically interlocking feature is created between the dissimilar materials. The geometric shape of this interlocking feature determines the shear strength attained by the lap joint. This work presents first use of scribe technology in joining polymers to aluminum alloy. Details of the several runs of scribe welding performed in lap joining of ~3.175mm thick polymers including HDPE, filled and unfilled Nylon 66 to 2mm thick AA5182 are presented. The effect of scribe geometry and length on weld interlocking features is presented along with lap shear strength evaluations.

  5. Friction Pull Plug Welding in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, Shane A.; Bradford, Vann; Burkholder, Jonathon

    2011-01-01

    NASA fs Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently invested much time and effort into the process development of Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW). FPPW, is a welding process similar to Friction Push Plug Welding in that, there is a small rotating part (plug) being spun and simultaneously pulled (forged) into a larger part. These two processes differ, in that push plug welding requires an internal reaction support, while pull plug welding reacts to the load externally. FPPW was originally conceived as a post proof repair technique for External Tank. FPPW was easily selected as the primary process used to close out the termination hole on the Constellation Program fs ARES I Upper Stage circumferential Self ] Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR ]FSW). The versatility of FPPW allows it to also be used as a repair technique for both SR ]FSW and Conventional Friction Stir Welds. To date, all MSFC led development has been concentrated on aluminum alloys (2195, 2219, and 2014). Much work has been done to fully understand and characterize the process fs limitations. A heavy emphasis has been spent on plug design, to match the various weldland thicknesses and alloy combinations. This presentation will summarize these development efforts including weld parameter development, process control, parameter sensitivity studies, plug repair techniques, material properties including tensile, fracture and failure analysis.

  6. Technology of welding aluminum alloys-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Step-by-step procedures were developed for high integrity manual and machine welding of aluminum alloys. Detailed instructions are given for each step with tables and graphs to specify materials and dimensions. Throughout work sequence, processing procedure designates manufacturing verification points and inspection points.

  7. Laser assisted arc welding for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerschbach, P.W.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effector to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (<1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  8. Aluminum alloys with improved strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiasi, R.; Adler, P.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical strength and stress corrosion of new BAR and 7050 alloys that include Zn instead of Cr have been studied and compared with those of 7075 aluminum alloy. Added mechanical strength of new alloys is attributed to finer grain size of 5 to 8 micrometers, however, susceptibility to stress corrosion attack is increased.

  9. Distribution of tensile property and microstructure in friction stir weld of 6063 aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki

    2001-12-01

    Dominant microstructural factors governing the global tensile properties of a friction-stir-welded joint of 6063 aluminum were examined by estimating distribution of local tensile properties corresponding to local microstructure and hardness. Yield and ultimate tensile strengths of the as-welded weld were significantly lower than those of the base material. Postweld aging and postweld solution heat-treatment and aging (SHTA) restored the strengths of the weld to the levels of the base material. Elongation was found to increase with increasing strength. Hardness tests showed that the as-welded weld was soft around the weld center and that the aged weld and the SHTA weld had relatively homogeneous distributions of high hardness. Hardness profiles of the welds were explained by precipitate distributions and precipitation sequences during the postweld heat treatments. The strengths of the welds were related to each minimum hardness value. In a weld having a heterogeneous hardness profile, the fracture occurred in the region with minimum hardness. When a weld had a homogeneous hardness profile, its fracture site depended on both crystallographic-orientation distribution of the matrix grains and strain tensor of the imposed deformation, i.e., it fractured in the region with a minimum average Taylor factor.

  10. Structure formation and properties of a copper-aluminum joint produced by ultrasound-assisted explosive welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, E. V.; Peev, A. P.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.

    2017-08-01

    The effect of ultrasound-assisted explosive welding on the structure formation and the properties of copper-aluminum joints is studied. Ultrasound-assisted explosive welding improves the quality of formed copper-aluminum joints, i.e., enhances their strength and significantly reduces the amount of fused metal over the entire weldability range. It is shown that ultrasound-assisted explosive welding can noticeably extend the weldability range of the copper-aluminum pair to obtain equal-in-strength joints with minimum structural heterogeneity in the wide welding range.

  11. Tailored Welding Technique for High Strength Al-Cu Alloy for Higher Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biradar, N. S.; Raman, R.

    AA2014 aluminum alloy, with 4.5% Cu as major alloying element, offers highest strength and hardness values in T6 temper and finds extensive use in aircraft primary structures. However, this alloy is difficult to weld by fusion welding because the dendritic structure formed can affect weld properties seriously. Among the welding processes, AC-TIG technique is largely used for welding. As welded yield strength was in the range of 190-195 MPa, using conventional TIG technique. Welding metallurgy of AA2014 was critically reviewed and factors responsible for lower properties were identified. Square-wave AC TIG with Transverse mechanical arc oscillation (TMAO) was postulated to improve the weld strength. A systematic experimentation using 4 mm thick plates produced YS in the range of 230-240 MPa, has been achieved. Through characterization including optical and SEM/EDX was conducted to validate the metallurgical phenomena attributable to improvement in weld properties.

  12. An investigation into geometry and microstructural effects upon the ultimate tensile strengths of butt welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical theory was evaluated empirically. This theory predicts weld ultimate tensile strength based on material properties and fusion line angles, mismatch, peaking, and weld widths. Welds were made on 1/4 and 1/2 in. aluminum 2219-T87, their geometries were measured, they were tensile tested, and these results were compared to theoretical predictions. Statistical analysis of results was performed to evaluate correlation of theory to results for many different categories of weld geometries.

  13. FSW of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks across Machine Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carlson, Blair; Szymanski, Robert; Luzanski, Tom; Marshall, Dustin

    2015-02-16

    Development and characterization of friction stir welded aluminum tailor welded blanks was successfully carried out on three separate machine platforms. Each was a commercially available, gantry style, multi-axis machine designed specifically for friction stir welding. Weld parameters were developed to support high volume production of dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor welded blanks at speeds of 3 m/min and greater. Parameters originally developed on an ultra-high stiffness servo driven machine where first transferred to a high stiffness servo-hydraulic friction stir welding machine, and subsequently transferred to a purpose built machine designed to accommodate thin sheet aluminum welding. The inherent beam stiffness, bearing compliance, and control system for each machine were distinctly unique, which posed specific challenges in transferring welding parameters across machine platforms. This work documents the challenges imposed by successfully transferring weld parameters from machine to machine, produced from different manufacturers and with unique control systems and interfaces.

  14. Exposure assessment of aluminum arc welding radiation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chiung-yu; Lan, Cheng-hang; Juang, Yow-jer; Tsao, Ta-ho; Dai, Yu-tung; Liu, Hung-hsin; Chen, Chiou-jong

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the non-ionizing radiation (NIR) exposure, especially optical radiation levels, and potential health hazard from aluminum arc welding processes based on the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) method. The irradiance from the optical radiation emissions can be calculated with various biological effective parameters [i.e., S(lambda), B(lambda), R(lambda)] for NIR hazard assessments. The aluminum arc welding processing scatters bright light with NIR emission including ultraviolet radiation (UVR), visible, and infrared spectra. The UVR effective irradiance (Eeff) has a mean value of 1,100 microW cm at 100 cm distance from the arc spot. The maximum allowance time (tmax) is 2.79 s according to the ACGIH guideline. Blue-light hazard effective irradiance (EBlue) has a mean value of 1840 microW cm (300-700 nm) at 100 cm with a tmax of 5.45 s exposure allowance. Retinal thermal hazard effective calculation shows mean values of 320 mW cm(-2) sr(-1) and 25.4 mW (cm-2) (380-875 nm) for LRetina (spectral radiance) and ERetina (spectral irradiance), respectively. From this study, the NIR measurement from welding optical radiation emissions has been established to evaluate separate types of hazards to the eye and skin simultaneously. The NIR exposure assessment can be applied to other optical emissions from industrial sources. The data from welding assessment strongly suggest employees involved in aluminum welding processing must be fitted with appropriate personal protection devices such as masks and gloves to prevent serious injuries of the skin and eyes upon intense optical exposure.

  15. Weld Growth Mechanisms and Failure Behavior of Three-Sheet Resistance Spot Welds Made of 5052 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Yan, Fuyu; Luo, Zhen; Chao, Y. J.; Ao, Sansan; Cui, Xuetuan

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the weld nugget formation in three-sheet aluminum alloy resistance spot welding. The nugget formation process in three equal thickness sheets and three unequal thickness sheets of 5052 aluminum alloy were studied. The results showed that the nugget was initially formed at the workpiece/workpiece interfaces (i.e., both upper interface and lower interface). The two small nuggets then grew along the radial direction and axial direction (welding direction) as the welding time increased. Eventually, the two nuggets fused into one large nugget. During the welding process, the Peltier effect between the Cu-Al caused the shift of the nugget in the welding direction. In addition, the mechanical strength and fracture mode of the weld nuggets at the upper and lower interfaces were also studied using tensile shear specimen configuration. Three failure modes were identified, namely interfacial, mixed, and pullout. The critical welding time and critical nugget diameter corresponding to the transitions of these modes were investigated. Finally, an empirical failure load formula for three-sheet weld similar to two-sheet spot weld was developed.

  16. Aluminum U-groove weld enhancement based on experimental stress analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Vaughan, R.

    1995-01-01

    Though butt-welds are among the most preferred joining methods in aerostructures because of their sealing and assembly integrity and general elastic performance; their inelastic mechanics are generally the least understood. This study investigated experimental strain distributions across a thick aluminum U-grooved weld and identified two weld process considerations for improving the multipass weld strength. The extreme thermal expansion and contraction gradient of the fusion heat input across the tab thickness between the grooves produce severe peaking, which induces bending moment under uniaxial loading. The filler strain hardening decreased with increasing filler pass sequence. These combined effects reduce the weld strength, and a depeaking index model was developed to select filler pass thicknesses, pass numbers, and sequences to improve the welding process results over the current normal weld schedule.

  17. Reasons for superior mechanical and corrosion properties of 2219 aluminum alloy electron beam welds

    SciTech Connect

    Koteswara Rao, S.R. . E-mail: sajjarkr@yahoo.com; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Kamaraj, M.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2005-11-15

    Electron beam welds of aluminum alloy 2219 offer much higher strength compared to gas tungsten arc welds of the same alloy and the reasons for this have not been fully explored. In this study both types of welds were made and mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile testing and pitting corrosion resistance by potentio dynamic polarization tests. It is shown that electron beam welds exhibit superior mechanical and corrosion properties. The weld metals have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy; transmission electron microscopy and electron probe micro analysis. Presence of partially disintegrated precipitates in the weld metal, finer micro porosity and uniform distribution of copper in the matrix were found to be the reasons for superior properties of electron beam welds apart from the fine equiaxed grain structure. Transmission electron micrographs of the heat affected zones revealed the precipitate disintegration and over aging in gas tungsten arc welds.

  18. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Spot Welded Aluminum Alloy AA2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, S.; Sankar, V. S.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Venkitakrishnan, P. V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is a relatively recent development, which can provide a superior alternative to resistance spot welding and riveting for fabrication of aluminum sheet metal structures. In the current work, FSSW experiments were conducted in 3-mm thick sheets of aluminum alloy 2014 in T4 and T6 conditions, with and without Alclad layers. The effects of tool geometry and welding process parameters on joint formation were investigated. A good correlation between process parameters, bond width, hook height, joint strength, and fracture mode was observed. The presence of Alclad layers and the base metal temper condition were found to have no major effect on joint formation and joint strength. Friction stir spot welds produced under optimum conditions were found to be superior to riveted joints in lap-shear and cross-tension tests. The prospects of FSSW in aluminum sheet metal fabrication are discussed.

  19. Effect of Welding Speeds on Mechanical Properties of Level Compensation Friction Stir Welded 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Quan; Yue, Yumei; Ji, Shude; Li, Zhengwei; Gao, Shuangsheng

    2016-04-01

    In order to eliminate the flash, arc corrugation and concave in weld zone, level compensation friction stir welding (LCFSW) was put forward and successfully applied to weld 6061-T6 aluminum alloy with varied welding speed at a constant tool rotational speed of 1,800 rpm in the present study. The glossy joint with equal thickness of base material can be attained, and the shoulder affected zone (SAZ) was obviously reduced. The results of transverse tensile test indicate that the tensile strength and elongation reach the maximum values of 248 MPa and 7.1% when the welding speed is 600 mm/min. The microhardness of weld nugget (WN) is lower than that of base material. The tensile fracture position locates at the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the advancing side (AS), where the microhardness is the minimum. The fracture surface morphology represents the typical ductile fracture.

  20. Damage Tolerance Assessment of Friction Pull Plug Welds in an Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks. Self-reacting friction stir welding is one variation of the friction stir weld process being developed for manufacturing tanks. Friction pull plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential self-reacting friction stir weld. A friction plug weld placed in a self-reacting friction stir weld results in a non-homogenous weld joint where the initial weld, plug weld, their respective heat affected zones and the base metal all interact. The welded joint is a composite plastically deformed material system with a complex residual stress field. In order to address damage tolerance concerns associated with friction plug welds in safety critical structures, such as propellant tanks, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data relating residual strength capability to flaw size in an aluminum alloy friction plug weld will be presented.

  1. CO2 laser beam welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy thin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.; Todaka, Hirotaka

    1997-12-01

    Laser beam welding is an attractive welding process for age-hardened aluminum alloys, because its low heat input minimizes the width of weld fusion and heat-affected zones (HAZs). In the present work, 1-mm-thick age-hardened Al-Mg-Si alloy, 6061-T6, plates were welded with full penetration using a 2.5-kW CO2 laser. Fractions of porosity in the fusion zones were less than 0.05 pct in bead-on-plate welding and less than 0.2 pct in butt welding with polishing the groove surface before welding. The width of a softened region in the-laser beam welds was less than 1/4 times that of a tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld. The softened region is caused by reversion of strengthening β″ (Mg2Si) precipitates due to weld heat input. The hardness values of the softened region in the laser beam welds were almost fully recovered to that of the base metal after an artificial aging treatment at 448 K for 28.8 ks without solution annealing, whereas those in the TIG weld were not recovered in a partly reverted region. Both the bead-on-plate weld and the butt weld after the postweld artificial aging treatment had almost equivalent tensile strengths to that of the base plate.

  2. A new technique for the strengthening of aluminum tungsten inert gas weld metals: using carbon nanotube/aluminum composite as a filler metal.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Rashidkhani, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S; Arabian, N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) on the mechanical properties of aluminum multipass weld metal prepared by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process was investigated. High energy ball milling was used to disperse MWCNT in the aluminum powder. Carbon nanotube/aluminum composite filler metal was fabricated for the first time by hot extrusion of ball-milled powders. After welding, the tensile strength, microhardness and MWCNT distribution in the weld metal were investigated. The test results showed that the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was greatly increased when using the filler metal containing 1.5 wt.% MWCNT. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the filler metal containing MWCNT can serve as a super filler metal to improve the mechanical properties of TIG welds of Al and its alloys.

  3. Strength of Welded Aircraft Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueggeman, W C

    1937-01-01

    This investigation is a continuation of work started in 1928 and described in NACA-TR-348 which shows that the insertion of gusset plates was the most satisfactory way of strengthening a joint. Additional tests of the present series show that joints of this type could be improved by cutting out the portion of the plate between the intersecting tubes. T and lattice joints in thin-walled tubing 1 1/2 by 0.020 inch have somewhat lower strengths than joints in tubing of greater wall thickness because of failure by local buckling. In welding the thin-walled tubing, the recently developed "carburizing flux" process was found to be the only method capable of producing joints free from cracks. The "magnetic powder" inspection was used to detect cracks in the joints and flaws in the tubing.

  4. Fatigue performance of welded aluminum deck structures

    SciTech Connect

    Haagensen, P.J.; Ranes, M.; Kluken, A.O.; Kvale, I.

    1996-12-01

    Aluminum alloys are used increasingly in load carrying structures where low weight and low maintenance costs are at a premium. Helicopter decks, structures for living quarters and personnel transfer bridges between platforms are examples of offshore applications. While these structures are not usually subjected to high fatigue loads, the increasing use of aluminum in high speed ships, and more recently in highway bridge structures, makes the question of fatigue performance more important. In this paper the fatigue properties of small scale weldments in an AA6005 alloy are compared with the results of fatigue tests on full scale sections of welded extrusions in the same material, which were used in an aluminum bridge deck structure. The fatigue performance is also compared with the fatigue clauses in the new British design code BS8118 for aluminium structures and the proposed Eurocode 9. The prospects of using a new joining technique, friction stir welding (FSW), in the production of large scale panels for deck and ship hull structures is discussed. The FSW process is described briefly, and some fatigue test data are presented.

  5. Study of inertia welding: the sensitivity of weld configuration and strength to variations in welding parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mote, M.W.

    1981-12-01

    An experiment is described which is designed to demonstrate the forgiveness of inertia welding, that is, the relative insensitivity of weld strength to variations in energy (rotational speed of parts) and axial force. Although easily observed variations in the welding parameters produced easily observed changes in weldment configuration and changes in dimension (upset), only extremes in parameters produced changes in weld strength. Consequently, process monitoring and product inspection would be sufficient for quality assurance in a production environment.

  6. Integration of NASA-sponsored studies on aluminum welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masubuchi, K.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of numerous studies relating to aluminum alloy welding. The subjects covered include: (1) effects of porosity on weld joint performance, (2) sources of porosity, (3) weld thermal effects, (4) residual stresses and distortion, and (5) manufacturing process system control.

  7. Aluminum oxide filler prevents obstructions in tubing during welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.

    1966-01-01

    Granular aluminum oxide is used as filler in serpentine tubing while welding the tubing to a flat surface. The filler eliminates obstructions in the tubes formed by molten weld nuggets and is porous enough to allow gases to escape from the welding area.

  8. Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum and Titanium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    What is this? Jata/US Air Force Typical FSW Tools W-Re tool in collet- style tool holder. Used for welding steels and Ti alloys 3-piece self...Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum and Titanium alloys NATO Advanced Research Workshop Metallic Materials with High Structural Efficiency Kyiv...valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 18 MAR 2004 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum

  9. Friction stir welding process to repair voids in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Charles D. (Inventor); Litwinski, Edward (Inventor); Valdez, Juan M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides an in-process method to repair voids in an aluminum alloy, particularly a friction stir weld in an aluminum alloy. For repairing a circular void or an in-process exit hole in a weld, the method includes the steps of fabricating filler material of the same composition or compatible with the parent material into a plug form to be fitted into the void, positioning the plug in the void, and friction stir welding over and through the plug. For repairing a longitudinal void (30), the method includes machining the void area to provide a trough (34) that subsumes the void, fabricating filler metal into a strip form (36) to be fitted into the trough, positioning the strip in the trough, and rewelding the void area by traversing a friction stir welding tool longitudinally through the strip. The method is also applicable for repairing welds made by a fusing welding process or voids in aluminum alloy workpieces themselves.

  10. Effect of Zinc Coatings on Joint Properties and Interfacial Reactions in Aluminum to Steel Ultrasonic Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, F.; Strong, D.; Prangnell, P. B.

    2012-03-01

    Dissimilar joining of aluminum to steel sheet in multimaterial automotive structures is an important potential application of ultrasonic spot welding (USW). Here, the weldability of different zinc-coated steels with aluminum is discussed, using a 2.5-kW USW welder. Results show that soft hot-dipped zinc (DX56-Z)-coated steel results in better weld performance than hard (galv-annealed) zinc coatings (DX53-ZF). For Al to hard galv-annealed-coated steel welds, lap shear strengths reached a maximum of ~80% of the strength of an Al-Al joint after a 1.0 s welding time. In comparison, welds between Al6111-T4 and hot dipped soft zinc-coated steel took longer to achieve the same maximum strength, but nearly matched the Al-Al joint properties. The reasons for these different behaviors are discussed in terms of the interfacial reactions between the weld members.

  11. Improved microstructure and mechanical properties in gas tungsten arc welded aluminum joints by using graphene nanosheets/aluminum composite filler wires.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Gholami, A R; Eynalvandpour, A; Ahmadi, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, different amounts of graphene nanosheets (GNSs) were added to the 4043 aluminum alloy powders by using the mechanical alloying method to produce the composite filler wires. With each of the produced composite filler wires, one all-weld metal coupon was welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. The microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture surface morphology of the weld metals have been evaluated and the results are compared. As the amount of GNSs in the composition of filler wire is increased, the microstructure of weld metal was changed from the dendritic structure to fine equiaxed grains. Furthermore, the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was improved, and is attributed to the augmented nucleation and retarded growth. From the results, it was seen that the GNSs/Al composite filler wire can be used to improve the microstructure and mechanical properties of GTA weld metals of aluminum and its alloys.

  12. Enabling high speed friction stir welding of aluminum tailor welded blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovanski, Yuri

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding (FSW) has traditionally been applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.

  13. Ultrasonic Impact Treatment to Improve Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Gou, G.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, H.; Yang, Y. P.

    2016-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the major issues for welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy in high-speed trains. High residual stress in the welded joints under corrosion results in stress corrosion cracking. Ultrasonic impact treatment was used to control the residual stress of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy. Experimental tests show that ultrasonic impact treatment can induce compressive longitudinal and transverse residual stress in the welded joint, harden the surface, and increase the tensile strength of welded joints. Salt-fog corrosion tests were conducted for both an as-welded sample and an ultrasonic impact-treated sample. The surface of the treated sample had far fewer corrosion pits than that of the untreated sample. The treated sample has higher strength and lower tensile residual stress than the untreated sample during corrosion. Therefore, ultrasonic impact treatment is an effective technique to improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy.

  14. Joining Uranium to Aluminum using Electron Beam Welding and an Explosively Clad Niobium Interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Terrill, P; Brasher, D; Butler, D

    2001-06-12

    A uranium alloy was joined to a high strength aluminum alloy using a commercially pure niobium interlayer. Joining of the Nb interlayer to the aluminum alloy was performed using an explosive welding process, while joining the Nb interlayer to the uranium alloy was performed using an electron beam welding process. Explosive welding was selected to bond the Nb to the aluminum alloy in order to minimize the formation of brittle intermetallic phases. Electron beam welding was selected to join the Nb to the uranium alloy in order to precisely control melting so as to minimize mixing of the two metals. A Modified Faraday Cup (MFC) technique using computer-assisted tomography was employed to determine the power distribution of the electron beam so that the welding parameters could be directly transferred to other welding machines. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, microhardness, and tensile testing of the welds were used to characterize the resulting joints. This paper presents the welding techniques and processing parameters that were developed to produce high integrity ductile joints between these materials.

  15. Investigation of aluminum-steel joint formed by explosion welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs-Coskun, T.; Volgyi, B.; Sikari-Nagl, I.

    2015-04-01

    Explosion welding is a solid state welding process that is used for the metallurgical joining of metals. Explosion cladding can be used to join a wide variety of dissimilar or similar metals [1]. This process uses the controlled detonation of explosives to accelerate one or both of the constituent metals into each other in such a manner as to cause the collision to fuse them together [2]. In this study, bonding ability of aluminum and steel with explosion welding was investigated. Experimental studies, microscopy, microhardness, tensile and bend test showed out that, aluminum and steel could be bonded with a good quality of bonding properties with explosion welding.

  16. Metallurgical and mechanical properties of laser welded high strength low alloy steel

    PubMed Central

    Oyyaravelu, Ramachandran; Kuppan, Palaniyandi; Arivazhagan, Natarajan

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser welded high strength low alloy (HSLA) SA516 grade 70 boiler steel. The weld joint for a 4 mm thick plate was successfully produced using minimum laser power of 2 kW by employing a single pass without any weld preheat treatment. The micrographs revealed the presence of martensite phase in the weld fusion zone which could be due to faster cooling rate of the laser weldment. A good correlation was found between the microstructural features of the weld joints and their mechanical properties. The highest hardness was found to be in the fusion zone of cap region due to formation of martensite and also enrichment of carbon. The hardness results also showed a narrow soft zone at the heat affected zone (HAZ) adjacent to the weld interface, which has no effect on the weld tensile strength. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints were 338 MPa and 549 MPa, respectively, which were higher than the candidate metal. These tensile results suggested that the laser welding process had improved the weld strength even without any weld preheat treatment and also the fractography of the tensile fractured samples showed the ductile mode of failure. PMID:27222751

  17. Tool For Friction Stir Tack Welding of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerald W.; Dingler, Johnny W.; Loftus, Zachary

    2003-01-01

    A small friction-stir-welding tool has been developed for use in tack welding of aluminum-alloy workpieces. It is necessary to tack-weld the workpieces in order to hold them together during friction stir welding because (1) in operation, a full-size friction-stir-welding tool exerts a large force that tends to separate the workpieces and (2) clamping the workpieces is not sufficient to resist this force. It is possible to tack the pieces together by gas tungsten arc welding, but the process can be awkward and time-consuming and can cause sufficient damage to necessitate rework. Friction stir tack welding does not entail these disadvantages. In addition, friction stir tack welding can be accomplished by use of the same automated equipment (except for the welding tool) used in subsequent full friction stir welding. The tool for friction stir tack welding resembles the tool for full friction stir welding, but has a narrower shoulder and a shorter pin. The shorter pin generates a smaller workpiece-separating force so that clamping suffices to keep the workpieces together. This tool produces a continuous or intermittent partial-penetration tack weld. The tack weld is subsequently consumed by action of the larger tool used in full friction stir welding tool.

  18. Study of 2219 aluminum alloy using direct current A-TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Zou, Jiasheng

    2017-07-01

    Direct current A-TIG (DCEN A-TIG) welding using special active agent had eliminated the pores and the oxidation of 2219 high-strength aluminum alloy in welding. Addition of AlF3-25% LiF active agent to DCEN A-TIG welding and arc morphology showed a trailing phenomenon. However, the change in arc morphology was not remarkable when AlF3-75% LiF active agent was added. Addition of AlF3-75% LiF active agent can refine the grain size of DCEN A-TIG joint. The mechanical properties of the weld were optimal at 10% AlF3-75% LiF active agent. Compared with AC TIG and AC A-TIG welding, DCEN A-TIG welding yielded better results for 2219 Al alloy.

  19. A Review of Dissimilar Welding Techniques for Magnesium Alloys to Aluminum Alloys.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liming; Ren, Daxin; Liu, Fei

    2014-05-08

    Welding of dissimilar magnesium alloys and aluminum alloys is an important issue because of their increasing applications in industries. In this document, the research and progress of a variety of welding techniques for joining dissimilar Mg alloys and Al alloys are reviewed from different perspectives. Welding of dissimilar Mg and Al is challenging due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound (IMC) such as Mg17Al12 and Mg₂Al₃. In order to increase the joint strength, three main research approaches were used to eliminate or reduce the Mg-Al intermetallic reaction layer. First, solid state welding techniques which have a low welding temperature were used to reduce the IMCs. Second, IMC variety and distribution were controlled to avoid the degradation of the joining strength in fusion welding. Third, techniques which have relatively controllable reaction time and energy were used to eliminate the IMCs. Some important processing parameters and their effects on weld quality are discussed, and the microstructure and metallurgical reaction are described. Mechanical properties of welds such as hardness, tensile, shear and fatigue strength are discussed. The aim of the report is to review the recent progress in the welding of dissimilar Mg and Al to provide a basis for follow-up research.

  20. A Review of Dissimilar Welding Techniques for Magnesium Alloys to Aluminum Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liming; Ren, Daxin; Liu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Welding of dissimilar magnesium alloys and aluminum alloys is an important issue because of their increasing applications in industries. In this document, the research and progress of a variety of welding techniques for joining dissimilar Mg alloys and Al alloys are reviewed from different perspectives. Welding of dissimilar Mg and Al is challenging due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound (IMC) such as Mg17Al12 and Mg2Al3. In order to increase the joint strength, three main research approaches were used to eliminate or reduce the Mg-Al intermetallic reaction layer. First, solid state welding techniques which have a low welding temperature were used to reduce the IMCs. Second, IMC variety and distribution were controlled to avoid the degradation of the joining strength in fusion welding. Third, techniques which have relatively controllable reaction time and energy were used to eliminate the IMCs. Some important processing parameters and their effects on weld quality are discussed, and the microstructure and metallurgical reaction are described. Mechanical properties of welds such as hardness, tensile, shear and fatigue strength are discussed. The aim of the report is to review the recent progress in the welding of dissimilar Mg and Al to provide a basis for follow-up research. PMID:28788646

  1. High-Speed Friction-Stir Welding To Enable Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carsley, John; Luzanski, Tom; Carlson, Blair; Eisenmenger, Mark; Soulami, Ayoub; Marshall, Dustin; Landino, Brandon; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Current joining technologies for automotive aluminum alloys are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding has been traditionally applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum welded components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability utilizing a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.

  2. Microstructure, hardness profile and tensile strength in welds of AA6013 T6 extrusions

    SciTech Connect

    Guitterez, L.A.; Neye, G.; Zschech, E.

    1996-04-01

    Alloy AA6013 is easily welded by conventional arc welding processes as well as by high-energy-density processes. However, some physical properties, which are inherent to all aluminum alloys, have to be considered during welding. In comparison to steel, the high thermal conductivity of aluminum alloys requires the use of higher heat input for welding. This is realized by a greater welding current during GTAW of aluminum alloys. One of the main problems associated with LBW of aluminum alloys is the high surface reflectivity. In particular, the threshold intensity for the development of a keyhole is much higher for aluminum than for steel. Finally, aluminum alloys, and particularly the heat-treatable alloys, are sensitive to weld cracking. This phenomenon can be avoided by proper filler and base metal alloy selection and adequate filler metal dilution. In order to improve the mechanical integrity of Al-Mg-Si weldments, it would be desirable to study the microstructure of the FZ and of the HAZ, as well as the residual stress distribution. The present study was performed in order to show differences in microstructure, hardness profile and tensile strength of gas tungsten arc (GTA) and laser beam (LB) welded AA6013-T6 extrusions. In addition, grain boundary liquations and hot tearing are discussed.

  3. Laser welding of automotive aluminum alloys to achieve defect-free, structurally sound and reliable welds

    SciTech Connect

    DebRoy, T.

    2000-11-17

    The objective of this program was to seek improved process control and weldment reliability during laser welding of automotive aluminum alloys while retaining the high speed and accuracy of the laser beam welding process. The effects of various welding variables on the loss of alloying elements and the formation of porosity and other geometric weld defects such as underfill and overfill were studied both experimentally and theoretically.

  4. The feasibility of producing aluminum-lithium structures for cryogenic tankage applications by laser beam welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martukanitz, R. P.; Lysher, K. G.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys exhibit high strength, high elastic modulus, and low density as well as excellent cryogenic mechanical properties making them ideal material candidates for cryogenic tanks. NASA has proposed the use of 'built-up' structure for panels fabricated into cryogenic tanks replacing current conventional machining. Superplastically formed stiffeners would be joined to sheet (tank skin) that had been roll formed to the radius of the tank in order to produce panels. Aluminum-lithium alloys of interest for producing the built-up structure include alloy 2095-T6 stiffeners to 2095-T8 sheet and alloy 8090-T6 stiffeners to 2090-T83 sheet. Laser welding, with comparable joint properties, offers the following advantages over conventional welding: higher production rates, minimal degradation within the heat affected zones, and full process automation. This study established process parameters for laser beam welding, mechanical property determinations, metallographic characterization, and fabrication of prototype panels. Tensile tests representing partial penetration of the skin alloys provided joint efficiencies between 65 and 77 percent, depending upon alloy and degree of penetration. Results of tension shear tests of lap welds indicated that the combination of 2095-T6 to 2090-T8 exhibited significantly higher weld shear strength at the interface in comparison to welds of 8090-T6 to 2090-T83. The increased shear strength associated with 2095 is believed to be due to the alloy's ability to precipitation strengthening (naturally age) after welding.

  5. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica

    2011-05-01

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  6. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica

    2011-05-04

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  7. Welding of aluminum alloy with high power direct diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Nobuyuki; Morikawa, Atsuhito; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Maeda, Koichi; Namba, Keizo

    2003-06-01

    Characterized by high conversion efficiency, small size, light weight and a long lifetime, high power diode lasers are currently being developed for application to various types of metal fabrication, such as welding. In this report, a 4kW high power direct diode laser was used to weld aluminum alloys, which are the focus of increasing attention from the automobile industry because of their light weight, high formability and easy recyclability. The applicability of a direct diode laser to aluminum alloy bead-on plate, butt and lap-fillet welding was studied under various welding conditions. A sound bead without cracks was successfully obtained when 1 mm thick aluminum alloy was welded by bead-on welding at a speed of 12m/min. Moreover, the bead cross section was heat conduction welding type rather than the keyhole welding type of conventional laser welding. Investigation of the welding phenomena with a high-speed video camera showed no spattering or laser plasma, so there was no problem with laser plasma damaging the focusing lens despite the diode laser's short focusing distance.

  8. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks at Superplastic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Richard W.; Vetrano, John S.; Smith, Mark T.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2002-10-06

    This paper describes an investigation of the mechanical properties of weld material in aluminum tailor welded blanks (TWB) at superplastic temperatures and discusses the potential application of TWBs in superplastic forming operations. Aluminum TWBs consist of multiple sheet materials of different thickness or alloy that are butt-welded together into a single, variable thickness blank. To evaluate the performance of the weld material in TWBs, a series of tensile tests were conducted at superplastic temperatures with specimens that contained weld material in the gage area. The sheet material used in the study was Sky 5083 aluminum alloy, which was joined to produce the TWBs by gas tungsten arc welding using an AA5356 filler wire. The experimental results show that, in the temperature range of 500?C to 550?C and at strain rates ranging from 10-4 sec-1 to 10-2 sec-1, the weld material has a higher flow stress and lower ductility than the monolithic sheet material. The weld material exhibited elongations of 40% to 60% under these conditions, whereas the monolithic sheet achieved 220% to 360% elongation. At the same temperatures and strain rates, the weld material exhibited flow stresses 1.3 to 4 times greater than the flow stress in the monolithic sheet. However, the weld material did show a substantial increase in the strain rate sensitivity and ductility when compared to the same material formed at room temperature.

  9. Applications of high-power diode lasers for aluminum welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Sonja; Merzkirch, Matthias; Zaeh, Michael F.; Schulze, Volker

    2009-02-01

    Industries worldwide are confronted with the need for an increased use of aluminum alloys in various applications. Therefore the requirements result in the necessity for a multitude of joining and welding innovations. Applications of modern aluminum alloys are not constricted to common components anymore. In fact, they are used in ever more complex lightweight structures. However, this complexity has to be fulfilled by a higher geometric flexibility in laser welding and represents a major challenge for new approaches in working lightweight structures. The present work includes the welding of aluminum utilizing Bifocal Hybrid Laser Welding (BHLW) and a 6 kW high power diode laser (HPDL) for welding. The welding setups allow for welded butt- and fillet-welds of tubes under consideration of the hardly fusion weldable alloy AA6060. Welded joints of AA6060 are investigated metallographically in regard to the influence of process parameters like intensity and the interconnected penetration. The weldability is characterized by qualitative investigations of the microstructure as well as the mechanical behavior under quasistatic loading. The investigations result in an adequate welding process for AA6060.

  10. Fabrication of Aluminum Tubes Filled with Aluminum Alloy Foam by Friction Welding

    PubMed Central

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Yukiko; Koyama, Shinji; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Kitahara, Soichiro; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum foam is usually used as the core of composite materials by combining it with dense materials, such as in Al foam core sandwich panels and Al-foam-filled tubes, owing to its low tensile and bending strengths. In this study, all-Al foam-filled tubes consisting of ADC12 Al-Si-Cu die-cast aluminum alloy foam and a dense A1050 commercially pure Al tube with metal bonding were fabricated by friction welding. First, it was found that the ADC12 precursor was firmly bonded throughout the inner wall of the A1050 tube without a gap between the precursor and the tube by friction welding. No deformation of the tube or foaming of the precursor was observed during the friction welding. Next, it was shown that by heat treatment of an ADC12-precursor-bonded A1050 tube, gases generated by the decomposition of the blowing agent expand the softened ADC12 to produce the ADC12 foam interior of the dense A1050 tube. A holding time during the foaming process of approximately tH = 8.5 min with a holding temperature of 948 K was found to be suitable for obtaining a sound ADC12-foam-filled A1050 tube with sufficient foaming, almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen, and no deformation and minimum reduction in the thickness of the tube. PMID:28793629

  11. Fabrication of Aluminum Tubes Filled with Aluminum Alloy Foam by Friction Welding.

    PubMed

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Yukiko; Koyama, Shinji; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Kitahara, Soichiro; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2015-10-23

    Aluminum foam is usually used as the core of composite materials by combining it with dense materials, such as in Al foam core sandwich panels and Al-foam-filled tubes, owing to its low tensile and bending strengths. In this study, all-Al foam-filled tubes consisting of ADC12 Al-Si-Cu die-cast aluminum alloy foam and a dense A1050 commercially pure Al tube with metal bonding were fabricated by friction welding. First, it was found that the ADC12 precursor was firmly bonded throughout the inner wall of the A1050 tube without a gap between the precursor and the tube by friction welding. No deformation of the tube or foaming of the precursor was observed during the friction welding. Next, it was shown that by heat treatment of an ADC12-precursor-bonded A1050 tube, gases generated by the decomposition of the blowing agent expand the softened ADC12 to produce the ADC12 foam interior of the dense A1050 tube. A holding time during the foaming process of approximately tH = 8.5 min with a holding temperature of 948 K was found to be suitable for obtaining a sound ADC12-foam-filled A1050 tube with sufficient foaming, almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen, and no deformation or reduction in the thickness of the tube.

  12. Residual Stress and Fatigue Strength of Hybrid Laser-MIG-Welded A7N01P-T4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiuying; Chen, Hui; Qiu, Peixian; Zhu, Zongtao

    2017-02-01

    A7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy is widely used in some important welded components of high-speed trains. The hybrid laser-metal inert gas (MIG) welding process was studied to solve problems associated with the MIG welding process, such as low welding efficiency, high residual stress and deformation, and serious loss of strength. A high-speed camera, a voltage and current collection system, and NI DAQ were used to acquire arc profiles, welding voltage, and welding current simultaneously. Thermal cycle tests were carried out. Residual stresses induced by the welding process and fatigue strength of the joint were investigated. Large-size fatigue specimens were used in fatigue tests. The results show that the energy of the hybrid welding process is focused, and the power density of hybrid welding process is intense. The heat input per unit of the hybrid welding process is only half of that of the MIG welding process. Compared with the MIG welded joint, the overall residual stress level of the hybrid-welded joint is lower. The peak longitudinal stress of the hybrid-welded joint is reduced by 20 pct. The fatigue strength of hybrid joints is 14 pct higher than that of MIG-welded joints. Narrow weld and HAZ, weak softening behavior, and low residual stress level are the causes of the improvement of fatigue strength.

  13. Shear Strength of Aluminum Oxynitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, Dattatraya P.; Vaughan, Brian A. M.; Proud, William G.

    2007-06-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (AlON) is a transparent, polycrystalline cubic spinel. The results of investigations^1-4 on shock response of AlON permit determination of the equation of state, and shear strength retained under shock compression. Whereas the values of the HEL of AlON holds no surprises, the inelastic response of AlON reported in Ref. 1-4 differ significantly and is stress dependent. The results of Ref. 1-2 show that AlON retains a shear strength of 3 to 4 GPa when shocked up to around 20 GPa, but the results of Ref, 3-4 seem to suggest a possible loss of shear strength when shocked to 16 GPa and beyond. Our analysis examines the observed differences in the inelastic response of AlON reported in these four studies . 1. J. U. Cazamias, et. al., in Fundamental Issues and Applications of Shock-Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena, Eds. Staudhammer, Murr, and Meyers, Elsevier, NY, 173 (2001). 2. B. A. M. Vaughn, et.al., Shock Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, Report SP/1092 (2001) 3. T. Sekine, et.al., J. Appl. Phys. 94, 4803 (2003). 4. T. F. Thornhill, et.al., Shock Compression of Matter-2005, Eds. Furnish, Elert, Russell, White, AIP, NY, 143 (2006).

  14. Renewal of corrosion protection of coated aluminum after welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, R. H.

    1969-01-01

    Effectiveness of conversion coatings designed to protect aluminum alloys against atmospheric corrosion is reduced after exposure to high temperature or welding. Damaged coating should be manually stripped six inches from the weld and then recoated by sponge or spray with the original solution.

  15. An inelastic analysis of a welded aluminum joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Butt-weld joints are most commonly designed into pressure vessels which then become as reliable as the weakest increment in the weld chain. In practice, weld material properties are determined from tensile test specimen and provided to the stress analyst in the form of a stress versus strain diagram. Variations in properties through the thickness of the weld and along the width of the weld have been suspect but not explored because of inaccessibility and cost. The purpose of this study is to investigate analytical and computational methods used for analysis of welds. The weld specimens are analyzed using classical elastic and plastic theory to provide a basis for modeling the inelastic properties in a finite-element solution. The results of the analysis are compared to experimental data to determine the weld behavior and the accuracy of prediction methods. The weld considered in this study is a multiple-pass aluminum 2219-T87 butt weld with thickness of 1.40 in. The weld specimen is modeled using the finite-element code ABAQUS. The finite-element model is used to produce the stress-strain behavior in the elastic and plastic regimes and to determine Poisson's ratio in the plastic region. The value of Poisson's ratio in the plastic regime is then compared to experimental data. The results of the comparisons are used to explain multipass weld behavior and to make recommendations concerning the analysis and testing of welds.

  16. High-power Laser Welding of Thick Steel-aluminum Dissimilar Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahdo, Rabi; Springer, André; Pfeifer, Ronny; Kaierle, Stefan; Overmeyer, Ludger

    According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a worldwide reduction of CO2-emissions is indispensable to avoid global warming. Besides the automotive sector, lightweight construction is also of high interest for the maritime industry in order to minimize CO2-emissions. Using aluminum, the weight of ships can be reduced, ensuring lower fuel consumption. Therefore, hybrid joints of steel and aluminum are of great interest to the maritime industry. In order to provide an efficient lap joining process, high-power laser welding of thick steel plates (S355, t = 5 mm) and aluminum plates (EN AW-6082, t = 8 mm) is investigated. As the weld seam quality greatly depends on the amount of intermetallic phases within the joint, optimized process parameters and control are crucial. Using high-power laser welding, a tensile strength of 10 kN was achieved. Based on metallographic analysis, hardness tests, and tensile tests the potential of this joining method is presented.

  17. High Strength Steel Weldment Reliability: Weld Metal Hydrogen Trapping.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    additions to welding consumables to control weld metal hydrogen and thus reduce susceptibility to cold cracking in high strength steel weldments. 14...applying weld metal hydrogen trapping to improve the resistance to hydrogen cracking in welding of high strength steels . Hydrogen cracking in high...requirements which are necessary to prevent hydrogen cracking in high strength steel welding. Common practices to prevent hydrogen cracking in steel

  18. Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks for High Volume Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Carlson, Blair; Carsley, John; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Eisenmenger, Mark

    2014-02-04

    A Design of Experiment based approach is used to systematically investigate relationships between 8 different welding factors (4 related to tool geometry, 4 related to weld process control) and resulting weld properties including strength, elongation and formability in 1.2mm-2mm thick friction stir welding of AA5182-O for TWB application. The factors that result in most significant effects are elucidated. The interactions between several key factors like plunge depth, tool tilt, pin feature and pin length on the overall weld quality is discussed. Appropriate levels of factors that lead to excellent weld properties are also identified.

  19. Interfacial characterization of joint between mild steel and aluminum alloy welded by resistance spot welding

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Ranfeng; Shi Hongxin; Zhang Keke; Tu Yimin; Iwamoto, Chihiro; Satonaka, Shinobu

    2010-07-15

    The interfacial characteristics of resistance spot welded steel-aluminum alloy joint have been investigated using electron microscopy. The results reveal that reaction product FeAl{sub 3} is generated in the peripheral region of the weld while a reaction layer consisting of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} adjacent to steel and FeAl{sub 3} adjacent to aluminum alloy forms in the central region of the weld, and that the morphology and thickness of the reaction layer vary with the position at the welding interface.

  20. Drawn arc aluminum stud welding for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, S.

    2002-08-01

    Federal regulations have been enacted to significantly reduce atmospheric pollution caused by motor vehicles. This forced the automotive manufacturers to improve fuel efficiency of cars and light trucks by using lightweight materials such as aluminum. The focus of the current study is to develop welding procedures using the drawn arc process for 5754-0 and 6061-T6 aluminum alloys. The mechanical and macrostructural characteristics of the welded joints were evaluated using tensile tests, torque tests, and optical microscopy. Preliminary study indicates that these alloys can be welded with a minimal amount of porosity and good mechanical properties.

  1. Welded repairs of punctured thin-walled aluminum pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. J.

    1969-01-01

    Punctures in thin-walled aluminum pressure vessels are repaired by plugging the hole with an interference-fit disc and welding the unit. The repaired vessels withstood test pressures in excess of vessel ultimate design values for 2-, 4-, and 6-inch holes in 0.202-inch-thick aluminum alloy parent material.

  2. High-Speed Friction-Stir Welding to Enable Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carsley, John; Luzanski, Tom; Carlson, Blair; Eisenmenger, Mark; Soulami, Ayoub; Marshall, Dustin; Landino, Brandon; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and they have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high volumes. While friction-stir welding (FSW) has been traditionally applied at linear velocities less than 1 m/min, high-volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost-sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low-to-moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high-speed linear FSW. Therefore, to facilitate production of high-volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of 3 m/min. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for postweld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. An evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum TWBs, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory-scale tests.

  3. Technology of welding aluminum alloys-IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginez, R.; Lewis, J. R.; Millett, A. U.; Saenger, K. A.; Skelly, J. K.; Standiford, V. E.; Whiteman, J. O.

