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Sample records for aluminum-inducible malate release

  1. Characterization of AtALMT1 expression in aluminum inducible malate release and its role for rhizotoxic stress in Arabidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Malate transporters play a critical role in aluminum (Al) tolerance responses for some plant species, such as Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here we further characterize AtALMT1, an Arabidopsis malate transporter, to clarify its specific role in malate release and Al stress responses. Malate ex...

  2. Peroxisomal malate dehydrogenase is not essential for photorespiration in Arabidopsis but its absence causes an increase in the stoichiometry of photorespiratory CO2 release.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Asaph B; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Zhou, Wenxu; Smith, Steven M; Badger, Murray R

    2008-10-01

    Peroxisomes are important for recycling carbon and nitrogen that would otherwise be lost during photorespiration. The reduction of hydroxypyruvate to glycerate catalyzed by hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) in the peroxisomes is thought to be facilitated by the production of NADH by peroxisomal malate dehydrogenase (PMDH). PMDH, which is encoded by two genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), reduces NAD(+) to NADH via the oxidation of malate supplied from the cytoplasm to oxaloacetate. A double mutant lacking the expression of both PMDH genes was viable in air and had rates of photosynthesis only slightly lower than in the wild type. This is in contrast to other photorespiratory mutants, which have severely reduced rates of photosynthesis and require high CO(2) to grow. The pmdh mutant had a higher O(2)-dependent CO(2) compensation point than the wild type, implying that either Rubisco specificity had changed or that the rate of CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation was increased in the pmdh plants. Rates of gross O(2) evolution and uptake were similar in the pmdh and wild-type plants, indicating that chloroplast linear electron transport and photorespiratory O(2) uptake were similar between genotypes. The CO(2) postillumination burst and the rate of CO(2) released during photorespiration were both greater in the pmdh mutant compared with the wild type, suggesting that the ratio of photorespiratory CO(2) release to Rubisco oxygenation was altered in the pmdh mutant. Without PMDH in the peroxisome, the CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation reaction can be increased by over 50%. In summary, PMDH is essential for maintaining optimal rates of photorespiration in air; however, in its absence, significant rates of photorespiration are still possible, indicating that there are additional mechanisms for supplying reductant to the peroxisomal HPR reaction or that the HPR reaction is altogether circumvented.

  3. Aluminum-induced granulomas in a tattoo

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, N.; Lyberg, T.; Hensten-Pettersen, A.

    1989-05-01

    A patient who developed localized, granulomatous reactions in a tattoo is described. With the use of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis, both aluminum and titanium particles were found in the involved skin sections. Intradermal provocation testing with separate suspensions of aluminum and titanium induced a positive response only in the case of aluminum. Examination by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis of the provoked response established aluminum as the only nonorganic element present in the test site tissue. This is the first report of confirmed aluminum-induced, delayed-hypersensitivity granulomas in a tattoo.

  4. Quercetin attenuates neuronal death against aluminum-induced neurodegeneration in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D R; Wani, W Y; Sunkaria, A; Kandimalla, R J; Sharma, R K; Verma, D; Bal, A; Gill, K D

    2016-06-02

    Aluminum is a light weight and toxic metal present ubiquitously on earth, which has gained considerable attention due to its neurotoxic effects. It also has been linked ecologically and epidemiologically to several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Guamanian-Parkinsonian complex and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The mechanism of aluminum neurotoxicity is poorly understood, but it is well documented that aluminum generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). Enhanced ROS production leads to disruption of cellular antioxidant defense systems and release of cytochrome c (cyt-c) from mitochondria to cytosol resulting in apoptotic cell death. Quercetin (a natural flavonoid) protects it from oxidative damage and has been shown to decrease mitochondrial damage in various animal models of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that if oxidative damage to mitochondria does play a significant role in aluminum-induced neurodegeneration, and then quercetin should ameliorate neuronal apoptosis. Administration of quercetin (10 mg/kg body wt/day) reduced aluminum (10 mg/kg body wt/day)-induced oxidative stress (decreased ROS production, increased mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity). In addition, quercetin also prevents aluminum-induced translocation of cyt-c, and up-regulates Bcl-2, down-regulates Bax, p53, caspase-3 activation and reduces DNA fragmentation. Quercetin also obstructs aluminum-induced neurodegenerative changes in aluminum-treated rats as seen by Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) staining. Further electron microscopic studies revealed that quercetin attenuates aluminum-induced mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae and chromatin condensation. These results indicate that treatment with quercetin may represent a therapeutic strategy to attenuate the neuronal death against aluminum-induced neurodegeneration.

  5. Is stored malate the quantitatively most important substrate utilised by respiration and ethanolic fermentation in grape berry pericarp during ripening?

    PubMed

    Famiani, Franco; Farinelli, Daniela; Palliotti, Alberto; Moscatello, Stefano; Battistelli, Alberto; Walker, Robert P

    2014-03-01

    A widely held view is that in grape pericarp glycolysis is inhibited during ripening, and that stored malate rather than sugars become the major substrate for respiration. In this study we determined what contribution stored malate could make to the substrate requirements of respiration and ethanolic fermentation in the pericarp of Cabernet Sauvignon berries during ripening. At a number of time points through development the amount of malate in the pericarp was measured. The change in malate content between each time point was then calculated, having first allowed for dilution arising from expansion of the fruit. The amount of CO2 that was released by the berry in the interval between each pair of time points was measured. It was found that the contribution that stored malate could make to the substrate requirements of respiration and ethanolic fermentation of grape pericarp was dependent on the stage of ripening. At the beginning of ripening stored malate could provide a greater proportion of substrate than later in ripening, and during the latter its contribution was relatively low. Therefore, stored malate was not the quantitatively most important substrate utilised by respiration and ethanolic fermentation in the pericarp of grape berries during most of ripening. It is likely that sugars provide the bulk of the deficit in substrate. Further, the increase in the respiratory quotient during most of ripening does not arise from the use of malate as main respiratory substrate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Malolactic fermentation: electrogenic malate uptake and malate/lactate antiport generate metabolic energy.

    PubMed Central

    Poolman, B; Molenaar, D; Smid, E J; Ubbink, T; Abee, T; Renault, P P; Konings, W N

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of metabolic energy production by malolactic fermentation in Lactococcus lactis has been investigated. In the presence of L-malate, a proton motive force composed of a membrane potential and pH gradient is generated which has about the same magnitude as the proton motive force generated by the metabolism of a glycolytic substrate. Malolactic fermentation results in the synthesis of ATP which is inhibited by the ionophore nigericin and the F0F1-ATPase inhibitor N,N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Since substrate-level phosphorylation does not occur during malolactic fermentation, the generation of metabolic energy must originate from the uptake of L-malate and/or excretion of L-lactate. The initiation of malolactic fermentation is stimulated by the presence of L-lactate intracellularly, suggesting that L-malate is exchanged for L-lactate. Direct evidence for heterologous L-malate/L-lactate (and homologous L-malate/L-malate) antiport has been obtained with membrane vesicles of an L. lactis mutant deficient in malolactic enzyme. In membrane vesicles fused with liposomes, L-malate efflux and L-malate/L-lactate antiport are stimulated by a membrane potential (inside negative), indicating that net negative charge is moved to the outside in the efflux and antiport reaction. In membrane vesicles fused with liposomes in which cytochrome c oxidase was incorporated as a proton motive force-generating mechanism, transport of L-malate can be driven by a pH gradient alone, i.e., in the absence of L-lactate as countersubstrate. A membrane potential (inside negative) inhibits uptake of L-malate, indicating that L-malate is transported an an electronegative monoanionic species (or dianionic species together with a proton). The experiments described suggest that the generation of metabolic energy during malolactic fermentation arises from electrogenic malate/lactate antiport and electrogenic malate uptake (in combination with outward diffusion of lactic acid), together with

  7. Identification and characterization of chemosensors for d-malate, unnatural enantiomer of malate, in Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum.

    PubMed

    Tunchai, Mattana; Hida, Akiko; Oku, Shota; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi

    2017-02-01

    Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum Ps29 is attracted by nonmetabolizable d-malate, an unnatural enantiomer. Screening of a complete collection of single-mcp-gene deletion mutants of Ps29 revealed that the RSc1156 homologue is a chemosensor for d-malate. An RSc1156 homologue deletion mutant of Ps29 showed decreased but significant responses to d-malate, suggesting the existence of another d-malate chemosensor. McpM previously had been identified as a chemosensor for l-malate. We constructed an RSc1156 homologue mcpM double deletion mutant and noted that this mutant failed to respond to d-malate; thus, the RSc1156 homologue and McpM are the major chemosensors for d-malate in this organism. To further characterize the ligand specificities of the RSc1156 homologue and McpM, we constructed a Ps29 derivative (designated K18) harbouring deletions in 18 individual mcp genes, including mcpM and RSc1156. K18 harbouring the RSc1156 homologue responded strongly to l-tartrate and d-malate and moderately to d-tartrate, but not to l-malate or succinate. K18 harbouring mcpM responded strongly to l-malate and d-tartrate and moderately to succinate, fumarate and d-malate. Ps29 utilizes l-malate and l-tartrate, but not d-malate. We therefore concluded that l-tartrate and l-malate are natural ligands of the RSc1156 homologue and McpM, respectively, and that chemotaxis toward d-malate is a fortuitous response by the RSc1156 homologue and McpM in Ps29. We propose re-designation of the RSc1156 homologue as McpT. In tomato plant infection assays, the mcpT deletion mutant of highly virulent R. pseudosolanacearum MAFF106611 was as infectious as wild-type MAFF106611, suggesting that McpT-mediated chemotaxis does not play an important role in tomato plant infection.

  8. Malate synthase a membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, K.D.; Turley, R.B.; Hermerath, C.A.; Carrapico, F.; Trelease, R.N.

    1987-04-01

    Malate synthase (MS) is generally regarded as a peripheral membrane protein, and believed by some to be ontogenetically associated with ER. However, immuno- and cyto-chemical in situ localizations show MS throughout the matrix of cotton (and cucumber) glyoxysomes, not specifically near their boundary membranes, nor in ER. Only a maximum of 50% MS can be solubilized from cotton glyoxysomes with 1% Triton X-100, 2mM Zwittergen 14, or 10mM DOC +/- salts. Cotton MS does not incorporate /sup 3/H-glucosamine in vivo, nor does it react with Con A on columns or blots. Cotton MS banded with ER in sucrose gradients (20-40%) in Tricine after 3h, but not after 22h in Tricine or Hepes, or after 3h in Hepes or K-phosphate. Collectively the authors data are inconsistent with physiologically meaningful MS-membrane associations in ER or glyoxysomes. It appears that experimentally-induced aggregates of MS migrate in ER gradients and occur in isolated glyoxysomes. These data indicate that ER is not involved in synthesis or modification of cottonseed MS prior to its import into the glyoxysomal matrix.

  9. Overexpression of AtALMT1 in the Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia results in enhanced Al-activated malate excretion and beneficial bacterium recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yasufumi; Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Asai, Minatsu; Iuchi, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Bais, Harsh P.; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    AtALMT1 (Arabidopsis thaliana ALuminum activated Malate Transporter 1) encodes an Arabidopsis thaliana malate transporter that has a pleiotropic role in Arabidopsis stress tolerance. Malate released through AtALMT1 protects the root tip from Al rhizotoxicity, and recruits beneficial rhizobacteria that induce plant immunity. To examine whether the overexpression of AtALMT1 can improve these traits, the gene, driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, was introduced into the Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia. Overexpression of the gene enhanced both Al-activated malate excretion and the recruitment of beneficial bacteria Bacillus subtilis strain FB17. These findings suggest that overexpression of AtALMT1 can be used as an approach to enhance a plant's ability to release malate into the rhizosphere, which can enhance plant tolerance to some environmental stress factors. PMID:23857348

  10. EFFECTS OF ALUMINUM-INDUCED AGGREGATION ON THE FLUORESCENCE OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES. (R822251)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aluminum-induced aggregates of terrestrial and aquatic humic acid standards from the International Humic Substances Society are shown to be fluorescent by means of a multiwavelength fluorescence anisotropy experiment in which the data was treated with a model for nonspherical ...

  11. EFFECTS OF ALUMINUM-INDUCED AGGREGATION ON THE FLUORESCENCE OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES. (R822251)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aluminum-induced aggregates of terrestrial and aquatic humic acid standards from the International Humic Substances Society are shown to be fluorescent by means of a multiwavelength fluorescence anisotropy experiment in which the data was treated with a model for nonspherical ...

  12. The metabolism of malate by cultured rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, M.C.; Tildon, J.T.; Couto, R.; Stevenson, J.H.; Caprio, F.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Since malate is known to play an important role in a variety of functions in the brain including energy metabolism, the transfer of reducing equivalents and possibly metabolic trafficking between different cell types; a series of biochemical determinations were initiated to evaluate the rate of 14CO2 production from L-(U-14C)malate in rat brain astrocytes. The 14CO2 production from labeled malate was almost totally suppressed by the metabolic inhibitors rotenone and antimycin A suggesting that most of malate metabolism was coupled to the electron transport system. A double reciprocal plot of the 14CO2 production from the metabolism of labeled malate revealed biphasic kinetics with two apparent Km and Vmax values suggesting the presence of more than one mechanism of malate metabolism in these cells. Subsequent experiments were carried out using 0.01 mM and 0.5 mM malate to determine whether the addition of effectors would differentially alter the metabolism of high and low concentrations of malate. Effectors studied included compounds which could be endogenous regulators of malate metabolism and metabolic inhibitors which would provide information regarding the mechanisms regulating malate metabolism. Both lactate and aspartate decreased 14CO2 production from malate equally. However, a number of effectors were identified which selectively altered the metabolism of 0.01 mM malate including aminooxyacetate, furosemide, N-acetylaspartate, oxaloacetate, pyruvate and glucose, but had little or no effect on the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate. In addition, alpha-ketoglutarate and succinate decreased 14CO2 production from 0.01 mM malate much more than from 0.5 mM malate. In contrast, a number of effectors altered the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate more than 0.01 mM. These included methionine sulfoximine, glutamate, malonate, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and ouabain.

  13. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 functions as a mediator in cardioprotective effects of fentanyl in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Hui; Hao, Wei; Meng, Qing-Tao; Du, Xiao-Bing; Lei, Shao-Qing; Xia, Zhong-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding (lncRNA) MALAT1 can be increased by hypoxia or ischemic limbs. Also, downregulation of MALAT1 contributes to reduction of cardiomyocyte apoptosis. However, the functional involvement of MALAT1 in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury has not been defined. This study investigated the functional involvement of lncRNA-MALAT1 in cardioprotective effects of fentanyl. HL-1, a cardiac muscle cell line from the AT-1 mouse atrial cardiomyocyte tumor lineage was pre-treated with fentanyl and generated cell model of hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R). Relative expression of MALAT1, miR-145, and Bnip3 mRNA in cells was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Cardiomyocyte H/R injury was indicated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and cell apoptosis. The results showed that fentanyl abrogates expression of responsive gene for H/R and induces downregulation of MALAT1 and Bnip3 and upregulation of miR-145. We found that miR-145/Bnip3 pathway was negatively regulated by MALAT1 in H/R-HL-1 cell with or without fentanyl treatment. Moreover, both MALAT1 overexpression and miR-145 knockdown reverse cardioprotective effects of fentanyl, as indicated by increase in LDH release and cell apoptosis. The reversal effect of MALAT1 for fentanyl is confirmed in cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) mice. In summary, lncRNA-MALAT1 is sensitive to H/R injury and abrogates cardioprotective effects of Fentanyl by negatively regulating miR-145/Bnip3 pathway. © 2016 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  14. Aluminum-induced pneumoconiosis confirmed by analytical scanning electron microscopy: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Carney, John; McAdams, Page; McCluskey, James; Roggli, Victor L

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum-induced lung injury is an uncommon, yet recognized pneumoconiosis capable of causing severe interstitial fibrosis. Important attention to the clinical history including occupational exposure is an essential component to making the correct diagnosis, despite which careful examination of the lung specimen is necessary to exclude other more common disease entities. We present a case of aluminum-induced pneumoconiosis in the setting of a bilateral lung transplant patient. Additionally, we review the literature on aluminum-induced pneumoconiosis and demonstrate the use of ancillary techniques including backscattered electron imaging and energy-dispersive spectrometry to aid in diagnosis.

  15. Screening for microorganisms producing D-malate from maleate.

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, M J; van den Tweel, W J; Hartmans, S

    1992-01-01

    More than 300 microorganisms were screened for their ability to convert maleate into D-malate as a result of the action of maleate hydratase. Accumulation of fumarate during incubation of permeabilized cells with maleate was shown to be indicative of one of the two enzymes known to transform maleate. The ratio in which fumarate and malate accumulated could be used to estimate the enantiomeric composition of the malate formed. Many strains (n = 128) were found to be capable of converting maleate to D-malate with an enantiomeric purity of more than 97%. Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes NCIMB 9867 was selected for more detailed studies. Although this strain was not able to grow on maleate, permeabilized cells were able to degrade maleate to undetectable levels, with a concomitant formation of D-malate. The D-malate was formed with an enantiomeric purity of more than 99.97%. PMID:1444397

  16. Protective Effects of L-Malate against Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shiao; Yang, Yang; Mei, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the protective effects of L-malate against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: sham (sham), an ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) model group (model), an DMF pretreated group (DMF), and 5 L-malate pretreated groups (15, 60, 120, 240, or 480 mg/kg, gavage) before inducing myocardial ischemia. Plasma LDH, cTn-I, TNF-α, hs-CRP, SOD, and GSH-PX were measured 3 h later I/R. Areas of myocardial infarction were measured; hemodynamic parameters during I/R were recorded. Hearts were harvested and Western blot was used to quantify Nrf2, Keap1, HO-1, and NQO-1 expression in the myocardium. Results. L-malate significantly reduced LDH and cTn-I release, reduced myocardial infarct size, inhibited expression of inflammatory cytokines, and partially preserved heart function, as well as increasing antioxidant activity after myocardial I/R injury. Western blot confirmed that L-malate reduced Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 in ischemic myocardial tissue, upregulated expression of Nrf2 and Nrf2 nuclear translocation, and increased expression of heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, which are major targets of Nrf2. Conclusions. L-malate may protect against myocardial I/R injury in rats and this may be associated with activation of the Nrf2/Keap1 antioxidant pathway. PMID:26941825

  17. Multiple Aluminum-Resistance Mechanisms in Wheat (Roles of Root Apical Phosphate and Malate Exudation).

    PubMed Central

    Pellet, D. M.; Papernik, L. A.; Kochian, L. V.

    1996-01-01

    Although it is well known that aluminum (Al) resistance in wheat (Triticum aestivum) is multigenic, physiological evidence for multiple mechanisms of Al resistance has not yet been documented. The role of root apical phosphate and malate exudation in Al resistance was investigated in two wheat cultivars (Al-resistant Atlas and Al-sensitive Scout) and two near-isogenic lines (Al-resistant ET3 and Al-sensitive ES3). In Atlas Al resistance is multigenic, whereas in ET3 resistance is conditioned by the single Alt1 locus. Based on root- growth experiments, Atlas was found to be 3-fold more resistant in 20 [mu]M Al than ET3. Root-exudation experiments were conducted under sterile conditions; a large malate efflux localized to the root apex was observed only in Atlas and in ET3 and only in the presence of Al (5 and 20 [mu]M). Furthermore, the more Al-resistant Atlas exhibited a constitutive phosphate release localized to the root apex. As predicted from the formation constants for the Al-malate and Al-phosphate complexes, the addition of either ligand to the root bathing solution alleviated Al inhibition of root growth in Al-sensitive Scout. These results provide physiological evidence that Al resistance in Atlas is conditioned by at least two genes. In addition to the alt locus that controls Al-induced malate release from the root apex, other genetic loci appear to control constitutive phosphate release from the apex. We suggest that both exudation processes act in concert to enhance Al exclusion and Al resistance in Atlas. PMID:12226413

  18. Malate and Fumarate Extend Lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Clare B.; Copes, Neil; Brito, Andres G.; Canfield, John; Bradshaw, Patrick C.

    2013-01-01

    Malate, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolite, increased lifespan and thermotolerance in the nematode C. elegans. Malate can be synthesized from fumarate by the enzyme fumarase and further oxidized to oxaloacetate by malate dehydrogenase with the accompanying reduction of NAD. Addition of fumarate also extended lifespan, but succinate addition did not, although all three intermediates activated nuclear translocation of the cytoprotective DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor and protected from paraquat-induced oxidative stress. The glyoxylate shunt, an anabolic pathway linked to lifespan extension in C. elegans, reversibly converts isocitrate and acetyl-CoA to succinate, malate, and CoA. The increased longevity provided by malate addition did not occur in fumarase (fum-1), glyoxylate shunt (gei-7), succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein (sdha-2), or soluble fumarate reductase F48E8.3 RNAi knockdown worms. Therefore, to increase lifespan, malate must be first converted to fumarate, then fumarate must be reduced to succinate by soluble fumarate reductase and the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex II. Reduction of fumarate to succinate is coupled with the oxidation of FADH2 to FAD. Lifespan extension induced by malate depended upon the longevity regulators DAF-16 and SIR-2.1. Malate supplementation did not extend the lifespan of long-lived eat-2 mutant worms, a model of dietary restriction. Malate and fumarate addition increased oxygen consumption, but decreased ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential suggesting a mild uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Malate also increased NADPH, NAD, and the NAD/NADH ratio. Fumarate reduction, glyoxylate shunt activity, and mild mitochondrial uncoupling likely contribute to the lifespan extension induced by malate and fumarate by increasing the amount of oxidized NAD and FAD cofactors. PMID:23472183

  19. Counteractive Effects of ABA and GA3 on Extracellular and Intracellular pH and Malate in Barley Aleurone.

    PubMed

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.; Heistek, J. C.; Wang, M.

    1994-09-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) aleurone layers are known to constitutively acidify their surroundings, primarily by L-malic acid release (J. Mikola, M. Virtanen [1980] Plant Physiol 66: S-142). Here we demonstrate the antagonistic effects of the plant hormones gibberellic acid (GA3) and abscisic acid (ABA) on the regulation of extracellular pH (pHe) of barley aleurone layers. We observed a strong correlation between ABA-induced enhancement of extracellular acidification and an ABA-induced increase in L-malic acid release. In addition, ABA caused an increase in intracellular L-malate level. GA3 caused a slight decrease in intracellular L-malate level and was able to inhibit the ABA-induced increase in L-malate intracellular concentration and release. In addition, this ABA-induced L-malate release could be completely inhibited by GA3. The ABA-induced release of L-malic acid could not account for the total ABA-induced pHe decrease, suggesting the existence of an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of pHe. It has been reported that ABA induces an intracellular pH (pHi) increase, possibly due to the activation of plasma membrane proton pumps (R. Van der Veen, S. Heimovaara-Dijkstra, M. Wang [1992] Plant Physiol 100: 699-705). A pHi increase, such as that caused by ABA, might be correlated with the intracellular L-malate increase as suggested by the pH stat model of D.D. Davies ([1986] Physiol Plant 67: 702-706). We studied if the effects of GA3 on L-malate concentration were correlated with changes in pHi and found that GA3 caused a pHi decrease and that GA3 and ABA could interfere in the regulation of pHi. In addition, we were able to mimic the effect of both hormones on L-malate release by bringing about artifical pHi changes with the weak acid 5,5-dimethyl-2,4-oxazolidinedione and the weak base methylamine. The physiological meaning of the effects of GA3 and ABA on the regulation of both pHe and pHi during grain germination are discussed.

  20. Materials and methods for efficient succinate and malate production

    SciTech Connect

    Jantama, Kaemwich; Haupt, Mark John; Zhang, Xueli; Moore, Jonathan C; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal

    2014-04-08

    Genetically engineered microorganisms have been constructed to produce succinate and malate in mineral salt media in pH-controlled batch fermentations without the addition of plasmids or foreign genes. The subject invention also provides methods of producing succinate and malate comprising the culture of genetically modified microorganisms.

  1. Protective effect of citicoline against aluminum-induced cognitive impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Zaher, Ahmed O; Hamdy, Mostafa M; Abdel-Rahman, Mahran S; Abd El-Hamid, Doaa H

    2017-04-01

    The potential protective effect of citicoline on aluminum chloride-induced cognitive deficits was investigated in rats. In a Morris water maze, administration of aluminum chloride to rats for 90 days resulted in increased escape latency to reach the platform and decreased swimming speed in acquisition trials. Similarly, in probe trials, the time required to reach the hidden platform was increased and the time spent in the target quadrant was reduced. Also, administration of aluminum chloride to rats for 90 days increased the reference and working memory errors and time required to end the task in the radial arm maze. In addition, this treatment decreased the step-through latency in the passive avoidance test. Concurrently, treatment of rats with aluminum chloride for 90 days increased hippocampal glutamate, malondialdehyde, and nitrite levels and decreased intracellular reduced glutathione level. In the citicoline-treated group, aluminum chloride-induced learning and memory impairments as assessed by the Morris water maze, radial arm maze, and passive avoidance tests were inhibited. At the same time, treatment of rats with citicoline prevented the biochemical alterations induced by aluminum chloride in the hippocampus. It can be concluded that elevation of hippocampal glutamate level with consequent oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO) overproduction may play an important role in aluminum-induced cognitive impairments. Also, our results suggest, for the first time, that citicoline can protect against the development of these cognitive deficits through inhibition of aluminum-induced elevation of glutamate level, oxidative stress, and NO overproduction in the hippocampus.

  2. Low pH, aluminum, and phosphorus coordinately regulate malate exudation through GmALMT1 to improve soybean adaptation to acid soils.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cuiyue; Piñeros, Miguel A; Tian, Jiang; Yao, Zhufang; Sun, Lili; Liu, Jiping; Shaff, Jon; Coluccio, Alison; Kochian, Leon V; Liao, Hong

    2013-03-01

    Low pH, aluminum (Al) toxicity, and low phosphorus (P) often coexist and are heterogeneously distributed in acid soils. To date, the underlying mechanisms of crop adaptation to these multiple factors on acid soils remain poorly understood. In this study, we found that P addition to acid soils could stimulate Al tolerance, especially for the P-efficient genotype HN89. Subsequent hydroponic studies demonstrated that solution pH, Al, and P levels coordinately altered soybean (Glycine max) root growth and malate exudation. Interestingly, HN89 released more malate under conditions mimicking acid soils (low pH, +P, and +Al), suggesting that root malate exudation might be critical for soybean adaptation to both Al toxicity and P deficiency on acid soils. GmALMT1, a soybean malate transporter gene, was cloned from the Al-treated root tips of HN89. Like root malate exudation, GmALMT1 expression was also pH dependent, being suppressed by low pH but enhanced by Al plus P addition in roots of HN89. Quantitative real-time PCR, transient expression of a GmALMT1-yellow fluorescent protein chimera in Arabidopsis protoplasts, and electrophysiological analysis of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing GmALMT1 demonstrated that GmALMT1 encodes a root cell plasma membrane transporter that mediates malate efflux in an extracellular pH-dependent and Al-independent manner. Overexpression of GmALMT1 in transgenic Arabidopsis, as well as overexpression and knockdown of GmALMT1 in transgenic soybean hairy roots, indicated that GmALMT1-mediated root malate efflux does underlie soybean Al tolerance. Taken together, our results suggest that malate exudation is an important component of soybean adaptation to acid soils and is coordinately regulated by three factors, pH, Al, and P, through the regulation of GmALMT1 expression and GmALMT1 function.

  3. Low pH, Aluminum, and Phosphorus Coordinately Regulate Malate Exudation through GmALMT1 to Improve Soybean Adaptation to Acid Soils1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Cuiyue; Piñeros, Miguel A.; Tian, Jiang; Yao, Zhufang; Sun, Lili; Liu, Jiping; Shaff, Jon; Coluccio, Alison; Kochian, Leon V.; Liao, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Low pH, aluminum (Al) toxicity, and low phosphorus (P) often coexist and are heterogeneously distributed in acid soils. To date, the underlying mechanisms of crop adaptation to these multiple factors on acid soils remain poorly understood. In this study, we found that P addition to acid soils could stimulate Al tolerance, especially for the P-efficient genotype HN89. Subsequent hydroponic studies demonstrated that solution pH, Al, and P levels coordinately altered soybean (Glycine max) root growth and malate exudation. Interestingly, HN89 released more malate under conditions mimicking acid soils (low pH, +P, and +Al), suggesting that root malate exudation might be critical for soybean adaptation to both Al toxicity and P deficiency on acid soils. GmALMT1, a soybean malate transporter gene, was cloned from the Al-treated root tips of HN89. Like root malate exudation, GmALMT1 expression was also pH dependent, being suppressed by low pH but enhanced by Al plus P addition in roots of HN89. Quantitative real-time PCR, transient expression of a GmALMT1-yellow fluorescent protein chimera in Arabidopsis protoplasts, and electrophysiological analysis of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing GmALMT1 demonstrated that GmALMT1 encodes a root cell plasma membrane transporter that mediates malate efflux in an extracellular pH-dependent and Al-independent manner. Overexpression of GmALMT1 in transgenic Arabidopsis, as well as overexpression and knockdown of GmALMT1 in transgenic soybean hairy roots, indicated that GmALMT1-mediated root malate efflux does underlie soybean Al tolerance. Taken together, our results suggest that malate exudation is an important component of soybean adaptation to acid soils and is coordinately regulated by three factors, pH, Al, and P, through the regulation of GmALMT1 expression and GmALMT1 function. PMID:23341359

  4. Electrogenic malate uptake and improved growth energetics of the malolactic bacterium Leuconostoc oenos grown on glucose-malate mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Loubiere, P; Salou, P; Leroy, M J; Lindley, N D; Pareilleux, A

    1992-01-01

    Growth of the malolactic bacterium Leuconostoc oenos was improved with respect to both the specific growth rate and the biomass yield during the fermentation of glucose-malate mixtures as compared with those in media lacking malate. Such a finding indicates that the malolactic reaction contributed to the energy budget of the bacterium, suggesting that growth is energy limited in the absence of malate. An energetic yield (YATP) of 9.5 g of biomass.mol ATP-1 was found during growth on glucose with an ATP production by substrate-level phosphorylation of 1.2 mol of ATP.mol of glucose-1. During the period of mixed-substrate catabolism, an apparent YATP of 17.7 was observed, indicating a mixotrophy-associated ATP production of 2.2 mol of ATP.mol of glucose-1, or more correctly an energy gain of 0.28 mol of ATP.mol of malate-1, representing proton translocation flux from the cytoplasm to the exterior of 0.56 or 0.84 H+.mol of malate-1(depending on the H+/ATP stoichiometry). The growth-stimulating effect of malate was attributed to chemiosmotic transport mechanisms rather than proton consumption by the malolactic enzyme. Lactate efflux was by electroneutral lactate -/H+ symport having a constant stoichiometry, while malate uptake was predominantly by a malate -/H+ symport, though a low-affinity malate- uniport was also implicated. The measured electrical component (delta psi) of the proton motive force was altered, passing from -30 to -60 mV because of this translocation of dissociated organic acids when malolactic fermentation occurred. PMID:1644757

  5. Study of polycrystalline silicon obtained by aluminum-induced crystallization depending on process conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyaslavtsev, Alexander; Sokolov, Igor; Sinev, Leonid

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we have decided to consider an alternative method of producing polycrystalline silicon and study change of its electrophysical characteristics depending on process parameters. As an alternative low-pressure chemical vapor deposition method appears aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC), which allows to obtain a polycrystalline silicon film is significantly larger grain size, thereby reducing contribution of grain boundaries. A comprehensive study of polycrystalline silicon was carried out using a variety of microscopic (OM, SEM) and spectroscopic (RAMAN, XPS) and diffraction (EBSD, XRD) analytic methods. We also considered possibility of self-doping in AIC, result of which was obtained polycrystalline silicon with different resistance. Additionally considered changes in temperature coefficient of resistance depending on technological parameters of AIC process.

  6. Controlling silicon crystallization in aluminum-induced crystallization via substrate plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainey, Mel F.; Innocent-Dolor, Jon-L.; Choudhury, Tanushree H.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of reactive ion etching using chlorine or fluorine-based plasmas on aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) of silicon on fused silica glass substrates was investigated with the goal of chemically modifying the substrate surface and thereby influencing the crystallization behavior. Chlorine etching of the glass prior to AIC resulted in six times faster silicon crystallization times and smaller grain sizes than films formed on untreated substrates while fluorine etching resulted in crystallization times double than those on untreated surfaces. The differences in crystallization behavior were attributed to changes in surface chemistry and surface energy of the glass as a result of the plasma treatment as supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The different surface treatments were then combined with optical lithography to control the location of crystallization on the substrate surface to realize the production of patterned polycrystalline silicon films from initially continuous aluminum and silicon.

  7. Structural properties of a-Si films and their effect on aluminum induced crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Tankut, Aydin; Ozkol, Engin; Karaman, Mehmet; Turan, Rasit; Canli, Sedat

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we report the influence of the structural properties of amorphous silicon (a-Si) on its subsequent crystallization behavior via the aluminum induced crystallization (AIC) method. Two distinct a-Si deposition techniques, electron beam evaporation and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), are compared for their effect on the overall AIC kinetics as well as the properties of the final poly-crystalline (poly-Si) silicon film. Raman and FTIR spectroscopy results indicate that the PECVD grown a-Si films has higher intermediate-range order, which is enhanced for increased hydrogen dilution during deposition. With increasing intermediate-range order of the a-Si, the rate of AIC is diminished, leading larger poly-Si grain size.

  8. Fabrication of Si(111) crystalline thin film on graphene by aluminum-induced crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Høiaas, I. M.; Kim, D. C. E-mail: helge.weman@ntnu.no; Weman, H. E-mail: helge.weman@ntnu.no

    2016-04-18

    We report the fabrication of a Si(111) crystalline thin film on graphene by the aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) process. The AIC process of Si(111) on graphene is shown to be enhanced compared to that on an amorphous SiO{sub 2} substrate, resulting in a more homogeneous Si(111) thin film structure as revealed by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy measurements. Raman measurements confirm that the graphene is intact throughout the process, retaining its characteristic phonon spectrum without any appearance of the D peak. A red-shift of Raman peaks, which is more pronounced for the 2D peak, is observed in graphene after the crystallization process. It is found to correlate with the red-shift of the Si Raman peak, suggesting an epitaxial relationship between graphene and the adsorbed AIC Si(111) film with both the graphene and Si under tensile strain.

  9. Neuronal gene expression in aluminum-induced neurofibrillary pathology: an in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Chambers, C B; Muma, N A

    1997-01-01

    Alterations in cytoskeletal proteins such as the perikaryal accumulation of neurofilaments (NFs) occur in a number of human neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and may contribute to their debilitating effects. The administration of aluminum salts to rabbits induces the aberrant accumulation of NFs within the proximal axons and perikarya of vulnerable neurons and is one animal model which has been extensively studied in an attempt to gain insight into the mechanism(s) of NF perturbations in human disease. Previous studies using Northern blotting techniques to examine mRNA levels in the aluminum-induced neuropathy model have led to seemingly contradictory results. We have used in situ hybridization which provides the cellular resolution needed to: 1) determine whether there are generalized decreases in the levels of mRNA expression or decreases in mRNA encoding specific proteins; 2) determine whether alterations in mRNA levels occur specifically in neurons with NF accumulations; and 3) begin to resolve some of the apparent contradictions in the literature. A moderate dose of aluminum lactate administered on two consecutive days produced neurofibrillary tangles in spinal cord neurons seven days after the first dose. Polyadenylated mRNA levels were not altered in spinal cord neurons in aluminum-treated compared to saline-treated control animals or in tangle-bearing compared to non tangle-bearing neurons in aluminum-treated animals. Middle and high NF subunit (NFH) mRNA levels were not significantly different from polyadenylated mRNA levels in spinal cord neurons in aluminum-treated/control animals. NFH mRNA levels were decreased in neurons containing aluminum-induced NF accumulations. These results suggest that NFH gene expression may be down regulated by an inhibitory feedback mechanism induced by perikaryal accumulations of NFs. This inhibitory feedback regulation for NFH may have

  10. The permeability of mitochondria to oxaloacetate and malate

    PubMed Central

    Haslam, J. M.; Krebs, H. A.

    1968-01-01

    1. A spectrophotometric assay of the rates of penetration of oxaloacetate and l-malate into mitochondria is described. The assay is based on the measurement of the oxidation of intramitochondrial NADH by oxaloacetate and of the reduction of intramitochondrial NAD+ by malate. 2. The rate of entry of both oxaloacetate and l-malate into mitochondria is restricted, as shown by the fact that disruption of the mitochondrial structure can increase the rate of interaction between the dicarboxylic acids and intramitochondrial NAD+ and NADH by between 100- and 1000-fold. 3. The rates of entry of oxaloacetate and malate into liver, kidney and heart mitochondria increased by up to 50-fold on addition of a source of energy, either ascorbate plus NNN′N′-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine aerobically, or ATP anaerobically. 4. In the absence of a source of energy the changes in the concentrations of intramitochondrial NAD+ and NADH brought about by the addition of l-malate or oxaloacetate were followed by parallel changes in the concentrations of NADP+ and NADPH, indicating the presence in the mitochondria of an energy-independent transhydrogenase system. 5. The results are discussed in relation to the hypothesis that malate acts as a carrier of reducing equivalents between mitochondria and cytoplasm. PMID:16742587

  11. l-Malate Production by Metabolically Engineered Escherichia coli▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X.; Wang, X.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Ingram, L. O.

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains (KJ060 and KJ073) that were previously developed for succinate production have now been modified for malate production. Many unexpected changes were observed during this investigation. The initial strategy of deleting fumarase isoenzymes was ineffective, and succinate continued to accumulate. Surprisingly, a mutation in fumarate reductase alone was sufficient to redirect carbon flow into malate even in the presence of fumarase. Further deletions were needed to inactivate malic enzymes (typically gluconeogenic) and prevent conversion to pyruvate. However, deletion of these genes (sfcA and maeB) resulted in the unexpected accumulation of d-lactate despite the prior deletion of mgsA and ldhA and the absence of apparent lactate dehydrogenase activity. Although the metabolic source of this d-lactate was not identified, lactate accumulation was increased by supplementation with pyruvate and decreased by the deletion of either pyruvate kinase gene (pykA or pykF) to reduce the supply of pyruvate. Many of the gene deletions adversely affected growth and cell yield in minimal medium under anaerobic conditions, and volumetric rates of malate production remained low. The final strain (XZ658) produced 163 mM malate, with a yield of 1.0 mol (mol glucose−1), half of the theoretical maximum. Using a two-stage process (aerobic cell growth and anaerobic malate production), this engineered strain produced 253 mM malate (34 g liter−1) within 72 h, with a higher yield (1.42 mol mol−1) and productivity (0.47 g liter−1 h−1). This malate yield and productivity are equal to or better than those of other known biocatalysts. PMID:21097588

  12. Development and characterization of cross-linked poly(malate) microspheres with dipyridamole.

    PubMed

    Yoncheva, K; Miloshev, S; Belcheva, N; Lambov, N

    2001-09-11

    Biodegradable cross-linked microspheres containing up to 63 wt.% of the active substance were obtained in a polycondensation process between D,L-malic acid and the tetrahydroxy compound dipyridamole. The in vitro release mechanism from biodegradable cross-linked microspheres has been studied. It was found that dipyridamole was released due to two-step hydrolysis of the ester bonds of the network. Initially, the only product of the hydrolytic degradation was found to be an oligomeric ester fraction with M(w)=1000 Da. The release of the free drug started after 8 days due to a further hydrolysis of the oligomers in solution. It was found that blood plasma enzymes in rats did not affect the hydrolytic processes. Biodegradable poly(malate) microspheres containing an anti-aggregating agent dipyridamole can be considered as a novel drug delivery system for a prolonged period of time implying a future parenteral application.

  13. Deposition and characterization of silicon thin-films by aluminum-induced crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebil, Ozgenc

    Polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) as a thin-film solar cell material could have major advantages compared to non-silicon thin-film technologies. In theory, thin-film poly-Si may retain the performance and stability of c-Si while taking advantage of established manufacturing techniques. However, poly-Si films deposited onto foreign substrates at low temperatures typically have an average grain size of 10--50 nm. Such a grain structure presents a potential problem for device performance since it introduces an excessive number of grain boundaries which, if left unpassivated, lead to poor solar cell properties. Therefore, for optimum device performance, the grain size of the poly-Si film should be at least comparable to the thickness of the films. For this project, the objectives were the deposition of poly-Si thin-films with 2--5 mum grain size on glass substrates using in-situ and conventional aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) and the development of a model for AIC process. In-situ AIC experiments were performed using Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) both above and below the eutectic temperature (577°C) of Si-Al binary system. Conventional AIC experiments were performed using a-Si layers deposited on aluminum coated glass substrates by Electron-beam deposition, Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and HWCVD. Continuous poly-Si films with an average grain size of 10 mum on glass substrates were achieved by both in-situ and conventional aluminum-induced crystallization of Si below eutectic temperature. The grain size was determined by three factors; the grain structure of Al layer, the nature of the interfacial oxide, and crystallization temperature. The interface oxide was found to be crucial for AIC process but not necessary for crystallization itself. The characterization of interfacial oxide layer formed on Al films revealed a bilayer structure containing Al2O3 and Al(OH)3 . The effective activation energy for AIC process was determined

  14. Malate synthesis and secretion mediated by a manganese-enhanced malate dehydrogenase confers superior manganese tolerance in Stylosanthes guianensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhijian; Sun, Lili; Liu, Pandao; Liu, Guodao; Tian, Jiang; Liao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) toxicity is a major constraint limiting plant growth on acidic soils. Superior Mn tolerance in Stylosanthes spp. has been well documented, but its molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, superior Mn tolerance in Stylosanthes guianensis was confirmed, as reflected by a high Mn toxicity threshold. Furthermore, genetic variation of Mn tolerance was evaluated using two S. guianensis genotypes, which revealed that the Fine-stem genotype had higher Mn tolerance than the TPRC2001-1 genotype, as exhibited through less reduction in dry weight under excess Mn, and accompanied by lower internal Mn concentrations. Interestingly, Mn-stimulated increases in malate concentrations and exudation rates were observed only in the Fine-stem genotype. Proteomic analysis of Fine-stem roots revealed that S. guianensis Malate Dehydrogenase1 (SgMDH1) accumulated in response to Mn toxicity. Western-blot and quantitative PCR analyses showed that Mn toxicity resulted in increased SgMDH1 accumulation only in Fine-stem roots, but not in TPRC2001-1. The function of SgMDH1-mediated malate synthesis was verified through in vitro biochemical analysis of SgMDH1 activities against oxaloacetate, as well as in vivo increased malate concentrations in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), soybean (Glycine max) hairy roots, and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) with SgMDH1 overexpression. Furthermore, SgMDH1 overexpression conferred Mn tolerance in Arabidopsis, which was accompanied by increased malate exudation and reduced plant Mn concentrations, suggesting that secreted malate could alleviate Mn toxicity in plants. Taken together, we conclude that the superior Mn tolerance of S. guianensis is achieved by coordination of internal and external Mn detoxification through malate synthesis and exudation, which is regulated by SgMDH1 at both transcription and protein levels. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Malate Synthesis and Secretion Mediated by a Manganese-Enhanced Malate Dehydrogenase Confers Superior Manganese Tolerance in Stylosanthes guianensis1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhijian; Sun, Lili; Liu, Pandao; Liu, Guodao; Tian, Jiang; Liao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) toxicity is a major constraint limiting plant growth on acidic soils. Superior Mn tolerance in Stylosanthes spp. has been well documented, but its molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, superior Mn tolerance in Stylosanthes guianensis was confirmed, as reflected by a high Mn toxicity threshold. Furthermore, genetic variation of Mn tolerance was evaluated using two S. guianensis genotypes, which revealed that the Fine-stem genotype had higher Mn tolerance than the TPRC2001-1 genotype, as exhibited through less reduction in dry weight under excess Mn, and accompanied by lower internal Mn concentrations. Interestingly, Mn-stimulated increases in malate concentrations and exudation rates were observed only in the Fine-stem genotype. Proteomic analysis of Fine-stem roots revealed that S. guianensis Malate Dehydrogenase1 (SgMDH1) accumulated in response to Mn toxicity. Western-blot and quantitative PCR analyses showed that Mn toxicity resulted in increased SgMDH1 accumulation only in Fine-stem roots, but not in TPRC2001-1. The function of SgMDH1-mediated malate synthesis was verified through in vitro biochemical analysis of SgMDH1 activities against oxaloacetate, as well as in vivo increased malate concentrations in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), soybean (Glycine max) hairy roots, and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) with SgMDH1 overexpression. Furthermore, SgMDH1 overexpression conferred Mn tolerance in Arabidopsis, which was accompanied by increased malate exudation and reduced plant Mn concentrations, suggesting that secreted malate could alleviate Mn toxicity in plants. Taken together, we conclude that the superior Mn tolerance of S. guianensis is achieved by coordination of internal and external Mn detoxification through malate synthesis and exudation, which is regulated by SgMDH1 at both transcription and protein levels. PMID:25378694

  16. [Malate oxidation by mitochondrial succinate:ubiquinone-reductase].

    PubMed

    Belikova, Iu O; Kotliar, A B

    1988-04-01

    Succinate:ubiquinone reductase was shown to catalyze the oxidation of L- and D-stereoisomers of malate by artificial electron acceptors and ubiquinone. The rate of malate oxidation by succinate:ubiquinone reductase is by two orders of magnitude lower than that for the natural substrate--succinate. The values of kinetic constants for the oxidation of D- and L-stereoisomers of malate are equal to: V infinity = 0.1 mumol/min/mg protein, Km = 2 mM and V infinity = 0.05 mumol/min/mg protein, Km = 2 mM, respectively. The malate dehydrogenase activity is fully inhibited by the inhibitors of the dicarboxylate-binding site of the enzyme, i.e., N-ethylmaleimide and malonate and is practically insensitive to carboxin, a specific inhibitor of the ubiquinone-binding center. The enol form of oxaloacetate was shown to be the product of malate oxidation by succinate:ubiquinone reductase. The kinetics of inhibition of the enzyme activity by the ketone and enol forms of oxaloacetate was studied. Both forms of oxaloacetate effectively inhibit the succinate:ubiquinone reductase reaction.

  17. Optimal dose of zinc supplementation for preventing aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hao; Hu, Jianyang; Li, Jing; Pang, Wei; Hu, Yandan; Yang, Hongpeng; Li, Wenjie; Huang, Chengyu; Zhang, Mingman; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-01-01

    Zinc supplementation can help maintain learning and memory function in rodents. In this study, we hypothesized that zinc supplementation could antagonize the neurotoxicity induced by aluminum in rats. Animals were fed a diet containing different doses of zinc (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) for 9 weeks, and orally administered aluminum chloride (300 mg/kg daily) from the third week for 7 consecutive weeks. Open-field behavioral test results showed that the number of rearings in the group given the 100 mg/kg zinc supplement was significantly increased compared with the group given the 50 mg/kg zinc supplement. Malondialdehyde content in the cerebrum was significantly decreased, while dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine levels were increased in the groups given the diet supplemented with 100 and 200 mg/kg zinc, compared with the group given the diet supplemented with 50 mg/kg zinc. The acetylcholinesterase activity in the cerebrum was significantly decreased in the group given the 100 mg/kg zinc supplement. Hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed evident pathological damage in the hippocampus of rats in the group given the diet supplemented with 50 mg/kg zinc, but the damage was attenuated in the groups given the diet supplemented with 100 and 200 mg/kg zinc. Our findings suggest that zinc is a potential neuroprotective agent against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rats, and the optimal dosages are 100 and 200 mg/kg. PMID:25206586

  18. Optimal dose of zinc supplementation for preventing aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hao; Hu, Jianyang; Li, Jing; Pang, Wei; Hu, Yandan; Yang, Hongpeng; Li, Wenjie; Huang, Chengyu; Zhang, Mingman; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-10-15

    Zinc supplementation can help maintain learning and memory function in rodents. In this study, we hypothesized that zinc supplementation could antagonize the neurotoxicity induced by aluminum in rats. Animals were fed a diet containing different doses of zinc (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) for 9 weeks, and orally administered aluminum chloride (300 mg/kg daily) from the third week for 7 consecutive weeks. Open-field behavioral test results showed that the number of rearings in the group given the 100 mg/kg zinc supplement was significantly increased compared with the group given the 50 mg/kg zinc supplement. Malondialdehyde content in the cerebrum was significantly decreased, while dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine levels were increased in the groups given the diet supplemented with 100 and 200 mg/kg zinc, compared with the group given the diet supplemented with 50 mg/kg zinc. The acetylcholinesterase activity in the cerebrum was significantly decreased in the group given the 100 mg/kg zinc supplement. Hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed evident pathological damage in the hippocampus of rats in the group given the diet supplemented with 50 mg/kg zinc, but the damage was attenuated in the groups given the diet supplemented with 100 and 200 mg/kg zinc. Our findings suggest that zinc is a potential neuroprotective agent against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rats, and the optimal dosages are 100 and 200 mg/kg.

  19. Naringin protects memory impairment and mitochondrial oxidative damage against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Atish; Shur, Bhargabi; Kumar, Anil

    2013-09-01

    Aluminum has been indicated in neurodegenerative disorders and naringin, a bioflavonoid has been used to reduce neurotoxic effects of aluminum against aluminum chloride-induced rats. Therefore, present study has been designed to explore the possible role of naringin against aluminum-induced cognitive dysfunction and oxidative damage in rats. Aluminum (100 mg/kg) and naringin (40 and 80 mg/kg) drug treatment were administered orally for six weeks to male wistar rats. Various behavioral performance tasks, biochemical, mitochondrial oxidative parameters, and aluminum concentration in the brain were assessed. Aluminum chloride treatment significantly caused cognitive dysfunction and mitochondria oxidative damage as compared to vehicle treated control group. Besides, aluminum chloride treatment significantly increased acetyl cholinesterase activity and aluminum concentration in the brain as compared to sham. Chronic administration of naringin significantly improved cognitive performance and attenuated mitochondria oxidative damage, acetyl cholinesterase activity, and aluminum concentration in aluminum-treated rats as compared to control rats. Results of the study demonstrate neuroprotective potential of naringin against aluminum chloride-induced cognitive dysfunction and mitochondrial oxidative damage.

  20. Effects of aluminum-induced aggregation on the fluorescence of humic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpless, C.M.; McGown, L.B.

    1999-09-15

    Aluminum-induced aggregates of terrestrial and aquatic humic acid standards from the International Humic Substances Society are shown to be fluorescent by means of a multiwavelength fluorescence anisotropy experiment in which the data were treated with a model for nonspherical particles. While aggregates of aquatic humic acids appear in the fluorescence signal at both short and long excitation wavelengths, aggregates of terrestrial humic acids are detected only at the long Wavelength. Furthermore, the results indicate that emission obtained at longer excitation wavelengths is representative of smaller particles. At pH 4, the aquatic humic acids appear to exist in an extended conformation, whereas the terrestrial humic acids show less extension. The size and shape of the fluorescent particles display a complex dependence on Al concentration. Both enhancement and quenching of fluorescence are observed in the total luminescence spectra upon Al addition. However, quenching is shown to be the result of decreased humic acid concentration due to precipitation by Al rather than photophysical processes.

  1. Poly-crystalline thin-film by aluminum induced crystallization on aluminum nitride substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhopal, Muhammad Fahad; Lee, Doo Won; Lee, Soo Hong

    2016-09-01

    Thin-film polycrystalline silicon ( pc-Si) on foreign (non-silicon) substrates has been researched by various research groups for the production of photovoltaic cells. High quality pc-Si deposition on foreign substrates with superior optical properties is considered to be the main hurdle in cell fabrication. Metal induced crystallization (MIC) is one of the renowned techniques used to produce this quality of material. In the current study, an aluminum induced crystallization (AIC) method was adopted to produce pc-Si thin-film on aluminum nitride (AlN) substrate by a seed layer approach. Aluminum and a-Si layer were deposited using an e-beam evaporator. Various annealing conditions were used in order to investigate the AIC grown pc-Si seed layers for process optimization. The effect of thermal annealing on grain size, defects preferentially crystallographic orientation of the grains were analyzed. Surface morphology was studied using an optical microscope. Poly-silicon film with a crystallinity fraction between 95-100% and an FWHM between 5-6 cm-1 is achievable at low temperatures and for short time intervals. A grain size of about 10 micron can be obtained at a low deposition rate on an AIN substrate. Similarly, Focused ion beam (FIB) also showed that at 425 °C sample B and at 400 °C sample A were fully crystallized. The crystalline quality of pc-Si was evaluated using μ-Raman spectroscopy as a function of annealed conditions and Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) was used to determine the phase direction of the pc-Si layer. The current study implicates that a poly-silicon layer with good crystallographic orientation and crystallinity fraction is achievable on AIN substrate at low temperatures and short time frames.

  2. Malate Utilization by a Group D Streptococcus: Regulation of Malic Enzyme Synthesis by an Inducible Malate Permease

    PubMed Central

    London, Jack; Meyer, Eleanor Y.

    1970-01-01

    Induction of an nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-specific malic enzyme and a malate entry system permits Streptococcus faecalis to grow at the expense of malate. Evidence is presented which shows that biosynthesis of the permease, but not of the malic enzyme, is subject to catabolite repression by glucose. In contrast to the malic enzyme, the catalytic function of the entry system does not appear to be inhibited by intermediate products of glycolysis. Although the induction of the entry system does not appear to be coordinated with the induction of the malic enzyme, the latter process is dependent upon the permease for the transport and accumulation of inducer. PMID:5437724

  3. Malate synthesis by dark carbon dioxide fixation in leaves.

    PubMed

    Levi, C; Perchorowicz, J T; Gibbs, M

    1978-04-01

    The rates of dark CO(2) fixation and the label distribution in malate following dark (14)CO(2) fixation in a C-4 plant (maize), a C-3 plant (sunflower), and two Crassulacean acid metabolism plants (Bryophyllum calycinum and Kalanchoë diagremontianum leaves and plantlets) are compared. Within the first 30 minutes of dark (14)CO(2) fixation, leaves of maize, B. calycinum, and sunflower, and K. diagremontianum plantlets fix CO(2) at rates of 1.4, 3.4, 0.23, and 1.0 mumoles of CO(2)/mg of chlorophyll. hour, respectively. Net CO(2) fixation stops within 3 hours in maize and sunflower, but Crassulaceans continue fixing CO(2) for the duration of the 23-hour experiment.A bacterial procedure using Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC No. 8014 and one using malic enzyme to remove the beta-carboxyl (C(4)) from malate are compared. It is reported that highly purified malic enzyme and the bacterial method provide equivalent results. Less purified malic enzyme may overestimate the label in C(4) as much as 15 to 20%.The contribution of carbon atom 1 of malate is between 18 and 21% of the total carboxyl label after 1 minute of dark CO(2) fixation. Isotopic labeling in the two carboxyls approached unity with time. The rate of increase is greatest in sunflower leaves and Kalanchoë plantlets. In addition, Kalanchoë leaves fix (14)CO(2) more rapidly than Kalanchoë plantlets and the equilibration of the malate carboxyls occurs more slowly. The rates of fixation and the randomization are tissue-specific. The rate of fixation does not correlate with the rate of randomization of isotope in the malate carboxyls.

  4. Malate Synthesis by Dark Carbon Dioxide Fixation in Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Carolyn; Perchorowicz, John T.; Gibbs, Martin

    1978-01-01

    The rates of dark CO2 fixation and the label distribution in malate following dark 14CO2 fixation in a C-4 plant (maize), a C-3 plant (sunflower), and two Crassulacean acid metabolism plants (Bryophyllum calycinum and Kalanchoë diagremontianum leaves and plantlets) are compared. Within the first 30 minutes of dark 14CO2 fixation, leaves of maize, B. calycinum, and sunflower, and K. diagremontianum plantlets fix CO2 at rates of 1.4, 3.4, 0.23, and 1.0 μmoles of CO2/mg of chlorophyll· hour, respectively. Net CO2 fixation stops within 3 hours in maize and sunflower, but Crassulaceans continue fixing CO2 for the duration of the 23-hour experiment. A bacterial procedure using Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC No. 8014 and one using malic enzyme to remove the β-carboxyl (C4) from malate are compared. It is reported that highly purified malic enzyme and the bacterial method provide equivalent results. Less purified malic enzyme may overestimate the label in C4 as much as 15 to 20%. The contribution of carbon atom 1 of malate is between 18 and 21% of the total carboxyl label after 1 minute of dark CO2 fixation. Isotopic labeling in the two carboxyls approached unity with time. The rate of increase is greatest in sunflower leaves and Kalanchoë plantlets. In addition, Kalanchoë leaves fix 14CO2 more rapidly than Kalanchoë plantlets and the equilibration of the malate carboxyls occurs more slowly. The rates of fixation and the randomization are tissue-specific. The rate of fixation does not correlate with the rate of randomization of isotope in the malate carboxyls. PMID:16660319

  5. Malate as a key carbon source of leaf dark-respired CO2 across different environmental conditions in potato plants.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Marco M; Rinne, Katja T; Blessing, Carola; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Buchmann, Nina; Werner, Roland A

    2015-09-01

    Dissimilation of carbon sources during plant respiration in support of metabolic processes results in the continuous release of CO2. The carbon isotopic composition of leaf dark-respired CO2 (i.e. δ (13) C R ) shows daily enrichments up to 14.8‰ under different environmental conditions. However, the reasons for this (13)C enrichment in leaf dark-respired CO2 are not fully understood, since daily changes in δ(13)C of putative leaf respiratory carbon sources (δ (13) C RS ) are not yet clear. Thus, we exposed potato plants (Solanum tuberosum) to different temperature and soil moisture treatments. We determined δ (13) C R with an in-tube incubation technique and δ (13) C RS with compound-specific isotope analysis during a daily cycle. The highest δ (13) C RS values were found in the organic acid malate under different environmental conditions, showing less negative values compared to δ (13) C R (up to 5.2‰) and compared to δ (13) C RS of soluble carbohydrates, citrate and starch (up to 8.8‰). Moreover, linear relationships between δ (13) C R and δ (13) C RS among different putative carbon sources were strongest for malate during daytime (r(2)=0.69, P≤0.001) and nighttime (r(2)=0.36, P≤0.001) under all environmental conditions. A multiple linear regression analysis revealed δ (13) C RS of malate as the most important carbon source influencing δ (13) C R . Thus, our results strongly indicate malate as a key carbon source of (13)C enriched dark-respired CO2 in potato plants, probably driven by an anapleurotic flux replenishing intermediates of the Krebs cycle.

  6. Malate as a key carbon source of leaf dark-respired CO2 across different environmental conditions in potato plants

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Marco M.; Rinne, Katja T.; Blessing, Carola; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Buchmann, Nina; Werner, Roland A.

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilation of carbon sources during plant respiration in support of metabolic processes results in the continuous release of CO2. The carbon isotopic composition of leaf dark-respired CO2 (i.e. δ 13 C R) shows daily enrichments up to 14.8‰ under different environmental conditions. However, the reasons for this 13C enrichment in leaf dark-respired CO2 are not fully understood, since daily changes in δ13C of putative leaf respiratory carbon sources (δ 13 C RS) are not yet clear. Thus, we exposed potato plants (Solanum tuberosum) to different temperature and soil moisture treatments. We determined δ 13 C R with an in-tube incubation technique and δ 13 C RS with compound-specific isotope analysis during a daily cycle. The highest δ 13 C RS values were found in the organic acid malate under different environmental conditions, showing less negative values compared to δ 13 C R (up to 5.2‰) and compared to δ 13 C RS of soluble carbohydrates, citrate and starch (up to 8.8‰). Moreover, linear relationships between δ 13 C R and δ 13 C RS among different putative carbon sources were strongest for malate during daytime (r2=0.69, P≤0.001) and nighttime (r2=0.36, P≤0.001) under all environmental conditions. A multiple linear regression analysis revealed δ 13 C RS of malate as the most important carbon source influencing δ 13 C R. Thus, our results strongly indicate malate as a key carbon source of 13C enriched dark-respired CO2 in potato plants, probably driven by an anapleurotic flux replenishing intermediates of the Krebs cycle. PMID:26139821

  7. Prognostic value of a newly identified MALAT1 alternatively spliced transcript in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meseure, Didier; Vacher, Sophie; Lallemand, François; Alsibai, Kinan Drak; Hatem, Rana; Chemlali, Walid; Nicolas, Andre; De Koning, Leanne; Pasmant, Eric; Callens, Celine; Lidereau, Rosette; Morillon, Antonin; Bieche, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epigenetic deregulation is considered as a new hallmark of cancer. The long non-coding RNA MALAT1 has been implicated in several cancers; however, its role in breast cancer is still little known. Methods: We used RT–PCR, in situ hybridisation, and RPPA methods to quantify (i) the full-length (FL) and an alternatively spliced variant (Δsv) of MALAT1, and (ii) a panel of transcripts and proteins involved in MALAT1 pathways, in a large series of breast tumours from patients with known clinical/pathological status and long-term outcome. Results: MALAT1 was overexpressed in 14% (63/446) of the breast tumours. MALAT1-overexpressed tumour epithelial cells showed marked diffuse nuclear signals and numerous huge nuclear speckles. Screening of the dbEST database led to the identification of Δsv-MALAT1, a major alternatively spliced MALAT1 transcript, with a very different expression pattern compared with FL-MALAT1. This alternative Δsv-MALAT1 transcript was mainly underexpressed (18.8%) in our breast tumour series. Multivariate analysis showed that alternative Δsv-MALAT1 transcript is an independent prognostic factor. Δsv-MALAT1 expression was associated with alterations of the pre-mRNAs alternative splicing machinery, and of the Drosha-DGCR8 complex required for non-coding RNA biogenesis. Alternative Δsv-MALAT1 transcript expression was associated to YAP protein status and with an activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway. Conclusions: Our results reveal a complex expression pattern of various MALAT1 transcript variants in breast tumours, and suggest that this pattern of expressions should be taken into account to evaluate MALAT1 as predictive biomarker and therapeutic target. PMID:27172249

  8. Biological function and mechanism of MALAT-1 in renal cell carcinoma proliferation and apoptosis: role of the MALAT-1-Livin protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoan; Ma, Pengpeng; Zhao, Ying; Li, Bin; Jiang, Shaobo; Xiong, Hui; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Hanbo; Jin, Xunbo; Liu, Chuan

    2017-09-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play a critical role in cancer development and progression. LncRNA metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1) is a kidney cancer-associated onco-lncRNA involved in the progression of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, the pathological role of lncRNA MALAT-1 in RCC proliferation and metastasis remains poorly understood. This study was designed to investigate the biological role and mechanism of MALAT-1 in RCC proliferation and metastasis. The experiments were performed in human tissues, renal carcinoma cell lines, and nude mice. The expression of lncRNA MALAT-1, Livin mRNA, and the Livin protein was determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) or a Western blot. The interaction between MALAT-1 and Livin was evaluated by RNA pull-down and RNA binding protein immunoprecipitation (RIP). Cell viability and apoptosis in RCC cell lines were detected using CCK-8 and TUNEL assays. LncRNA MALAT-1 and the Livin protein were highly expressed in RCC tissues, as well as in RCC 786-O and Caki-1 cell lines. MALAT-1 interference contributed to an increase in cell apoptosis and a reduction in the cell viability of 786-O and Caki-1 cells. The increase in apoptosis by si-MALAT-1 was reversed by overexpression of Livin. The RIP results showed that MALAT-1 promoted the expression of the Livin protein in 786-O and Caki-1 cells by enhancing the stability of the protein. Furthermore, the volume of si-MALAT-1-786-O cell xenograft was significantly suppressed. These data indicate that lncRNA MALAT-1-mediated promotion of RCC proliferation and metastasis may be due to the upregulation of the expression of Livin.

  9. Metabolic Fate of the Carboxyl Groups of Malate and Pyruvate and their Influence on δ13C of Leaf-Respired CO2 during Light Enhanced Dark Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Marco M.; Wegener, Frederik; Barthel, Matti; Maurino, Veronica G.; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Buchmann, Nina; Werner, Christiane; Werner, Roland A.

    2016-01-01

    The enhanced CO2 release of illuminated leaves transferred into darkness, termed “light enhanced dark respiration (LEDR)”, is often associated with an increase in the carbon isotope ratio of the respired CO2 (δ13CLEDR). The latter has been hypothesized to result from different respiratory substrates and decarboxylation reactions in various metabolic pathways, which are poorly understood so far. To provide a better insight into the underlying metabolic processes of δ13CLEDR, we fed position-specific 13C-labeled malate and pyruvate via the xylem stream to leaves of species with high and low δ13CLEDR values (Halimium halimifolium and Oxalis triangularis, respectively). During respective label application, we determined label-derived leaf 13CO2 respiration using laser spectroscopy and the 13C allocation to metabolic fractions during light–dark transitions. Our results clearly show that both carboxyl groups (C-1 and C-4 position) of malate similarly influence respiration and metabolic fractions in both species, indicating possible isotope randomization of the carboxyl groups of malate by the fumarase reaction. While C-2 position of pyruvate was only weakly respired, the species-specific difference in natural δ13CLEDR patterns were best reflected by the 13CO2 respiration patterns of the C-1 position of pyruvate. Furthermore, 13C label from malate and pyruvate were mainly allocated to amino and organic acid fractions in both species and only little to sugar and lipid fractions. In summary, our results suggest that respiration of both carboxyl groups of malate (via fumarase) by tricarboxylic acid cycle reactions or by NAD-malic enzyme influences δ13CLEDR. The latter supplies the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction, which in turn determines natural δ13CLEDR pattern by releasing the C-1 position of pyruvate. PMID:27375626

  10. Metabolic Fate of the Carboxyl Groups of Malate and Pyruvate and their Influence on δ(13)C of Leaf-Respired CO2 during Light Enhanced Dark Respiration.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Marco M; Wegener, Frederik; Barthel, Matti; Maurino, Veronica G; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Buchmann, Nina; Werner, Christiane; Werner, Roland A

    2016-01-01

    The enhanced CO2 release of illuminated leaves transferred into darkness, termed "light enhanced dark respiration (LEDR)", is often associated with an increase in the carbon isotope ratio of the respired CO2 (δ(13)CLEDR). The latter has been hypothesized to result from different respiratory substrates and decarboxylation reactions in various metabolic pathways, which are poorly understood so far. To provide a better insight into the underlying metabolic processes of δ(13)CLEDR, we fed position-specific (13)C-labeled malate and pyruvate via the xylem stream to leaves of species with high and low δ(13)CLEDR values (Halimium halimifolium and Oxalis triangularis, respectively). During respective label application, we determined label-derived leaf (13)CO2 respiration using laser spectroscopy and the (13)C allocation to metabolic fractions during light-dark transitions. Our results clearly show that both carboxyl groups (C-1 and C-4 position) of malate similarly influence respiration and metabolic fractions in both species, indicating possible isotope randomization of the carboxyl groups of malate by the fumarase reaction. While C-2 position of pyruvate was only weakly respired, the species-specific difference in natural δ(13)CLEDR patterns were best reflected by the (13)CO2 respiration patterns of the C-1 position of pyruvate. Furthermore, (13)C label from malate and pyruvate were mainly allocated to amino and organic acid fractions in both species and only little to sugar and lipid fractions. In summary, our results suggest that respiration of both carboxyl groups of malate (via fumarase) by tricarboxylic acid cycle reactions or by NAD-malic enzyme influences δ(13)CLEDR. The latter supplies the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction, which in turn determines natural δ(13)CLEDR pattern by releasing the C-1 position of pyruvate.

  11. An InDel in the promoter of Al-activated malate transporter 9 selected during tomato domestication determines fruit malate content and aluminum tolerance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Deciphering the mechanism of malate accumulation in plants would contribute to a greater understanding of plant chemistry, which has implications for improving flavor quality in crop species and enhancing human health benefits. However, the regulation of malate metabolism is poorly understood in cro...

  12. Malate. Jack of all trades or master of a few?

    PubMed

    Fernie, Alisdair R; Martinoia, Enrico

    2009-05-01

    The dicarboxylic acid malate has long been thought to play important roles in plant physiology. In addition to being a major photosynthate in C4 and CAM plants and an intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle it has been proposed to play essential roles in pH regulation and important roles in pathogen response, as a component of the root exudates and as a regulatory osmolyte affecting stomatal function. Recent years have seen the cloning and functional analysis of a wide range of enzymes and transporters associated with malate metabolism. Here we attempt to provide a synthesis of research in this field as well as re-evaluating the role of this metabolite in mediating guard cell function.

  13. The glucose-dependent transport of L-malate in Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, K; Radler, F

    1984-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii possesses a constitutive malic enzyme, but only small amounts of malate are decomposed when the cells ferment fructose. Cells growing anaerobically on glucose (glucose cells) decompose malate, whereas fructose cells do not. Only glucose cells show an increase in the intracellular concentration of malate when suspended in a malate-containing solution. The transport system for malate is induced by glucose, but it is repressed by fructose. The synthesis of this transport system is inhibited by cycloheximide. Of the two enantiomers L-malate is transported preferentially. The transport of malate by induced cells is not only inhibited by addition of fructose but also inactivated. This inactivation is independent of the presence of cycloheximide. The transport of malate is inhibited by uranyl ions; various other inhibitors of transport and phosphorylation were of little influence. It is assumed that the inducible protein carrier for malate operates by facilitated diffusion. Fructose cells of Z. bailii and cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae do not contain a transport system for malate.

  14. Effect of bicarbonate and oxaloacetate on malate oxidation by spinach leaf mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Neuburger, M; Douce, R

    1980-02-08

    Mitochondria isolated from spinach leaves oxidized malate by both a NAD+-linked malic enzyme and malate dehydrogenase. In the presence of sodium arsenite the accumuation of oxaloacetate and pyruvate during malate oxidation was strongly dependent on the malate concentration, the pH in the reaction medium and the metabolic state condition. Bicarbonate, especially at alkaline pH, inhibited the decarboxylation of malate by the NAD+-linked malic enzyme in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of the reaction products showed that with 15 mM bicarbonate, spinach leaf mitochondria excreted almost exclusively oxaloacetate. The inhibition by oxaloacetate of malate oxidation by spinach leaf mitochondria was strongly dependent on malate concentration, the pH in the reaction medium and on the metabolic state condition. The data were interpreted as indicating that: (a) the concentration of oxaloacetate on both sides of the inner mitochondrial membrane governed the efflux and influx of oxaloacetate; (b) the NAD+/NADH ratio played an important role in regulating malate oxidation in plant mitochondria; (c) both enzymes (malate dehydrogenase and NAD+-linked malic enzyme) were competing at the level of the pyridine nucleotide pool, and (d) the NAD+-linked malic enzyme provided NADH for the reversal of the reaction catalyzed by the malate dehydrogenase.

  15. Role of Exogenous Melatonin on Cell Proliferation and Oxidant/Antioxidant System in Aluminum-Induced Renal Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Karabulut-Bulan, Omur; Bayrak, Bertan Boran; Arda-Pirincci, Pelin; Sarikaya-Unal, Guner; Us, Huseyin; Yanardag, Refiye

    2015-11-01

    Aluminum has toxic potential on humans and animals when it accumulates in various tissues. It was shown in a number of studies that aluminum causes oxidative stress by free radical formation and lipid peroxidation in tissues and thus may cause damage in target organs. Although there are numerous studies investigating aluminum toxicity, biochemical mechanisms of the damage caused by aluminum have yet to be explained. Melatonin produced by pineal gland was shown to be an effective antioxidant. Since kidneys are target organs for aluminum accumulation and toxicity, we have studied the role of melatonin against aluminum-induced renal toxicity in rats. Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups. Group I served as control, and received only physiological saline; group II served as positive control for melatonin, and received ethanol and physiological saline; group III received melatonin (10 mg/kg); group IV received aluminum sulfate (5 mg/kg) and group V received aluminum sulfate and melatonin (in the same dose), injected three times a week for 1 month. Administration of aluminum caused degenerative changes in renal tissues, such as increase in metallothionein immunoreactivity and decrease in cell proliferation. Moreover, uric acid and lipid peroxidation levels and xanthine oxidase activity increased, while glutathione, catalase, superoxide dismutase, paraoxonase 1, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and sodium potassium ATPase activities decreased. Administration of melatonin mostly prevented these symptoms. Results showed that melatonin is a potential beneficial agent for reducing damage in aluminum-induced renal toxicity.

  16. Rewiring the reductive tricarboxylic acid pathway and L-malate transport pathway of Aspergillus oryzae for overproduction of L-malate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Xie, Zhipeng; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Liu, Long

    2017-07-10

    Aspergillus oryzae finds wide application in the food, feed, and wine industries, and is an excellent cell factory platform for production of organic acids. In this work, we achieved the overproduction of L-malate by rewiring the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) pathway and L-malate transport pathway of A. oryzae NRRL 3488. First, overexpression of native pyruvate carboxylase and malate dehydrogenase in the rTCA pathway improved the L-malate titer from 26.1gL(-1) to 42.3gL(-1) in shake flask culture. Then, the oxaloacetate anaplerotic reaction was constructed by heterologous expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from Escherichia coli, increasing the L-malate titer to 58.5gL(-1). Next, the export of L-malate from the cytoplasm to the external medium was strengthened by overexpression of a C4-dicarboxylate transporter gene from A. oryzae and an L-malate permease gene from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, improving the L-malate titer from 58.5gL(-1) to 89.5gL(-1). Lastly, guided by transcription analysis of the expression profile of key genes related to L-malate synthesis, the 6-phosphofructokinase encoded by the pfk gene was identified as a potential limiting step for L-malate synthesis. Overexpression of pfk with the strong sodM promoter increased the L-malate titer to 93.2gL(-1). The final engineered A. oryzae strain produced 165gL(-1) L-malate with a productivity of 1.38gL(-1)h(-1) in 3-L fed-batch culture. Overall, we constructed an efficient L-malate producer by rewiring the rTCA pathway and L-malate transport pathway of A. oryzae NRRL 3488, and the engineering strategy adopted here may be useful for the construction of A. oryzae cell factories to produce other organic acids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Stringency of substrate specificity of Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Boernke, W. E.; Millard, C. S.; Stevens, P. W.; Kakar, S. N.; Stevens, F. J.; Donnelly, M. I.; Nebraska Wesleyan Univ.

    1995-09-10

    Malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase are members of the structurally and functionally homologous family of 2-ketoacid dehydrogenases. Both enzymes display high specificity for their respective keto substrates, oxaloacetate and pyruvate. Closer analysis of their specificity, however, reveals that the specificity of malate dehydrogenase is much stricter and less malleable than that of lactate dehydrogenase. Site-specific mutagenesis of the two enzymes in an attempt to reverse their specificity has met with contrary results. Conversion of a specific active-site glutamine to arginine in lactate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus generated an enzyme that displayed activity toward oxaloacetate equal to that of the native enzyme toward pyruvate (H. M. Wilks et al. (1988) Science 242, 1541-1544). We have constructed a series of mutants in the mobile, active site loop of the Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase that incorporate the complementary change, conversion of arginine 81 to glutamine, to evaluate the role of charge distribution and conformational flexibility within this loop in defining the substrate specificity of these enzymes. Mutants incorporating the change R81Q all had reversed specificity, displaying much higher activity toward pyruvate than to the natural substrate, oxaloacetate. In contrast to the mutated lactate dehydrogenase, these reversed-specificity mutants were much less active than the native enzyme. Secondary mutations within the loop of the E. coli enzyme (A80N, A80P, A80P/M85E/D86T) had either no or only moderately beneficial effects on the activity of the mutant enzyme toward pyruvate. The mutation A80P, which can be expected to reduce the overall flexibility of the loop, modestly improved activity toward pyruvate. The possible physiological relevance of the stringent specificity of malate dehydrogenase was investigated. In normal strains of E. coli, fermentative metabolism was not affected by expression of the mutant

  18. Multiple strategies to prevent oxidative stress in Arabidopsis plants lacking the malate valve enzyme NADP-malate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Hebbelmann, Inga; Selinski, Jennifer; Wehmeyer, Corinna; Goss, Tatjana; Voss, Ingo; Mulo, Paula; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Aro, Eva-Mari; Oelze, Marie-Luise; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Do, Phuc T.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Talla, Sai K.; Raghavendra, Agepati S.; Linke, Vera; Scheibe, Renate

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear-encoded chloroplast NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) is a key enzyme controlling the malate valve, to allow the indirect export of reducing equivalents. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. T-DNA insertion mutants of NADP-MDH were used to assess the role of the light-activated NADP-MDH in a typical C3 plant. Surprisingly, even when exposed to high-light conditions in short days, nadp-mdh knockout mutants were phenotypically indistinguishable from the wild type. The photosynthetic performance and typical antioxidative systems, such as the Beck–Halliwell–Asada pathway, were barely affected in the mutants in response to high-light treatment. The reactive oxygen species levels remained low, indicating the apparent absence of oxidative stress, in the mutants. Further analysis revealed a novel combination of compensatory mechanisms in order to maintain redox homeostasis in the nadp-mdh plants under high-light conditions, particularly an increase in the NTRC/2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx) system in chloroplasts. There were indications of adjustments in extra-chloroplastic components of photorespiration and proline levels, which all could dissipate excess reducing equivalents, sustain photosynthesis, and prevent photoinhibition in nadp-mdh knockout plants. Such metabolic flexibility suggests that the malate valve acts in concert with other NADPH-consuming reactions to maintain a balanced redox state during photosynthesis under high-light stress in wild-type plants. PMID:22140244

  19. Multiple strategies to prevent oxidative stress in Arabidopsis plants lacking the malate valve enzyme NADP-malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hebbelmann, Inga; Selinski, Jennifer; Wehmeyer, Corinna; Goss, Tatjana; Voss, Ingo; Mulo, Paula; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Aro, Eva-Mari; Oelze, Marie-Luise; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Do, Phuc T; Fernie, Alisdair R; Talla, Sai K; Raghavendra, Agepati S; Linke, Vera; Scheibe, Renate

    2012-02-01

    The nuclear-encoded chloroplast NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) is a key enzyme controlling the malate valve, to allow the indirect export of reducing equivalents. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. T-DNA insertion mutants of NADP-MDH were used to assess the role of the light-activated NADP-MDH in a typical C(3) plant. Surprisingly, even when exposed to high-light conditions in short days, nadp-mdh knockout mutants were phenotypically indistinguishable from the wild type. The photosynthetic performance and typical antioxidative systems, such as the Beck-Halliwell-Asada pathway, were barely affected in the mutants in response to high-light treatment. The reactive oxygen species levels remained low, indicating the apparent absence of oxidative stress, in the mutants. Further analysis revealed a novel combination of compensatory mechanisms in order to maintain redox homeostasis in the nadp-mdh plants under high-light conditions, particularly an increase in the NTRC/2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx) system in chloroplasts. There were indications of adjustments in extra-chloroplastic components of photorespiration and proline levels, which all could dissipate excess reducing equivalents, sustain photosynthesis, and prevent photoinhibition in nadp-mdh knockout plants. Such metabolic flexibility suggests that the malate valve acts in concert with other NADPH-consuming reactions to maintain a balanced redox state during photosynthesis under high-light stress in wild-type plants.