    1978-01-01

    Skate-weld carriage and track assembly were developed for controlled fusion welding on compound-curvature surfaces. Unlike fixed-position carriage used for vertical, horizontal, and circumferential welding, carriage has suspension system that permits angular positioning of weld head on carriage. It also has carriage-and-drive track mechanism capable of traveling over compound curvatures. Carriage is designed with universal mounting platform so that slim tools, weld heads, or X-ray units can be interchanged without need for realinement.

  4. Friction Stir Welding of Age-Hardenable Aluminum Alloys: A Parametric Approach Using RSM Based GRA Coupled With PCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, D.; Rao, V. S.

    2014-04-01

    Age-hardenable aluminum alloys, primarily used in the aerospace, automobile and marine industries (2×××, 6××× and 7×××), can be welded using solid-state welding techniques. Friction stir welding is an emerging solid-state welding technique used to join both similar and dissimilar materials. The strength of a friction stir welded joint depends on the joining process parameters. Therefore, a combination of the statistical techniques of a response surface methodology based on a grey relational analysis coupled to a principal component analysis was proposed to select the process parameters suitable for joining AA 2024 and AA 6061 aluminum alloys via friction stir welding. The significant process parameters, such as rotational speed, welding speed, axial load and pin shapes (PS) were considered during the statistical experiment. The results indicate that the square PS plays a vital role and yields an ultimate tensile strength of 141 MPa for an elongation of 12 % versus cylinder and taper pin profiles. The root cause for joint strength loss and fracture mode was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Severe material flow during macro defects, such as pin holes and porosity, degrades the joint strength by approximately 44 % for AA 2024 and 51 % for AA 6061 fabricated FS-welded aluminum alloys relative to the base material. The results of this approach are useful for accurately controlling the response and optimize the process parameters.

  5. Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum-Steel Weld-Brazing Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu; Li, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Huang, Jiankang; Gu, Yufen

    2016-05-01

    Dissimilar metals of 1060 aluminum and galvanized steel were joined with a lap joint by pulsed double-electrode gas metal arc weld brazing with aluminum-magnesium and aluminum-silicon filler metals. The corrosion behavior of the weld joints was investigated with immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests, and the corrosion morphology of the joints was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Galvanic corrosion was found to occur when the samples were immersed in corrosive media, and the corrosion rate of joints was increased with increased heat input of the workpiece. Comparison of the corrosion properties of weld joints with different filler wires indicated that the corrosion rate of weld joints with aluminum-silicon filler wire was larger than that of weld joints with aluminum-magnesium filler wire. Results also showed that the zinc-rich zone of weld joints was prone to corrosion. The corrosion behavior of zinc-rich zone was analyzed with SEM equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis system based on the test results.

  6. Drawn arc stud welding: Crossing over from steel to aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, S.

    2000-01-01

    In their quest to reduce vehicle weights, car manufacturers are exploring further use of aluminum, including more aluminum components in body construction. To acquire a better understanding of aluminum stud welding, auto manufacturers worldwide have formed a task force to conduct research on aluminum joining methods. Currently, Emhart Fastening Teknologies is working with this group in development programs such as Earthing studs, WELDFAST and Self-Pierce Rivet (SPR). The global automotive industry is clearly committed to the increased use of aluminum in cars and trucks. This presents enormous challenges and responsibilities for assembly systems suppliers, particularly those specializing in welding processes. Continuing strides in the technological sophistication of DASW is bringing this process to the forefront in advancing the use of aluminum in vehicles throughout the world.

  7. Exposure and urinary excretion of aluminum during welding.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, B; Lidums, V; Håkansson, M; Hedström, L

    1985-02-01

    The exposure and urinary excretion of aluminum was studied among three previously unexposed volunteers and six welders exposed to welding fumes containing aluminum. The aluminum concentrations in air and urine were determined. The urinary aluminum concentrations rose rapidly in volunteers exposed only for 1 d and returned to the preexposure levels with an estimated half-time of about 8 h. The welders were monitored for one workweek. During the subsequent weekend a decrease in the urinary concentrations occurred in the three welders exposed for two years or less, but such a decrease was not observed among welders exposed for more than 15 years. The urinary concentrations of aluminum were dependent partly on the level of current exposure and partly on the duration of exposure. The data suggest that welders exposed to welding fumes containing aluminum may retain some of the inhaled metal fume for extended periods of time.

  8. Yield detection in aluminum welded joints using photostress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambrell, S. C., Jr.; Kavikondala, K.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work using photostress to analyze behavior of aluminum welded joints was useful to determine mechanical properties of the weld and parent materials along the centerline of the joint. It was shown that significant differences exist in the stress-strain characteristics at points beginning at the centerline of the weld and extending for a distance of one inch to either side of the weld. Because of the highly variable behavior detected in the previous work, it was decided to extend the work to investigate behavior of joints 1/8, 1/2, and 1.40 inches thick.

  9. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  10. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Lowell D.

    1984-01-01

    A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  11. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  12. Disk Laser Weld Brazing of AW5083 Aluminum Alloy with Titanium Grade 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahul, Miroslav; Sahul, Martin; Vyskoč, Maroš; Čaplovič, Ľubomír; Pašák, Matej

    2017-03-01

    Disk laser weld brazing of dissimilar metals was carried out. Aluminum alloy 5083 and commercially pure titanium Grade 2 with the thickness of 2.0 mm were used as experimental materials. Butt weld brazed joints were produced under different welding parameters. The 5087 aluminum alloy filler wire with a diameter of 1.2 mm was used for joining dissimilar metals. The elimination of weld metal cracking was attained by offsetting the laser beam. When the offset was 0 mm, the intermixing of both metals was too high, thus producing higher amount of intermetallic compounds (IMCs). Higher amount of IMCs resulted in poorer mechanical properties of produced joints. Grain refinement in the fusion zone occurred especially due to the high cooling rates during laser beam joining. Reactions at the interface varied in the dependence of its location. Continuous thin IMC layer was observed directly at the titanium-weld metal interface. Microhardness of an IMC island in the weld metal reached up to 452.2 HV0.1. The XRD analysis confirmed the presence of tetragonal Al3Ti intermetallic compound. The highest tensile strength was recorded in the case when the laser beam offset of 300 μm from the joint centerline toward aluminum alloy was utilized.

  13. Analysis and Comparison of Aluminum Alloy Welded Joints Between Metal Inert Gas Welding and Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Guan, Yingchun; Wang, Qiang; Cong, Baoqiang; Qi, Bojin

    2015-09-01

    Surface contamination usually occurs during welding processing and it affects the welds quality largely. However, the formation of such contaminants has seldom been studied. Effort was made to study the contaminants caused by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes of aluminum alloy, respectively. SEM, FTIR and XPS analysis was carried out to investigate the microstructure as well as surface chemistry. These contaminants were found to be mainly consisting of Al2O3, MgO, carbide and chromium complexes. The difference of contaminants between MIG and TIG welds was further examined. In addition, method to minimize these contaminants was proposed.

  14. Effect of Preheating in Hybrid Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaduwanshi, D. K.; Bag, S.; Pal, S.

    2014-10-01

    The controlled energy input into the system by introducing an extra heat source to enhance the material flow along with reduction of the plunging force remains a potential area of considerate for the development of hybrid friction stir welding (FSW) process. Hence, the effect of preheating on the weld joint properties is evaluated using plasma-assisted friction stir welding (P-FSW) process for joining aluminum alloy. A comparative study of mechanical and macro-microstructural characterizations of weld joint by FSW and P-FSW has been performed. Transverse tensile strength of weld joint is approximately 95% of base metal produced by P-FSW and is 8% more than conventional FSW welds. The effect of preheating enhances material flow and dissolution of fine oxide particles by plasma arc results in increase of strength and marginal modification of deformation behavior. The preheating brings uniformly distributed hardness in weld zone and the magnitude is higher in the advancing side with overall increase in average hardness value. Grain sizes are much finer due to the pinning effect of Al2O3 particles that retarded grain growth following recrystallization during P-FSW and thus led to more pronounced reduction in grain size and relatively brittle fracture during tensile loading of welded joint. Overall, the influence of preheating acts quite homogeneously throughout the structure as compared to conventional FSW. However, the results reveal that the development of P-FSW is still in initial stage and needs to improve in various aspects.

  15. Experimental Investigation and Optimization of TIG Welding Parameters on Aluminum 6061 Alloy Using Firefly Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rishi; Mevada, N. Ramesh; Rathore, Santosh; Agarwal, Nitin; Rajput, Vinod; Sinh Barad, AjayPal

    2017-08-01

    To improve Welding quality of aluminum (Al) plate, the TIG Welding system has been prepared, by which Welding current, Shielding gas flow rate and Current polarity can be controlled during Welding process. In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the effect of Welding current, current polarity, and shielding gas flow rate on the tensile strength of the weld joint. Based on the number of parameters and their levels, the Response Surface Methodology technique has been selected as the Design of Experiment. For understanding the influence of input parameters on Ultimate tensile strength of weldment, ANOVA analysis has been carried out. Also to describe and optimize TIG Welding using a new metaheuristic Nature – inspired algorithm which is called as Firefly algorithm which was developed by Dr. Xin-She Yang at Cambridge University in 2007. A general formulation of firefly algorithm is presented together with an analytical, mathematical modeling to optimize the TIG Welding process by a single equivalent objective function.

  16. High Strength Steel Welding Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    22000 C to 15000 C. - Kluken and Gr6ng [57] considered three major growth processes: collision, 0S diffusion, and Ostwald ripening. They excluded...0- zz * 22000 - * 21000 *20000 0 0 0 0 0 .51o.5225o . Figure 4.7 Temperature profiles at indicated heights for a UMAW process with 220-ppm hydrogen...steel weld metal. With increasing S100 -- 1 0.-Pt I -. , -s ll ie (XO oil - a - IS - 3S0 o 0.20 -- 30 t* \\+ 0~4xo- bg s0o 10 10 IV 60o I0D ISO 0o 0o OION

  17. Joint strength of laser-welded titanium.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Watanabe, I; Yoshida, K; Atsuta, M

    2002-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the joint strength of titanium laser-welding using several levels of laser output energy [current (A)]. Cast titanium plates (0.5 x 3.0 x 40 and 1.0 x 3.0 x 40 mm(3)) were prepared and perpendicularly cut at the center of the plate. After the cut halves were fixed in a jig, they were laser-welded using a Nd: YAG laser at several levels of output energy in increments of 30A from 180 to 300A. The penetration depths of laser to titanium were measured under various conditions for output energy, pulse duration, and spot diameter to determine the appropriate conditions for these parameters. Based on the correlation between the results obtained for penetration depth and the size of the specimens (thickness: 0.5 and 1.0 mm, width: 3.0 mm), the pulse duration and spot diameter employed in this study were 10 ms and 1.0 mm, respectively. Three laser pulses (spot diameter: 1.0 mm) were applied from one side to weld the entire joint width (3.0 mm) of the specimens. Uncut specimens served as the non-welded control specimens. Tensile testing was conducted at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min and a gage length of 10 mm. The breaking force (N) was recorded, and the data (n=5) were statistically analyzed. For the 0.5 mm thick specimens, the breaking force of the specimens laser-welded at currents of 240, 270, and 300A were not statistically (P>0.05) different from the non-welded control specimens. There were no significant differences in breaking force among the 1.0mm thick specimens laser-welded at currents of 270 and 300A, and the non-welded control specimens. Under appropriate conditions, joint strengths similar to the strength of the non-welded parent metal were achieved.

  18. Experimental Study of Stationary Shoulder Friction Stir Welded 7N01-T4 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, S. D.; Meng, X. C.; Li, Z. W.; Ma, L.; Gao, S. S.

    2016-03-01

    Stationary shoulder friction stir welding (SSFSW) was successfully used to weld 7N01-T4 aluminum alloy with the thickness of 4 mm. Effects of welding speed on formations, microstructures, and mechanical properties of SSFSW joint were investigated in detail. Under a constant rotational velocity of 2000 rpm, defect-free joints with smooth surface and small flashes are attained using welding speeds of 20 and 30 mm/min. Macrostructure of nugget zone in cross section presents kettle shape. For 7N01-T4 aluminum alloy with low thermal conductivity, decreasing welding speed is beneficial to surface formation of joint. With the increase of welding speed, mechanical properties of joints firstly increase and then decrease. When the welding speed is 30 mm/min, the tensile strength and elongation of joint reach the maximum values of 379 MPa and 7.9%, equivalent to 84.2 and 52% of base material, respectively. Fracture surface morphology exhibits typical ductile fracture. In addition, the minimum hardness value of joint appears in the heat affected zone.

  19. Friction Stir Spot Welding of 6061 Aluminum-to-Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heideman, Robert J.

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) between 1.5mm thick 6061 Al on top and 1.5mm thick Cu at bottom was conducted. First, weld parameters and the weld macrostructure that were necessary to form good quality welds, as determined using lap shear weld strength, were identified. Tool rotation speed and tool pin length are key variables that control weld strength. To obtain high quality strong welds, a Cu ring extruded upward from the lower Cu sheet into the upper 6061 Al-sheet, which promoted bonding and interlocking between the sheets, and an Al-rich stir zone between Cu ring and weld keyhole were both necessary. Second, a technique where the tool remained in the sample after FSSW helped determine the material flow that takes place during high quality weld formation and the functions of the welding tool features. The tool threads cause 6061 Al from the upper sheet to move downward into the region near the threads. The tool shoulder causes a counter flow movement of 6061 Al that results in the formation of the Al-rich stir zone and also causes the upward extrusion of the lower Cu sheet. This technique also identified that a Cu-rich material forms on the tool tip, that this material sheds and rebuilds during subsequent welds, and that this material can form large Cu-rich particles that can completely fill the tool threads, impede proper material flow and lead to a low strength, poor quality weld. Third, to further understand welding parameters, weld temperatures, torque, and vertical forces were measured. Temperature data was collected using a tool holder that permitted wireless thermocouple data collection. Through these measurements, rotational plunge weld energy was recognized as important in determining if a quality weld formed, and weld plunge rate was identified as the welding parameter that significantly impacted rotational weld plunge energy. The final phase of research was to improve weld quality consistency. Through repetitive trials with a single tool

  20. Metallurgical aspects in laser welding of steels and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsuna, Muneharu

    1996-12-31

    Rapid cooled microstructures, solid state transformation, hardness distribution, porosity formation, hot cracking and crack susceptibility are discussed as the metallurgical aspects in laser welding of carbon steels, stainless steels and aluminum alloys in the present paper. In the cases of CO{sub 2} and YAG laser welding, the thermal cycles during welding of carbon steels showed a rapid heating rate of 10{sup 5} K/s and a rapid cooling rate of 10{sup 4} K/s. The solid state transformations during the thermal cycle are different from that in steel welds by arc. The microstructure in heat affected zone consists of ferrite band or matrix and hard martensite colonies with high carbon. It seems a kind of composite materials. The hardness distribution of steel welds by laser is different from that of arc welds in which the location of maximum hardness is coarse grain zone. However, it is the center of fusion zone or near the base metal in laser welds of carbon steel. Even in ultra low carbon steel welds, the hardness of weld metal is higher than 200 Hv and the microstructure is bainitic ferrite and low carbon martensite which have a low cold crack susceptibility. In addition, two mechanisms of porosity formation in laser welding of aluminum alloys including A3003, A5052, A5083, A5182 and A6061 alloys were investigated using the fundamental knowledge and the solidification crack susceptibility in laser welding of A5052, A5083, A6061 and A7NO1 alloys were studied for the application of laser welding in industries.

  1. Microstructural Investigation of Friction-Stir-Welded 7005 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xuesong; Lu, Yan; Zheng, Feiyan; Chen, Bin

    2015-11-01

    This paper is aimed to investigate the microstructure of 7005 aluminum sheets joined by friction-stir welding as well as their mechanical properties. Specimens with ten different sets of welding parameters were studied. Tensile test and fracture analysis determined that the joint of the best quality was obtained at the rotation speed of 1000 rpm matching with the travel speed of 200 mm/min, and the travel speed has more impact on the ultimate tensile strength. Optical microscope observation was applied to this high-quality specimen and gave evidence to explaining the formation of the onion ring structure. Electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) technique was employed to characterize the textures and revealed the evolution of microstructures during friction stir processing. The EBSD results showed that the grains maintain their original orientations at relatively low deformation while the orientations rotate under increasing strain. Accumulated rotation will turn the textures into mixed shear components, which finally results in grain refinement and contributes to the high quality of the joint.

  2. Effect of the Number of Welding Repairs with GTAW on the Mechanical Behavior of AA7020 Aluminum Alloy Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maya-Johnson, Santiago; Santa, Juan Felipe; Mejía, Oscar L.; Aristizábal, Santiago; Ospina, Sebastian; Cortés, Paula Andrea; Giraldo, Jorge Enrique

    2015-10-01

    In this work, two different tests were done to establish the effect of heating cycles by welding in an AA7020-T6 aluminum alloy welded with ER5087 and ER5356 electrodes. During 10 months, welds were done to simulate in the laboratory several welding repairs (up to six repairs). Tensile and hardness measurements were done to evaluate the evolution of the properties against time. It was found that a single pass is enough to generate a heat-affected zone (HAZ) of 30 mm, and after four repairs the width of the HAZ exceeds 210 mm. In the HAZ, two regions were observed: the dissolution zone, which recovers a percentage of hardness by natural aging, and the over-aging zone, showing no increase in hardness. The results indicate that there is a maximum number of welding repairs that can be performed in a heat-treatable aluminum superstructure before it fails on the HAZ of the base material, since the tensile strength is reduced around 40 pct compared to the base metal.

  3. Effect of Postweld Aging Treatment on Fatigue Behavior of Pulsed Current Welded AA7075 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2008-04-01

    This article reports the effect of postweld aging treatment on fatigue behavior of pulsed current welded AA 7075 aluminum alloy joints. AA7075 aluminum alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers, and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of AA7075 aluminum alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Rolled plates of 10 mm thickness have been used as the base material for preparing multipass welded joints. Single V butt joint configuration has been prepared for joining the plates. The filler metal used for joining the plates is AA 5356 (Al-5Mg (wt.%)) grade aluminum alloy. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW), and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. Argon (99.99% pure) has been used as the shielding gas. Rotary bending fatigue testing machine has been used to evaluate fatigue behavior of the welded joints. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in GTA and GMA welds. Grain refinement is accompanied by an increase in fatigue life and endurance limit. Simple postweld aging treatment applied to the joints is found to be beneficial to enhance the fatigue performance of the welded joints.

  4. Damage Tolerance Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of various aerospace structures. Self-reacting and conventional friction stir welding are variations of the friction stir weld process employed in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks which are classified as pressurized structure in many spaceflight vehicle architectures. In order to address damage tolerance behavior associated with friction stir welds in these safety critical structures, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data describing fracture behavior, residual strength capability, and cyclic mission life capability of friction stir welds at ambient and cryogenic temperatures have been generated and will be presented in this paper. Fracture behavior will include fracture toughness and tearing (R-curve) response of the friction stir welds. Residual strength behavior will include an evaluation of the effects of lack of penetration on conventional friction stir welds, the effects of internal defects (wormholes) on self-reacting friction stir welds, and an evaluation of the effects of fatigue cycled surface cracks on both conventional and selfreacting welds. Cyclic mission life capability will demonstrate the effects of surface crack defects on service load cycle capability. The fracture data will be used to evaluate nondestructive inspection and proof test requirements for the welds.

  5. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  6. 49 CFR 178.68 - Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders. 178.68... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.68 Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4E cylinder is a welded aluminum cylinder with a water capacity (nominal...

  7. Flaw growth behavior in thick welded plates of 2219-T87 aluminum at room and cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Glorioso, S. V.; Medlock, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Axial load fatigue and fracture tests were conducted on thick welded plates of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy to determine the tensile strength properties and the flaw growth behavior in electron beam, gas metal arc, and pulse current gas tungsten arc welds for plates 6.35 centimeters (2.5 in.) thick. The tests were conducted in room temperature air and in liquid nitrogen environments. Specimens were tested in both the as-welded and the aged after welding conditions. The experimental crack growth rate were correlated with theoretical crack growth rate predictions for semielliptical surface flaws.

  8. Experiments and simulation for 6061-T6 aluminum alloy resistance spot welded lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florea, Radu Stefanel

    and base metal of the joints. Neutron diffraction results showed residual stresses in the weld are approximately 40% lower than the yield strength of the parent material, with maximum variation occurring in the vertical position of the specimen because of the orientation of electrode clamping forces that produce a non-uniform solidification pattern. In the final section a theoretical continuum modeling framework for 6061-T6 aluminum resistance spot welded joints is presented.

  9. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Sabina Luisa; Casalino, Giuseppe; Casavola, Caterina; Moramarco, Vincenzo

    2013-12-18

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the weld. In this work FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 6 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in butt joint configuration. LAFSW is studied firstly to demonstrate the weldability of aluminum alloy using that technique. Secondly, process parameters, such as laser power and temperature gradient are investigated in order to evaluate changes in microstructure, micro-hardness, residual stress, and tensile properties. Once the possibility to achieve sound weld using LAFSW is demonstrated, it will be possible to explore the benefits for tool wear, higher welding speeds, and lower clamping force.

  10. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Campanelli, Sabina Luisa; Casalino, Giuseppe; Casavola, Caterina; Moramarco, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the weld. In this work FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 6 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in butt joint configuration. LAFSW is studied firstly to demonstrate the weldability of aluminum alloy using that technique. Secondly, process parameters, such as laser power and temperature gradient are investigated in order to evaluate changes in microstructure, micro-hardness, residual stress, and tensile properties. Once the possibility to achieve sound weld using LAFSW is demonstrated, it will be possible to explore the benefits for tool wear, higher welding speeds, and lower clamping force. PMID:28788430

  11. Neural network modeling of pulsed-laser weld pool shapes in aluminum alloy welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; Iskander, Y.S.; Oblow, E.M.; Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Fuerschbach, P.W.; Smartt, H.B.; Pace, D.P. Tolle, C.R.

    1998-11-01

    A model was developed to predict the weld pool shape in pulsed Nd:YAG laser welds of aluminum alloy 5754. The model utilized neural network analysis to relate the weld process conditions to four pool shape parameters: penetration, width, width at half-penetration, and cross-sectional area. The model development involved the identification of the input (process) variables, the desired output (shape) variables, and the optimal neural network architecture. The latter was influenced by the number of defined inputs and outputs as well as the amount of data that was available for training the network. After appropriate training, the best network was identified and was used to predict the weld shape. A routine to convert the shape parameters into predicted weld profiles was also developed. This routine was based on the actual experimental weld profiles and did not impose an artificial analytical function to describe the weld profile. The neural network model was tested on experimental welds. The model predictions were excellent. It was found that the predicted shapes were within the experimental variations that were found along the length of the welds (due to the pulsed nature of the weld power) and the reproducibility of welds made under nominally identical conditions.

  12. Neural network modeling of pulsed-laser weld pool shapes in aluminum alloy welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; Iskander, Y.S.; Oblow, E.M.; Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Fuerschbach, P.W.; Smartt, H.B.

    1998-09-01

    A model was developed to predict the weld pool shape in pulsed Nd:YAG laser welds of aluminum alloy 5754. The model utilized neural network analysis to relate the weld process conditions to four pool shape parameters: (1) penetration width, (2) width at half-penetration, and (3) cross-sectional area. The model development involved the identification of the input (process) variables, the desired output (shape) variables, and the optimal neural network architecture. The latter was influenced by the number of defined inputs and outputs as well as the amount of data that was available for training the network. After appropriate training, die best network was identified and was used to predict the weld shape. A routine to convert the shape parameters into predicted weld profiles was also developed. This routine was based on the actual experimental weld profiles and did not impose an artificial analytical function to describe the weld profile. The neural network model was tested on experimental welds. The model predictions were excellent. It was found that the predicted shapes were within the experimental variations that were found along the length of the welds (due to the pulsed nature of the weld power) and the reproducibility of welds made under nominally identical conditions.

  13. Vertical Compensation Friction Stir Welding of 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shude; Meng, Xiangchen; Xing, Jingwei; Ma, Lin; Gao, Shuangsheng

    2016-09-01

    Vertical compensation friction stir welding (VCFSW) was proposed in order to solve the adverse effect caused by a big gap at the interface between two welded workpieces. VCFSW was successfully applied to weld 6061-T6 aluminum alloy with the thickness of 4 mm, while 2024-T4 aluminum alloy was selected as a rational compensation material. The results show that VCFSW is difficult to get a sound joint when the width of strip is no less than 1.5 mm. Decreasing the welding speed is beneficial to break compensation strip into pieces and then get higher quality joint. When the width of strip is 1 mm, the tensile strength and elongation of joint at the welding speed of 50 mm/min and rotational velocity of 1,800 rpm reach the maximum values of 203 MPa and 5.2%, respectively. Moreover, the addition of 2024-T4 alloy plays a strengthening effect on weld zone (WZ) of VCFSW joint. The fracture surface morphology of joint consisting of amounts of dimples exhibits ductile fracture.

  14. Copper Electrode Degradation Due to the Resistance Welding of Aluminum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    pieces employed in the automotive and aerospace induatries. When the. copper and aluminum make contact at the interface, there is some undesirable...refractory metals, such as molybdenum, niobium , and chromium, have been fabricated. Since the refractory metals are not readily soluble in copper, it...focuses on increasing the life of copper electrodes used in the resistance welding of aluminum work pieces employed in the automotive and aerospace

  15. Effects of Pulse Parameters on Weld Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Extra Pulse Current Aided Laser Welded 2219 Aluminum Alloy Joints.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinge; Li, Liqun; Chen, Yanbin; Yang, Zhaojun; Chen, Yanli; Guo, Xinjian

    2017-09-15

    In order to expand the application range of laser welding and improve weld quality, an extra pulse current was used to aid laser-welded 2219 aluminum alloy, and the effects of pulse current parameters on the weld microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated. The effect mechanisms of the pulse current interactions with the weld pool were evaluated. The results indicated that the coarse dendritic structure in the weld zone changed to a fine equiaxed structure using an extra pulse current, and the pulse parameters, including medium peak current, relatively high pulse frequency, and low pulse duty ratio benefited to improving the weld structure. The effect mechanisms of the pulse current were mainly ascribed to the magnetic pinch effect, thermal effect, and electromigration effect caused by the pulse current. The effect of the pulse parameters on the mechanical properties of welded joints were consistent with that of the weld microstructure. The tensile strength and elongation of the optimal pulse current-aided laser-welded joint increased by 16.4% and 105%, respectively, compared with autogenous laser welding.

  16. Effects of Pulse Parameters on Weld Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Extra Pulse Current Aided Laser Welded 2219 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinge; Li, Liqun; Chen, Yanbin; Yang, Zhaojun; Chen, Yanli; Guo, Xinjian

    2017-01-01

    In order to expand the application range of laser welding and improve weld quality, an extra pulse current was used to aid laser-welded 2219 aluminum alloy, and the effects of pulse current parameters on the weld microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated. The effect mechanisms of the pulse current interactions with the weld pool were evaluated. The results indicated that the coarse dendritic structure in the weld zone changed to a fine equiaxed structure using an extra pulse current, and the pulse parameters, including medium peak current, relatively high pulse frequency, and low pulse duty ratio benefited to improving the weld structure. The effect mechanisms of the pulse current were mainly ascribed to the magnetic pinch effect, thermal effect, and electromigration effect caused by the pulse current. The effect of the pulse parameters on the mechanical properties of welded joints were consistent with that of the weld microstructure. The tensile strength and elongation of the optimal pulse current-aided laser-welded joint increased by 16.4% and 105%, respectively, compared with autogenous laser welding. PMID:28914825

  17. Dye-Assisted Laser Skin Closure with Pulsed Radiation: An In Vitro Study of Weld Strength and Thermal Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Walsh, Joseph T.

    1998-10-01

    Previous laser skin welding studies have used continuous wave delivery of radiation. However, heat diffusion during irradiation prevents strong welds from being achieved without creating large zones of thermal damage. Previously published results indicate that a thermal damage zone in skin greater than 200 micrometers may prevent normal wound healing. We proposed that both strong welds and minimal thermal damage can be achieved by introducing a dye and delivering the radiation in a series of sufficiently short pulses. Two-cm-long incisions were made in guinea pig skin, in vitro. India ink and egg white (albumin) were applied to the wound edges to enhance radiation absorption and to close the wound, respectively. Continuous wave (cw), 1.06 micrometers , Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser radiation was scanned over the weld producing approximately 100 ms pulses. The cooling time between scans and the number of scans was varied. The thermal damage zone at the weld edges was measured using a transmission polarizing light microscope. The tensile strength of the welds was measured using a tensiometer. For pulsed welding and long cooling times between pulses (8 s), weld strengths of 2.4 +/- 0.9 kg/cm2 were measured, and lateral thermal damage at the epidermis was limited to 500 +/- 150 micrometers . With cw welding, comparable weld strengths produced 2700 +/- 300 micrometers of lateral thermal damage. The cw weld strengths were only 0.6 +/- 0.3 kg/cm2 for thermal damage zones comparable to pulsed welding.

  18. 2195 Aluminum-Copper-Lithium Friction Plug Welding Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeshita, Rike P.; Hartley, Paula J.; Baker, Kent S.

    1997-01-01

    Technology developments and applications of friction plug welding is presented. This friction repair welding technology is being studied for implementation on the Space Transportation System's Super Light Weight External Tank. Single plug repairs will be used on a vast majority of weld defects, however, linear defects of up to several inches can be repaired by overlapping plug welds. Methods and results of tensile, bend, simulated service, surface crack tension and other tests at room and cryogenic temperatures is discussed. Attempts to implement Friction Plug Welding has led to both tool and process changes in an attempt to minimize expansive tooling and lengthy implementation times. Process control equipment and data storage methods intended for large scale production will also be addressed. Benefits include increased strength and toughness, decreased weld repair time, automated and highly reliable process, and a lower probability of having to re-repair defect locations.

  19. 2195 Aluminum-Copper-Lithium Friction Plug Welding Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeshita, Rike P.; Hartley, Paula J.; Baker, Kent S.

    1997-01-01

    Technology developments and applications of friction plug welding is presented. This friction repair welding technology is being studied for implementation on the Space Transportation System's Super Light Weight External Tank. Single plug repairs will be used on a vast majority of weld defects, however, linear defects of up to several inches can be repaired by overlapping plug welds. Methods and results of tensile, bend, simulated service, surface crack tension and other tests at room and cryogenic temperatures is discussed. Attempts to implement Friction Plug Welding has led to both tool and process changes in an attempt to minimize expansive tooling and lengthy implementation times. Process control equipment and data storage methods intended for large scale production will also be addressed. Benefits include increased strength and toughness, decreased weld repair time, automated and highly reliable process, and a lower probability of having to re-repair defect locations.

  20. Molten pool characterization of laser lap welded copper and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiqing; Hu, Shengsun; Zuo, Di; Cai, Wayne; Lee, Dongkyun; Elijah, Kannatey-Asibu, Jr.

    2013-12-01

    A 3D finite volume simulation model for laser welding of a Cu-Al lap joint was developed using ANSYS FLUENT to predict the weld pool temperature distribution, velocity field, geometry, alloying element distribution and transition layer thickness—all key attributes and performance characteristics for a laser-welded joint. Melting and solidification of the weld pool was simulated with an enthalpy-porosity formulation. Laser welding experiments and metallographic examination by SEM and EDX were performed to investigate the weld pool features and validate the simulated results. A bowl-shaped temperature field and molten pool, and a unique maximum fusion zone width were observed near the Cu-Al interface. Both the numerical simulation and experimental results indicate an arch-shaped intermediate layer of Cu and Al, and a gradual transition of Cu concentration from the aluminum plate to the copper plate with high composition gradient. For the conditions used, welding with Cu on top was found to result in a better weld joint.

  1. Computational Analysis of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of AA5059 Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    273 7906. J.Q. Su, T.W. Nelson, R. Mishra, and M. Mahoney, Microstructural 791Investigation of Friction Stir Welded 7050 -T651 Aluminum , Acta 792Mater...REPORT Computational Analysis of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of AA5059 Aluminum Alloys 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...During Friction Stir Welding of AA5059 Aluminum Alloys Report Title ABSTRACT Workpiece material flow and stirring/mixing during the friction stir welding

  2. Electromagnetic hammer removes weld distortions from aluminum tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1965-01-01

    Distortions around weld areas on sheet-aluminum tanks and other structures are removed with a portable electromagnetic hammer. The hammer incorporates a coil that generates a controlled high-energy pulsed magnetic field over localized areas on the metal surface.

  3. Effects of high frequency current in welding aluminum alloy 6061

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Uncontrolled high frequency current causes cracking in the heat-affected zone of aluminum alloy 6061 weldments during tungsten inert gas ac welding. Cracking developed when an improperly adjusted superimposed high frequency current was agitating the semimolten metal in the areas of grain boundary.

  4. Device prepares aluminum surfaces for welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulkner, G. E.; Saperstein, Z. P.

    1971-01-01

    Dry machining technique removes original surfaces to obtain contamination free welding surface. Device straddles edge being prepared and aligns with existing edges and adjacent surfaces of workpiece while sensing device regulates cut depth. Description of prototype is given.

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded 5083 and 7075 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalemba-Rec, I.; Hamilton, C.; Kopyściański, M.; Miara, D.; Krasnowski, K.

    2017-02-01

    Through microscopy, mechanical testing, and numerical modeling, the microstructure and mechanical performance of friction stir welded aluminum alloys 7075-T651 and 5083-H111 were characterized. In particular, the influence of the weld configuration, i.e., the locations of the 7075 and 5083 alloys alternately on the advancing and retreating sides, on material flow, microstructure, and mechanical properties was considered. Thermographic data in conjunction with a process simulation demonstrated that the weld configuration significantly impacts heat generation during friction stir welding. The microstructure in the stir zone was a clear visualization of the material flow and was characterized by a vortex-like structure with alternating bands of the alloys being joined. These bands differed in elemental content and grain size. The microstructure became more complex when greater heat generation (higher temperatures) occurred. The weld configuration strongly influenced the material flow, but did not impact the tensile properties (such as yield strength, tensile strength, and elongation). The configuration of 5083 on the advancing side and 7075 on the retreating side produced the most uniform material flow. The joint efficiencies of all tested welds were above 100%.

  6. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of single and double pass Aluminum AA6061 friction stir weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, N. H.; Shah, L. H.; Ishak, M.

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on the effect of single pass (SP), double sided pass (DSP) and normal double pass (NDP) method on friction stir welding of aluminum AA6061. Two pieces of AA6061 alloy with thickness of 6 mm were friction stir welded by using conventional milling machine. The rotational speeds that were used in this study were 800 rpm, 1000 rpm and 1200 rpm, respectively. The welding speed is fixed to 100 mm/min. Microstructure observation of welded area was studied by using optical microscope. Tensile test and Vickers hardness test were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of this specimen. Mechanical property analysis results indicate that at low rotational speeds, defects such as surface lack of fill and tunneling in the welded area can be observed. Vickers hardness of specimens however did not vary much when rotational speed is varied. Welded specimens using single pass method shows higher tensile strength and hardness value compared to both double pass methods up to 180.61 MPa. Moreover, DSP showed better tensile test and hardness test compared to NDP method. The optimum parameters were found to be single pass method with 1200 rpm of rotational speed. Therefore economically sound to only perform SP method to obtain maximum tensile strength for AA6061 FSW with thickness of 6 mm.

  7. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded 5083 and 7075 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalemba-Rec, I.; Hamilton, C.; Kopyściański, M.; Miara, D.; Krasnowski, K.

    2017-03-01

    Through microscopy, mechanical testing, and numerical modeling, the microstructure and mechanical performance of friction stir welded aluminum alloys 7075-T651 and 5083-H111 were characterized. In particular, the influence of the weld configuration, i.e., the locations of the 7075 and 5083 alloys alternately on the advancing and retreating sides, on material flow, microstructure, and mechanical properties was considered. Thermographic data in conjunction with a process simulation demonstrated that the weld configuration significantly impacts heat generation during friction stir welding. The microstructure in the stir zone was a clear visualization of the material flow and was characterized by a vortex-like structure with alternating bands of the alloys being joined. These bands differed in elemental content and grain size. The microstructure became more complex when greater heat generation (higher temperatures) occurred. The weld configuration strongly influenced the material flow, but did not impact the tensile properties (such as yield strength, tensile strength, and elongation). The configuration of 5083 on the advancing side and 7075 on the retreating side produced the most uniform material flow. The joint efficiencies of all tested welds were above 100%.

  8. Microstructural issues in a friction-stir-welded aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, O.V.; Kennedy, C.; Murr, L.E.; Brown, D.; Pappu, S.; Nowak, B.M.; McClure, J.C.

    1998-02-03

    Recent observations of microstructures associated with friction-stir welding (FSW) in a number of aluminum alloys have consistently demonstrated the actual weld zone to consist of a (dynamically) recrystallized grain structure resulting from the extreme, solid-state, plastic deformation characterizing the process. Because of solubilities associated with the various precipitates in 7075 and 6061 aluminum alloys, and the fact that the precipitates were either homogeneously distributed throughout both the original (unwelded) work-piece plates and the well zones (or formed varying densities of Widmanstaetten patterns within the original and recrystallized grains), it has been difficult to follow the stirring of stable, second-phase particles from the base metal (work-piece) into the weld zone. In the present investigation, a compositionally modified 1100 aluminum alloy (nominally 99.2% Al, 0.5% Fe, 0.15% Cu, 0.12% Si, 0.05 Mn, 0.04 Ti, balance in weight percent of Be and Mg), forming a stable microdendritic (second-phase), equiaxed, cell structure was friction-stir welded. These thermally stable, geometrically specific, precipitates in the base metal were compared with their disposition within the friction-stir-weld zone. In addition, as-cast plates of this alloy were cold-rolled 50% and friction-stir-welded in order to compare these two schedules (as-cast and 50% cold-rolled) in terms of residual hardness variations and related microstructural issues as well as the effect of prior deformation on the friction-stir welding process.

  9. Aluminum Lithium Alloy 2195 Fusion Welding Improvements with New Filler Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carolyn; Bjorkman, Gerry; McCool, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems, and McCook Metals' development an aluminum-copper weld filler wire for fusion welding 2195 aluminum lithium. The aluminum-copper based weld filler wire has been identified as B218, which is the result of six years of weld filler wire development funded by NASA, Lockheed Martin, and McCook Metals. The Super Lightweight External Tank for the NASA Space Shuttle Program consists of 2195 welded with 4043 aluminum-silicon weld filler wire. The B218 filler wire chemistry was developed to produce enhanced 2195 weld and repair weld mechanical properties. An initial characterization of the B218 weld filler wire was performed consisting of initial weld and repair weld evaluation comparing B218 and 4043. The testing involved room temperature and cryogenic tensile testing along with fracture toughness testing. B218 weld filler wire proved to produce enhanced initial and repair weld tensile and fracture properties over 4043. B218 weld filler wire has proved to be a superior weld filler wire for welding 2195 and other aluminum lithium alloys over 4043.

  10. Influence of Solute Content and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement of Aluminum Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schempp, Philipp; Cross, Carl Edward; Pittner, Andreas; Rethmeier, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Grain refinement provides an important possibility to enhance the mechanical properties ( e.g., strength and ductility) and the weldability (susceptibility to solidification cracking) of aluminum weld metal. In the current study, a filler metal consisting of aluminum base metal and different amounts of commercial grain refiner Al Ti5B1 was produced. The filler metal was then deposited in the base metal and fused in a GTA welding process. Additions of titanium and boron reduced the weld metal mean grain size considerably and resulted in a transition from columnar to equiaxed grain shape ( CET). In commercial pure aluminum (Alloy 1050A), the grain-refining efficiency was higher than that in the Al alloys 6082 and 5083. Different welding and solidification parameters influenced the grain size response only slightly. Furthermore, the observed grain-size reduction was analyzed by means of the undercooling parameter P and the growth restriction parameter Q, which revealed the influence of solute elements and nucleant particles on grain size.

  11. Neural Network Modeling of Weld Pool Shape in Pulsed-Laser Aluminum Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, Y.S.; Oblow, E.M.; Vitek, J.M.

    1998-11-16

    A neural network model was developed to predict the weld pool shape for pulsed-laser aluminum welds. Several different network architectures were examined and the optimum architecture was identified. The neural network was then trained and, in spite of the small size of the training data set, the network accurately predicted the weld pool shape profiles. The neural network output was in the form of four weld pool shape parameters (depth, width, half-width, and area) and these were converted into predicted weld pool profiles with the use of the actual experimental poo1 profiles as templates. It was also shown that the neural network model could reliably predict the change from conduction-mode type shapes to keyhole-mode shapes.

  12. Butt weld of aluminum alloy plates 6063 and LY12 by laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jin'an; Cheng, Zhaogu; Xu, Guoliang; Li, Xianqin

    2000-02-01

    By means of a transverse flow 5 kW CO2 laser with low- order mode laser beam output, 1 - 4 mm thick aluminum alloy plates 6063 and LY12 were successfully butt welded. The result shows that the butt weldability and the weld quality of the aluminum alloy plates are mainly dependent on incident laser power density, laser beam defocused distance and shielding gas. The relationship between the weld quality of the aluminum alloy plates and the welding parameters is discussed. The macrostructure and microstructure of the welded seams are analyzed. The mechanical properties of the welded seams are discussed.

  13. Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy 6061 T6 Formed by Arc and Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astarita, A.; Squillace, A.; Nele, L.

    2016-01-01

    Butt welds formed by arc welding in inert gas with nonconsumable electrode (tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding) and by friction stir welding (FSW) from aluminum alloy AA6061 T6 are studied. Comparative analysis of the structures and mechanical properties of the welded joints is performed using the results of optical and electron microscopy, tensile tests, tests for residual bending ductility, and measurements of microhardness. The changes in the microstructure in different zones and the degrees of degradation of the mechanical properties after the welding are determined. It is shown that the size of the tool for the friction stir welding affects the properties of the welds. Quantitative results showing the relation between the microscopic behavior of the alloy and the welding-induced changes in the microstructure are obtained. Friction stir welding is shown to provide higher properties of the welds.

  14. An Investigation of the Microstructure of an Intermetallic Layer in Welding Aluminum Alloys to Steel by MIG Process

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quoc Manh; Huang, Shyh-Chour

    2015-01-01

    Butt joints of A5052 aluminum alloy and SS400 steel, with a new type of chamfered edge, are welded by means of metal inert gas welding and ER4043 Al-Si filler metal. The microhardness and microstructure of the joint are investigated. An intermetallic layer is found on the surface of the welding seam and SS400 steel sheet. The hardness of the intermetallic layer is examined using the Vickers hardness test. The average hardness values at the Intermetallic (IMC) layer zone and without the IMC layer zone were higher than that of the welding wire ER4043. The tensile strength test showed a fracture at the intermetallic layer when the tensile strength is 225.9 MPa. The tensile value test indicated the average of welds was equivalent to the 85% tensile strength of the A5052 aluminum alloy. The thickness of the intermetallic layers is non-uniform at different positions with the ranges from 1.95 to 5 μm. The quality of the butt joint is better if the intermetallic layer is minimized. The Si crystals which appeared at the welding seam, indicating that this element participated actively during the welding process, also contributed to the IMC layer’s formation. PMID:28793708

  15. An Investigation of the Microstructure of an Intermetallic Layer in Welding Aluminum Alloys to Steel by MIG Process.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quoc Manh; Huang, Shyh-Chour

    2015-12-02

    Butt joints of A5052 aluminum alloy and SS400 steel, with a new type of chamfered edge, are welded by means of metal inert gas welding and ER4043 Al-Si filler metal. The microhardness and microstructure of the joint are investigated. An intermetallic layer is found on the surface of the welding seam and SS400 steel sheet. The hardness of the intermetallic layer is examined using the Vickers hardness test. The average hardness values at the Intermetallic (IMC) layer zone and without the IMC layer zone were higher than that of the welding wire ER4043. The tensile strength test showed a fracture at the intermetallic layer when the tensile strength is 225.9 MPa. The tensile value test indicated the average of welds was equivalent to the 85% tensile strength of the A5052 aluminum alloy. The thickness of the intermetallic layers is non-uniform at different positions with the ranges from 1.95 to 5 μm. The quality of the butt joint is better if the intermetallic layer is minimized. The Si crystals which appeared at the welding seam, indicating that this element participated actively during the welding process, also contributed to the IMC layer's formation.

  16. Investigation of Torsional Strength of the VT6 Weld Joint Produced by Linear Friction Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanova, G. R.; Kabirov, R. R.; Karavaeva, M. V.; Ershova, Yu. A.; Zhilyaev, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    Results of measurement of torsional strength of the weld joint of the VT6 titanium alloy produced by linear friction welding are presented. For a comparison, the same method was used to test monolithic specimens of the VT6 alloy. Torsional strength values of the weld joint (τUS = 861 MPa and φ = 110°) correspond to the strength of the monolithic material. In this case, the specimens fail along the base metal.

  17. Simulation of Local Material Properties during Laser Beam Welding of Aluminum-Titanium Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Annika; Hunkel, Martin; von Hehl, Axel

    Combinations of aluminum and titanium by firmly bonding via laser beam welding enable the production of customized hybrid designs with enhanced properties. A novel approach of coupling process, microstructure and mechanical simulation, considering the development of weld geometry and local material conditions, is intended to deliver a fast and reliable method for evaluating the quasi-static strength of laser beam welded hybrid compounds. For microstructure and mechanical simulations a comprehensive data set of material specific mechanical properties is required to reach simulation results. This includes hot tensile tests, tensile tests concerning the heat affected zone (by means of micro flat specimens) and metallographic examinations to determine the microstructure and hardness. The data set was implemented into a simulation model in order to validate the simulation results including microstructure evolution and resulting local mechanical properties. These results provide the basis for refining and advancing the coupled simulation model.