  20. A MALAT1/HIF-2α feedback loop contributes to arsenite carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuan; Liu, Yi; Liu, Xinlu; Lu, Lu; Li, Jun; Wang, Qingling; Wei, Shaofeng; Shi, Le; Lu, Xiaolin; Liu, Qizhan; Zhang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is well established as a human carcinogen, but the molecular mechanisms leading to arsenic-induced carcinogenesis are complex and elusive. It is also not known if lncRNAs are involved in arsenic-induced liver carcinogenesis. We have found that MALAT1, a non-coding RNA, is over-expressed in the sera of people exposed to arsenite and in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs), and MALAT1 has a close relation with the clinicopathological characteristics of HCC. In addition, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is up-regulated in HCCs, and MALAT1 and HIF-2α have a positive correlation in HCC tissues. During the malignant transformation of human hepatic epithelial (L-02) cells induced by a low concentration (2.0 μM) of arsenite, MALAT1 and HIF-2α are increased. In addition, arsenite-induced MALAT1 causes disassociation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein from HIF-2α, therefore, alleviating VHL-mediated HIF-2α ubiquitination, which causes HIF-2α accumulation. In turn, HIF-2α transcriptionally regulates MALAT1, thus forming a positive feedback loop to ensure expression of arsenite-induced MALAT1 and HIF-2α, which are involved in malignant transformation. Moreover, MALAT1 and HIF-2α promote the invasive and metastatic capacities of arsenite-induced transformed L-02 cells and in HCC-LM3 cells. The capacities of MALAT1 and HIF-2α to promote tumor growth are validated in mouse xenograft models. In mice, arsenite induces an inflammatory response, and MALAT1 and HIF-2α are over-expressed. Together, these findings suggest that the MALAT1/HIF-2α feedback loop is involved in regulation of arsenite-induced malignant transformation. Our results not only confirm a novel mechanism involving reciprocal regulation between MALAT1 and HIF-2α, but also expand the understanding of the carcinogenic potential of arsenite. PMID:26735578

  1. Malic Acid Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Engineering of Pyruvate Carboxylation, Oxaloacetate Reduction, and Malate Export▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zelle, Rintze M.; de Hulster, Erik; van Winden, Wouter A.; de Waard, Pieter; Dijkema, Cor; Winkler, Aaron A.; Geertman, Jan-Maarten A.; van Dijken, Johannes P.; Pronk, Jack T.; van Maris, Antonius J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Malic acid is a potential biomass-derivable “building block” for chemical synthesis. Since wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains produce only low levels of malate, metabolic engineering is required to achieve efficient malate production with this yeast. A promising pathway for malate production from glucose proceeds via carboxylation of pyruvate, followed by reduction of oxaloacetate to malate. This redox- and ATP-neutral, CO2-fixing pathway has a theoretical maximum yield of 2 mol malate (mol glucose)−1. A previously engineered glucose-tolerant, C2-independent pyruvate decarboxylase-negative S. cerevisiae strain was used as the platform to evaluate the impact of individual and combined introduction of three genetic modifications: (i) overexpression of the native pyruvate carboxylase encoded by PYC2, (ii) high-level expression of an allele of the MDH3 gene, of which the encoded malate dehydrogenase was retargeted to the cytosol by deletion of the C-terminal peroxisomal targeting sequence, and (iii) functional expression of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe malate transporter gene SpMAE1. While single or double modifications improved malate production, the highest malate yields and titers were obtained with the simultaneous introduction of all three modifications. In glucose-grown batch cultures, the resulting engineered strain produced malate at titers of up to 59 g liter−1 at a malate yield of 0.42 mol (mol glucose)−1. Metabolic flux analysis showed that metabolite labeling patterns observed upon nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of cultures grown on 13C-labeled glucose were consistent with the envisaged nonoxidative, fermentative pathway for malate production. The engineered strains still produced substantial amounts of pyruvate, indicating that the pathway efficiency can be further improved. PMID:18344340

  2. A domain-based approach for analyzing the function of aluminum-activated malate transporters from wheat (Triticum aestivum) and Arabidopsis thaliana in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Tsuchiya, Yoshiyuki; Ariyoshi, Michiyo; Ryan, Peter R; Furuichi, Takuya; Yamamoto, Yoko

    2014-12-01

    Wheat and Arabidopsis plants respond to aluminum (Al) ions by releasing malate from their root apices via Al-activated malate transporter. Malate anions bind with the toxic Al ions and contribute to the Al tolerance of these species. The genes encoding the transporters in wheat and Arabidopsis, TaALMT1 and AtALMT1, respectively, were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized electrophysiologically using the two-electrode voltage clamp system. The Al-activated currents generated by malate efflux were detected for TaALMT1 but not for AtALMT1. Chimeric proteins were generated by swapping the N- and C-terminal halves of TaALMT1 and AtALMT1 (Ta::At and At::Ta). When these chimeras were characterized in oocytes, Al-activated malate efflux was detected for the Ta::At chimera but not for At::Ta, suggesting that the N-terminal half of TaALMT1 is necessary for function in oocytes. An additional chimera, Ta(48)::At, generated by swapping 17 residues from the N-terminus of AtALMT1 with the equivalent 48 residues from TaALMT1, was sufficient to support transport activity. This 48 residue region includes a helical region with a putative transmembrane domain which is absent in AtALMT1. The deletion of this domain from Ta(48)::At led to the complete loss of transport activity. Furthermore, truncations and a deletion at the C-terminal end of TaALMT1 indicated that a putative helical structure in this region was also required for transport function. This study provides insights into the structure-function relationships of Al-activated ALMT proteins by identifying specific domains on the N- and C-termini of TaALMT1 that are critical for basal transport function and Al responsiveness in oocytes.

  3. Reassessment of the transhydrogenase/malate shunt pathway in Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 through kinetic characterization of malic enzyme and malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Taillefer, M; Rydzak, T; Levin, D B; Oresnik, I J; Sparling, R

    2015-04-01

    Clostridium thermocellum produces ethanol as one of its major end products from direct fermentation of cellulosic biomass. Therefore, it is viewed as an attractive model for the production of biofuels via consolidated bioprocessing. However, a better understanding of the metabolic pathways, along with their putative regulation, could lead to improved strategies for increasing the production of ethanol. In the absence of an annotated pyruvate kinase in the genome, alternate means of generating pyruvate have been sought. Previous proteomic and transcriptomic work detected high levels of a malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme, which may be used as part of a malate shunt for the generation of pyruvate from phosphoenolpyruvate. The purification and characterization of the malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme are described in order to elucidate their putative roles in malate shunt and their potential role in C. thermocellum metabolism. The malate dehydrogenase catalyzed the reduction of oxaloacetate to malate utilizing NADH or NADPH with a kcat of 45.8 s(-1) or 14.9 s(-1), respectively, resulting in a 12-fold increase in catalytic efficiency when using NADH over NADPH. The malic enzyme displayed reversible malate decarboxylation activity with a kcat of 520.8 s(-1). The malic enzyme used NADP(+) as a cofactor along with NH4 (+) and Mn(2+) as activators. Pyrophosphate was found to be a potent inhibitor of malic enzyme activity, with a Ki of 0.036 mM. We propose a putative regulatory mechanism of the malate shunt by pyrophosphate and NH4 (+) based on the characterization of the malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme.

  4. Dietary protein restriction causes modification in aluminum-induced alteration in glutamate and GABA system of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Prasunpriya; Chatterjee, Ajay K

    2003-02-25

    Alteration of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyrate system have been reported to be associated with neurodegenerative disorders and have been postulated to be involved in aluminum-induced neurotoxicity as well. Aluminum, an well known and commonly exposed neurotoxin, was found to alter glutamate and gamma-aminobutyrate levels as well as activities of associated enzymes with regional specificity. Protein malnutrition also reported to alter glutamate level and some of its metabolic enzymes. Thus the region-wise study of levels of brain glutamate and gamma-aminobutyrate system in protein adequacy and inadequacy may be worthwhile to understand the mechanism of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity. Protein restriction does not have any significant impact on regional aluminum and gamma-aminobutyrate contents of rat brain. Significant interaction of dietary protein restriction and aluminum intoxication to alter regional brain glutamate level was observed in the tested brain regions except cerebellum. Alteration in glutamate alpha-decarboxylase and gamma-aminobutyrate transaminase activities were found to be significantly influenced by interaction of aluminum intoxication and dietary protein restriction in all the tested brain regions. In case of regional brain succinic semialdehyde content, this interaction was significant only in cerebrum and thalamic area. The alterations of regional brain glutamate and gamma-aminobutyrate levels by aluminum are region specific as well as dependent on dietary protein intake. The impact of aluminum exposure on the metabolism of these amino acid neurotransmitters are also influenced by dietary protein level. Thus, modification of dietary protein level or manipulation of the brain amino acid homeostasis by any other means may be an useful tool to find out a path to restrict amino acid neurotransmitter alterations in aluminum-associated neurodisorders.

  5. Dietary protein restriction causes modification in aluminum-induced alteration in glutamate and GABA system of rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Prasunpriya; Chatterjee, Ajay K

    2003-01-01

    Background Alteration of glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate system have been reported to be associated with neurodegenerative disorders and have been postulated to be involved in aluminum-induced neurotoxicity as well. Aluminum, an well known and commonly exposed neurotoxin, was found to alter glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate levels as well as activities of associated enzymes with regional specificity. Protein malnutrition also reported to alter glutamate level and some of its metabolic enzymes. Thus the region-wise study of levels of brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate system in protein adequacy and inadequacy may be worthwhile to understand the mechanism of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity. Results Protein restriction does not have any significant impact on regional aluminum and γ-aminobutyrate contents of rat brain. Significant interaction of dietary protein restriction and aluminum intoxication to alter regional brain glutamate level was observed in the tested brain regions except cerebellum. Alteration in glutamate α-decarboxylase and γ-aminobutyrate transaminase activities were found to be significantly influenced by interaction of aluminum intoxication and dietary protein restriction in all the tested brain regions. In case of regional brain succinic semialdehyde content, this interaction was significant only in cerebrum and thalamic area. Conclusion The alterations of regional brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate levels by aluminum are region specific as well as dependent on dietary protein intake. The impact of aluminum exposure on the metabolism of these amino acid neurotransmitters are also influenced by dietary protein level. Thus, modification of dietary protein level or manipulation of the brain amino acid homeostasis by any other means may be an useful tool to find out a path to restrict amino acid neurotransmitter alterations in aluminum-associated neurodisorders. PMID:12657166

  6. Malat1 regulates myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration through modulating MyoD transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaona; He, Liangqiang; Zhao, Yu; Li, Yuying; Zhang, Suyang; Sun, Kun; So, Karl; Chen, Fengyuan; Zhou, Liang; Lu, Leina; Wang, Lijun; Zhu, Xihua; Bao, Xichen; Esteban, Miguel A; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Wu, Zhenguo; Sun, Hao; Wang, Huating

    2017-01-01

    Malat1 is one of the most abundant long non-coding RNAs in various cell types; its exact cellular function is still a matter of intense investigation. In this study we characterized the function of Malat1 in skeletal muscle cells and muscle regeneration. Utilizing both in vitro and in vivo assays, we demonstrate that Malat1 has a role in regulating gene expression during myogenic differentiation of myoblast cells. Specifically, we found that knockdown of Malat1 accelerates the myogenic differentiation in cultured cells. Consistently, Malat1 knockout mice display enhanced muscle regeneration after injury and deletion of Malat1 in dystrophic mdx mice also improves the muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, in the proliferating myoblasts, Malat1 recruits Suv39h1 to MyoD-binding loci, causing trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9me3), which suppresses the target gene expression. Upon differentiation, the pro-myogenic miR-181a is increased and targets the nuclear Malat1 transcripts for degradation through Ago2-dependent nuclear RNA-induced silencing complex machinery; the Malat1 decrease subsequently leads to the destabilization of Suv39h1/HP1β/HDAC1-repressive complex and displacement by a Set7-containing activating complex, which allows MyoD trans-activation to occur. Together, our findings identify a regulatory axis of miR-181a-Malat1-MyoD/Suv39h1 in myogenesis and uncover a previously unknown molecular mechanism of Malat1 action in gene regulation. PMID:28326190

  7. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 associates with the malignant status and poor prognosis in glioma.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kang-xiao; Wang, Hong-jie; Li, Xiao-rong; Li, Tao; Su, Gang; Yang, Pan; Wu, Jian-wen

    2015-05-01

    The metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a bona fide long noncoding RNA (lncRNA). LncRNA MALAT1 was discovered as a prognostic factor for lung cancer metastasis but also has been linked to several other human tumor entities. However, little is known about the role of lncRNA MALAT1 in glioma patients. The aim of this study was to identify the role of lncRNA MALAT1 in the pathogenesis of glioma; we analyzed the relationship of lncRNA MALAT1 expression with clinicopathological characteristics in glioma patients. In our results, lncRNA MALAT1 expression was increased in glioma tissues compared with paired adjacent brain normal tissues (P < 0.001). Furthermore, lncRNA MALAT1 was associated significantly with WHO grade (I-II vs. III-IV; P = 0.007) and tumor size (< 3 cm vs. T ≥ 3 cm; P = 0.008). However, lncRNA MALAT1 expression was not associated significantly with age (<45 vs. ≥ 45, P = 0.343), gender (female vs. male, P = 0.196), family history of cancer (yes vs. no, P = 0.665), and tumor location (supratentorial vs. infratentorial, P = 0.170). Moreover, the level of lncRNA MALAT1 expression was markedly correlated with the glioma patients' overall survival (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis suggested that increased lncRNA MALAT1 expression was a poor independent prognostic predictor for glioma patients (P = 0.002). In conclusion, lncRNA MALAT1 plays an important role on glioma progression and prognosis and may serve as a convictive prognostic biomarker for glioma patients.

  8. Structures of citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Davide M; Spallek, Ralf; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir; Rizzi, Menico

    2015-02-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is a central metabolic pathway of all aerobic organisms and is responsible for the synthesis of many important precursors and molecules. TCA cycle plays a key role in the metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is involved in the adaptation process of the bacteria to the host immune response. We present here the first crystal structures of M. tuberculosis malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase, two consecutive enzymes of the TCA, at 2.6 Å and 1.5 Å resolution, respectively. General analogies and local differences with the previously reported homologous protein structures are described. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Safety Assessment of Dialkyl Malates as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 6 dialkyl malate compounds used in cosmetics. These ingredients function mostly as skin-conditioning agents-emollients. The Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data related to the ingredients along with a previous safety assessment of malic acid. The similar structure, properties, functions, and uses of these ingredients enabled grouping them and using the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. The Panel concluded that these dialkyl maleate compounds are safe in the present practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Ontogeny of malate-aspartate shuttle capacity and gene expression in cardiac mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Scholz, T D; Koppenhafer, S L; tenEyck, C J; Schutte, B C

    1998-03-01

    Developmental downregulation of the malate-aspartate shuttle has been observed in cardiac mitochondria. The goals of this study were to determine the time course of the postnatal decline and to identify potential regulatory sites by measuring steady-state myocardial mRNA and protein levels of the mitochondrial proteins involved in the shuttle. By use of isolated porcine cardiac mitochondria incubated with saturating concentrations of the cytosolic components of the malate-aspartate shuttle, shuttle capacity was found to decline by approximately 50% during the first 5 wk of life (from 921 +/- 48 to 531 +/- 53 nmol.min-1.mg protein-1). Mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase mRNA levels were greater in adult than in newborn myocardium. mRNA levels of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase in adult cardiac tissue were 224% of levels in newborn tissue, whereas protein levels were 54% greater in adult myocardium. Aspartate/glutamate carrier protein levels were also greater in adult than in newborn tissue. mRNA and protein levels of the oxoglutarate/malate carrier were increased in newborn myocardium. It was concluded that 1) myocardial malate-aspartate shuttle capacity declines rapidly after birth, 2) divergence of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase mRNA and protein levels during development suggests posttranscriptional regulation of this protein, and 3) the developmental decline in malate-aspartate shuttle capacity is regulated by decreased oxoglutarate/malate carrier gene expression.

  11. Natural antisense RNA promotes 3′ end processing and maturation of MALAT1 lncRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Xinying; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Freier, Susan M.; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V.

    2016-01-01

    The RNase P-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage plays a crucial role in the 3′ end processing and cellular accumulation of MALAT1, a nuclear-retained long noncoding RNA that promotes malignancy. The regulation of this cleavage event is largely undetermined. Here we characterize a broadly expressed natural antisense transcript at the MALAT1 locus, designated as TALAM1, that positively regulates MALAT1 levels by promoting the 3′ end cleavage and maturation of MALAT1 RNA. TALAM1 RNA preferentially localizes at the site of transcription, and also interacts with MALAT1 RNA. Depletion of TALAM1 leads to defects in the 3′ end cleavage reaction and compromises cellular accumulation of MALAT1. Conversely, overexpression of TALAM1 facilitates the cleavage reaction in trans. Interestingly, TALAM1 is also positively regulated by MALAT1 at the level of both transcription and RNA stability. Together, our data demonstrate a novel feed-forward positive regulatory loop that is established to maintain the high cellular levels of MALAT1, and also unravel the existence of sense-antisense mediated regulatory mechanism for cellular lncRNAs that display RNase P-mediated 3′ end processing. PMID:26826711

  12. A rapid procedure for eliminating chromatofocusing buffer and concentrating minor active subforms of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gelpí, J L; Gracia, V; Imperial, S; Mazo, A; Cortés, A

    1990-11-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase from several sources contains different molecular forms whose origin is still under discussion. Separation of these subforms has been achieved by chromatofocusing. A simple and rapid method, based on 5' AMP Sepharose chromatography, has been developed to concentrate mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase subforms and simultaneously remove chromatofocusing buffer.

  13. MALAT1 promotes osteosarcoma development by targeting TGFA via MIR376A

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; He, Hongbo; Xiao, Wenfeng; Liu, Qing; Deng, Zhenhan; Lu, Yaojuan; Wang, Qian; Zheng, Qiping; Li, Yusheng

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that contributes to the initiation and development of many solid tumors, including osteosarcoma (OS). Here, we showed that MALAT1 was increased in human OS cell lines and tissues and promoted OS cell growth, while MALAT1 knockdown suppressed OS cell growth. We also detected downregulation of MIR376A, a suppressor of OS growth, and upregulation of TGFA, a promoter of OS growth, in OS tissues. TGFA expression was positively correlated with MALAT1 expression, and both were negatively correlated with MIR376A expression. There was a direct interaction between MIR376A and MALAT1 via a putative MIR376A binding site within the MALAT1 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR). There was also a direct interaction between MIR376A and the TGFA 3′-UTR. Thus, MALAT1 may promote OS cell growth through inhibition of MIR376A, leading to increased expression of TGFA. Our results suggest a MALAT1/MIR376A/TGFA axis mediates OS cell proliferation and tumor progression. PMID:27458156

  14. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli W3110 to produce L-malate.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoxiang; Chen, Xiulai; Qian, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yuancai; Wang, Li; Qiao, Weihua; Liu, Liming

    2017-03-01

    A four-carbon dicarboxylic acid L-malate has recently attracted attention due to its potential applications in the fields of medicine and agriculture. In this study, Escherichia coli W3110 was engineered and optimized for L-malate production via one-step L-malate synthesis pathway. First, deletion of the genes encoding lactate dehydrogenase (ldhA), pyruvate oxidase (poxB), pyruvate formate lyase (pflB), phosphotransacetylase (pta), and acetate kinase A (ackA) in pta-ackA pathway led to accumulate 20.9 g/L pyruvate. Then, overexpression of NADP(+) -dependent malic enzyme C490S mutant in this multi-deletion mutant resulted in the direct conversion of pyruvate into L-malate (3.62 g/L). Next, deletion of the genes responsible for succinate biosynthesis further enhanced L-malate production up to 7.78 g/L. Finally, L-malate production was elevated to 21.65 g/L with the L-malate yield to 0.36 g/g in a 5 L bioreactor by overexpressing the pos5 gene encoding NADH kinase in the engineered E. coli F0931 strain. This study demonstrates the potential utility of one-step pathway for efficient L-malate production. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 656-664. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The role of MALAT1 correlates with HPV in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, YAN; LI, YUEHUI; FANG, SHUJUAN; JIANG, BINYUAN; QIN, CHANGFEI; XIE, PINGLI; ZHOU, GUOHUA; LI, GUANCHENG

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer, the second most common type of cancer in women worldwide, is responsible for >275,100 mortalities each year and is associated with high-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV). HPVs have two important oncogenes, E6 and E7, which have crucial roles in malignant transformation in cervical cancer. Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a long non-coding RNA originally identified in non-small cell lung cancer. Previous studies have revealed that MALAT1 is expressed in numerous tissue types, and is significant in maintaining the normal function of the body. However, it also appeared to be notably upregulated in numerous carcinoma types compared with adjacent non-cancerous tissues. In the present study, it was identified that MALAT1 expression was upregulated in cervical cancer cell lines compared with normal cervical squamous cell samples. Further study into the effect of MALAT1 on cellular phenotype revealed that MALAT1 was able to promote cell migration and proliferation. Of note, it was revealed that the expression of MALAT1 was decreased with the knockdown of HPV16 E6/E7 in CaSki cells. Furthermore, the investigations in clinical samples also revealed that MALAT1 was expressed in HPV-positive cervical squamous cells, but not in HPV-negative normal cervical squamous cells. These results indicate that HPV correlates with MALAT1 deregulation in cervical cancer. PMID:24932303

  16. Malate decarboxylases: evolution and roles of NAD(P)-ME isoforms in species performing C(4) and C(3) photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexandra; Zell, Martina B; Maurino, Veronica G

    2011-05-01

    In the C(4) pathway of photosynthesis two types of malate decarboxylases release CO(2) in bundle sheath cells, NADP- and NAD-dependent malic enzyme (NADP-ME and NAD-ME), located in the chloroplasts and the mitochondria of these cells, respectively. The C(4) decarboxylases involved in C(4) photosynthesis did not evolve de novo; they were recruited from existing housekeeping isoforms. NADP-ME housekeeping isoforms would function in the control of malate levels during hypoxia, pathogen defence responses, and microspore separation, while NAD-ME participates in the respiration of malate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Recently, the existence of three enzymatic NAD-ME entities in Arabidopsis, occurring by alternative association of two subunits, was described as a novel mechanism to regulate NAD-ME activity under changing metabolic environments. The C(4) NADP-ME is thought to have evolved from a C(3) chloroplastic ancestor, which in turn would have evolved from an ancient cytosolic enzyme. In this way, the C(4) NADP-ME would have emerged through gene duplication, acquisition of a new promoter, and neo-functionalization. In contrast, there would exist a unique NAD-ME in C(4) plants, which would have been adapted to perform a dual function through changes in the kinetic and regulatory properties of the C(3) ancestors. In addition to this, for the evolution of C(4) NAD-ME, insertion of promoters or enhancers into the single-copy genes of the C(3) ancestors would have changed the expression without gene duplication.

  17. Function, kinetic properties, crystallization, and regulation of microbial malate dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi-Íñiguez, Tóshiko; Aburto-Rodríguez, Nelly; Vilchis-González, Ana Laura; Flores, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) is an enzyme widely distributed among living organisms and is a key protein in the central oxidative pathway. It catalyzes the interconversion between malate and oxaloacetate using NAD+ or NADP+ as a cofactor. Surprisingly, this enzyme has been extensively studied in eukaryotes but there are few reports about this enzyme in prokaryotes. It is necessary to review the relevant information to gain a better understanding of the function of this enzyme. Our review of the data generated from studies in bacteria shows much diversity in their molecular properties, including weight, oligomeric states, cofactor and substrate binding affinities, as well as differences in the direction of the enzymatic reaction. Furthermore, due to the importance of its function, the transcription and activity of this enzyme are rigorously regulated. Crystal structures of MDH from different bacterial sources led to the identification of the regions involved in substrate and cofactor binding and the residues important for the dimer-dimer interface. This structural information allows one to make direct modifications to improve the enzyme catalysis by increasing its activity, cofactor binding capacity, substrate specificity, and thermostability. A comparative analysis of the phylogenetic reconstruction of MDH reveals interesting facts about its evolutionary history, dividing this superfamily of proteins into two principle clades and establishing relationships between MDHs from different cellular compartments from archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes.

  18. Interaction of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase monomer with phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, K A; Patel, H V; Freeman, K B; Papahadjopoulos, D

    1979-01-01

    The association between bovine and porcine mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37) and phospholipid vesicles was investigated. At concentrations at which malate dehydrogenase exists as a dimer, entrapment within the aqueous compartment but not binding of the 14C-labelled enzyme was observed. The dissociated enzyme was labile to moderate heat and to p-chloromercuribenzoate, but in both cases inactivation was decreased by incubation with suspensions of charged phospholipid vesicles. This suggested an interaction between enzyme subunits and phospholipid, and this was confirmed by direct binding measurements and by studies that followed changes in the fluorescein-labelled enzyme. The circular-dichroism spectra of the enzyme indicated a high alpha-helix content, and suggested that a small conformational change occurred when the enzyme dissociated. Fluorescence data also suggested less-rigid molecules after dissociation. A possible mechanism, based on the flexibility of enzyme monomer and its interaction with phospholipids, by which mitochondrial matrix enzymes are specifically localized in cells, is discussed. PMID:435273

  19. Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase regulates senescence in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Min; Dho, So Hee; Ju, Sung-Kyu; Maeng, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jeong-Yoon; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2012-10-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism changes during cellular senescence. Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (MDH1) catalyzes the reversible reduction of oxaloacetate to malate at the expense of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). Here, we show that MDH1 plays a critical role in the cellular senescence of human fibroblasts. We observed that the activity of MDH1 was reduced in old human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) [population doublings (PD) 56], suggesting a link between decreased MDH1 protein levels and aging. Knockdown of MDH1 in young HDFs (PD 20) and the IMR90 human fibroblast cell line resulted in the appearance of significant cellular senescence features, including senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining, flattened and enlarged morphology, increased population doubling time, and elevated p16(INK4A) and p21(CIP1) protein levels. Cytosolic NAD/NADH ratios were decreased in old HDFs to the same extent as in MDH1 knockdown HDFs, suggesting that cytosolic NAD depletion is related to cellular senescence. We found that AMP-activated protein kinase, a sensor of cellular energy, was activated in MDH1 knockdown cells. We also found that sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) deacetylase, a controller of cellular senescence, was decreased in MDH1 knockdown cells. These results indicate that the decrease in MDH1 and subsequent reduction in NAD/NADH ratio, which causes SIRT1 inhibition, is a likely carbohydrate metabolism-controlled cellular senescence mechanism.

  20. Long Noncoding RNA Malat1 Regulates Cerebrovascular Pathologies in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejing; Tang, Xuelian; Liu, Kai; Hamblin, Milton H; Yin, Ke-Jie

    2017-02-15

    The study was designed to determine the role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (Malat1), in ischemic stroke outcome. Primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) were cultured and treated with Malat1 GapmeR before 16 h oxygen and glucose depravation (OGD). Cell death was assayed by LDH and MTT methods. Malat1 knock-out and wild-type mice were subjected to 1 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and 24-72 h of reperfusion. To explore the underlying mechanism, apoptotic and inflammatory factors were measured by qPCR, ELISA, and Western blotting. The physical interaction between Malat1 and apoptotic or inflammatory factors was measured by RNA immunoprecipitation. Increased Malat1 levels were found in cultured mouse BMECs after OGD as well as in isolated cerebral microvessels in mice after MCAO. Silencing of Malat1 by Malat1 GapmeR significantly increased OGD-induced cell death and Caspase 3 activity in BMECs. Silencing of Malat1 also significantly aggravated OGD-induced expression of the proapoptotic factor Bim and proinflammatory cytokines MCP-1, IL-6, and E-selectin. Moreover, Malat1 KO mice presented larger brain infarct size, worsened neurological scores, and reduced sensorimotor functions. Consistent with in vitro findings, significantly increased expression of proapoptotic and proinflammatory factors was also found in the cerebral cortex of Malat1 KO mice after ischemic stroke compared with WT controls. Finally, we demonstrated that Malat1 binds to Bim and E-selectin both in vitro and in vivo Our study suggests that Malat1 plays critical protective roles in ischemic stroke.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Accumulative studies have demonstrated the important regulatory roles of microRNAs in vascular and neural damage after ischemic stroke. However, the functional significance and mechanisms of other classes of noncoding RNAs in cerebrovascular pathophysiology after stroke are less studied. Here we

  1. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 as a potential therapeutic target in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xianyi; Liu, Yunlu; Yang, Wen; Xia, Yun; Yang, Cao; Yang, Shuhua; Liu, Xianzhe

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed that long noncoding RNA metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) plays an important role in the development of several solid tumors. However, the function of MALAT1 in the tumorigenesis of osteosarcoma remains unknown. In the present study, levels of MALAT1 in human osteosarcoma cell lines and tissues were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The roles of MALAT1 in osteosarcoma were investigated by using in vitro and in vivo assays. We observed that MALAT1 expression was up-regulated in human osteosarcoma cell lines and tissues. In vitro knockdown of MALAT1 by siRNA significantly inhibited cell proliferation and migration, and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells. In addition, MALAT1 knockdown markedly suppressed the formation of tubular network structures and caused breakage of stress fibers in osteosarcoma cell lines U2OS and MNNG/HOS. Furthermore, MALAT1 knockdown delayed tumor growth in an osteosarcoma xenograft model. Specifically, we found that administration of MALAT1 siRNA decreased the protein levels of RhoA and its downstream effectors Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinases (ROCKs). Taken together, these findings suggest that MALAT1 plays an oncogenic role in osteosarcoma and may be a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of osteosarcoma patients. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:932-941, 2016. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Inhibition of the malate-aspartate shuttle in mouse pancreatic islets abolishes glucagon secretion without affecting insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Stamenkovic, Jelena A; Andersson, Lotta E; Adriaenssens, Alice E; Bagge, Annika; Sharoyko, Vladimir V; Gribble, Fiona; Reimann, Frank; Wollheim, Claes B; Mulder, Hindrik; Spégel, Peter

    2015-05-15

    Altered secretion of insulin as well as glucagon has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the mechanisms controlling glucagon secretion from α-cells largely remain unresolved. Therefore, we studied the regulation of glucagon secretion from αTC1-6 (αTC1 clone 6) cells and compared it with insulin release from INS-1 832/13 cells. We found that INS-1 832/13 and αTC1-6 cells respectively secreted insulin and glucagon concentration-dependently in response to glucose. In contrast, tight coupling of glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism was observed only in INS-1 832/13 cells. Although glycolytic metabolism was similar in the two cell lines, TCA (tricarboxylic acid) cycle metabolism, respiration and ATP levels were less glucose-responsive in αTC1-6 cells. Inhibition of the malate-aspartate shuttle, using phenyl succinate (PhS), abolished glucose-provoked ATP production and hormone secretion from αTC1-6 but not INS-1 832/13 cells. Blocking the malate-aspartate shuttle increased levels of glycerol 3-phosphate only in INS-1 832/13 cells. Accordingly, relative expression of constituents in the glycerol phosphate shuttle compared with malate-aspartate shuttle was lower in αTC1-6 cells. Our data suggest that the glycerol phosphate shuttle augments the malate-aspartate shuttle in INS-1 832/13 but not αTC1-6 cells. These results were confirmed in mouse islets, where PhS abrogated secretion of glucagon but not insulin. Furthermore, expression of the rate-limiting enzyme of the glycerol phosphate shuttle was higher in sorted primary β- than in α-cells. Thus, suppressed glycerol phosphate shuttle activity in the α-cell may prevent a high rate of glycolysis and consequently glucagon secretion in response to glucose. Accordingly, pyruvate- and lactate-elicited glucagon secretion remains unaffected since their signalling is independent of mitochondrial shuttles.

  3. Modeling the vacuolar storage of malate shed lights on pre- and post-harvest fruit acidity.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Audrey; Génard, Michel; Lobit, Philippe; Bugaud, Christophe

    2014-11-18

    Malate is one of the most important organic acids in many fruits and its concentration plays a critical role in organoleptic properties. Several studies suggest that malate accumulation in fruit cells is controlled at the level of vacuolar storage. However, the regulation of vacuolar malate storage throughout fruit development, and the origins of the phenotypic variability of the malate concentration within fruit species remain to be clarified. In the present study, we adapted the mechanistic model of vacuolar storage proposed by Lobit et al. in order to study the accumulation of malate in pre and postharvest fruits. The main adaptation concerned the variation of the free energy of ATP hydrolysis during fruit development. Banana fruit was taken as a reference because it has the particularity of having separate growth and post-harvest ripening stages, during which malate concentration undergoes substantial changes. Moreover, the concentration of malate in banana pulp varies greatly among cultivars which make possible to use the model as a tool to analyze the genotypic variability. The model was calibrated and validated using data sets from three cultivars with contrasting malate accumulation, grown under different fruit loads and potassium supplies, and harvested at different stages. The model predicted the pre and post-harvest dynamics of malate concentration with fairly good accuracy for the three cultivars (mean RRMSE = 0.25-0.42). The sensitivity of the model to parameters and input variables was analyzed. According to the model, vacuolar composition, in particular potassium and organic acid concentrations, had an important effect on malate accumulation. The model suggested that rising temperatures depressed malate accumulation. The model also helped distinguish differences in malate concentration among the three cultivars and between the pre and post-harvest stages by highlighting the probable importance of proton pump activity and particularly of the free

  4. Differentiation of mammary tumors and reduction in metastasis upon Malat1 lncRNA loss

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Gayatri; Diermeier, Sarah; Akerman, Martin; Chang, Kung-Chi; Wilkinson, J. Erby; Hearn, Stephen; Kim, Youngsoo; MacLeod, A. Robert; Krainer, Adrian R.; Norton, Larry; Brogi, Edi; Egeblad, Mikala; Spector, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide analyses have identified thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Malat1 (metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1) is among the most abundant lncRNAs whose expression is altered in numerous cancers. Here we report that genetic loss or systemic knockdown of Malat1 using antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in the MMTV (mouse mammary tumor virus)-PyMT mouse mammary carcinoma model results in slower tumor growth accompanied by significant differentiation into cystic tumors and a reduction in metastasis. Furthermore, Malat1 loss results in a reduction of branching morphogenesis in MMTV-PyMT- and Her2/neu-amplified tumor organoids, increased cell adhesion, and loss of migration. At the molecular level, Malat1 knockdown results in alterations in gene expression and changes in splicing patterns of genes involved in differentiation and protumorigenic signaling pathways. Together, these data demonstrate for the first time a functional role of Malat1 in regulating critical processes in mammary cancer pathogenesis. Thus, Malat1 represents an exciting therapeutic target, and Malat1 ASOs represent a potential therapy for inhibiting breast cancer progression. PMID:26701265

  5. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-04-01

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction.

  6. [Research on the phase and optical properties of nc-Si films prepared by low temperature aluminum induced crystallization].

    PubMed

    Duan, Liang-fei; Yang, Wen; Yang, Pei-zhi; Song, Zhao-ning

    2014-08-01

    In the present paper, nanocrystalline silicon thin films on glass substrates were prepared by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of RF magnetron sputtered system and alpha-Si/Al films at a low temperature in Nz atmosphere. Optical metallographic microscope, confocal optical microscopy, X-ray diffractometer, Raman scattering and UV-Vis-NIR spectrometers were used to characterize the surface morphology and the phase and optical properties of nc-Si films. The influence of annealing process on the nc-Si films properties was studied. The results showed that nc-Si films were obtained after aluminum induced crystallization of the alpha-Si/Al films at 300 degrees C, withthe crystallization rate 15.56% and the grain size 1.75 nm. The surface uniformity and lattice distortion of nc-Si films reduced, while grain size, degree of crystallization and the optical band gap of the films increased with increasing annealing temperature from 300 to 400 degrees C. As the annealing temperature increased from 400 to 500 degrees C, although the degree of crystallization and grain size increased, the tendencies of all other characteristics were opposite. On the contrary, the surface uniformity and the lattice distortion increased, but the optical band gap of nc-Si films reduced. The optical properties of the resulting films were confirmed by the absorption model of nc-Si thin films, where the tendency of band gap changes is in consistent with the optical modeling.

  7. On the Discontinuity of Polycrystalline Silicon Thin Films Realized by Aluminum-Induced Crystallization of PECVD-Deposited Amorphous Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qingtao; Wang, Tao; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Ming; Mai, Yaohua

    2017-01-01

    Crystallization of glass/Aluminum (50, 100, 200 nm) /hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) (50, 100, 200 nm) samples by Aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) is investigated in this article. After annealing and wet etching, we found that the continuity of the polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin films was strongly dependent on the double layer thicknesses. Increasing the a-Si:H/Al layer thickness ratio would improve the film microcosmic continuity. However, too thick Si layer might cause convex or peeling off during annealing. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) are introduced to analyze the process of the peeling off. When the thickness ratio of a-Si:H/Al layer is around 1 to 1.5 and a-Si:H layer is less than 200 nm, the poly-Si film has a good continuity. Hall measurements are introduced to determine the electrical properties. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that the poly-Si film is completely crystallized and has a preferential (111) orientation.

  8. Nanomolar aluminum induces pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic gene expression in human brain cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Lukiw, Walter J; Percy, Maire E; Kruck, Theo P

    2005-09-01

    Aluminum, the most abundant neurotoxic metal in our biosphere, has been implicated in the etiology of several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). To further understand aluminum's influence on gene expression, we examined total messenger RNA levels in untransformed human neural cells exposed to 100 nanomolar aluminum sulfate using high density DNA microarrays that interrogate the expression of every human gene. Preliminary data indicate that of the most altered gene expression levels, 17/24 (70.8%) of aluminum-affected genes, and 7/8 (87.5%) of aluminum-induced genes exhibit expression patterns similar to those observed in AD. The seven genes found to be significantly up-regulated by aluminum encode pro-inflammatory or pro-apoptotic signaling elements, including NF-kappaB subunits, interleukin-1beta precursor, cytosolic phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase-2, beta-amyloid precursor protein and DAXX, a regulatory protein known to induce apoptosis and repress transcription. The promoters of genes up-regulated by aluminum are enriched in binding sites for the stress-inducible transcription factors HIF-1 and NF-kappaB, suggesting a role for aluminum, HIF-1 and NF-kappaB in driving atypical, pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic gene expression. The effect of aluminum on specific stress-related gene expression patterns in human brain cells clearly warrant further investigation.

  9. Controlled aluminum-induced crystallization of an amorphous silicon thin film by using an oxide-layer diffusion barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Kwak, Hyunmin; Kwon, Myeung Hoi

    2014-03-01

    Aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) of amorphous silicon with an Al2O3 diffusion barrier was investigated for controlling Si crystallization and preventing layer exchange during the annealing process. An Al2O3 layer was deposited between the a-Si and the Al films (a-Si/Al2O3/Al/Glass) and was blasted with an air spray gun with alumina beads to form diffusion channels between the Si and the Al layers. During the annealing process, small grain Si x Al seeds were formed at the channels. Then, the Al2O3 diffusion barrier was restructured to close the channels and prevent further diffusion of Al atoms into the a-Si layer. A polycrystalline Si film with (111), (220) and (311) crystallization peaks in the X-ray diffraction pattern was formed by annealing at 560 °C in a conventional furnace. That film showed a p-type semiconducting behavior with good crystallinity and a large grain size of up to 14.8 µm. No layer conversion occurred between the Si and the Al layers, which had been the fundamental obstacle to the applications in the crystallization of a-Si films by using the AIC method.

  10. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25873429

  11. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-04-15

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction.

  12. On the Discontinuity of Polycrystalline Silicon Thin Films Realized by Aluminum-Induced Crystallization of PECVD-Deposited Amorphous Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qingtao; Wang, Tao; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Ming; Mai, Yaohua

    2017-04-01

    Crystallization of glass/Aluminum (50, 100, 200 nm) /hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) (50, 100, 200 nm) samples by Aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) is investigated in this article. After annealing and wet etching, we found that the continuity of the polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin films was strongly dependent on the double layer thicknesses. Increasing the a-Si:H/Al layer thickness ratio would improve the film microcosmic continuity. However, too thick Si layer might cause convex or peeling off during annealing. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) are introduced to analyze the process of the peeling off. When the thickness ratio of a-Si:H/Al layer is around 1 to 1.5 and a-Si:H layer is less than 200 nm, the poly-Si film has a good continuity. Hall measurements are introduced to determine the electrical properties. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that the poly-Si film is completely crystallized and has a preferential (111) orientation.

  13. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 is a key modulator of aluminum-induced neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Zaky, Amira; Mohammad, Bassma; Moftah, Marie; Kandeel, Kamal M; Bassiouny, Ahmad R

    2013-03-11

    Cl₃-induced expression and release of TNF-α, IL-6, and iNOS in rat brain. These findings establish a role for APE1 as a master regulator of AlCl₃ dependent inflammatory responses in rat brain. In addition, there was an ameliorative change with resveratrol against AlCl₃-induced neurotoxicity. These results suggest that rat brain cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to AlCl₃ in a similar pattern, and further suggest that resveratrol exerts anti-inflammatory effects in rat brain, at least partly, by inhibiting different pro-inflammatory cytokines and key signaling molecules. It might be a potential agent for treatment of neuroinflammation-related diseases, such as AD.