  18. Welding Phenomenon and Removal Mechanism of Aluminum-Oxide Films by Space GHTA Welding Process in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suita, Yoshikazu; Ekuni, Tomohide; Kamei, Misa; Tsukuda, Yoshiyuki; Terajima, Noboru; Yamashita, Masahiro; Imagawa, Kichiro; Masubuchi, Koichi

    Aluminum alloys have been widely used in constructing various space structures including the ISS (International Space Station) and launch vehicles. In order to apply the welding technology in space, welding experiments on aluminum alloy were performed using by the GHTA (Gas Hollow Tungsten Arc) welding processes using an inverter controlled DC/AC GTA welding machine in vacuum. We observed the removal mechanism of aluminum-oxide films on molten metal in detail during the welding using a high-speed video camera. As a result, it is clarified that the impact arc pressure produced by pulsed current mechanically crushes and removes aluminum-oxide films on the molten pool. This removal mechanism of aluminum-oxide films is completely different from a removal mechanism by cleaning action.

  19. Microstructural characterization and mechanical properties of high power ultrasonic spot welded aluminum alloy AA6111–TiAl6V4 dissimilar joints

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.Q. Robson, J.D.; Ciuca, O.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2014-11-15

    Aluminum alloy AA6111 and TiAl6V4 dissimilar alloys were successfully welded by high power ultrasonic spot welding. No visible intermetallic reaction layer was detected in as-welded AA6111/TiAl6V4 welds, even when transmission electron microscopy was used. The effects of welding time and natural aging on peak load and fracture energy were investigated. The peak load and fracture energy of welds increased with an increase in welding time and then reached a plateau. The lap shear strength (peak load) can reach the same level as that of similar Al–Al joints. After natural aging, the fracture mode of welds transferred from ductile fracture of the softened aluminum to interfacial failure due to the strength recovery of AA6111. - Highlights: • Dissimilar Al/Ti welds were produced by high power ultrasonic spot welding. • No visible intermetallic reaction layer was detected on weld interface. • The lap shear strength can reach the same level as that of similar Al–Al joints. • The fracture mode becomes interfacial failure after natural aging.

  20. New backup-bar groove configuration improves heliarc welding of 2014-T6 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. J.

    1966-01-01

    Backup chill bar with new grooved dimensions improve welding of 2014-T6 aluminum. This groove geometry affords optimum chilling characteristics, reduces shrinkage and the weld bead is narrower and consistently free from impurities or voids.

  1. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Carpenter, Joseph A.; Warren, C. D.; Smith, Mark T.

    2008-12-28

    Experiments are continuing to evaluate the feasibility of friction stir spot welding advanced high-strength steels including, DP780, martensitic hot-stamp boron steel, and TRIP steels. Spot weld lap-shear strengths can exceed those required by industry standards such as AWS D8.1.

  2. Investigations on Laser Beam Welding of Different Dissimilar Joints of Steel and Aluminum Alloys for Automotive Lightweight Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seffer, Oliver; Pfeifer, Ronny; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan

    Due to the enormous potential of weight saving, and the consequential reduction of pollutant emissions, the use of hybrid components made of steel and aluminum alloys is increasing steadily, especially concerning automotive lightweight construction. However, thermal joining of steel and aluminum is still being researched, due to a limited solubility of the binary system of iron and aluminum causing the formation of hard and brittle intermetallic phases, which decrease the strength and the formability of the dissimilar seam. The presented results show the investigation of laser beam welding for joining different dissimilar hybrid components of the steel materials HX220LAD+Z100, 22MnB5+AS150 and 1.4301, as well as the aluminum alloy AA6016-T4 as a lap joint. Among other things, the influences of the energy per unit length, the material grade, the sheet thickness t, the weld type (lap weld, fillet weld) and the arrangement of the base materials in a lap joint (aluminum-sided irradiation, steel-sided irradiation) on the achievable strengths are analyzed. The characterization of the dissimilar joints includes tensile shear tests and metallographic analyses, depending on the energy per unit length.

  3. Simulating weld-fusion boundary microstructures in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrivas, Anastasios D.; Lippold, John C.

    2004-02-01

    A fundamental study of weld-fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys was conducted in an effort to understand equiaxed grain zone formation and fusion boundary nucleation and growth phenomena. In addition to commercial aluminum alloys, experimental Mg-bearing alloys with Zr and Sc additions were studied along with the widely used Cu- and Licontaining alloy 2195-T8. This article describes work conducted to clarify the interrelation among composition, base metal substrate, and temperature as they relate to nucleation and growth phenomena at the fusion boundary.

  4. Investigation of the Microstructure of Joints of Aluminum Alloys Produced by Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-02-01

    Special features of the microstructure of joints of aluminum-magnesium and aluminum-copper alloys produced by friction stir welding are analyzed. It is demonstrated that a layered structure with ultradisperse grains is produced by friction stir welding at the center of the weld joint. An analogy is drawn between the microstructures of joints produced by friction stir welding and surface layer produced by sliding friction.

  5. Impact Welding of Aluminum to Copper and Stainless Steel by Vaporizing Foil Actuator: Effect of Heat Treatment Cycles on Mechanical Properties and Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek, Anupam; Hansen, Steven; Benzing, Jake; He, Mei; Daehn, Glenn

    2015-10-01

    This work studies the mechanical property effect of microstructure on impact welds of aluminum alloy AA6061 with both copper alloy Cu 110 and stainless steel AISI 304. AA6061-T6 and T4 temper aluminum sheets of 1 mm thickness were launched toward copper and stainless steel targets using the vaporizing foil actuator technique. Flyer plate velocities, measured via photonic Doppler velocimetry, were observed to be approximately 800 m/s. The welded aluminum-copper samples were subjected to instrumented peel testing, microhardness testing, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The welded joints exhibited cracks through their continuous intermetallic layers. The cracks were impeded upon encountering a ductile metallic wave. The welds created with T6 temper flyer sheets were found to have smaller intermetallic-free and wavy interface regions as compared to those created with T4 temper flyer sheets. Peel strength tests of the two weld combinations resulted in failure along the interface in the case of the T6 flyer welds, while the failure generally occurred in the parent aluminum for the T4 temper flyer welds. Half of the T4 flyer welds were subjected to aging for 18 h at 433 K (160 °C) to convert the aluminum sheet to the T6 condition. Although the aged flyer material did not attain the hardness of the as-received T6 material, it was found to be significantly stronger than the T4 material. These welds retained their strength after the aging process, and diffusion across the interface was minimal. The welded aluminum-stainless steel samples were analyzed on a more basic level than aluminum-copper samples, but were found to exhibit similar results.

  6. Effect of adding powder on joint properties of laser penetration welding for dual phase steel and aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, D. W.; Liu, J. S.; Lu, Y. Z.; Xu, S. H.

    2017-09-01

    The experiments of laser penetration welding for dual phase steel and aluminum alloy were carried out, and the effect of adding Mn or Si powder on mechanical properties and microstructure of the weld was investigated. Some defects, such as spatter, inclusion, cracks and softening in heat affected zone (HAZ), can be avoided in welding joints, and the increased penetration depth is obtained by adding Mn or Si powder. The average tensile-shear strength of Si-added joint is 3.84% higher than that of Mn-added joint, and the strength of both joints exceeds that of no-added joint. In the case of adding Mn powder, small amount of liquid Al is mixed into steel molten pool, and the Al content increases in both sides of the weld, which leads to the increased weld width in aluminum molten pool. Thus, transverse area increases in jointing steel to aluminum, which is significant for the improved tensile-shear strength of joints. As far as adding Si powder is concerned, it is not the case, the enhancement of the joint properties benefits from improvement of metallurgical reaction.

  7. Grain fragmentation in ultrasonic-assisted TIG weld of pure aluminum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qihao; Lin, Sanbao; Yang, Chunli; Fan, Chenglei; Ge, Hongliang

    2017-11-01

    Under the action of acoustic waves during an ultrasonic-assisted tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process, a grain of a TIG weld of aluminum alloy is refined by nucleation and grain fragmentation. Herein, effects of ultrasound on grain fragmentation in the TIG weld of aluminum alloy are investigated via systematic welding experiments of pure aluminum. First, experiments involving continuous and fixed-position welding are performed, which demonstrate that ultrasound can break the grain of the TIG weld of pure aluminum. The microstructural characteristics of an ultrasonic-assisted TIG weld fabricated by fixed-position welding are analyzed. The microstructure is found to transform from plane crystal, columnar crystal, and uniform equiaxed crystal into plane crystal, deformed columnar crystal, and nonuniform equiaxed crystal after application of ultrasound. Second, factors influencing ultrasonic grain fragmentation are investigated. The ultrasonic amplitude and welding current are found to have a considerable effect on grain fragmentation. The degree of fragmentation first increases and then decreases with an increase in ultrasonic amplitude, and it increases with an increase in welding current. Measurement results of the vibration of the weld pool show that the degree of grain fragmentation is related to the intensity of acoustic nonlinearity in the weld pool. The greater the intensity of acoustic nonlinearity, the greater is the degree of grain fragmentation. Finally, the mechanism of ultrasonic grain fragmentation in the TIG weld of pure aluminum is discussed. A finite element simulation is used to simulate the acoustic pressure and flow in the weld pool. The acoustic pressure in the weld pool exceeds the cavitation threshold, and cavitation bubbles are generated. The flow velocity in the weld pool does not change noticeably after application of ultrasound. It is concluded that the high-pressure conditions induced during the occurrence of cavitation, lead to grain

  8. High Temperature Analysis of Aluminum-Lithium 2195 Alloy to Aid in the Design of Improved Welding Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talia, George E.; Widener, Christian

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys have extraordinary properties. The addition of lithium to an aluminum alloy decreases its density, while making large increases in its strength and hardness. The down side is that they are unstable at higher temperatures, and are subsequently difficult to weld or even manufacture. Martin Marietta, though, developed an aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 that was reported to have exceptional properties and good weldability. Thus, it was chosen as the alloy for the space shuttles super light external tank. Unfortunately, welding 2195 has turned out to be much more of a challenge than anticipated. Thus, research has been undergone in order to understand the mechanisms that are causing the welding problems. Gas reactions have been observed to be detrimental to weld strength. Water vapor has often been identified as having a significant role in these reactions. Nitrogen, however, has also been shown to have a direct correlation to porosity. These reactions were suspected as being complex and responsible for the two main problems of welding 2195. One, the initial welds of 2195 are much weaker than the parent metal. Second, each subsequent welding pass increases the size and number of cracks and porosity, yielding significant reductions in strength. Consequently, the objective of this research was to characterize the high-temperature reactions of 2195 in order to understand the mechanisms for crack growth and the formation of porosity in welds. In order to accomplish that goal, an optical hot-stage microscope, HSM, was used to observe those reactions as they occurred. Surface reactions of 2195 were observed in a variety of environments, such as air, vacuum, nitrogen and helium. For comparison, some samples of Al-2219 were also observed. Some of the reacted surfaces were then analyzed on a scanning electron microscope, SEM. Additionally, a gas chromatograph was used to analyze the gaseous products of the high temperature reactions.

  9. Neutron diffraction studies of welds of aerospace aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Martukanitz, R.P.; Howell, P.R.; Payzant, E.A.; Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.

    1996-10-01

    Neutron diffraction and electron microscopy were done on residual stress in various regions comprising variable polarity plasma arc welds of alloys 2219 (Al-6.3Cu) and 2195 (Al-4.0Cu-1.0Li-0.5Mg-0.5Ag). Results indicate that lattice parameter changes in the various weld regions may be attributed to residual stresses generated during welding, as well as local changes in microstructure. Distribution of longitudinal and transverse stress of welded panels shows peaks of tension and compression, respectively, within the HAZ and corroborate earlier theoretical results. Position of these peaks are related to position of minimum strength within the HAZ, and the magnitude of these peaks are a fraction of the local yield strength in this region. Weldments of alloy 2195-T8 exhibited higher peak residual stress than alloy 2219-T87. Comparison of neutron diffraction and microstructural analysis indicate decreased lattice parameters associated with the solid solution of the near HAZ; this results in decreased apparent tensile residual stress within this region and may significantly alter interpretation of residual stress measurements of these alloys. Considerable relaxation of residual stress occurs during removal of specimens from welded panels and was used to aid in differentiating changes in lattice parameters attributed to residual stress from welding and modifications in microstructure.

  10. Effect of zirconium addition on welding of aluminum grain refined by titanium plus boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaid, A. I. O.

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum oxidizes freely in ordinary atmosphere which makes its welding difficult and weak, particularly it solidifies in columnar structure with large grains. Therefore, it is anticipated that the effect of addition of some grain refiners to its melt before solidification is worth while investigating as it may enhance its weldabilty and improve its mechanical strength. In this paper, the effect of addition of zirconium at a weight of 0.1% (which corresponds to the peretictic limit on the aluminum-zirconium base phase diagram) to commercially pure aluminum, grain refined by Ti+B on its weldability, using gas tungsten arc welding, GTAW, method which was formerly known as TIG. A constant current level of 30 AC Ampere was used because it removes the oxides during the welding process. Metallographic examination of the weldments of the different combinations of Al with Al and Al with its microalloys: in the heat affected zone, HAZ, and away from it was carried out and examined for HAZ width, porosity, cracks and microhardness. It was found that grain refining by Ti+B or Zr resulted in enhancement of the weldment.

  11. Aluminum and stainless steel tubes joined by simple ring and welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townhill, A.

    1967-01-01

    Duranel ring is used to join aluminum and stainless steel tubing. Duranel is a bimetal made up of roll-bonded aluminum and stainless steel. This method of joining the tubing requires only two welding operations.

  12. Parametric studies on tensile strength in joining AA6061- T6 and AA7075-T6 by gas metal arc welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, M.; Noordin, N. F. M.; Shah, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Proper selection of the welding parameters can result in better joining. In this study, the effects of various welding parameters on tensile strength in joining dissimilar aluminum alloys AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 were investigated. 2 mm thick samples of both base metals were welded by semi-automatic gas metal arc welding (GMAW) using filler wire ER5356. The welding current, arc voltage and welding speed were chosen as variables parameters. The strength of each specimen after the welding operations were tested and the effects of these parameters on tensile strength were identified by using Taguchi method. The range of parameter for welding current were chosen from 100 to 115 A, arc voltage from 17 to 20 V and welding speed from 2 to 5 mm/s. L16 orthogonal array was used to obtained 16 runs of experiments. It was found that the highest tensile strength (194.34 MPa) was obtained with the combination of a welding current of 115 A, welding voltage of 18 V and welding speed of 4 mm/s. Through analysis of variance (ANOVA), the welding voltage was the most effected parameter on tensile strength with percentage of contribution at 41.30%.

  13. Structure-property relationships of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinones, Rogie Irwin Rodriguez

    In this work, the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of dissimilar friction stir welded AA6061-to-AA7050 aluminum alloys were evaluated. Experimental results from this study revealed that static strength increased with the tool rotational speed and was correlated with the material intermixing. Fully-reversed low cycle fatigue experimental results showed an increase in the strain hardening properties as well as the number of cycles-to-failure as the tool rotational speed was increased. Furthermore, under both static and cyclic loading, fracture of the joint was dominated by the AA6061 alloy side of the weld. In addition, inspection of the fatigue surfaces revealed that cracks initiated from intermetallic particles located near the surface. In order to determine the corrosion resistance of the dissimilar joint, corrosion defects were produced on the crown surface of the weld by static immersion in 3.5% NaCl for various exposure times. Results revealed localized corrosion damage in the thermo-mechanically affected and heat affected zones. Results demonstrated a decrease in the fatigue life, with evidence of crack initiation at the corrosion defects; however, the fatigue life was nearly independent of the exposure time. This can be attributed to total fatigue life dominated by incubation time. Furthermore, two types of failure were observed: fatigue crack initiation in the AA6061 side at high strain amplitudes (>0.3%); and fatigue crack initiation in the AA7050 side at low strain amplitudes (<0.2%). Lastly, a microstructure-sensitive model based on a multi-stage fatigue damage concept was extended to the dissimilar friction stir welded joints in order to capture the crack initiation and propagation in as-welded and pre-corroded conditions. Good correlation between experimental fatigue results and the model was achieved based on the variation in the initial defect size, microstructure, and mechanical properties of the dissimilar friction stir

  14. The effect of postprocessing on tensile property and microstructure evolution of friction stir welding aluminum alloy joint

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Z.L.; Wang, X.S.; Pang, Q.; Huang, F.; Qin, X.P.; Hua, L.

    2015-01-15

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining aluminum alloy and can dramatically reduce grain size conferring excellent plastic deformation properties. Consequently, friction stir welding is used to manufacture tailor welded blanks to optimize weight or performance in the final component. In the study, the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welding joint during plastic forming and subsequent heat treatment were investigated. The microstructural characteristics of the friction stir welding joints were studied by Electron Backscattered Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile and microhardness tests. It is found that the tensile and yield strengths of friction stir welding joints are significantly improved after severe plastic deformation due to the grain refinement. Following heat treatment, the strength of the friction stir welding joints significantly decrease due to the obvious abnormal grain growth. Careful attention must be given to the processing route of any friction stir welding joint intended for plastic forming, especially the annealing between forming passes. Severe plastic deforming of the friction stir welding joint leads to a high level of stored energy/dislocation density, which causes the abnormal grain growth during subsequent heat treatment, and consequently reduce the mechanical properties of the friction stir welding joint. - Highlights: • Great changes are observed in the microstructure of FSW joint after postprocessing. • Postprocessing shows great effect on the microstructure stability of FSW joint. • The weld shows more significant decrease in strength than the BM due to the AGG. • Attention must be given to the processing route of FSW joint for plastic forming.

  15. Spatial Mechanical Response and Strain Gradient Evolution of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-2139

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    Background Aluminum alloys are becoming increasingly desirable structural metals for replacing steel due to their lower density, 2.67 and 7.87 g/cm 3... aluminum alloys. FSW is an optimal process for welding aluminum , in comparison to conventional welding techniques that are difficult to fuse together...due to the aluminum oxide (Al2O3) formed on the surface (3). FSW reduces the cracks and voids that are formed during other joining processes. FSW

  16. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  17. Role of the micro/macro structure of welds in crack nucleation and propagation in aerospace aluminum-lithium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Talia, G.E.

    1996-02-01

    Al-Li alloys offer the benefits of increased strength, elastic modulus and lower densities as compared to conventional aluminum alloys. Martin Marietta Laboratories has developed an Al-Li alloy designated 2195 which is designated for use in the cryogenic tanks of the space shuttle. The Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding process is currently being used to produce these welds. VPPA welding utilizes high temperature ionized gas (plasma) to transfer heat to the workpiece. An inert gas, such as Helium, is used to shield the active welding zone to prevent contamination of the molten base metal with surrounding reactive atmospheric gases. (1) In the Space Shuttle application, two passes of the arc are used to complete a butt-type weld. The pressure of the plasma stream is increased during the first pass to force the arc entirely through the material, a practice commonly referred to as keyholing. Molten metal forms on either side of the arc and surface tension draws this liquid together as the arc passes. 2319 Al alloy filler material may also be fed into the weld zone during this pass. During the second pass, the plasma stream pressure is reduced such that only partial penetration of the base material is obtained. Al 2319 filler material is added during this pass to yield a uniform, fully filled welded joint. This additional pass also acts to alter the grain structure of the weld zone to yield a higher strength joint.

  18. Role of the micro/macro structure of welds in crack nucleation and propagation in aerospace aluminum-lithium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talia, George E.

    1996-01-01

    Al-Li alloys offer the benefits of increased strength, elastic modulus and lower densities as compared to conventional aluminum alloys. Martin Marietta Laboratories has developed an Al-Li alloy designated 2195 which is designated for use in the cryogenic tanks of the space shuttle. The Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding process is currently being used to produce these welds [1]. VPPA welding utilizes high temperature ionized gas (plasma) to transfer heat to the workpiece. An inert gas, such as Helium, is used to shield the active welding zone to prevent contamination of the molten base metal with surrounding reactive atmospheric gases. [1] In the Space Shuttle application, two passes of the arc are used to complete a butt-type weld. The pressure of the plasma stream is increased during the first pass to force the arc entirely through the material, a practice commonly referred to as keyholing. Molten metal forms on either side of the arc and surface tension draws this liquid together as the arc passes. 2319 Al alloy filler material may also be fed into the weld zone during this pass. During the second pass, the plasma stream pressure is reduced such that only partial penetration of the base material is obtained. Al 2319 filler material is added during this pass to yield a uniform, fully filled welded joint. This additional pass also acts to alter the grain structure of the weld zone to yield a higher strength joint.

  19. Friction stir welding of thin-sheet, age-hardenable aluminum alloys: A study of process/structure/property relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Alpesh Khushalchand

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining process that, as a solid-state process, offers several advantages over conventional fusion welding. Although FSW has been used extensively for the joining of age-hardenable aluminum alloys, the detailed effects of process parameters on the microstructures and mechanical properties of these welds have not been studied, especially for thin-sheet alloys. The present study investigated the FSW of thin-sheet, age-hardenable aluminum alloys, including: the development and optimization of welding process parameters that produce high-integrity, defect-free welds; the systematic evaluation of the effect of the base metal microstructure, FSW process parameters, and corresponding weld zone thermal conditions on microstructure evolution across the weld zone; the analysis of FSW mechanical properties and fracture behavior; and the development of relationships between the process parameters, microstructure, properties, and fracture that allow the optimization of weld performance. Two alloy systems, viz., Al-Cu-Mg (2024) and Al-Cu-Li (2195) in naturally-aged and artificially-aged conditions, respectively, were studied. Process optimization in 1 mm thick 2024-T3 sheet resulted in superior properties versus those of FS welds in thick sheet and plate, and nearly 100% joint efficiency. Microstructures, hardness and tensile properties of FS welds in 2024-T3 exhibited a strong dependency on process parameters. The heat of welding promoted various weld zone microstructures that were produced via the dissolution of base metal GPB zones, the nucleation of GBP and GPB II, and the nucleation and coarsening of S phase. SZ hardness for 2024-T3 welds exhibited a strong, but unusual dependency on the FSW process parameters, which was related to different mechanisms related to GPB zone formation. The microstructures of FS welds in 1 mm thick 2195-T8 were generally insensitive to the FSW process parameters. For all weld heat inputs, FSW

  20. TIG welding of aluminum alloys for the APS storage ring - a UHV application

    SciTech Connect

    Goeppner, G.A.

    1996-05-29

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) incorporates a 7-GeV positron storage ring 1104 meters in circumference. The storage ring vacuum system is designed to maintain a pressure of 1 nTorr or less with a circulating current of 300 mA to enable beam lifetimes of greater than 10 hours. The vacuum chamber is an aluminum extrusion of 6063T5 alloy. There are 235 separate aluminum vacuum chambers in the storage ring connected by stainless steel bellows assemblies. Aluminum was chosen for the vacuum chamber because it can be economically extruded and machined, has good thermal conductivity, low thermal emissivity, a low outgassing rate, low residual radioactivity, and is non-magnetic. The 6063 aluminum-silicon-magnesium alloy provides high strength combined with good machining and weldability characteristics. The extrusion process provides the interior surface finish needed for the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environments There are six different vacuum chambers with the same extrusion cross section. The average vacuum chamber length is 171.6 inches. The extruded vacuum chambers are welded to flange assemblies made up of machined 2219 aluminum alloy pieces and 2219 aluminum vacuum flanges from a commercial source.

  1. Laser welding aluminum without filler metal using continuous wave and pulsed Nd:YAG lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bransch, H.N.

    1994-12-31

    A problem with automotive aluminum tubing applications, particularly for air conditioning heat exchanger assemblies, is terminating the tube reliably and inexpensively. An alternative to upsetting and mchining threads to the tube end is welding a nut (made from a stronger, easily machinable alloy such as Al 5456 or Al 6061) to lengths of tubing (made from a softer alloy such as Al 3003). Laser welding was investigated in order to reduce heat input and increase process speeds copared to brazing or gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Nd:YAG lasers were selected as beam source because of better absorptivity of the wavelength compared to CO{sub 2} lasers and simplified tooling with fiber optic beam delivery. It wa determined that a pulsed Nd:YAG laser produced 1.0 mm penetration at 0.3 m/min with 400 W average power, and 1.0 mm penetration at 0.75 m/min with 1000 W average power, however, an Al 4047 filler metal was required to eliminate solidification cracking. A 1900 W CW laser could weld the Al 3003 tube to the Al 5456 nut without filler metal, however, there was insufficient penetration (0.25 mm) to meet the mechanical and hermeticity requirements. To enhance penetration, but still reduce the tendency for hot cracking, the 1900 W average power beam was sine wave modulated from 400 W to 3600 W at 250 Hz and usd to weld the Al 3003 directly to the Al 5456. These parameters produced 1.2 mm penetration at 1.2 m/min without significant cracking and without using a filler metal. In addition, the welds passed all hermeticity and tensile strength tests. This combination of materials, joint design, and laser parameters produced tube assemblies that passed a leak check (300 psi nitrogen in 60{degrees}C water for 1 min) and tensile (tube breakage 100 mm from the joint, 5.2 kN tensile strength).

  2. Precipitate evolution in friction stir welding of 2219-T6 aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.C.; Feng, J.C.; Liu, H.J.

    2009-06-15

    Precipitate evolution in friction stir welding of 2219-T6 aluminum alloys was characterized by transmission electron microscopy. In the weld nugget zone and the thermo-mechanically affected zone some metastable precipitates overaged to equilibrium phase while others solutionized into the aluminum solid solution. In the heat-affected zone the precipitates coarsened.

  3. Effects of conventional welding and laser welding on the tensile strength, ultimate tensile strength and surface characteristics of two cobalt-chromium alloys: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Madhan Kumar, Seenivasan; Sethumadhava, Jayesh Raghavendra; Anand Kumar, Vaidyanathan; Manita, Grover

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of laser welding and conventional welding on the tensile strength and ultimate tensile strength of the cobalt-chromium alloy. Samples were prepared with two commercially available cobalt-chromium alloys (Wironium plus and Diadur alloy). The samples were sectioned and the broken fragments were joined using Conventional and Laser welding techniques. The welded joints were subjected to tensile and ultimate tensile strength testing; and scanning electron microscope to evaluate the surface characteristics at the welded site. Both on laser welding as well as on conventional welding technique, Diadur alloy samples showed lesser values when tested for tensile and ultimate tensile strength when compared to Wironium alloy samples. Under the scanning electron microscope, the laser welded joints show uniform welding and continuous molt pool all over the surface with less porosity than the conventionally welded joints. Laser welding is an advantageous method of connecting or repairing cast metal prosthetic frameworks.

  4. Microprobe investigation of brittle segregates in aluminum MIG and TIG welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larssen, P. A.; Miller, E. L.

    1968-01-01

    Quantitative microprobe analysis of segregated particles in aluminum MIG /Metal Inert Gas/ and TIG /Tungsten Inert Gas/ welds indicated that there were about ten different kinds of particles, corresponding to ten different intermetallic compounds. Differences between MIG and TIG welds related to the individual cooling rates of these welds.

  5. Friction Stir Welding of Thick Section Aluminum for Military Vehicle Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    dissimilar joints can be quite prevelant. These dissimilar aluminum joints can be difficult to join using tradtional arc welding methods due to the care...Friction Stir Welding of Thick Section Aluminum for Military Vehicle Applications by Brian Thompson, Kevin Doherty, Craig Niese, Mike Eff...International Symposium on Friction Stir Welding (9ISFSW), Huntsville, AL, 15–17 May 2012. Approved for public release

  6. Joining aluminum to titanium alloy by friction stir lap welding with cutting pin

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yanni; Li, Jinglong; Xiong, Jiangtao; Huang, Fu; Zhang, Fusheng; Raza, Syed Hamid

    2012-09-15

    Aluminum 1060 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V plates were lap joined by friction stir welding. A cutting pin of rotary burr made of tungsten carbide was employed. The microstructures of the joining interface were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Joint strength was evaluated by a tensile shear test. During the welding process, the surface layer of the titanium plate was cut off by the pin, and intensively mixed with aluminum situated on the titanium plate. The microstructures analysis showed that a visible swirl-like mixed region existed at the interface. In this region, the Al metal, Ti metal and the mixed layer of them were all presented. The ultimate tensile shear strength of joint reached 100% of 1060Al that underwent thermal cycle provided by the shoulder. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW with cutting pin was successfully employed to form Al/Ti lap joint. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Swirl-like structures formed due to mechanical mixing were found at the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-strength joints fractured at Al suffered thermal cycle were produced.

  7. Friction-stir welding effects on microstructure and fatigue of aluminum alloy 7050-T7451

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jata, K. V.; Sankaran, K. K.; Ruschau, J. J.

    2000-09-01

    Aluminum alloy 7050 was friction-stir welded (FSW) in a T7451 temper to investigate the effects on the microstructure and mechanical properties. Results are discussed for the as-welded condition (as-FSW) and for a postweld heat-treated condition consisting of 121 °C for 24 hours (as-FSW + T6). Optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of the weld-nugget region show that the FS welding process transforms the initial millimeter-sized pancake-shaped grains in the parent material to fine 1 to 5 µm dynamically recrystallized grains; also, the FS welding process redissolves the strengthening precipitates in the weld-nugget region. In the heat-affected zone (HAZ), the initial grain size is retained, while the size of the strengthening precipitates and of the precipitatefree zone (PFZ) is coarsened by a factor of 5. Tensile specimens tested transverse to the weld show that there is a 25 to 30 pct reduction in the strength level, a 60 pct reduction in the elongation in the as-FSW condition, and that the fracture path is in the HAZ. The postweld heat treatment of 121 °C for 24 hours did not result in an improvement either in the strength or the ductility of the welded material. Comparison of fatigue-crack growth rates (FCGRs) between the parent T7451 material and the as-FSW + T6 condition, at a stress ratio of R = 0.33, shows that the FCG resistance of the weldnugget region is decreased, while the FCG resistance of the HAZ is increased. Differences in FCGRs, however, are substantially reduced at a stress ratio of R = 0.70. Analysis of residual stresses, fatigue-crack closure, and fatigue fracture surfaces suggests that decrease in fatigue crack growth resistance in the weld-nugget region is due to an intergranular failure mechanism; in the HAZ region, residual stresses are more dominant than the microstructure improving the fatigue crack growth resistance.

  8. Effects of flux modifications on high strength steel weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, G.L.

    1994-12-31

    The performance of high strength steel welds is sensitive to the weld metal chemistry, and that, in turn, is dependent on the composition of the welding consumables. In the case of submerged arc welding, the flux plays an important role in determining the chemistry of the resulting weld metal. The u.S. Navy is conducting a program to gain a basic understanding of fluxes used for welding high strength steels in an effort to be able to better select the appropriate flux, or design a new flux, for a given application. The objective of the present work is to analyze the effects of a systematic chance in flux composition on weld metal chemistry and properties The dry mix of a commercial flux was modified with additions of MnO to produce a series of four experimental flux mixes with target MnO levels from 1 wt% to 4 wt%. A fifth experimental flux mix was produced with an addition of 1/2 wt% CeO{sub 2} to examine the effect of rare earth additions to the flux. Tensile and impact properties and weld metal chemistry were tested for each weldment, and correlations were made with flux composition. Weld metal Mn levels from 1.37 wt% (0.76 wt% flux MnO) to 1.75 wt% (4.26 wt% flux MnO) were achieved with the MnO-added fluxes.The small CeO{sub 2} addition appeared to improve weld metal impact performance it was concluded that a more basic knowledge of welding fluxes can be used in selecting or designing appropriate fluxes for Navy applications. Further work is required to characterize the specific effects of other flux constituents and their interactions on weld metal performance.

  9. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Santella, M. L.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2009-12-28

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  10. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Frederick, D Alan; Dahl, Michael E

    2009-02-01

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  11. Automatic Welding System of Aluminum Pipe by Monitoring Backside Image of Molten Pool Using Vision Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskoro, Ario Sunar; Kabutomori, Masashi; Suga, Yasuo

    An automatic welding system using Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding with vision sensor for welding of aluminum pipe was constructed. This research studies the intelligent welding process of aluminum alloy pipe 6063S-T5 in fixed position and moving welding torch with the AC welding machine. The monitoring system consists of a vision sensor using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to monitor backside image of molten pool. The captured image was processed to recognize the edge of molten pool by image processing algorithm. Neural network model for welding speed control were constructed to perform the process automatically. From the experimental results it shows the effectiveness of the control system confirmed by good detection of molten pool and sound weld of experimental result.

  12. Mechanical strength of laser-welded cobalt-chromium alloy.

    PubMed

    Baba, N; Watanabe, I; Liu, J; Atsuta, M

    2004-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the output energy of laser welding and welding methods on the joint strength of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy. Two types of cast Co-Cr plates were prepared, and transverse sections were made at the center of the plate. The cut surfaces were butted against one another, and the joints welded with a laser-welding machine at several levels of output energy with the use of two methods. The fracture force required to break specimens was determined by means of tensile testing. For the 0.5-mm-thick specimens, the force required to break the 0.5-mm laser-welded specimens at currents of 270 and 300 A was not statistically different (p > 0.05) from the results for the nonwelded control specimens. The force required to break the 1.0-mm specimens double-welded at a current of 270 A was the highest value among the 1.0-mm laser-welded specimens. The results suggested that laser welding under the appropriate conditions improved the joint strength of cobalt- chromium alloy. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Radiographic detection of defects in friction stir welding on aluminum alloy AMg5M

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Sergei Yu. Kolubaev, Evgeny A.; Rubtsov, Valery E.

    2014-11-14

    In order to reveal weld defects specific to friction stir welding we undertook radiographic inspection of AMg5M aluminum alloy welded joints. Weld defects in the form of voids have been revealed in the weld obtained under the non-optimal rotation and feed rate. Both shape and size of these defects have been confirmed by examining metallographically successive sections prepared in the weld plane as well as in the plane transversal to the tool feed direction. Linear defects have been also found in the sections that are not seen in the radiographic images. Both the preferable localization and origination of the defects have been analyzed.

  14. Elements loss analysis based on spectral diagnosis in laser-arc hybrid welding of aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Minhao; Yang, Tao; Shen, Lin

    2017-07-01

    Aluminum alloy has been widely used in automobiles, high-speed trains, aerospace and many other fields. The loss of elements during welding process causes welding defects and affects the microstructure and properties of the joints. This paper discusses the correlation between welding process, spectral intensity and loss of elements in laser-arc hybrid welding of Al alloys. The results show that laser power and arc current have a significant impact on the spectral intensity and loss of elements. Compared with the base metal, the contents of alloying elements in the weld area are lower. The burning losses of alloy elements increase with the welding heat input.

  15. Optimizing the parameters for laser beam welding of aluminum-lithium alloy 2195

    SciTech Connect

    Jan, R.; Howell, P.R.; Martukanitz, R.P.

    1996-12-31

    Aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 is of considerable interest in the aerospace industry because of its high strength, high stiffness, and low density. Laser processing of this material offers potential advantages in processing speed and material cost savings. An investigation was conducted to determine the effect of laser beam process and material parameters on weld characteristics. The issues addressed were coupling efficiency, process stability, solidification cracking, and strengthening mechanisms. The results indicated that coupling of a laser beam with aluminum alloys is enhanced by lithium additions; and process stability and crack sensitivity is improved when using a defocused laser beam and silicon-rich filler alloys. In addition, the fusion zone exhibits a high degree of solute partitioning but not strengthening precipitates.

  16. Weld Metallurgy and Mechanical Properties of High Manganese Ultra-high Strength Steel Dissimilar Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Lindner, Stefan; Monfort, Damien; Petring, Dirk

    The increasing demand for ultra-high strength steels in vehicle manufacturing leads to the application of new alloys. This poses a challenge on joining especially by fusion welding. A stainless high manganese steel sheet with excellent strength and deformation properties stands in the centre of the development. Similar and dissimilar welds with a metastable austenitic steel and a hot formed martensitic stainless steel were performed. An investigation of the mixing effects on the local microstructure and the hardness delivers the metallurgical features of the welds. Despite of carbon contents above 0.4 wt.% none of the welds have shown cracks. Mechanical properties drawn from tensile tests deliver high breaking forces enabling a high stiffness of the joints. The results show the potential for the application of laser beam welding for joining in assembly of structural parts.

  17. Fusion and friction stir welding of aluminum-metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storjohann, D.; Barabash, O. M.; David, S. A.; Sklad, P. S.; Bloom, E. E.; Babu, S. S.

    2005-11-01

    Microstructure evolutions and degradations of aluminum-metal-matrix composites during fusion welding were studied and compared with thermodynamic calculations. In fusion welds of Al2O3-reinforced composites, the decomposition of Al2O3 was observed. In fusion welds of SiC whisker-reinforced composites, the decomposition of SiC to Al4C3+Si by reaction with molten aluminum occurred. These phenomena led to unacceptable fusion welds in aluminum metal-matrix composites. Successful welds were produced in the same composites by friction stir welding (FSW). Significant reorientation of SiC whiskers close to the boundary of the dynamically recrystallized and thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) was observed. The small hardening in the dynamically recrystallized region was attributed to the presence of dislocation tangles in between SiC whiskers.

  18. Effect of welding position on porosity formation in aluminum alloy welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haryung, J.; Wroth, R. S.

    1967-01-01

    Program investigates the effects of varied welding positions on weld qualities. Progressive changes in bead geometry occur as the weld plane angle is varied from upslope to downslope. The gravitational effect on the weld puddle varies greatly with welding position.

  19. Fatigue Strength Estimation Based on Local Mechanical Properties for Aluminum Alloy FSW Joints

    PubMed Central

    Sillapasa, Kittima; Mutoh, Yoshiharu; Miyashita, Yukio; Seo, Nobushiro

    2017-01-01

    Overall fatigue strengths and hardness distributions of the aluminum alloy similar and dissimilar friction stir welding (FSW) joints were determined. The local fatigue strengths as well as local tensile strengths were also obtained by using small round bar specimens extracted from specific locations, such as the stir zone, heat affected zone, and base metal. It was found from the results that fatigue fracture of the FSW joint plate specimen occurred at the location of the lowest local fatigue strength as well as the lowest hardness, regardless of microstructural evolution. To estimate the fatigue strengths of aluminum alloy FSW joints from the hardness measurements, the relationship between fatigue strength and hardness for aluminum alloys was investigated based on the present experimental results and the available wide range of data from the references. It was found as: σa (R = −1) = 1.68 HV (σa is in MPa and HV has no unit). It was also confirmed that the estimated fatigue strengths were in good agreement with the experimental results for aluminum alloy FSW joints. PMID:28772543

  20. Fatigue Strength Estimation Based on Local Mechanical Properties for Aluminum Alloy FSW Joints.

    PubMed

    Sillapasa, Kittima; Mutoh, Yoshiharu; Miyashita, Yukio; Seo, Nobushiro

    2017-02-15

    Overall fatigue strengths and hardness distributions of the aluminum alloy similar and dissimilar friction stir welding (FSW) joints were determined. The local fatigue strengths as well as local tensile strengths were also obtained by using small round bar specimens extracted from specific locations, such as the stir zone, heat affected zone, and base metal. It was found from the results that fatigue fracture of the FSW joint plate specimen occurred at the location of the lowest local fatigue strength as well as the lowest hardness, regardless of microstructural evolution. To estimate the fatigue strengths of aluminum alloy FSW joints from the hardness measurements, the relationship between fatigue strength and hardness for aluminum alloys was investigated based on the present experimental results and the available wide range of data from the references. It was found as: σa (R = -1) = 1.68 HV (σa is in MPa and HV has no unit). It was also confirmed that the estimated fatigue strengths were in good agreement with the experimental results for aluminum alloy FSW joints.

  1. Aluminum Rayleigh Taylor Strength Measurements and Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lindquist, M J; Cavallo, R M; Lorenz, K T; Pollaine, S M; Remington, B A; Raevsky, V A

    2007-01-10

    A traditional approach to the study of material strength has been revitalized at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center (VNIIEF). Rayleigh Taylor strength experiments have long been utilized to measure the material response of metals at high pressure and strain rates. A modulated (sinusoidal or sawtooth perturbation) surface is shocklessly (quasi-isentropically) accelerated by a high explosive (HE) driver, and radiography is used to measure the perturbation amplitude as a function of time. The Aluminum T-6061 targets are designed with several sets of two-dimensional sawtooth perturbations machined on the loading surface. The HE driver was designed to reach peak pressures in the range of 200 to 300 kbar and strain rates in the range of 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}. The standard constitutive strength models, Steinberg-Guinan (SG) [1], Steinberg-Lund (SL) [2], Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) [3], Johnson-Cooke (JC) [4], and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) [5], have been calibrated by traditional techniques: (Hopkinson-Bar, Taylor impact, flyer plate/shock-driven experiments). The VNIIEF experimental series accesses a strain rate regime not attainable using traditional methods. We have performed a detailed numerical study with a two-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamics computer code containing several constitutive strength models to predict the perturbation growth. Results show that the capabilities of the computational methodology predict the amplitude growth to within 5 percent of the measured data, thus validating both the code and the strength models under the given conditions and setting the stage for credible future design work using different materials.

  2. The Mechanical Behavior of Friction-Stir Spot Welded Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, Hande

    2014-10-01

    Aluminum and alloys are widely used in the automotive industry due to the light weight, good formability, and malleability. Spot welding is the most commonly used joining method of these materials, but the high current requirements and the inconsistent quality of the final welds make this process unsuitable. An alternative welding technique, the friction-stir spot welding process, can also be successfully used in joining of aluminum and alloys. In this study, 1-mm-thick AA5754 Al-alloy plates in the H-111 temper conditions were joined by friction-stir spot welding using two different weld parameters such as tool rotational speed and dwell time. Mechanical properties of the joints were obtained with extensive hardness measurements and tensile shear tests. The effect of these parameters on the failure modes of welded joints was also determined.

  3. Strength of Welded Joints in Tubular Members for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittemore, H L; Brueggeman, W C

    1931-01-01

    The object of this investigation is to make available to the aircraft industry authoritative information on the strength, weight, and cost of a number of types of welded joints. This information will, also, assist the aeronautics branch in its work of licensing planes by providing data from which the strength of a given joint may be estimated. As very little material on the strength of aircraft welds has been published, it is believed that such tests made by a disinterested governmental laboratory should be of considerable value to the aircraft industry. Forty joints were welded under procedure specifications and tested to determine their strengths. The weight and time required to fabricate were also measured for each joint.

  4. Aluminum/steel wire composite plates exhibit high tensile strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Composite plate of fine steel wires imbedded in an aluminum alloy matrix results in a lightweight material with high tensile strength. Plates have been prepared having the strength of titanium with only 85 percent of its density.

  5. Laser beam welding of aluminum die casting with reduced pore formation

    SciTech Connect

    Rehbein, D.H.; Decker, I.; Wohlfahrt, H.

    1994-12-31

    Laser beam welding is already well treated within the laboratory, but there is still a minor industrial application because of the lack of reliability of the process due to violent fluctuations of the plasma formation above and melt flow turbulence around the welding key-hole. An even greater challenge is the welding of die cast aluminum since the high hydrogen content dissolved within the material during the casting process is responsible for a strong pore formation of the weld and a rather unsteady welding process. During the last 10 years, intensive research work has been executed by the research institute of the authors in order to increase the weldability of die-case aluminum by optimization of the casting process. The casting process has been optimized in such a way that as few gases as possible can penetrate into the castings. The porosity of the welds has been reduced to a level comparable to that of high-quality joints of wrought material. The weld quality achieved by electron beam welding is excellent. The range of possible welding speeds and the necessary laser power depending on the wall thickness and the chosen optical arrangement are quantified. Die casting of aluminum is a manufacturing operation of high productivity. However, it s not suited for production of hollow structures. A combination with a highly productive welding technique such as laser beam welding is now available, and one may expect it to be of reasonable economic benefit in the future.

  6. Superplastic Forming of Aluminum Multisheet Structures Fabricated Using Friction Stir Welding and Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Glenn J.; Herling, Darrell R.; Arbegast, William J.; Allen, Casey D.; Degen, Cassandra M.

    2006-12-20

    5083 aluminum multisheet packs that can be SPF formed into 3-D structural or integrally stiffened panels. Several configurations of 3-sheet egg crate and truss structures were friction stir welded and hot gas SPF formed in a parallel-platen SPF press. Data on weld conditions for optimum SPF forming as well as pre- and post- forming microstructures will be presented. It is found that FSW process conditions are a key feature of a successful SPF forming operation and the nugget microstructures and other features of the weld zone can be optimized to produce a wide range of weld region elongations. Friction Stir Welding may prove to be the enabler that allows aluminum to be considered in multisheet and integrally stiffened SPF Aluminum structures.

  7. Hybrid Welding of 45 mm High Strength Steel Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunaziv, Ivan; Frostevarg, Jan; Akselsen, Odd M.; Kaplan, Alexander F.

    Thick section welding has significant importance for oil and gas industry in low temperature regions. Arc welding is usually employed providing suitable quality joints with acceptable toughness at low temperatures with very limited productivity compared to modern high power laser systems. Laser-arc hybrid welding (LAHW) can enhance the productivity by several times due to higher penetration depth from laser beam and combined advantages of both heat sources. LAHW was applied to join 45 mm high strength steel with double-sided technique and application of metal cored wire. The process was captured by high speed camera, allowing process observation in order to identify the relation of the process stability on weld imperfections and efficiency. Among the results, it was found that both arc power and presence of a gap increased penetration depth, and that higher welding speeds cause unstable processing and limits penetration depth. Over a wide range of heat inputs, the welds where found to consist of large amounts of fine-grained acicular ferrite in the upper 60-75% part of welds. At the root filler wire mixing was less and cooling faster, and thus found to have bainitic transformation. Toughness of deposited welds provided acceptable toughness at -50 °C with some scattering.

  8. Recovery of Mechanical Properties of a 6061-T6 Aluminum Weld by Heat Treatment After Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Javier Serrano; Ambriz, Ricardo Rafael; López, Francisco Fernando Curiel; Vigueras, David Jaramillo

    2016-07-01

    The dilution effects in welds of a 6061-T6 (Al-Si-Mg) alloy obtained by the modified indirect electric arc (MIEA), using an ER4043 filler metal (Al-Si), and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) were analyzed. The soft zone (55 to 70 HV0.1) formed by the microstructural transformation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was eliminated. The hardness measurements were presented on a traditional microhardness profile and mapping representation. A hardening effect of the fusion zone was observed; the hardness values were above 120 HV0.1 and tended to be uniform. This behavior could be attributed to the chemical composition of the filler metal, the Mg migration from the base to the weld metal, and the reversible process of the PWHT, which promotes precipitation hardening. Improvement for yield (260 MPa) and tensile strength (310 MPa) of the MIEA joints was observed; these values were similar to those obtained for the base metal. However, the presence of porosity in the fusion zone limits the ductility of the joints (4.3 pct). Even though the yield and tensile strengths of the base metal and welded joints were similar, the stress concentration due to porosity in the weld metal generated data dispersion in fatigue life. As a consequence, the high-cycle fatigue life decreases with respect to the base metal. In contrast, when the crack propagates under elastic conditions, the crack-tip singularity is affected by the porosity in the weld metal (stress liberator). This aspect, in conjunction with the hardening effect in joints subjected to PWHT, improves the fatigue crack growth rate when compared to the as-welded condition.

  9. Reduction of Residual Stress and Distortion in HY100 and HY130 High Strength Steels During Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    High Yields) Steels for pressure hulls and special applications like flight decks where aluminum is impractical to use. HY80 is the most famous and...most widely used of the HYQ & T steels developed. Interest waned in widely using the steels with strengths above HY80 because of cracking problems...Reduction of Residual Stress and Distortion in HYI00 and HYI30 High Strength Steels During Welding CY) by _RICHARD ALLEN BASS B.S. Electrical

  10. Mechanical properties of a dissimilar aluminum alloy joint welded by hybrid laser-MIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiuying; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Zongtao; Cui, Yunlong

    2017-07-01

    Two dissimilar Al alloys, 5083-H111 and 6005A-T6, were joined by hybrid laser-MIG welding method. Mechanical properties of the welded joint were investigated and compared. The results show that the tensile strength of the dissimilar joint is 219.8 MPa, 11.7% higher than that of 6005A-T5 joint. After statistical analysis of the fatigue data, the P-S-N curves of the dissimilar joint were obtained. The mean fatigue strength at Nf = 107 of the dissimilar joint is 112.5 MPa. The fatigue strength at Nf = 107 of the dissimilar joint for a given 10% probability of failure, at a confidence level of 95%, is 101.4 MPa. The fatigue strength at Nf = 107 of the dissimilar joint is almost same as that of the 6005A-T6 joint. In welded structure designing, different P-S-N curves should be chosen according to the different service conditions and reliability requirements.

  11. High Strength and Compatible Aluminum Alloy for Hydrogen-Peroxide Fuel Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a new high strength and Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) propellant compatible aluminum alloy for NASA Hyper-X vehicle's fuel tanks and structures. The tensile strength of the new alloy is more than 3 times stronger than the conventional 5254 alloy while it still maintains HP compatibility similar to 5254 (Class 1 category). The alloy development strategy consists of selecting certain rare earth and transition metals, with unique electrochemical properties, that will not act as catalysts to decompose liquid HP at the atomic level. Such elements will added to the aluminum alloy and the mixture will be cast and rolled into thin sheet metals. Test coupons are machined from sheet metals for HP long-term exposure testing and mechanical properties testing. In addition, the ability to weld the new alloy using Friction Stir Welding has also been explored. Currently, aluminum alloy 5254 is the state-of-the-art material for HP storage, but its yield strength is very low (420 ksi) and may not be suitable for the development of light-weight fuel tanks for Hyper-X vehicles. The new high strength and HP compatible alloy could represent an enabling material technology for NASA's Hyper-X vehicles, where flight weight reduction is a critical requirement. These X-planes are currently under studied as air-breathing hypersonic research vehicles featuring a lifting body configuration with a Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) engine system.

  12. High Strength and Compatible Aluminum Alloy for Hydrogen-Peroxide Fuel Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a new high strength and Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) propellant compatible aluminum alloy for NASA Hyper-X vehicle's fuel tanks and structures. The tensile strength of the new alloy is more than 3 times stronger than the conventional 5254 alloy while it still maintains HP compatibility similar to 5254 (Class 1 category). The alloy development strategy consists of selecting certain rare earth and transition metals, with unique electrochemical properties, that will not act as catalysts to decompose liquid HP at the atomic level. Such elements will added to the aluminum alloy and the mixture will be cast and rolled into thin sheet metals. Test coupons are machined from sheet metals for HP long-term exposure testing and mechanical properties testing. In addition, the ability to weld the new alloy using Friction Stir Welding has also been explored. Currently, aluminum alloy 5254 is the state-of-the-art material for HP storage, but its yield strength is very low (420 ksi) and may not be suitable for the development of light-weight fuel tanks for Hyper-X vehicles. The new high strength and HP compatible alloy could represent an enabling material technology for NASA's Hyper-X vehicles, where flight weight reduction is a critical requirement. These X-planes are currently under studied as air-breathing hypersonic research vehicles featuring a lifting body configuration with a Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) engine system.

  13. The study on microstructural and mechanical properties of weld heat affected zone of 7075-T651 aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, R.Y.; Chou, C.P.

    1997-12-22

    Aluminum alloys play an important role in aerospace industry due to their high strength and low density. The general accepted precipitation behavior of 7075 alloy was represented as: supersaturated solid solution {alpha}{sub ss} {yields} Gp zones {yields} {eta}{prime}(MgZn{sub 2}) {yields} {eta}(MgZn{sub 2}). The Addition of Cu in Al-Zn-Mg alloy would promote the transformation of GP zones into {eta}{prime}(MgZn{sub 2}) phase and stabilize the {eta}(MgZn{sub 2}) phase. The T6 temper has the maximum strength but lower ductility. The T73 temper may lose some strength, but can gain higher corrosion resistance and lower susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking as compared to the T6 temper. The welding fabrication can produce thermal cycling on the weldment. In the heat affected zone (HAZ) beside the fusion zone, different temperatures can be obtained. This would cause change of microstructure in the HAZ of aluminum alloy weldment. Many workers studied the behavior of weld HAZ by cutting the HAZ into many small pieces or using short time isothermal heat treatment to simulate the HAZ. This may lose some information, especially near the fusion zone, because high temperature gradient occurred in this region. In this study, the Gleeble system was used to simulate the weld HAZ. It can accurately simulate every point of weld HAZ by heating and cooling the specimen to the thermal history of weld HAZ as the same as measured. The microstructural and mechanical properties of weld HAZ of 7075-T651 alloy were investigated.

  14. Characterization of disk-laser dissimilar welding of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V to aluminum alloy 2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiazzo, Fabrizia; Alfieri, Vittorio; Cardaropoli, Francesco; Corrado, Gaetano; Sergi, Vincenzo

    2013-02-01

    Both technical and economic reasons suggest to join dissimilar metals, benefiting from the specific properties of each material in order to perform flexible design. Adhesive bonding and mechanical joining have been traditionally used although adhesives fail to be effective in high-temperature environments and mechanical joining are not adequate for leak-tight joints. Friction stir welding is a valid alternative, even being difficult to perform for specific joint geometries and thin plates. The attention has therefore been shifted to laser welding. Interest has been shown in welding titanium to aluminum, especially in the aviation industry, in order to benefit from both corrosive resistance and strength properties of the former, and low weight and cost of the latter. Titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V and aluminum alloy 2024 are considered in this work, being them among the most common ones in aerospace and automotive industries. Laser welding is thought to be particularly useful in reducing the heat affected zones and providing deep penetrative beads. Nevertheless, many challenges arise in welding dissimilar metals and the aim is further complicated considering the specific features of the alloys in exam, being them susceptible to oxidation on the upper surface and porosity formation in the fused zone. As many variables are involved, a systematic approach is used to perform the process and to characterize the beads referring to their shape and mechanical features, since a mixture of phases and structures is formed in the fused zone after recrystallization.

  15. A microstructural study of flash welded and aged 6061 and 6013 aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, C.; Dille, J.; Delplancke, J.-L.; Rebello, J.M.A.

    2006-09-15

    Extruded, flash welded and artificially aged 6061 and 6013 aluminum alloys were analyzed with the use of techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging, selected area electron diffraction (SAD) and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) in order to identify the precipitates present in both alloys. Vickers microindentation hardness measurements were performed at different distances from the weld interface. The results show a small decrease in hardness near the 6013 alloy weld interface. On the other hand, there is an important hardness drop near the 6061 weld interface. This drop can be explained by a lack of fine structural precipitation during the aging treatment in the 6061 weld interface zone.

  16. Influence of Process Parameters on Laser Weld Characteristics in Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    1 1󈧚 , 4 4 2.1.2 Alloying Element Vaporization Alloying elements added to aluminum for improving the mechanical properties and corrosion...effects the properties of the base metal surrounding the weld zone called the heat affected zone (HAZ). In the non-heat treatable aluminum alloys in the...Hydrogen in Aluminum . Magnesium, Copper, and Their Alloys . Int. Metall. Reviews, Review 201, 20:166-184. 31. Hatch, J.E. 1984. Aluminum , Properties and

  17. Residual Stresses in Friction-Stir-Welded 2195 and 7075 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Rivero, Iris V.; Maredia, Arif

    2008-12-01

    Surface residual stresses (RSs) were characterized along friction-stir-welded 2195 and 7075 aluminum alloy (AA) plates. The surface measurements were obtained through X-ray diffraction (XRD) at five different locations along the weld. Each location consisted of several regions across the welded plate including the weld nugget, thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ), heat-affected zone (HAZ), and base material. Measurements revealed that RSs were not uniform along the welded plate, with the highest RSs obtained on the middle of the plate. The RSs across the weld were also asymmetric relative to the weld centerline, with RSs as high as 231 MPa in the TMAZ for the retreating side of the weld.

  18. The effect of impurity gasses on variable polarity plasma arc welded 2219 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, John C.; Torres, Martin R.; Gurevitch, Alan C.; Newman, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding has been used with considerable success by NASA for the welds on the Space Shuttle External Tank as well as by others concerned with high quality welded structures. The effects of gaseous contaminants on the appearance of VPPA welds on 2219 aluminum are examined so that a welder can recognize that such contamination is present and take corrective measures. There are many possible sources of such contamination including, contaminated gas bottles, leaks in the gas plumbing, inadequate shield gas flow, condensed moisture in the gas lines or torch body, or excessive contaminants on the workpiece. The gasses chosen for study in the program were nitrogen, oxygen, methane, and hydrogen. Welds were made in a carefully controlled environment and comparisons were made between welds with various levels of these contaminants and welds made with research purity (99.9999 percent) gasses. Photographs of the weld front and backside as well as polished and etched cross sections are presented.

  19. Ultrasonic girth weld evaluation for aluminum substrate of spherical Kevlar-epoxy test specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Brosey, W.D.; Dews, T.W.

    1984-08-28

    An ultrasonic weld inspection has been developed for the girth weld of the aluminum substrate for a Kevlar-epoxy filament wound test specimen. The filament wound spheres are test coupons in a study to evaluate NDE techniques on a composite material with enclosed geometry. The girth weld of the aluminum substrate has been examined to ensure the weld is not a weak point in the coupon in which failure will initiate. Analog and B-scan data are combined to determine the presence of lack of penetration, suckback, protrusion, or porosity in the weld. The data are calibrated with a standard and then plotted as analog, B-scan, or color contour data as a function of angular position around the weld.

  20. Laser beam interactions with vapor plumes during Nd:YAG laser welding on aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, H. C.; Russo, A. J.; Hadley, G. R.; Akau, R. L.

    Welds produced on pure aluminum targets using pulsed Nd:YAG lasers can be accurately described using a relatively simple conduction mode heat transfer model provided that the fraction of laser energy absorbed is known and the amount of metal vaporized is smalled however at laser fluences commonly used in many production welding schedules significant aluminum vaporization does occur. The possible mechanisms have been identified which could result in laser beam attenuation by the vapor plume.

  1. Technique for in-place welding of aluminum backed up by a combustible material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spagnuolo, A. C.

    1971-01-01

    Welding external aluminum jacket, tightly wrapped around inner layer of wood composition fiberboard, in oxygen free environment prevents combustion and subsequent damage to underlying fiberboard. Technique also applies to metal cutting in similar assemblies without disassembly to remove combustible materials from welding heat proximity.

  2. 49 CFR 178.68 - Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... connection with record of physical test detailed information in regard to such specimens. (iv) Heating of a..., “Welding Aluminum: Theory and Practice.” The root of the weld (inside surface of the cylinder) must be...) Inspector's report. In addition to the information required by § 178.35, the record of chemical analyses...

  3. The microstructure of aluminum A5083 butt joint by friction stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Jasri, M. A. H. M.; Afendi, M.; Ismail, A.; Ishak, M.

    2015-05-15

    This study presents the microstructure of the aluminum A5083 butt joint surface after it has been joined by friction stir welding (FSW) process. The FSW process is a unique welding method because it will not change the chemical properties of the welded metals. In this study, MILKO 37 milling machine was modified to run FSW process on 4 mm plate of aluminum A5083 butt joint. For the experiment, variables of travel speed and tool rotational speed based on capability of machine were used to run FSW process. The concentrated heat from the tool to the aluminum plate changes the plate form from solid to plastic state. Two aluminum plates is merged to become one plate during plastic state and return to solid when concentrated heat is gradually further away. After that, the surface and cross section of the welded aluminum were investigated with a microscope by 400 x multiplication zoom. The welding defect in the FSW aluminum was identified. Then, the result was compared to the American Welding Society (AWS) FSW standard to decide whether the plate can be accepted or rejected.

  4. The microstructure of aluminum A5083 butt joint by friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasri, M. A. H. M.; Afendi, M.; Ismail, A.; Ishak, M.

    2015-05-01

    This study presents the microstructure of the aluminum A5083 butt joint surface after it has been joined by friction stir welding (FSW) process. The FSW process is a unique welding method because it will not change the chemical properties of the welded metals. In this study, MILKO 37 milling machine was modified to run FSW process on 4 mm plate of aluminum A5083 butt joint. For the experiment, variables of travel speed and tool rotational speed based on capability of machine were used to run FSW process. The concentrated heat from the tool to the aluminum plate changes the plate form from solid to plastic state. Two aluminum plates is merged to become one plate during plastic state and return to solid when concentrated heat is gradually further away. After that, the surface and cross section of the welded aluminum were investigated with a microscope by 400 x multiplication zoom. The welding defect in the FSW aluminum was identified. Then, the result was compared to the American Welding Society (AWS) FSW standard to decide whether the plate can be accepted or rejected.

  5. Effect of welding method on joint strength of laser-welded gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ikuya; Liu, Jie; Atsuta, Mitsuru; Okabe, Toru

    2003-08-01

    To examine the effect of welding method and heat treatment on the strength of laser-welded gold alloy with age-hardenability at intraoral temperature. Cast gold alloy plates (0.5 x 3.0 x 20 mm3) were prepared and cut perpendicular to the 3.0 mm surface of the plate. After the cut halves were fixed in a jig, they were laser-welded using a Nd: YAG laser. Three laser pulses were applied from one side (single-welded) or both sides (double-welded) to weld the entire joint width of the specimens. Three different heat treatments were given the specimens: solution treatment at 700 degrees C for 5 minute (ST), aging at 250 degrees C for 15 minute after ST (HA), and aging at 37 degrees C for 3 day after ST (IA). As-cast specimens were also reserved. Uncut specimens served as non-welded control specimens. Tensile testing was conducted at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/minute and a gauge length of 10 mm. The breaking stress (Bs: MPa) was recorded, and the data (n = 5 per group) were statistically analyzed. In the control groups, the Bs values of the IA were not significantly different (P > 0.05) from those of the HA specimens. The laser-welded IA specimens showed significantly greater (P < 0.05) Bs values compared to the solution-treated and as-cast specimens. The double-welded specimens showed significantly greater Bs values compared to the single-welded specimens after any heat treatment.

  6. The effects of microstructure on MIC susceptibility in high strength aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D.W.

    1999-11-01

    Aluminum alloys, and in particular Al-Li-Cu alloys are attractive to the aerospace industry. The high specific strength and stiffness of these alloys will improve lift efficiency, fuel economy, performance and increase payload capabilities of air and spacecraft. The objectives of this work were to examine the corrosion behavior of Al 2195 (UNS A92195) (Al-4Cu-1Li) and to assess the effect of welding on corrosion behavior in biologically active and in sterile waters. Al 2219 (UNS A922 19) samples were used in parallel tests to provide a baseline for the data generated. In this study samples were exposed to mild corrosive water solutions in both the as received and as welded conditions. The results of the study indicate exposure to biologically active solutions increases the corrosion rate. In addition, welding increases the corrosion rate in both Al 2195 and Al 2219, and causes severe localization in Al 2195. Furthermore, autogenously welded Al 2195 samples were more susceptible to attack than heterogeneously welded Al 2195 samples. Heterogeneously welded samples in both materials also had high corrosion rates, but only the Al 2195 material was subject to localization of attack. The partially melted zones of Al 2195 samples were subject to severe, focused attack. In Al 2219, interdendritic constituents in welded areas and intergranular constituents in base material were cathodic to the Al rich matrix materials. In Al 2195, some interdendritic constituents in welded areas and intergranular constituents in base material were anodic to the Al rich matrix materials. Corrosion resistance was correlated to material microstructure using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis and polarization resistance.

  7. Influence of shielding gas on the mechanical and metallurgical properties of DP-GMA-welded 5083-H321 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koushki, Amin Reza; Goodarzi, Massoud; Paidar, Moslem

    2016-12-01

    In the present research, 6-mm-thick 5083-H321 aluminum alloy was joined by the double-pulsed gas metal arc welding (DP-GMAW) process. The objective was to investigate the influence of the shielding gas composition on the microstructure and properties of GMA welds. A macrostructural study indicated that the addition of nitrogen and oxygen to the argon shielding gas resulted in better weld penetration. Furthermore, the tensile strength and bending strength of the welds were improved when oxygen and nitrogen (at concentrations as high as approximately 0.1vol%) were added to the shielding gas; however, these properties were adversely affected when the oxygen and nitrogen contents were increased further. This behavior was attributed to the formation of excessive brown and black oxide films on the bead surface, the formation of intermetallic compounds in the weld metal, and the formation of thicker oxide layers on the bead surface with increasing nitrogen and oxygen contents in the argon-based shielding gas. Analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that most of these compounds are nitrides or oxides.

  8. Microstructural Characterization of 6061 Aluminum to 304L Stainless Steel Inertia Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.A.

    1999-09-29

    'Microstructural characterization of 6061-T6 aluminum-to-Type 304L stainless steel inertia welds provided a technical basis to conclude that transition joints fabricated from such welds should satisfactorily contain helium/hydrogen gas mixtures. This conclusion is based on the lack of semi-continuous alignments of particles and/or inclusions at, or near, the aluminum-to-stainless steel interface. These dissimilar metal transition joints play a key role in the operation of an accelerator driven, spallation neutron source designed for the production of tritium. The Accelerator Production of Tritium system will produce tritium through neutron interactions with 3He gas contained in water-cooled, 6061-T6 aluminum pressure tubes. Current design concepts include thousands of thin-walled pressure tubes distributed throughout a number of aluminum-clad, lead-filled, blanket modules. The aluminum pressure tubes are connected to a tritium extraction and purification system through a stainless steel manifold. The transition from aluminum to stainless steel is made via transition joints machined from the aluminum-to-stainless steel inertia welds. The paper describes the baseline microstructural characterization of the welds, including optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and uses that characterization to evaluate potential gas leakage across the weld.'

  9. High strength cast aluminum alloy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschitz, Edward A.

    The goal of this research was to understand how chemistry and processing affect the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties of high strength cast aluminum alloys. Two alloy systems were investigated including the Al-Cu-Ag and the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu systems. Processing variables included solidification under pressure (SUP) and heat treatment. This research determined the range in properties that can be achieved in BAC 100(TM) (Al-Cu micro-alloyed with Ag, Mn, Zr, and V) and generated sufficient property data for design purposes. Tensile, stress corrosion cracking, and fatigue testing were performed. CuAl2 and Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallics were identified as the ductility limiting flaws. A solution treatment of 75 hours or longer was needed to dissolve most of the intermetallic CuAl 2. The Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallic was unaffected by heat treatment. These results indicate that faster cooling rates, a reduction in copper concentration and a reduction in iron concentration might increase the ductility of the alloy by decreasing the size and amount of the intermetallics that form during solidification. Six experimental Al-Zn-Mg-Cu series alloys were produced. Zinc concentrations of 8 and 12wt% and Zn/Mg ratios of 1.5 to 5.5 were tested. Copper was held constant at 0.9%. Heat treating of the alloys was optimized for maximum hardness. Al-Zn-Mg-Cu samples were solution treated at 441°C (826°F) for 4 hours before ramping to 460°C (860°F) for 75 hours and then aged at 120°C (248°F) for 75 hours. X-ray diffraction showed that the age hardening precipitates in most of these alloys was the T phase (Mg32Zn 31.9Al17.1). Tensile testing of the alloys showed that the best mechanical properties were obtained in the lowest alloy condition. Chilled Al-8.2Zn-1.4Mg-0.9Cu solidified under pressure resulted in an alloy with a yield strength of 468MPa (68ksi), tensile strength of 525MPa (76ksi) and an elongation of 9%.

  10. Effect of thermal exposure, forming, and welding on high-temperature, dispersion-strengthened aluminum alloy: Al-8Fe-1V-2Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. R.; Gilman, P. S.; Zedalis, M. S.; Skinner, D. J.; Peltier, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of applying conventional hot forming and welding methods to high temperature aluminum alloy, Al-8Fe-1V-2Si (FVS812), for structural applications and the effect of thermal exposure on mechanical properties were determined. FVS812 (AA8009) sheet exhibited good hot forming and resistance welding characteristics. It was brake formed to 90 deg bends (0.5T bend radius) at temperatures greater than or equal to 390 C (730 F), indicating the feasibility of fabricating basic shapes, such as angles and zees. Hot forming of simple contoured-flanged parts was demonstrated. Resistance spot welds with good static and fatigue strength at room and elevated temperatures were readily produced. Extended vacuum degassing during billet fabrication reduced porosity in fusion and resistance welds. However, electron beam welding was not possible because of extreme degassing during welding, and gas-tungsten-arc welds were not acceptable because of severely degraded mechanical properties. The FVS812 alloy exhibited excellent high temperature strength stability after thermal exposures up to 315 C (600 F) for 1000 h. Extended billet degassing appeared to generally improve tensile ductility, fatigue strength, and notch toughness. But the effects of billet degassing and thermal exposure on properties need to be further clarified. The manufacture of zee-stiffened, riveted, and resistance-spot-welded compression panels was demonstrated.

  11. Summary of Results of Tests Made by Aluminum Research Laboratories of Spot-welded Joints and Structural Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HARTMANN E C; Stickley, G W

    1942-01-01

    Available information concerning spot welding as a means of joining aluminum-alloy parts has been summarized and comparisons have been made of the relative merits of spot-welded and riveted aluminum-alloy structural elements. The results indicated that spot welding was as satisfactory as riveting insofar as resistance to static loads is concerned. Spot welds showed slightly lower resistance to impact loads but definitely lower resistance to repeated loads than rivets.

  12. Multi-Objective Process Optimization of Pulsed Plasma Arc Welding SS400 Steel Pipe with Foamed Aluminum Liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Jing-Shiang; Tzeng, Yih-Fong; Lin, Young-Fu; Yang, Jin-Bin

    Principal component analysis (PCA) coupled with Taguchi methods are employed in the study for developing multiple quality characteristics optimization of pulsed plasma arc welding SS400 steel pipe with foamed aluminum liner (SPFAL). The quality characteristics investigated are the micro-hardness, the compression strength, and the bending strength of the weldments. Eight control factors selected are the tip aperture (Factor A), plasma base current (Factor B), plasma pulse current (Factor C), duty cycle (Factor D), pulse frequency (Factor E), shielding gas (Factor F), plasma gas (Factor G), and welding velocity (Factor H), respectively. It is shown by the experimental results that the optimal parameter combination of the pulsed plasma arc welding process is A1 (tip aperture: Ø1.5mm), B3 (plasma base current: 30A), C3 (plasma pulse current: 100A), D2 (duty cycle: 50%), E3 (pulse frequency: 300Hz), F2 (shielding gas: 14L/min), G3 (plasma gas: 0.4L/min), and H2 (welding velocity: 4RPM). Moreover, it is ascertained from the analysis of variance (ANOVA) results that plasma base current (B), plasma pulse current (C), duty cycle (D), and welding velocity (H) are the most important control factors in the process design, and thus strict control must be applied to them. They account for 75.02% of the total variance. The experimental results likewise show that the best process design could indeed enhance the multiple quality characteristics of the pulsed plasma arc welded SPFAL as 3020kgf of the bending strength, 13650kgf of the compression strength, and 180.4Hv of the hardness, respectively.

  13. Tensile Strength of Welded Steel Tubes : First Series of Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rechtlich, A

    1928-01-01

    The purpose of the experiments was to determine the difference in the strength of steel tubes welded by different methods, as compared with one another and also with unwelded, unannealed tubes, including; moreover, a comparison of the results obtained by experienced and inexperienced welders.

  14. Preventive strength training improves working ergonomics during welding.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Karsten; Petermann, Carmen; Pilat, Christian; Schubert, Emil; Pons-Kühnemann, Jörn; Mooren, Frank C

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of a preventive strength training program on cardiovascular, metabolic and muscular strains during welding. Welders are one of the occupation groups which typically have to work in extended forced postures which are known to be an important reason for musculoskeletal disorders. Subjects (exercise group) accomplished a 12-week strength training program, while another group served as controls (control group). Pre and post training examinations included the measurements of the one repetition maximum and an experimental welding test. Local muscle activities were analysed by surface electromyography. Furthermore, heart rate, blood pressure, lactate and rating of perceived exertion were examined. In the exercise group, strength training lead to a significant increase of one repetition maximum in all examined muscles (p<.05). During the experimental welding test muscle activities of trunk and shoulder muscles and arm muscles were significantly reduced in the exercise group after intervention (p<.05). While no changes of neither cardiovascular nor metabolic parameters were found, subjects of the exercise group rated a significantly decreased rate of perceived exertion welding (p<.05). Effects of strength training can be translated in an improved working ergonomics and tolerance against the exposure to high physical demands at work.

  15. A Micro-Electrochemical Study of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum 6061-T6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Calle, Luz M.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of friction stir welded Aluminum alloy 606 1-T6 was studied using a micro-electrochemical cell. The micro-electrochemical cell has a measurement area of about 0.25 square mm which allows for measurement of corrosion properties at a very small scale. The corrosion and breakdown potentials were measured at many points inside and outside the weld along lines perpendicular to the weld. The breakdown potential is approximately equal inside and outside the weld; however, it is lower in the narrow border between the weld and base material. The results of electrochemical measurements were correlated to micro-structural analysis. The corrosion behavior of the friction stir welded samples was compared to tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded samples of the same material.

  16. Design for low-cost gas metal arc weld-based aluminum 3-D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haselhuhn, Amberlee S.

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3-D printing, has the potential to change the state of manufacturing across the globe. Parts are made, or printed, layer by layer using only the materials required to form the part, resulting in much less waste than traditional manufacturing methods. Additive manufacturing has been implemented in a wide variety of industries including aerospace, medical, consumer products, and fashion, using metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, and even organic tissues. However, traditional 3-D printing technologies, particularly those used to print metals, can be prohibitively expensive for small enterprises and the average consumer. A low-cost open-source metal 3-D printer has been developed based upon gas metal arc weld (GMAW) technology. Using this technology, substrate release mechanisms have been developed, allowing the user to remove a printed metal part from a metal substrate by hand. The mechanical and microstructural properties of commercially available weld alloys were characterized and used to guide alloy development in 4000 series aluminum-silicon alloys. Wedge casting experiments were performed to screen magnesium, strontium, and titanium boride alloying additions in hypoeutectic aluminum-silicon alloys for their properties and the ease with which they could be printed. Finally, the top performing alloys, which were approximately 11.6% Si modified with strontium and titanium boride were cast, extruded, and drawn into wire. These wires were printed and the mechanical and microstructural properties were compared with those of commercially available alloys. This work resulted in an easier-to-print aluminum-silicon-strontium alloy that exhibited lower porosity, equivalent yield and tensile strengths, yet nearly twice the ductility compared to commercial alloys.

  17. High Strength Stainless Steel Properties that Affect Resistance Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R.

    2001-08-01

    This report discusses results of a study on selected high strength stainless steel alloy properties that affect resistance welding. The austenitic alloys A-286, JBK-75 (Modified A-286), 21-6-9, 22-13-5, 316 and 304L were investigated and compared. The former two are age hardenable, and the latter four obtain their strength through work hardening. Properties investigated include corrosion and its relationship to chemical cleaning, the effects of heat treatment on strength and surface condition, and the effect of mechanical properties on strength and weldability.

  18. Laser Welded versus Resistance Spot Welded Bone Implants: Analysis of the Thermal Increase and Strength

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo; Meleti, Marco; Bonanini, Mauro; Lagori, Giuseppe; Vescovi, Paolo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Nammour, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The first aim of this “ex vivo split mouth” study was to compare the thermal elevation during the welding process of titanium bars to titanium implants inserted in pig jaws by a thermal camera and two thermocouples. The second aim was to compare the strength of the joints by a traction test with a dynamometer. Materials and Methods. Six pigs' jaws were used and three implants were placed on each side of them for a total of 36 fixtures. Twelve bars were connected to the abutments (each bar on three implants) by using, on one side, laser welding and, on the other, resistance spot welding. Temperature variations were recorded by thermocouples and by thermal camera while the strength of the welded joint was analyzed by a traction test. Results. For increasing temperature, means were 36.83 and 37.06, standard deviations 1.234 and 1.187, and P value 0.5763 (not significant). For traction test, means were 195.5 and 159.4, standard deviations 2.00 and 2.254, and P value 0.0001 (very significant). Conclusion. Laser welding was demonstrated to be able to connect titanium implant abutments without the risk of thermal increase into the bone and with good results in terms of mechanical strength. PMID:25110731

  19. 49 CFR 178.68 - Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of The Aluminum Association's 2002 publication, “Welding Aluminum: Theory and Practice.” The root of... report must show in connection with record of physical test detailed information in regard to such... information required by § 178.35, the record of chemical analyses must also include applicable information on...

  20. 49 CFR 178.68 - Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of The Aluminum Association's 2002 publication, “Welding Aluminum: Theory and Practice.” The root of... report must show in connection with record of physical test detailed information in regard to such... information required by § 178.35, the record of chemical analyses must also include applicable information on...

  1. INFLUENCE OF JOINING LOCATIONS AND PLATE WIDTH ON ULTIMATE STRENGTH OF ALUMINUM ALLOY PLATES IN IN-PLANE BENDING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okura, Ichiro; Ogasahara, Koji

    The ultimate strength of aluminum alloy plates in in-plane bending is investigated considering joining locations and plate width by the elastic-plastic large deflection analysis with FEM. The aluminum alloys taken into account are heat-treated A6061-T6 and A6005C-T5 and non-heat-treated A5083-O. The softening of material and the residual stresses caused by the friction stir welding (FSW) and the MIG welding are introduced in the analysis. It is shown that the joining locations and the width of plate have a great influence on the ultimate strength. The formula which gives the curves for the ultimate strength of plates in in-plane bending considering joining locations and plate width are proposed, based on the results of the FEM analysis.

  2. Polymer Welding and Self-healing: Strength Through Entanglements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Ting; Robbins, Mark O.; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2013-03-01

    Polymer interfaces are crucial in determining the mechanical strength of many systems. A common means of welding joints or self-healing cracks is to apply heat and allow polymers to interdiffuse. As the microscopic mechanism of interface strengthening is difficult to isolate experimentally, we probe the molecular origins of interfacial strength using large scale molecular simulations of welding and self-healing of cut systems. Systems are heated well above the glass temperature Tg and then quenched below Tg for mechanical testing. The interfacial strength is characterized by the maximum shear stress σmax before failure. As strength grows, the dominant failure mode changes from chain pullout at the interface to chain scission, as in the bulk. In all simulations, σmax saturates long before polymers diffuse by their own size. Bulk strength is observed for miscible welds, while strength is suppressed for cut systems due to short chain segments that remain near the interface. Entanglements are tracked using the Primitive Path Analysis. We find that the bulk response is not fully recovered until the density of entanglements at the interface reaches the bulk value. Moreover, the increase of σmax beforesaturationisproportionaltothenumberofinterfacial entanglements between chains from opposite sides, which correlates linearly with the interdiffusion depth. This material is based upon work supported by NSF Grant DMR-1006805 and DMR-0907390.

  3. Relationship between apposition pressure during welding and tensile strength of the acute weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Paul J.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2001-05-01

    Dye-assisted photothermal welding is a technique used to close wounds by thermally cross-linking collagen across apposed tissue edges. For a successful weld, not only do laser parameters have to be optimized, but also apposition of the incision has to be consistent and controlled. The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between the applied apposition pressure (i.e., the compressive force holding the wound closed during the welding procedure divided by the area of the skin-to-skin interface) and the tensile strength of the wound following the welding procedure. By using a clamping device made of two complementary pieces, each 3 cm wide with a row of 10 equally spaced blunt wire mesh tips, the apposition pressure along a 2-cm-long incision in each albino guinea pig was quantified using a 127-micrometers -thick load cell and varied from 0-1.8 kgf/cm2. A continuous wave, Nd:YAG laser emitting 10.0 W of 1.06-micrometers radiation from a 600-micrometers -diameter fiber irradiating a 5-mm-diameter spot size was scanned across the incision in order to deliver 300 J of total energy. As the apposition pressure of the incisions was increased, the resulting tensile strength of welded skin increased in a sigmoidal manner. For this welding technique, an apposition pressure of at least 1.2 kgf/cm2 is necessary to obtain maximum weld strength of the skin (2.56+/- 0.36 kg/cm2).

  4. Ultrasonic-promoted rapid TLP bonding of fine-grained 7034 high strength aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weibing; Leng, Xuesong; Luan, Tianmin; Yan, Jiuchun; He, Jingshan

    2017-05-01

    High strength aluminum alloys are extremely sensitive to the thermal cycle of welding. An ultrasonic-promoted rapid TLP bonding with an interlayer of pure Zn was developed to join fine-grained 7034 aluminum alloys at the temperature of lower 400°C. The oxide film could be successfully removed with the ultrasonic vibration, and the Al-Zn eutectic liquid phase generated once Al and Zn contacted with each other. Longer ultrasonic time can promote the diffusion of Zn into the base metal, which would shorten the holding time to complete isothermal solidification. The joints with the full solid solution of α-Al can be realized with the ultrasonic action time of 60s and holding time of only 3min at 400°C, and the shear strength of joints could reach 223MPa. The joint formation mechanism and effects of ultrasounds were discussed in details.

  5. Laser Deep Penetration Welding of an Aluminum Alloy with Simultaneously Applied Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woizeschke, Peer; Radel, Tim; Nicolay, Paul; Vollertsen, Frank

    2016-12-01

    In aluminum welding, the grain structure of produced seams is an essential factor with respect to the seam properties. In the casting technology the effect of mechanical vibrations on the grain growth during the solidification of liquid metals is known as a refinement method. In this paper, the transferability of this approach from comparatively long-time processes in the field of casting to the short-time process of laser deep penetration welding is investigated. Therefore, specimens were sinusoidal vibrated with frequencies up to 4 kHz during bead-on-plate full-penetration welding experiments. The resulting grain size was determined by applying the circular intercept procedure on the center of a cross-section micrograph of each weld. The results show that grain refinement is in general achievable by mechanical vibrations in the audible frequency range during laser full penetration keyhole welding of the aluminum alloy EN AW-5083.

  6. Laser Deep Penetration Welding of an Aluminum Alloy with Simultaneously Applied Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woizeschke, Peer; Radel, Tim; Nicolay, Paul; Vollertsen, Frank

    2017-03-01

    In aluminum welding, the grain structure of produced seams is an essential factor with respect to the seam properties. In the casting technology the effect of mechanical vibrations on the grain growth during the solidification of liquid metals is known as a refinement method. In this paper, the transferability of this approach from comparatively long-time processes in the field of casting to the short-time process of laser deep penetration welding is investigated. Therefore, specimens were sinusoidal vibrated with frequencies up to 4 kHz during bead-on-plate full-penetration welding experiments. The resulting grain size was determined by applying the circular intercept procedure on the center of a cross-section micrograph of each weld. The results show that grain refinement is in general achievable by mechanical vibrations in the audible frequency range during laser full penetration keyhole welding of the aluminum alloy EN AW-5083.

  7. Ultrasonic-assisted friction stir welding on V95AT1 (7075) aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. Ye.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Ivanov, A. N.; Fortuna, S. V.; Eliseev, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic-assisted friction stir butt welding on aluminum alloy V95AT1 (7075) has been carried out. Samples have been characterized using metallography, microhardness and XRD. As shown, ultrasonic treatment during welding provides extra plasticizing of metal and better stirring efficiency. The latter serves for elimination of defects, such as root flaw and grain refining in the stir zone. The stress state in the welded joint is characterized by tensile stress in the direction of the weld seam centerline and compression in the transversal direction. The ultrasonic treatment was shown to increase the compression stress and relieve the tensile one.

  8. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Complex Curvature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Randy J.; Martin, W.; Schneider, J.; Hartley, P. J.; Russell, Carolyn; Lawless, Kirby; Jones, Chip

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph representation provides an overview of sucessful research conducted by Lockheed Martin and NASA to develop an advanced self-reacting friction stir technology for complex curvature aluminum alloys. The research included weld process development for 0.320 inch Al 2219, sucessful transfer from the 'lab' scale to the production scale tool and weld quality exceeding strenght goals. This process will enable development and implementation of large scale complex geometry hardware fabrication. Topics covered include: weld process development, weld process transfer, and intermediate hardware fabrication.

  9. Taguchi Optimization of Pulsed Current GTA Welding Parameters for Improved Corrosion Resistance of 5083 Aluminum Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastkerdar, E.; Shamanian, M.; Saatchi, A.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the Taguchi method was used as a design of experiment (DOE) technique to optimize the pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) parameters for improved pitting corrosion resistance of AA5083-H18 aluminum alloy welds. A L9 (34) orthogonal array of the Taguchi design was used, which involves nine experiments for four parameters: peak current ( P), base current ( B), percent pulse-on time ( T), and pulse frequency ( F) with three levels was used. Pitting corrosion resistance in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution was evaluated by anodic polarization tests at room temperature and calculating the width of the passive region (∆ E pit). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the measured data and S/ N (signal to noise) ratios. The "bigger is better" was selected as the quality characteristic (QC). The optimum conditions were found as 170 A, 85 A, 40%, and 6 Hz for P, B, T, and F factors, respectively. The study showed that the percent pulse-on time has the highest influence on the pitting corrosion resistance (50.48%) followed by pulse frequency (28.62%), peak current (11.05%) and base current (9.86%). The range of optimum ∆ E pit at optimum conditions with a confidence level of 90% was predicted to be between 174.81 and 177.74 mVSCE. Under optimum conditions, the confirmation test was carried out, and the experimental value of ∆ E pit of 176 mVSCE was in agreement with the predicted value from the Taguchi model. In this regard, the model can be effectively used to predict the ∆ E pit of pulsed current gas tungsten arc welded joints.

  10. Manual gas tungsten arc (dc) and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of 6XXX aluminum. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-1009 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc (DC) welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.187 to 2 in.; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23); shielding gases are helium (GTAW) and argon (GMAW).

  11. Effects of Fusion Tack Welds on Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Pendleton, M. L.; Brooke, S. A.; Russell, C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In order to know whether fusion tack welds would affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir seam welds in 2195-T87 aluminum alloy, the fracture stresses of 144 tensile test coupons cut from 24 welded panels containing segments of friction stir welds were measured. Each of the panels was welded under unique processing conditions. A measure of the effect of the tack welds for each panel was devised. An analysis of the measures of the tack weld effect supported the hypothesis that fusion tack welds do not affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir welds to a 5% level of confidence.

  12. Resistance Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloy to Steel with Transition Material - Part II: Finite Element Analyses of Nugget Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2004-07-01

    This paper summarizes work on finite element modeling of nugget growth for resistance spot welding of aluminum alloy to steel. It is a sequel to a previous paper on experimental studies of resistance spot welding of aluminum to steel using a transition material. Since aluminum alloys and steel cannot be readily fusion welded together due to their drastically different thermal physical properties, a cold-rolled clad material was introduced as a transition to aid the resistance welding process. Coupled electrical-thermal-mechanical finite element analyses were performed to simulate the nugget growth and heat generation patterns during the welding process. The predicted nugget growth results were compared to the experimental weld cross sections. Reasonable comparisons of nugget size were achieved. The finite element simulation procedures were also used in the electrode selection state to help reduce weld expulsion and improve weld quality.

  13. Microstructure and Strength Characteristics of Alloy 617 Welds

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Totemeier; H. Tian; D.E. Clark; J.A. Simpson

    2005-06-01

    Three types of high-temperature joints were created from alloy 617 base metal: fusion welds, braze joints, and diffusion bonds. The microstructures of all joint types and tensile properties of fusion welds and braze joints were characterized. Sound fusion welds were created by the GTAW process with alloy 617 filler wire. Cross-weld tensile strengths were equal to the parent metal at temperatures of 25, 800, and 1000°C; ductilities of the joints were only slightly lower than that of the parent metal. Failure occurred in the weld fusion zone at room temperature and in the parent metal at elevated temperatures. Incomplete wetting occurred in joints produced by vacuum brazing using AWS BNi-1 braze alloy, believed to be due to tenacious Al and Ti oxide formation. Incompletely bonded butt joints showed relatively poor tensile properties. A second set of braze joints has been created with faying surfaces electroplated with pure Ni prior to brazing; characterization of these joints is in progress. Conditions resulting in good diffusion bonds characterized by grain growth across the bondline and no porosity were determined: vacuum bonding at 1150°C for 3 hours with an initial uniaxial stress of 20 MPa (constant ram displacement). A 15 µm thick pure Ni interlayer was needed to achieve grain growth across the bondline. Tensile testing of diffusion bonds is in progress

  14. Cleavage fracture in high strength low alloy weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, W.W.; Bowen, P.; Strangwood, M.

    1996-12-31

    The present investigation gives an evaluation of the effect of microstructure on the cleavage fracture process of High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) multipass weld metals. With additions of alloying elements, such as Ti, Ni, Mo and Cr, the microstructure of C-Mn weld metal changes from the classical composition, i.e., allotriomorphic ferrite with acicular ferrite and Widmanstaetten ferrite, to bainite and low carbon martensite. Although the physical metallurgy of some HSLA weld metals has been studied before, more work is necessary to correlate the effect of the microstructure on the fracture behavior of such weld metals. In this work detailed microstructural analysis was carried out using optical and electron (SEM and TEM) microscopy. Single edge notched (SEN) bend testpieces were used to assess the cleavage fracture stress, {sigma}{sub F}. Inclusions beneath the notch surface were identified as the crack initiators of unstable cleavage fracture. From the size of such inclusions and the value of tensile stress predicted at the initiation site, the effective surface energy for cleavage was calculated using a modified Griffth energy balance for a penny shape crack. The results suggest that even though inclusions initiate cleavage fracture, the local microstructure may play an important role in the fracture process of these weld metals. The implications of these observations for a quantitative theory of the cleavage fracture of ferritic steels is discussed.

  15. Fatigue Strength and Related Characteristics of Aircraft Joints I : Comparison of Spot-Weld and Rivet Patterns in 24s-t Alclad and 75s-t Alclad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, H W; Jackson, L R; Grover, H J; Beaver, W W

    1944-01-01

    Report contains detailed results of a number of fatigue tests on spot-welded joints in aluminum alloys. The tests described include: (1) fatigue tests on spot-welded lap joints in sheets of unequal thickness of alclad 24s-t. These tests indicate that the fatigue strength of a spot-welded joint in sheets of two different gages is slightly higher than that of a similar joint in two sheets of the thinner gage but definitely lower than that of a similar joint in two sheets of the thicker gage. (2) Fatigue tests on spot-welded alclad 75s-t spot-welded lap-joint specimens of alclad 75s-t were not any stronger in fatigue than similar specimens of alclad 24s-t. (3) Fatigue tests on lap-joint specimens spot -welded after various surface preparations--these included ac welding wire-brushed surfaces, dc welding wire-brushed surfaces, and dc welding chemically cleaned surfaces. While the ac welds were strongest statically, the dc welds on wire-brushed surfaces were strongest in fatigue. Specimens prepared in this way were very nearly as strong as the best riveted specimens tested for comparison. (4) Fatigue tests on specimens spot-welded with varying voltage so as to include a wide range of static spot-weld strengths. The fatigue strengths were in the same order as the static strengths but showed less range. (author)

  16. Prediction of Tensile Strength of Friction Stir Weld Joints with Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewan, Mohammad W.; Huggett, Daniel J.; Liao, T. Warren; Wahab, Muhammad A.; Okeil, Ayman M.

    2015-01-01

    Friction-stir-welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process where joint properties are dependent on welding process parameters. In the current study three critical process parameters including spindle speed (??), plunge force (????), and welding speed (??) are considered key factors in the determination of ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of welded aluminum alloy joints. A total of 73 weld schedules were welded and tensile properties were subsequently obtained experimentally. It is observed that all three process parameters have direct influence on UTS of the welded joints. Utilizing experimental data, an optimized adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) model has been developed to predict UTS of FSW joints. A total of 1200 models were developed by varying the number of membership functions (MFs), type of MFs, and combination of four input variables (??,??,????,??????) utilizing a MATLAB platform. Note EFI denotes an empirical force index derived from the three process parameters. For comparison, optimized artificial neural network (ANN) models were also developed to predict UTS from FSW process parameters. By comparing ANFIS and ANN predicted results, it was found that optimized ANFIS models provide better results than ANN. This newly developed best ANFIS model could be utilized for prediction of UTS of FSW joints.

  17. Amorphization by friction welding between 5052 aluminum alloy and 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, S.; Tsubakino, H.; Okita, K.; Aritoshi, M.; Tomita, T.