  14. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 is a key modulator of aluminum-induced neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    inhibited AlCl3-induced expression and release of TNF-α, IL-6, and iNOS in rat brain. Conclusions These findings establish a role for APE1 as a master regulator of AlCl3 dependent inflammatory responses in rat brain. In addition, there was an ameliorative change with resveratrol against AlCl3-induced neurotoxicity. These results suggest that rat brain cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to AlCl3 in a similar pattern, and further suggest that resveratrol exerts anti-inflammatory effects in rat brain, at least partly, by inhibiting different pro-inflammatory cytokines and key signaling molecules. It might be a potential agent for treatment of neuroinflammation-related diseases, such as AD. PMID:23497276

  15. Malate Utilization by a Group D Streptococcus: Physiological Properties and Purification of an Inducible Malic Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    London, Jack; Meyer, Eleanor Y.

    1969-01-01

    Growth of Streptococcus faecalis in the presence of l-malate resulted in the induction of a “malic enzyme” [l-malate:nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) oxidoreductase (decarboxylating), E.C. 1.1.1.39]. Synthesis of the malic enzyme did not appear to be subject to catabolite repression by intermediate products of glucose or fructose dissimilation. However, malate utilization was inhibited during growth in the presence of glucose or fructose. The purified enzyme was specific for malate as substrate and NAD as cofactor. Mn+2 or Mg+2 was required for optimal activity and NH4Cl stimulated the reaction rate. Several lines of indirect evidence suggested that the streptococcal malic enzyme was involved primarily with energy production and not biosynthesis. Images PMID:4306540

  16. Kinetic studies of the regulation of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase by citrate.

    PubMed Central

    Gelpí, J L; Dordal, A; Montserrat, J; Mazo, A; Cortés, A

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase shows a complex regulation pattern in the presence of citrate. Previously published results indicate that this enzyme is activated by citrate in the NAD(+)----NADH direction and inhibited in the opposite direction. Moreover, high concentrations of L-malate or oxaloacetate produce deviations from the Michaelis-Menten behaviour. Results reported in this paper clearly show that citrate both activates and inhibits mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase in the same direction (NAD(+)----NADH), and in the same reaction medium, depending on substrate concentration. This surprising effect has made it necessary to propose a new kinetic mechanism that extends those previously suggested and allows us to explain both the citrate effect (activating or inhibitory) and the effect of high concentrations of L-malate and oxaloacetate. PMID:1567375

  17. Photosynthetic metabolism of malate and aspartate in Flaveria trinervia a C/sub 4/ dicot

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    C/sub 4/ species are known to vary in their apparent relative use of malate and aspartate to mediate carbon flux through the C/sub 4/ cycle. These studies investigate some of the adjustments in photosynthetic carbon metabolism that occur during a dark to light transition and during expansion of leaves of Flaveria trinervia, a C/sub 4/ dicot. Enzyme localization studies with isolated leaf mesophyll and bundle sheath protoplasts, indicated that both C/sub 4/ acids are formed in the mesophyll chloroplast, and that aspartate is metabolized to malate in the bundle sheath chloroplast prior to decaroxylation there. During photosynthetic induction, the partitioning of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ between malate and aspartate showed a single oscillation of increased aspartate labelling after 5 min of illumination. Turnover of (4-14C) (malate plus aspartate) was slow initially during illumination, prior to establishment of active pools of C/sub 4/ cycle metabolites.

  18. Carbohydrate metabolism in two apple genotypes that differ in malate accumulation.

    PubMed

    Berüter, Josef

    2004-09-01

    In the apple variety 'Usterapfel', there are two known genotypes, which differ in malic acid content. One hundred days after full bloom, low-acid fruit (LA-fruit) contained 125 micromolg(-1) dry matter (DW) of malate, while the high-acid genotype (HA-fruit) reached levels up to 627 micromolg(-1) DW. There was no difference in the catalytic activity of enzymes involved in malate metabolism, such as PEPcarboxylase, malate dehydrogenase, and NADP malic enzyme. After [14C]glucose incorporation into the excised tissue of either genotype, the organic acid fraction was labeled to approximately the same extent. Furthermore, uptake of [14C]malate was significantly lower in excised tissue of LA-fruit. These findings suggest that low malate content in LA-fruit is the result of a restricted ability to accumulate malate in apple parenchyma cells. The different ability to accumulate malate had a pronounced effect on overall carbon partitioning. However, the rate of respiration and the rate of malate synthesis was similar in both genotypes. In HA-fruit, the glycolytic flux through pyruvate kinase was increased to compensate for the carbon that accumulated in the vacuole as malate. Since malate storage in the LA-fruit was restricted, it was more easily available for gluconeogenesis, and was correlated with a three-times higher activity of PEPcarboxykinase. LA-fruit showed higher concentrations of ATP, which stimulated Glc6P and fructose-6-phosphate formation. The elevated hexosephosphate content led to an enhanced partitioning of carbon into starch (+40%), hemicellulose (+104%), and sucrose (+40%) in more mature fruit. The activation of carbohydrate synthesis resulted in a significant drop in glucose-1-phosphate (Glc1P). To meet the increased demand for Glc1P, the activities of neutral and acid invertase, hexokinase, and phosphoglucomutase were higher in LA-fruit. Glucose was a more versatile substrate for this metabolic route than was fructose. It was also evident that glycolytic

  19. Role for malic enzyme, pyruvate carboxylation, and mitochondrial malate import in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Heart, Emma; Cline, Gary W.; Collis, Leon P.; Pongratz, Rebecca L.; Gray, Joshua P.; Smith, Peter J. S.

    2009-01-01

    Pyruvate cycling has been implicated in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. The operation of some pyruvate cycling pathways is proposed to necessitate malate export from the mitochondria and NADP+-dependent decarboxylation of malate to pyruvate by cytosolic malic enzyme (ME1). Evidence in favor of and against a role of ME1 in GSIS has been presented by others using small interfering RNA-mediated suppression of ME1. ME1 was also proposed to account for methyl succinate-stimulated insulin secretion (MSSIS), which has been hypothesized to occur via succinate entry into the mitochondria in exchange for malate and subsequent malate conversion to pyruvate. In contrast to rat, mouse β-cells lack ME1 activity, which was suggested to explain their lack of MSSIS. However, this hypothesis was not tested. In this report, we demonstrate that although adenoviral-mediated overexpression of ME1 greatly augments GSIS in rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cells, it does not restore MSSIS, nor does it significantly affect GSIS in mouse islets. The increase in GSIS following ME1 overexpression in INS-1 832/13 cells did not alter the ATP-to-ADP ratio but was accompanied by increases in malate and citrate levels. Increased malate and citrate levels were also observed after INS-1 832/13 cells were treated with the malate-permeable analog dimethyl malate. These data suggest that although ME1 overexpression augments anaplerosis and GSIS in INS-1 832/13 cells, it is not likely involved in MSSIS and GSIS in pancreatic islets. PMID:19293334

  20. Fine-Tuned Transcriptional Regulation of Malate Operons in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Mortera, Pablo; Espariz, Martín; Suárez, Cristian; Repizo, Guillermo; Deutscher, Josef; Alarcón, Sergio; Blancato, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    In Enterococcus faecalis, the mae locus is constituted by two putative divergent operons, maePE and maeKR. The first operon encodes a putative H+/malate symporter (MaeP) and a malic enzyme (MaeE) previously shown to be essential for malate utilization in this bacterium. The maeKR operon encodes two putative proteins with significant similarity to two-component systems involved in sensing malate and activating its assimilation in bacteria. Our transcriptional and genetic assays showed that maePE and maeKR are induced in response to malate by the response regulator MaeR. In addition, we observed that both operons were partially repressed in the presence of glucose. Accordingly, the cometabolism of this sugar and malate was detected. The binding of the complex formed by CcpA and its corepressor P-Ser-HPr to a cre site located in the mae region was demonstrated in vitro and explains the carbon catabolite repression (CCR) observed for the maePE operon. However, our results also provide evidence for a CcpA-independent CCR mechanism regulating the expression of both operons. Finally, a biomass increment of 40 or 75% was observed compared to the biomass of cells grown only on glucose or malate, respectively. Cells cometabolizing both carbon sources exhibit a higher rate of glucose consumption and a lower rate of malate utilization. The growth improvement achieved by E. faecalis during glucose-malate cometabolism might explain why this microorganism employs different regulatory systems to tightly control the assimilation of both carbon sources. PMID:22247139

  1. 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Acetate Incorporation into Malate During Ca2+-Uptake by Isolated Leaf Tissues 1

    PubMed Central

    Borchert, Rolf; Everett, Grover W.

    1987-01-01

    13C Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of leaflets of Gleditsia triacanthos and Albizia julibrisin was used to determine the fate of acetate taken up during the absorption of calcium from 13C-labeled Ca-acetate solution. Small amounts of acetate accumulated temporarily in the leaf tissues, but the bulk of acetate was incorporated into malate. The initial rate of malate synthesis was very low, but increased rapidly during acetate treatment and reached its maximum after 8 hours; the enzymes involved in malate synthesis thus appear to be substrate induced. Use of acetate-2-13C yielded malate labeled in C-3, indicating that vacuolar malate accumulating during Ca-uptake might be synthesized via malate synthase from acetate and glyoxalate. However, a source of glyoxalate condensing with acetate during malate synthesis could not be identified. Glycolate produced in photorespiration is an unlikely source, because glycolate-2-13C was absorbed and metabolized by the leaf tissues into products of the glycolate pathway, but was not a major precursor in malate synthesis. Malate synthesis via the glyoxalate cycle is also unlikely, because no evidence for the recycling of a 13C-labeled 4-carbon organic acid was found. Malate synthesis in the leaflets of Gleditsia and Albizia thus appears to involve the inducible condensation of acetate with a 2-carbon compound of unidentified nature and origin. PMID:16665548

  2. C nuclear magnetic resonance study of acetate incorporation into malate during ca-uptake by isolated leaf tissues.

    PubMed

    Borchert, R; Everett, G W

    1987-07-01

    (13)C Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of leaflets of Gleditsia triacanthos and Albizia julibrisin was used to determine the fate of acetate taken up during the absorption of calcium from (13)C-labeled Ca-acetate solution. Small amounts of acetate accumulated temporarily in the leaf tissues, but the bulk of acetate was incorporated into malate. The initial rate of malate synthesis was very low, but increased rapidly during acetate treatment and reached its maximum after 8 hours; the enzymes involved in malate synthesis thus appear to be substrate induced. Use of acetate-2-(13)C yielded malate labeled in C-3, indicating that vacuolar malate accumulating during Ca-uptake might be synthesized via malate synthase from acetate and glyoxalate. However, a source of glyoxalate condensing with acetate during malate synthesis could not be identified. Glycolate produced in photorespiration is an unlikely source, because glycolate-2-(13)C was absorbed and metabolized by the leaf tissues into products of the glycolate pathway, but was not a major precursor in malate synthesis. Malate synthesis via the glyoxalate cycle is also unlikely, because no evidence for the recycling of a (13)C-labeled 4-carbon organic acid was found. Malate synthesis in the leaflets of Gleditsia and Albizia thus appears to involve the inducible condensation of acetate with a 2-carbon compound of unidentified nature and origin.

  3. The role of lncRNA MALAT1 in the regulation of hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cuicui; Chang, Lei; Chen, Zhiquan; Liu, Zhongzhong; Wang, Yanfeng; Ye, Qifa

    2017-01-01

    Exploring the biological functions of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) has come to the foreground in recent years. Studies have indicated that the lncRNA metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) not only regulates tumorigenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma, but also controls cell cycle progression in hematopoietic cells. The present study was designed to investigate the biological role of lncRNA MALAT1 in liver regeneration. We carried out a series of assays during liver regeneration following 2/3 partial hepatectomy in mice. We explored the functions of lncRNA MALAT1 with a series of functional analyses in vitro. We found that MALAT1 was upregulated during liver regeneration. Moreover, MALAT1 accelerated hepatocyte proliferation by stimulating cell cycle progression from the G1 to the S phase and inhibiting apoptosis in vitro. In addition, our findings also demonstrated that MALAT1 was regulated by p53 during liver regeneration, and that p53 may be a key upstream regulator of MALAT1 activity. Mechanistically, we found that MALAT1 activated the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by inhibiting the expression of Axin1 and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), and subsequently promoting the expression of cyclin D1. On the whole, the findings of this study suggest that MALAT1 is a critical molecule for liver regeneration. Pharmacological interventions targeting MALAT1 may thus prove to be therapeutically beneficial in liver failure or liver transplantation by promoting liver regeneration. PMID:28075444

  4. Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:Malate Hydroxycinnamoyl Transferase is Crucial for 2-O-Caffeoyl-L-Malate Biosynthesis in Red Clover and Defines a New Pathway for Hydroxycinnamoyl-Malate Ester Biosynthesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) leaves accumulate several µmol of phaselic acid [2-O-caffeoyl-L-malate] per gram fresh weight. Post-harvest oxidation of such o-diphenols to o-quinones by endogenous polyphenol oxidases prevents breakdown of forage protein during storage. Forages like alfalfa (Medi...

  5. MALAT1 promotes the proliferation and metastasis of osteosarcoma cells by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yongqiang; Liang, Guojun; Yuan, Bo; Yang, Chaoqun; Gao, Rui; Zhou, Xuhui

    2015-03-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), one of the first found cancer-associated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), involves in the development and progression of many types of tumors. An aberrant expression of MALAT1 was observed in hepatocellular carcinoma, cervical cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and colorectal cancer. However, the exact effects and molecular mechanisms of MALAT1 in osteosarcoma progression are still unknown up to now. Here, we investigated the role of MALAT1 in human osteosarcoma cell lines and clinical tumor samples in order to determine the function of this molecule. In our research, the MALAT1 messenger RNA (mRNA) was highly expressed in human osteosarcoma tissues, and its expression level was closely correlated with pulmonary metastasis. Then, we employed lentivirus-mediated knockdown of MALAT1 in U-2 OS and SaO2 to determine the role of MALAT1 in osteosarcoma cell lines. Lentivirus-mediated MALAT1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) could efficiently downregulated the expression level of MALAT1 in osteosarcoma cell lines. Knockdown of MALAT1 inhibited the proliferation and invasion of human osteosarcoma cell and suppressed its metastasis in vitro and vivo. At the same time, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9), phosphorylated PI3Kp85α, and Akt expressions were significantly inhibited in MALAT1-deleted cells. These findings indicated that MALAT1 might suppress the tumor growth and metastasis via PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Taken together, our data indicated that MALAT1 might be an oncogenic lncRNA that promoted proliferation and metastasis of osteosarcoma and could be regarded as a therapeutic target in human osteosarcoma.

  6. Prognostic value of long non-coding RNA MALAT1 in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yihua; Lu, Wei; Xu, Jinming; Shi, Yu; Zhang, Honghe; Xia, Dajing

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis associated in lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) was identified to be the first long non-coding RNA as a biomarker of independent prognostic value for early stage non-small cell lung cancer patient survival. In recent years, the association between upregulated tissue MALAT1 level and incidence of various cancers including bladder cancer, colorectal cancer, and renal cancer has been widely discussed. The aim of our present study was to assess the potential prognostic value of MALAT1 in various human cancers. PubMed, Embase, Ovid, and Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched, and eligible studies evaluating the prognostic value of MALAT1 in various cancers were included. Finally, 11 studies encompassing 1216 participants reporting with sufficient data were enrolled in the current meta-analysis. The pooled hazard ratio (HR) was 2.05 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.64-2.55, p < 0.01) for overall survival (OS) and 2.66 (95 % CI 1.86-3.80, p < 0.01) for disease-free survival (DFS). In conclusion, high tissue MALAT1 level was associated with an inferior clinical outcome in various cancers, suggesting that MALAT1 might serve as a potential prognostic biomarker for various cancers.

  7. Anticancer Efficacy of Self-Nanoemulsifying Drug Delivery System of Sunitinib Malate.

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, Saad M; Alshetaili, Abdullah S; Alalaiwe, Ahmed; Alsulays, Bader B; Anwer, Md Khalid; Al-Shdefat, Ramadan; Imam, Faisal; Shakeel, Faiyaz

    2017-06-15

    Sunitinib malate (SM) is reported as a weakly soluble drug in water due to its poor dissolution rate and oral bioavailability. Hence, in the current study, various "self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS)" of SM were prepared, characterized and evaluated for the enhancement of its in vitro dissolution rate and anticancer efficacy. On the basis of solubilization potential of SM in various excipients, "Lauroglycol-90 (oil), Triton-X100 (surfactant) and Transcutol-P (cosurfactant)" were selected for the preparation of SM SNEDDS. SM-loaded SNEDDS were developed by spontaneous emulsification method, characterized and evaluated for "thermodynamic stability, self-nanoemulsification efficiency, droplet size, polydispersity index (PDI), zeta potential (ZP), surface morphology, refractive index (RI), the percent of transmittance (% T) and drug release profile." In vitro dissolution rate of SM was significantly enhanced from an optimized SNEDDS in comparison with SM suspension. The optimized SNEDDS of SM with droplet size of 42.3 nm, PDI value of 0.174, ZP value of -36.4 mV, RI value of 1.339, % T value of 97.3%, and drug release profile of 95.4% (after 24 h via dialysis membrane) was selected for in vitro anticancer efficacy in human colon cancer cells (HT-29) by MTT assay. MTT assay indicated significant anticancer efficacy of optimized SM SNEDDS against HT-29 cells in comparison with free SM. The results of this study showed the great potential of SNEDDS in the enhancement of in vitro dissolution rate and anticancer efficacy of poorly soluble drug such as SM.

  8. Enzymatic urea adaptation: lactate and malate dehydrogenase in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Laganà, G; Bellocco, E; Mannucci, C; Leuzzi, U; Tellone, E; Kotyk, A; Galtieri, A

    2006-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) electrophoretic tissue patterns of two different orders of Elasmobranchii: Carchariniformes (Galeus melanostomus and Prionace glauca) and Squaliformes (Etmopterus spinax and Scymnorinus licha) were studied. The number of loci expressed for these enzymes was the same of other elasmobranch species. Differences in tissue distribution were noted in LDH from G. melanostomus due to the presence of an additional heterotetramer in the eye tissue. There were also differences in MDH. In fact, all the tissues of E. spinax and G. melanostomus showed two mitochondrial bands. Major differences were noted in the number of isozymes detected in the four compared elasmobranchs. The highest polymorphism was observed in E. spinax and G. melanostomus, two species that live in changeable environmental conditions. The resistance of isozymes after urea treatment was examined; the resulting patterns showed a quite good resistance of the enzymes, higher for LDH than MDH, also at urea concentration much greater than physiological one. These results indicated that the total isozyme resistance can be considered higher in urea accumulators (such as elasmobranchs) than in the non-accumulators (such as teleosts).

  9. Vesicocutaneous fistula formation during treatment with sunitinib malate: Case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The oral multi-kinase inhibitor sunitinib malate improves the survival of patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) after the disease progresses or intolerance to imatinib mesylate develops. Urinary fistulae arising during treatment with sunitinib for GIST have not been described. Case presentation We describe a 62-year-old female patient diagnosed with unresectable GIST that involved the abdominal wall, urinary bladder wall, bowel, mesentery and peritoneum in the pelvic cavity. Intestinocutaneous fistulae developed on a surgical lesion after orally administered imatinib was supplemented by an arterial infusion of 5-flurouracil. Sunitinib was started after the patient developed resistance to imatinib. On day 4 of the fourth course of sunitinib, a widely dilated cutaneous fistula discharged large amounts of fluid accompanied by severe abdominal pain. Urinary communication was indicated based on the results of an intravenous injection of indigo carmine. Computed tomography findings suggested a small opening on the anterior urinary bladder wall and fistulous communication between the bladder and abdominal walls bridged by a subcutaneous cavity. The fistula closed and the amount of discharge decreased when sunitinib was discontinued. Therefore, sunitinib might have been associated with the development of the vesicocutaneous fistula in our patient. Conclusion This is the first description of a vesicocutaneous fistula forming while under sunitinib treatment. Clinicians should be aware of the possible complication of vesicocutaneous fistula formation during treatment with molecular targeting agents in patients with extravesical invasion and peritoneal dissemination of GIST. PMID:21040530

  10. Streptococcus pyogenes Malate Degradation Pathway Links pH Regulation and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Paluscio, Elyse

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Streptococcus pyogenes to infect different niches within its human host most likely relies on its ability to utilize alternative carbon sources. In examining this question, we discovered that all sequenced S. pyogenes strains possess the genes for the malic enzyme (ME) pathway, which allows malate to be used as a supplemental carbon source for growth. ME is comprised of four genes in two adjacent operons, with the regulatory two-component MaeKR required for expression of genes encoding a malate permease (maeP) and malic enzyme (maeE). Analysis of transcription indicated that expression of maeP and maeE is induced by both malate and low pH, and induction in response to both cues is dependent on the MaeK sensor kinase. Furthermore, both maePE and maeKR are repressed by glucose, which occurs via a CcpA-independent mechanism. Additionally, malate utilization requires the PTS transporter EI enzyme (PtsI), as a PtsI– mutant fails to express the ME genes and is unable to utilize malate. Virulence of selected ME mutants was assessed in a murine model of soft tissue infection. MaeP–, MaeK–, and MaeR– mutants were attenuated for virulence, whereas a MaeE– mutant showed enhanced virulence compared to that of the wild type. Taken together, these data show that ME contributes to S. pyogenes' carbon source repertory, that malate utilization is a highly regulated process, and that a single regulator controls ME expression in response to diverse signals. Furthermore, malate uptake and utilization contribute to the adaptive pH response, and ME can influence the outcome of infection. PMID:25583521

  11. Long Noncoding RNA MALAT1 Promotes Aggressive Renal Cell Carcinoma through Ezh2 and Interacts with miR-205.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Hinoda, Yuji; Shahryari, Varahram; Deng, Guoren; Nakajima, Koichi; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2015-04-01

    Recently, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA) have emerged as new gene regulators and prognostic markers in several cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In this study, we investigated the contributions of the lncRNA MALAT1 in RCC with a specific focus on its transcriptional regulation and its interactions with Ezh2 and miR-205. We found that MALAT1 expression was higher in human RCC tissues, where it was associated with reduced patient survival. MALAT1 silencing decreased RCC cell proliferation and invasion and increased apoptosis. Mechanistic investigations showed that MALAT1 was transcriptionally activated by c-Fos and that it interacted with Ezh2. After MALAT1 silencing, E-cadherin expression was increased, whereas β-catenin expression was decreased through Ezh2. Reciprocal interaction between MALAT1 and miR-205 was also observed. Lastly, MALAT1 bound Ezh2 and oncogenesis facilitated by MALAT1 was inhibited by Ezh2 depletion, thereby blocking epithelial-mesenchymal transition via E-cadherin recovery and β-catenin downregulation. Overall, our findings illuminate how overexpression of MALAT1 confers an oncogenic function in RCC that may offer a novel theranostic marker in this disease.

  12. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1-regulated microRNA 506 modulates ovarian cancer growth by targeting iASPP

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Ruilin; Xue, Min; Zhang, Lan; Lin, ZhongQiu

    2017-01-01

    MALAT1, an important cancer-associated long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), contributes to the development and progression of several cancers. Disordered expression of MALAT1 has been observed in several cancers, including cervical cancer, breast cancer, and ovarian cancer. However, the exact effects and molecular mechanisms of MALAT1 in ovarian cancer progression are still unknown. Here, we investigated the role of MALAT1 in human ovarian cancer cell lines and clinical tumor samples, in order to determine the function of this molecule. In our research, lncRNA-MALAT1 was specifically upregulated in ovarian cancer cell lines and promoted ovarian cancer-cell growth through targeting microRNA (miR)-506. Knockdown of MALAT1 inhibited the proliferation and DNA synthesis of human ovarian cancer cell in vitro. In addition, miR-506-dependent iASPP regulation was required in MALAT1-induced ovarian cancer-cell growth. These findings indicated that MALAT1 might suppress tumor growth via miR-506-dependent iASPP regulation. Taken together, our data indicated that MALAT1 might be an oncogenic lncRNA that promotes proliferation of ovarian cancer and could be regarded as a therapeutic target in human ovarian cancer. PMID:28031721

  13. Red clover coumarate 3'-hydroxylase (CYP98A44) is capable of hydroxylating p-coumaroyl-shikimate but not p-coumaroyl-malate: implications for the biosynthesis of phaselic acid.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Michael L; Zarnowski, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense) leaves accumulate several mumol of phaselic acid [2-O-caffeoyl-L-malate] per gram fresh weight. Post-harvest oxidation of such o-diphenols to o-quinones by endogenous polyphenol oxidases (PPO) prevents breakdown of forage protein during storage. Forages like alfalfa (Medicago sativa) lack both foliar PPO activity and o-diphenols. Consequently, breakdown of their protein upon harvest and storage results in economic losses and release of excess nitrogen into the environment. Understanding how red clover synthesizes o-diphenols such as phaselic acid will help in the development of forages utilizing this natural system of protein protection. We have proposed biosynthetic pathways in red clover for phaselic acid that involve a specific hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:malate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase. It is unclear whether the transfer reaction to malate to form phaselic acid involves caffeic acid or p-coumaric acid and subsequent hydroxylation of the resulting p-coumaroyl-malate. The latter would require a coumarate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H) capable of hydroxylating p-coumaroyl-malate, an activity not previously described. Here, a cytochrome P450 C3'H (CYP98A44) was identified and its gene cloned from red clover. CYP98A44 shares 96 and 79% amino acid identity with Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana C3'H proteins that are capable of hydroxylating p-coumaroyl-shikimate and have been implicated in monolignol biosynthesis. CYP98A44 mRNA is expressed in stems and flowers and to a lesser extent in leaves. Immune serum raised against CYP98A44 recognizes a membrane-associated protein in red clover stems and leaves and cross-reacts with C3'H proteins from other species. CYP98A44 expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is capable of hydroxylating p-coumaroyl-shikimate, but not p-coumaroyl-malate. This finding indicates that in red clover, phaselic acid is likely formed by transfer of a caffeoyl moiety to malic acid, although the existence of a second C

  14. Intermolecular interactions of the malate synthase of Paracoccidioides spp

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The fungus Paracoccidioides spp is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a pulmonary mycosis acquired by the inhalation of fungal propagules. Paracoccidioides malate synthase (PbMLS) is important in the infectious process of Paracoccidioides spp because the transcript is up-regulated during the transition from mycelium to yeast and in yeast cells during phagocytosis by murine macrophages. In addition, PbMLS acts as an adhesin in Paracoccidioides spp. The evidence for the multifunctionality of PbMLS indicates that it could interact with other proteins from the fungus and host. The objective of this study was to identify and analyze proteins that possibly bind to PbMLS (PbMLS-interacting proteins) because protein interactions are intrinsic to cell processes, and it might be possible to infer the function of a protein through the identification of its ligands. Results The search for interactions was performed using an in vivo assay with a two-hybrid library constructed in S. cerevisiae; the transcripts were sequenced and identified. In addition, an in vitro assay using pull-down GST methodology with different protein extracts (yeast, mycelium, yeast-secreted proteins and macrophage) was performed, and the resulting interactions were identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Some of the protein interactions were confirmed by Far-Western blotting using specific antibodies, and the interaction of PbMLS with macrophages was validated by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. In silico analysis using molecular modeling, dynamics and docking identified the amino acids that were involved in the interactions between PbMLS and PbMLS-interacting proteins. Finally, the interactions were visualized graphically using Osprey software. Conclusion These observations indicate that PbMLS interacts with proteins that are in different functional categories, such as cellular transport, protein biosynthesis, modification and degradation of proteins and signal

  15. Identification and characterization of a class of MALAT1 -like genomic loci

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Bin; Mao, Yuntao S.; Diermeier, Sarah D.; ...

    2017-05-23

    The MALAT1 (Metastasis-Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1) gene encodes a noncoding RNA that is processed into a long nuclear retained transcript (MALAT1) and a small cytoplasmic tRNA-like transcript (mascRNA). Using an RNA sequence- and structure-based covariance model, we identified more than 130 genomic loci in vertebrate genomes containing the MALAT1 3' end triple-helix structure and its immediate downstream tRNA-like structure, including 44 in the green lizard Anolis carolinensis. Structural and computational analyses revealed a co-occurrence of components of the 3' end module. MALAT1-like genes in Anolis carolinensis are highly expressed in adult testis, thus we named them testis-abundant long noncodingmore » RNAs (tancRNAs). MALAT1-like loci also produce multiple small RNA species, including PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), from the antisense strand. The 3' ends of tancRNAs serve as potential targets for the PIWI-piRNA complex. Furthermore, we have identified an evolutionarily conserved class of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) with similar structural constraints, post-transcriptional processing, and subcellular localization and a distinct function in spermatocytes.« less

  16. Synergistic Effect between Cisplatin and Sunitinib Malate on Human Urinary Bladder-Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Arantes-Rodrigues, Regina; Pinto-Leite, Rosário; Fidalgo-Gonçalves, Lio; Palmeira, Carlos; Santos, Lúcio; Colaço, Aura; Oliveira, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse sunitinib malate in vitro ability to enhance cisplatin cytotoxicity in T24, 5637, and HT1376 human urinary bladder-cancer cell lines. Cells were treated with cisplatin (3, 6, 13, and 18 μM) and sunitinib malate (1, 2, 4, 6, and 20 μM), either in isolation or combined, over the course of 72 hours. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, acridine orange, and monodansylcadaverine staining and flow cytometry were performed. The combination index (CI) was calculated based on the Chou and Talalay method. In isolation, cisplatin and sunitinib malate statistically (P < 0.05) decrease cell viability in all cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, with the presence of autophagic vacuoles. A cell cycle arrest in early S-phase and in G0/G1-phase was also found after exposure to cisplatin and sunitinib malate, in isolation, respectively. Treatment of urinary bladder-cancer cells with a combination of cisplatin and sunitinib malate showed a synergistic effect (CI < 1). Autophagy and apoptosis studies showed a greater incidence when the combined treatment was put into use. This hints at the possibility of a new combined therapeutic approach. If confirmed in vivo, this conjugation may provide a means of new perspectives in muscle-invasive urinary bladder cancer treatment. PMID:24369536

  17. Day-Night Variations in Malate Concentration, Osmotic Pressure, and Hydrostatic Pressure in Cereus validus1

    PubMed Central

    Lüttge, Ulrich; Nobel, Park S.

    1984-01-01

    Malate concentration and stem osmotic pressure concomitantly increase during nighttime CO2 fixation and then decrease during the daytime in the obligate Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant, Cereus validus (Cactaceae). Changes in malate osmotic pressure calculated using the Van't Hoff relation match the changes in stem osmotic pressure, indicating that changes in malate level affected the water relations of the succulent stems. In contrast to stem osmotic pressure, stem water potential showed little day-night changes, suggesting that changes in cellular hydrostatic pressure occurred. This was corroborated by direct measurements of hydrostatic pressure using the Jülich pressure probe where a small oil-filled micropipette is inserted directly into chlorenchyma cells, which indicated a 4-fold increase in hydrostatic pressure from dusk to dawn. A transient increase of hydrostatic pressure at the beginning of the dark period was correlated with a short period of stomatal closing between afternoon and nighttime CO2 fixation, suggesting that the rather complex hydrostatic pressure patterns could be explained by an interplay between the effects of transpiration and malate levels. A second CAM plant, Agave deserti, showed similar day-night changes in hydrostatic pressure in its succulent leaves. It is concluded that, in addition to the inverted stomatal rhythm, the oscillations of malate markedly affect osmotic pressures and hence water relations of CAM plants. PMID:16663708

  18. The efficacy of topical ivermectin versus malation 0.5% lotion for the treatment of scabies.

    PubMed

    Goldust, Mohamad; Rezaee, Elham

    2013-05-06

    Objective: There are different medications for the treatment of scabies but the treatment of choice is still controversial. This study aimed at comparing the efficacy of topical ivermectin versus malation 0.5% lotion for the treatment of scabies. Methods: In total, 340 patients with scabies were enrolled, and randomized into two groups: the first group received 1% ivermectin applied topically to the affected skin and the second group received topical malation 0.5% lotion and were told to apply this twice with 1 week interval. Treatment was evaluated at intervals of 2 and 4 weeks, and if there was treatment failure at the 2-week follow-up, treatment was repeated. Results: Two application of topical ivermectin provided a cure rate of 67.6% at the 2-week follow-up, which increased to 85.2% at the 4-week follow-up after repeating the treatment. Treatment with two applications of malation 0.5% lotion was effective in 44.1% of patients at the 2-week follow-up, which increased to 67.6% at the 4-week follow-up after this treatment was repeated. Conclusion:Two application of ivermectin was as effective as single applications of malation 0.5% lotion at the 2-week follow-up. After repeating the treatment, ivermectin was superior to malation 0.5% lotion at the 4-week follow up.

  19. Ethylene negatively regulates aluminium-induced malate efflux from wheat roots and tobacco cells transformed with TaALMT1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxin; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2014-01-01

    An important mechanism for Al3+ tolerance in wheat is exudation of malate anions from the root apex through activation of malate-permeable TaALMT1 channels. Here, the effect of ethylene on Al3+-activated efflux of malate was investigated using Al3+-tolerant wheat genotype ET8, which has high expression of TaALMT1. Exposure of ET8 plants to Al3+ enhanced ethylene evolution in root apices. Treatment with the ethylene synthesis precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and ethylene gas suppressed Al3+-induced malate efflux from root apices, whereas the intracellular malate concentrations in roots were not affected. Malate efflux from root apices was enhanced in the presence of Al3+ by two antagonists of ethylene biosynthesis, aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG) and 2-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB). An increase in Al accumulation in root apices was observed when treated with ACC, whereas AVG and AIB suppressed Al accumulation in root apices. Al3+-induced inhibition of root elongation was ameliorated by pretreatment with AIB. In addition, ethylene donor (Ethrel) also inhibited Al3+-induced malate efflux from tobacco cells transformed with TaALMT1. ACC and the anion-channel blocker niflumate had a similar and non-additive effect on Al-induced malate efflux from root apices. Treatment of ET8 plants with ACC enhanced expression of TaALMT1, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of ethylene on Al-induced malate efflux is unlikely to occur at the transcriptional level. These findings indicate that ethylene may behave as a negative regulator of Al3+-induced malate efflux by targeting TaALMT1-mediated malate efflux by an unknown mechanism. PMID:24668874

  20. Augmentation of aluminum-induced oxidative stress in rat cerebrum by presence of pro-oxidant (graded doses of ethanol) exposure.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Prasunpriya; Sharma, Shiv Bhushan; Chowdary, Nadella Vijaya Subbaraya

    2010-11-01

    Both aluminum and ethanol are pro-oxidants and neurotoxic. Considering the possibilities of co-exposure and sharing mechanisms of producing neurotoxicity, the present study was planned to identify the level of aluminum-induced oxidative stress in altered pro-oxidant (ethanol exposure) status of cerebrum. Male rats were coexposed to aluminum and ethanol for 4 weeks. After the exposure period, cerebral levels of protein, reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (TBARS) were measured. Activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione perioxidase (GPx) of cerebrum were estimated. In most of the cases significant correlations were observed between the alterations and graded ethanol doses, suggesting a dose-dependency in pushing the oxidant equilibrium toward pro-oxidants. Aluminum is found to influence significantly all the studied parameters of oxidative stress. Likewise, ethanol also influenced these parameters significantly, except GR, while the interaction between ethanol and aluminum could significantly influence only the GSH content and GR activity of cerebrum. Present study demonstrate that coexposure of aluminum with pro-oxidant might favor development of aluminum-induced oxidative stress in cerebrum. This observation might be helpful in understanding of mechanism of neurodegenerative disorders and ameliorate them.

  1. Evaluating the potential role of pomegranate peel in aluminum-induced oxidative stress and histopathological alterations in brain of female rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2012-12-01

    Studies have shown that pomegranate, Punica granatum Linn. (Lythraceae), has remarkable biological and medicinal properties. However, the effects of pomegranate peel methanolic extract (PPME) on the aluminum-induced oxidative stress and histopathological change have not been reported yet. To determine the effect of PPME (200 mg/kg bwt) on the aluminum chloride (AlCl₃; 34 mg/kg bwt)-induced neurotoxicity, aluminum accumulation in brain and oxidant/antioxidant status were determined. The change of brain structure was investigated with hematoxylin and eosin, and anti-apoptosis effects of PPME were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The present study showed an indication of carcinogenicity in the AlCl₃-treated group representing an increase in tissue tumor markers such as tumor necrosis factor-α and angiogenin and inflammation by inducing an increase in prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin F2α. PPME protected brain through decreasing the aluminum accumulation and stimulating antioxidant activities and anti-apoptotic proteins namely Bcl-2. Therefore, these results indicated that pomegranate peel methanolic extract could inhibit aluminum-induced oxidative stress and histopathological alternations in brain of female rats, and these effects may be related to anti-apoptotic and antioxidants activities.

  2. Malate Dehydrogenases of Pisum sativum: Tissue Distribution and Properties of the Particulate Forms.

    PubMed

    Zschoche, W C; Ting, I P

    1973-06-01

    Mitochondria and leaf microbodies isolated from leaves of pea (Pisum sativum) by sucrose density gradient centrifugation were each shown to have a unique form (isoenzyme) of malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37) based on chromatographic and kinetic properties. Root organelle preparations were shown to contain only a mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase with physical and kinetic properties similar to the leaf form. The absence of a detectable root microbody malate dehydrogenase similar to the leaf enzyme, which is intermediate in electrophoretic and chromatographic properties between the mitochondrial and soluble isoenzymes, was confirmed by diethylaminoethyl cellulose column chromatography and starch-gel electrophoresis of total homogenates from leaf and root tissue. These findings tend to support the role of the leaf microbody isoenzyme in a pathway unique to photosynthetic tissue.

  3. Ringer's malate solution protects against the multiple organ injury and dysfunction caused by hemorrhagic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhong-Liang; Wu, Jing; Meng, Chen; Zeng, Fang; Yang, Yan; Yao, Shang-Long

    2012-08-01

    Malic acid, in the form of its anion malate, is a key intermediate in the major biochemical energy-producing cycle known as the citric acid or Krebs cycle. In this study, the authors investigated the protective effect of a novel crystalloid solution of Ringer's malate following fluid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock using a rat model. Under general anesthesia, Sprague-Dawley male rats were subjected to 60 min of hemorrhagic shock (40 mmHg for 60 min) followed by crystalloid resuscitation. Groups were as follows: (1) sham shock, (2) normal saline, (3) Ringer's lactate, and (4) Ringer's malate. The experiment was terminated at 4 h after resuscitation. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and blood biophysical parameters were monitored during the experiment. The alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, urea, creatinine, superoxide dismutase, and malondialdehyde levels in plasma were detected. The intestine, liver, lung, and renal histopathology were measured. It was found that Ringer's malate could increase MAP immediately and maintain MAP for a long time. Ringer's malate could reduce the level of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, urea, and creatinine. At the same time, the activity of superoxide dismutase was increased, and the level of malondialdehyde was decreased. Histopathology indicated that Ringer's malate can protect against the multiple organ injury caused by hemorrhagic shock in rats. Ringer's malate prevented circulatory failure and alleviated multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in animals with hemorrhagic shock. The study suggests that Ringer's malate solution could be a potential novel therapeutic agent for fluid resuscitation.

  4. Aluminum-activated citrate and malate transporters from the MATE and ALMT families function independently to confer Arabidopsis aluminum tolerance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aluminum (Al) activated root malate and citrate exudation play an important role in Al tolerance in many plant species. AtALMT1, an Al-activated malate transporter, is a major contributor to Arabidopsis Al tolerance. Here, we demonstrate that a second, unrelated gene, AtMATE, encodes an Arabidopsi...