    2000-04-14

    The joining of dissimilar metals such as aluminum/stainless steel is a very important technique. In the case of fusion welding of an Fe-Al system, excess formation of brittle intermetallic compounds degrades the joint. Since friction welding is one of the solid-state bonding procedures, few intermetallic compounds are formed at the weld interface. However, in the Al-Fe system, the solid solubility is almost nil, so some intermetallic compounds will be formed in spite of the friction welding. In the present study, microstructure of the friction weld interface between Al-Mg alloy and austenitic stainless steel was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and the mechanism of friction welding was examined.

  18. Welding aluminum alloys 6061 with the opposing dual-torch GTAW process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.M.; Zhang, S.B.

    1999-06-01

    Cracking is a major concern in welding aluminum alloys. Although weld solidification cracks can be eliminated through the addition of filler metal, the additives modify the alloy or base metal constituents and may not always be desirable. High-energy beam processes, such as electron beam welding, that result in minimal heat input reduce crack sensitivity, but their high cost limits their applications. In this study, the conventional gas tungsten arc welding process is modified by disconnecting the workpiece form the power supply and placing a second torch on the opposite side of the workpiece. Such a modification changes the direction of the current flow, improves the weld penetration and reduces the heat input. Using this modified process, 6061-T651 alloy was welded without filler metals. Analysis suggested the reduced heat input, the changed direction of the current flow and the symmetric heating were responsible for the observed reduction of the cracking sensitivity.

  19. Numerical simulation of friction stir spot welding process for aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongun; Badarinarayan, Harsha; Ryu, Ill; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Chongmin; Okamoto, Kazutaka; Wagoner, R. H.; Chung, Kwansoo

    2010-04-01

    Thermo-mechanical simulations of the Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) processes were performed for AA5083-H18 and AA6022-T4, utilizing commercial Finite Element Method (FEM) and Finite Volume Method (FVM) codes, which are based on Lagrangian and Eulerian formulations, respectively. The Lagrangian explicit dynamic FEM code, PAM-CRASH, and the Eulerian Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) FVM code, STAR-CD, were utilized to understand the effect of pin geometry on weld strength and material flow under the unsteady state condition. Using FVM code, material flow patterns near the tool boundary were analyzed to explain weld strength difference between welds by a cylindrical pin and welds by a triangular pin, whereas the frictional energy concept using the FEM code had a limited capacity to explain the weld strength difference.

  20. Physical Simulation Method for the Investigation of Weld Seam Formation During the Extrusion of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Gang; Nguyen, Duc-Thien; Zhou, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Extrusion through the porthole die is a predominant forming process used in the production of hollow aluminum alloy profiles across the aluminum extrusion industry. Longitudinal weld seams formed during the process may negatively influence the quality of extruded profiles. It is therefore of great importance to understand the formation of weld seams inside the welding chamber during extrusion, as affected by extrusion process variables and die design. Previously developed physical simulation methods could not fully reproduce the thermomechanical conditions inside the welding chamber of porthole die. In this research, a novel physical simulation method for the investigation of weld seam formation during extrusion was developed. With a tailor-designed tooling set mounted on a universal testing machine, the effects of temperature, speed, and strain on the weld seam quality of the 6063 alloy were investigated. The strains inside the welding chamber were found to be of paramount importance for the bonding of metal streams, accompanied by microstructural changes, i.e., recovery or recrystallization, depending on the local deformation condition. The method was shown to be able to provide guidelines for the design of porthole dies and choice of extrusion process variables, thereby reducing the scrap rate of aluminum extrusion operation.

  1. Fine-tuned Remote Laser Welding of Aluminum to Copper with Local Beam Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetzer, Florian; Jarwitz, Michael; Stritt, Peter; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    Local beam oscillation in remote laser welding of aluminum to copper was investigated. Sheets of 1 mm thickness were welded in overlap configuration with aluminum as top material. The laser beam was scanned in a sinusoidal mode perpendicular to the direction of feed and the influence of the oscillation parameters frequency and amplitude on the weld geometry was investigated. Scanning frequencies up to 1 kHz and oscillation amplitudes in the range from 0.25 mm to 1 mm were examined. Throughout the experiments the laser power and the feed rate were kept constant. A decrease of welding depth with amplitude and frequency is found. The scanning amplitude had a strong influence and allowed coarse setting of the welding depth into the lower material, while the frequency allowed fine tuning in the order of 10% of the obtained depth. The oscillation parameters were found to act differently on the aluminum sheet compared to copper sheet regarding the amount of fused material. It is possible to influence the geometry of the fused zones separately for both sheets. Therefore the average composition in the weld can be set with high precision via the oscillation parameters. A setting of the generated intermetallics in the weld zone is possible without adjustment of laser power and feed rate.

  2. Physical Simulation Method for the Investigation of Weld Seam Formation During the Extrusion of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Gang; Nguyen, Duc-Thien; Zhou, Jie

    2017-04-01

    Extrusion through the porthole die is a predominant forming process used in the production of hollow aluminum alloy profiles across the aluminum extrusion industry. Longitudinal weld seams formed during the process may negatively influence the quality of extruded profiles. It is therefore of great importance to understand the formation of weld seams inside the welding chamber during extrusion, as affected by extrusion process variables and die design. Previously developed physical simulation methods could not fully reproduce the thermomechanical conditions inside the welding chamber of porthole die. In this research, a novel physical simulation method for the investigation of weld seam formation during extrusion was developed. With a tailor-designed tooling set mounted on a universal testing machine, the effects of temperature, speed, and strain on the weld seam quality of the 6063 alloy were investigated. The strains inside the welding chamber were found to be of paramount importance for the bonding of metal streams, accompanied by microstructural changes, i.e., recovery or recrystallization, depending on the local deformation condition. The method was shown to be able to provide guidelines for the design of porthole dies and choice of extrusion process variables, thereby reducing the scrap rate of aluminum extrusion operation.

  3. Comparison of the Effects of Tool Geometry for Friction Stir Welding Thin Sheet Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merry, Josh; Takeshita, Jennifer; Tweedy, Bryan; Burford, Dwight

    2006-01-01

    In this presentation, the results of a recent study on the effect of pin tool design for friction stir welding thin sheets (0.040") of aluminum alloys 2024 and 7075 are provided. The objective of this study was to investigate and document the effect of tool shoulder and pin diameter, as well as the presence of pin flutes, on the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature. Specifically, the comparison between three tools will include: FSW process load analysis (tool forces required to fabricate the welds), Static Mechanical Properties (ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation), and Process window documenting the range of parameters that can be used with the three pin tools investigated. All samples were naturally aged for a period greater than 10 days. Prior research has shown 7075 may require post weld heat treatment. Therefore, an additional pair of room temperature and cryogenic temperature samples was post-weld aged to the 7075-T7 condition prior to mechanical testing.

  4. Comparison of the Effects of Tool Geometry for Friction Stir Welding Thin Sheet Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merry, Josh; Takeshita, Jennifer; Tweedy, Bryan; Burford, Dwight

    2006-01-01

    In this presentation, the results of a recent study on the effect of pin tool design for friction stir welding thin sheets (0.040") of aluminum alloys 2024 and 7075 are provided. The objective of this study was to investigate and document the effect of tool shoulder and pin diameter, as well as the presence of pin flutes, on the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature. Specifically, the comparison between three tools will include: FSW process load analysis (tool forces required to fabricate the welds), Static Mechanical Properties (ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation), and Process window documenting the range of parameters that can be used with the three pin tools investigated. All samples were naturally aged for a period greater than 10 days. Prior research has shown 7075 may require post weld heat treatment. Therefore, an additional pair of room temperature and cryogenic temperature samples was post-weld aged to the 7075-T7 condition prior to mechanical testing.

  5. Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

    2007-06-06

    It was desired to assemble thick-walled Al alloy 2219 pressure vessels by bobbin-tool friction-stir welding. To develop the welding-process, mechanical-property, and fitness-for-service information to support this effort, extensive friction-stir welding-parameter studies were conducted on 2.5 cm. and 3.8 cm. thick 2219 Al alloy plate. Starting conditions of the plate were the fully-heat-treated (-T62) and in the annealed (-O) conditions. The former condition was chosen with the intent of using the welds in either the 'as welded' condition or after a simple low-temperature aging treatment. Since preliminary stress-analyses showed that stresses in and near the welds would probably exceed the yield-strength of both 'as welded' and welded and aged weld-joints, a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging treatment was also examined. Once a suitable set of welding and post-weld heat-treatment parameters was established, the project divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on developing the necessary process information to be able to make defect-free friction-stir welds in 3.8 cm. thick Al alloy 2219 in the form of circumferential welds that would join two hemispherical forgings with a 102 cm. inside diameter. This necessitated going to a bobbin-tool welding-technique to simplify the tooling needed to react the large forces generated in friction-stir welding. The bobbin-tool technique was demonstrated on both flat-plates and plates that were bent to the curvature of the actual vessel. An additional issue was termination of the weld, i.e. closing out the hole left at the end of the weld by withdrawal of the friction-stir welding tool. This was accomplished by friction-plug welding a slightly-oversized Al alloy 2219 plug into the termination-hole, followed by machining the plug flush with both the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. The second part of the project involved demonstrating that the welds were fit for the intended service. This

  6. Microstructure and Fatigue Properties of Ultrasonic Spot Welded Joints of Aluminum 5754 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, F. A.; Macwan, A.; Bhole, S. D.; Chen, D. L.

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the microstructural change, lap shear tensile load, and fatigue resistance of ultrasonic spot welded joints of aluminum 5754 alloy for automotive applications. A unique "necklace"-type structure with very fine equiaxed grains was observed to form along the weld line due to the mechanical interlocking coupled with the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization. The maximum lap shear tensile strength of 85 MPa and the fatigue limit of about 0.5 kN (at 1 × 107 cycles) were achieved. The tensile fracture occurred at the Al/Al interface in the case of lower energy inputs, and at the edge of nugget zone in the case of higher energy inputs. The maximum cyclic stress for the transition of fatigue fracture mode from the transverse through-thickness crack growth to the interfacial failure increased with increasing energy input. Fatigue crack propagation was mainly characterized by the formation of fatigue striations, which usually appeared perpendicular to the fatigue crack propagation.

  7. Tensile and flexural strength of commercially pure titanium submitted to laser and tungsten inert gas welds.

    PubMed

    Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Orsi, Iara Augusta; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile and flexural strength of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) compared with laser welds. Sixty cylindrical specimens (2 mm diameter x 55 mm thick) were randomly assigned to 3 groups for each test (n=10): no welding (control), TIG welding (10 V, 36 A, 8 s) and Nd:YAG laser welding (380 V, 8 ms). The specimens were radiographed and subjected to tensile and flexural strength tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min using a load cell of 500 kgf applied on the welded interface or at the middle point of the non-welded specimens. Tensile strength data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test, and flexural strength data by the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Non-welded specimens presented significantly higher tensile strength (control=605.84 ± 19.83) (p=0.015) and flexural strength (control=1908.75) (p=0.000) than TIG- and laser-welded ones. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the welding types for neither the tensile strength test (TIG=514.90 ± 37.76; laser=515.85 ± 62.07) nor the flexural strength test (TIG=1559.66; laser=1621.64). As far as tensile and flexural strengths are concerned, TIG was similar to laser and could be suitable to replace laser welding in implant-supported rehabilitations.

  8. High Rotation Speed Friction Stir Welding for 2014 Aluminum Alloy Thin Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shujin; Zhou, Yang; Xue, Junrong; Ni, Ruiyang; Guo, Yue; Dong, Jianghui

    2017-03-01

    In this study, 2014 aluminum alloy sheets with 1 mm thickness are welded successfully by friction stir welding (FSW) robot under the condition of high rotation speed. When the high rotation speed of 10,000-16,500 rpm is applied, the lower axial pressure (less than 200 N) is obtained, which reduces stiffness requirements for equipment. Welding deformation is inevitable because high rotation speed can easily result in rapid heating rate and uneven heat input. The welding distortion caused by two cooling methods is measured, respectively, by laser range finder. The experimental results show that the welding distortion is smaller under the condition of water cooling. When the rotation speed is up to 15,000 rpm and welding speed 50-170 mm/min, the whole welding process is controllable. Under the higher rotation speed condition, the welding defects disappear gradually and more stable mechanical properties can be obtained up to 75% of base metal (ω = 16,000 rpm, ν = 110 mm/min). The results of different welding parameters demonstrate that the high rotation speed can increase material mixing and reduce the axial force (z force), and it can benefit lightweight sheet welding by using FSW robot.

  9. High Rotation Speed Friction Stir Welding for 2014 Aluminum Alloy Thin Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shujin; Zhou, Yang; Xue, Junrong; Ni, Ruiyang; Guo, Yue; Dong, Jianghui

    2017-02-01

    In this study, 2014 aluminum alloy sheets with 1 mm thickness are welded successfully by friction stir welding (FSW) robot under the condition of high rotation speed. When the high rotation speed of 10,000-16,500 rpm is applied, the lower axial pressure (less than 200 N) is obtained, which reduces stiffness requirements for equipment. Welding deformation is inevitable because high rotation speed can easily result in rapid heating rate and uneven heat input. The welding distortion caused by two cooling methods is measured, respectively, by laser range finder. The experimental results show that the welding distortion is smaller under the condition of water cooling. When the rotation speed is up to 15,000 rpm and welding speed 50-170 mm/min, the whole welding process is controllable. Under the higher rotation speed condition, the welding defects disappear gradually and more stable mechanical properties can be obtained up to 75% of base metal (ω = 16,000 rpm, ν = 110 mm/min). The results of different welding parameters demonstrate that the high rotation speed can increase material mixing and reduce the axial force (z force), and it can benefit lightweight sheet welding by using FSW robot.

  10. Adaptive Control for Partial- and Full-Penetration Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloy Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Katayama, Seiji

    A new procedure of in-process monitoring and adaptive control for stable formation of laser spot lap welds has been developed with the objectives of producing sound partial- and full-penetration welds without through-holes and swell in A3003 aluminum alloy sheets, respectively. In the case of the formation of partial-penetration welds, the reflected laser beam and the radiated heat from the welding area were effectively utilized as in-process monitoring signals in detecting melting and though-hole formation in the upper sheet during laser irradiation. Laser pulse duration and peak power were controlled at every 0.15 ms interval during spot welding on the basis of the heat radiation signal detecting the though-hole. In the full-penetration welds, spot welding was performed at low laser power density to reduce the swell of joint part. Then the concavity level of a weld fusion zone increased remarkably with an increase in the pulse duration. Therefore, the laser pulse duration was controlled at 0.15 ms intervals on the basis of the total intensity of heat radiation so as to produce a satisfactory spot weld fusion zone. As a result, fully penetrated welds of desirable sizes with the reduced swells were consistently produced in all 20 samples. These results proved the effectiveness of in-process monitoring and the availability of adaptive control.

  11. Dynamic strength of aluminum single crystals at melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanel, G. I.; Baumung, K.; Singer, J.; Razorenov, S. V.

    2000-05-01

    Results of measurements of dynamic tensile strength ("spall strength") of aluminum single crystals are presented. In the shock-wave experiments the load duration was about 40 ns, the initial temperature was varied from 20 to 648 °C that is only 12 °C less than the melting temperature of aluminum. Under these conditions the dynamic tensile strength of aluminum single crystals has been found practically independent on the temperature up to ˜630 °C. The spall strength slightly decreases at further increase in the initial temperature up to 648 °C. The high-temperature data exceed estimated stresses at which melting should start in a stretched material.

  12. Forge Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Aluminum Alloy Using a Cu, Ni, or Ti Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Hideki; Sumioka, Junji; Kakiuchi, Shigeki; Tomida, Shogo; Takeda, Kouichi; Shimazaki, Kouichi

    2015-08-01

    The forge-welding process was examined to develop a high-strength bonding application of magnesium (Mg) alloy to aluminum (Al) alloy under high-productivity conditions. The effect of the insert material on the tensile strength of the joints, under various preheat temperatures and pressures, was investigated by analyzing the reaction layers of the bonded interface. The tensile strengths resulting from direct bonding, using pure copper (Cu), pure nickel (Ni), and pure titanium (Ti) inserts were 56, 100, 119, and 151 MPa, respectively. The maximum joint strength reached 93 pct with respect to the Mg cast billet. During high-pressure bonding, a microscopic plastic flow occurred that contributed to an anchor effect and the generation of a newly formed surface at the interface, particularly prominent with the Ti insert in the form of an oxide layer. The bonded interfaces of the maximum-strength inserts were investigated using scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron probe microanalysis. The diffusion reaction layer at the bonded interface consisted of brittle Al-Mg intermetallics having a thickness of approximately 30 μm. In contrast, for the three inserts, the thicknesses of the diffusion reaction layer were infinitely thin. For the pure Ti insert, exhibiting the maximum tensile strength value among the inserts tested, focused ion beam-transmission electron microscopy-EDS analysis revealed a 60-nm-thick Al-Ti reaction layer, which had formed at the bonded interface on the Mg alloy side. Thus, a high-strength Al-Mg bonding method in air was demonstrated, suitable for mass production.

  13. Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic Impact Loading Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    REPORT Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic Impact Loading Conditions 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY... Under Ballistic Impact Loading Conditions Report Title ABSTRACT A critical assessment is carried out of the microstructural changes in respect of the...microstructure and properties, and the operative failure mechanisms in different regions of the weld. Toward this end, a procedure is proposed in the

  14. Strength analysis of welded corners of PVC window profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postawa, P.; Stachowiak, T.; Gnatowski, A.

    2017-08-01

    The article presents the results of researches which main purpose was to define the influence of welding parameters on strength of welded corners of PVC window profile. PVC profiles of a branded name GENEO® produced by Rehau Company were used for this research. The profiles were made by using a co-extrusion method. The surface of the profile was made of PVC mixture with no additives. Its main task was to get a smooth surface resistant to a smudge. The use of an unfilled polyester provides an aesthetic look and improves the resistance of extrudate to water getting into inner layers. The profile's inner layers have been filled up with glass fibre in order to improve its stiffness and mechanical properties. Window frames with cut corners used for this research, were produced on technological line of EUROCOLOR Company based in Pyskowice (Poland). The main goal of this analysis was to evaluate the influence of the main welding parameter (temperature upsetting) on hardness of welds we received in whole process. A universal testing machine was used for the research.

  15. Effect of Traverse and Rotational Speeds on the Tensile Behavior of the Underwater Dissimilar Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijanrostami, Kh.; Barenji, R. Vatankhah; Hashemipour, M.

    2017-02-01

    The tensile behavior of the underwater dissimilar friction stir welded AA6061 and AA7075 aluminum alloy joints was investigated for the first time. For this aim, the joints were welded at different conditions and tensile test was conducted for measuring the strength and elongation of them. In addition, the microstructure of the joints was characterized by means of optical and transmission electron microscopes. Scanning electron microscope was used for fractography of the joints. Furthermore, the process parameters and tensile properties of the joints were correlated and optimized. The results revealed that the maximum tensile strength of 237.3 MPa and elongation of 41.2% could be obtained at a rotational speed 1853 rpm and a traverse speed of 50 mm/min. In comparison with the optimum condition, higher heat inputs caused grain growth and reduction in dislocation density and hence led to lower strength. The higher elongations for the joints welded at higher heat inputs were due to lower dislocation density inside the grains, which was consistent with a more ductile fracture of them.

  16. Effect of Traverse and Rotational Speeds on the Tensile Behavior of the Underwater Dissimilar Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijanrostami, Kh.; Barenji, R. Vatankhah; Hashemipour, M.

    2017-01-01

    The tensile behavior of the underwater dissimilar friction stir welded AA6061 and AA7075 aluminum alloy joints was investigated for the first time. For this aim, the joints were welded at different conditions and tensile test was conducted for measuring the strength and elongation of them. In addition, the microstructure of the joints was characterized by means of optical and transmission electron microscopes. Scanning electron microscope was used for fractography of the joints. Furthermore, the process parameters and tensile properties of the joints were correlated and optimized. The results revealed that the maximum tensile strength of 237.3 MPa and elongation of 41.2% could be obtained at a rotational speed 1853 rpm and a traverse speed of 50 mm/min. In comparison with the optimum condition, higher heat inputs caused grain growth and reduction in dislocation density and hence led to lower strength. The higher elongations for the joints welded at higher heat inputs were due to lower dislocation density inside the grains, which was consistent with a more ductile fracture of them.

  17. Low-temperature friction-stir welding of 2024 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Benavides, S.; Li, Y.; Murr, L.E.; Brown, D.; McClure, J.C.

    1999-09-10

    Solid-state, friction-stir welding (FSW) has been demonstrated to involve dynamic recrystallization producing ultra-fine, equiaxed grain structures to facilitate superplastic deformation as the welding or joining mechanism. Since the recrystallization temperature also decreases with increasing strain rate, the FSW process is somewhat complicated because the ambient temperature, the frictional heating fraction, and the adiabatic heating fraction (proportional to the product of strain and strain-rate) will all influence both the recrystallization and grain growth within the FSW zone. Significantly reducing the ambient temperature of the base metal or work pieces to be welded would be expected to reduce the residual weld-zone grain size. The practical consequences of this temperature reduction would be the achievement of low-temperature welding. This study compares the residual grain sizes and microstructures in 2024 Al friction-stir welded at room temperature ({approximately} 30 C) and low temperature ({minus} 30 C).

  18. Laser beam welding of aluminum alloy 5754-O using a 3 kW Nd:YAG laser and fiber optic beam delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Martukanitz, R.P.; Altshuller, B.

    1996-12-31

    A program was conducted to evaluate laser beam welding of aluminum alloy 5754-O using a 3.0 kW Nd:YAG laser and fiber optic beam delivery. The alloy and laser system were chosen based on consideration for potential applications in the automotive industry. Process parameters were developed for producing autogenous, square-butt welds in 1.6 mm thickness. Metallographic analyses, mechanical property testing, and post weld formability testing were conducted to characterize joints produced under these conditions. Results of these evaluations indicate that the 3.0 kW Nd:YAG laser provides adequate power density and beam quality for welding of this thickness. Enhanced absorption associated with the Nd:YAG laser is believed to be responsible for improved stability of the weld pool and increased weld consistency. Results of tensile tests of the Nd:YAG laser beam welds provided over 90 percent of base metal strength and measurements of post process formability of the welds yielded approximately 70 percent of base metal formability.

  19. Effect of cooling rate on microstructure of friction-stir welded AA1100 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, D.; Mironov, S.; Sato, Y. S.; Kokawa, H.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the microstructural changes occurring during cooling of friction-stir welded aluminum alloy AA1100 were evaluated. To this end, friction-stir welding (FSW) was performed in a wide range of cooling rates of 20-62 K/s and the evolved microstructures were studied by using electron backscatter diffraction. Below 0.6 Tm (Tm being the melting point), the stir zone material was found to experience no significant changes during cooling. At higher FSW temperatures, however, notable changes occurred in the welded material, including grain growth, sharpening of texture, reduction of the fraction of high-angle boundaries and material softening.

  20. Microstructure and Salt Fog Corrosion Behavior of AA2219 Friction-Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa Rao, G.; Subba Rao, V. V.; Rao, S. R. K.

    2017-07-01

    Plates (8.1-mm-thick) from aluminum alloy AA2219-T87 are studied after friction stir welding. The plates are subjected to salt fog corrosion tests according to ASTM B117 at different pH values and different spraying times. The regions affected by corrosion are studied in different zones of welded joints by the methods of optical and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is determined in acid, basic and neutral solutions. The resistances of the base metal and of the zones of welded joints are compared.

  1. Stability of the grain structure in 2219-O aluminum alloy friction stir welds during solution treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.C. . E-mail: armstrong@hit.edu.cn; Feng, J.C.; Liu, H.J.

    2007-02-15

    The stability of the grain structure in 2219-O aluminum alloy friction stir welds during solution treatment has been investigated. Experimental results show that the solution treatment causes drastic grain growth, Grain growth initiates at the surface and the bottom of the weld and then extends to the weld centre within several minutes. The solution treatment temperature and the welding heat input have a significant effect on grain growth. The higher the solution temperature, or the higher the welding heat input, the greater the grain growth. The instability of the grains is attributed to an imbalance between thermodynamic driving forces for grain growth and the pinning forces impeding grain boundary migration during solution treatment.

  2. Transverse texture and microstructure gradients in friction-stir welded 2519 aluminum.

    SciTech Connect

    Bingert, J. F.; Fonda, R. W.

    2003-01-01

    Friction-stir welding produces severe thermomechanical transients that generate crystallographic texture evolution throughout the weld-affected microstructure . In this study, a friction stir weld in a coarse-grained 2519 aluminum plate was investigated in order to resolve the influence of these thermal and deformation effects on texture and microstructure development . Automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was applied to spatially resolve orientations in the base metal, weld nugget, and thermomechanical and heat-affected zones. Results show a gradient demarcated by an alteration in boundary character, texture, and precipitate distribution between the thermomechanical affected zone and the recrystallized weld nugget . EBSD scans and microstructural characterizations reveal substructure evolution from the base plate to the nugget indicative of dynamic recovery and recrystallization processes . Experimental results of texture evolution, however, did not directly follow from considerations of simplified deformation gradients and resultant simple shear textures resulting from restricted glide .

  3. Influence of Alloy and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement in Aluminum Weld Metal due to Inoculation

    SciTech Connect

    Schempp, Philipp; Tang, Z.; Cross, Carl E.; Seefeld, T.; Pittner, A.; Rethmeier, M.

    2012-06-28

    The goals are: (1) Establish how much Ti/B grain refiner is need to completely refine aluminum weld metal for different alloys and different welding conditions; (2) Characterize how alloy composition and solidification parameters affect weld metal grain refinement; and (3) Apply relevant theory to understand observed behavior. Conclusions are: (1) additions of Ti/B grain refiner to weld metal in Alloys 1050, 5083, and 6082 resulted in significant grain refinement; (2) grain refinement was more effective in GTAW than LBW, resulting in finer grains at lower Ti content - reason is limited time available for equiaxed grain growth in LBW (inability to occlude columnar grain growth); (3) welding travel speed did not markedly affect grain size within GTAW and LBW clusters; and (4) application of Hunt CET analysis showed experimental G to be on the order of the critical G{sub CET}; G{sub CET} was consistently higher for GTAW than for LBW.

  4. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema. The extent of the hazard of UVR varies depending on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the levels of UVR that are present under various conditions. In this study, we experimentally evaluated the hazard of UVR emitted in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of aluminum alloys. The degree of hazard of UVR is measured by the effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines. The effective irradiances measured in this study are in the range 0.10-0.91 mW/cm(2) at a distance of 500 mm from the welding arc. The maximum allowable exposure times corresponding to these levels are only 3.3-33 s/day. This demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by GTAW of aluminum alloys is quite hazardous in practice. In addition, we found the following properties of the hazard of UVR. (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) It is more hazardous when magnesium is included in the welding materials than when it is not. (3) The hazard depends on the direction of emission from the arc.

  5. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    PubMed Central

    NAKASHIMA, Hitoshi; UTSUNOMIYA, Akihiro; FUJII, Nobuyuki; OKUNO, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema. The extent of the hazard of UVR varies depending on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the levels of UVR that are present under various conditions. In this study, we experimentally evaluated the hazard of UVR emitted in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of aluminum alloys. The degree of hazard of UVR is measured by the effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines. The effective irradiances measured in this study are in the range 0.10–0.91 mW/cm2 at a distance of 500 mm from the welding arc. The maximum allowable exposure times corresponding to these levels are only 3.3–33 s/day. This demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by GTAW of aluminum alloys is quite hazardous in practice. In addition, we found the following properties of the hazard of UVR. (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) It is more hazardous when magnesium is included in the welding materials than when it is not. (3) The hazard depends on the direction of emission from the arc. PMID:26632121

  6. Ideal pure shear strength of aluminum and copper.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Shigenobu; Li, Ju; Yip, Sidney

    2002-10-25

    Although aluminum has a smaller modulus in [111]<112> shear than that of copper, we find by first-principles calculation that its ideal shear strength is larger because of a more extended deformation range before softening. This fundamental behavior, along with an abnormally high intrinsic stacking fault energy and a different orientation dependence on pressure hardening, are traced to the directional nature of its bonding. By a comparative analysis of ion relaxations and valence charge redistributions in aluminum and copper, we arrive at contrasting descriptions of bonding characteristics in these two metals that can explain their relative strength and deformation behavior.

  7. Computational Investigation of Hardness Evolution During Friction-Stir Welding of AA5083 and AA2139 Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Stir Welded 7050 -T651 Aluminum , Acta 903 Mater., 2003, 51, p 713–729 904 14. O. Frigaard, Ø. Grong, and O.T. Midling, A Process Model for Friction...REPORT Computational Investigation of Hardness Evolution During Friction-Stir Welding of AA5083 and AA2139 Aluminum Alloys 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...is combined with the basic physical metallurgy of two wrought aluminum alloys to predict/assess their FSW behaviors. The two alloys selected are AA5083

  8. Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (MMC's) (Center Director's Discretionary Fund, Project No. 98-09)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. A.; Carter, R. W.; Ding, J.

    1999-01-01

    This technical memorandum describes an investigation of using friction stir welding (FSW) process for joining a variety of aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC's) reinforced with discontinuous silicon-carbide (SiC) particulate and functional gradient materials. Preliminary results show that FSW is feasible to weld aluminum MMC to MMC or to aluminum-lithium 2195 if the SiC reinforcement is <25 percent by volume fraction. However, a softening in the heat-affected zone was observed and is known to be one of the major limiting factors for joint strength. The pin tool's material is made from a low-cost steel tool H-13 material, and the pin tool's wear was excessive such that the pin tool length has to be manually adjusted for every 5 ft of weldment. Initially, boron-carbide coating was developed for pin tools, but it did not show a significant improvement in wear resistance. Basically, FSW is applicable mainly for butt joining of flat plates. Therefore, FSW of cylindrical articles such as a flange to a duct with practical diameters ranging from 2-5 in. must be fully demonstrated and compared with other proven MMC joining techniques for cylindrical articles.

  9. Structural State of a Weld Formed in Aluminum Alloy by Friction Stir Welding and Treated by Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenov, V. A.; Abzaev, Yu. A.; Potekaev, A. I.; Vlasov, V. A.; Klopotov, A. A.; Zaitsev, K. V.; Chumaevskii, A. V.; Porobova, S. A.; Grinkevich, L. S.; Tazin, I. D.; Tazin, D. I.

    2016-11-01

    The experimental data on structural state of an aluminum alloy, AlMg6, in the weld zone formed by friction stir welding are analyzed in order to evaluate the effect of its subsequent ultrasonic treatment. It is found that the crystal lattice transits into a low-stability state as a result of combined heat-induced and severe shear deformation. This transition is accompanied by considerable structural-phase changes that are manifested as an increased lattice parameter of the solid solution. This increase is caused by both high values of internal stresses and increased concentration of Mg atoms in the solid solution due to essential dissolution of the β-Al2Mg3 particles with the content of manganese higher than that in the matrix. This is accompanied by high-intensity diffusion and relaxation processes due to the low-stability state of crystal lattice (inhomogeneous stresses) in the weld zone.

  10. Welding of Aluminum Alloys to Steels: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    joining techniques for the dissimilar materials. 2. Recent technologies for joining aluminum alloys to steels ...2012) 143-147. UNCLASSIFIED 33 UNCLASSIFIED [19] J. Bruckner, Considering thermal processes for dissimilar metals- joining steel to aluminum in...Murakami, K. Nakata, H. Tong, M. Ushio, Dissimilar metal joining of aluminum to steel by MIG arc brazing using flux cored wire, ISIJ Int. 43 (10)

  11. Low-Temperature Friction-Stir Welding of 2024 Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, S.; Li, Y.; Murr, L. E.; Brown, D.; McClure, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    Solid state friction-stir welding (FSW) has been demonstrated to involve dynamic recrystallization producing ultra-fine, equiaxed grain structures to facilitate superplastic deformation as the welding or joining mechanism. However, the average residual, equiaxed, grain size in the weld zone has ranged from roughly 0.5 micron to slightly more than 10 micron, and the larger weld zone grain sizes have been characterized as residual or static grain growth as a consequence of the temperatures in the weld zone (where center-line temperatures in the FSW of 6061 Al have been shown to be as high as 480C or -0.8 T(sub M) where T(sub M) is the absolute melting temperature)). In addition, the average residual weld zone grain size has been observed to increase near the top of the weld, and to decrease with distance on either side of the weld-zone centerline, an d this corresponds roughly to temperature variations within the weld zone. The residual grain size also generally decreases with decreasing FSW tool rotation speed. These observations are consistent with the general rules for recrystallization where the recrystallized grain size decreases with increasing strain (or deformation) at constant strain rate, or with increasing strain-rate, or with increasing strain rate at constant strain; especially at lower ambient temperatures, (or annealing temperatures). Since the recrystallization temperature also decreases with increasing strain rate, the FSW process is somewhat complicated because the ambient temperature, the frictional heating fraction, and the adiabatic heating fraction )proportional to the product of strain and strain-rate) will all influence both the recrystallization and growth within the FSW zone. Significantly reducing the ambient temperature of the base metal or work pieces to be welded would be expected to reduce the residual weld-zone grain size. The practical consequences of this temperature reduction would be the achievement of low temperature welding. This

  12. Ultrasonic Spot and Torsion Welding of Aluminum to Titanium Alloys: Process, Properties and Interfacial Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balle, Frank; Magin, Jens

    Hybrid lightweight structures shape the development of future vehicles in traffic engineering and the aerospace industry. For multi-material concepts made out of aluminum and titanium alloys, the ultrasonic welding technique is an alternative effective joining technology. The overlapped structures can be welded in the solid state, even without gas shielding. In this paper the conventional ultrasonic spot welding with longitudinal oscillation mode is compared to the recent ultrasonic torsion welding with a torsional mode at 20 kHz working frequency. For each technique the process parameters welding force, welding energy and oscillation amplitude were optimized for the hybrid joints using design of experiments. Relationships between the process parameters, mechanical properties and related welding zone should be understood. Central aspects of the research project are microscopic studies of the joining zone in cross section and extensive fracture surface analysis. Detailed electron microscopy and spectroscopy of the hybrid interface help to understand the interfacial formation during ultrasonic welding as well as to transfer the gained knowledge for further multi-metal joints.

  13. Microstructural Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of 7050-T7451 Aluminum Alloy Friction Stir-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Wang, T.; Zhou, W. L.; Li, Z. Y.; Huang, Y. X.; Feng, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    The ultra-high-strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy, 7050-T7451, was friction stir welded at a constant tool rotation speed of 600 rpm. Defect-free welds were successfully obtained at a welding speed of 100 mm/min, but lack-of-penetration defect was formed at a welding speed of 400 mm/min. The as-received material was mainly composed of coarse-deformed grains with some fine recrystallized grains. Fine equiaxed, dynamic, recrystallized grains were developed in the stir zone, and elongated grains were formed in the thermomechanically affected zone with dynamic recovered subgrains. Grain sizes in different regions of friction stir-welded joints varied depending on the welding speed. The sizes and distributions of precipitates changed in different regions of the joint, and wider precipitation free zone was developed in the heat-affected zone compared to that in the base material. Hardness of the heat-affected zone was obviously lower than that of the base material, and the softening region width was related to the welding speed. The tensile strength of the defect-free joints increased with the increasing welding speed, while the lack-of-penetration defect greatly reduced the tensile strength. The tensile fracture path was significantly influenced by the position and orientation of lack-of-penetration defect.

  14. Tensile strength of laser welded cobalt-chromium alloy with and without an argon atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Tartari, Anna; Clark, Robert K F; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R

    2010-06-01

    The tensile strength and depth of weld of two cobalt chromium alloys before and after laser welding with and without an argon gas atmosphere were investigated. Using two cobalt chromium alloys, rod shaped specimens (5 cm x 1.5 mm) were cast. Specimens were sand blasted, sectioned and welded with a pulsed Nd: YAG laser welding machine and tested in tension using an Instron universal testing machine. A statistically significant difference in tensile strength was observed between the two alloys. The tensile strength of specimens following laser welding was significantly less than the unwelded controls. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the micro-structure of the cast alloy was altered in the region of the weld. No statistically significant difference was found between specimens welded with or without an argon atmosphere.

  15. Effect of Water Cooling on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 6N01 Aluminum Alloy P-MIG-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Li, Haiyang; Liang, Zhimin; Wang, Dianlong

    2017-06-01

    In-process water cooling was applied to 8-mm-thick 6N01 aluminum alloy joined using the pulsed metal-inert gas (P-MIG) multi-pass welding method. The influence of the cooling conditions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints were mainly discussed. Compared with natural cooling, under water cooling, the peak temperature decreased and the cooling rate increased substantially, leading to a decrease in the partially melted zone of the welded joint. The columnar grain sizes adjacent to the fusion boundary were much more elongated under water cooling than under natural cooling. In addition, when water cooling was performed, the width of the softened zone was approximately 6 mm smaller than that with natural cooling, and the overall microhardness of the welded joint was improved. The tensile and nominal yield strengths of the welded joint were approximately 11 and 7 MPa higher under water cooling than under natural cooling, respectively. The fracture surface morphology of the welded joints exhibited typical ductile fracture. Thus, water cooling can optimize the microstructure and improve the mechanical properties of the 6N01 alloy P-MIG-welded joint.

  16. Effect of Water Cooling on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 6N01 Aluminum Alloy P-MIG-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Li, Haiyang; Liang, Zhimin; Wang, Dianlong

    2017-08-01

    In-process water cooling was applied to 8-mm-thick 6N01 aluminum alloy joined using the pulsed metal-inert gas (P-MIG) multi-pass welding method. The influence of the cooling conditions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints were mainly discussed. Compared with natural cooling, under water cooling, the peak temperature decreased and the cooling rate increased substantially, leading to a decrease in the partially melted zone of the welded joint. The columnar grain sizes adjacent to the fusion boundary were much more elongated under water cooling than under natural cooling. In addition, when water cooling was performed, the width of the softened zone was approximately 6 mm smaller than that with natural cooling, and the overall microhardness of the welded joint was improved. The tensile and nominal yield strengths of the welded joint were approximately 11 and 7 MPa higher under water cooling than under natural cooling, respectively. The fracture surface morphology of the welded joints exhibited typical ductile fracture. Thus, water cooling can optimize the microstructure and improve the mechanical properties of the 6N01 alloy P-MIG-welded joint.

  17. Review of Fillet Weld Strength Parameters for Shipbuilding.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    AD-ACED 356M ASSACHUJSETTS INST OF TECH CAMRaIDOS DEPT OF OCEAN E-EcTC Pft 13110 REVIEW OF FILLET WELD STREMOYN PARAMETERS FOR SHIPSUILOINS. RU) FES...hours are devoted to welding . A further analysis indicated that 75 percent of the welded joints were fillet welded . Inasmuch as the requirements of...fillet weld sizes have not been revised for many years, the Ship Structure Committee considered a review and analysis of current marine fillet weld

  18. Structure and Hardness of 01570 Aluminum Alloy Friction Stir Welds Processed Under Different Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'yasov, R. R.; Avtokratova, E. V.; Markushev, M. V.; Predko, P. Yu.; Konkevich, V. Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Structure and hardness of the 01570 aluminum alloy joints processed by friction stir welding at various speeds are investigated. It is shown that increasing the traverse tool speed lowers the probability of macrodefect formation in the nugget zone; however, this can lead to anomalous grain growth in the zone of contact with the tool shoulder. Typical "onion-like" structure of the weld consisting of rings that differ by optical contrast is formed for all examined welding regimes. It is demonstrated that this contrast is caused by the difference in the grain sizes in the rings rather than by their chemical or phase composition. Mechanisms of transformation of the alloy structure during friction stir welding are discussed.

  19. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of Steel and Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisada, Yoshiaki; Imaizumi, Takuya; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Matsushita, Muneo; Ikeda, Rinsei

    2014-11-01

    Material flow is a key phenomenon to obtain sound joints by friction stir welding (FSW), and it is highly dependent of the welded material. It is well known that the optimal FSW condition depends on the welded material. However, the material flow during FSW has not been totally clarified in spite of many researches. Especially, the material flow of steel during FSW is still unclear. It seems difficult to understand the material flow by the traditional method such as the tracer method or observation of the microstructure in the stir zone. Therefore, in this study, the material flow of steel was three dimensionally visualized by x-ray radiography using two pairs of x-ray transmission real-time imaging systems, and was then compared with the material flow of aluminum. The result revealed the effect of the welded material on the material flow during FSW.

  20. Effects of weld metal strength and defects on the ductility of HSLA-100 plates

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, R.J.; Ferrell, M.

    1995-12-31

    Wide-plate tension tests were performed on high-strength low-alloy steel, minimum yield strength of 690 MPa, with various controlled intentional defects in both undermatched and overmatched welds. Lack-of-fusion areas on the sidewall comprising about 10 percent of the cross-section resulted in full net-section strength. Weld undercut to a depth of 12 percent of the thickness resulted in gross-section yielding and good elongation. Misalignment (offset) of 3 mm slightly reduced the elongation relative to plates within tolerances. There was no consistent difference between the results of the undermatched welds and the overmatched welds.

  1. Stress corrosion in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    Report describes results of stress-corrosion tests on aluminum alloys 7075, 7475, 7050, and 7049. Tests compare performance of original stress-corrosion-resistant (SCR) aluminum, 7075, with newer, higher-strength SCR alloys. Alloys 7050 and 7049 are found superior in short-transverse cross-corrosion resistance to older 7075 alloy; all alloys are subject to self-loading effect caused by wedging of corrosion products in cracks. Effect causes cracks to continue to grow, even at very-low externally applied loads.

  2. A Fundamental Study of Laser Beam Welding Aluminum-Lithium Alloy 2195 for Cryogenic Tank Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martukanitz, R. P.; Jan. R.

    1996-01-01

    Based on the potential for decreasing costs of joining stiffeners to skin by laser beam welding, a fundamental research program was conducted to address the impediments identified during an initial study involving laser beam welding of aluminum-lithium alloys. Initial objectives of the program were the identification of governing mechanism responsible for process related porosity while establishing a multivariant relationship between process parameters and fusion zone geometry for laser beam welds of alloy 2195. A three-level fractional factorial experiment was conducted to establish quantitative relationships between primary laser beam processing parameters and critical weld attributes. Although process consistency appeared high for welds produced during partial completion of this study, numerous cracks on the top-surface of the welds were discovered during visual inspection and necessitated additional investigations concerning weld cracking. Two experiments were conducted to assess the effect of filler alloy additions on crack sensitivity: the first experiment was used to ascertain the effects of various filler alloys on cracking and the second experiment involved modification to process parameters for increasing filler metal dilution. Results indicated that filler alloys 4047 and 4145 showed promise for eliminating cracking.

  3. Microstructural Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Thick 5083 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imam, Murshid; Sun, Yufeng; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Ma, Ninshu; Tsutsumi, Seiichiro; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2017-01-01

    Joining thick sections of aluminum alloys by friction stir welding (FSW) in a single pass needs to overcome many challenges before it comes to full-scale industrial use. Important parameters controlling the structure-properties relationships both across weld cross-section and through thickness direction were investigated through mechanical testing, electron backscatter diffraction technique, transmission electron microscopy, and occurrence of serrated plastic flow. The evolution of the properties in the weld cross-section shows that the presence of undissolved and fragmented Al_6MnFe particles cause discrepancies in establishing the Hall-Petch relationship, and derive the strengthening from the Orowan strengthening mechanism. A `stop action' friction stir weld has been prepared to understand the role of geometrical features of the tool probe in the development of the final microstructure after complete weld. Sectioning through the `stop action' weld with the probe in situ displays the individual effect of thread and flat on the grain structure formation. The material at the thread surface experiences more severe deformation than the material at flat surface. Both the high-angle boundaries and mean grain size are found to be higher at the thread surface. The strain hardening capacity, stress serration amplitude, and frequency are observed to be higher in the stir zone than other weld regions.

  4. Thermal-mechanical modeling and experimental validation of weld solidification cracking in 6061-T6 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Dike, J.J.; Brooks, J.A.; Bammann, D.J.; Li, M.

    1997-12-31

    Finite element simulation using an internal state variable constitutive model coupled with a void growth and damage model are used to study weld solidification cracking of 6061-T6 aluminum. Calculated results are compared with data from an experimental program determining the locations of failure as a function of weld process parameters and specimen geometry. Two types of weld solidification cracking specimen were studied. One specimen, in which cracking did not occur, was used to evaluate finite element simulations of the thermal response and calculations of average strain across the weld. The other specimen type was used to determine the location of crack initiation as a function of weld process parameters. This information was used to evaluate the finite element simulations of weld solidification cracking. A solidification model which includes dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling was used in both thermal and mechanical finite element analyses. A strain rate and temperature history dependent constitutive model is coupled with a ductile void growth damage model in the mechanical analyses. Stresses near the weld pool are examined to explain results obtained in the finite element analyses and correlated with experimental observations. Good agreement is obtained between simulation and experiment for locations of crack initiation and extent of cracking. Some effects of uncertainties in material parameters are discussed.

  5. Sample preparation method for glass welding by ultrashort laser pulses yields higher seam strength

    SciTech Connect

    Cvecek, K.; Miyamoto, I.; Strauss, J.; Wolf, M.; Frick, T.; Schmidt, M.

    2011-05-01

    Glass welding by ultrashort laser pulses allows joining without the need of an absorber or a preheating and postheating process. However, cracks generated during the welding process substantially impair the joining strength of the welding seams. In this paper a sample preparation method is described that prevents the formation of cracks. The measured joining strength of samples prepared by this method is substantially higher than previously reported values.

  6. The Effect of Nitrogen and Titanium on the Toughness of High Strength Saw Weld Deposits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-12

    for joining high strength steels . In this endeavor, ten butt-welded HY-100 sample plates were produced using the submerged arc welding process. With...was shown to degrade toughness. In this case, the DBTT increased at a rate of +11C for every 0.01 weight percent increase in titanium. Examination of...to degrade toughness through precipitation and dispersion hardening effects. It is concluded that for the welding of high strength steels , nitrogen

  7. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Akgun, H.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1991-02-01

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young`s modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs.