  5. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 as a potential novel biomarker in digestive system cancers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Zhang, Run J; Zou, Shu B

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), a newly discovered long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), has been reported to be overexpressed in various cancers. However, the clinical value of MALAT1 in digestive system cancers is unclear. This study was designed to investigate the potential value of MALAT1 as a prognostic biomarker in digestive system cancers. We searched the Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. All studies that explored the correlation between lncRNA MALAT1 expression and survival in digestive system tumors were selected. A quantitative meta-analysis was performed for the correlation between lncRNA MALAT1 expression and survival in digestive system tumors. Five studies were eligible for analysis, which included 547 patients. Meta-analysis showed that high expression of MALAT1 could predict poor overall survival (OS) in digestive system cancers (pooled HR: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.41-2.43, P<0.0001). For disease-free survival (DFS), elevated MALAT1 expression was also a significant predictor with a combined HR of 2.28 (95% CI: 1.42-3.67, P=0.0007). lncRNA MALAT1 may serve as a potential novel prognostic biomarker in digestive system cancers.

  6. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 as a potential novel biomarker in digestive system cancers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Zhang, Run J; Zou, Shu B

    2016-05-17

    MALAT1 (Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1), a newly discovered long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), has been reported to be overexpressed in various cancers. However, the clinical value of MALAT1 in digestive system cancers is unclear. This study was designed to investigate the potential value of MALAT1 as a prognostic biomarker in digestive system cancers. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases. All studies that explored the correlation between lncRNA MALAT1 expression and survival in digestive system tumors were selected. A quantitative meta-analysis was performed for the correlation between lncRNA MALAT1 expression and survival in digestive system tumors. Five studies were eligible for analysis, which included 547 patients. Meta-analysis showed that high expression of MALAT1 could predict poor overall survival (OS) in digestive system cancers (pooled HR: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.41-2.43, p < 0.0001). For disease-free survival (DFS), elevated MALAT1 expression was also a significant predictor with a combined HR of 2.28 (95% CI: 1.42-3.67, p = 0.0007). lncRNA MALAT1 may serve as a potential novel prognostic biomarker in digestive system cancers.

  7. LncRNA MALAT1 enhances oncogenic activities of EZH2 in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liguo; Zhao, Yu; Sun, Zhifu; Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Zhang, Jun; Huang, Haojie

    2015-01-01

    The Polycomb protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is frequently overexpressed in advanced human prostate cancer (PCa), especially in lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, the signaling pathways that regulate EZH2 functions in PCa remain incompletely defined. Using EZH2 antibody-based RNA immunoprecipitation-coupled high throughput sequencing (RIP-seq), we demonstrated that EZH2 binds to MALAT1, a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that is overexpressed during PCa progression. GST pull-down and RIP assays demonstrated that the 3′ end of MALAT1 interacts with the N-terminal of EZH2. Knockdown of MALAT1 impaired EZH2 recruitment to its target loci and upregulated expression of EZH2 repressed genes. Further studies indicated that MALAT1 plays a vital role in EZH2-enhanced migration and invasion in CRPC cell lines. Meta-analysis and RT-qPCR of patient specimens demonstrated a positive correlation between MALAT1 and EZH2 expression in human CRPC tissues. Finally, we showed that MALAT1 enhances expression of PRC2-independent target genes of EZH2 in CRPC cells in culture and patient-derived xenografts. Together, these data indicate that MALAT1 may be a crucial RNA cofactor of EZH2 and that the EZH2-MALAT1 association may provide a new avenue for development new strategies for treatment of CRPC. PMID:26516927

  8. Metabolic engineering of Aspergillus oryzae for efficient production of l-malate directly from corn starch.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Liu, Long

    2017-09-28

    L-malate, an important chemical building block, has been widely applied in the food, pharmaceutical, and bio-based materials industries. In previous work, we engineered Aspergillus oryzae by rewiring the reductive tricarboxylic acid pathway to produce L-malate from glucose. To decrease the production cost, here, we further engineered A. oryzae to efficiently produce L-malate directly from corn starch with simultaneous liquefaction-saccharification and fermentation. First, a promoter PN5 was constructed by quintuple tandem of the 97-bp fragment containing the cis-element of the glucoamylase gene promoter (PglaA), and with the promoter PN5, the transcriptional level of glaA gene increased by 25∼45%. Then, by co-overexpression of glaA, a-amylase (amyB) and a-glucosidase (agdA) genes with the promoter PN5, the L-malate titer increased from 55.5g/L to 72.0g/L with 100g/L corn starch in shake flask. In addition, to reduce the concentration of byproducts succinate and fumarate, a fumarase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which facilitated the transformation of fumarate to L-malate, was overexpressed. As a result, the concentration of succinate and fumarate decreased from 12.6 and 1.29g/L to 7.8 and 0.59g/L, and the L-malate titer increased from 72.0g/L to 78.5g/L. Finally, we found that the addition of glucose at the initial fermentation stage facilitated the cell growth and L-malate synthesis, and the L-malate titer further increased to 82.3g/L by co-fermentation of 30g/L glucose and 70g/L corn starch, with a productivity of 1.18g/L/h and a yield of 0.82g/g total carbon sources. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cytochemical localization of malate synthase in amphibian fat body adipocytes: possible glyoxylate cycle in a vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Davis, W L; Jones, R G; Goodman, D B

    1986-05-01

    The adipocytes of amphibian abdominal fat bodies contain typical microperoxisomes, as indicated by their fine structure. Electron microscopic cytochemistry showed that these organelles contain the enzymes catalase, typical for peroxisomes, and malate synthase. The latter is an enzymatic component characteristic of the glyoxylate cycle, a biochemical pathway known to exist in plant glyoxysomes (peroxisomes). This metabolic pathway makes possible the net conversion of lipid to carbohydrate. Toad adipocytes may represent yet another example of vertebrate peroxisomes which contain one of the marker enzymes (malate synthase) characteristic of the glyoxylate shunt.

  10. Lack of malate valve capacities lead to improved N-assimilation and growth in transgenic A. thaliana plants

    PubMed Central

    Selinski, Jennifer; Scheibe, Renate

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the relationship between malate valve capacities, N-assimilation, and energy metabolism. We used transgenic plants either lacking the chloroplast NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase or mutants with a decreased transcript level of the plastid-localized NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase. Plants were grown on nitrate or ammonium, respectively, as the sole N-source and transcripts were analyzed by qRT-PCR. We could show that the lack of malate valve capacities enhances N-assimilation and plastidial glycolysis by increasing transcript levels of Fd-GOGATs or NADH-GOGAT and plastidic NAD-GAPDHs (GapCps), respectively. Based on our results, we conclude that the lack of malate valve capacities is balanced by an increase of the activity of plastid-localized glycolysis in order to cover the high demand for plastidial ATP, stressing the importance of the plastids for energy metabolism in plant cells. PMID:25763488

  11. Lack of malate valve capacities lead to improved N-assimilation and growth in transgenic A. thaliana plants.

    PubMed

    Selinski, Jennifer; Scheibe, Renate

    2014-05-06

    In this study we analyzed the relationship between malate valve capacities, N-assimilation, and energy metabolism. We used transgenic plants either lacking the chloroplast NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase or mutants with a decreased transcript level of the plastid-localized NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase. Plants were grown on nitrate or ammonium, respectively, as the sole N-source and transcripts were analyzed by qRT-PCR. We could show that the lack of malate valve capacities enhances N-assimilation and plastidial glycolysis by increasing transcript levels of Fd-GOGATs or NADH-GOGAT and plastidic NAD-GAPDHs (GapCps), respectively. Based on our results, we conclude that the lack of malate valve capacities is balanced by an increase of the activity of plastid-localized glycolysis in order to cover the high demand for plastidial ATP, stressing the importance of the plastids for energy metabolism in plant cells.

  12. Leaf malate and succinate accumulation are out of phase throughout the development of the CAM plant Ananas comosus.

    PubMed

    Rainha, N; Medeiros, V P; Ferreira, C; Raposo, A; Leite, J P; Cruz, C; Pacheco, C A; Ponte, D; Silva, A B

    2016-03-01

    In plants with Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM), organic acids, mainly malate are crucial intermediates for carbon fixation. In this research we studied the circadian oscillations of three organic anions (malate, citrate, and succinate) in Ananas comosus, assessing the effect of season and plant development stage. Seasonal and plant development dependencies were observed. The circadian oscillations of malate and citrate were typical of CAM pathways reported in the literature. Citrate content was quite stable (25-30 μmol g(-1) FW) along the day, with a seasonal effect. Succinate was shown to have both diurnal and seasonal oscillations and also a correlation with malate, since it accumulated during the afternoon when malate content was normally at a minimum, suggesting a possible mechanistic effect between both anions in CAM and/or respiratory metabolisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Interplant Aboveground Signaling Prompts Upregulation of Auxin Promoter and Malate Transporter as Part of Defensive Response in the Neighboring Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Connor; Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Bais, Harsh P.

    2017-01-01

    When disrupted by stimuli such as herbivory, pathogenic infection, or mechanical wounding, plants secrete signals such as root exudates and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The emission of VOCs induces a response in the neighboring plant communities and can improve plant fitness by alerting nearby plants of an impending threat and prompting them to alter their physiology for defensive purposes. In this study, we investigated the role of plant-derived signals, released as a result of mechanical wounding, that may play a role in intraspecific communication between Arabidopsis thaliana communities. Plant-derived signals released by the wounded plant resulted in more elaborate root development in the neighboring, unwounded plants. Such plant-derived signals also upregulated the Aluminum-activated malate transporter (ALMT1) responsible for the secretion of malic acid (MA) and the DR5 promoter, an auxin responsive promoter concentrated in root apex of the neighboring plants. We speculate that plant-derived signal-induced upregulation of root-specific ALMT1 in the undamaged neighboring plants sharing the environment with stressed plants may associate more with the benign microbes belowground. We also observed increased association of beneficial bacterium Bacillus subtilis UD1022 on roots of the neighboring plants sharing environment with the damaged plants. Wounding-induced plant-derived signals therefore induce defense mechanisms in the undamaged, local plants, eliciting a two-pronged preemptive response of more rapid root growth and up-regulation of ALMT1, resulting in increased association with beneficial microbiome. PMID:28469632

  14. L-malate enhances the gene expression of carried proteins and antioxidant enzymes in liver of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Zeng, X; Wu, J; Wu, Q; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory reported L-malate as a free radical scavenger in aged rats. To investigate the antioxidant mechanism of L-malate in the mitochondria, we analyzed the change in gene expression of two malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS)-related carried proteins (AGC, aspartate/glutamate carrier and OMC, oxoglutarate/malate carrier) in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and three antioxidant enzymes (CAT, SOD, and GSH-Px) in the mitochondria. The changes in gene expression of these proteins and enzymes were examined by real-time RT-PCR in the heart and liver of aged rats treated with L-malate. L-malate was orally administered in rats continuously for 30 days using a feeding atraumatic needle. We found that the gene expression of OMC and GSH-Px mRNA in the liver increased by 39 % and 38 %, respectively, in the 0.630 g/kg L-malate treatment group than that in the control group. The expression levels of SOD mRNA in the liver increased by 39 %, 56 %, and 78 % in the 0.105, 0.210, and 0.630 g/kg L-malate treatment groups, respectively. No difference were observed in the expression levels of AGC, OMC, CAT, SOD, and GSH-Px mRNAs in the heart of rats between the L-malate treatment and control groups. These results predicted that L-malate may increase the antioxidant capacity of mitochondria by enhancing the expression of mRNAs involved in the MAS and the antioxidant enzymes.

  15. Respiratory properties and malate metabolism in Percoll-purified mitochondria isolated from pineapple, Ananas comosus (L.) Merr. cv. smooth cayenne.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hoang Thi Kim; Nose, Akihiro; Agarie, Sakae

    2004-10-01

    An investigation was made of the respiratory properties and the role of the mitochondria isolated from one phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK)-CAM plant Ananas comosus (pineapple) in malate metabolism during CAM phase III. Pineapple mitochondria showed very high malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and low malic enzyme (ME) and glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) activities. The mitochondria readily oxidized succinate and NADH with high rates and coupling, while they only oxidized NADPH in the presence of Ca(2+). Pineapple mitochondria oxidized malate with low rates under most assay conditions, despite increasing malate concentrations, optimizing pH, providing cofactors such as coenzyme A, thiamine pyrophosphate, and NAD(+), and supplying individually external glutamate or GOT. However, providing glutamate and GOT simultaneously strongly increased the rates of malate oxidation. The OAA easily permeated the mitochondrial membranes to import into or export out of pineapple mitochondria during malate oxidation, but the mitochondria did not consume external Asp or alpha-KG. These results suggest that OAA played a significant role in the mitochondrial malate metabolism of pineapple, in which malate was mainly oxidized by active mMDH to produce OAA which could be exported outside the mitochondria via a malate-OAA shuttle. Cytosolic GOT then consumed OAA by transamination in the presence of glutamate, leading to a large increase in respiration rates. The malate-OAA shuttle might operate as a supporting system for decarboxylation in phase III of PCK-CAM pineapple. This shuttle system may be important in pineapple to provide a source of energy and substrate OAA for cytosolic PCK activity during the day when cytosolic OAA and ATP was limited for the overall decarboxylation process.

  16. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 affects the efficacy of radiotherapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by regulating Cks1 expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijun; Zhou, Yang; Tu, Bo; Bu, Yu; Liu, Aqiu; Kong, Jianmin

    2017-09-01

    Long noncoding RNA metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) has been well studied in the progression of many malignancies. However, its association with the radioresistance of tumors has not been well understood yet. This study tried to explore the role of MALAT1 in regulating the radiosensitivity of esophageal cancer (EC), especially esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), involving its regulation on Cks1 expression. KYSE150 cells were subcutaneously inoculated into nude mice to establish ESCC xenografts. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis were performed to detect the expression of MALAT1 and Cks1 in irradiated xenografts and cells. Functional analysis was performed in both EC9706 and KYSE150 cells via the transfection of corresponding plasmids or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Irradiation-induced damage was examined by the detection of cell viability and apoptosis using MTT and TUNEL assays, respectively. Both MALAT1 and Cks1 were downregulated in irradiated xenografts and cells. Cks1FER1L4 showed significant downregulation. Overexpression of MALAT1 inhibited irradiation-induced decrease in cell viability, increase in apoptosis, and downregulation of Cks1. Cks1 expression was also downregulated by MALAT1 siRNA, while Cks1 siRNA strongly recovered MALAT1-induced radioresistance in vitro. Moreover, better tumor growth, accompanied by Cks1 upregulation, was observed in KYSE150 xenografts with MALAT1 overexpression, especially under radiation treatment. MALAT1 acted as one positive regulator of the radioresistance of ESCC, at least partly due to its promotion on Cks1 expression. Furthermore, MALAT1-targeted therapies showed great potential in enhancing the radiotherapeutic effect on ESCC. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Long Noncoding RNA MALAT1 Functions as a Sponge of MiR-200c in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pa, Meili; Naizaer, Gulimire; Seyiti, Ayinuer; Kuerbang, Gulina

    2017-09-11

    Previous researches have revealed that alteration of non-coding RNAs expression level in malignancies can significantlymodify the course of diseases. Current study was aimed to investigate the biological functions of lncRNA MALAT1 and miR-200c, as well as the interaction between them. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) showed that lncRNA MALAT1 was overexpressed in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines in compare to adjacent normal tissue and normal human ovarian surface epithelial cells (HOSEPiCs). Contrarily, miR-200c expression was significantly decreased in ovarian cancer, which is negatively correlated with MALAT1 expression. In addition, overexpression of lncRNA MALAT1 appeared to be related to worse prognosis and higher metastasis. In consistent with clinical outcomes, down-regulation of lncRNA MALAT1 suppressed the cell viability, migration and invasion abilities of ovarian cancer cell lines. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis suggested that3'-UTR of lncRNA MALAT1 and miR-200c have a complementarity region. Rescue experiments confirmed that miR-200c could reverse the tumor-suppressive effect of knock-down of lncRNA MALAT1 on ovarian cancer cells. Nevertheless, luciferase assays verified the existence of direct binding between miR-200c and lncRNA MALAT1. In general, results of this study indicated that lncRNA MALAT1 is a oncogene in ovarian cancer, involved in the regulation of cell viability, migration and invasion abilities of ovarian cancer cells, which achieved its biological function by regulating miR-200c expression. Therefore, lncRNA MALAT1 could be a promising prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for ovarian cancer and its relation with miR-200c might be a starting point for future researches.

  18. CLYBL is a polymorphic human enzyme with malate synthase and β-methylmalate synthase activity

    PubMed Central

    Strittmatter, Laura; Li, Yang; Nakatsuka, Nathan J.; Calvo, Sarah E.; Grabarek, Zenon; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2014-01-01

    CLYBL is a human mitochondrial enzyme of unknown function that is found in multiple eukaryotic taxa and conserved to bacteria. The protein is expressed in the mitochondria of all mammalian organs, with highest expression in brown fat and kidney. Approximately 5% of all humans harbor a premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL that has been associated with reduced levels of circulating vitamin B12. Using comparative genomics, we now show that CLYBL is strongly co-expressed with and co-evolved specifically with other components of the mitochondrial B12 pathway. We confirm that the premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL leads to a loss of protein expression. To elucidate the molecular function of CLYBL, we used comparative operon analysis, structural modeling and enzyme kinetics. We report that CLYBL encodes a malate/β-methylmalate synthase, converting glyoxylate and acetyl-CoA to malate, or glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA to β-methylmalate. Malate synthases are best known for their established role in the glyoxylate shunt of plants and lower organisms and are traditionally described as not occurring in humans. The broader role of a malate/β-methylmalate synthase in human physiology and its mechanistic link to vitamin B12 metabolism remain unknown. PMID:24334609

  19. The proton motive force generated in Leuconostoc oenos by L-malate fermentation.

    PubMed Central

    Salema, M; Lolkema, J S; San Romão, M V; Lourero Dias, M C

    1996-01-01

    In cells of Leuconostoc oenos, the fermentation of L-malic acid generates both a transmembrane pH gradient, inside alkaline, and an electrical potential gradient, inside negative. In resting cells, the proton motive force ranged from -170 mV to -88 mV between pH 3.1 and 5.6 in the presence Of L-malate. Membrane potentials were calculated by using a model for probe binding that accounted for the different binding constants at the different pH values at the two faces of the membrane. The delta psi generated by the transport of monovalent malate, H-malate-, controlled the rate of fermentation. The fermentation rate significantly increased under conditions of decreased delta psi, i.e., upon addition of the ionophore valinomycin in the presence of KCl, whereas in a buffer depleted of potassium, the addition of valinomycin resulted in a hyperpolarization of the cell membrane and a reduction of the rate of fermentation. At the steady state, the chemical gradient for H-malate- was of the same magnitude as delta psi. Synthesis of ATP was observed in cells performing malolactic fermentation. PMID:8655490

  20. Malate Oxidation, Rotenone-Resistance, and Alternative Path Activity in Plant Mitochondria 1

    PubMed Central

    Wiskich, Joseph T.; Day, David A.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cyanide and rotenone on malate (pH 6.8), malate plus glutamate (pH 7.8), citrate, α-ketoglutarate, and succinate oxidation by cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L.) bud, sweet potato (Ipomoea batatis L.) tuber, and spinach (Spinacia oleracea and Kalanchoë daigremontiana leaf mitochondria was investigated. Cyanide inhibited all substrates equally with the exception of malate plus glutamate; in this case, inhibition of O2 uptake was more severe due to an effect of cyanide on aspartate aminotransferase. Azide and antimycin A gave similar inhibitions with all substrates. Subsequent addition of NAD had no effect with any substrate. Providing that oxalacetate accumulation was prevented, rotenone inhibited all NAD-linked substrates equally and caused ADP:O ratios to decrease by one-third. Addition of succinate to mitochondria oxidizing malate stimulated oxygen uptake, but adding citrate and α-ketoglutarate did not. These results indicate that there is no direct link between malic enzyme and the rotenone- and cyanide-resistant respiratory pathways, and that there is no need to postulate separate compartmentation of malic enzyme and the other NAD-linked enzymes in the matrix. PMID:16662651

  1. Prognostic value of long noncoding RNA MALAT1 in digestive system malignancies.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Hui; Li, Xiao-Mei; Maimaiti, Ailifeire; Chen, Qing-Jie; Liao, Wu; Lai, Hong-Mei; Liu, Fen; Yang, Yi-Ning

    2015-01-01

    MALAT1, a newly discovered long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), has been reported to be highly expressed in many types of cancers. This meta-analysis summarizes its potential prognostic value in digestive system malignancies. A quantitative meta-analysis was performed through a systematic search in PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) for eligible papers on the prognostic impact of MALAT1 in digestive system malignancies from inception to Apr. 25, 2015. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated to summarize the effect. Five studies were included in the study, with a total of 527 patients. A significant association was observed between MALAT1 abundance and poor overall survival (OS) of patients with digestive system malignancies, with pooled hazard ratio (HR) of 7.68 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.32-13.66, P<0.001). Meta sensitivity analysis suggested the reliability of our findings. No publication bias was observed. MALAT1 abundance may serve as a novel predictive factor for poor prognosis in patients with digestive system malignancies.

  2. Occurrence of the malate-aspartate shuttle in various tumor types.

    PubMed

    Greenhouse, W V; Lehninger, A L

    1976-04-01

    The activity of the malate-aspartate shuttle for the reoxidation of cytoplasmic reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by mitochondria was assessed in six lines of rodent ascites tumor cells (two strains of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma, Krebs II carcinoma, Novikoff hepatoma, AS-30D hepatoma, and L1210 mouse leukemia). All the tumor cells examined showed mitochondrial reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH, as evidenced by the accumulation of pyruvate when the cells were incubated aerobically with L-lactate. Reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH thus generated was completely inhibited by the transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetate. The involvement of the respiratory chain in the reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH was demonstrated by the action of cyanide, rotenone, and antimycin A, which strongly inhibited the formation of pyruvate from added L-lactate. Compounds that inhibit the carrier-mediated entry of malate into mitochondria, such as butylmalonate, benzenetricarboxylate, and iodobenzylmalonate, also inhibited the accumulation of pyruvate from added L-lactate by the tumor cells. The maximal rate of the malate-aspartate shuttle was established by addtion of arsenite to inhibit the mitochondrial oxidation of the pyruvate formed from added lactate. The capacity of the various tumor lines for the reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH via the malate-aspartate shuttle approaches 20% of the total respiratory rate of the cells and thus appears to be sufficient to account for the mitochondrial reoxidation of that fraction of glycolytic NADH not reoxidized by pyruvate and lactate dehydrognenase in the cytoplasm.

  3. Homochiral Cu(II) and Ni(II) malates with tunable structural features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavakhina, Marina S.; Samsonenko, Denis G.; Virovets, Alexander V.; Dybtsev, Danil N.; Fedin, Vladimir P.

    2014-02-01

    Four new homochiral metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) based on S-malate anions and N-donor linkers of different length have been prepared under solvothermal conditions. [Cu(mal)(bpy)]·H2O (1), [Cu(mal)(bpe)]·2H2O (2), [Ni(mal)(bpy)]·1.3CH3OH (3) and [Ni(mal)(bpe)]·4H2O (4) (mal=S-malate, bpy=4,4‧-bipyridil, bpe=trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene) were characterized by a number of analytical methods including powder X-ray diffraction, elemental, thermogravimetric analyses, IR spectroscopy. Compounds 1-3 were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. The absence of the chiral ligand racemization under synthetic conditions was unambiguously confirmed by polarimetry experiments. Compounds 1 and 2 contain metal-malate layered motives, connected by N-donor linkers and contribute to the family of isoreticular Cu(II) malates and tartrates [Cu(mal)L] and [Cu(tart)L], (tart=tartrate; L=ditopic rigid organic ligand). The Ni-based compounds 3 and 4 share 1D chiral {Ni(mal)} motives and possess novel type of the chiral framework, previously unknown for chiral carboxylates. The linear N-donor linkers connect these chiral chains, thus controlling the channel diameter and guest accessible volume of the homochiral structure, which exceeds 60 %.

  4. The anomalous kinetics of coupled aspartate aminotransferase and malate dehydrogenase. Evidence for compartmentation of oxaloacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Bryce, C F; Williams, D C; John, R A; Fasella, P

    1976-01-01

    Cytoplasmic aspartate aminotransferase and malate dehydrogenase were purified from pig heart. Kinetic parameters were determined for the separate reaction catalysed by each enzyme and used to predict the course of the coupled reaction: (see article). Although a lag phase should have been easily seen, none was detected. The same coupled reaction was also carried out by using radioactive aspartate in the presence of unlabelled oxaloacetate. The reaction was quenched with HClO4 after 70 ms and the specific radioactivity of the malate produced in this system was found to be essentially the same as that of the original aspartate. These results show that oxaloacetate produced by the aspartate aminotransferase is converted into malate by malate dehydrogenase before it equilibrates with the pool of unlabelled oxaloacetate and are consistent with a proposal that the enzymes are associated in a complex. However, no physical evidence of the existence of a complex could be found. An alternative means of compartmentation of the intermediate as an unstable isomer is considered. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:942372

  5. Long Non-Coding RNA MALAT1 Promotes Proliferation, Angiogenesis, and Immunosuppressive Properties of Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Inducing VEGF and IDO.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiujun; Song, Yuxian; Liu, Fei; Liu, Dan; Miao, Huishuang; Ren, Jing; Xu, Jingjing; Ding, Liang; Hu, Yali; Wang, Zhiqun; Hou, Yayi; Zhao, Guangfeng

    2017-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in regulating angiogenesis and immune balance. The abnormal MSCs in proliferation and function were reported at maternal fetal interface in patients with pre-eclampsia (PE). Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 was known to regulate the function of trophoblast cells. However, it is not clear whether MALAT1 regulates MSCs to be related to PE. In the present study, we found that the expression of MALAT1 was significantly reduced in both umbilical cord tissues and MSCs in patients with severe PE. MALAT1 did not affect the phenotype and differentiation of MSCs. Of note, transfection with MALAT1 plasmid into MSCs drove the cell cycle into G2/M phase and inhibited cell apoptosis. The supernatants from MALAT1-overexpressed MSCs promoted the migration of MSCs, invasion of HTR-8/SVneo and tube formation of HUVEC, while si-MALAT1 had the opposite effects. Moreover, we found that MALAT1-induced VEGF mediated these effects of MALAT1 on MSCs. Furthermore, we found that MALAT1-overexpressed MSCs promoted M2 macrophage polarization and this effect was mediated by MALAT1-induced IDO expression, suggesting that MALAT1 may enhance the immunosuppressive properties of MSCs in vivo. In addition, we also investigated the factors that inhibit MALAT1 expression in PE and found that peroxide was a cause for MALAT1 downregulation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that MALAT1 is an important endogenous regulator in the proliferation, angiogenesis, and immunosuppressive properties of MSCs, suggesting it may be involved in the pathogenesis of PE. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2780-2791, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Homochiral Cu(II) and Ni(II) malates with tunable structural features

    SciTech Connect

    Zavakhina, Marina S.; Samsonenko, Denis G.; Virovets, Alexander V.; Dybtsev, Danil N.; Fedin, Vladimir P.

    2014-02-15

    Four new homochiral metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) based on S-malate anions and N-donor linkers of different length have been prepared under solvothermal conditions. [Cu(mal)(bpy)]·H{sub 2}O (1), [Cu(mal)(bpe)]·2H{sub 2}O (2), [Ni(mal)(bpy)]·1.3CH{sub 3}OH (3) and [Ni(mal)(bpe)]·4H{sub 2}O (4) (mal=S-malate, bpy=4,4′-bipyridil, bpe=trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene) were characterized by a number of analytical methods including powder X-ray diffraction, elemental, thermogravimetric analyses, IR spectroscopy. Compounds 1–3 were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. The absence of the chiral ligand racemization under synthetic conditions was unambiguously confirmed by polarimetry experiments. Compounds 1 and 2 contain metal-malate layered motives, connected by N-donor linkers and contribute to the family of isoreticular Cu(II) malates and tartrates [Cu(mal)L] and [Cu(tart)L], (tart=tartrate; L=ditopic rigid organic ligand). The Ni-based compounds 3 and 4 share 1D chiral (Ni(mal)) motives and possess novel type of the chiral framework, previously unknown for chiral carboxylates. The linear N-donor linkers connect these chiral chains, thus controlling the channel diameter and guest accessible volume of the homochiral structure, which exceeds 60 %. - Graphical abstract: Four new homochiral metal–organic frameworks are built from Ni{sup 2+} or Cu{sup 2+} cations, S-malate anions and N-donor linkers of different length, which controls the size of pores and guest accessible volume of the homochiral structure. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Four new homohiral metal–organic frameworks based on Ni{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+}. • Cu(II)–malate layers and Ni(II)–malate chains are connected by N-donor linkers. • N-donor linkers of different length control the size of pores.

  7. Cooperative self-assembly of chiral L-malate and achiral succinate in the formation of a three-dimensional homochiral framework.

    PubMed

    Zingiryan, Areg; Zhang, Jian; Bu, Xianhui

    2008-10-06

    Chiral l-malate and achiral succinate ligands have been integrated into a three-dimensional homochiral framework by reacting transition-metal cations (Mn (2+)), l-(-)-malic acid ( l-H 2ma), succinic acid (H 2suc), and 4,4'-bipyridine (4,4'-bipy). Chiral l-malate bonds to Mn (2+) without using the -OH group, which is very unusual for malate. Such unusual bonding of chiral malate results from the cooperative effect of chiral malate and achiral succinate ligands during the self-assembly process, further assisted by the third complementary bipyridine ligand.

  8. The long noncoding RNA MALAT1 promotes tumor-driven angiogenesis by up-regulating pro-angiogenic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tee, Andrew E; Liu, Bing; Song, Renhua; Li, Jinyan; Pasquier, Eddy; Cheung, Belamy B; Jiang, Cizhong; Marshall, Glenn M; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray D; Fletcher, Jamie I; Dinger, Marcel E; Liu, Tao

    2016-02-23

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor during early childhood. One of the key features of neuroblastoma is extensive tumor-driven angiogenesis due to hypoxia. However, the mechanism through which neuroblastoma cells drive angiogenesis is poorly understood. Here we show that the long noncoding RNA MALAT1 was upregulated in human neuroblastoma cell lines under hypoxic conditions. Conditioned media from neuroblastoma cells transfected with small interfering RNAs (siRNA) targeting MALAT1, compared with conditioned media from neuroblastoma cells transfected with control siRNAs, induced significantly less endothelial cell migration, invasion and vasculature formation. Microarray-based differential gene expression analysis showed that one of the genes most significantly down-regulated following MALAT1 suppression in human neuroblastoma cells under hypoxic conditions was fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses confirmed that MALAT1 suppression reduced FGF2 expression, and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays revealed that transfection with MALAT1 siRNAs reduced FGF2 protein secretion from neuroblastoma cells. Importantly, addition of recombinant FGF2 protein to the cell culture media reversed the effects of MALAT1 siRNA on vasculature formation. Taken together, our data suggest that up-regulation of MALAT1 expression in human neuroblastoma cells under hypoxic conditions increases FGF2 expression and promotes vasculature formation, and therefore plays an important role in tumor-driven angiogenesis.

  9. MALAT1 participates in ultraviolet B-induced photo-aging via regulation of the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Li; Zeng, Qinghai; Lu, Jianyun; Ding, Shu; Xia, Fang; Kang, Jian; Tan, Lina; Gao, Lihua; Kang, Liyang; Cao, Ke; Zhou, Jianda; Xiao, Rong; Chen, Jing; Huang, Jinhua

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), transcripts of >200 bp in length that do not appear to exhibit any coding capacity, are important in the occurrence and development of cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. However, effects of lncRNAs on photo-aging remain to be elucidated. To explore the potential effects of the lncRNA metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) on photo-aging in fibroblasts, MALAT1 expression was silenced in fibroblasts using small interference RNA. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to examine MALAT1 expression in normal and silenced fibroblasts following irradiation with 60 mJ/cm2 ultraviolet B (UVB) and an ELISA assay was used to identify matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) content in the cellular supernatant. A β-galactosidase kit was applied to measure the number of senescent cells and a western blot assay was used to detect extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 phosphorylation levels. RT-qPCR was additionally used to detect changes in MALAT1 expression following suppression of UVB-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Fibroblasts irradiated with 60 mJ/cm2 UVB demonstrated increased MALAT1 expression, MMP-1 secretory volume and number of senescent cells, and greater levels of ERK, p38 and JNK phosphorylation. Following silencing of MALAT1 expression in photo-aged fibroblasts, decreases were observed in MMP-1 secretory volume, number of senescent cells and phosphorylation levels of ERK. NAC reduced ROS content, however, it did not affect MALAT1 expression. Therefore, it was concluded that MALAT1 may participate in UVB-induced photo-aging via regulation of the ERK/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and UVB-induced MALAT1 expression is independent of ROS generation. PMID:28487970

  10. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 promotes brain metastasis by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liqin; Chen, Lei; Wang, Yongsheng; Jiang, Xiaochun; Xia, Hongping; Zhuang, Zhixiang

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastasis often has a poor prognosis in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Therefore, it is urgent to identify factors associated with lung cancer brain metastasis. Metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) also known as noncoding nuclear-enriched abundant transcript 2 is a long noncoding RNA, which is highly conserved amongst mammals. It has been shown to be increased in a variety of tumors including NSCLC and regulate the expression of metastasis-associated genes. However, the role of MALAT1 in lung cancer brain metastasis has not been investigated. In this study, we examined the level of MALAT1 in 78 cases of NSCLC samples with 19 brain metastasis and 59 non-brain metastasis by qRT-PCR. We observed that the level of MALAT1 was significantly higher in brain metastasis than that of non brain metastasis samples (P < 0.001). The level of MALAT1 was associated with patients' survival. To investigate the role of MALAT1 in brain metastasis, we established a highly invasive and metastatic cell subline using the brain metastasis lung cancer cell H1915. We found that MALAT1 is increased in highly invasive subline of brain metastasis lung cancer cells. Further functional studies indicate that silencing MALAT1 inhibits highly invasive subline of brain metastasis lung cancer cell migration and metastasis by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Therefore, increased level of long noncoding RNA MALAT1 promotes lung cancer brain metastasis by inducing EMT, which may be a promising prognosis factor and therapeutic target to treat lung cancer brain metastasis in future.

  11. Crystal structure of Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase. A complex of the apoenzyme and citrate at 1.87 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Hall, M D; Levitt, D G; Banaszak, L J

    1992-08-05

    The crystal structure of malate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli has been determined with a resulting R-factor of 0.187 for X-ray data from 8.0 to 1.87 A. Molecular replacement, using the partially refined structure of porcine mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase as a probe, provided initial phases. The structure of this prokaryotic enzyme is closely homologous with the mitochondrial enzyme but somewhat less similar to cytosolic malate dehydrogenase from eukaryotes. However, all three enzymes are dimeric and form the subunit-subunit interface through similar surface regions. A citrate ion, found in the active site, helps define the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis. Two arginine residues, R81 and R153, interacting with the citrate are believed to confer substrate specificity. The hydroxyl of the citrate is hydrogen-bonded to a histidine, H177, and similar interactions could be assigned to a bound malate or oxaloacetate. Histidine 177 is also hydrogen-bonded to an aspartate, D150, to form a classic His.Asp pair. Studies of the active site cavity indicate that the bound citrate would occupy part of the site needed for the coenzyme. In a model building study, the cofactor, NAD, was placed into the coenzyme site which exists when the citrate was converted to malate and crystallographic water molecules removed. This hypothetical model of a ternary complex was energy minimized for comparison with the structure of the binary complex of porcine cytosolic malate dehydrogenase. Many residues involved in cofactor binding in the minimized E. coli malate dehydrogenase structure are homologous to coenzyme binding residues in cytosolic malate dehydrogenase. In the energy minimized structure of the ternary complex, the C-4 atom of NAD is in van der Waals' contact with the C-3 atom of the malate. A catalytic cycle involves hydride transfer between these two atoms.

  12. The role of lncRNA MALAT1 in bone metastasis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meijuan; Sun, Wanli; Liu, Yongquan; Dong, Xiuhong

    2016-09-01

    lncRNA metastasis-associated lung adencarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) plays an important role in the metastasis of lung cancer. Yet, its role in bone metastasis and the related mechanism remain unknown. The present study aimed to investigate the role of lncRNA MALAT1 in the bone metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including the expression pattern in tumor tissues, and the effect on the apoptosis, proliferation, migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. The expression level of MALAT1 in NSCLC tissues with/without bone metastasis and in NSCLC cell lines with (ACC-LC-319/bone2)/without (SPC‑A1) bone metastatic ability was determined with qRT-PCR and compared with t-test. si-MALAT1 was used to downregulate the expression of MALAT1 in ACC-LC-319/bone2 cells. The proliferation ability was assessed by MTT assay, and the apoptosis, migration, invasion and tumorigenesis in vivo were also assessed to detect the effect of MALAT1 expression on NSCLC cells. In conclusion, the present study found that MALAT1 was significantly highly expressed in NSCLC tissues with bone metastasis and in NSCLC cell lines with high bone metastatic ability (P<0.0001). Downregulation of MALAT1 expression significantly inhibited proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in comparing with the negative controls. Our results also revealed that MALAT1 significantly increased the migration, invasion and tumorigenesis in vivo, which suggests its important role in the bone metastasis of NSCLC.

  13. Down-regulation of long non-coding RNA MALAT1 by RNA interference inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Huihan; Wu, Bin; Yao, Kun; Liao, Aijun; Miao, Miao; Li, Yang; Yang, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic plasma-cell disorder characterized by abnormal proliferation of monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), an evolutionarily highly conserved long non-coding RNA was originally identified in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer and has been reported to be up-regulated in many other cancers. However, the function of MALAT1 in MM remains unknown. In the present study, by transfecting MM cells with MALAT1-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression plasmids, the role of MALAT1 in the proliferation and apoptosis of MM cells was investigated in vitro, and the tumorigenicity of MALAT1-silenced cells was evaluated in vivo. MALAT1 was found to be highly expressed in RPMI8226 and U266 cells. Down-regulation of MALAT1 via RNA interference significantly inhibited the proliferation of MM cells through cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. Moreover, knockdown of MALAT1 induced apoptosis, which was closely associated with the activation of caspase-3/-9, down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax. In addition, silencing of MALAT1 by intratumoral injection of MALAT1 shRNA attenuated the tumour growth in mice bearing myeloma xenograft and led to massive apoptosis in the xenograft tumour. Therefore, MALAT1 may serve as a promising target in the genetic therapeutic strategy for MM treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Dysregulation of MALAT1 and miR-619-5p as a prognostic indicator in advanced colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Gu; Zhang, Xiu-Bing; Zhang, Shu-Qing; Liu, Pei-Long; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Jin-Ye; Dai, Shi-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to detect the expression of metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) and microRNA (miR)-619-5p in colorectal carcinoma (CRC), and to evaluate the significance of MALAT1 and miR-619-5p expression in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of CRC. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect MALAT1 and miR-619-5p expression in 120 colorectal carcinoma and 120 adjacent normal tissue samples. The expression levels of MALAT1 and miR-619-5p were significantly different between colorectal carcinoma and adjacent normal tissues (P<0.05). MALAT1 exhibited an average 2.52-fold increase in colorectal adenoma when compared with adjacent normal tissues, while miR-619-5p exhibited an average 5.79-fold decrease in colorectal adenoma when compared with adjacent normal tissues. There was a significant difference between the MALAT1 expression in CRC tissues obtained from men and women (P=0.027), and in tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage II and stage III lesions (P=0.019). MALAT1 expression was associated with lymphovascular invasion (P=0.047) and perineural invasion (P=0.012). In addition, miR-619-5p expression was also significantly different between men and women (P=0.032), and between TNM stage II and stage III lesions (P=0.012). miR-619-5p expression was also associated with lymphovascular invasion (P=0.023) and perineural invasion (P=0.009). Patients with high expression of MALAT1 and low expression of miR-619-5p demonstrated significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.002) and overall survival (OS) times (P=0.004) compared with patients with low MALAT1 expression and high miR-619-5p expression. Patients with perineural invasion demonstrated significantly shorter DFS (P=0.001) and OS times (P=0.003) compared with patients without perineural invasion. In addition, there was a negative correlation between MALAT1 expression and miR-619-5p expression (r=−0.415, P=0.004) in CRC tissues. In conclusion, MALAT1 and mi

  15. Ligand binding on to maize (Zea mays) malate synthase: a structural study.

    PubMed

    Beeckmans, S; Khan, A S; Kanarek, L; Van Driessche, E

    1994-10-15

    A kinetic and ligand binding study on maize (Zea mays) malate synthase is presented. It is concluded from kinetic measurements that the enzyme proceeds through a ternary-complex mechanism. Michaelis constants (Km,glyoxylate and Km,acetyl-CoA) were determined to be 104 microM and 20 microM respectively. C.d. measurements in the near u.v.-region indicate that a conformational change is induced in the enzyme by its substrate, glyoxylate. From these studies we are able to calculate the affinity for the substrate (Kd,glyoxylate) as 100 microM. A number of inhibitors apparently trigger the same conformational change in the enzyme, i.e. pyruvate, glycollate and fluoroacetate. Another series of inhibitors bearing more bulky groups and/or an extra carboxylic acid also induce a conformational change, which is, however, clearly different from the former one. Limited proteolysis with trypsin results in cleavage of malate synthase into two fragments of respectively 45 and 19 kDa. Even when no more intact malate synthase chains are present, the final enzymic activity still amounts to 30% of the original activity. If trypsinolysis is performed in the presence of acetyl-CoA, the cleavage reaction is appreciably slowed down. The dissociation constant for acetyl-CoA (Kd,acetyl-CoA) was calculated to be 14.8 microM when the glyoxylate subsite is fully occupied by pyruvate and 950 microM (= 50 x Km) when the second subsite is empty. It is concluded that malate synthase follows a compulsory-order mechanism, glyoxylate being the first-binding substrate. Glyoxylate triggers a conformational change in the enzyme and, as a consequence, the correctly shaped binding site for acetyl-CoA is created. Demetallization of malate synthase has no effect on the c.d. spectrum in the near u.v.-region. Moreover, glyoxylate induces the same spectral change in the absence of Mg2+ as in its presence. Nevertheless, malate synthase shows no activity in the absence of the cation. We conclude that Mg2+ is

  16. Specificity and direction of depolymerization of beta-poly(L-malate) catalysed by polymalatase from Physarum polycephalum--fluorescence labeling at the carboxy-terminus of beta-poly(L-malate).