  8. Influence of Filler Alloy Composition and Process Parameters on the Intermetallic Layer Thickness in Single-Sided Cold Metal Transfer Welding of Aluminum-Steel Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvayeh, Zahra; Vallant, Rudolf; Sommitsch, Christof; Götzinger, Bruno; Karner, Werner; Hartmann, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    Hybrid components made of aluminum alloys and high-strength steels are typically used in automotive lightweight applications. Dissimilar joining of these materials is quite challenging; however, it is mandatory in order to produce multimaterial car body structures. Since especially welding of tailored blanks is of utmost interest, single-sided Cold Metal Transfer butt welding of thin sheets of aluminum alloy EN AW 6014 T4 and galvanized dual-phase steel HCT 450 X + ZE 75/75 was experimentally investigated in this study. The influence of different filler alloy compositions and welding process parameters on the thickness of the intermetallic layer, which forms between the weld seam and the steel sheet, was studied. The microstructures of the weld seam and of the intermetallic layer were characterized using conventional optical light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results reveal that increasing the heat input and decreasing the cooling intensity tend to increase the layer thickness. The silicon content of the filler alloy has the strongest influence on the thickness of the intermetallic layer, whereas the magnesium and scandium contents of the filler alloy influence the cracking tendency. The layer thickness is not uniform and shows spatial variations along the bonding interface. The thinnest intermetallic layer (mean thickness < 4 µm) is obtained using the silicon-rich filler Al-3Si-1Mn, but the layer is more than twice as thick when different low-silicon fillers are used.

  9. Microstructural analysis of the 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talia, George E.

    1993-01-01

    The principal objective of this research was to explain a tendency of 2195 Al-Li alloy to crack at elevated temperature during welding. Therefore, a study was made on the effect of welding and thermal treatment on the microstructure of Al-Li Alloy 2195. The critical roles of precipitates, boundaries, phases, and other features of the microstructure were inferred from the crack propagation paths and the morphology of fracture surface of the alloy with different microstructures. Particular emphasis was placed on the microstructures generated by the welding process and the mechanisms of crack propagation in such structures. Variation of the welding parameters and thermal treatments were used to alter the micro/macro structures, and they were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. A theoretical model is proposed to explain changes in the microstructure of welded material. This model proposes a chemical reaction in which gases from the air (i.e., nitrogen) release hydrogen inside the alloy. Such a reaction could generate large internal stresses capable to induce porosity and crack-like delamination in the material.

  10. A Microsample Tensile Test Application: Local Strength of Impact Welds Between Sheet Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzing, J. T.; He, M.; Vivek, A.; Taber, G. A.; Mills, M. J.; Daehn, G. S.

    2017-03-01

    Microsample tensile testing was conducted to evaluate the quality of impact welds created by vaporizing foil actuator welding. Tensile test samples with a gauge length of 0.6 mm were electro-discharge machined out of welds created between 1-mm-thick aluminum alloy type 6061 (AA6061) sheets and 6-mm-thick copper (Cu110) plates. Aluminum sheets were used as flyers, while copper plates acted as targets. Flyer sheets in T6 as well as T4 temper conditions were utilized to create welds. Some of the welds made with T4 temper flyers were heat treated to a T6 temper. It was found that the welds made with T4 temper flyers were slightly stronger (max. of 270 MPa) than those produced with T6 temper flyers. Generally, failure propagated in a brittle manner across the weld interface; however, elemental mapping reveals material transfer on either member of the welded system. This work proves the feasibility to apply microsample tensile testing to assess impact welding, even when conducted with flyer sheets of 1 mm or less, and provides insight that is complementary to other test methods.

  11. A Microsample Tensile Test Application: Local Strength of Impact Welds Between Sheet Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzing, J. T.; He, M.; Vivek, A.; Taber, G. A.; Mills, M. J.; Daehn, G. S.

    2017-01-01

    Microsample tensile testing was conducted to evaluate the quality of impact welds created by vaporizing foil actuator welding. Tensile test samples with a gauge length of 0.6 mm were electro-discharge machined out of welds created between 1-mm-thick aluminum alloy type 6061 (AA6061) sheets and 6-mm-thick copper (Cu110) plates. Aluminum sheets were used as flyers, while copper plates acted as targets. Flyer sheets in T6 as well as T4 temper conditions were utilized to create welds. Some of the welds made with T4 temper flyers were heat treated to a T6 temper. It was found that the welds made with T4 temper flyers were slightly stronger (max. of 270 MPa) than those produced with T6 temper flyers. Generally, failure propagated in a brittle manner across the weld interface; however, elemental mapping reveals material transfer on either member of the welded system. This work proves the feasibility to apply microsample tensile testing to assess impact welding, even when conducted with flyer sheets of 1 mm or less, and provides insight that is complementary to other test methods.

  12. Factors affecting the strength of multipass low-alloy steel weld metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical properties of multipass high-strength steel weld metals depend upon several factors, among the most important being: (1) The interaction between the alloy composition and weld metal cooling rate which determines the as-deposited microstructure; and (2) the thermal effects of subsequent passes on each underlying pass which alter the original microstructure. The bulk properties of a multipass weld are therefore governed by both the initial microstructure of each weld pass and its subsequent thermal history. Data obtained for a high strength low alloy steel weld metal confirmed that a simple correlation exists between mechanical properties and welding conditions if the latter are in turn correlated as weld cooling rate.

  13. Tensile Strength and Hardness Correlations with Microscopy in Friction welded Aluminium to Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satish, Rengarajan; Seshagiri Rao, Vaddi; Ananthapadmanaban, Dattaguru; Ravi, Balappa

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium and copper are good conductors of heat and electricity, copper being the better conductor, is a costly metal indeed. On the other hand, aluminium is cheap, easily available and also has a lower density than copper. Hence, worldwide efforts are being made to partially replace copper wire. Solid state welding should be used to join aluminium to copper. This is because the use of fusion welding results in brittle phases formed in the weld interface. One of the solid state welding techniques used for joining aluminium to copper is friction welding. In this paper, an attempt has been made to join aluminium to copper by friction welding by varying the friction welding parameters, namely friction pressure, upset pressure, burn-off length and speed of rotation of the workpiece. Nine different friction welding parameter combinations were used during welding in accordance with ASTM standards and results have been reported. Tensile strength and hardness tests were carried out for each parameter combination. Optimum friction welding parameter combination was identified with respect to tensile strength. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron dispersive spectroanalysis were obtained to identify modes of fracture and presence of intermetallic phases for each friction welding combination with the aim to narrow down friction welding parameters that give good properties on the whole.

  14. Study of MA Effect on Yield Strength and Ductility of X80 Linepipe Steels Weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Nazmul; Lazor, Robert; Gerlich, Adrian P.

    2017-06-01

    Multipass GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) welding was used to join X80 linepipe materials using two weld metals of slightly different compositions. Welding wires with diameters of 0.984 and 0.909 mm were used while applying the same heat input in each pass. The slight difference in the wire diameters resulted in different HAZ microstructures. The microstructures in the doubly reheated HAZ of both welds were found to contain bainite-ferrite. However, etching also revealed a difference in martensite-austenite (MA) fraction in these reheated zones. The MA exhibited twice the hardness of ferrite when measured by nanoindentation. Tensile testing from the reheated zone of both welds revealed a difference in yield strength, tensile strength and elongation of the transverse weld specimens. In the reheated zone of weld A, (produced with a 0.984 mm wire) a higher fraction of MA was observed, which resulted in higher strength but lower elongation compared to weld B. The ductility of weld A was found severely impaired (to nearly half of weld B) due to formation of closely spaced voids around the MA, along with debonding of MA from the matrix, which occurs just above the yield stress.

  15. Initiation and growth of microcracks in high strength steel butt welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Edward

    1993-05-01

    Early tests such as the explosion bulge test created a preference for overmatched welds (welds which are stronger than the base metal) which eventually became codified for many structural applications. While an overmatched system offers advantages such as the shedding of strain to the base plate, it requires the use of expensive fabrication procedures to avoid cracking. Undermatched welding of some high strength steels may offer reductions in welding costs with little sacrifice in weld performance or low cycle fatigue integrity. An experimental study was carried out to observe microcrack initiation and growth of overmatched and undermatched butt welded high strength steel samples using globally elastic low cycle fatigue testing. First, 1 inch thick HY-80 and HY-100 base plates were multipass, spray gas metal arc welded (GMAW) with overmatching and undermatching filler metal using a semiautomatic welding machine. Second, 1/4 inch thick MIL-A-46100 high hardness armor plates (HHA) were manually, two pass spray GMAW welded with two grades of undermatching consumables. Weld reinforcements were removed from all HY specimens and six HHA specimens. All specimens had a crack initiator slit machined in the test section. The specimens were fatigue tested by transverse tensile loading with a 12 to 13 Hz tension-tension profile. The loading range was from 10% to 85% of the tensile strength of the HY steel base plate and HHA weld metal respectively. Crack initiation and propagation was observed in situ using a confocal scanning laser microscope.

  16. Study of MA Effect on Yield Strength and Ductility of X80 Linepipe Steels Weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Nazmul; Lazor, Robert; Gerlich, Adrian P.

    2017-09-01

    Multipass GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) welding was used to join X80 linepipe materials using two weld metals of slightly different compositions. Welding wires with diameters of 0.984 and 0.909 mm were used while applying the same heat input in each pass. The slight difference in the wire diameters resulted in different HAZ microstructures. The microstructures in the doubly reheated HAZ of both welds were found to contain bainite-ferrite. However, etching also revealed a difference in martensite-austenite (MA) fraction in these reheated zones. The MA exhibited twice the hardness of ferrite when measured by nanoindentation. Tensile testing from the reheated zone of both welds revealed a difference in yield strength, tensile strength and elongation of the transverse weld specimens. In the reheated zone of weld A, (produced with a 0.984 mm wire) a higher fraction of MA was observed, which resulted in higher strength but lower elongation compared to weld B. The ductility of weld A was found severely impaired (to nearly half of weld B) due to formation of closely spaced voids around the MA, along with debonding of MA from the matrix, which occurs just above the yield stress.

  17. Microstructure and Residual Stress Distributions Under the Influence of Welding Speed in Friction Stir Welded 2024 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Danial Ghahremani; Farhangdoost, Khalil; Nejad, Reza Masoudi

    2016-06-01

    Friction stir welding was conducted on 8-mm-thick plates made of AA2024-T351 aluminum alloy at tool traverse speeds between 8 and 31.5 mm/minutes and tool rotational speed between 400 and 800 rpm. Metallographic analyses and mechanical tests including hardness, tensile, residual stress, and fracture toughness tests were carried out to evaluate the microstructural and mechanical properties of the joints as a function of the process parameters. The finite element simulation of the FSW process was also performed using a thermal model. The hardness test results show that the increase in rotational speed or decrease in traverse speed of the tool would cause a decrease in weld zone hardness. The best tensile properties are obtained at rotational/traverse speed ratio between 20 and 32. Also, the longitudinal residual stress profiles were evaluated by employing X-ray diffraction method. The numerical and experimental results showed that the increase in a traverse or rotational speed would increase the residual stress of the weld zone. From the fracture toughness results, it was found that the welding process decreases the joints fracture toughness 18 to 49 pct with respect to the base metal.

  18. Acoustic Emission Weld Monitoring in the 2195 Aluminum-Lithium Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Due to its low density, the 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy was developed as a replacement for alloy 2219 in the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET). The external tank is the single largest component of the space shuttle system. It is 154 feet long and 27.6 feet in diameter, and serves as the structural backbone for the shuttle during launch, absorbing most of the 7 million plus pounds of thrust produced. The almost 4% decrease in density between the two materials provides an extra 7500 pounds of payload capacity necessary to put the International Space Station components into orbit. The ET is an all-welded structure; hence, the requirement is for up to five rewelds without hot cracking. Unfortunately, hot cracking during re-welding or repair operations was occurring and had to be dealt with before the new super lightweight tank could be used. Weld metal porosity formation was also of concern because it leads to hot cracking during weld repairs. Accordingly, acoustic emission (AE) nondestructive testing was employed to monitor the formation of porosity and hot cracks in order to select the best filler metal and optimize the weld schedule. The purpose of this work is to determine the feasibility of detecting hot cracking in welded aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) structures through the analysis of acoustic emission data. By acoustically characterizing the effects of reheating during a repair operation, the potential for hidden flaws coalescing and becoming "unstable" as the panel is repaired could be reduced. Identification of regions where microcrack growth is likely to occur and the location of active flaw growth in the repair weld will provide the welder with direct feedback as to the current weld quality enabling adjustments to the repair process be made in the field. An acoustic emission analysis of the source mechanisms present during welding has been conducted with the goals of locating regions in the weld line that are susceptible to damage from a repair operation

  19. Laser beam welding of new ultra-high strength and supra-ductile steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-high strength and supra-ductile are entering fields of new applications. Those materials are excellent candidates for modern light-weight construction and functional integration. As ultra-high strength steels the stainless martensitic grade 1.4034 and the bainitic steel UNS 53835 are investigated. For the supra-ductile steels stand two high austenitic steels with 18 and 28 % manganese. As there are no processing windows an approach from the metallurgical base on is required. Adjusting the weld microstructure the Q+P and the QT steels require weld heat treatment. The HSD steel is weldable without. Due to their applications the ultra-high strength steels are welded in as-rolled and strengthened condition. Also the reaction of the weld on hot stamping is reflected for the martensitic grades. The supra-ductile steels are welded as solution annealed and work hardened by 50%. The results show the general suitability for laser beam welding.

  20. Prediction of the Properties of Heat-Affected Zone of Welded Joints of Sheets from Aluminum Alloys with Structured Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, V. G.

    2016-05-01

    Welded joints of light structured sheets from aluminum alloy EN AW-6181-T4 (DIN EN 515) of the Al - Si - Mg system are studied. The welding is performed in an argon environment with a short arc by the method of cold metal transfer (CMT®). The results of the study are used in an amended Leblond model for describing the variation of the properties of the heat-affected zone of welded joints of structured sheets.

  1. Effects of filling material and laser power on the formation of intermetallic compounds during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of steel and aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Xinjiang; Jin, Xiangzhong; Peng, Nanxiang; Ye, Ying; Wu, Sigen; Dai, Houfu

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, two kinds of materials, Ni and Zn, are selected as filling material during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of Q235 steel and 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, and their influences on the formation of intermetallic compounds on the steel/aluminum interface of the joints were first studied. SEM was used to analyze the profile of the intermetallic compound layer and the fractography of tensile fracture surfaces. In addition, EDS was applied to investigate the types of the intermetallic compounds. The results indicate that a thin iron-abundant intermetallic compound layer forms and ductile fracture mode occurs when Ni is added, but a thick aluminum-abundant intermetallic compound layer generates and brittle fracture mode occurs when Zn is added. So the tensile strength of the welds with Ni as filling material is greater than that with Zn as filling material. Besides, the effect of laser power on the formation of intermetallic compound layer when Ni is added was investigated. The preheated temperature field produced by laser beam in the cross section of workpiece was calculated, and the tensile strength of the joints at different laser powers was tested. Results show that only when suitable laser power is adopted, can suitable preheating temperature of the steel reach, then can thin intermetallic compound layer form and high tensile strength of the joints reach. Either excessive or insufficient laser power will reduce the tensile strength of the joints.

  2. Complex vibration ultrasonic welding systems with large area welding tips.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Sano, Tsutomu; Ogata, Hayato; Tanaka, Soichi; Harada, Yoshiki

    2002-05-01

    Vibration and welding characteristics of complex vibration ultrasonic welding systems of 27 and 40 kHz were studied. Complex vibration systems, which have elliptical to circular or rectangular to square locus, are effective for ultrasonic welding of various specimens including the same and different metal specimens, and for direct welding of semiconductor tips and packaging of various electronic devices without solder. The complex vibration systems consist of a one-dimensional longitudinal-torsional vibration converter with slitted part, a stepped horn and a longitudinal vibration transducer as a driving source. The complex vibration welding tips of 27 and 40 kHz have enough area of 6-8 mm square for various welding specimens. Aluminum plate specimens of 0.3-1.0 mm thickness were successfully joined with weld strengths almost equal to aluminum specimen strength, and independent to the specimen direction. Required vibration amplitude of 40 kHz is smaller than that of 27 kHz.

  3. Effect of stress concentration on the fatigue strength of A7N01S-T5 welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingyue; Gou, Guoqing; Hang, Zongqiu; Chen, Hui

    2017-07-01

    Stress concentration is a key factor that affects the fatigue strength of welded joints. In this study, the fatigue strengths of butt joints with and without the weld reinforcement were tested to quantify the effect of stress concentration. The fatigue strength of the welded joints was measured with a high-frequency fatigue machine. The P-S-N curves were drawn under different confidence levels and failure probabilities. The results show that butt joints with the weld reinforcement have much lower fatigue strength than joints without the weld reinforcement. Therefore, stress concentration introduced by the weld reinforcement should be controlled.

  4. High Strength Discontinuously Reinforced Aluminum For Rocket Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, A. B.; Shah, S. R.; Shadoan, M.

    2003-01-01

    This study presents results on the development of a new aluminum alloy with very high strength and ductility. Five compositions of Al-Mg-Sc-Gd-Zr alloy were selected for this purpose. These alloys were also reinforced with 15 volume percent silicon-carbide and boron-carbide particles to produce Discontinuously Reinforced Aluminum (DRA) materials. Matrix alloys and DRA were processed using a powder metallurgy process. The helium gas atomization produced very fine powder with cellular-dentritic microstructure. The microstructure of matrix alloys showed fine Al3Sc based precipitate which provides significant strengthening in these alloys. DRA showed uniform distribution of reinforcement in aluminum matrix. DRA materials were tested at -320 F, 75 F in air and 7S F in gaseous hydrogen environments and matrix alloys were tested at 75 F in air. DRA showed high strengths in the range of 89-111 ksi (614-697 MPa) depending on alloy compositions and test environments. Matrix alloys had a good combination of strength, 84-89 ksi (579-621 MPa) and ductility, 4.5-6.5%. The properties of these materials can further be improved by proper control of processing parameters.

  5. Structural strength of welded shells made of corrosion-resistant maraging steels

    SciTech Connect

    Raimond, E.D.; Lapin, P.G.; Pautkin, U.S.; Shiganov, N.V.; Tashchikov, V.S.

    1986-03-01

    The authors devise special measures to increase the resistance of welded shells made of corrosion-resistant maraging steels. High structural strenght is ensured for shells loaded by internal pressure when ait (impact toughness) greater than or equal to10 J/cm/sup 2/. For welds of corrosion-resistant maraging steels of the O3Kh11N10M2T type, this condition is satisfied when the weld strength does not exceed 1400-1450 MPa. A structural strength of 15001750 MPa in welds of corrosion-resistant maraging steels can be obtained by means of mechanicothermal treatment.

  6. Partially melted zone in aluminum welds -- Liquation mechanism and directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Kou, S.

    2000-05-01

    Aluminum Alloy 2219 was welded by gas metal arc welding and the microstructure was examined in the partially melted zone (PMZ), which is a narrow region immediately outside the fusion zone. Extensive liquation was observed at three different locations: at large {theta} (Al{sub 2}Cu) particles, along grain boundaries (GBs) and at numerous isolated points within grains. Liquation was initiated at the eutectic temperature T{sub E}, by the eutectic reaction {alpha} + {theta} {r_arrow} L{sub E} and intensified by further melting, above T{sub E}, of the {alpha} matrix surrounding the eutectic liquid (L{sub E}). The microstructure of the liquated-and-solidified GB material is intriguing. First, the material consisted of a new GB of mostly thin, divorced eutectic and a eutectic-free strip of {alpha} immediately next to it. Second, within an individual grain, the strip was along the top and the side facing the weld. Third, with respect to the weld, the strip was always behind the new GB. These three characteristics point to an important phenomenon, that is, solidification of the liquated GB is directional - upward and toward the weld, as a result of the temperature gradients across the PMZ. A thin, brittle eutectic GB and a soft ductile {alpha} strip side by side are expected to be much weaker than a normal GB before welding.

  7. Effect of friction stir welding on microstructure and corrosion behavior of LF6 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghauri, Faizan Ali; Farooq, A.; Ahmad, A.; Deen, K. M.

    2017-03-01

    The LF6 aluminum alloy plates were joined by friction stir welding method. The tool rotational (1180 rpm) and transverse speed (0.56 mm s-1) were kept constant during welding of 4 mm thick plates. The microstructural features, hardness and tensile properties of the welded samples were determined to evaluate the structural integrity in comparison with the base metal. The electrochemical behavior of base metal (BM), thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) and weld nugget zone (WNZ) was also investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 3.5% NaCl solution. The microstructural study revealed significant grain refinement and agglomeration of β (Mg2Al3) intermetallic precipitates in the WNZ. The relatively higher hardness and a decrease in the ductility (3%) also assured the formation of precipitates β precipitates in the WNZ welded samples. The fracture surface of welded sample also revealed the existence of β precipitates within the elongated dimples which may be considered as the crack initiation sites. The relatively lower corrosion rate (23.68 mpy) and higher charge transfer resistance (403 Ω cm2) of BM compared to WNZ could be associated with the galvanic dissolution of Al-matrix through competitive charge transfer and relaxation (adsorption/desorption of intermediate species) processes specifically at the vicinity of the β precipitates.

  8. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  9. The effect of welding parameters on high-strength SMAW all-weld-metal. Part 1: AWS E11018-M

    SciTech Connect

    Vercesi, J.; Surian, E.

    1996-06-01

    Three AWS A5.5-81 all-weld-metal test assemblies were welded with an E110180-M electrode from a standard production batch, varying the welding parameters in such a way as to obtain three energy inputs: high heat input and high interpass temperature (hot), medium heat input and medium interpass temperature (medium) and low heat input and low interpass temperature (cold). Mechanical properties and metallographic studies were performed in the as-welded condition, and it was found that only the tensile properties obtained with the test specimen made with the intermediate energy input satisfied the AWS E11018-M requirements. With the cold specimen, the maximal yield strength was exceeded, and with the hot one, neither the yield nor the tensile minimum strengths were achieved. The elongation and the impact properties were high enough to fulfill the minimal requirements, but the best Charpy-V notch values were obtained with the intermediate energy input. Metallographic studies showed that as the energy input increased the percentage of the columnar zones decreased, the grain size became larger, and in the as-welded zone, there was a little increment of both acicular ferrite and ferrite with second phase, with a consequent decrease of primary ferrite. These results showed that this type of alloy is very sensitive to the welding parameters and that very precise instructions must be given to secure the desired tensile properties in the all-weld-metal test specimens and under actual working conditions.

  10. Recommended Aluminum Pipe Welding Procedures for Corps of Engineers Construction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    GTAW ) method was chosen surveyed and found to contain valuable procedures based on recommendations of the AA and the Table I Materials Usting and...made in the pipe using moving these contaminants. Naptha, toluene, and the GTAW process in the IG, 2G, and SG positions butyl alcohol are examples of...it is recommended moisture or condensation from the weld area. This that the GTAW torch be equipped with an on/off push- thermal treatment can increase

  11. Efficient Welding Fabrication of Extruded Aluminum Mat Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Degreasing with methyl ehyl ketone. BR - Edge preparation with fine stainless pneumatic brush. M - Edge miling on milling machine. GR - Edge grinding...degreasing in methyl ethyl ketone and then brushing with a fine stainless wire brush to bright metal. 5-27 * Do not soil cleaned surfaces with...method includes degreasing in methyl ethyl ketone followed by brushing with a fine stainless steel brush. Effect of weld storage period prior to testing on

  12. Thermal Management in Friction-Stir Welding of Precipitation-Hardening Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Reynolds, Anthony

    2015-05-25

    Process design and implementation in FSW is mostly dependent on empirical information gathered through experience. Basic science of friction stir welding and processing can only be complete when fundamental interrelationships between process control parameters and response variables and resulting weld microstructure and properties are established to a reasonable extent. It is known that primary process control parameters like tool rotation and translation rate and forge axis force have complicated and interactive relationships to the process response variables such as peak temperature, time at temperature etc. Of primary influence to the other process response parameters are temperature and its gradient at the deformation and heat affected zones. Through review of pertinent works in the literature and some experimental results from boundary condition work performed in precipitation hardening aluminum alloys this paper will partially elucidate the nature and effects of temperature transients caused by variation of thermal boundaries in Friction Stir Welding.

  13. Themo-mechanical and microstructural modeling of friction stir welding of 6111-T4 aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Barlat, Frédéric; Kim, Chongmin; Chung, Kwansoo

    2009-02-01

    Plastic deformation and thermal history as well as microstructure evolution of friction stir welded 6111-T4 aluminum alloys were numerically simulated. Material and heat flow during friction stir welding were calculated considering the momentum balance equation and energy balance equation under the steady state condition. Based on the calculated temperature history, the coupled nucleation, growth, and coarsening of precipitates were simulated using microstructural modeling, as proposed by Myhr et al. [7,8]. Finally, the distribution of precipitates was used to calculate the mechanical properties of the weld zone, particularly the yield stress, based on the dislocation theory. The results compared well with the measurements, suggesting that the method can be applicable to predict yield stress.

  14. Al-Si-Mn Alloy Coating on Aluminum Substrate Using Cold Metal Transfer (CMT) Welding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, G. P.; Kamaraj, M.; Bakshi, S. R.

    2014-06-01

    The cold metal transfer (CMT) process was explored as a weld overlay technique for synthesizing Al-Si-Mn alloy coating on a commercially pure Al plate. The effect of welding speed on the bead geometry, deposition rate, and the dilution were studied and the best parameter was used to synthesize the coatings. The CMT process can be used to produce thick coatings (>2.5 mm) without porosity and with low dilution levels. The Vickers hardness number of the Al substrate increased from 28 in the bulk to 57 in the coating. It is suggested that the CMT process can be an effective and energy-efficient technique for depositing thick coatings and is useful in weld repair of aluminum alloy components.

  15. Surface roughness and friction coefficient in peened friction stir welded 2195 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Smith, James; Cohen, Donald; Bradley, Robert

    2009-05-01

    The tribological properties of friction stir welded 2195 aluminum alloy joints were investigated for several laser- and shot-peened specimens. The first portion of this study assessed the surface roughness changes at different regions of the weld resulting from the various peening processes and included an atomic force microscopy (AFM) study to reveal fine structures. The second portion investigated the friction characteristics for various conditions when slid against a 440C ball slider. Shot peening resulted in significant surface roughness when compared to the unpeened and laser-peened samples. The initial friction for all types of specimens was highly variable. However, long-term friction was shown to be lowest for samples with no peening treatment. Laser peening caused the friction to increase slightly. The shot peening process on the other hand resulted in an increase of the long-term friction effects on both sides of the weld.

  16. Laser Beam Welding of Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. Strengths of up to 2 GPa at fracture elongations of 15% can be attained through this. Welding of these materials, as a result, became a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply efficient heat control. For two application cases, tailored blank production in as-rolled condition and welding during assembly in hot stamped condition, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown through metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KS-II concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method.

  17. Dye penetrant indications caused by superficial surface defects in 2014 aluminum alloy welds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hocker, R. G.; Wilson, K. R.

    1971-01-01

    Demonstration that dye penetrant indications on the heat-affected zone of 2014-T6 aluminum GMA weldments are frequently caused by superficial surface conditions and are less than 0.007 in. deep. The following methods are suggested for minimization of these surface defects: stabilization of the arc, application of dc ?GTA' welding procedures, reduction of the caustic etch time, and use of fine grain materials.

  18. Tensile strength of simulated and welded butt joints in W-Cu composite sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Watson, Gordon K.

    1994-01-01

    The weldability of W-Cu composite sheet was investigated using simulated and welded joints. The welded joints were produced in a vacuum hot press. Tensile test results showed that simulated joints can provide strength and failure mode data which can be used in joint design for actual weldments. Although all of the welded joints had flaws, a number of these joints were as strong as the W-Cu composite base material.

  19. Improvement of Transverse Strength in Graphite-Aluminum Composites by High-Strength Surface Foils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    purchased from Material Concepts Incorporated. The precursor wire had Union Carbide’s VSB-32 or VS0054 pitch mesophase graphite fibers in a matrix of...probably valid. The reason for the low strength of these plates, particularly G4407, is not known. Pitch fiber graphite-aluminum composites usually have

  20. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Validation of MIG Welding of T-Joints of Thin Aluminum Plates for Top Class Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonazzi, Enrico; Colombini, Elena; Panari, Davide; Vergnano, Alberto; Leali, Francesco; Veronesi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The integration of experiments with numerical simulations can efficiently support a quick evaluation of the welded joint. In this work, the MIG welding operation on aluminum T-joint thin plate has been studied by the integration of both simulation and experiments. The aim of the paper is to enlarge the global database, to promote the use of thin aluminum sheets in automotive body industries and to provide new data. Since the welding of aluminum thin plates is difficult to control due to high speed of the heat source and high heat flows during heating and cooling, a simulation model could be considered an effective design tool to predict the real phenomena. This integrated approach enables new evaluation possibilities on MIG-welded thin aluminum T-joints, as correspondence between the extension of the microstructural zones and the simulation parameters, material hardness, transient 3D temperature distribution on the surface and inside the material, stresses, strains, and deformations. The results of the mechanical simulations are comparable with the experimental measurements along the welding path, especially considering the variability of the process. The results could well predict the welding-induced distortion, which together with local heating during welding must be anticipated and subsequently minimized and counterbalance.

  1. Evaluation of low hydrogen welding processes for pipeline construction in high strength steel

    SciTech Connect

    Howse, D S; Jones, R L

    1996-08-01

    Low hydrogen manual welding processes, suitable for pipeline girth welding, have been available for some time for the lower strength pipe grades, and latterly, for high strength pipelines (up to and including X80). Despite their availability and advantages in terms of reduced crack susceptibility, they have been rarely used in production up to the present time. Basic coated shielded metal arc (SMA) electrodes, suitable for vertical-down welding, are produced by some manufacturers at the strength level required for both the root welding and filling of pipeline girth welds. Self-shielded flux-cored wires (SSFCA) are also available for both root and fill welding, and in addition to the low hydrogen levels, these have the advantage of increased productivity. Both of these processes require different methods of deposition compared to welding using cellulosic electrodes, which necessitates specialized training of welders. It is thought that this, along with doubts concerning the reliability and speed of the processes in site conditions, has made contractors reluctant to adopt them. Furthermore, there was a dearth of independently produced information on the welding production performance of low hydrogen processes. Therefore, the primary aim of the present work was to generate data to enable users to make an informed judgment regarding the practical application of low hydrogen processes. Furthermore, it was intended to develop improved root welding procedures, which had been recognized as being significant process limitation. The conclusions and recommendations from this work are discussed.

  2. Microstructure and Low-Cycle Fatigue of a Friction-Stir-Welded 6061 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, A. H.; Chen, D. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2010-10-01

    Strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests and microstructural evaluation were performed on a friction-stir-welded 6061Al-T651 alloy with varying welding parameters. Friction stir welding (FSW) resulted in fine recrystallized grains with uniformly distributed dispersoids and dissolution of primary strengthening precipitates β″ in the nugget zone (NZ). Two low-hardness zones (LHZs) appeared in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) adjacent to the border between the thermomechanically-affected zone (TMAZ) and HAZ, with the width decreasing with increasing welding speed. No obvious effect of the rotational rate on the LHZs was observed. Cyclic hardening of the friction-stir-welded joints was appreciably stronger than that of base metal (BM), and it also exhibited a two-stage character where cyclic hardening of the friction-stir-welded 6061Al-T651 alloy at higher strain amplitudes was initially stronger followed by an almost linear increase of cyclic stress amplitudes on the semilog scale. Fatigue life, cyclic yield strength, cyclic strain hardening exponent, and cyclic strength coefficient all increased with increasing welding speed, but were nearly independent of the rotational rate. Most friction-stir-welded joints failed along the LHZs and exhibited a shear fracture mode. Fatigue crack initiation was observed to occur from the specimen surface, and crack propagation was mainly characterized by the characteristic fatigue striations. Some distinctive tiremark patterns arising from the interaction between the hard dispersoids/inclusions and the relatively soft matrix in the LHZ under cyclic loading were observed to be present in-between the fatigue striations.

  3. Effect of Welding Consumables on Fatigue Performance of Shielded Metal Arc Welded High Strength, Q&T Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magudeeswaran, G.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2009-02-01

    Quenched and Tempered (Q&T) steels are widely used in the construction of military vehicles due to their high strength-to-weight ratio and high hardness. These steels are prone to hydrogen-induced cracking in the heat affected zone (HAZ) after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel consumables to weld the above steel was the only remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. Recent studies proved that high nickel steel and low hydrogen ferritic steel consumables can be used to weld Q&T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. In this investigation an attempt has been made to study the effect of welding consumables on high cycle fatigue properties of high strength, Q&T steel joints. Three different consumables namely (i) austenitic stainless steel, (ii) low hydrogen ferritic steel, and (iii) high nickel steel have been used to fabricate the joints by shielded metal arc (SMAW) welding process. The joints fabricated using low hydrogen ferritic steel electrodes showed superior fatigue properties than other joints.

  4. Bearing Strengths of Some Wrought-aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R L; Wescoat, C

    1943-01-01

    Although a number of investigations of the bearing strength of aluminum alloys have been made, the problem remains one of considerable interest to the aircraft industry. For this reason it has seemed advisable to make additional tests of the commonly used aircraft alloys in an effort to establish a better basis for the selection of allowable bearing values. Current design practice does not recognize the effect of edge distance upon bearing strengths, and for this reason edge distance was one of the principal variables considered in this investigation. The increasing emphasis being placed upon permanent set limitations makes it essential that more information on bearing yield phenomena be obtained. The object of this investigation was to determine bearing yield and ultimate strengths of the following aluminum alloy products: 17S-T, 24S-T, Alclad 24S-T, 24S-RT, 52S-0, 52S-1/2H, 52S-H, 53S-T, and 61S-T extrusions. Ratios of these bearing properties to tensile properties were also determined.

  5. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    alloy, while being larger and more needle- and flower petal-shaped nearer to the steel [19]. In the case of galvanized steels, iron-zinc (Fe-Zn...ASM Handbook , Vol 9: Metallography and Microstructures. 2004. 49. J.C. Russ. Practical Stereology 2nd ed. New York: Plenum Press. 1999. 50. P. J...Characterization of Aluminum, Steel, and Superalloys. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Fl. 2006. 53. O. Engler, V. Randle. Introduction to Texture Analysis

  6. Study on the Formation and Characterization of the Intermetallics in Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy to Coated Steel Sheet Lap Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, H.; Ghosh, R. N.; Pal, T. K.

    2014-10-01

    Multimaterial fabrication such as joining of steel and aluminum is currently prominent in a variety of industries. Friction stir welding is a novel solid-state welding process that causes good joint strength between steel and aluminum. However, the phenomenon contributing significant strength at the interface is not yet clear. In the present study, the interface of the friction stir lap-welded aluminum and coated steel sheet having joint strength maximum (71.4 pct of steel base metal) and minimum, respectively, under two parameter combinations, i.e., 1000 rpm 50 mm min-1 and 500 rpm 100 mm min-1, was exclusively characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), concentration profile, and elemental mapping by electron-probe microanalysis. A TEM-assisted EDS study identifies the morphologies of large size Al13Fe4 and small size Fe3Al-type intermetallic compounds at the interface. The diffusion-induced intermetallic growth (thickness) measured from a backscattered image and concentration profile agreed well with the numerically calculated one. The growth of these two phases at 1000 rpm 50 mm min-1 is attributed to the slower cooling rate (~3.5 K/s) with higher diffusion time (44 seconds) along the interface in comparison to the same for 500 rpm 100 mm min-1 with faster cooling rate (~10 K/s) and less diffusion time (13.6 seconds). The formation of thermodynamically stable and hard intermetallic phase Al13Fe4 at 1000 rpm and travel speed 50 mm min-1 in amounts higher than 500 rpm and a travel speed of 100 mm min-1 results in better joint strength, i.e., 71.4 pct, of the steel base metal.

  7. Statistical Analysis of Strength Data for an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neergaard, Lynn; Malone, Tina; Gentz, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerospace vehicles are produced in limited quantities that do not always allow development of MIL-HDBK-5 A-basis design allowables. One method of examining production and composition variations is to perform 100% lot acceptance testing for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper discusses statistical trends seen in strength data for one Al alloy. A four-step approach reduced the data to residuals, visualized residuals as a function of time, grouped data with quantified scatter, and conducted analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  8. Statistical Analysis of Strength Data for an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neergaard, L.; Malone, T.

    2001-01-01

    Aerospace vehicles are produced in limited quantities that do not always allow development of MIL-HDBK-5 A-basis design allowables. One method of examining production and composition variations is to perform 100% lot acceptance testing for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper discusses statistical trends seen in strength data for one Al alloy. A four-step approach reduced the data to residuals, visualized residuals as a function of time, grouped data with quantified scatter, and conducted analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  9. Effect of strength mismatch on fracture toughness of HSLA steel weld joints

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, I.; Gliha, V.; Gubeljak, N.; Praunseis, Z.; Kocak, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this experimental work is to present the results of measured toughness and strength on mismatched weld joints made on HSLA steel grade HT 80. In the determined over and undermatched weld joints the local mismatching in the through thickness direction was found by hardness measurement. It seems that local mismatch because of WM low toughness has controlled the fracture behavior of weld metal and HAZ in both cases instead of the global one. Direct local CTOD({delta}{sub 5}) technique is found to be particular useful for the determination of fracture toughness values on mismatched weld joints.

  10. Investigation on the Effect of Friction Welding Parameters on Impact Strength in Dissimilar Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanjeevi, C.; Arputhabalan, J. Jeswin; Dutta, Rohan; Pradeep

    2017-05-01

    Due to increase in demand of joining dissimilar material combinations in applications such as cryogenic fluids, power generation industries and reactor cooling systems, the solid state welding is most suitable in the current scenario. In this study, the experiment is undergone to evaluate the impact strength on the friction welded joint of copper and AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel material in the weld interface. The experiment is conducted by varying the input parameters such as friction pressure, upset pressure, burn-off length and rotational speed using Taguchi’s L9 orthogonal array. The welded joints were examined under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and type of failure mode is discussed.

  11. Influence of weld metal alloying additions to extend the heat input range for the submerged arc welding of high strength steels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.; Ramirez, J.E.

    1993-12-16

    Weld metal microstructural development for high strength steels when welded with submerged arc welding process was investigated as a function of consumable composition and thermal experience. Of specific interest is the effect of systematic variations of microalloying additions on broadening of applicable heat input range. Controlled weld metal oxygen content, particularly in the range of 300 to 400 ppm, has been found to improve HY-130 steel weld metal toughness. Molybdenum additions was found to increase the strength of the HY-130 steel weld deposits. Copper additions up to 3.5 wt.pct. were found to strengthen the high strength steel weld metals, in particular, those of higher heat input, 3.6 kJ/mm. Niobium additions alone did not provide as powerful strengthening effect in the high heat input weld metals as the copper additions. In the case of copper-enriched welds, multi-pass welding induced both the precipitation and overaging of epsilon copper precipitates in the reheated weld metal which resulted in non-uniform mechanical properties. When added together, copper and niobium produced the synergistic effect of dual precipitation (Epsilon copper and niobium carbides) which provided the needed strength and thermal stability to the reheated weld metal even at high heat inputs. With this novel approach, the applicable heat input range to produce both adequate weld metal strength and toughness in high strength steels (Sigma y > 690 MPa) can be extended significantly. The optimal additions for copper and niobium were found to be 3.3 and up to 0. 1 wt. pct., Heat input, High strength steel, Precipitation strengthening, Copper, Niobium, Single and multi-pass welding.

  12. Analysis of peel strength of consisting of an aluminum sheet, anodic aluminum oxide and a copper foil laminate composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyeong-Won; Lee, Hyo-Soo; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2017-01-01

    Laminate composites consisting of an aluminum sheet, anodic aluminum oxide, and copper foil have been used as heat-spreader materials for high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs). These composites are comparable to the conventional structure comprising an aluminum sheet, epoxy adhesives, and copper foil. The peel strength between the copper foil and anodic aluminum oxide should be more than 1.0 kgf/cm in order to be applied in high-power LED products. We investigated the effect of the anodic aluminum oxide morphology and heat-treatment conditions on the peel strength of the composites. We formed an anodic aluminum oxide layer on a 99.999% pure aluminum sheet using electrochemical anodization. A Ti/Cu seed layer was formed using the sputtering direct bonding copper process in order to form a copper circuit layer on the anodic aluminum oxide layer by electroplating. The developed heat spreader, composed of an aluminum layer, anodic aluminum oxide, and a copper circuit layer, showed peel strengths ranging from 1.05 to 3.45 kgf/cm, which is very suitable for high-power LED applications.

  13. Optimization of friction stir welding process to maximize tensile strength of AA6061/ZrB2 in-situ composite butt joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinaharan, I.; Murugan, N.

    2012-02-01

    A variety of ceramic particles is added to aluminum alloys to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs). Establishing the joining procedure for AMCs is an essential requirement prior to extending their applications. Friction stir welding (FSW) is an emerging solid state welding which eliminates all the defects associated with fusion welding of AMCs. An attempt has been made to friction stir weld AA6061/ ZrB2 in-situ composite. A four factor, five level central composite rotatable design has been used to minimize the number of experiments. The four factors considered are tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force and weight percentage of ZrB2. A mathematical model has been developed incorporating the FSW process parameters to predict the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and FS process is optimized using generalized reduced gradient method (GRG) to maximize the UTS. The effect of process parameters on UTS was analyzed. It was observed that the process parameters independently influence the UTS over the entire range studied in this work.

  14. Strength Recovery in a High-Strength Steel During Multiple Weld Thermal Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xinghua; Caron, Jeremy L.; Babu, S. S.; Lippold, John C.; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.

    2011-12-01

    BlastAlloy 160 (BA160) is a low-carbon martensitic steel strengthened by copper and M2C precipitates. Heat-affected zone (HAZ) microstructure evaluation of BA160 exhibited softening in samples subjected to the coarse-grained HAZ thermal simulations of this steel. This softening is partially attributed to dissolution of copper precipitates and metal carbides. After subjecting these coarse-grained HAZs to a second weld thermal cycle below the A c1 temperature (at which austenite begins to form on heating), recovery of strength was observed. Atom-probe tomography and microhardness analyses correlated this strength recovery to re-precipitation of copper precipitates and metal carbides. A continuum model is proposed to rationalize strengthening and softening in the HAZ regions of BlastAlloy 160.

  15. Explosive Welding of Aluminum, Titanium and Zirconium to Copper Sheet Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegazy, A. A.; Mote, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The main material properties affecting the explosive weldability of a certain metal combination are the yield strength, the ductility, the density and the sonic velocity of the two metals. Successful welding of the metal combination depends mainly on the correct choice of the explosive welding parameters; i.e., the stand off distance, the weight of the explosive charge relative to the weight of the flyer plate and the detonation velocity of the explosive. Based on the measured and the handbook values of the properties of interest, the explosive welding parameters were calculated and the arrangements for the explosive welding of the Al alloy 6061-T6, titanium and zirconium to OFHC copper were determined. The relatively small sheet metal thickness (1/8") and the fact that the thickness of the explosive layer must exceed a certain minimum value were considered during the determination of the explosive welding conditions. The results of the metallographic investigations and the measurements of the shear strength at the interface demonstrate the usefulness of these calculations to minimize the number of experimental trials.

  16. Control of Softening Processes in the Heat-Affected Zone During Welding of High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimenko, L. A.; Kapustin, O. E.; Ramus', A. A.; Ramus', R. O.

    2016-11-01

    The hardness and the structure of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) under welding of tube steels of strength category K60 - K70 are studied. The steels are treated by regimes imitating the thermal cycles of different welding processes applied to tubes starting with manual arc welding and ending with energy-intensive automatic submerged-arc welding. The welding modes causing maximum decrease in the hardness of HAZ regions are determined. The conditions preventing softening under one-pass and multipass welding of high-strength steels are presented.

  17. Evaluation of Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Resistance of Friction Stir-Welded Aluminum and Magnesium Dissimilar Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Sapate, Sanjay G.; Patil, Awanikumar P.; Dhoble, Ashwinkumar S.

    2017-09-01

    Microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar friction stir-welded aluminum and magnesium alloys were investigated by applying three different rotational speeds at two different travel speeds. Sound joints were obtained in all the conditions. The microstructure was examined by an optical and scanning electron microscope, whereas localized chemical information was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Stir zone microstructure showed mixed bands of Al and Mg with coarse and fine equiaxed grains. Grain size of stir zone reduced compared to base metals, indicated by dynamic recrystallization. More Al patches were observed in the stir zone as rotational speed increased. X-ray diffraction showed the presence of intermetallics in the stir zone. Higher tensile strength and hardness were obtained at a high rotational speed corresponding to low travel speed. Tensile fractured surface indicated brittle nature of joints. Dissimilar friction stir weld joints showed different behaviors in different corrosive environments, and better corrosion resistance was observed at a high rotational speed corresponding to low travel speed (FW3) in a sulfuric and chloride environments. Increasing travel speed did not significantly affect on microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance as much as the rotational speed.

  18. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding

    PubMed Central

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10–20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%. PMID:26491719

  19. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

    2012-04-16

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.

  20. Technology Of MIG-MAG Welds Strength Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodskiy, S. A.; Saraev, Yu N.; Malchik, A. G.; Korotkov, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    A new technology of MIG MAG welding control is developed. Authors introduce use of power AC and pulse feed of welding wire in the arc zone, that downsizes the heat affected zone, stabilizes formation of electrode metal droplets, as external magnetic field's effect on the arc is reduced. Principal criteria for electrode metal transfer control, when powered by AC sources, are specified.

  1. Parameters controlling microstructure and hardness during friction-stir welding of precipitation-hardenable aluminum alloy 6063

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yutaka S.; Urata, Mitsunori; Kokawa, Hiroyuki

    2002-03-01

    The aluminum (Al) alloys 6063-T5 and T4 were friction-stir welded at different tool rotation speeds ( R), and then distributions of the microstructure and hardness were examined in these welds. The maximum temperature of the welding thermal cycle rose with increasing R values. The recrystallized grain size of the weld increased exponentially with increasing maximum temperature. The relationship between the grain size and the maximum temperature satisfied the static grain-growth equation. In the as-welded condition, 6063-T5 Al was softened around the weld center, whereas 6063-T4 Al showed homogeneous hardness profiles. Different R values did not result in significant differences in the hardness profile in these welds, except for the width of the softened region in the weld of 6063-T5 Al. Postweld aging raised the hardness in most parts of the welds, but the increase in hardness was small in the stir zone produced at the lower R values. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations detected a similar distribution of the strengthening precipitates in the grain interiors and the presence of a precipitation-free zone (PFZ) adjacent to the grain boundaries in all the welds. Microstructural analyses suggested that the small increase in hardness in the stir zone produced at the lower R values was caused by an increase in the volume fraction of PFZs.

  2. Gas Metal Arc Weld (GMAW) Qualification of 7020-T651 Aluminum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    filler metals, Al-magnesium ( Mg ) alloys AA5087, AA5556A, and Al-Mg6- Zr fusion welded with the gas metal arc weld (GMAW) pulse (P) and spray (S) methods...high strength levels of candidate Al structural and protection materials (e.g., Al-Zn- Mg 7020) for application to land vehicles. The 7020 alloy has...of the Al- Mg 5087, 5556A, and AlMg6- Zr filler metals, which were test evaluated by GMAW-P and -S processes in this study. The alloys range in

  3. Nondestructive Evaluation of Friction Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy to Coated Steel Sheet Lap Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, H.; Kumar, A.; Rajkumar, K. V.; Saravanan, T.; Jayakumar, T.; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Dissimilar lap joints of aluminum sheet (AA 6061) of 2 mm thickness and zinc-coated steel sheet of 1 mm thickness were produced by friction stir welding with different combinations of rotational speed and travel speed. Ultrasonic C- and B-scanning, and radiography have been used in a complementary manner for detection of volumetric (cavity and flash) and planar (de bond) defects as the defects are in micron level. Advanced ultrasonic C-scanning did not provide any idea about the defects, whereas B-scanning cross-sectional image showed an exclusive overview of the micron-level defects. A digital x-ray radiography methodology is proposed for quality assessment of the dissimilar welds which provide three-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio with improved defect detection sensitivity. The present study clearly shows that the weld tool rotational speed and travel speed have a decisive role on the quality of the joints obtained by the friction stir welding process. The suitability of the proposed NDE techniques to evaluate the joint integrity of dissimilar FSW joints is thus established.

  4. A Numerical Simulation for Dissimilar Aluminum Alloys Joined by Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Carter; Kopyściański, Mateusz; Węglowska, Aleksandra; Dymek, Stanisław; Pietras, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Dissimilar aluminum alloy sheets of 2017A-T451 and 7075-T651 (6 mm thickness) were friction stir welded in a butt weld configuration. A numerical simulation of the joining process was developed to visualize the material flow patterns and temperature distribution and to correlate the microstructure to the hardness behavior. Due to the complementary downward flow of surface material into the workpiece thickness and upward flow of mid-plane and bottom-plane material, the weld nugget is composed of alternating layers of 7075 and 2017A. These layers have unique temperature histories depending on the material's initial location within the cross section; therefore, they also have distinctive precipitate distributions. Supersaturated surface material flows into the process zone and forms a core in which GP zones reprecipitate upon cooling. Mid-plane and bottom-plane material flow toward the workpiece surface and encompass the surface material core. Within this region, the weld temperatures overage the equilibrium θ phase in 2017A, decreasing the hardness, and at the same time, dissolve the equilibrium η/ T phase in the 7075, leading to reprecipitation of GP zones upon cooling and a hardness recovery.

  5. Friction Stir-Welded Dissimilar Aluminum Alloys: Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Physical State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, M.; Husain, Md. M.; Kumar, K.; Kailas, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    A356 and 6061 aluminum alloys were joined by friction stir welding at constant tool rotational rate with different tool-traversing speeds. Thermomechanical data of welding showed that increment in tool speed reduced the pseudo heat index and temperature at weld nugget (WN). On the other hand, volume of material within extrusion zone, strain rate, and Zenner Hollomon parameter were reduced with decrease in tool speed. Optical microstructure of WN exhibited nearly uniform dispersion of Si-rich particles, fine grain size of 6061 Al alloy, and disappearance of second phase within 6061 Al alloy. With enhancement in welding speed, matrix grain size became finer, yet size of Si-rich particles did not reduce incessantly. Size of Si-rich particles was governed by interaction time between tool and substrate. Mechanical property of WN was evaluated. It has been found that the maximum joint efficiency of 116% with respect to that of 6061 alloy was obtained at an intermediate tool-traversing speed, where matrix grain size was significantly fine and those of Si-rich particles were substantially small.

  6. Experimental Investigation on Friction Stir Welding of Cryorolled AA2219 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K. Kamal; Panneerselvam, K.; Sathiya, P.; Haq, A. Noorul; Sundarrajan, S.; Mastanaiah, P.; Murthy, C. V. Srinivasa

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, experimental investigation on cryorolled aluminum AA2219-T87 plate by using friction stir welding (FSW) process is carried out. AA2219-T87 plates with a size of 200×100×22.4 mm were rolled and reduced to 12.2mm thickness (more than 45% of reduction in total thickness of the base material) at cryogenic temperature (operating temperature range -90--30∘C). The cryorolled (CR) plates have reduced grain size, improved hardness and increased corrosion resistance property compared with the uncryorolled AA2219-T87 plates. FSW joints of cryorolled AA2219-T87 plates were prepared using cylindrical threaded FSW tool pin profile. Mechanical and metallurgical behaviors of friction stir welded joints were analyzed and the effects of the FSW process parameters are discussed in this paper. The variation of microhardness in the FSW joint regions were correlated with the microstructure of FSW joints. Cryorolled plate and FSW joints were tested for corrosion resistance using potentiodynamic polarization test. FSW joints shows better result during the corrosion resistance analysis compared to base AA2219-T87. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) test results showed that fine α-Al grains with eutectic phase (Al2Cu) were present in the weld nugget (WN). The large clusters of strengthening precipitates were reduced in size and merged with the weld nugget portion.

  7. Experimental Research on Fatigue Failure for 2219-T6 Aluminum Alloy Friction Stir-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guo-Qin; Niu, Jiang-Pei; Chen, Ya-Jing; Sun, Feng-Yang; Shang, De-Guang; Chen, Shu-Jun

    2017-08-01

    The fatigue experiment was executed for the 2219-T6 aluminum alloy friction stir-welded joints at the rotation speed of 800 r/min and the welding velocity of 150 mm/min. Most fatigue failures occurred in the weld nugget zone (WNZ), the thermo-mechanical affected zone and the nearby areas. The experimental results demonstrated that the sudden hardness gradient increases sites corresponding to the fatigue failure locations. The high-angle grain boundaries with the highest concentration were scattered within the WNZ. The microcracks initiated at the intersection of the soft grains. More than one crack initiation site was observed within the WNZ and the thermo-mechanical affected zone, when the fracture occurred in these areas. The rough surface of the welding area should be one of the main reasons for the fatigue failure occurrence. The fatigue crack growth rate in the WNZ at the first stage was fastest in comparison with the fatigue crack growth rate in the other areas of the joint.

  8. Numerical modelling of thermal phenomenon in friction stir welding of aluminum plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaira Vignesh, R.; Padmanaban, R.; Arivarasu, M.; Thirumalini, S.; Gokulachandran, J.; Sai Ram, Mutyala Sesha Satya

    2016-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential to join materials that are non weldable by conventional fusion welding techniques. The study of heat transfer in FSW aids in the identification of defects like flash, inadequate heat input, poor material flow and mixing etc. In this paper, transient temperature distribution during FSW of aluminum alloy AA6061-T6 was simulated using finite element modelling. The model was used to predict the peak temperature and analyse the thermal history during FSW. The effect of process parameters namely tool rotation speed, tool traverse speed (welding speed), shoulder diameter and pin diameter of tool on the temperature distribution was investigated using two level factorial design. The model results were validated using the experimental results from the published literature. It was found that peak temperature was directly proportional to tool rotation speed and shoulder diameter and inversely proportional to tool traverse speed. The effect of pin diameter on peak temperature was found to be trivial.

  9. Effect of aluminum on the Ti-O-B-N balance in submerged arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, J. ); Lau, T. ); North, T.H. ); L'Esperance, G. )

    1988-08-01

    The arguments explaining the interplay of titanium and boron during welding essentially depend on a weld metal gas absorption/reaction phenomenon, i.e., on the Ti-O-B-N balance. Although increasing deposit nitrogen content is generally associated with inferior toughness properties, this is not always the case. Recent work has indicated that lowering deposit nitrogen content from 70 to 30 ppm can actually increase fracture appearance transition temperature (FATT) values. These results were interpreted using a model depending on the reaction sequence, Ti/O, Ti/N and B/N. Optimum toughness occurred when TiN and BN formations left an active boron content of 8 ppm at prior austenite grain boundaries. This emphasis on TiN formation prior to BN formation and the necessity of BN formation in order to prevent excess boron (and borocarbide formation) has important consequences. This paper evaluates the interaction of aluminum and nitrogen content during submerged arc welding and confirms the critical role of TiN formation in the performance of TiB-containing welding consumables.

  10. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of 6XXX aluminum. [6061 and 6063

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-1009 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc (DC) welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.187 to 2,0 inch; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23); shielding gases are helium (GTAW) and argon (GMAW).

  11. Friction Stir Welding of SiC/Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    1999-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a new solid state process for joining metals by plasticizing and consolidating materials around the bond line using thermal energy producing from frictional forces. A feasibility study for FSW of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) was investigated using aluminum 6092 alloy reinforced with 17% SiC particulates. FSW process consists of a special rotating pin tool that is positioned to plunge into the MMC surface at the bond line. As the tool rotates and move forward along the bond line, the material at the bond line is heated up and forced to flow around the rotating tip to consolidate on the tip's backside to form a solid state joint. FSW has the potential for producing sound welds with MMC because the processing temperature occurs well below the melting point of the metal matrix; thereby eliminating the reinforcement-to-matrix solidification defects, reducing the undesirable chemical reactions and porosity problems.

  12. Electron-microscopic examination of the transition zone of aluminum-tantalum bimetallic joints (explosion welding)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, A. Yu.; Greenberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Elkina, O. A.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Plotnikov, A. V.; Patselov, A. M.; Kozhevnikov, V. E.

    2014-04-01

    A study of the structure of an aluminum-tantalum joint and a comparison of this structure with the structures of iron-silver and copper-tantalum joints have revealed the following processes of the interpenetration of the materials that occur during explosion welding: the formation of protrusions, the injection of particles of one material into the other, and the formation of zones of local melting. Regardless of the mutual solubility of the metals being welded, two types of fragmentation occur, i.e., (1) a granulating fragmentation (GF), which includes the formation, explosion-governed (EG) dispersion, and partial consolidation of particles, and (2) the fragmentation that is usually observed during severe plastic deformation. It is important that this traditional fragmentation is not accompanied by the formation and EG dispersion of particles. This feature allows one to easily distinguish these types of fragmentation (traditional and GF fragmentation).

  13. Friction Stir Welding of SiC/Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    1999-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a new solid state process for joining metals by plasticizing and consolidating materials around the bond line using thermal energy producing from frictional forces. A feasibility study for FSW of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) was investigated using aluminum 6092 alloy reinforced with 17% SiC particulates. FSW process consists of a special rotating pin tool that is positioned to plunge into the MMC surface at the bond line. As the tool rotates and move forward along the bond line, the material at the bond line is heated up and forced to flow around the rotating tip to consolidate on the tip's backside to form a solid state joint. FSW has the potential for producing sound welds with MMC because the processing temperature occurs well below the melting point of the metal matrix; thereby eliminating the reinforcement-to-matrix solidification defects, reducing the undesirable chemical reactions and porosity problems.

  14. Investigation of Interfacial Layer for Ultrasonic Spot Welded Aluminum to Copper Joints.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijiao; Wang, Kaifeng; Li, Jingjing; Yu, Qian; Cai, Wayne

    2017-10-02

    The bonding formation for ultrasonic welding of dissimilar metals has been shrouded in mystery because of the complex thermomechanical behavior at the bonding interface. We investigated the microstructure and phases at the bonding interface of ultrasonically welded aluminum to copper joints using transmission electron microscopy, and found a ~10 nm thick transition layer composed of amorphous phase and nanocrystallines, which was believed to form the bonding between these two metals in addition to mechanical interlocking observed at a larger scale. Interdiffusion of parent elements (i.e. Al and Cu) was noticed in the amorphous phase, which was mainly driven by plastic deformation in solid state introduced by ultrasonic vibration. High densities of dislocations and stacking faults were also observed in the parent metals close to the transition layer, confirming the effects of severe plastic deformation.

  15. Thermal Management in Friction-Stir Welding of Precipitation-Hardened Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Reynolds, Anthony P.

    2015-05-01

    Process design and implementation in friction-stir welding (FSW) is mostly dependent on empirical information. Basic science of FSW and processing can only be complete when fundamental interrelationships between the process control parameters and response variables and the resulting weld microstructure and properties are established to a reasonable extent. It is known that primary process control parameters such as tool rotation, translation rates, and forge axis force have complicated and interactive relationships to process-response variables such as peak temperature and time at temperature. Of primary influence on the other process-response parameters are temperature and its gradient in the deformation and heat-affected zones. Through a review of pertinent works in the literature and results from boundary condition experiments performed in precipitation-hardening aluminum alloys, this article partially elucidates the nature and effects of temperature transients caused by variation of thermal boundaries in FSW.

  16. Character of melting and evaporation in laser beam welding of two aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Xijing, W.; Katayama, S.; Matsunawa, A.

    1997-02-01

    The phenomenon of evaporation within the keyhole during laser beam welding of aluminum Alloys A5052 and A5083 was investigated under different welding conditions. The character of the molten pool was compared and analyzed. It was found that the evaporation of the main alloying element for these alloys, magnesium, greatly influenced the reaction force induced between the metal vapor and thermal plasma, which in turn affected the degree of penetration. The results of these experiments also confirmed that increasing shielding gas flow rate, within a limit, and a light increase in the entrance angle of the laser beam improved meltability and increased penetration depth. Surface preparation was also observed to improve beam absorption and increase penetration.

  17. On the Critical Technological Issues of Friction Stir Welding T-Joints of Dissimilar Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astarita, A.; Squillace, A.; Scala, A.; Prisco, A.

    2012-08-01

    In this article, friction stir welded T-joints of innovative dissimilar aluminum alloys have been produced and tested with the aim to investigate the feasibility of using this joining technique, in this configuration, in the aerospace field with the final aim to save weight. The introduction of both this new welding technique and innovative alloys, such as AA 2198 and AA 6056, could allow making lighter and stronger structures. Some experiments, carried out previously, have shown that the fixturing device, the tool geometry, and the tilt angle play a significant role in the joint soundness. A wide experimental characterization has been carried out on FSW T-joints of AA 6056 T4 extrudes to AA 2198 T3 rolled plates. The results attained allow to put in evidence some critical issues on the investigated configuration and can be considered as a further acquired knowledge in the understanding and the design of friction stir processes.

  18. Achieving High Strength Joint of Pure Copper Via Laser-Cold Metal Transfer Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yulong; Chen, Cong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding of pure copper was studied. Weld porosity was tested by X-ray nondestructive testing. Microstructure and fracture features were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by cross weld tensile test. Full penetrated and continuous welds were obtained by hybrid welding once the laser power reached 2 kW, while they could not be obtained by laser welding alone, even though the laser power reached 5 kW. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the yield strength (YS), and the elongation of the best hybrid weld material were up to 227, 201 MPa, and 21.5 pct, respectively. The joint efficiencies in UTS and YS of hybrid weld were up to 84 and 80 pct of the BM, respectively. The fracture location changes from the fusion zone to the heat-affected zone with the increase of laser power. Besides, the mechanisms of process stability and porosity suppression were clarified by laser-arc interaction and pool behavior. The strengthening mechanism was discussed by microstructure characteristics.

  19. Joint strength in high speed friction stir spot welded DP 980 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Nathan; Miles, Michael; Hartman, Trent; Hovanski, Yuri; Hong, Sung Tae; Steel, Russell

    2014-05-01

    High speed friction stir spot welding was applied to 1.2 mm thick DP 980 steel sheets under different welding conditions, using PCBN tools. The range of vertical feed rates used during welding was 2.5 mm – 102 mm per minute, while the range of spindle speeds was 2500 – 6000 rpm. Extended testing was carried out for five different sets of welding conditions, until tool failure. These welding conditions resulted in vertical welding loads of 3.6 – 8.2 kN and lap shear tension failure loads of 8.9 – 11.1 kN. PCBN tools were shown, in the best case, to provide lap shear tension fracture loads at or above 9 kN for 900 spot welds, after which tool failure caused a rapid drop in joint strength. Joint strength was shown to be strongly correlated to bond area, which was measured from weld cross sections. Failure modes of the tested joints were a function of bond area and softening that occurred in the heat-affected zone.

  20. Influences of process parameters on tensile strength of friction stir welded cast A319 aluminium alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, M.; Sivasubramanian, R.; Balasubramanian, V.; Babu, S.

    2009-04-01

    Fusion welding of cast A319 (Al-Si-Cu) alloy will lead to many problems including porosity, micro-fissuring, and hot cracking. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) can be used to weld A319 alloy without these defects. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to study the effect of FSW process parameters on the tensile strength of A319 alloy welded joints. Joints were made using different combinations of tool rotation speed, welding speed, and axial force, each at four levels. The quality of weld zone was analyzed using macrostructure and microstructure analysis. Tensile strength of the joints were evaluated and correlated with the weld zone microstructure. The joint fabricated with a 1200 rpm tool rotation speed, 40 mm/min welding speed, and 4 kN axial force showed superior tensile strength compared with the other joints.

  1. Dissimilar Laser Welding/Brazing of 5754 Aluminum Alloy to DP 980 Steel: Mechanical Properties and Interfacial Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Li, Yulong; Zhang, Hua; Guo, Wei; Weckman, David; Zhou, Norman

    2015-11-01

    A diode laser welding/brazing technique was used for lap joining of 5754 aluminum alloy to DP 980 steel with Al-Si filler metal. The correlation between joint interfacial microstructure, wettability of filler metal, and mechanical properties was systematically investigated. At low laser power (1.4 kW), a layer of intermetallic compounds, composed of θ-Fe(Al,Si)3 and τ 5 -Al7.2Fe1.8Si, was observed at the interface between fusion zone and steel. Because of the poor wettability of filler metal on the steel substrate, the joint strength was very low and the joint failed at the FZ/steel interface. When medium laser power (2.0 kW) was applied, the wettability of filler metal was enhanced, which improved the joint strength and led to FZ failure. With further increase of laser power to 2.6 kW, apart from θ and τ 5, a new hard and brittle η-Fe2(Al,Si)5 IMC with microcracks was generated at the FZ/steel interface. The formation of η significantly degraded the joint strength. The failure mode changed back to interfacial failure.

  2. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material.

    PubMed

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05) and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05). In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N). Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test) were found in each joint configuration. The highest fracture strength means were observed for laser welding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N). Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test). In conclusion, the fracture strength of welded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band.

  3. FRACTURE STRENGTH OF DIFFERENT SOLDERED AND WELDED ORTHODONTIC JOINING CONFIGURATIONS WITH AND WITHOUT FILLING MATERIAL

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05) and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05). In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N). Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test) were found in each joint configuration. The highest fracture strength means were observed for laser welding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N). Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test). In conclusion, the fracture strength of welded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band. PMID:19089229

  4. Effects of fabrication and joining processes on compressive strength of boron/aluminum and borsic/aluminum structural panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Wiant, H. R.; Mcwithey, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Processes for forming and joining boron/aluminum and borsic/aluminum to themselves and to titanium alloys were studied. Composite skin and titanium skin panels were joined to composite stringers by high strength bolts, by spotwelding, by diffusion bonding, by adhesive bonding, or by brazing. The effects of the fabrication and joining processes on panel compressive strengths were discussed. Predicted buckling loads were compared with experimental data.

  5. The effect of yield strength on side-bonding upset welds

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.G.; Perkins, M.A.

    1991-09-24

    During the course of 9{degree} tapered side-bonding resistance upset weld development at Mound, various studies have been conducted to evaluate the effect of yield strength on welds in 304L stainless steel. The results of these studies have concluded that at high yield strengths there may be a minor reduction in the length of Class 2 or better bond. Satisfactory welds have been produced with materials having yield strengths ranging from 36.0 to 141.0 ksi. However, when body yield strengths exceed 80.0 ksi a minor decrease in bond lengths begins. A significant inverse relationship between stem yield strength and bond length was shown to exist. 8 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Microstructural characterisation of interfaces in magnetic pulse welded aluminum/aluminum joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiev, S.; Pabst, C.; F-X Wagner, M.; Groche, P.

    2016-03-01

    Electromagnetic pulse welding provides novel and useful solutions in the field of multi-material structures. The joining occurs through the high-energy mechanical impact of metal sheets, which leads to a strong, cohesive, metallic bonding between the sheets. The high- velocity collision results in changes of the microstructure in the regions adjacent to the interface. The aim of this work is the microstructural characterization of the interface and the welding zone of Al/Al joints. One typical interface is analysed by optical and electron microscopy and using the electron backscatter diffraction technique. Our results show that the interface exhibits a well-known type of wavy weld geometry. Moreover, the formation of an intermediate layer that is different from the bulk aluminium structure is observed. The microstructure of this intermediate layer consists of ultrafine grains and in some regions exhibits a columnar grain structure. It is likely that this special microstructure (which plays an important role in determining the cohesive, continuous bonding between the metal sheets) is formed through a rapid melting and crystallisation process in the interface region.

  7. Combination Effects of Nocolok Flux with Ni Powder on Properties and Microstructures of Aluminum-Stainless Steel TIG Welding-Brazing Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Huan; Lin, Sanbao; Yang, Chunli; Fan, Chenglei; Chen, Zhe

    2013-11-01

    A flux consisting of Nocolok and nickel powder was first applied for TIG welding-brazing of aluminum-stainless steel. Results of tensile and impact tests illustrated that a significant improvement in mechanical properties of the butt joint was obtained with the flux, tensile strength increased from 116 to 158 MPa, and impact energy increased from 3.2 to 6.7 J. Investigation results on microstructures of interfaces and seams suggested that Ni addition significantly decreased the thickness of intermetallic compound (IMC) layer on the interfaces, but did not change the phase structure of Al13Fe4. Furthermore, precipitate phase in the welded seams changed from Al6Fe to Al9FeNi, and the quantity of precipitate phases decreased from 12 to 9% approximately. Finally, effect of Ni powder's addition on the joint was analyzed and discussed. The reduction in the thickness of IMC and quantity of precipitate phases are beneficial to joint properties.

  8. Effect of plasma welding parameters on the flexural strength of Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

    PubMed

    Lyra e Silva, João Paulo; Fernandes Neto, Alfredo Júlio; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Novais, Veridiana Resende; de Araujo, Cleudmar Amaral; Cavalcante, Luisa de Andrade Lima; Simamoto Júnior, Paulo Cezar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different plasma arc welding parameters on the flexural strength of titanium alloy beams (Ti-6Al-4V). Forty Ti-6Al-4V and 10 NiCr alloy beam specimens (40 mm long and 3.18 mm diameter) were prepared and divided into 5 groups (n=10). The titanium alloy beams for the control group were not sectioned or subjected to welding. Groups PL10, PL12, and PL14 contained titanium beams sectioned and welded at current 3 A for 10, 12 or 14 ms, respectively. Group NCB consisted of NiCr alloy beams welded using conventional torch brazing. After, the beams were subjected to a three-point bending test and the values obtained were analyzed to assess the flexural strength (MPa). Statistical analysis was carried out by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test at 0.05 confidence level. Significant difference was verified among the evaluated groups (p<0.001), with higher flexural strength for the control group (p<0.05). No significant differences was observed among the plasma welded groups (p>0.05). The NCB group showed the lowest flexural strength, although it was statistically similar to the PL 14 group (p>0.05). The weld depth penetration was not significantly different among the plasma welded groups (p=0.05). Three representative specimens were randomly selected to be evaluated under scanning electron microcopy. The composition of the welded regions was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. This study provides an initial set of parameters supporting the use of plasma welding during fabrication of titanium alloy dental frameworks.

  9. Colossal super saturation of oxygen at the iron-aluminum interfaces fabricated using solid state welding

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Niyanth; Isheim, D.; Seidman, David N.; Babu, Suresh S.

    2016-12-14

    Solid state joining is achieved in three steps, (i) interface asperity deformation, (ii) oxide dispersion, followed by (iii) atomic contact and bonding. Atomically clean metallic surfaces without an oxide layer bond spontaneously. Despite its importance the oxide dispersion mechanism is not well studied. In this work the first ever atom probe study of iron-aluminum solid state welds show that the oxygen concentration at the interface is 20 at.%. This is significantly lower than any equilibrium oxide concentration. Here, we therefore propose that the high-strain rate deformation at the interfaces renders the oxide unstable resulting in the observed concentration of oxygen.

  10. Effect of composition on the tensile properties and fracture toughness of A7N01S-T5 aluminum alloys welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yali; Gou, Guoqing; Chen, Jia; Chen, Hui; Wang, Wanjng; Li, Xiaodong; Che, Xiaoli; Wang, Yirong

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, welded joints of four types of A7N01S-T5 aluminum alloy with different chemical compositions were investigated. The welding process was under 70% environmental humidity conditions at 10∘C with single-pulse GMAW welding technology. The strength and fracture toughness of the four types of samples were tested, and the microstructures were investigated by micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-LXRF) technology and backscattered electron diffraction (EBSD) technology. The results showed that the #2 alloy that is composed of Zn: 4.59 wt.%, Mg: 1.56 wt.% Mn: 0.22 wt.%, Cr: 0.14 wt.%, Zr: 0.01 wt.% and Ti: 0.027 wt.% had the best combination of tensile strength and elongation, with the values of 302.35 MPa and 3.74%, respectively. The better result for the combination of the strength and elongation was mainly determined by the volume fraction and size. The fine grain size and compositions played important roles to obtain high fracture toughness.

  11. Analysis and Prediction of the Billet Butt and Transverse Weld in the Continuous Extrusion Process of a Hollow Aluminum Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Shumei; Wang, Yongxiao; Liu, Chuanxi; Lu, Shuai; Liu, Sujun; Su, Chunjian

    2017-08-01

    In continuous extrusions of aluminum profiles, the thickness of the billet butt and the length of the discarded extrudate containing the transverse weld play key roles in reducing material loss and improving product quality. The formation and final distribution of the billet butt and transverse weld depend entirely on the flow behavior of the billet skin material. This study examined the flow behavior of the billet skin material as well as the formation and evolution of the billet butt and the transverse weld in detail through numerical simulation and a series of experiments. In practical extrusions, even if the billet skin is removed by lathe turning shortly before extrusion, billet skin impurities are still distributed around the transverse weld and in the billet butt. The thickness of the scrap billet butt and the length of the discarded extrudate containing the transverse weld can be exactly predicted via simulation.

  12. Analysis and Prediction of the Billet Butt and Transverse Weld in the Continuous Extrusion Process of a Hollow Aluminum Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Shumei; Wang, Yongxiao; Liu, Chuanxi; Lu, Shuai; Liu, Sujun; Su, Chunjian

    2017-07-01

    In continuous extrusions of aluminum profiles, the thickness of the billet butt and the length of the discarded extrudate containing the transverse weld play key roles in reducing material loss and improving product quality. The formation and final distribution of the billet butt and transverse weld depend entirely on the flow behavior of the billet skin material. This study examined the flow behavior of the billet skin material as well as the formation and evolution of the billet butt and the transverse weld in detail through numerical simulation and a series of experiments. In practical extrusions, even if the billet skin is removed by lathe turning shortly before extrusion, billet skin impurities are still distributed around the transverse weld and in the billet butt. The thickness of the scrap billet butt and the length of the discarded extrudate containing the transverse weld can be exactly predicted via simulation.

  13. Effect of laser welding on the titanium composite tensile bond strength.

    PubMed

    Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Pagnano, Valéria de Oliveira; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the shear bond strength between commercially pure titanium, with and without laser welding, after airbone-particle abrasion (Al(2)O(3)) and 2 indirect composites. Sixty-four specimens were cast and divided into 2 groups with and without laser welding. Each group was divided in 4 subgroups, related to Al(2)O(3) grain size: A - 250 microm; B - 180 microm; C- 110 microm; and D - 50 microm. Composite rings were formed around the rods and light polymerized using UniXS unit. Specimens were invested and their shear bond strength at failure was measured with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2.0 mm/min. Statistical analysis was carried out with ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). The highest bond strength means were recorded in 250 microm group without laser welding. The lowest shear bond strength means were recorded in 50 microm group with laser welding. Statistically significant differences (p<0.05) were found between all groups. In conclusion, airborne particle abrasion yielded significantly lower bond strength as the Al(2)O(3) particle size decreased. Shear bond strength decreased in the laser welded specimens.

  14. Feasibility of correlating V-Cr-Ti alloy weld strength with weld chemistry. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Odom, R.W.

    1998-06-01

    The mechanical properties of refractory metals such as vanadium are determined to a large extent by the interstitial impurities in the alloy. In the case of welding, interstitial impurities are introduced in the welding process from the atmosphere and by dissolution of existing precipitates in the alloy itself. Because of the necessity of having an ultra-pure atmosphere, a vacuum chamber or a glove box is necessary. In the V-Cr-Ti system, the titanium serves as a getter to control the concentration of oxygen and nitrogen in solid solution in the alloy. In this project the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) technique was used to detect, measure, and map the spacial distribution of impurity elements in welds in the alloy V-4Cr-4Ti. An attempt was then made to correlate the concentrations and distributions of the impurities with mechanical properties of the welds. Mechanical integrity of the welds was determined by Charpy V-notch testing. Welds were prepared by the gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) method. Charpy testing established a correlation between weld impurity concentration and the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Higher concentrations of oxygen resulted in a higher DBTT. An exception was noted in the case of a low-oxygen weld which had a high hydrogen concentration resulting in a brittle weld. The concentrations and distributions of the impurities determined by SIMS could not be correlated with the mechanical properties of the welds. This research supports efforts to develop fusion reactor first wall and blanket structural materials.

  15. Finite volume modeling of laser assisted friction stir welding of 2017A-T451 aluminum alloy for enhanced sustainability of welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimouni, Oussama; Badji, Riad; Hadji, Mohamed; Kouadri-Henni, Afia

    2016-10-01

    This study focuses on a new welding modification friction stir welding, using a preheating during the welding phase. This method utilizes laser energy to pre-heat the workpiece to a localized area at the front of the FSW tool, thereby reducing the temperature gradient over a localized area in advance of the tool. The amount of heat generated during welding determines the quality of the weld. Therefore the understanding of the temperature distribution is required to determine the optimal method of welding parameters. In this study, a two-dimensional model of an aluminum alloy plate coupled to a circular laser source is developed, using FLUENT software that is based on the finite volume method, also the geometry of the pin of the FSW tool was modified in several configurations to highlight the effect of the geometry of the tool on the temperature distribution in the welded plate. The model developed can be used to better understand the process, predict process performance and to determine the optimal parameters of the process.

  16. Ultrasonic Welding of Hybrid Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Guntram; Balle, Frank; Eifler, Dietmar

    2012-03-01

    A central research field of the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Kaiserslautern (WKK), Germany, is the realization of innovative hybrid joints by ultrasonic metal welding. This article gives an overview of suitable ultrasonic welding systems as well as of essential machine and material parameters, which influence the quality of the welds. Besides the ultrasonic welding of dissimilar metals such as Al to Cu or Al to steels, the welds between newly developed materials like aluminum foam sandwiches or flat flexible cables also can be realized. Moreover, the joining of glass and ceramic to sheet metals is a point of interest at the WKK. By using the ultrasonic metal welding process, it is possible to realize metal/glass welds with tensile shear strengths of 50 MPa. For metal/ceramic joints, the shear strengths values up to 150 MPa were measured. Finally, selected results about the occurring bonding mechanisms will be discussed.

  17. Tensile strength and corrosion resistance of brazed and laser-welded cobalt-chromium alloy joints.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Rok; Legat, Andraz; Funduk, Nenad

    2006-10-01

    The longevity of prosthodontic restorations is often limited due to the mechanical or corrosive failure occurring at the sites where segments of a metal framework are joined together. The purpose of this study was to determine which joining method offers the best properties to cobalt-chromium alloy frameworks. Brazed and 2 types of laser-welded joints were compared for their mechanical and corrosion characteristics. Sixty-eight cylindrical cobalt-chromium dental alloy specimens, 35 mm long and 2 mm in diameter, were cast. Sixteen specimens were selected for electrochemical measurements in an artificial saliva solution and divided into 4 groups (n=4). In the intact group, the specimens were left as cast. The specimens of the remaining 3 groups were sectioned at the center, perpendicular to the long-axis, and were subsequently rejoined by brazing (brazing group) or laser welding using an X- or I-shaped joint design (X laser and I laser groups, respectively). Another 16 specimens were selected for electrochemical measurements in a more acidic artificial saliva solution. These specimens were also divided into 4 groups (n=4) as described above. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization were used to assess corrosion potentials, breakdown potentials, corrosion current densities, total impedances at lowest frequency, and polarization charge-transfer resistances. The remaining 36 specimens were used for tensile testing. They were divided into 3 groups in which specimen pairs (n=6) were joined by brazing or laser welding to form 70-mm-long cylindrical rods. The tensile strength (MPa) was measured using a universal testing machine. Differences between groups were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance (alpha=.05). The fracture surfaces and corrosion defects were examined with a scanning electron microscope. The average tensile strength of brazed joints was 792 MPa and was significantly greater (P<.05) than the tensile strength of both types of

  18. A method for studying weld fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kostrivas, A.; Lippold, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Aluminum alloys may exhibit a variety of microstructures within the fusion zone adjacent to the fusion boundary. Under conventional weld solidification conditions, epitaxial nucleation occurs off grains in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and solidification proceeds along preferred growth directions. In some aluminum alloys, such as those containing Li and Zr, a nondendritic equiaxed grain zone (EQZ) has been observed along the fusion boundary that does not nucleate epitaxially from the HAZ substrate. The EQZ has been the subject of considerable study because of its susceptibility to cracking during initial fabrication and repair. The motivation of this investigation was to develop a technique that would allow the nature and evolution of the fusion boundary to be studied under controlled thermal conditions. A melting technique was developed to simulate the fusion boundary of aluminum alloys using the Gleeble{reg{underscore}sign} thermal simulator. Using a steel sleeve to contain the aluminum, samples wee heated to incremental temperatures above the solidus temperature of a number of alloys. In Alloy 2195, a 4Cu-1Li alloy, an EQZ could be formed by heating in the temperature range approximately from 630--640 C. At temperatures above 640 C, solidification occurred by the normal epitaxial nucleation and growth mechanism. Fusion boundary behavior was also studied in Alloys 5454-H34, 6061-T6 and 2219-T8. Nucleation in these alloys was observed to be epitaxial. Details of the technique and its effectiveness for performing controlled melting experiments at incremental temperatures above the solidus are described.

  19. Artificial neural networks application for modeling of friction stir welding effects on mechanical properties of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, E.

    2015-12-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new solid-state joining technique that is widely adopted in manufacturing and industry fields to join different metallic alloys that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. Friction stir welding is a very complex process comprising several highly coupled physical phenomena. The complex geometry of some kinds of joints makes it difficult to develop an overall governing equations system for theoretical behavior analyse of the friction stir welded joints. Weld quality is predominantly affected by welding effective parameters, and the experiments are often time consuming and costly. On the other hand, employing artificial intelligence (AI) systems such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) as an efficient approach to solve the science and engineering problems is considerable. In present study modeling of FSW effective parameters by ANNs is investigated. To train the networks, experimental test results on thirty AA-7075-T6 specimens are considered, and the networks are developed based on back propagation (BP) algorithm. ANNs testing are carried out using different experimental data that they are not used during networks training. In this paper, rotational speed of tool, welding speed, axial force, shoulder diameter, pin diameter and tool hardness are regarded as inputs of the ANNs. Yield strength, tensile strength, notch-tensile strength and hardness of welding zone are gathered as outputs of neural networks. According to the obtained results, predicted values for the hardness of welding zone, yield strength, tensile strength and notch-tensile strength have the least mean relative error (MRE), respectively. Comparison of the predicted and the experimental results confirms that the networks are adjusted carefully, and the ANN can be used for modeling of FSW effective parameters.

  20. Friction stir welding process and material microstructure evolution modeling in 2000 and 5000 series of aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalavarthy, Harshavardhan

    Interactions between the rotating and advancing pin-shaped tool (terminated at one end with a circular-cylindrical shoulder) with the clamped welding-plates and the associated material and heat transport during a Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process are studied computationally using a fully-coupled thermo-mechanical finite-element analysis. To surmount potential numerical problems associated with extensive mesh distortions/entanglement, an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation was used which enabled adaptive re-meshing (to ensure the continuing presence of a high-quality mesh) while allowing full tracking of the material free surfaces. To demonstrate the utility of the present computational approach, the analysis is applied to the cases of same-alloy FSW of two Aluminum-alloy grades: (a) AA5083 (a solid-solution strengthened and strain-hardened/stabilized Al-Mg-Mn alloy); and (b) AA2139 (a precipitation hardened quaternary Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy). Both of these alloys are currently being used in military-vehicle hull structural and armor systems. In the case of non-age-hardenable AA5083, the dominant microstructure evolution processes taking place during FSW are extensive plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization of highly-deformed material subjected to elevated temperatures approaching the melting temperature. To account for the competition between plastic-deformation controlled strengthening and dynamic-recrystallization induced softening phenomena during the FSW process, the original Johnson-Cook strain- and strain-rate hardening and temperature-softening material strength model is modified in the present work using the available recrystallization-kinetics experimental data. In the case of AA2139, in addition to plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization, precipitates coarsening, over-aging, dissolution and re-precipitation had to be also considered. Limited data available in the open literature pertaining to the kinetics of the aforementioned

  1. Double-sided laser beam welded T-joints for aluminum-lithium alloy aircraft fuselage panels: Effects of filler elements on microstructure and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bing; Tao, Wang; Chen, Yanbin; Li, Hao

    2017-08-01

    In the current work, T-joints consisting of 2.0 mm thick 2060-T8/2099-T83 aluminum-lithium alloys for aircraft fuselage panels have been fabricated by double-sided fiber laser beam welding with different filler wires. A new type wire CW3 (Al-6.2Cu-5.4Si) was studied and compared with conventional wire AA4047 (Al-12Si) mainly on microstructure and mechanical properties. It was found that the main combined function of Al-6.2%Cu-5.4%Si in CW3 resulted in considerable improvements especially on intergranular strength, hot cracking susceptibility and hoop tensile properties. Typical non-dendritic equiaxed zone (EQZ) was observed along welds' fusion boundary. Hot cracks and fractures during the load were always located within the EQZ, however, this typical zone could be restrained by CW3, effectively. Furthermore, changing of the main intergranular precipitated phase within the EQZ from T phase by AA4047 to T2 phase by CW3 also resulted in developments on microscopic intergranular reinforcement and macroscopic hoop tensile properties. In addition, bridging caused by richer substructure dendrites within CW3 weld's columnar zone resulted in much lower hot cracking susceptibility of the whole weld than AA4047.

  2. 49 CFR 587.15 - Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. 587.15 Section 587.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL... Deformable Barrier § 587.15 Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. The following procedure is...

  3. 49 CFR 587.15 - Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. 587.15 Section 587.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL... Deformable Barrier § 587.15 Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. The following procedure is...

  4. 49 CFR 587.15 - Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. 587.15 Section 587.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL... Deformable Barrier § 587.15 Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. The following procedure is...

  5. 49 CFR 587.15 - Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. 587.15 Section 587.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL... Deformable Barrier § 587.15 Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. The following procedure is...

  6. 49 CFR 587.15 - Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. 587.15 Section 587.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL... Deformable Barrier § 587.15 Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. The following procedure is...

  7. Addressing the Limit of Detectability of Residual Oxide Discontinuities in Friction Stir Butt Welds of Aluminum using Phased Array Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, P. H.

    2008-01-01

    This activity seeks to estimate a theoretical upper bound of detectability for a layer of oxide embedded in a friction stir weld in aluminum. The oxide is theoretically modeled as an ideal planar layer of aluminum oxide, oriented normal to an interrogating ultrasound beam. Experimentally-measured grain scattering level is used to represent the practical noise floor. Echoes from naturally-occurring oxides will necessarily fall below this theoretical limit, and must be above the measurement noise to be potentially detectable.

  8. Addressing the Limit of Detectability of Residual Oxide Discontinuities in Friction Stir Butt Welds of Aluminum Using Phased Array Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, P. H.

    2009-03-01

    This activity seeks to estimate a theoretical upper bound of detectability for a layer of oxide embedded in a friction stir weld in aluminum. The oxide is theoretically modeled as an ideal planar layer of aluminum oxide, oriented normal to an interrogating ultrasound beam. Experimentally-measured grain scattering level is used to represent the practical noise floor. Echoes from naturally-occurring oxides will necessarily fall below this theoretical limit, and must be above the measurement noise to be potentially detectable.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Laser Beam Welded Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. A strength of up to 2 GPa at a fracture strain of 15% can be attained. Welding of these materials became apparently a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply an efficient heat control. For two application cases, production of tailored blanks in as-rolled condition and welding in assembly in hot stamped conditions, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown in metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KSII concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method. For the case of assembly also joining with deep drawing and manganese boron steel was taken into consideration. The strength of the joint is determined by the weaker partner but can benefit from its ductility.

  10. Effective Use of Weld Metal Yield Strength for HY-Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    and Hasubuchi 1959; Hall et al. 1967). Residual stresses also play important roles in stress corrosion cracking and-hydrogen-induced delayed cracking ... stress corrosion cracking . Weldments with inferior strength have been acceptable only in a few limited cases--repair melds in HY-S0 (made with covered...residual weld stresses could reduce the tendency for hydrogen-induced cracking . Welding processes with very low hydrogen potential are available

  11. Surface and microstructural characterization of laser beam welds in an aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascente, P. A. P.; Bolfarini, C.; Benassi, C. L.; Alcantara, N. G.; Santos, J. F.

    2002-07-01

    The weldability of aluminum alloys is one of the main requirements to be considered for their application in the automotive and aerospace industry. In this work, the weld joints of an AA7020 alloy obtained by laser process were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The laser process can be described as a high-speed solidification process. The solidification rate can be estimated from the correlation among several solidification rates and the corresponding dendritic/cellular spacings, and the value calculated for this rate was 3.0 x103 K/s. The inclusions present in the base metal were identified as (Cr,Fe)4Si4Al13, which were not observed in the fused zone. The fused zone microstructure showed two distinct phases: an aluminum solid solution and fine precipitates of MgZn2. The transition from the base metal to the fused zone presented a narrow heat-affected zone. A strong depletion of Zn was observed, and this does not influence the hot tearing susceptibility since hot cracks were not observed in the weld zone. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  12. Computational Analysis of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of AA5059 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, G.; Pandurangan, B.; Ochterbeck, J. M.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.; Reynolds, A. P.; Sutton, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Workpiece material flow and stirring/mixing during the friction stir welding (FSW) process are investigated computationally. Within the numerical model of the FSW process, the FSW tool is treated as a Lagrangian component while the workpiece material is treated as an Eulerian component. The employed coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian computational analysis of the welding process was of a two-way thermo-mechanical character (i.e., frictional-sliding/plastic-work dissipation is taken to act as a heat source in the thermal-energy balance equation) while temperature is allowed to affect mechanical aspects of the model through temperature-dependent material properties. The workpiece material (AA5059, solid-solution strengthened and strain-hardened aluminum alloy) is represented using a modified version of the classical Johnson-Cook model (within which the strain-hardening term is augmented to take into account for the effect of dynamic recrystallization) while the FSW tool material (AISI H13 tool steel) is modeled as an isotropic linear-elastic material. Within the analysis, the effects of some of the FSW key process parameters are investigated (e.g., weld pitch, tool tilt-angle, and the tool pin-size). The results pertaining to the material flow during FSW are compared with their experimental counterparts. It is found that, for the most part, experimentally observed material-flow characteristics are reproduced within the current FSW-process model.

  13. B218 Weld Filler Wire Characterization for Al-Li Alloy 2195

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Russell, Carolyn

    2000-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Lockheed Martin Space Systems- Michoud Operations, and McCook Metals have developed an aluminum-copper weld filler wire for fusion welding aluminum lithium alloy 2195. The aluminum-copper based weld filler wire has been identified as B218, a McCook Metals designation. B218 is the result of six years of weld filler wire development funded by NASA, Lockheed Martin, and McCook Metals. The filler wire chemistry was developed to produce enhanced 2195 weld and repair weld mechanical properties over the 4043 aluminum-silicon weld filler wire, which is currently used to weld 2195 on the Super Lightweight External Tank for the NASA Space Shuttle Program. An initial characterization was performed consisting of a repair weld evaluation using B218 and 4043 weld filler wires. The testing involved room temperature and cryogenic repair weld tensile testing along with fracture toughness testing. From the testing, B218 weld filler wire produce enhanced repair weld tensile strength, ductility, and fracture properties over 4043. B218 weld filler wire has proved to be a superior weld filler wire for welding aluminum lithium alloy 2195 over 4043.

  14. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  15. Effect of Pin Geometry on the Mechanical Strength of Friction-Stir-Welded Polypropylene Composite Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordestani, F.; Ashenai Ghasemi, F.; Arab, N. B. M.