    PubMed

    Gasslmaier, B; Holler, E

    1997-12-01

    Beta-poly(L-malate), a major constituent of nuclei in plasmodia of Physarum polycephalum, is enzymatically degraded to L-malate after secretion into the culture medium. This depolymerization is specifically catalysed by an endogenous polymalatase. The mode of action and the specificity criteria have been investigated by employing various chemical derivatives of beta-poly(L-malate), including substitution at the hydroxy-terminus and carboxy-terminus of the polymer, esterification of the pending alpha-carboxylate, and beta-poly(DL-malate). The results of the investigation were summarized in a specificity model that involved recognition of the hydroxy-terminus and of the alpha-carboxylate as substituents of the asymmetric carbon in the malic acid unit. Depolymerization proceeded from the hydroxy-terminus towards the carboxy-terminus, thereby degrading the polymer to L-malate. When the terminal beta-carboxylate had been amidated with the fluorescent N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine, degradation was normal but was arrested at the level of the terminal beta-carboxy-substituted dimer. It should be possible to employ polymalatase as a tool for the detection of branching and other modifications of beta-poly(L-malate).

  17. Role of the divalent metal ion in the NAD:malic enzyme reaction: an ESEEM determination of the ground state conformation of malate in the E:Mn:malate complex.

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, P. A.; Quinn, T. P.; Peisach, J.; Cook, P. F.

    1996-01-01

    The conformation of L-malate bound at the active site of Ascaris suum malic enzyme has been investigated by electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy. Dipolar interactions between Mn2+ bound to the enzyme active site and deuterium specifically placed at the 2-position, the 3R-position, and the 3S-position of L-malate were observed. The intensities of these interactions are related to the distance between each deuterium and Mn2+. Several models of possible Mn-malate complexes were constructed using molecular graphics techniques, and conformational searches were conducted to identify conformers of malate that meet the distance criteria defined by the spectroscopic measurements. These searches suggest that L-malate binds to the enzyme active site in the trans conformation, which would be expected to be the most stable conformer in solution, not in the gauche conformer, which would be more similar to the conformation required for oxidative decarboxylation of oxalacetate formed from L-malate at the active site of the enzyme. PMID:8844853

  18. Calcium and Malate Are Sporulation-Promoting Factors of Physarum polycephalum

    PubMed Central

    Renzel, Stefan; Esselborn, Sigrid; Sauer, Helmut W.; Hildebrandt, Armin

    2000-01-01

    Fruiting body formation (sporulation) is a distinctive, irreversible differentiation process in the life cycle of the slime mold Physarum polycephalum. The most important requirement for sporulation of Physarum is a period of starvation, and normally sporulation proceeds in the light. It is shown here that by omitting the liquid sporulation medium and elevating the temperature from 21 to 25°C, sporulation can occur routinely in the dark. It is further shown that this autocrine signaling in the dark requires calcium ions and malate. A putative sporulation control factor was detected in conditioned media derived from plasmodia starved in the dark, which was then identified as polymalate. As an additional role for this previously detected polyanion, specific for the plasmodial state of Physarum, it is suggested that the secreted compound serves as a source for both malate and calcium ions and thus promotes sporulation without light signaling. PMID:11092848

  19. The varied functions of aluminium-activated malate transporters-much more than aluminium resistance.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Antony J; Baker, Alison; Muench, Stephen P

    2016-06-15

    The ALMT (aluminium-activated malate transporter) family comprises a functionally diverse but structurally similar group of ion channels. They are found ubiquitously in plant species, expressed throughout different tissues, and located in either the plasma membrane or tonoplast. The first family member identified was TaALMT1, discovered in wheat root tips, which was found to be involved in aluminium resistance by means of malate exudation into the soil. However, since this discovery other family members have been shown to have many other functions such as roles in stomatal opening, general anionic homoeostasis, and in economically valuable traits such as fruit flavour. Recent evidence has also shown that ALMT proteins can act as key molecular actors in GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) signalling, the first evidence that GABA can act as a signal transducer in plants. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  20. The varied functions of aluminium-activated malate transporters–much more than aluminium resistance

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Antony J.; Baker, Alison; Muench, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    The ALMT (aluminium-activated malate transporter) family comprises a functionally diverse but structurally similar group of ion channels. They are found ubiquitously in plant species, expressed throughout different tissues, and located in either the plasma membrane or tonoplast. The first family member identified was TaALMT1, discovered in wheat root tips, which was found to be involved in aluminium resistance by means of malate exudation into the soil. However, since this discovery other family members have been shown to have many other functions such as roles in stomatal opening, general anionic homoeostasis, and in economically valuable traits such as fruit flavour. Recent evidence has also shown that ALMT proteins can act as key molecular actors in GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) signalling, the first evidence that GABA can act as a signal transducer in plants. PMID:27284052

  1. Primary structure and phylogenetic relationships of a malate dehydrogenase gene from Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Roger, A J; Morrison, H G; Sogin, M L

    1999-06-01

    The lactate and malate dehydrogenases comprise a complex protein superfamily with multiple enzyme homologues found in eubacteria, archaebacteria, and eukaryotes. In this study we describe the sequence and phylogenetic relationships of a malate dehydrogenase (MDH) gene from the amitochondriate diplomonad protist, Giardia lamblia. Parsimony, distance, and maximum-likelihood analyses of the MDH protein family solidly position G. lamblia MDH within a eukaryote cytosolic MDH clade, to the exclusion of chloroplast, mitochondrial, and peroxisomal homologues. Furthermore, G. lamblia MDH is specifically related to a homologue from Trichomonas vaginalis. This MDH topology, together with published phylogenetic analyses of beta-tubulin, chaperonin 60, valyl-tRNA synthetase, and EF-1alpha, suggests a sister-group relationship between diplomonads and parabasalids. Since these amitochondriate lineages contain genes encoding proteins which are characteristic of mitochondria and alpha-proteobacteria, their shared ancestry suggests that mitochondrial properties were lost in the common ancestor of both groups.

  2. Tumor-suppressive function of long noncoding RNA MALAT1 in glioma cells by suppressing miR-155 expression and activating FBXW7 function

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shuanzhu; Wang, Yanzhou; Li, Jinquan; Lv, Mingliang; Niu, Haitao; Tian, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The human metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a long non-coding RNA associated with metastasis, and is a favorable prognostic factor for lung cancer. Recent studies have shown that MALAT1 plays an important role in many malignancies. However, little is known about the role of MALAT1 in glioma. In this study, we determined the expression of MALAT1 and explored its prognostic value in glioma. Further, we investigated the regulatory mechanism of MALAT1 in glioma progression. Our results showed that the expression of MALAT1 was significantly decreased in glioma specimens than in noncancerous brain tissues. In addition, MALAT1 expression was significantly correlated with tumor size, WHO grade and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), and was an independent prognostic factor for survival of glioma patients. The gain- and loss-of-function experiments revealed miR-155 down-regulation by MALAT1, resulting in reciprocal effects. Further, MALAT1 suppresses cell viability by down-regulating miR-155. FBXW7 mRNA was identified as a direct target of miR-155 in glioma. The miR-155-induced tumorigenesis is mediated through FBXW7 function. Finally, we found that MALAT1 positively regulated FBXW7 expression, which was responsible for glioma progression mediated by MALAT1-miR-155 pathway. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that MALAT1 may be a novel prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target in glioma. Restoration of MALAT1 levels represents a novel therapeutic strategy against glioma. PMID:27904771

  3. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 promotes oral squamous cell carcinoma development via microRNA-125b/STAT3 axis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shi-Min; Hu, Wei-Wei

    2017-09-19

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), as the most common type of oral cancer, is responsible for almost 3% of all malignant tumors worldwide. Non-coding RNAs such as lncRNAs and microRNAs have been involved in many cancers including OSCC. Recently, lncRNA metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript-1 (MALAT1) has been reported to play an oncogenic role in OSCC metastasis. However, the underlying mechanism of MALAT1 in regulating OSCC progression remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the specific role of MALAT1 in OSCC development. It was observed that MALAT1 was upregulated in OSCC cell lines. Inhibition of MALAT1 can prevent OSCC proliferation while overexpressing MALAT1 promoted OSCC progression. In addition, bioinformatics search was used to identify that miR-125b was a direct target of MALAT1, which indicated a negative correlation between MALAT1 and miR-125b. Besides these, STAT3 was predicted as a binding target of miR-125b in OSCC. Overexpression of MALAT1 was able to suppress the tumor inhibitory effect of miR-125b mimics via upregulating STAT3. Moreover, the function of MALAT1 in OSCC development was further investigated by using in vivo assays. The established nude mice models revealed that downregulated MALAT1 greatly inhibited OSCC tumor growth and reversely upregualated MALAT1 promoted OSCC development via miR-125b/STAT3 axis respectively. In conclusion, MALAT1 can function as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) to modulate STAT3 expression by absorbing miR-125b in OSCC and could be used as a novel therapeutic target in OSCC diagnosis and treatment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 promotes gastric cancer tumorigenicity and metastasis by regulating vasculogenic mimicry and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Wu, Zhenzhen; Yuan, Jia; Sun, Li; Lin, Li; Huang, Na; Bin, Jianping; Liao, Yulin; Liao, Wangjun

    2017-06-01

    MALAT1 is an oncogenic long non-coding RNA that has been found to promote the proliferation of many malignant cell types and non-malignant human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). However, the functions of MALAT1 in vasculogenic mimicry (VM) and angiogenesis and the potential mechanisms responsible have not yet been investigated in any malignancy. Here, in situ hybridization and CD31/periodic acid-Schiff double staining of 150 gastric cancer (GC) clinical specimens revealed that MALAT1 expression was tightly associated with densities of VM and endothelial vessels. MALAT1 knockdown markedly reduced GC cell migration, invasion, tumorigenicity, metastasis, and VM, while restricting HUVEC angiogenesis and increasing vascular permeability. Moreover, MALAT1 was found to regulate expression of VE-cadherin, β-catenin, MMPs 2 and 9, MT1-MMP, p-ERK, p-FAK, and p-paxillin, which have been established as classical markers of VM and angiogenesis and components of associated signaling pathways. Consistent with this, the p-ERK inhibitors U0126 and PD98059 both effectively blocked GC cell VM. In conclusion, MALAT1 can promote tumorigenicity and metastasis in GC by facilitating VM and angiogenesis via the VE-cadherin/β-catenin complex and ERK/MMP and FAK/paxillin signaling pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. HULC cooperates with MALAT1 to aggravate liver cancer stem cells growth through telomere repeat-binding factor 2

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mengying; Lin, Zhuojia; Li, Xiaonan; Xin, Xiaoru; An, Jiahui; Zheng, Qidi; Yang, Yuxin; Lu, Dongdong

    2016-01-01

    The dysregulation of lncRNAs has increasingly been linked to many human diseases, especially in cancers. Our results demonstrate HULC, MALAT1 and TRF2 are highly expressed in human hepatocellular carcinoma tissues, and HULC plus MALAT1 overexpression drastically promotes the growth of liver cancer stem cells. Mechanistically, both HULC and MALAT1 overexpression enhanced RNA polII, P300, CREPT to load on the promoter region of telomere repeat-binding factor 2(TRF2), triggering the overexpression, phosphorylation and SUMOylation of TRF2. Strikingly, the excessive TRF2 interacts with HULC or MALAT1 to form the complex that loads on the telomeric region, replacing the CST/AAF and recruiting POT1, pPOT1, ExoI, SNM1B, HP1 α. Accordingly, the telomere is greatly protected and enlonged. Furthermore, the excessive HULC plus MALAT1 reduced the methylation of the TERC promoter dependent on TRF2, increasing the TERC expression that causes the increase of interplay between TRET and TERC. Ultimately, the interaction between RFC and PCNA or between CDK2 and CyclinE, the telomerase activity and the microsatellite instability (MSI) are significantly increased in the liver cancer stem cells. Our demonstrations suggest that haploinsufficiency of HULC/MALAT1 plays an important role in malignant growth of liver cancer stem cell. PMID:27782152

  6. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 as a putative biomarker of lymph node metastasis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Hui; Chen, Qing-Jie; Chen, Bang-Dang; Yang, Yi-Ning; Ma, Yi-Tong; Li, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Fen; Yu, Zi-Xiang; Xiang, Yang; Liao, Wu; Lai, Hong-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies in cancer have demonstrated that cancerous tissues have a significantly higher MALAT1 level than in noncancerous tissues. Overexpression of MALAT1 is associated with susceptibility to lymph node metastasis. This meta-analysis collected all relevant articles and explored the association of MALAT1 expression levels with lymph node metastasis in patients with carcinoma. Literature collections were conducted by searching electronic databases PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science (up to January 20, 2015). The odds ratio (OR) and its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated to assess the strength of the association by using RevMan5.1 software. A total of 573 patients from 5 studies were included in this meta-analysis. The results showed lymph node metastasis occurred more frequently in patients with high MALAT1 expression group than in patients with low MALAT1 expression group (OR = 2.64, 95% CI 1.06-6.56, P = 0.04 random-effects model). This meta-analysis demonstrated that overexpression of MALAT1 is significantly associated with lymph node metastasis in carcinoma patients.

  7. Observation of cytoplasmic and vacuolar malate in maize root tips by sup 13 C-NMR spectroscopy. [Zea mays L

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, K.; Roberts, J.K.M. )

    1989-01-01

    The accumulation of malate by maize (Zea mays L.) root tips perfused with KH{sup 13}CO{sub 3} was followed by {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectra contained distinct signals from two pools of malate in maize root tips, one at a pH {approximately}5.3 (assigned to the vacuole) and one at a pH > 6.5 (assigned to the cytoplasm). The ratio of cytoplasmic to vacuolar malate was lower in 12 millimeter long root tips than in 2 millimeter root tips. The relatively broad width of the signals from C1- and C4-labeled vacuolar malate indicated heterogeneity in vacuolar pH. During the 3 hour KH{sup 13}CO{sub 3} treatment, {sup 13}C-malate accumulated first primarily in the cytoplasm, increasing to a fairly constant level of {approximately}6 millimolar by 1 hour. After a lag, vacuolar malate increased throughout the experiment.

  8. Hydrocortisone and triiodothyronine regulation of malate-aspartate shuttle enzymes during postnatal development of chicken.

    PubMed

    Lyngdoh, H G; Sharma, R

    2001-06-01

    The normal endogenous level of malate-aspartate shuttle enzymes and its regulation by hydrocortisone and triiodothyronine were studied in the liver and kidney of 0-, 30- and 60-day old male Rhode Island Red (RIR) chicken. The endogenous activity of cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (c-MDH) was significantly higher in the liver of day 30 as compared to day 0 and 60. In contrast, mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (m-MDH) activity decreased at day 60 in the liver. However, both c- and m-MDH had significantly lower activities at day 0, which increased sharply at day 30 and 60 in the kidney. On the other hand, activity of both cytosolic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase (c- and m-AsAT) showed peak value at day 30 in both liver and kidney. Hydrocortisone administration induced c-MDH in the liver at all the ages studied, but did not influence the activity of the isoenzymes in the kidney whereas, it induced m-MDH in the liver at day 0 and in kidney at day 30. Administration of hydrocortisone, however, did not influence AsAT isoenzymes (c- and m-AsAT) in either of the tissues at any of the postnatal ages. Triiodothyronine induced c-MDH in the liver at all the ages whereas kidney isoenzyme was induced only at day 60. In contrast, m-MDH was induced by triiodothyronine in both liver and kidney at day 30 and 60. Administration of triiodothyronine did not influence c-AsAT of liver and kidney at either of the ages, whereas it induced m-AsAT of only liver at day 0 and 60. These findings indicated a tissue- and age-specific expression of the malate-aspartate shuttle enzymes in chicken and difference in the regulation exerted by hydrocortisone and triiodothyronine during postnatal development of chicken.

  9. Purification and Properties of Cytoplasmic and Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenases of Physarum polycephalum

    PubMed Central

    Teague, W. Martin; Henney, Henry R.

    1973-01-01

    Two isoenzymes of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were demonstrated in plasmodia of Physarum polycephalum by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The more “cathodal” form was uniquely associated with mitochondria (M-MDH) and the other form was found in the soluble cytoplasm (S-MDH). The isoenzymes were separated by acetone fractionation of soluble plasmodial homogenates acidified to pH 5.0. The M-MDH was purified 201-fold by cetylpyridinium chloride treatment, fractionation with ammonium sulfate, gradient elution from sulfoethyl cellulose at pH 6.0, and Sephadex G-100 chromatography. The S-MDH was purified 155-fold by ammonium sulfate fractionation, diethylaminoethyl cellulose chromatography, gradient elution from sulfoethyl cellulose at pH 5.5, and Sephadex G-100 chromatography. The optimal cis-oxalacetate concentrations were 0.35 mM for M-MDH and 0.25 mM for S-MDH, and the optimal pH for both isoenzymes was 7.6 for oxalacetate reduction. The optimal l-malate concentrations were 5 mM for S-MDH and 6 mM for M-MDH, and both isoenzymes exhibited an optimal pH of 10.0 for L-malate oxidation. The Michaelis constants of S-MDH and M-MDH served to discriminate between the isoenzymes. The S-MDH was more heat-stable than the M-MDH. High concentrations of oxalacetate and malate inhibited S-MDH more than M-MDH. The isoenzymes were further distinguished by their utilization of analogues of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. Many properties of the Physarum isoenzymes were similar to those of more complex organisms, especially vertebrates. Images PMID:4355490

  10. Organelle-Bound Malate Dehydrogenase Isoenzymes Are Synthesized as Higher Molecular Weight Precursors 1

    PubMed Central

    Gietl, Christine; Hock, Bertold

    1982-01-01

    Biosynthesis of malate dehydrogenase isoenzymes was studied in cotyledons of watermelons (Citrullus vulgaris Schrad., var. Stone Mountain). The glyoxysomal and mitochondrial isoenzymes are synthesized as higher molecular weight precursors which can be immunoprecipitated by mono-specific antibodies from the products of in vitro translation in reticulocyte lysates programed with cotyledonary mRNA and with the same size from enzyme extracts of pulse-labeled cotyledons. During translocation from the cytosol into the organelles, processing takes place. An 8 kilodalton extra sequence is cleaved from the glyoxysomal precursor and a 3.3 kilodalton extra sequence from the mitochondrial precursor producing the native subunits of 33 and 38 kilodaltons, respectively. The data support a post-translational translocation of the organelle-destined malate dehydrogenase isoenzymes. The in vitro translation of the cytosolic malate dehydrogenase I yields a product which has the same molecular weight as the subunit of the native isoenzyme (39.5 kilodaltons). Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:16662520

  11. Another unusual type of citric acid cycle enzyme in Helicobacter pylori: the malate:quinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Kather, B; Stingl, K; van der Rest, M E; Altendorf, K; Molenaar, D

    2000-06-01

    The only enzyme of the citric acid cycle for which no open reading frame (ORF) was found in the Helicobacter pylori genome is the NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase. Here, it is shown that in this organism the oxidation of malate to oxaloacetate is catalyzed by a malate:quinone oxidoreductase (MQO). This flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent membrane-associated enzyme donates electrons to quinones of the electron transfer chain. Similar to succinate dehydrogenase, it is part of both the electron transfer chain and the citric acid cycle. MQO activity was demonstrated in isolated membranes of H. pylori. The enzyme is encoded by the ORF HP0086, which is shown by the fact that expression of the HP0086 sequence from a plasmid induces high MQO activity in mqo deletion mutants of Escherichia coli or Corynebacterium glutamicum. Furthermore, this plasmid was able to complement the phenotype of the C. glutamicum mqo deletion mutant. Interestingly, the protein predicted to be encoded by this ORF is only distantly related to known or postulated MQO sequences from other bacteria. The presence of an MQO shown here and the previously demonstrated presence of a 2-ketoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and a succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetoacetyl-CoA transferase indicate that H. pylori possesses a complete citric acid cycle, but one which deviates from the standard textbook example in three steps.

  12. Magnitude of malate-aspartate reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide shuttle activity in intact respiring tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Greenhouse, W V; Lehninger, A L

    1977-11-01

    Measurements of respiration, CO2 and lactate production, and changes in the levels of various key metabolites of the glycolytic sequence and tricarboxylic acid cycle were made on five lines of rodent ascites tumor cells (two strains of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, Krebs II carcinoma, AS-30D carcinoma, and L1210 cells) incubated aerobically in the presence of uniformly labeled D-[14C]glucose. From these data, as well as earlier evidence demonstrating that the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) shuttle in these cells requires a transaminase step and is thus identified as the malate-aspartate shuttle (W.V.V. Greenhouse and A.L. Lehninger, Cancer Res., 36: 1392-1396, 1976), metabolic flux diagrams were constructed for the five cell lines. These diagrams show the relative rates of glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, electron transport, and the malate-aspartate shuttle in these tumors. Large amounts of cytosolic NADH were oxidized by the mitochondrial respiratory chain via the NADH shuttle, comprising anywhere from about 20 to 80% of the total flow of reducing equivalents to oxygen in these tumors. Calculations of the sources of energy for adenosine triphosphate synthesis indicated that on the average about one-third of the respiratory adenosine triphosphate is generated by electron flow originating from cytosolic NADH via the malate-aspartate shuttle.

  13. The long noncoding RNAs NEAT1 and MALAT1 bind active chromatin sites

    PubMed Central

    West, Jason A.; Davis, Christopher P.; Sunwoo, Hongjae; Simon, Matthew D.; Sadreyev, Ruslan I.; Wang, Peggy I.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Kingston, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mechanistic roles for many lncRNAs are poorly understood in part because their direct interactions with genomic loci and proteins are difficult to assess. Using a method to purify endogenous RNAs and their associated factors, we mapped the genomic binding sites for two highly expressed human lncRNAs, NEAT1 and MALAT1. We show that NEAT1 and MALAT1 localize to hundreds of genomic sites in human cells, primarily over active genes. NEAT1 and MALAT1 exhibit colocalization to many of these loci, but display distinct gene body binding patterns at these sites, suggesting independent but complementary functions for these RNAs. We also identified numerous proteins enriched by both lncRNAs, supporting complementary binding and function, in addition to unique associated proteins. Transcriptional inhibition or stimulation alters localization of NEAT1 on active chromatin sites, implying that underlying DNA sequence does not target NEAT1 to chromatin and that localization responds to cues involved in the transcription process. PMID:25155612

  14. Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase regulates RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis via AMPK/c-Fos/NFATc1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Se Jeong; Gu, Dong Ryun; Jin, Su Hyun; Park, Keun Ha; Lee, Seoung Hoon

    2016-06-17

    Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (malate dehydrogenase 1, MDH1) plays pivotal roles in the malate/aspartate shuttle that might modulate metabolism between the cytosol and mitochondria. In this study, we investigated the role of MDH1 in osteoclast differentiation and formation. MDH1 expression was induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) treatment. Knockdown of MDH1 by infection with retrovirus containing MDH1-specific shRNA (shMDH1) reduced mature osteoclast formation and bone resorption activity. Moreover, the expression of marker genes associated with osteoclast differentiation was downregulated by shMDH1 treatment, suggesting a role of MDH1 in osteoclast differentiation. In addition, intracellular ATP production was reduced following the activation of adenosine 5′ monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a cellular energy sensor and negative regulator of RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, in shMDH1-infected osteoclasts compared to control cells. In addition, the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), a critical transcription factor of osteoclastogenesis, was decreased with MDH1 knockdown during RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation. These findings provide strong evidence that MDH1 plays a critical role in osteoclast differentiation and function via modulation of the intracellular energy status, which might affect AMPK activity and NFATc1 expression.

  15. Pcal_1699, an extremely thermostable malate dehydrogenase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Ghazaleh; Rashid, Naeem; Bashir, Qamar; Gardner, Qura-Tul Ann Afza; Akhtar, Muhammad; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2016-01-01

    Two malate dehydrogenase homologs, Pcal_0564 and Pcal_1699, have been found in the genome of Pyrobaculum calidifontis. The gene encoding Pcal_1699 consisted of 927 nucleotides corresponding to a polypeptide of 309 amino acids. To examine the properties of Pcal_1699, the structural gene was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified gene product was characterized. Pcal_1699 was NADH specific enzyme exhibiting a high malate dehydrogenase activity (886 U/mg) at optimal pH (10) and temperature (90 °C). Unfolding studies suggested that urea could not induce complete unfolding and inactivation of Pcal_1699 even at a final concentration of 8 M; however, in the presence of 4 M guanidine hydrochloride enzyme structure was unfolded with complete loss of enzyme activity. Thermostability experiments revealed that Pcal_1699 is the most thermostable malate dehydrogenase, reported to date, retaining more than 90 % residual activity even after heating for 6 h in boiling water.

  16. Final report on the safety assessment of Malic Acid and Sodium Malate.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Z

    2001-01-01

    Malic Acid functions in cosmetic formulations as a pH adjuster, and Sodium Malate functions as a skin conditioning agent-humectant. Malic Acid is reportedly used in almost 50 cosmetic formulations across a range of product types at low concentrations, whereas Sodium Malate is used in only one. As a pH adjuster, Malic Acid is used at low concentrations. One commercial method of preparing Malic Acid is hydration of fumaric acid or maleic acid, and then purified to limit the amount of the starting material present. Because Malic Acid is a component of the Kreb's cycle, another method is fermentation. Malic Acid was relatively nontoxic in acute toxicity studies using animals. In a chronic oral study, feeding Malic Acid to rats resulted only in weight gain changes and changes in feed consumption. Malic Acid did not cause reproductive toxicity in mice, rats, or rabbits. Malic Acid was a moderate to strong skin irritatant in animal tests, and was a strong ocular irritant. Malic Acid was not mutagenic across a range of genotoxicity tests. Malic Acid was irritating in clinical tests, with less irritation seen as pH of the applied material increased. Patients patch tested with Malic Acid, placed on a diet that avoided foods containing Malic or citric acid, and then challenged with a diet high in Malic and citric acid had both immediate urticarial and delayed contact dermatitis reactions. These data were considered sufficient to determine that Malic Acid and Sodium Malate would be safe at the low concentrations at which these ingredients would be used to adjust pH (even though Sodium Malate is not currently used for that purpose). The data, however, were insufficient to determine the safety of these ingredients when used in cosmetics as other than pH adjusters and specifically, the data are insufficient to determine the safety of Sodium Malate when used as a skin conditioning agent-humectant. The types of data required for the Expert Panel to determine the safety of Sodium

  17. MALAT1 promotes osteosarcoma development by regulation of HMGB1 via miR-142-3p and miR-129-5p.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Huang, Jun; Ni, Jiangdong; Song, Deye; Ding, Muliang; Wang, Junjie; Huang, Xianzhe; Li, Wenzhao

    2017-03-19

    Recently, emerging evidence has demonstrated that metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), a long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), contributes to the initiation and development of tumors, including osteosarcoma (OS). Multiple studies have suggested an oncogenic role of MALAT1 and high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) in OS tumorigenesis and metastasis, but the effects and mechanisms are not unanimous. Here, we showed that MALAT1 and HMGB1 were significantly increased in human OS cell lines and knockdown of MALAT1 reduced HMGB1 expression. By using online tools, we screen out 2 candidate miRNAs, miR-142-3p and miR-129-5p which may be associated with both MALAT1 and HMGB1. Luciferase reporter assay revealed a direct interaction between the 2 miRNAs and MALAT1, respectively, via a putative binding site within MALAT1. Meanwhile, both the 2 miRNAs could bind to HMGB1 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) and regulate HMGB1 expression. Moreover, knockdown of MALAT1 decreased HMGB1 expression, inhibited OS cell growth and promoted apoptosis, while miR-142-3p and miR-129-5p inhibitor partly restored the inhibitory effect of MALAT1 knockdown on HMGB1 expression, OS cell growth and the promotion of apoptosis. In OS tissues, the expression of MALAT1 and HMGB1 was upregulated while the expression of miR-142-3p and miR-129-5p was downregulated. Together, our results support a MALAT1/miR-142-3p/miR-129-5p/HMGB1 axis in OS cell proliferation and tumor progression. MALAT1 promoted OS cell growth through inhibition of miR-142-3p or miR-129-5p and by targeting HMGB1.

  18. Malate-Mediated Carbon Catabolite Repression in Bacillus subtilis Involves the HPrK/CcpA Pathway ▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Frederik M.; Jules, Matthieu; Mehne, Felix M. P.; Le Coq, Dominique; Landmann, Jens J.; Görke, Boris; Aymerich, Stéphane; Stülke, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Most organisms can choose their preferred carbon source from a mixture of nutrients. This process is called carbon catabolite repression. The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis uses glucose as the preferred source of carbon and energy. Glucose-mediated catabolite repression is caused by binding of the CcpA transcription factor to the promoter regions of catabolic operons. CcpA binds DNA upon interaction with its cofactors HPr(Ser-P) and Crh(Ser-P). The formation of the cofactors is catalyzed by the metabolite-activated HPr kinase/phosphorylase. Recently, it has been shown that malate is a second preferred carbon source for B. subtilis that also causes catabolite repression. In this work, we addressed the mechanism by which malate causes catabolite repression. Genetic analyses revealed that malate-dependent catabolite repression requires CcpA and its cofactors. Moreover, we demonstrate that HPr(Ser-P) is present in malate-grown cells and that CcpA and HPr interact in vivo in the presence of glucose or malate but not in the absence of a repressing carbon source. The formation of the cofactor HPr(Ser-P) could be attributed to the concentrations of ATP and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in cells growing with malate. Both metabolites are available at concentrations that are sufficient to stimulate HPr kinase activity. The adaptation of cells to environmental changes requires dynamic metabolic and regulatory adjustments. The repression strength of target promoters was similar to that observed in steady-state growth conditions, although it took somewhat longer to reach the second steady-state of expression when cells were shifted to malate. PMID:22001508

  19. Quercetin promotes the apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes in rheumatoid arthritis by upregulating lncRNA MALAT1.

    PubMed

    Pan, Fang; Zhu, Lihua; Lv, Haozhe; Pei, Chunpeng

    2016-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune joint disease and fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are the resident mesenchymal cells of synovial joints. Quercetin is a dietary antioxidant. In this study, we aimed to explore the mechanisms responsible for the quercetin-induced apoptosis of FLS from patients with RA (termed RAFLS). RAFLS viability was determined following treatent of the cells with or without quercetin using the Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The apoptosis of the RAFLS was analyzed using the Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) apoptosis detection kit I. The results revealed that RAFLS viability decreased and apoptosis increased in following treatment with quercetin. The differentially expressed long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were screened and marked by PCR array following treatment with quercetin. The expression levels of the screened lncRNAs were then determined and compared in the cells treated with or without quercetin by quantitative PCR. The lncRNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) was finally selected. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was then used to knock down the expression of MALAT1 in order to determine the role of MALAT1 in the quercetin-induced apoptosis of RAFLS. The results revealed that the knockdown of MALAT1 inhibited RAFLS apoptosis. At the same time, the expression of caspase-3 and caspase-9 was significantly decreased in the cells in which MALAT1 was knocked down. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling pathway was activated; this activation is known to be associated with enhanced cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis. The findings of our study indicate that quercetin promotes RAFLS apoptosis by upregulating lncRNA MALAT1, and that MALAT1 induces apoptosis by inhibiting the activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway.

  20. Identification of Pseudomonas fluorescens Chemotaxis Sensory Proteins for Malate, Succinate, and Fumarate, and Their Involvement in Root Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Oku, Shota; Komatsu, Ayaka; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 exhibited chemotactic responses to l-malate, succinate, and fumarate. We constructed a plasmid library of 37 methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP) genes of P. fluorescens Pf0-1. To identify a MCP for l-malate, the plasmid library was screened using the PA2652 mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, a mutant defective in chemotaxis to l-malate. The introduction of Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 genes restored the ability of the PA2652 mutant to respond to l-malate. The Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 double mutant of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 showed no response to l-malate or succinate, while the Pfl01_0728 single mutant did not respond to fumarate. These results indicated that Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 were the major MCPs for l-malate and succinate, and Pfl01_0728 was also a major MCP for fumarate. The Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 double mutant unexpectedly exhibited stronger responses toward the tomato root exudate and amino acids such as proline, asparagine, methionine, and phenylalanine than those of the wild-type strain. The ctaA, ctaB, ctaC (genes of the major MCPs for amino acids), Pfl01_0728, and Pfl01_3768 quintuple mutant of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 was less competitive than the ctaA ctaB ctaC triple mutant in competitive root colonization, suggesting that chemotaxis to l-malate, succinate, and/or fumarate was involved in tomato root colonization by P. fluorescens Pf0-1. PMID:25491753

  1. Identification of Pseudomonas fluorescens chemotaxis sensory proteins for malate, succinate, and fumarate, and their involvement in root colonization.

    PubMed

    Oku, Shota; Komatsu, Ayaka; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 exhibited chemotactic responses to l-malate, succinate, and fumarate. We constructed a plasmid library of 37 methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP) genes of P. fluorescens Pf0-1. To identify a MCP for l-malate, the plasmid library was screened using the PA2652 mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, a mutant defective in chemotaxis to l-malate. The introduction of Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 genes restored the ability of the PA2652 mutant to respond to l-malate. The Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 double mutant of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 showed no response to l-malate or succinate, while the Pfl01_0728 single mutant did not respond to fumarate. These results indicated that Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 were the major MCPs for l-malate and succinate, and Pfl01_0728 was also a major MCP for fumarate. The Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 double mutant unexpectedly exhibited stronger responses toward the tomato root exudate and amino acids such as proline, asparagine, methionine, and phenylalanine than those of the wild-type strain. The ctaA, ctaB, ctaC (genes of the major MCPs for amino acids), Pfl01_0728, and Pfl01_3768 quintuple mutant of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 was less competitive than the ctaA ctaB ctaC triple mutant in competitive root colonization, suggesting that chemotaxis to l-malate, succinate, and/or fumarate was involved in tomato root colonization by P. fluorescens Pf0-1.

  2. Hydrogen-rich water alleviates aluminum-induced inhibition of root elongation in alfalfa via decreasing nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng; Cui, Weiti; Zhu, Kaikai; Xie, Yanjie; Zhang, Chunhua; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-02-28

    One of the earliest and distinct symptoms of aluminum (Al) toxicity is the inhibition of root elongation. Although hydrogen gas (H2) is recently described as an important bio-regulator in plants, whether and how H2 regulates Al-induced inhibition of root elongation is largely unknown. To address these gaps, hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to investigate a physiological role of H2 and its possible molecular mechanism. Individual or simultaneous (in particular) exposure of alfalfa seedlings to Al, or a fresh but not old nitric oxide (NO)-releasing compound sodium nitroprusside (SNP), not only increased NO production, but also led to a significant inhibition of root elongation. Above responses were differentially alleviated by pretreatment with 50% saturation of HRW. The addition of HRW also alleviated the appearance of Al toxicity symptoms, including the improvement of seedling growth and less accumulation of Al. Subsequent results revealed that the removal of NO by the NO scavenger, similar to HRW, could decrease NO production and alleviate Al- or SNP-induced inhibition of root growth. Thus, we proposed that HRW alleviated Al-induced inhibition of alfalfa root elongation by decreasing NO production. Such findings may be applicable to enhance crop yield and improve stress tolerance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of the Reproductive Toxicity, Glycometabolism, Glycometabolism-Related Enzyme Levels and Lipid Metabolism of Chromium Malate Supplementation in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Weiwei; Zhang, Weijie; Zhao, Ting; Mao, Guanghua; Wang, Wei; Wu, Xueshan; Zhou, Zhaoxiang; Huang, Jing; Bao, Yongtuan; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2015-11-01

    Our previous study showed that chromium malate improved the regulation of blood glucose in mice with alloxan-induced diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the reproductive toxicity of chromium malate in Sprague-Dawley rats and then inspected the effect of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes, and lipid metabolism. The results showed that no pathological, toxic feces and urine changes were observed in clinical signs of parental and fetal rats in chromium malate groups. The fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, insulin resistance index, C-peptide, hepatic glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucokinase, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels of chromium malate groups have no significant change compared with control group and chromium picolinate group. The serum and organ contents of Cr in chromium malate groups have no significant change when compared with control group. No measurable damage on liver, brain, kidney, and testis/uterus of chromium malate groups was found. No significant change in body mass, absolute and relative organ weights, and hematological and biochemical changes of rats were observed compared with the control and chromium picolinate groups. The results indicated that supplements with chromium malate does not cause obvious damage and has no obvious effect on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzyme, and lipid metabolism on female and male rats. The results of this study suggested that chromium malate is safe for human consumption and has the potential for application as a functional food ingredient and dietary supplement.

  4. Upregulation of long non-coding RNA MALAT-1 confers poor prognosis and influences cell proliferation and apoptosis in acute monocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin-Long; Liu, Wei; Tian, Li-Hong; Chai, Ting-Ting; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Feng; Fu, Hai-Ying; Zhou, Hua-Rong; Shen, Jian-Zhen

    2017-09-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1), a long non-coding RNA, has been documented to be a new prognostic marker and gene regulator in several types of cancer, but its potential involvement in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains unclear. This study investigated the expression and functional role of MALAT-1 in AML. MALAT-1 expression was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. After lentiviral-mediated MALAT-1 knockdown, the proliferation of AML cells was determined by CCK-8 and colony formation assays. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry and the expression of caspase-3, -8 and -9 was assessed by western blot analysis. We found that MALAT-1 expression in patients with acute monocytic leukemia (M5) was significantly increased when compared with that of healthy controls, and the overall survival of M5 patients with high MALAT-1 expression was markedly reduced when compared with the overall survival of patients with low MALAT-1 expression. The analysis of cellular experiments showed that MALAT-1 silencing decreased the proliferation of M5 cells (U-937 and THP-1), inhibited cell cycle progression and increased apoptosis. Taken together, these findings suggest that high MALAT-1 expression is closely associated with poor prognosis in M5 patients and may play a role in leukemia cell proliferation and apoptosis, and may serve as a promising theranostic marker.