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state welding process, which has successfully been applied in aerospace and automotive industries for joining materials. The friction stir tool is the key element in the FSW process. In this study, the effect of four different tool pin geometries on the mechanical properties of two types of polypropylene composite plates, with 30% glass and carbon fiber, respectively, were investigated. For this purpose, four pins of different geometry, namely, a threaded-tapered pin, square pin, four-flute threaded pin, and threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer were made and used to carry out the butt welding of 5-mm-thick plates. The standard tensile and Izod impact tests were performed to evaluate the tensile strength and impact toughness of welded specimens. The results indicated that the threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer produced welds with a better surface appearance and higher tensile and impact strengths. The tests also showed that, with the threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer, the impact strength of the glass- and carbon-fiber composite welds were about 40 and 50%, respectively, of that of the base materials.

  16. Fabrication of Aluminum Foam-Filled Thin-Wall Steel Tube by Friction Welding and Its Compression Properties

    PubMed Central

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Saito, Masaki; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kitahara, Soichiro; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum foam has received considerable attention in various fields and is expected to be used as an engineering material owing to its high energy absorption properties and light weight. To improve the mechanical properties of aluminum foam, combining it with dense tubes, such as aluminum foam-filled tubes, was considered necessary. In this study, an aluminum foam-filled steel tube, which consisted of ADC12 aluminum foam and a thin-wall steel tube, was successfully fabricated by friction welding. It was shown that a diffusion bonding layer with a thickness of approximately 10 μm was formed, indicating that strong bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube was realized. By the X-ray computed tomography observation of pore structures, the fabrication of an aluminum foam-filled tube with almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen was confirmed. In addition, it was confirmed that the aluminum foam-filled steel tube exhibited mechanical properties superior to those of the ADC12 aluminum foam and steel tube. This is considered to be attributed to the combination of the aluminum foam and steel tube, which particularly prevents the brittle fracture and collapse of the ADC12 foam by the steel tube, along with the strong metal bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube. PMID:28788213

  17. Fabrication of Aluminum Foam-Filled Thin-Wall Steel Tube by Friction Welding and Its Compression Properties.

    PubMed

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Saito, Masaki; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kitahara, Soichiro; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2014-09-19

    Aluminum foam has received considerable attention in various fields and is expected to be used as an engineering material owing to its high energy absorption properties and light weight. To improve the mechanical properties of aluminum foam, combining it with dense tubes, such as aluminum foam-filled tubes, was considered necessary. In this study, an aluminum foam-filled steel tube, which consisted of ADC12 aluminum foam and a thin-wall steel tube, was successfully fabricated by friction welding. It was shown that a diffusion bonding layer with a thickness of approximately 10 μm was formed, indicating that strong bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube was realized. By the X-ray computed tomography observation of pore structures, the fabrication of an aluminum foam-filled tube with almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen was confirmed. In addition, it was confirmed that the aluminum foam-filled steel tube exhibited mechanical properties superior to those of the ADC12 aluminum foam and steel tube. This is considered to be attributed to the combination of the aluminum foam and steel tube, which particularly prevents the brittle fracture and collapse of the ADC12 foam by the steel tube, along with the strong metal bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube.

  18. Effect of joint design and welding type on the flexural strength and weld penetration of Ti-6Al-4V alloy bars.

    PubMed

    Simamoto Júnior, Paulo Cézar; Resende Novais, Veridiana; Rodrigues Machado, Asbel; Soares, Carlos José; Araújo Raposo, Luís Henrique

    2015-05-01

    Framework longevity is a key factor for the success of complete-arch prostheses and commonly depends on the welding methods. However, no consensus has been reached on the joint design and welding type for improving framework resistance. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of different joint designs and welding methods with tungsten inert gas (TIG) or laser to join titanium alloy bars (Ti-6Al-4V). Seventy titanium alloy bar specimens were prepared (3.18 mm in diameter × 40.0 mm in length) and divided into 7 groups (n=10): the C-control group consisting of intact specimens without joints and the remaining 6 groups consisting of specimens sectioned perpendicular to the long-axis and rejoined using an I-, X30-, or X45-shaped joint design with TIG welding (TI, TX30, and TX45) or laser welding (LI, LX30, and LX45). The specimens were tested with 3-point bending. The fracture surfaces were first evaluated with stereomicroscopy to measure the weld penetration area and then analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The data were statistically analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey post hoc test, 1-way ANOVA and the Dunnett test, and the Pearson correlation test (α=.05). Specimens from the X30 and X45 groups showed higher flexural strength (P<.05) and welded area (P<.05) than specimens from the I groups, regardless of the welding type. TIG welded groups showed significantly higher flexural strength than the laser groups (P<.05), regardless of the joint design. TIG welding also resulted in higher welded areas than laser welding for the I-shaped specimens. No significant differences were found for the weld penetration area in the X45 group, either for laser or TIG welding. SEM analysis showed more pores at the fracture surfaces of the laser specimens. Fracture surfaces indicative of regions of increased ductility were detected for the TIG specimens. TIG welding resulted in higher flexural strength for the joined titanium specimens than laser welding

  19. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  20. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  1. Mechanical Property Analysis in the Retracted Pin-Tool (RPT) Region of Friction Stir Welded (FSW) Aluminum Lithium 2195

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Oelgoetz, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    The "Auto-Adjustable Pin Tool for Friction Stir Welding", was developed at The Marshall Space Flight Center to address process deficiencies unique to the FSW process. The auto-adjustable pin tool, also called the retractable pin-tool (R.PT) automatically withdraws the welding probe of the pin-tool into the pin-tool's shoulder. The primary function of the auto-adjustable pin-tool is to allow for keyhole closeout, necessary for circumferential welding and localized weld repair, and, automated pin-length adjustment for the welding of tapered material thickness. An overview of the RPT hardware is presented. The paper follows with studies conducted using the RPT. The RPT was used to simulate two capabilities; welding tapered material thickness and closing out the keyhole in a circumferential weld. The retracted pin-tool regions in aluminum- lithium 2195 friction stir weldments were studied through mechanical property testing and metallurgical sectioning. Correlation's can be =de between retractable pin-tool programmed parameters, process parameters, microstructure, and resulting weld quality.

  2. Effect of tool pin features on process response variables during friction stir welding of dissimilar aluminum alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Rabby, Reza; Tang, Wei; Reynolds, A. P.

    2015-05-13

    In this article, the effect of pin features and orientation/placement of the materials on advancing side were investigated for friction stir welding (FSW) of dissimilar aluminum alloys AA2050 and AA6061. Pins for FSW were produced with a 2.12 mm pitch thread having three flats/flutes. Three sets of rotational speed/welding speed were used to perform a series of welds in a butt joint arrangement. The results show that, joint quality, process response variables and welding temperature are highly affected by pin features and material orientation in FSW. Defect free joints with effective material transportation in the weld nugget zone were obtainedmore » when welding was performed with AA2050 on the advancing side. The tool also encounters less in-plane reaction force for welding with 2050 on the advancing side. Pin with thread+3 flats produces quality welds at low rotational and travel speed regardless of the location of alloys on advancing or retreating side.« less

  3. Effect of tool pin features on process response variables during friction stir welding of dissimilar aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rabby, Reza; Tang, Wei; Reynolds, A. P.

    2015-05-13

    In this article, the effect of pin features and orientation/placement of the materials on advancing side were investigated for friction stir welding (FSW) of dissimilar aluminum alloys AA2050 and AA6061. Pins for FSW were produced with a 2.12 mm pitch thread having three flats/flutes. Three sets of rotational speed/welding speed were used to perform a series of welds in a butt joint arrangement. The results show that, joint quality, process response variables and welding temperature are highly affected by pin features and material orientation in FSW. Defect free joints with effective material transportation in the weld nugget zone were obtained when welding was performed with AA2050 on the advancing side. The tool also encounters less in-plane reaction force for welding with 2050 on the advancing side. Pin with thread+3 flats produces quality welds at low rotational and travel speed regardless of the location of alloys on advancing or retreating side.

  4. Mechanical Property Analysis in the Retracted Pin-Tool (RPT) Region of Friction Stir Welded (FSW) Aluminum Lithium 2195

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Oelgoetz, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    The "Auto-Adjustable Pin Tool for Friction Stir Welding", was developed at The Marshall Space Flight Center to address process deficiencies unique to the FSW process. The auto-adjustable pin tool, also called the retractable pin-tool (R.PT) automatically withdraws the welding probe of the pin-tool into the pin-tool's shoulder. The primary function of the auto-adjustable pin-tool is to allow for keyhole closeout, necessary for circumferential welding and localized weld repair, and, automated pin-length adjustment for the welding of tapered material thickness. An overview of the RPT hardware is presented. The paper follows with studies conducted using the RPT. The RPT was used to simulate two capabilities; welding tapered material thickness and closing out the keyhole in a circumferential weld. The retracted pin-tool regions in aluminum- lithium 2195 friction stir weldments were studied through mechanical property testing and metallurgical sectioning. Correlation's can be =de between retractable pin-tool programmed parameters, process parameters, microstructure, and resulting weld quality.

  5. Modeling of Residual Stresses and Property Distributions in Friction Stir Welds of Aluminum Alloy 6061-T6

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A; Wang, Xun-Li; Sklad, Philip S

    2007-01-01

    An integrated thermal-metallurgical-mechanical model is used to analyze and provide insights into the formation of the residual stress and the changes in microstructure and property of Al6061-T6 friction stir welds. The simulations were conducted by means of a three-dimensional finite element model that accounts for the phenomena of frictional heating, weld microstructure and strength changes due to dissolution and reprecipitation of the hardening precipitate particles, and the mechanical workpiece/tool contact during the friction stir welding (FSW) process. The model predictions were confirmed by experimental measurement data from previous studies. For the friction stir welds investigated, it was found that the residual stress distribution is strongly dependent on the welding process parameters and the degree of material softening caused by welding. The recovery of material strength from natural aging does not increase the residual stress in the weld. The failure of friction stir weld under tensile load is controlled by the combination of the reduction in strength and the residual stresses in the heat affected zone (HAZ).

  6. Shielded Metal Arc Welding Consumables for Advanced High Strength Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    100 ksi) depends on the availability of adequate welding consumables. In the case of shielded metal arc welding, the electrodes must provide...associated with the potassium silicate binder (K2 SiO3 .nH2 0). The fluxes were then crushed and sized to 14# Tyler mesh (1.7 mm screen aperture) to...determined that the hydrated potassium silicate binder (K2 SiO3 .nH20) used in this investi- gation was 50 wt. pct. potassium silicate (K 2SiO 3 ) and

  7. Weldability characteristics of shielded metal arc welded high strength quenched and tempered plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, R.; Mukerjee, D.; Jha, S.; Narasimhan, K.; Veeraraghavan, R.

    2002-02-01

    High strength, quench and tempered (Q&T) plates having yield strength of a minimum of 670 MPa and conforming to SA 517 Gr. F specification were successfully developed at Rourkela Steel Plant in plates up to 40 mm thickness. The plates are used extensively for the fabrication of impellers, penstocks, excavators, dumpers, and raw material handling devices, where welding is an important processing step. SA 517 Gr. F plates, characterized by a relatively high carbon equivalent (CE: ˜0.6) and alloyed with Ni, Cr, Mo, Cu, and V, are susceptible to a crack-sensitive microstructure and cold cracking during welding. In view of the above, the present study investigated the weldability properties of 20 mm thick plates using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. Implant and elastic restraint cracking (ERC) tests were carried out to assess the cold cracking resistance of the weld joint under different welding conditions. Preheat of 100 °C, partial or full rebake, and a heat input of 14.9 to 15.4 KJ/cm resulted in static fatigue limit (SFL) values well in excess of the minimum specified yield strength (MSYS) of 670 MPa and a critical restraint intensity (K cr) value of 34,650 MPa, indicating adequate cold cracking resistance. Lamellar tear tests conducted using full thickness plates at heat input levels ranging from 9.7 to 14.4 KJ/cm and weld restraint loads (WRL) of 510 to 685 MPa showed no incidence of lamellar tear upon visual, ultrasonic, and four-section macroexamination. The weld joint, based on optimized welding parameters, exhibited adequate tensile strength (812.4 MPa) and low temperature impact toughness 88.3 and 63.4 J (9.2 and 6.6 kg-m) at -40 °C for weld metal (WM), and heat-affected zone (HAZ) properties, respectively. The crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) values of WM and HAZ (0.40 and 0.36 mm, respectively) were superior to that of the parent metal (0.29 mm), indicating adequate resistance of weld joint to brittle fracture. It was concluded that

  8. Effect of Welding Parameters on the Microstructure and Strength of Friction Stir Weld Joints in Twin Roll Cast EN AW Al-Mn1Cu Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol, Yucel; Kasman, Sefika

    2013-10-01

    Twin roll cast EN AW Al-Mn1Cu plates were butt welded with the friction stir welding process which employed a non-consumable tool, tilted by 1.5° and 3° with respect to the plate normal, rotated in a clockwise direction at 400 and 800 rpm, while traversing at a fixed rate of 80 mm/min along the weld line. Microstructural observations and microhardness tests were performed on sections perpendicular to the tool traverse direction. Tensile tests were carried out at room temperature on samples cut perpendicular to the weld line. The ultimate tensile strength of the welded EN AW Al-Mn1Cu plates improved with increasing tool rotation speed and decreasing tool tilt angle. This marked improvement in ultimate tensile strength is attributed to the increase in the heat input owing to an increased frictional heat generation. There appears to be a perfect correlation between the ultimate tensile strength and the size of the weld zone. The fracture surfaces of the base plate and the welded plates are distinctly different. The former is dominated by dimples typical of ductile fractures. A vast majority of the intermetallic particles inside the weld zones are too small to generate dimples during a tensile test. The fracture surface of the welded plates is thus characterized by occasional dimples that are elongated in the same direction suggesting a tensile tearing mechanism.

  9. Friction Stir Welding in Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys: Weld Quality Evaluation and Effects of Processing Parameters on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2017-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state process widely used for joining similar and dissimilar materials for critical applications in the transportation sector. Understanding the effects of the process on microstructure and mechanical properties is critical in design for structural integrity. In this study, four aluminum alloy systems (wrought 6061-T651 and cast A356, 319, and A390) were processed in both as-fabricated and pre-weld heat-treated (T6) conditions using various processing parameters. The effects of processing and heat treatment on the resulting microstructures, macro-/micro-hardness, and tensile properties were systematically investigated and mechanistically correlated to changes in grain size, characteristic phases, and strengthening precipitates. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature both along and across the welding zones. A new method able to evaluate weld quality (using a weld quality index) was developed based on the stress concentration calculated under tensile loading. Optimum processing parameter domains that provide both defect-free welds and good mechanical properties were determined for each alloy and associated with the thermal history of the process. These results were further related to characteristic microstructural features, which can be used for component design and materials/process optimization.

  10. Friction Stir Welding in Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys: Weld Quality Evaluation and Effects of Processing Parameters on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2017-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state process widely used for joining similar and dissimilar materials for critical applications in the transportation sector. Understanding the effects of the process on microstructure and mechanical properties is critical in design for structural integrity. In this study, four aluminum alloy systems (wrought 6061-T651 and cast A356, 319, and A390) were processed in both as-fabricated and pre-weld heat-treated (T6) conditions using various processing parameters. The effects of processing and heat treatment on the resulting microstructures, macro-/micro-hardness, and tensile properties were systematically investigated and mechanistically correlated to changes in grain size, characteristic phases, and strengthening precipitates. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature both along and across the welding zones. A new method able to evaluate weld quality (using a weld quality index) was developed based on the stress concentration calculated under tensile loading. Optimum processing parameter domains that provide both defect-free welds and good mechanical properties were determined for each alloy and associated with the thermal history of the process. These results were further related to characteristic microstructural features, which can be used for component design and materials/process optimization.

  11. Effect of laser welding on the titanium ceramic tensile bond strength

    PubMed Central

    GALO, Rodrigo; RIBEIRO, Ricardo Faria; RODRIGUES, Renata Cristina Silveira; PAGNANO, Valéria de Oliveira; de MATTOS, Maria da Glória Chiarello

    2011-01-01

    Titanium reacts strongly with elements, mainly oxygen at high temperature. The high temperature of titanium laser welding modifies the surface, and may interfere on the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength. Objective The influence of laser welding on the titanium-ceramic bonding has not yet been established. The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the influence of laser welding applied to commercially pure titanium (CpTi) substructure on the bond strength of commercial ceramic. The influence of airborne particle abrasion (Al2O3) conditions was also studied. Material and Methods Forty CpTi cylindrical rods (3 mm x 60 mm) were cast and divided into 2 groups: with laser welding (L) and without laser welding (WL). Each group was divided in 4 subgroups, according to the size of the particles used in airborne particle abrasion: A - Al2O3 (250 µm); B - Al2O3 (180 µm); C - Al2O3 (110 µm); D - Al2O3 (50 µm). Ceramic rings were fused around the CpTi rods. Specimens were invested and their tensile strength was measured at fracture with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2.0 mm/min and 200 kgf load cell. Statistical analysis was carried out with analysis of variance and compared using the independent t test (p≤0.05). Results Significant differences were found among all subgroups (p<0.05). The highest and the lowest bond strength means were recorded in subgroups WLC (52.62 MPa) and LD (24.02 MPa), respectively. Conclusion Airborne particle abrasion yielded significantly lower bond strength as the Al2O3 particle size decreased. Mechanical retention decreased in the laser-welded specimens, i.e. the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength was lower. PMID:21956585

  12. Effect of laser welding on the titanium ceramic tensile bond strength.

    PubMed

    Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Pagnano, Valéria de Oliveira; Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello de

    2011-08-01

    Titanium reacts strongly with elements, mainly oxygen at high temperature. The high temperature of titanium laser welding modifies the surface, and may interfere on the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength. The influence of laser welding on the titanium-ceramic bonding has not yet been established. The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the influence of laser welding applied to commercially pure titanium (CpTi) substructure on the bond strength of commercial ceramic. The influence of airborne particle abrasion (Al2O3) conditions was also studied. Forty CpTi cylindrical rods (3 mm x 60 mm) were cast and divided into 2 groups: with laser welding (L) and without laser welding (WL). Each group was divided in 4 subgroups, according to the size of the particles used in airborne particle abrasion: A - Al2O3 (250 µm); B - Al2O3 (180 µm); C - Al2O3 (110 µm); D - Al2O3 (50 µm). Ceramic rings were fused around the CpTi rods. Specimens were invested and their tensile strength was measured at fracture with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2.0 mm/min and 200 kgf load cell. Statistical analysis was carried out with analysis of variance and compared using the independent t test (p<0.05). Significant differences were found among all subgroups (p<0.05). The highest and the lowest bond strength means were recorded in subgroups WLC (52.62 MPa) and LD (24.02 MPa), respectively. Airborne particle abrasion yielded significantly lower bond strength as the Al2O3 particle size decreased. Mechanical retention decreased in the laser-welded specimens, i.e. the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength was lower.

  13. Ultrasonic inspection of MC2893 strength member assembly weld

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, W.A.

    1984-02-17

    An ultrasonic technique developed at Mound to nondestructively inspect an assembly weld critical to the fabrication and production of MC2893 heat sources is described. Prior to transferring the assembly technology to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the ultrasonic technique was used at Mound as a 100% in-line inspection tool.

  14. The tensile strength characteristics study of the laser welds of biological tissue using the nanocomposite solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimshan, I. B.; Ryabkin, D. I.; Savelyev, M. S.; Zhurbina, N. N.; Pyanov, I. V.; Eganova, E. M.; Pavlov, A. A.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Ichkitidze, L. P.; Selishchev, S. V.; Gerasimenko, A. Y.

    2016-04-01

    Laser welding device for biological tissue has been developed. The main device parts are the radiation system and adaptive thermal stabilization system of welding area. Adaptive thermal stabilization system provided the relation between the laser radiation intensity and the weld temperature. Using atomic force microscopy the structure of composite which is formed by the radiation of laser solder based on aqua- albuminous dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes was investigated. AFM topograms nanocomposite solder are mainly defined by the presence of pores in the samples. In generally, the surface structure of composite is influenced by the time, laser radiation power and MWCNT concentration. Average size of backbone nanoelements not exceeded 500 nm. Bulk density of nanoelements was in the range 106-108 sm-3. The data of welding temperature maintained during the laser welding process and the corresponding tensile strength values were obtained. Maximum tensile strength of the suture was reached in the range 50-55°C. This temperature and the pointwise laser welding technology (point area ~ 2.5mm) allows avoiding thermal necrosis of healthy section of biological tissue and provided reliable bonding construction of weld join. In despite of the fact that tensile strength values of the samples are in the range of 15% in comparison with unbroken strips of pigskin leather. This situation corresponds to the initial stage of the dissected tissue connection with a view to further increasing of the joint strength of tissues with the recovery of tissue structure; thereby achieved ratio is enough for a medical practice in certain cases.

  15. Hot press and roll welding of titanium-6-percent-aluminum-4-percent-vanadium bar and sheet with auto-vacuum cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    Hot press butt welds were made in 0.5 in. diameter bar, and roll lap welds were made in 0.060 in. thick sheet of Ti-6A1-4V. For hot press welds made after auto-vacuum cleaning at 1800 F for 2 hours, weld strength and ductility equaled the parent metal properties. Only 5 minutes of pressing time were needed at 1800 F and 200 psi to make the hot press welds. Roll welds were made in sheet at 1750 F with only 10 percent deformation. The welds in the bar and sheet were metallurgically indistinguishable from the parent material.

  16. Characteristics of Dissimilar FSW Welds of Aluminum Alloys 2017A and 7075 on the Basis of Multiple Layer Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroczka, Krzysztof; Wójcicka, Anna; Pietras, Adam

    2013-09-01

    This work is concerned with the structure of the FSW joint of 2017A/7075 aluminum alloys, which was analyzed on the basis of a number of longitudinal and cross-sectional sections. Various ways and degrees of alloy stirring were identified, depending on the distance from the face of the weld. Furthermore, considerable variation in the length of the weld microstructures was demonstrated, reflecting the variability of the welding process. Studies of mechanical properties are also presented—the distributions of hardness on individual layers. A significant effect of plastic deformation on the hardness of the alloy 7075, which strengthened in deformed areas and shows weakness in the heat-affected zone, was noticed. The influence of the weld structure on the fracture of the sample, which was broken in the static tensile test, was analyzed applying scanning electron microscopy. The presence of non-deformed areas was revealed within the ductile fracture of the sample.

  17. Grain structure and dislocation density measurements in a friction stir welded aluminum alloy using x-ray peak profile analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Balogh, Levente; Ungar, Prof Tomas; Choo, Hahn; Feng, Zhili

    2008-01-01

    The dislocation density and grain structure of a friction stir welded 6061-T6 aluminum alloy was determined as a function of distance from the weld centerline using high-resolution micro-beam x-ray diffraction. The results of the x-ray peak profile analysis show that the dislocation density is about 1.2 x 10^14 m-2 inside and 4.8 x 10^14 m-2 outside of the weld region. The average subgrain size is about 180 nm in both regions. Compared to the base material, the dislocation density was significantly decreased in the dynamic recrystallized zone of the friction stir welds, which is a good correlation with the TEM observations. The influence of the dislocation density on the strain hardening behavior during tensile deformation is also discussed.

  18. Effect of external applied steady magnetic field on the morphology of laser welding joint of 4-mm 2024 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Xiaohong; Zhou, Junjie; Sun, Weihua; Chen, Jicheng; Wei, Yanhong

    2017-01-01

    Additional external steady magnetic fields were applied to investigate the influence of a steady magnetic field aligned perpendicular to the welding direction during laser beam welding of 2024 aluminum alloy. The flow pattern in the molten pool and the weld seam geometry were significantly changed by the induced Lorentz force distribution in the liquid metal. It revealed that the application of a steady magnetic field to laser beam welding was helpful to the suppression of the characteristic wineglass-shape and the depth-to-width ratio because of the Marangoni convection. The microstructures and component distributions at various laser power and magnetic field intensity were analyzed too. It was indicated that the suppression of the Marangoni convection by Lorentz force was beneficial to accumulation of component and grain coarsening near the fusion line.

  19. The Effects of Laser Peening and Shot Peening on Mechanical Properties in Friction Stir Welded 7075-T7351 Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatamleh, Omar

    2006-01-01

    Peening techniques like laser peening and shot peening were used to modify the surface of friction stir welded 7075-T7351 Aluminum Alloy specimens. The tensile coupons were machined such as the loading was applied in a direction perpendicular to the weld direction. The peening effects on the global and local mechanical properties through the different regions of the weld were characterized and assessed. The surface hardness levels resulting from various peening techniques were also investigated for both sides of the welds. Shot peening resulted in an increase to surface hardness levels, but no improvement was noticed on the mechanical properties. In contrast, mechanical properties were improved by laser peening when compared to the unpeened material.

  20. Study of issues in difficult-to-weld thick materials by hybrid laser arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazar Atabaki, Mehdi

    There is a high interest for the high strength-to-weight ratio with good ductility for the welds of advanced alloys. The concern about the welding of thick materials (Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and 5xxx and 6xxx series of aluminum alloys) has stimulated the development of manufacturing processes to overcome the associated issues. The need to weld the dissimilar materials (AHSS and aluminum alloys) is also required for some specific applications in different industries. Hence, the requirement in the development of a state-of-the-art welding procedure can be helpful to fulfill the constraints. Among the welding methods hybrid laser/arc welding (HLAW) has shown to be an effective method to join thick and difficult-to-weld materials. This process benefits from both advantages of the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and laser welding processes. The interaction of the arc and laser can help to have enough penetration of weld in thick plates. However, as the welding of dissimilar aluminum alloys and steels is very difficult because of the formation of brittle intermetallics the present work proposed a procedure to effectively join the alloys. The reports showed that the explosively welded aluminum alloys to steels have the highest toughness, and that could be used as an "insert" (TRICLAD) for welding the thick plates of AHSS to aluminum alloys. Therefore, the HLAW of the TRICLAD-Flange side (Aluminum alloy (AA 5456)) to the Web side (Aluminum alloys (AA 6061 and AA 5456)) and the TRICLAD-Flange side (ASTM A516) to the Web side (AHSS) was studied in the present work. However, there are many issues related to HLAW of the dissimilar steels as well as dissimilar aluminum alloys that have to be resolved in order to obtain sound welds. To address the challenges, the most recent welding methods for joining aluminum alloys to steels were studied and the microstructural development, mechanical properties, and on-line monitoring of the welding processes were discussed as well

  1. Experimental characterization of fatigue strength in butt welded joint considering the geometry and the effect of cooling rate of the weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzola, Nelson; Hernández, Edgar

    2017-05-01

    In this work the experimental characterization of fatigue strength in butt welded joints considering the geometry and the post-weld cooling cycle was performed. ASTM A-36 structural steel was used as the base metal for the shielded metal arc welding process, with welding electrode E6013. Two experimental factors were established: weld bead geometry and the post-weld cooling rate. Two levels for each factor, the welding reinforcement (1 and 3 mm), and the rate of cooling, slow (quiet air) and fast (immersion in water) are evaluated respectively. For the uniaxial fatigue tests, 8 samples were selected for each treatment for a total of 32 specimens. The mechanical and fractomechanical properties of fusion zone, heat affected zone and base metal in relation to the analysis of failure mechanisms were analysed. The fatigue crack growth rates were estimated based on the counting of microstrations. Furthermore, experimental tests, such as uniaxial tension, microindentation hardness, Charpy impact and metallographic analysis, were made to know the influence of the experimental factors in the fatigue strength. On this research, about the 78.13% of the samples obtained a resistance higher than the recommended one by class FAT 100. The results showed that the geometry of the joint is the factor of greatest influence on fatigue strength for butt welded joints; the greater the weld reinforcement the lower the fatigue strength of the joint. Although it is also important to consider other geometric factors of less impact as it is the weld toe radius and the welding chord width.

  2. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy AA7020-T6 Obtained by Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa Rao, G.; Subba Rao, V. V.; Rao, S. R. K.

    2017-07-01

    Plates from alloy AA7020 (Al - Zn - Mg) with a thickness of 4.5 mm are studied after T6 heat treatment and friction stir welding. Tensile and bending tests are performed. The hardness of the welds is measured in transverse direction. The microstructure over cross section of a weld is studied by the methods of light and transmission electron microscopy. The weldability of alloy AA7020 by friction stir welding is shown to be high.

  3. Prospects of increasing the strength of aluminum by reinforcing it with stainless steel wire (a review)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botvina, L. R.; Ivanova, V. S.; Kopev, I. M.

    1982-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental strength of aluminum reinforced with stainless steel wire is analyzed. Various methods of producing the composite material and it's static and cyclical strengths are considered. The reinforcement of aluminum with stainless steel wire was accomplished from the perspective of increasing the specific strength of aluminum and it's alloys, increasing the strength of the material with respect to high and low temperatures, as well as increasing the cyclical strength. The production of the composite aluminum-stainless steel wire material with approximated or calculated strengthening is possible by any of the considered methods. The selection of the proper production technology depends on precise details and conditions of application of the material.

  4. Modeling, simulation and control of pulsed DE-GMA welding process for joining of aluminum to steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang; Shi, Yu; Li, Jie; Huang, Jiankang; Fan, Ding

    2014-09-01

    Joining of aluminum to steel has attracted significant attention from the welding research community, automotive and rail transportation industries. Many current welding methods have been developed and applied, however, they can not precisely control the heat input to work-piece, they are high costs, low efficiency and consist lots of complex welding devices, and the generated intermetallic compound layer in weld bead interface is thicker. A novel pulsed double electrode gas metal arc welding(Pulsed DE-GMAW) method is developed. To achieve a stable welding process for joining of aluminum to steel, a mathematical model of coupled arc is established, and a new control scheme that uses the average feedback arc voltage of main loop to adjust the wire feed speed to control coupled arc length is proposed and developed. Then, the impulse control simulation of coupled arc length, wire feed speed and wire extension is conducted to demonstrate the mathematical model and predict the stability of welding process by changing the distance of contact tip to work-piece(CTWD). To prove the proposed PSO based PID control scheme's feasibility, the rapid prototyping experimental system is setup and the bead-on-plate control experiments are conducted to join aluminum to steel. The impulse control simulation shows that the established model can accurately represent the variation of coupled arc length, wire feed speed and the average main arc voltage when the welding process is disturbed, and the developed controller has a faster response and adjustment, only runs about 0.1 s. The captured electric signals show the main arc voltage gradually closes to the supposed arc voltage by adjusting the wire feed speed in 0.8 s. The obtained typical current waveform demonstrates that the main current can be reduced by controlling the bypass current under maintaining a relative large total current. The control experiment proves the accuracy of proposed model and feasibility of new control scheme

  5. Evaluation of occupational exposure to toxic metals released in the process of aluminum welding.

    PubMed

    Matczak, Wanda; Gromiec, Jan

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate occupational exposure to welding fumes and its elements on aluminum welders in Polish industry. The study included 52 MIG/Al fume samples and 18 TIG/Al samples in 3 plants. Air samples were collected in the breathing zone of welders (total and respirable dust). Dust concentration was determined gravimetrically, and the elements in the collected dust were determined by AAS. Mean time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations of the welding dusts/fumes and their components in the breathing zone obtained for different welding processes were, in mg/m3: MIG/Al fumes mean 6.0 (0.8-17.8), Al 2.1 (0.1-7.7), Mg 0.2 (< 0.1-0.9), Mn 0.014 (0.002-0.049), Cu 0.011 (0.002-0.092), Zn 0.016 (0.002-0.14), Pb 0.009 (0.005-0.025), Cr 0.003 (0.002-0.007), and TIG/Al fumes 0.7 (0.3-1.4), Al 0.17 (0.07-0.50). A correlation has been found between the concentration of the main components and the fume/dust concentrations in MIG/Al and TIG/Al fumes. Mean percentages of the individual components in MIG/Al fumes/dusts were Al: 30 (9-56) percent; Mg: 3 (1-5.6) percent; Mn: 0.2 (0.1-0.3) percent; Cu: 0.2 (< 0.1-1.8) percent; Zn: 0.2 (< 0.1-0.8) percent; Pb: 0.2 (< 0.1-1) percent; Cr: < 0.1 percent. The proportion of the respirable fraction in the fumes and their constituents varied between 10 percent and 100 percent. The results showed that MIG/Al fumes concentration was 1.2 times higher than the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV), and the index of the combined exposure to the determined agents was 2.3 (0.4-8.0), mostly because of high Al2O3 contribution. The background concentrations of the components (ca. 5-10 times lower than those in the breathing zone of the welders) did not exceed the Polish MAC value. The elemental composition of total and respirable fume/dust may differ considerably depending on welding methods, the nature of welding-related operations, and work environment conditions.

  6. Assessing Hydrogen Assisted Cracking Modes in High Strength Steel Welds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    posed theoretical hydrogen assisted cracking mechanisms. It was found that the microplasticity theory of Beachem can best describe how the stress ...steel and determined the stress corrosion cracking toughness, Kscc. Herman and Campbell found that the fracture toughness of this material was 16 MPa...embrittlement Welding Cracking (fracturing) Implant tests Stress intensity ("T, ) ’ 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side if necessary end identify by

  7. Effect of Welding Parameters on Microstructure, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties of Friction-Stir Welded Joints of AA7075-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfi, Amir Hossein; Nourouzi, Salman

    2014-06-01

    A high-strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy AA7075-T6 was friction-stir welded with various process parameter combinations incorporating the design of the experiment to investigate the effect of welding parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties. A three-factors, five-level central composition design (CCD) has been used to minimize the number of experimental conditions. The friction-stir welding parameters have significant influence on the heat input and temperature profile, which in turn regulates the microstructural and mechanical properties of the joints. The weld thermal cycles and transverse distribution of microhardness of the weld joints were measured, and the tensile properties were tested. The fracture surfaces of tensile specimens were observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the formation of friction-stir processing zone has been analyzed macroscopically. Also, an equation was derived to predict the final microhardness and tensile properties of the joints, and statistical tools are used to develop the relationships. The results show that the peak temperature during welding of all the joints was up to 713 K (440 °C), which indicates the key role of the tool shoulder diameter in deciding the maximum temperature. From this investigation, it was found that the joint fabricated at a rotational speed of 1050 rpm, welding speed of 100 mm/min, and shoulder diameter of 14 mm exhibited higher mechanical properties compared to the other fabricated joints.

  8. Effect of Welding Speed on Mechanical Properties and the Strain-Hardening Behavior of Friction Stir Welded 7075 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weifeng; Li, Zhaoxi; Sun, Xiaohong

    2017-03-01

    The effect of welding speed on the microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and strain-hardening behavior of friction stir welded (FSWed) high-strength AA7075-T651 was investigated. Large intermetallic particles and grains, whose sizes increased at lower welding speeds, were present in the heat-affected zone. FSWed joints fabricated at the higher welding speed or lower strain rates exhibited higher strength, joint efficiency and ductility than those fabricated at lower welding speeds or higher strain rates. A maximum joint efficiency of 97.5% and an elongation to failure of 15.9% were obtained using a welding speed of 400 mm/min at a strain rate of 10-5 s-1. The hardening capacity, strain-hardening exponent and strain-hardening rate of the FSWed joints were significantly higher than those of the base material, but materials exhibited stage III and stage IV hardening characteristics. The results morphology of the fracture surfaces is consistent with the above results.

  9. Effect of Welding Speed on Mechanical Properties and the Strain-Hardening Behavior of Friction Stir Welded 7075 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weifeng; Li, Zhaoxi; Sun, Xiaohong

    2017-04-01

    The effect of welding speed on the microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and strain-hardening behavior of friction stir welded (FSWed) high-strength AA7075-T651 was investigated. Large intermetallic particles and grains, whose sizes increased at lower welding speeds, were present in the heat-affected zone. FSWed joints fabricated at the higher welding speed or lower strain rates exhibited higher strength, joint efficiency and ductility than those fabricated at lower welding speeds or higher strain rates. A maximum joint efficiency of 97.5% and an elongation to failure of 15.9% were obtained using a welding speed of 400 mm/min at a strain rate of 10-5 s-1. The hardening capacity, strain-hardening exponent and strain-hardening rate of the FSWed joints were significantly higher than those of the base material, but materials exhibited stage III and stage IV hardening characteristics. The results morphology of the fracture surfaces is consistent with the above results.

  10. The effect of weld porosity on the cryogenic fatigue strength of ELI grade Ti-5Al-2. 5Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, P.R.; Lambdin, R.C.; Fox, D.E.

    1992-09-01

    The effect of weld porosity on the fatigue strength of ELI grade Ti-5Al-2.5Sn at cryogenic temperature was determined. A series of high cycle fatigue (HCF) and tensile tests were performed at -320 F on specimens made from welded sheets of the material. All specimens were tested with weld beads intact and some amount of weld offset. Specimens containing porosity and control specimens containing no porosity were tested. Results indicate that for the weld configuration tested, the fatigue life of the material is not affected by the presence of spherical embedded pores.

  11. The effect of weld porosity on the cryogenic fatigue strength of ELI grade Ti-5Al-2.5Sn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, P. R.; Lambdin, R. C.; Fox, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of weld porosity on the fatigue strength of ELI grade Ti-5Al-2.5Sn at cryogenic temperature was determined. A series of high cycle fatigue (HCF) and tensile tests were performed at -320 F on specimens made from welded sheets of the material. All specimens were tested with weld beads intact and some amount of weld offset. Specimens containing porosity and control specimens containing no porosity were tested. Results indicate that for the weld configuration tested, the fatigue life of the material is not affected by the presence of spherical embedded pores.

  12. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Peened Friction Stir Welded 2195 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Singh, Preet M.; Garmestani, Hamid

    2009-06-01

    The surface treatment techniques of laser and shot peening were used to investigate their effect on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in friction stir welded (FSW) 2195 aluminum alloy joints. The investigation consisted of two parts: the first part explored the peening effects on slow strain rate testing (SSRT) in a 3.5% NaCl solution, while the second part investigated the effects of peening on corrosion while submerged in a 3.5% NaCl solution with no external loads applied. For the SSRT, the laser-peened samples demonstrated superior properties to the other samples, but no signs of corrosion pitting or SCC were evident on any of the samples. For the second part of the study, the FSW plates were inspected periodically for signs of corrosion. After 60 days there were signs of corrosion pitting, but no stress corrosion cracking was noticed in any of the peened and unpeened samples.

  13. A review of computer aided interpretation technology for the evaluation of radiographs of aluminum welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, J. F., Sr.

    1987-01-01

    Industrial radiography is a well established, reliable means of providing nondestructive structural integrity information. The majority of industrial radiographs are interpreted by trained human eyes using transmitted light and various visual aids. Hundreds of miles of radiographic information are evaluated, documented and archived annually. In many instances, there are serious considerations in terms of interpreter fatigue, subjectivity and limited archival space. Quite often it is difficult to quickly retrieve radiographic information for further analysis or investigation. Methods of improving the quality and efficiency of the radiographic process are being explored, developed and incorporated whenever feasible. High resolution cameras, digital image processing, and mass digital data storage offer interesting possibilities for improving the industrial radiographic process. A review is presented of computer aided radiographic interpretation technology in terms of how it could be used to enhance the radiographic interpretation process in evaluating radiographs of aluminum welds.

  14. Microstructure and Phase Constitution Near the Interface of Explosively Welded Aluminum/Copper Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Henryk; Lityńska-Dobrzyńska, Lidia; Prażmowski, Mariusz

    2013-08-01

    The microstructure changes and the phase constitution within the layers close to the bonding interface strongly influence the properties of bimetallic strips. In this work, the layers near the interface of explosively welded aluminum and copper plates were investigated by means of microscopic observations, mostly with the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDX). The study was focused on the identification of the intermetallic phases, the possible interdiffusion between the copper and the aluminum, and the changes in the dislocation structure of the parent plates. In macro-/mesoscale, the interfaces were outlined by a characteristic sharp transition indicating that there was no mechanical mixing between the welded metals in the solid state. In micro-/nanoscale, the layers adhering to the interface show typical deformed microstructure features, i.e., structure refinement, elongated dislocation cells, slip bands, and microtwins (in copper plate). The internal microstructure of the intermetallic inclusion is composed mostly of dendrites. The electron diffractions and TEM/EDX chemical composition measurements revealed three crystalline equilibrium phases of the γ-Al4Cu9, η-AlCu, and Θ-Al2Cu type (the last one was dominant). However, most of the observed phases of the general Cu m Al n type (also crystalline) do not appear in the equilibrium Al-Cu phase diagram. Inside the intermetallic inclusions, no significant regularity in the phase distribution with respect to the parent sheets was observed. Therefore, it was concluded that the processes occurring in the melt determined their local chemical composition.

  15. Mitigating Localized Corrosion Using Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings on Welded 25% Cr Superduplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Lu, Q.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2015-04-01

    Thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) coating has been increasingly used for the protection of carbon steel offshore structures, topside equipment, and flowlines/pipelines exposed to both marine atmospheres and seawater immersion conditions. In this paper, the effectiveness of TSA coatings in preventing localized corrosion, such as pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) in subsea applications, has been investigated. Welded 25% Cr SDSS (coated and uncoated) with and without defects, and surfaces coated with epoxy paint were also examined. Pitting and crevice corrosion tests, on welded 25% Cr SDSS specimens with and without TSA/epoxy coatings, were conducted in recirculated, aerated, and synthetic seawater at 90 °C for 90 days. The tests were carried out at both the free corrosion potentials and an applied cathodic potential of -1100 mV saturated calomel electrode. The acidity (pH) of the test solution was monitored daily and adjusted to between pH 7.5 and 8.1, using dilute HCl solution or dilute NaOH, depending on the pH of the solution measured during the test. The test results demonstrated that TSA prevented pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr SDSS in artificial seawater at 90 °C, even when 10-mm-diameter coating defect exposing the underlying steel was present.

  16. Aluminum-Scandium Alloys: Material Characterization, Friction Stir Welding, and Compatibility With Hydrogen Peroxide (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Proj. No. 04-14)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. A.; Chen, P. S.

    2004-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum describes the development of several high-strength aluminum (Al) alloys that are compatible with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) propellant for NASA Hypersonic-X (Hyper-X) vehicles fuel tanks and structures. The yield strengths for some of these Al-magnesium-based alloys are more than 3 times stronger than the conventional 5254-H112 Al alloy, while maintaining excellent H2O2 compatibility similar to class 1 5254 alloy. The alloy development strategy is to add scandium, zirconium, and other transitional metals with unique electrochemical properties, which will not act as catalysts, to decompose the highly concentrated 90 percent H2O2. Test coupons are machined from sheet metals for H2O2 long-term exposure testing and mechanical properties testing. In addition, the ability to weld the new alloys using friction stir welding has also been explored. The new high-strength alloys could represent an enabling material technology for Hyper-X vehicles, where flight weight reduction is a critical requirement.

  17. Brazing process provides high-strength bond between aluminum and stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huschke, E. G., Jr.; Nord, D. B.

    1966-01-01

    Brazing process uses vapor-deposited titanium and an aluminum-zirconium-silicon alloy to prevent formation of brittle intermetallic compounds in stainless steel and aluminum bonding. Joints formed by this process maintain their high strength, corrosion resistance, and hermetic sealing properties.

  18. Column and Plate Compressive Strength of Extruded XB75S-T Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J.; Roy, J. Albert

    1944-01-01

    Results are presented of tests to determine the column and plate compressive strength of extruded XB75S-T aluminum alloy, and comparative values are shown for 24S-T aluminum-alloy sheet. Stress-strain curves are also given,

  19. Advanced characterization techniques in understanding the roles of nickel in enhancing strength and toughness of submerged arc welding high strength low alloy steel multiple pass welds in the as-welded condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, Kin-Ling

    Striving for higher strength along with higher toughness is a constant goal in material properties. Even though nickel is known as an effective alloying element in improving the resistance of a steel to impact fracture, it is not fully understood how nickel enhances toughness. It was the goal of this work to assist and further the understanding of how nickel enhanced toughness and maintained strength in particular for high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel submerged arc welding multiple pass welds in the as-welded condition. Using advanced analytical techniques such as electron backscatter diffraction, x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermodynamic modeling software, the effect of nickel was studied with nickel varying from one to five wt. pct. in increments of one wt. pct. in a specific HSLA steel submerged arc welding multiple pass weldment. The test matrix of five different nickel compositions in the as-welded and stress-relieved condition was to meet the targeted mechanical properties with a yield strength greater than or equal to 85 ksi, a ultimate tensile strength greater than or equal to 105 ksi, and a nil ductility temperature less than or equal to -140 degrees F. Mechanical testing demonstrated that nickel content of three wt. pct and greater in the as-welded condition fulfilled the targeted mechanical properties. Therefore, one, three, and five wt. pct. nickel in the as-welded condition was further studied to determine the effect of nickel on primary solidification mode, nickel solute segregation, dendrite thickness, phase transformation temperatures, effective ferrite grain size, dislocation density and strain, grain misorientation distribution, and precipitates. From one to five wt. pct nickel content in the as-welded condition, the primary solidification was shown to change from primary delta-ferrite to primary austenite. The nickel partitioning coefficient increased and dendrite/cellular thickness was

  20. Microstructural analysis of cracks generated during welding of 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talia, George E.

    1994-01-01

    This research summarizes a series of studies conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center to characterize the properties of 2195 Al-Li alloy. 2195 Al-Li alloy, developed by Martin Marietta laboratories, is designated as a replacement of 2219 Al-Cu alloy for the External Tank (E.T.) of the space shuttle. 2195 Al-Li alloy with its advantage of increased strength per weight over its predecessor, 2219 Al-Cu alloy, also challenges current technology. 2195 Al-Li has a greater tendency to crack than its predecessor. The present study began with the observation of pore formation in 2195 Al-Li alloy in a thermal aging process. In preliminary studies, Talia and Nunes found that most of the two pass welds studied exhibited round and crack-like porosity at the weld roots. Furthermore, the porosity observed was associated with the grain boundaries. The porosity level can be increased by thermal treatment in the air. A solid state reaction proceeding from dendritic boundaries in the weld fusion zone was observed to correlate with the generation of the porosity.