  5. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 interacts with miR-124 and modulates tongue cancer growth by targeting JAG1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong-Han; Liang, Li-Zhong; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Wu, Ji-Nan; Su, Kui; Chen, Jue-Yao; Zheng, Qiao-Yi; Huang, Hong-Zhang; Liao, Gui-Qing

    2017-04-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), was the earliest discovered to be correlated with cancer and contributes to the initiation and development of several types of tumors. Dysregulation of MALAT1 expression is frequently observed in many types of cancer such as gastric cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and glioma. To date, the role of MALAT1 and the underlying mechanisms in tongue cancer development remain unclear. In the present study, we studied the influence of MALAT1 on tongue cancer cell lines and clinical tongue cancer samples so as to detect its function and the underlying mechanism. In the present study, lncRNA-MALAT1 was specifically upregulated in tongue cancer cell lines and overexpression promoted tongue cancer cell growth by targeting miR-124. Knockdown of MALAT1 suppressed the growth and invasion of human tongue cancer cells and inhibited metastasis in vitro and in vivo. In addition, miR-124-dependent jagged1 (JAG1) regulation was required for MALAT1-induced tongue cancer cell growth. Our data revealed that MALAT1 inhibited tongue cancer cell growth and metastasis through miR-124-dependent JAG1 regulation. In conclusion, we revealed that MALAT1 may play an oncogenic role by increasing proliferation and metastasis of tongue cancer and is a potential therapeutic target in human tongue cancer.

  6. Long Non Coding RNA MALAT1 Promotes Tumor Growth and Metastasis by inducing Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Liu, Su; Cai, Guoshuai; Kong, Lingping; Zhang, Tingting; Ren, Yu; Wu, Yansheng; Mei, Mei; Zhang, Lun; Wang, Xudong

    2015-11-02

    The prognosis of advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients remains dismal, and a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms is critical for identifying effective targets with therapeutic potential to improve the survival of patients with OSCC. This study aims to clarify the clinical and biological significance of metastasis-associated long non-coding RNA, metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) in OSCC. We found that MALAT1 is overexpressed in OSCC tissues compared to normal oral mucosa by real-time PCR. MALAT1 served as a new prognostic factor in OSCC patients. When knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in OSCC cell lines TSCCA and Tca8113, MALAT1 was shown to be required for maintaining epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) mediated cell migration and invasion. Western blot and immunofluorescence staining showed that MALAT1 knockdown significantly suppressed N-cadherin and Vimentin expression but induced E-cadherin expression in vitro. Meanwhile, both nucleus and cytoplasm levels of β-catenin and NF-κB were attenuated, while elevated MALAT1 level triggered the expression of β-catenin and NF-κB. More importantly, targeting MALAT1 inhibited TSCCA cell-induced xenograft tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, these findings provide mechanistic insight into the role of MALAT1 in regulating OSCC metastasis, suggesting that MALAT1 is an important prognostic factor and therapeutic target for OSCC.

  7. The Role of Vacuolar Malate-Transport Capacity in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism and Nitrate Nutrition. Higher Malate-Transport Capacity in Ice Plant after Crassulacean Acid Metabolism-Induction and in Tobacco under Nitrate Nutrition1

    PubMed Central

    Lüttge, Ulrich; Pfeifer, Tanja; Fischer-Schliebs, Elke; Ratajczak, Rafael

    2000-01-01

    Anion uptake by isolated tonoplast vesicles was recorded indirectly via increased H+-transport by H+-pumping of the V-ATPase due to dissipation of the electrical component of the electrochemical proton gradient, ΔμH+, across the membrane. ATP hydrolysis by the V-ATPase was measured simultaneously after the Palmgren test. Normalizing for ATP-hydrolysis and effects of chloride, which was added to the assays as a stimulating effector of the V-ATPase, a parameter, Jmalrel, of apparent ATP-dependent malate-stimulated H+-transport was worked out as an indirect measure of malate transport capacity. This allowed comparison of various species and physiological conditions. Jmalrel was high in the obligate crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier, it increased substantially after CAM induction in ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum), and it was positively correlated with NO3− nutrition in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). For tobacco this was confirmed by measurements of malate transport energized via the V-PPase. In ice plant a new polypeptide of 32-kD apparent molecular mass appeared, and a 33-kD polypeptide showed higher levels after CAM induction under conditions of higher Jmalrel. It is concluded that tonoplast malate transport capacity plays an important role in physiological regulation in CAM and NO3− nutrition and that a putative malate transporter must be within the 32- to 33-kD polypeptide fraction of tonoplast proteins. PMID:11080309

  8. Investigation for antimicrobial resistance-modulating activity of diethyl malate and 1-methyl malate against beta-lactamase class A from Bacillus licheniformis by molecular dynamics, in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Mirzaie, Sako; Najafi, Kambiz; Hakhamaneshi, Mohammad Saeed; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Fathi, Fardin

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to antibiotics in bacteria, is one of the major problems of mankind. Each year, a large number of patients due to infection, lose their lives. One of the main mechanisms of antibiotic resistance is beta-lactamase secretion. This enzyme hydrolyzes the amide bond of a lactam ring in beta-lactam antibiotics. Bacillus licheniformis is a mesophilic gram-positive bacterium, which has a high potential to produce beta-lactamase class A. In this study, the inhibitory effects of some malate analogous were studied by in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, the effects of inhibitor binding on beta-lactamase were studied using MD simulations. Our results showed that diethyl malate and 1-methyl malate can decrease the MIC value of benzyl penicillin by sixteen and eight-fold, respectively. Data derived from in vitro studies revealed that decrease in MIC values is correlated with beta-lactamase inhibition. Molecular docking studies predicted the binding mode of inhibitors with the beta-lactamase active site. The structural analysis from MD simulations exhibits that binding of citrate and diethyl malate causes earlier equilibrium of beta-lactamase. After binding, the fluctuation of Ser 70 is also decreased. Based on our data, diethyl malate can be used to design the potent inhibitor against beta-lactamase class A.

  9. The protective effect of Rho-associated kinase inhibitor on aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsan-Ju; Hung, Hui-Shan; Wang, Dean-Chuan; Chen, Shun-Sheng

    2010-07-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a neurotoxicant and is implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). In AD brains, one of the pathological hallmarks is the extracellular deposition of senile plaques, which are mainly composed of aggregated amyloid-beta (Abeta). Endoproteolysis of the amyloid-beta precursor protein (AbetaPP) by the beta-secretase and the gamma-secretase generates Abeta. AbetaPP can also be cleaved by the alpha-secretase within the Abeta region, which releases a soluble fragment sAPPalpha and precludes the formation of Abeta. Al has been reported to increase the level of Abeta, promote Abeta aggregation, and increase Abeta neurotoxicity. In contrast, small G protein Rho and its effector, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), are known to negatively regulate the amount of Abeta. Inhibition of the Rho-ROCK pathway may underlie the ability of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and statins to reduce Abeta production. Whether the Rho-ROCK pathway is involved in Al-induced elevation and aggregation of Abeta is unknown. In the present study, cultured rat cortical neurons were treated with Al(malt)(3) in the absence or presence of ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. After the treatment of Al(malt)(3), the cell viability and the level of sAPPalpha were reduced, whereas the amyloid fibrils in the conditioned media were increased. Treatment with Y-27632 prevented these adverse effects of Al(malt)(3) and thus maintained neuronal survival. These results reveal that the activation of the Rho-ROCK signaling pathway was involved in Al-induced effects in terms of the cell viability, the production of sAPPalpha, and the formation of amyloid fibril, which provides a novel mechanism underlying Al-induced neurotoxicity.

  10. Long-Term Supplementation with Chromium Malate Improves Short Chain Fatty Acid Content in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huiyu; Feng, Weiwei; Mao, Guanghua; Zhao, Ting; Wu, Xiangyang; Wang, Songmei; Zou, Yanmin; Yang, Liuqing; Wang, Liang

    2016-11-01

    Our previous study showed that chromium malate improved the composition of intestinal flora, glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes, and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of chromium malate with long-term supplementation on short chain fatty acid (SCFA) content in Sprague-Dawley rats. The samples were analyzed by gas chromatography with high linearity (R (2) ≥ 0.9995), low quantification limit (0.011-0.070 mM), and satisfactory recoveries. The method was simple and environmentally friendly. The acetic content in cecum of 3-month control group was significantly higher than that of 1-year control group. When compared with 1-year control group, chromium malate (at a dose of 20.0 μg Cr/kg bw) could significantly increase acetic, propionic, i-butyric butyric, butyric, i-valeric, valeric, and n-caproic levels. The acetic, propionic, i-butyric, valeric, and n-caproic contents of 1-year chromium malate group (at a dose of 20.0 μg Cr/kg bw) had a significant improvement when compared with 1-year chromium picolinate group. Acetic, propionic, and butyric contained approximately 91.65 % of the total SCFAs in 1-year group. The results indicated that the improvement of chromium malate on short chain fatty acid content change was better than that of chromium picolinate.

  11. Long Noncoding RNA MALAT1 Promotes Hepatocellular Carcinoma Development by SRSF1 Upregulation and mTOR Activation.

    PubMed

    Malakar, Pushkar; Shilo, Asaf; Mogilevsky, Adi; Stein, Ilan; Pikarsky, Eli; Nevo, Yuval; Benyamini, Hadar; Elgavish, Sharona; Zong, Xinying; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Karni, Rotem

    2017-03-01

    Several long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA) are abrogated in cancer but their precise contributions to oncogenesis are still emerging. Here we report that the lncRNA MALAT1 is upregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma and acts as a proto-oncogene through Wnt pathway activation and induction of the oncogenic splicing factor SRSF1. Induction of SRSF1 by MALAT1 modulates SRSF1 splicing targets, enhancing the production of antiapoptotic splicing isoforms and activating the mTOR pathway by modulating the alternative splicing of S6K1. Inhibition of SRSF1 expression or mTOR activity abolishes the oncogenic properties of MALAT1, suggesting that SRSF1 induction and mTOR activation are essential for MALAT1-induced transformation. Our results reveal a mechanism by which lncRNA MALAT1 acts as a proto-oncogene in hepatocellular carcinoma, modulating oncogenic alternative splicing through SRSF1 upregulation. Cancer Res; 77(5); 1155-67. ©2016 AACR.

  12. The glcB locus of Rhizobium leguminosarum VF39 encodes an arabinose-inducible malate synthase.

    PubMed

    García-de los Santos, Alejandro; Morales, Alejandro; Baldomá, Laura; Clark, Scott R D; Brom, Susana; Yost, Christopher K; Hernández-Lucas, Ismael; Aguilar, Juan; Hynes, Michael F

    2002-10-01

    In the course of a study conducted to isolate genes upregulated by plant cell wall sugars, we identified an arabinose-inducible locus from a transcriptional fusion library of Rhizobium leguminosarum VF39, carrying random insertions of the lacZ transposon Tn5B22. Sequence analysis of the locus disrupted by the transposon revealed a high similarity to uncharacterized malate synthase G genes from Sinorhizobium meliloti, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and Mesorhizobium loti. This enzyme catalyzes the condensation of glyoxylate and acetyl-CoA to yield malate and CoA and is thought to be a component of the glyoxylate cycle, which allows microorganisms to grow on two carbon compounds. Enzyme assays showed that a functional malate synthase is encoded in the glcB gene of R. leguminosarum and that its expression is induced by arabinose, glycolate, and glyoxylate. An Escherichia coli aceB glcB mutant, complemented with the R. leguminosarum PCR-amplified gene, recovered malate synthase activity. A very similar genome organization of the loci containing malate synthase and flanking genes was observed in R. leguminosarum, S. meliloti, and A. tumefaciens. Pea plants inoculated with the glcB mutant or the wild-type strain showed no significant differences in nitrogen fixation. This is the first report regarding the characterization of a mutant in one of the glyoxylate cycle enzymes in the rhizobia.

  13. Mutual inhibition between YAP and SRSF1 maintains long non-coding RNA, Malat1-induced tumourigenesis in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiayi; Wang, Hongmei; Zhang, Yue; Zhen, Ni; Zhang, Li; Qiao, Yongxia; Weng, Wenhao; Liu, Xiangfan; Ma, Lifang; Xiao, Weifan; Yu, Wenjun; Chu, Qinghua; Pan, Qiuhui; Sun, Fenyong

    2014-05-01

    Emerging studies have revealed that Malat1 is overexpressed in many malignant diseases, including liver cancer, and contributes to enhancing cell migration or facilitating proliferation. However, the mechanism underlying its regulation has largely remained elusive. Here, we characterised the oncoprotein Yes-associated protein (YAP), which up-regulated metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (Malat1) expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, whereas serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) played an opposing role. SRSF1 inhibited YAP activity by preventing its co-occupation with TCF/β-catenin on the Malat1 promoter. In contrast, overexpression of YAP impaired the nuclear retention of both SRSF1 and itself via an interaction with Angiomotin (AMOT). This effect removed the inhibitory role of SRSF1 on Malat1 in the nucleus. Furthermore, higher expression of YAP was consistent with a lower SRSF1 nuclear accumulation in human liver cancer tissues. We also revealed that overexpression of YAP combined with a knockdown of SRSF1 resulted in conspicuously enhanced transwell cell mobility, accelerated tumour growth rate, and loss of body weight in a tail vein-injected mouse models. Taken together, these data provided a novel mechanism underlying the balance between SRSF1, YAP and Malat1 and uncovered a new role of YAP in regulating long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). Thus, disrupting the interaction between YAP and SRSF1 may serve as a crucial therapeutic method in liver cancer.

  14. The Nuclear-Retained Noncoding RNA MALAT1 Regulates Alternative Splicing by Modulating SR Splicing Factor Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Vidisha; Ellis, Jonathan D.; Shen, Zhen; Song, David Y.; Pan, Qun; Watt, Andrew T.; Freier, Susan M.; Bennett, C. Frank; Sharma, Alok; Bubulya, Paula A.; Blencowe, Benjamin J.; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Alternative splicing (AS) of pre-mRNA is utilized by higher eukaryotes to achieve increased transcriptome and proteomic complexity. The serine/arginine (SR) splicing factors regulate tissue- or cell-type-specific AS in a concentration- and phosphorylation-dependent manner. However, the mechanisms that modulate the cellular levels of active SR proteins remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we provide evidence for a role for the long nuclear-retained regulatory RNA (nrRNA), MALAT1 in AS regulation. MALAT1 interacts with SR proteins and influences the distribution of these and other splicing factors in nuclear speckle domains. Depletion of MALAT1 or overexpression of an SR protein changes the AS of a similar set of endogenous pre-mRNAs. Furthermore, MALAT1 regulates cellular levels of phosphorylated forms of SR proteins. Taken together, our results suggest that MALAT1 regulates AS by modulating the levels of active SR proteins. Our results further highlight the role for an nrRNA in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:20797886

  15. Fermentation and malate metabolism in response to elevated CO2 concentrations in two strawberry cultivars.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Valadez, Monica; Watkins, Christopher B

    2008-09-01

    Concentrations of acetaldehyde, ethanol, ethyl acetate (EA), organic acids and activities and gene expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; EC 1.1.1.1), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1), alcohol acyltransferase (AAT; EC 1.4.1.14), malate dehydrogenase (MDH; EC 1.1.1.37), malic enzyme (ME; EC 1.1.1.40) and glutamate dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.14) were investigated in two strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch) cultivars with different responses to CO(2) during storage. 'Jewel' fruit treated with CO(2) accumulated acetaldehyde and ethanol but little EA, while 'Cavendish' accumulated little acetaldehyde or ethanol but accumulated EA. In CO(2)-treated fruit, PDC activity was positively correlated with EA accumulation in 'Jewel' but not in 'Cavendish', while no differential effect of atmosphere was observed on its gene expression. ADH activity and gene expression show a correlation with ethanol accumulation in 'Cavendish'. In 'Jewel', there was a positive correlation between ADH gene expression and enzyme activity; however, this correlation does not explain ethanol accumulation in this cultivar. EA accumulation did not show any correlation with AAT activity and gene expression in any of the cultivars. Succinate concentrations were highest and those of malate lowest in CO(2)-treated fruit of both cultivars, but MDH and ME activities were not affected by CO(2). Gene expression of MDH and ME were not affected by atmosphere in 'Cavendish', although in 'Jewel' the MDH expression was slightly lower in CO(2)- than air-treated fruit. The results of this study show that differences in fermentation products and malate accumulation in CO(2)-treated strawberry fruit are not consistently correlated with enzyme activities and gene expression.

  16. GABA Production in Lactococcus lactis Is Enhanced by Arginine and Co-addition of Malate

    PubMed Central

    Laroute, Valérie; Yasaro, Chonthicha; Narin, Waranya; Mazzoli, Roberto; Pessione, Enrica; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Loubière, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis NCDO 2118 was previously selected for its ability to decarboxylate glutamate to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an interesting nutritional supplement able to improve mood and relaxation. Amino acid decarboxylation is generally considered as among the biochemical systems allowing lactic acid bacteria to counteracting acidic stress and obtaining metabolic energy. These strategies also include arginine deiminase pathway and malolactic fermentation but little is known about their possible interactions of with GABA production. In the present study, the effects of glutamate, arginine, and malate (i.e., the substrates of these acid-resistance pathways) on L. lactis NCDO 2118 growth and GABA production performances were analyzed. Both malate and arginine supplementation resulted in an efficient reduction of acidity and improvement of bacterial biomass compared to glutamate supplementation. Glutamate decarboxylation was limited to narrow environmental conditions (pH < 5.1) and physiological state (stationary phase). However, some conditions were able to improve GABA production or activate glutamate decarboxylation system even outside of this compass. Arginine clearly stimulated glutamate decarboxylation: the highest GABA production (8.6 mM) was observed in cultures supplemented with both arginine and glutamate. The simultaneous addition of arginine, malate, and glutamate enabled earlier GABA production (i.e., during exponential growth) at relatively high pH (6.5). As far as we know, no previous study has reported GABA production in such conditions. Although further studies are needed to understand the molecular basis of these phenomena, these results represent important keys suitable of application in GABA production processes. PMID:27458444

  17. Improved phosphorus acquisition by tobacco through transgenic expression of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase from Penicillium oxalicum.

    PubMed

    Lü, Jun; Gao, Xiaorong; Dong, Zhimin; Yi, Jun; An, Lijia

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for plant growth and development, but is generally unavailable and inaccessible in soil, since applied P is mostly fixed to aluminium (Al) and ferrum (Fe) in acidic soils and to calcium (Ca) in alkaline soils. Increased organic acid excretion is thought to be one mechanism by which plants use to enhance P uptake. In this study, we overexpressed a mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (MDH) gene from the mycorrhizal fungi Penicillium oxalicum in tobacco. The MDH activity of transgenic lines was significantly increased compared to that of wild type. Malate content in root exudation of transgenic lines induced in response to P deficiency was 1.3- to 2.9-fold greater than that of wild type under the same condition. Among the transgenic lines that were selected for analysis, one line (M1) showed the highest level of MDH activity and malate exudate. M1 showed a significant increase in growth over wild type, with 149.0, 128.5, and 127.9% increases in biomass, when grown in Al-phosphate, Fe-phosphate, and Ca-phosphate media, respectively. M1 also had better P uptake compared to wild type, with total P content increased by 287.3, 243.5, and 223.4% when grown in Al-phosphate, Fe-phosphate, and Ca-phosphate media, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first study on improving the ability of a plant to utilize P from Al-phosphate, Fe-phosphate, and Ca-phosphate by manipulating the organic acid metabolism of the plant through genetic engineering.

  18. Characterization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Malate Permease by Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Camarasa, Carole; Bidard, Frédérique; Bony, Muriel; Barre, Pierre; Dequin, Sylvie

    2001-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, l-malic acid transport is not carrier mediated and is limited to slow, simple diffusion of the undissociated acid. Expression in S. cerevisiae of the MAE1 gene, encoding Schizosaccharomyces pombe malate permease, markedly increased l-malic acid uptake in this yeast. In this strain, at pH 3.5 (encountered in industrial processes), l-malic acid uptake involves Mae1p-mediated transport of the monoanionic form of the acid (apparent kinetic parameters: Vmax = 8.7 nmol/mg/min; Km = 1.6 mM) and some simple diffusion of the undissociated l-malic acid (Kd = 0.057 min−1). As total l-malic acid transport involved only low levels of diffusion, the Mae1p permease was further characterized in the recombinant strain. l-Malic acid transport was reversible and accumulative and depended on both the transmembrane gradient of the monoanionic acid form and the ΔpH component of the proton motive force. Dicarboxylic acids with stearic occupation closely related to l-malic acid, such as maleic, oxaloacetic, malonic, succinic and fumaric acids, inhibited l-malic acid uptake, suggesting that these compounds use the same carrier. We found that increasing external pH directly inhibited malate uptake, resulting in a lower initial rate of uptake and a lower level of substrate accumulation. In S. pombe, proton movements, as shown by internal acidification, accompanied malate uptake, consistent with the proton/dicarboxylate mechanism previously proposed. Surprisingly, no proton fluxes were observed during Mae1p-mediated l-malic acid import in S. cerevisiae, and intracellular pH remained constant. This suggests that, in S. cerevisiae, either there is a proton counterflow or the Mae1p permease functions differently from a proton/dicarboxylate symport. PMID:11526017

  19. High Expression of Long Noncoding RNA MALAT1 Indicates a Poor Prognosis and Promotes Clinical Progression and Metastasis in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Cui, Yu; Liu, Long-Fei; Ren, Wen-Biao; Li, Qia-Qia; Zhou, Xu; Li, Yang-Le; Li, Yang; Bai, Xiang-Yang; Zu, Xiong-Bing

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the expression of long noncoding RNA metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) promotes cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis in many tumor types, but the association between bladder cancer and MALAT1 remains unknown. The expression of MALAT1 was tested by in situ hybridization (ISH) in 120 bladder cancer specimens. The association between MALAT1 expression and clinicopathological features and prognosis of the patients with bladder cancer was analyzed. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to verify the relationship between the expression of MALAT1 and progression and metastasis of bladder cancer. ISH showed that high MALAT1 expression was associated with advanced histological grade, high tumor stage, and positive lymph nodes. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression analysis indicated that high tumor stage, positive lymph nodes, and high MALAT1 expression were independent prognostic indicators for overall survival (OS) of patients with bladder cancer. qRT-PCR showed that the expression of MALAT1 in bladder cancer tissues was 2.85 times higher than those measured in adjacent normal tissues (P < .001). The expression of MALAT1 was 2.673 ± 0.254 in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer and 2.987 ± 0.381 in muscle-invasive bladder cancer (P = .018). In bladder cancer specimens with positive lymph nodes, MALAT1 expression was 3.167 ± 0.297 versus 2.896 ± 0.329 in bladder cancer specimens with negative lymph nodes (P = .020). High MALAT1 expression could serve as an independent prognostic factor for OS of patients with bladder cancer and could be considered as a potential therapeutic target of bladder cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of 1 alpha,25- and 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on aluminum-induced rickets in growing uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Vukicević, S; Krempien, B; Stavljenić, A

    1987-12-01

    Rats were subjected to a two-stage subtotal nephrectomy or sham operation, and treated with aluminum (Al) or both aluminum and vitamin D3 metabolites for 5 weeks with a cumulative dose of 13.6 mg aluminum. Animals were injected with 3H-thymidine and 3H-proline. The following analyses were performed: quantitative histology of tibial metaphyses and cytomorphometric electron microscopy of osteoclasts, quantitative (ICP-spectroscopy) and qualitative determination (histochemical staining) of aluminum within organs, and serum biochemistry (Ca, P, Mg, vitamin D3 metabolites, alkaline phosphatase, urea). The following new facts of the aluminum-related bone disease became evident: (a) Application of aluminum to growing uremic rats induced rickets, whose major epiphyseal growth plate changes were 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3-dependent. Addition of 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3 prevented the formation of rachitic metaphysis, but failed to prevent osteoid accumulation on epiphyseal and metaphyseal trabecular surfaces. Moreover, calcitriol produced hyperosteoidosis and osteosclerosis in the same rats. Aluminum did not alter the function of osteoblasts, while osteoclasts seemed inactivated. (b) The development of rickets was associated with suppressed serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3, reduced phosphorus level and the high content of aluminum in the bone, kidney, and liver. The addition of 24R,25(OH)2D3 markedly exaggerated the reduction of serum levels of calcitriol. We suggested that aluminum induces rickets in growing uremic rats, which consists of two components: vitamin D refractory osteomalacia and 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3-dependent epiphyseal growth plate changes.

  1. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 increases AKAP-9 expression by promoting SRPK1-catalyzed SRSF1 phosphorylation in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi-Yan; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Guo, Wen-Bin; Xie, Lin-Ying; Huang, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yan-Ping; Xiao, Li-Wei; Li, Sheng-Nan; Zhu, Hui-Fang; Li, Zu-Guo; Kan, Heping

    2016-03-08

    Our earlier findings indicate that the long non-coding RNA MALAT1 promotes colorectal cancer (CRC) cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo by increasing expression of AKAP-9. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which MALAT1 enhances AKAP9 expression in CRC SW480 cells. We found that MALAT1 interacts with both SRPK1 and SRSF1. MALAT1 increases AKAP-9 expression by promoting SRPK1-catalyzed SRSF1 phosphorylation. Following MALAT1 knockdown, overexpression of SRPK1 was sufficient to restore SRSF1 phosphorylation and AKAP-9 expression to a level that promoted cell proliferation, invasion and migration in vitro. Conversely, SRPK1 knockdown after overexpression of MALAT1 in SW480 cells diminished SRSF1 phosphorylation and AKAP-9 expression and suppressed cell proliferation, invasion and migration in vitro. These findings suggest MALAT1 increases AKAP-9 expression by promoting SRPK1-catalyzed SRSF1 phosphorylation in CRC cells. These results reveal a novel molecular mechanism by which MALAT1 regulates AKAP-9 expression in CRC cells.

  2. MALAT1 functions as a competing endogenous RNA to mediate Rac1 expression by sequestering miR-101b in liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fujun; Lu, Zhongqiu; Cai, Jing; Huang, Kate; Chen, Bicheng; Li, Guojun; Dong, Peihong; Zheng, Jianjian

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence shows that Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) plays a pivotal role in cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in tumors. However, the biological role and underlying mechanism of MALAT1 in liver fibrosis remains undefined. In this study, up-regulation of MALAT1 was observed in fibrotic liver tissues and in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). In addition, depletion of MALAT1 inhibited the activation of HSCs in vitro and attenuated collagen deposits in vivo. Our results demonstrated that MALAT1 expression is negatively correlated with microRNA-101b (miR-101b) expression. Furthermore, there was a negative feedback loop between the levels of MALAT1 and miR-101b. Luciferase reporter assay indicated that MALAT1 and RAS-related C3 botulinum substrate 1 (Rac1) are targets of miR-101b. We uncovered that MALAT1 regulates Rac1 expression through miR-101b as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA), thereby influencing the proliferation, cell cycle and activation of primary HSCs. Collectively, The ceRNA regulatory network may prompt a better understanding of liver fibrogenesis and contribute to a novel therapeutic strategy for liver fibrosis. PMID:26697839

  3. MALAT1 Long Non-coding RNA Expression in Thyroid Tissues: Analysis by In Situ Hybridization and Real-Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ranran; Hardin, Heather; Huang, Wei; Chen, Jidong; Asioli, Sofia; Righi, Alberto; Maletta, Francesca; Sapino, Anna; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2017-03-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important for transcription and for epigenetic or posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression and may contribute to carcinogenesis. Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), an lncRNA involved in the regulation of the cell cycle, cell proliferation, and cell migration, is known to be deregulated in multiple cancers. Here, we analyzed the expression of MALAT1 on 195 cases of benign and malignant thyroid neoplasms by using tissue microarrays for RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) and real-time PCR. MALAT1 is highly expressed in normal thyroid (NT) tissues and thyroid tumors, with increased expression during progression from NT to papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs) but is downregulated in poorly differentiated thyroid cancers (PDCs) and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas (ATCs) compared to NT. Induction of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) by transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta in a PTC cell line (TPC1) led to increased MALAT1 expression, supporting a role for MALAT1 in EMT in thyroid tumors. This is the first ISH study of MALAT1 expression in thyroid tissues. It also provides the first piece of evidence suggesting MALAT1 downregulation in certain thyroid malignancies. Our findings support the notion that ATCs may be molecularly distinct from low-grade thyroid malignancies and suggest that MALAT1 may function both as an oncogene and as a tumor suppressor in different types of thyroid tumors.

  4. Serum long non coding RNA MALAT-1 protected by exosomes is up-regulated and promotes cell proliferation and migration in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Xia, Yuhong; Wang, Zhixin; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Yafei; Li, Xiaoli; Wang, Yu; Ming, Huaikun

    2017-08-19

    Circulating lncRNAs have been defined as a novel biomarker for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), MALAT-1 was first identified lncRNA that was related to lung cancer metastasis. However, the relationship between exosomal lncRNAs and the diagnosis and prognosis of NSCLC was poorly understood. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical significance of serum exosomal MALAT-1 as a biomarker in the metastasis of NSCLC. In this study, we firstly isolated the exosomes from healthy subjects and NSCLC patients. Then we measured the expression levels of MALAT-1 contained in exosomes, and found that exosomal MALAT-1 was highly expressed in NSCLC patients, more importantly, the levels of exosomal MALAT-1 were positively associated with tumor stage and lymphatic metastasis. In addition, we decreased MALAT-1 expression by short hairpin RNA and conducted a series of assays including MTT, cell cycle, colony formation, wound-healing scratch and Annexin/V PI by flow cytometry in human lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro studies demonstrated that serum exosome-derived long noncoding RNA MALAT-1 promoted the tumor growth and migration, and prevented tumor cells from apoptosis in lung cancer cell lines. Taken together, this study shed a light on utilizing MALAT-1 in exosomes as a non-invasive serum-based tumor biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of NSCLC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhancement of malate-production and increase in sensitivity to dimethyl succinate by mutation of the VID24 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Negoro, Hiroaki; Kotaka, Atsushi; Matsumura, Kengo; Tsutsumi, Hiroko; Hata, Yoji

    2016-06-01

    Malate in sake (a Japanese alcoholic beverage) is an important component for taste that is produced by yeasts during alcoholic fermentation. To date, many researchers have developed methods for breeding high-malate-producing yeasts; however, genes responsible for the high-acidity phenotype are not known. We determined the mutated gene involved in high malate production in yeast, isolated as a sensitive mutant to dimethyl succinate. In the comparative whole genome analysis between high-malate-producing strain and its parent strain, one of the non-synonymous substitutions was identified in the VID24 gene. The mutation of VID24 resulted in enhancement of malate-productivity and sensitivity to dimethyl succinate. The mutation appeared to lead to a deficiency in Vid24p function. Furthermore, disruption of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase (Mdh2p) gene in the VID24 mutant inhibited the high-malate-producing phenotype. Vid24p is known as a component of the multisubunit ubiquitin ligase and participates in the degradation of gluconeogenic enzymes such as Mdh2p. We suggest that the enhancement of malate-productivity results from an accumulation of Mdh2p due to the loss of Vid24p function. These findings propose a novel mechanism for the regulation of organic acid production in yeast cells by the component of ubiquitin ligase, Vid24p. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of 90-day Repeated Dose Oral Toxicity, Glycometabolism, Learning and Memory Ability, and Related Enzyme of Chromium Malate Supplementation in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Weiwei; Wu, Huiyu; Li, Qian; Zhou, Zhaoxiang; Chen, Yao; Zhao, Ting; Feng, Yun; Mao, Guanghua; Li, Fang; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2015-11-01

    Our previous study showed that chromium malate improved the regulation of blood glucose in mice with alloxan-induced diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the 90-day oral toxicity of chromium malate in Sprague-Dawley rats. The present study inspected the effect of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes, lipid metabolism, and learning and memory ability in metabolically healthy Sprague-Dawley rats. The results showed that all rats survived and pathological, toxic, feces, and urine changes were not observed. Chromium malate did not cause measurable damage on liver, brain, and kidney. The fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, insulin resistance index, C-peptide, hepatic glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucokinase, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels of normal rats in chromium malate groups had no significant change when compared with control group and chromium picolinate group under physiologically relevant conditions. The serum and organ content of Cr in chromium malate groups had no significant change compared with control group. No significant changes were found in morris water maze test and superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and true choline esterase (TChE) activity. The results indicated that supplementation with chromium malate did not cause measurable toxicity and has no obvious effect on glycometabolism and related enzymes, learning and memory ability, and related enzymes and lipid metabolism of female and male rats. The results of this study suggest that chromium malate is safe for human consumption.

  7. A novel malate dehydrogenase from Ceratonia siliqua L. seeds with potential biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Muccio, Clelia; Guida, Vincenzo; Di Petrillo, Amalia; Severino, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo

    2012-12-01

    A novel malate dehydrogenase (MDH; EC 3.1.1.1.37), hereafter MDHCs, from Ceratonia siliqua seeds, commonly known as Carob tree, was purified by using ammonium sulphate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on SteamLine SP and gel-filtration. The molecular mass of the native protein, obtained by analytical gel-filtration, was about 65 kDa, whereas, by using SDS-PAGE analysis, with and without reducing agent, was 34 kDa. The specific activity of purified MDHCs (0.25 mg/100 g seeds) was estimated to be 188 U/mg. The optimum activity of the enzyme is at pH 8.5, showing a decrease in the presence of Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and NaCl. The N-terminal sequence of the first 20 amino acids of MDHCs revealed 95 % identity with malate dehydrogenase from Medicago sativa L. Finally, the enzymatic activity of MDHCs was preserved even after absorption onto a PVDF membrane. To our knowledge, this is the first contribution to the characterization of an enzyme from Carob tree sources.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Malate Synthase Structures with Fragments Reveal a Portal for Substrate/Product Exchange*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Krieger, Inna V.; Parai, Maloy K.; Gawandi, Vijay B.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Fragment screening and high throughput screening are complementary approaches that combine with structural biology to explore the binding capabilities of an active site. We have used a fragment-based approach on malate synthase (GlcB) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and discovered several novel binding chemotypes. In addition, the crystal structures of GlcB in complex with these fragments indicated conformational changes in the active site that represent the enzyme conformations during catalysis. Additional structures of the complex with malate and of the apo form of GlcB supported that hypothesis. Comparative analysis of GlcB structures in complex with 18 fragments allowed us to characterize the preferred chemotypes and their binding modes. The fragment structures showed a hydrogen bond to the backbone carbonyl of Met-631. We successfully incorporated an indole group from a fragment into an existing phenyl-diketo acid series. The resulting indole-containing inhibitor was 100-fold more potent than the parent phenyl-diketo acid with an IC50 value of 20 nm. PMID:27738104

  9. Visnagin protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy through modulation of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Asnani, Aarti; Zou, Lin; Bentley, Victoria L.; Yu, Min; Wang, You; Dellaire, Graham; Sarkar, Kumar S.; Dai, Matthew; Chen, Howard H.; Sosnovik, David E.; Shin, Jordan T.; Haber, Daniel A.; Berman, Jason N.; Chao, Wei; Peterson, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a highly effective anti-cancer chemotherapy agent, but its usage is limited by its cardiotoxicity. To develop a drug that prevents the cardiac toxicity of doxorubicin while preserving its anti-tumor potency, we established a doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy model in zebrafish that recapitulated the cardiomyocyte apoptosis and contractility decline observed in patients. Using this model, we screened 3000 compounds and discovered that visnagin (VIS) and diphenylurea (DPU) rescue cardiac performance and circulatory defects caused by doxorubicin treatment in zebrafish. VIS and DPU reduced doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in cultured cardiomyocytes and in vivo in zebrafish and mouse hearts. Furthermore, VIS treatment improved cardiac contractility in doxorubicin-treated mice. Importantly, VIS and DPU caused no reduction in the chemotherapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in several cultured tumor lines or in zebrafish and mouse xenograft models. Using affinity chromatography, we discovered that VIS binds to mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (MDH2), one of the key enzymes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. As with VIS, treatment with the MDH2 inhibitors mebendazole, thyroxine, and iodine prevented doxorubicin cardiotoxicity, as did treatment with malate itself, suggesting that modulation of MDH2 activity is responsible for VIS’s cardioprotective effects. Taken together, this study identified VIS and DPU as potent cardioprotective compounds and implicates MDH2 as a previously undescribed, druggable target for doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:25504881

  10. Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase activity helps support glycolysis in actively proliferating cells and cancer.

    PubMed

    Hanse, E A; Ruan, C; Kachman, M; Wang, D; Lowman, X H; Kelekar, A

    2017-03-06

    Increased glucose consumption is a hallmark of cancer cells. The increased consumption and subsequent metabolism of glucose during proliferation creates the need for a constant supply of NAD, a co-factor in glycolysis. Regeneration of the NAD required to support enhanced glycolysis has been attributed to the terminal glycolytic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). However, loss of glucose carbons to biosynthetic pathways early in glycolysis reduces the carbon supply to LDH. Thus, alternative routes for NAD regeneration must exist to support the increased glycolytic rate while allowing for the diversion of glucose to generate biomass and support proliferation. Here we demonstrate, using a variety of cancer cell lines as well as activated primary T cells, that cytosolic malate dehydrogenase 1 (MDH1) is an alternative to LDH as a supplier of NAD. Moreover, our results indicate that MDH1 generates malate with carbons derived from glutamine, thus enabling utilization of glucose carbons for glycolysis and for biomass. Amplification of MDH1 occurs at an impressive frequency in human tumors and correlates with poor prognosis. Together, our findings suggest that proliferating cells rely on both MDH1 and LDH to replenish cytosolic NAD, and that therapies designed at targeting glycolysis must consider both dehydrogenases.Oncogene advance online publication, 6 March 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.36.

  11. Phosphorylation of glyoxysomal malate synthase from castor oil seed endosperm and cucumber cotyledon

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.P; Randall, D.D. )

    1989-04-01

    Glyoxysomal malate synthase (MS) was purified to apparent homogeneity from 3-d germinating castor oil seed endosperm by a relatively simple procedure including two sucrose density gradient centrifugations. Antibodies raised to the caster oil seed MS crossreacted with MS from cucumber cotyledon. MS was phosphorylated in both tissues in an MgATP dependent reaction. The phosphorylation pattern was similar for both enzymes and both enzymes were inhibited by NaF, NaMo, (NH{sub 4})SO{sub 4}, glyoxylate and high concentration of MgCl{sub 2} (60 mM), but was not inhibited by NaCl and malate. Further characterization of the phosphorylation of MS from castor oil seed endosperms showed that the 5S form of MS is the form which is labelled by {sup 32}P. The addition of exogenous alkaline phosphatase to MS not only decreased enzyme activity, but could also dephosphorylate phospho-MS. The relationship between dephosphorylation of MS and the decrease of MS activity is currently under investigation.

  12. Polyethylene glycol-induced heteroassociation of malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, J.M.; Webster, T.A.; Appleman, J.R.; Manley, E.R.; Yu, H.A.; Datta, A.; Ackerson, B.J.; Spivey, H.O.

    1987-10-01

    Studies by dynamic and total intensity light scattering, ultracentrifugation, electron microscopy, and chemical crosslinking on solutions of the pig heart mitochondrial enzymes, malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase (separately and together) demonstrate that polyethylene glycol induces very large homoassociations of each enzyme, and still larger heteroenzyme complexes between these two enzymes in the solution phase. Specificity of this heteroassociation is indicated by the facts that heteroassociations with bovine serum albumin were not observed for either the mitochondrial dehydrogenase or the synthase or between cytosolic malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. The weight fraction of the enzymes in the mitochondrial dehydrogenase-synthase associated particles in the solution phase was less than 0.03% with the dilute conditions used in the dynamic light scattering measurements. Neither palmitoyl-CoA nor other solution conditions tested significantly increased this weight fraction of associated enzymes in the solution phase. Because of the extremely low solubility of the associated species, however, the majority of the enzymes can be precipitated as the heteroenzyme complex. This precipitation is a classical first-order transition in spite of the large particle sizes and broad size distribution. Ionic effects on the solubility of the heteroenzyme complex appear to be of general electrostatic nature. Polyethylene glycol was found to be more potent in precipitating this complex than dextrans, polyvinylpyrrolidones, ficoll, and beta-lactoglobulin.

  13. Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase activity helps support glycolysis in actively proliferating cells and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hanse, Eric A; Ruan, Chunhai; Kachman, Maureen; Wang, Dongyu; Lowman, Xazmin H; Kelekar, Ameeta

    2017-01-01

    Increased glucose consumption is a hallmark of cancer cells. The increased consumption and subsequent metabolism of glucose during proliferation creates the need for a constant supply of NAD, a co-factor in glycolysis. Regeneration of the NAD required to support enhanced glycolysis has been attributed to the terminal glycolytic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). However, loss of glucose carbons to biosynthetic pathways early in glycolysis reduces the carbon supply to LDH. Thus, alternative routes for NAD regeneration must exist to support the increased glycolytic rate while allowing for the diversion of glucose to generate biomass and support proliferation. Here we demonstrate, using a variety of cancer cell lines as well as activated primary T cells, that cytosolic malate dehydrogenase 1 (MDH1) is an alternative to LDH as a supplier of NAD. Moreover, our results indicate that MDH1 generates malate with carbons derived from glutamine, thus enabling utilization of glucose carbons for glycolysis and for biomass. Amplification of MDH1 occurs at an impressive frequency in human tumors and correlates with poor prognosis. Together, our findings suggest proliferating cells rely on both MDH1 and LDH to replenish cytosolic NAD and therapies designed at targeting glycolysis must consider both dehydrogenases. PMID:28263970

  14. Structural insights into the stabilization of MALAT1 noncoding RNA by a bipartite triple helix.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessica A; Bulkley, David; Wang, Jimin; Valenstein, Max L; Yario, Therese A; Steitz, Thomas A; Steitz, Joan A

    2014-07-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a highly abundant nuclear long noncoding RNA that promotes malignancy. A 3'-stem-loop structure is predicted to confer stability by engaging a downstream A-rich tract in a triple helix, similar to the expression and nuclear retention element (ENE) from the KSHV polyadenylated nuclear RNA. The 3.1-Å-resolution crystal structure of the human MALAT1 ENE and A-rich tract reveals a bipartite triple helix containing stacks of five and four U•A-U triples separated by a C+•G-C triplet and C-G doublet, extended by two A-minor interactions. In vivo decay assays indicate that this blunt-ended triple helix, with the 3' nucleotide in a U•A-U triple, inhibits rapid nuclear RNA decay. Interruption of the triple helix by the C-G doublet induces a 'helical reset' that explains why triple-helical stacks longer than six do not occur in nature.

  15. Structural insights into the stabilization of MALAT1 noncoding RNA by a bipartite triple helix

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jessica A.; Bulkley, David; Wang, Jimin; Valenstein, Max L.; Yario, Therese A.; Steitz, Thomas A.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a highly-abundant nuclear long noncoding RNA that promotes malignancy. A 3′-stem-loop structure is predicted to confer stability by engaging a downstream A-rich tract in a triple helix, similar to the expression and nuclear retention element (ENE) from the KSHV polyadenylated nuclear RNA. The 3.1-Å resolution crystal structure of the human MALAT1 ENE and A-rich tract reveals a bipartite triple helix containing stacks of five and four U•A-U triples separated by a C+•G-C triplet and C-G doublet, extended by two A-minor interactions. In vivo decay assays indicate that this blunt-ended triple helix, with the 3′ nucleotide in a U•A-U triple, inhibits rapid nuclear RNA decay. Interruption of the triple helix by the C-G doublet induces a “helical reset” that explains why triple-helical stacks longer than six do not occur in nature. PMID:24952594

  16. Regulation of insulin release by factors that also modify glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Fahien, L A; MacDonald, M J; Kmiotek, E H; Mertz, R J; Fahien, C M

    1988-09-25

    Leucine and monomethyl succinate initiate insulin release, and glutamine potentiates leucine-induced insulin release. Alanine enhances and malate inhibits leucine plus glutamine-induced insulin release. The insulinotropic effect of leucine is at least in part secondary to its ability to activate glutamate oxidation by glutamate dehydrogenase (Sener, A., Malaisse-Lagae, F., and Malaisse, W. J. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 78, 5460-5464). The effect of these other amino acids or Krebs cycle intermediates on insulin release also correlates with their effects on glutamate dehydrogenase and their ability to regulate inhibition of this enzyme by alpha-ketoglutarate. For example, glutamine enhances insulin release and islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity only in the presence of leucine. This could be because leucine, especially in the presence of alpha-ketoglutarate, increases the Km of glutamate and converts alpha-ketoglutarate from a noncompetitive to a competitive inhibitor of glutamate. Thus, in the presence of leucine, this enzyme is more responsive to high levels of glutamate and less responsive to inhibition by alpha-ketoglutarate. Malate could decrease and alanine could increase insulin release because malate increases the generation of alpha-ketoglutarate in islet mitochondria via the combined malate dehydrogenase-aspartate aminotransferase reaction, and alanine could decrease the level of alpha-ketoglutarate via the alanine transaminase reaction. Monomethyl succinate alone is as stimulatory of insulin release as leucine alone, and glutamine enhances the action of both. Succinyl coenzyme A, leucine, and GTP are all bound in the same region on glutamate dehydrogenase, where GTP is a potent inhibitor and succinyl coenzyme A and leucine are comparable activators. Thus, the insulinotropic properties of monomethyl succinate could result from it increasing the level of succinyl coenzyme A and decreasing the level of GTP via the succinate thiokinase reaction.

  17. Red clover HCT2, a hydroxycinnamoyl-coenzyme A:malate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase, plays a crucial role in biosynthesis of phaselic acid and other hydroxycinnamoyl-malate esters in vivo

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In red clover (Trifolium pratense) leaves, phaselic acid (2-O-caffeoyl-L-malate) accumulates to several mmol kg-1 fresh weight and is a crucial component of a natural system that prevents protein breakdown during harvest and storage of this forage crop. Previously, we identified HCT2, a red clover g...

  18. Structure and Function of Plasmodium falciparum malate dehydrogenase: Role of Critical Amino Acids in C-substrate Binding Procket

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Malaria parasite thrives on anaerobic fermentation of glucose for energy. Earlier studies from our lab have demonstrated that a cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (PfMDH) with striking similarity to lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) might complement PfLDH function in Plasmodium falciparum. The N-terminal g...

  19. Analysis of Quaternary Structure of a [LDH-like] Malate Dehydrogenase of Plasmodium falciparum with Oligomeric Mutants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    L-Malate dehydrogenase (PfMDH) from Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent for the most severe form of malaria, has shown remarkable similarities to L-lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH). PfMDH is more closely related to [LDH-like] MDHs characterized in archea and other prokaryotes. Initial sequence a...

  20. Aluminum-activated citrate and malate transporters from the MATE and ALMT families function independently to confer Arabidopsis aluminum tolerance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aluminum (Al) activated root malate and citrate exudation plays an important role in Al tolerance in many plant species. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of AtMATE, a homolog of the recently discovered sorghum and barley Al tolerance genes, here shown to encode an Al-activ...

  1. Identification and biochemical characterization of a thermostable malate dehydrogenase from the mesophile Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Ge, Ya-Dong; Cao, Zheng-Yu; Wang, Zong-Da; Chen, Lu-Lu; Zhu, You-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Ping

    2010-01-01

    We identified and characterized a malate dehydrogenase from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) (ScMDH). The molecular mass of ScMDH was 73,353.5 Da with two 36,675.0 Da subunits as analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The detailed kinetic parameters of recombinant ScMDH are reported here. Heat inactivation studies showed that ScMDH was more thermostable than most MDHs from other organisms, except for a few extremely thermophile bacteria. Recombinant ScMDH was highly NAD(+)-specific and displayed about 400-fold (k(cat)) and 1,050-fold (k(cat)/K(m)) preferences for oxaloacetate reduction over malate oxidation. Substrate inhibition studies showed that ScMDH activity was inhibited by excess oxaloacetate (K(i)=5.8 mM) and excess L-malate (K(i)=12.8 mM). Moreover, ScMDH activity was not affected by most metal ions, but was strongly inhibited by Fe(2+) and Zn(2+). Taken together, our findings indicate that ScMDH is significantly thermostable and presents a remarkably high catalytic efficiency for malate synthesis.

  2. Identification of a Malate Chemoreceptor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Screening for Chemotaxis Defects in an Energy Taxis-Deficient Mutant▿

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Ortega, Carolina; Harwood, Caroline S.

    2007-01-01

    We found that a robust energy taxis response mediated by the Aer receptor can sometimes mask chemotaxis mediated by other methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We identified PA2652 as a chemoreceptor for malate by screening aer mcp double mutants by using swarm plate assays. PMID:17933940

  3. Identification of a malate chemoreceptor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by screening for chemotaxis defects in an energy taxis-deficient mutant.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ortega, Carolina; Harwood, Caroline S

    2007-12-01

    We found that a robust energy taxis response mediated by the Aer receptor can sometimes mask chemotaxis mediated by other methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We identified PA2652 as a chemoreceptor for malate by screening aer mcp double mutants by using swarm plate assays.

  4. Resveratrol Inhibits Invasion and Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer Cells via MALAT1 Mediated Wnt/β-Catenin Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Long; Sui, Hua; Zhou, Lihong; Sun, Jian; Cai, Jianfeng; Qin, Jianmin; Ren, Jianlin; Li, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Resveratrol, extracted from Chinese herbal medicine Polygonum cuspidatum, is known to inhibit invasion and metastasis of human colorectal cancer (CRC), in which long non-coding Metastasis Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1 (RNA-MALAT1) also plays an important role. Using MALAT1 lentiviral shRNA and over-expression constructs in CRC derived cell lines, LoVo and HCT116, we demonstrated that the anti-tumor effects of resveratrol on CRC are through inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling, thus the expression of its target genes such as c-Myc, MMP-7, as well as the expression of MALAT1. In detail, resveratrol down-regulates MALAT1, resulting in decreased nuclear localization of β-catenin thus attenuated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which leads to the inhibition of CRC invasion and metastasis. This finding of ours surely provides important pre-clinical evidence supporting future use of resveratrol in prevention and treatment of CRC. PMID:24244343

  5. L-Malate dehydrogenase activity in the reductive arm of the incomplete citric acid cycle of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Charles E

    2013-11-01

    The autotrophic nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea does not synthesize 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase under aerobic conditions and so has an incomplete citric acid cycle. L-malate (S-malate) dehydrogenase (MDH) from N. europaea was predicted to show similarity to the NADP(+)-dependent enzymes from chloroplasts and was separated from the NAD(+)-dependent proteins from most other bacteria or mitochondria. MDH activity in a soluble fraction from N. europaea ATCC 19718 was measured spectrophotometrically and exhibited simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the reductive direction, activity with NADH increased from pH 6.0 to 8.5 but activity with NADPH was consistently lower and decreased with pH. At pH 7.0, the K m for oxaloacetate was 20 μM; the K m for NADH was 22 μM but that for NADPH was at least 10 times higher. In the oxidative direction, activity with NAD(+) increased with pH but there was very little activity with NADP(+). At pH 7.0, the K m for L-malate was 5 mM and the K m for NAD(+) was 24 μM. The reductive activity was quite insensitive to inhibition by L-malate but the oxidative activity was very sensitive to oxaloacetate. MDH activity was not strongly activated or inhibited by glycolytic or citric acid cycle metabolites, adenine nucleotides, NaCl concentrations, or most metal ions, but increased with temperature up to about 55 °C. The reductive activity was consistently 10-20 times higher than the oxidative activity. These results indicate that the L-malate dehydrogenase in N. europaea is similar to other NAD(+)-dependent MDHs (EC 1.1.1.37) but physiologically adapted for its role in a reductive biosynthetic sequence.

  6. Plastidial NAD-Dependent Malate Dehydrogenase Is Critical for Embryo Development and Heterotrophic Metabolism in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Beeler, Seraina; Liu, Hung-Chi; Stadler, Martha; Schreier, Tina; Eicke, Simona; Lue, Wei-Ling; Truernit, Elisabeth; Zeeman, Samuel C.; Chen, Jychian; Kötting, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    In illuminated chloroplasts, one mechanism involved in reduction-oxidation (redox) homeostasis is the malate-oxaloacetate (OAA) shuttle. Excess electrons from photosynthetic electron transport in the form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced are used by NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase (MDH) to reduce OAA to malate, thus regenerating the electron acceptor NADP. NADP-MDH is a strictly redox-regulated, light-activated enzyme that is inactive in the dark. In the dark or in nonphotosynthetic tissues, the malate-OAA shuttle was proposed to be mediated by the constitutively active plastidial NAD-specific MDH isoform (pdNAD-MDH), but evidence is scarce. Here, we reveal the critical role of pdNAD-MDH in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. A pdnad-mdh null mutation is embryo lethal. Plants with reduced pdNAD-MDH levels by means of artificial microRNA (miR-mdh-1) are viable, but dark metabolism is altered as reflected by increased nighttime malate, starch, and glutathione levels and a reduced respiration rate. In addition, miR-mdh-1 plants exhibit strong pleiotropic effects, including dwarfism, reductions in chlorophyll levels, photosynthetic rate, and daytime carbohydrate levels, and disordered chloroplast ultrastructure, particularly in developing leaves, compared with the wild type. pdNAD-MDH deficiency in miR-mdh-1 can be functionally complemented by expression of a microRNA-insensitive pdNAD-MDH but not NADP-MDH, confirming distinct roles for NAD- and NADP-linked redox homeostasis. PMID:24453164

  7. 17β-Estradiol treatment inhibits breast cell proliferation, migration and invasion by decreasing MALAT-1 RNA level

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Ziyi; Chen, Changjin; Liu, Yu; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • E2 affects not only estrogen-receptor α positive breast cells but also negative ones. • 100 nM E2 treatment affects breast cells proliferation, migration. • 100 nM E2 treatment functions in an estrogen-receptor α-independent way. • E2 treatment decreases MALAT-1 RNA level by post-transcriptional regulation. - Abstract: Breast cancer cells, which express estrogen receptor α (ERα), respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. But breast cancer cells without ERα show no effect on low concentration of estrogen treatment. Proliferation, migration and invasion of MCF10a, MCF7 and MB231 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified the effects of E2 on these breast cell lines, and looked for the difference in the presence and absence of ERα. Specifically, we looked for the changes of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1), which is found extensively and highly expressed in several kinds of tumor cells, including breast carcinoma. It was observed that proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cells were greatly affected by high concentration E2 treatment and were not affected by low concentration E2 treatment in an ERα independent way. We found that the high concentration E2 treatment largely decreased MALAT-1 RNA level. Interestingly, MALAT-1 decreasing by knocking down showed similar effects on proliferation, migration and invasion. E2 treatment affects breast tumor or non-tumor cells proliferation, migration and invasion in an ERα -independent, but a dose-dependent way by decreasing the MALAT-1 RNA level.

  8. Methyltransferase-like protein 16 binds the 3'-terminal triple helix of MALAT1 long noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessica A; Kinzig, Charles G; DeGregorio, Suzanne J; Steitz, Joan A

    2016-12-06

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), a cancer-promoting long noncoding RNA, accumulates in cells by using a 3'-triple-helical RNA stability element for nuclear expression (ENE). The ENE, a stem-loop structure containing a U-rich internal loop, interacts with a downstream A-rich tract (ENE+A) to form a blunt-ended triple helix composed of nine U•A-U triples interrupted by a C•G-C triple and C-G doublet. This unique structure prompted us to explore the possibility of protein binding. Native gel-shift assays revealed a shift in radiolabeled MALAT1 ENE+A RNA upon addition of HEK293T cell lysate. Competitive gel-shift assays suggested that protein binding depends not only on the triple-helical structure but also its nucleotide composition. Selection from the lysate using a biotinylated-RNA probe followed by mass spectrometry identified methyltransferase-like protein 16 (METTL16), a putative RNA methyltransferase, as an interacting protein of the MALAT1 ENE+A. Gel-shift assays confirmed the METTL16-MALAT1 ENE+A interaction in vitro: Binding was observed with recombinant METTL16, but diminished in lysate depleted of METTL16, and a supershift was detected after adding anti-METTL16 antibody. Importantly, RNA immunoprecipitation after in vivo UV cross-linking and an in situ proximity ligation assay for RNA-protein interactions confirmed an association between METTL16 and MALAT1 in cells. METTL16 is an abundant (∼5 × 10(5) molecules per cell) nuclear protein in HeLa cells. Its identification as a triple-stranded RNA binding protein supports the formation of RNA triple helices inside cells and suggests the existence of a class of triple-stranded RNA binding proteins, which may enable the discovery of additional cellular RNA triple helices.

  9. Methyltransferase-like protein 16 binds the 3′-terminal triple helix of MALAT1 long noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jessica A.; Kinzig, Charles G.; DeGregorio, Suzanne J.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), a cancer-promoting long noncoding RNA, accumulates in cells by using a 3′-triple-helical RNA stability element for nuclear expression (ENE). The ENE, a stem-loop structure containing a U-rich internal loop, interacts with a downstream A-rich tract (ENE+A) to form a blunt-ended triple helix composed of nine U•A-U triples interrupted by a C•G-C triple and C-G doublet. This unique structure prompted us to explore the possibility of protein binding. Native gel-shift assays revealed a shift in radiolabeled MALAT1 ENE+A RNA upon addition of HEK293T cell lysate. Competitive gel-shift assays suggested that protein binding depends not only on the triple-helical structure but also its nucleotide composition. Selection from the lysate using a biotinylated-RNA probe followed by mass spectrometry identified methyltransferase-like protein 16 (METTL16), a putative RNA methyltransferase, as an interacting protein of the MALAT1 ENE+A. Gel-shift assays confirmed the METTL16–MALAT1 ENE+A interaction in vitro: Binding was observed with recombinant METTL16, but diminished in lysate depleted of METTL16, and a supershift was detected after adding anti-METTL16 antibody. Importantly, RNA immunoprecipitation after in vivo UV cross-linking and an in situ proximity ligation assay for RNA–protein interactions confirmed an association between METTL16 and MALAT1 in cells. METTL16 is an abundant (∼5 × 105 molecules per cell) nuclear protein in HeLa cells. Its identification as a triple-stranded RNA binding protein supports the formation of RNA triple helices inside cells and suggests the existence of a class of triple-stranded RNA binding proteins, which may enable the discovery of additional cellular RNA triple helices. PMID:27872311

  10. The vacuolar channel VvALMT9 mediates malate and tartrate accumulation in berries of Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    De Angeli, Alexis; Baetz, Ulrike; Francisco, Rita; Zhang, Jingbo; Chaves, Maria Manuela; Regalado, Ana

    2013-08-01

    Vitis vinifera L. represents an economically important fruit species. Grape and wine flavour is made from a complex set of compounds. The acidity of berries is a major parameter in determining grape berry quality for wine making and fruit consumption. Despite the importance of malic and tartaric acid (TA) storage and transport for grape berry acidity, no vacuolar transporter for malate or tartrate has been identified so far. Some members of the aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) anion channel family from Arabidopsis thaliana have been shown to be involved in mediating malate fluxes across the tonoplast. Therefore, we hypothesised that a homologue of these channels could have a similar role in V. vinifera grape berries. We identified homologues of the Arabidopsis vacuolar anion channel AtALMT9 through a TBLASTX search on the V. vinifera genome database. We cloned the closest homologue of AtALMT9 from grape berry cDNA and designated it VvALMT9. The expression profile revealed that VvALMT9 is constitutively expressed in berry mesocarp tissue and that its transcription level increases during fruit maturation. Moreover, we found that VvALMT9 is targeted to the vacuolar membrane. Using patch-clamp analysis, we could show that, besides malate, VvALMT9 mediates tartrate currents which are higher than in its Arabidopsis homologue. In summary, in the present study we provide evidence that VvALMT9 is a vacuolar malate channel expressed in grape berries. Interestingly, in V. vinifera, a tartrate-producing plant, the permeability of the channel is apparently adjusted to TA.

  11. A reappraisal of some structural features of bovine heart malate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Heyde, Elizabeth; Ainsworth, S.

    1968-01-01

    1. Malate dehydrogenase of the mitochondrial type was prepared from an acetone-prepared powder of thoroughly washed minces of whole bovine heart by previously reported methods that were modified to give higher yields of the purified enzyme. 2. Determinations of the sedimentation and diffusion coefficients showed the molecular weight of the enzyme to be approx. 63000. The amino acid composition of the enzyme was also determined. Discrepancies between these data and similar data previously reported by Davies & Kun (1957) and Siegel & Englard (1962) were resolved. 3. `Fingerprints' were made from tryptic digests of heat-denatured and of reduced and alkylated enzyme. These indicated that the enzyme is composed of a number of identical or similar sub-units. ImagesFig. 1. PMID:5683513

  12. Effects of Al(III) and Nano-Al13 Species on Malate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al13 can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al13 concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al13 on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules. PMID:22163924

  13. Isoform expression in the multiple soluble malate dehydrogenase of Hoplias malabaricus (Erythrinidae, Characiformes).

    PubMed

    Aquino-Silva, M R; Schwantes, M L; Schwantes, A R

    2003-02-01

    Kinetic properties and thermal stabilities of Hoplias malabaricus liver and skeletal muscle unfractionated malate dehydrogenase (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37) and its isolated isoforms were analyzed to further study the possible sMDH-A* locus duplication evolved from a recent tandem duplication. Both A (A1 and A2) and B isoforms had similar optima pH (7.5-8.0). While Hoplias A isoform could not be characterized as thermostable, B could as thermolabile. A isoforms differed from B isoform in having higher Km values for oxaloacetate. The possibly duplicated A2 isoform showed higher substrate affinity than the A1. Hoplias duplicated A isoforms may influence the direction of carbon flow between glycolisis and gluconeogenesis.

  14. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules.

  15. Closing Plant Stomata Requires a Homolog of an Aluminum-Activated Malate Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Mori, Izumi C.; Furuichi, Takuya; Munemasa, Shintaro; Toyooka, Kiminori; Matsuoka, Ken; Murata, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Plant stomata limit both carbon dioxide uptake and water loss; hence, stomatal aperture is carefully set as the environment fluctuates. Aperture area is known to be regulated in part by ion transport, but few of the transporters have been characterized. Here we report that AtALMT12 (At4g17970), a homolog of the aluminum-activated malate transporter (ALMT) of wheat, is expressed in guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. Loss-of-function mutations in AtALMT12 impair stomatal closure induced by ABA, calcium and darkness, but do not abolish either the rapidly activated or the slowly activated anion currents previously identified as being important for stomatal closure. Expressed in Xenopus oocytes, AtALMT12 facilitates chloride and nitrate currents, but not those of organic solutes. Therefore, we conclude that AtALMT12 is a novel class of anion transporter involved in stomatal closure. PMID:20154005

  16. Changes in lactate and malate dehydrogenase isoenzymes in salmonella under the effect of potassium dichloroisocyanurate.

    PubMed

    Kotova, A L

    1978-01-01

    The method of enzyme-electrophoresis in agar gel according to Wieme (1959) was used for the study of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) isoenzymes of 24-hour and 48-hour Salmonella cultures exposed to a 0.02% solution of potassium dichloroisocyanurate (PDIC). Severe repression of LDH and MDH isoenzymes was observed immediately after the exposure of the culture to the disinfectant solution. A significant decrease in the content of the isoenzyme LDH1 and of the cytoplasmic fraction (C1) of MDH simultaneously with the appearance of the fractions LDH4, LDH1a and LDH1b were established in the strains cultured on MPA in the course of 24 hours following the exposure. A tendency to a decrease in the LDH1 content was preserved in the experimental cultures after 48 hours, but the spectrum of MDH isoenzymes showed almost no differences in comparison with that of MDH isoenzymes in 48-hour cultures of the control strains.

  17. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone encoding rat mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, P M; Tellam, J; May, V L; Strauss, A W

    1986-01-01

    We have determined the complete sequence of the rat mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) precursor derived from nucleotide sequence of the cDNA. A single synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide probe was used to screen a rat atrial cDNA library constructed in lambda gt10. A 1.2 kb full-length cDNA clone provided the first complete amino acid sequence of pre-mMDH. The 1014 nucleotide-long open reading frame encodes the 314 residue long mature mMDH protein and a 24 amino acid NH2-terminal extension which directs mitochondrial import and is cleaved from the precursor after import to generate mature mMDH. The amino acid composition of the transit peptide is polar and basic. The pre-mMDH transit peptide shows marked homology with those of two other enzymes targeted to the rat mitochondrial matrix. Images PMID:3755817

  18. Silencing of long noncoding RNA MALAT1 by miR-101 and miR-217 inhibits proliferation, migration, and invasion of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinyu; Li, Meng; Wang, Zhiqiong; Han, Sichong; Tang, Xiaohu; Ge, Yunxia; Zhou, Liqing; Zhou, Changchun; Yuan, Qipeng; Yang, Ming

    2015-02-13

    MALAT1, a highly conserved long noncoding RNA, is deregulated in several types of cancers. However, its role in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and its posttranscriptional regulation remain poorly understood. In this study we provide first evidences that a posttranscriptional regulation mechanism of MALAT1 by miR-101 and miR-217 exists in ESCC cells. This posttranscriptional silencing of MALAT1 could significantly suppress the proliferation of ESCC cells through the arrest of G2/M cell cycle, which may be due to MALAT1-mediated up-regulation of p21 and p27 expression and the inhibition of B-MYB expression. Moreover, we also found the abilities of migration and invasion of ESCC cells were inhibited after overexpression of miR-101, miR-217, or MALAT1 siRNA. This might be attributed to the deregulation of downstream genes of MALAT1, such as MIA2, HNF4G, ROBO1, CCT4, and CTHRC1. A significant negative correlation exists between miR-101 or miR-217 and MALAT1 in 42 pairs of ESCC tissue samples and adjacent normal tissues. Mice xenograft data also support the tumor suppressor role of both miRNAs in ESCCs. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Long non-coding RNA Malat1 promotes neurite outgrowth through activation of ERK/MAPK signalling pathway in N2a cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Feng, Peimin; Zhu, Xi; He, Shixu; Duan, Jialan; Zhou, Dong

    2016-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are playing critical roles in neurogenesis, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely elusive. Neurite outgrowth is an early step in neuronal differentiation and regeneration. Using in vitro differentiation of neuroblastoma-derived Neuro-2a (N2a) cell as a model, we performed expression profiling to identify lncRNAs putatively relevant for neurite outgrowth. We identified that Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (Malat1) was one of the most significantly up-regulated lncRNAs during N2a cell differentiation. Malat1 knockdown resulted in defects in neurite outgrowth as well as enhanced cell death. To pinpoint signalling pathways perturbed by Malat1 depletion, we then performed a reporter-based screening to examine the activities of 50 signalling pathways in Malat1 knockdown cells. We found that Malat1 knockdown resulted in conspicuous inhibition of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway as well as abnormal activation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) and P53 signalling pathway. Inhibition of ERK/MAPK pathway with PD98059 potently blocked N2a cell neurite outgrowth, whereas phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced ERK activation rescued defects in neurite outgrowth and cell death induced by Malat1 depletion. Together, our results established a critical role of Malat1 in the early step of neuronal differentiation through activating ERK/MAPK signalling pathway.

  20. Hoogsteen-position pyrimidines promote the stability and function of the MALAT1 RNA triple helix

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jessica A.; Kinzig, Charles G.; DeGregorio, Suzanne J.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-stranded RNA was first deduced to form in vitro more than 50 years ago and has since been implicated in RNA catalysis, stability, and small molecule binding. Despite the emerging biological significance of RNA triple helices, it remains unclear how their nucleotide composition contributes to their thermodynamic stability and cellular function. To investigate these properties, we used in vitro RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) and in vivo intronless β-globin reporter assays to measure the relative contribution of 20 RNA base triples (N•A–U, N•G–C, N•C–G, N•U–A, and N•G–U) to triple-helical stability. These triples replaced a single internal U•A–U within the known structure of the triple-helical RNA stability element of human metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), which contains 10 major-groove base triples. In addition to the canonical C•G–C triple, the noncanonical base triples U•G–C, U•G–U, C•C–G, and U•C–G exhibited at least 30% stability relative to the wild-type U•A–U base triple in both assays. Of these triples, only U•A–U, C•G–C, and U•G–C, when tested as four successive triples, formed stabilizing structures that allowed accumulation of the intronless β-globin reporter. Overall, we find that Hoogsteen-position pyrimidines support triple helix stability and function and that thermodynamic stability, based on EMSA results, is necessary but not sufficient for stabilization activity of the MALAT1 triple helix in cells. These results suggest that additional RNA triple helices containing noncanonical triples likely exist in nature. PMID:26952103

  1. Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase lowers leaf respiration and alters photorespiration and plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tomaz, Tiago; Bagard, Matthieu; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Lindén, Pernilla; Lee, Chun Pong; Carroll, Adam J; Ströher, Elke; Smith, Steven M; Gardeström, Per; Millar, A Harvey

    2010-11-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes a reversible NAD(+)-dependent-dehydrogenase reaction involved in central metabolism and redox homeostasis between organelle compartments. To explore the role of mitochondrial MDH (mMDH) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), knockout single and double mutants for the highly expressed mMDH1 and lower expressed mMDH2 isoforms were constructed and analyzed. A mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has no detectable mMDH activity but is viable, albeit small and slow growing. Quantitative proteome analysis of mitochondria shows changes in other mitochondrial NAD-linked dehydrogenases, indicating a reorganization of such enzymes in the mitochondrial matrix. The slow-growing mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has elevated leaf respiration rate in the dark and light, without loss of photosynthetic capacity, suggesting that mMDH normally uses NADH to reduce oxaloacetate to malate, which is then exported to the cytosol, rather than to drive mitochondrial respiration. Increased respiratory rate in leaves can account in part for the low net CO(2) assimilation and slow growth rate of mmdh1mmdh2. Loss of mMDH also affects photorespiration, as evidenced by a lower postillumination burst, alterations in CO(2) assimilation/intercellular CO(2) curves at low CO(2), and the light-dependent elevated concentration of photorespiratory metabolites. Complementation of mmdh1mmdh2 with an mMDH cDNA recovered mMDH activity, suppressed respiratory rate, ameliorated changes to photorespiration, and increased plant growth. A previously established inverse correlation between mMDH and ascorbate content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has been consolidated in Arabidopsis and may potentially be linked to decreased galactonolactone dehydrogenase content in mitochondria in the mutant. Overall, a central yet complex role for mMDH emerges in the partitioning of carbon and energy in leaves, providing new directions for bioengineering of plant growth rate and a new insight into the molecular mechanisms

  2. Acute Citrulline-Malate Supplementation and High-Intensity Cycling Performance.

    PubMed

    Cunniffe, Brian; Papageorgiou, Maria; OʼBrien, Barbara; Davies, Nathan A; Grimble, George K; Cardinale, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Cunniffe, B, Papageorgiou, M, O'Brien, B, Davies, NA, Grimble, GK, and Cardinale, M. Acute citrulline-malate supplementation and high-intensity cycling performance. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2638-2647, 2016-Dietary L-citrulline-malate (CM) consumption has been suggested to improve skeletal muscle metabolism and contractile efficiency, which would be expected to predispose exercising individuals to greater fatigue resistance. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of CM supplementation on acid-base balance and high-intensity exercise performance. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 10 well-trained males consumed either 12 g of CM (in 400 ml) or lemon sugar-free cordial (placebo [PL]) 60 minutes before completion of 2 exercise trials. Each trial consisted of subjects performing 10 (×15 seconds) maximal cycle sprints (with 30-second rest intervals) followed by 5 minutes recovery before completing a cycle time-to-exhaustion test (TTE) at 100% of individual peak power (PP). Significant increases in plasma concentrations of citrulline (8.8-fold), ornithine (3.9-fold), and glutamine (1.3-fold) were observed 60 minutes after supplementation in the CM trial only (p ≤ 0.05) and none of the subjects experienced gastrointestinal side-effects during testing. Significantly higher exercise heart rates were observed in CM condition (vs. PL) although no between trial differences in performance related variables (TTE: [120 ± 61 seconds CM vs. 113 ± 50 seconds PL]), PP or mean power, ([power fatigue index: 36 ± 16% CM vs. 28 ± 18% PL]), subjective rating of perceived exertion or measures of acid-base balance (pH, lactate, bicarbonate, base-excess) were observed (p > 0.05). This study demonstrated that acute supplementation of 12 g CM does not provide acute ergogenic benefits using the protocol implemented in this study in well-trained males.

  3. Hoogsteen-position pyrimidines promote the stability and function of the MALAT1 RNA triple helix.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessica A; Kinzig, Charles G; DeGregorio, Suzanne J; Steitz, Joan A

    2016-05-01

    Triple-stranded RNA was first deduced to form in vitro more than 50 years ago and has since been implicated in RNA catalysis, stability, and small molecule binding. Despite the emerging biological significance of RNA triple helices, it remains unclear how their nucleotide composition contributes to their thermodynamic stability and cellular function. To investigate these properties, we used in vitro RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) and in vivo intronless β-globin reporter assays to measure the relative contribution of 20 RNA base triples (N•A-U, N•G-C, N•C-G, N•U-A, and N•G-U) to triple-helical stability. These triples replaced a single internal U•A-U within the known structure of the triple-helical RNA stability element of human metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), which contains 10 major-groove base triples. In addition to the canonical C•G-C triple, the noncanonical base triples U•G-C, U•G-U, C•C-G, and U•C-G exhibited at least 30% stability relative to the wild-type U•A-U base triple in both assays. Of these triples, only U•A-U, C•G-C, and U•G-C, when tested as four successive triples, formed stabilizing structures that allowed accumulation of the intronless β-globin reporter. Overall, we find that Hoogsteen-position pyrimidines support triple helix stability and function and that thermodynamic stability, based on EMSA results, is necessary but not sufficient for stabilization activity of the MALAT1 triple helix in cells. These results suggest that additional RNA triple helices containing noncanonical triples likely exist in nature.

  4. Citrulline/malate promotes aerobic energy production in human exercising muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bendahan, D; Mattei, J; Ghattas, B; Confort-Gouny, S; Le Guern, M E; Cozzone, P

    2002-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown an antiasthenic effect of citrulline/malate (CM) but the mechanism of action at the muscular level remains unknown. Objective: To investigate the effects of CM supplementation on muscle energetics. Methods: Eighteen men complaining of fatigue but with no documented disease were included in the study. A rest-exercise (finger flexions)-recovery protocol was performed twice before (D-7 and D0), three times during (D3, D8, D15), and once after (D22) 15 days of oral supplementation with 6 g/day CM. Metabolism of the flexor digitorum superficialis was analysed by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 4.7 T. Results: Metabolic variables measured twice before CM ingestion showed no differences, indicating good reproducibility of measurements and no learning effect from repeating the exercise protocol. CM ingestion resulted in a significant reduction in the sensation of fatigue, a 34% increase in the rate of oxidative ATP production during exercise, and a 20% increase in the rate of phosphocreatine recovery after exercise, indicating a larger contribution of oxidative ATP synthesis to energy production. Considering subjects individually and variables characterising aerobic function, extrema were measured after either eight or 15 days of treatment, indicating chronological heterogeneity of treatment induced changes. One way analysis of variance confirmed improved aerobic function, which may be the result of an enhanced malate supply activating ATP production from the tricarboxylic acid cycle through anaplerotic reactions. Conclusion: The changes in muscle metabolism produced by CM treatment indicate that CM may promote aerobic energy production. PMID:12145119

  5. Primary structure of the light-dependent regulatory site of corn NADP-malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Decottignies, P; Schmitter, J M; Miginiac-Maslow, M; Le Maréchal, P; Jacquot, J P; Gadal, P

    1988-08-25

    The light-activated NADP-malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) catalyzes the reduction of oxaloacetate to malate in higher plant chloroplasts. This enzyme is regulated in vivo by the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system through redox reactions. NADP-MDH has been photoactivated in vitro in a chloroplast system reconstituted from the pure protein components and thylakoid membranes. Photoactivation was accompanied by the appearance of new thiol groups (followed by [14C]iodoacetate incorporation). 14C-Carboxymethylated NADP-MDH has been purified from the incubation mixture and its amino-terminal sequence analyzed. Two [14C]carboxymethylcysteines were identified at positions 10 and 15 after light activation, while they were not detected in the dark-treated protein. In addition, the analysis of the tryptic digest of light-activated [14C]carboxymethylated NADP-MDH revealed that the radioactive label was mostly incorporated in Cys10 and Cys15, indicating that these 2 residues play a major role in the light activation mechanism. Moreover, an activation model, in which photoreduced thio-redoxin was replaced by the dithiol reductant dithio-threitol, has been developed. When NADP-MDH was activated in this way, the same sulfhydryls were found to be labeled, and alternatively, they did not incorporate any radioactivity when dithiothreitol reduction was performed after carboxymethylation in denaturating conditions. These results indicate that activation (by light or by dithiothreitol) proceeds on each subunit by reduction of a disulfide bridge located at the amino terminus of the enzyme between Cys10 and Cys15.

  6. Chemically Defined Medium for the Accumulation of Intracellular Malate Dehydrogenase by Streptomyces aureofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Laluce, Cecília; Ernandes, José Roberto; Molinari, Rubens

    1987-01-01

    A chemically defined medium was developed for the production of intracellular malate dehydrogenases by Streptomyces aureofaciens NRRL-B 1286. The composition of the medium (per liter) was as follows: 50 g of starch, 4 g of ammonium sulfate, 7.32 g of l-aspartic acid, 13.8 g of MgSO4 · 7H2O, 1.7 g of K2HPO4, 0.01 g of ZnSO4 · 7H2O, 0.01 g of FeSO4 · 7H2O, 0.01 g of MnSO4 · H2O, and 0.005 g of CoSO4 · 7H2O. The pH of the medium was adjusted to 6.7 to 7.0 after sterilization. The activity of the intracellular malate dehydrogenases of the crude cell extract was greatest after 40 h of mycelium growth in a rotary shaker at 30°C. The best temperature for the enzyme reactions was approximately 35°C for NAD+ activity at pH 9.7 and 40°C for NADP+ -linked enzyme at pH 9.0. The NAD+ activity required Mg2+, and both activities were sensitive to SH-group reagents. The NADP+ -dependent activity remained completely stable, and the NAD+ -dependent activity decreased to a very low residual level after 30 min at 60°C. PMID:16347416

  7. Primary structure of the light-dependent regulatory site of corn NADP-malate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Decottignies, P.; Schmitter, J.M.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.; Le Marechal, P.; Jacquot, J.P.; Gadal, P.

    1988-08-25

    The light-activated NADP-malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) catalyzes the reduction of oxaloacetate to malate in higher plant chloroplasts. This enzyme is regulated in vivo by the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system through redox reactions. NADP-MDH has been photoactivated in vitro in a chloroplast system reconstituted from the pure protein components and thylakoid membranes. Photoactivation was accompanied by the appearance of new thiol groups (followed by (14C)iodoacetate incorporation). 14C-Carboxymethylated NADP-MDH has been purified from the incubation mixture and its amino-terminal sequence analyzed. Two (14C)carboxymethylcysteines were identified at positions 10 and 15 after light activation, while they were not detected in the dark-treated protein. In addition, the analysis of the tryptic digest of light-activated (14C)carboxymethylated NADP-MDH revealed that the radioactive label was mostly incorporated in Cys10 and Cys15, indicating that these 2 residues play a major role in the light activation mechanism. Moreover, an activation model, in which photoreduced thio-redoxin was replaced by the dithiol reductant dithio-threitol, has been developed. When NADP-MDH was activated in this way, the same sulfhydryls were found to be labeled, and alternatively, they did not incorporate any radioactivity when dithiothreitol reduction was performed after carboxymethylation in denaturating conditions. These results indicate that activation (by light or by dithiothreitol) proceeds on each subunit by reduction of a disulfide bridge located at the amino terminus of the enzyme between Cys10 and Cys15.

  8. Functional and prognostic significance of long non-coding RNA MALAT1 as a metastasis driver in ER negative lymph node negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jadaliha, Mahdieh; Zong, Xinying; Malakar, Pushkar; Ray, Tania; Singh, Deepak K.; Freier, Susan M.; Jensen, Tor; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Karni, Rotem; Ray, Partha S.; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V.

    2016-01-01

    MALAT1 (metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript1) is a conserved long non-coding RNA, known to regulate gene expression by modulating transcription and post-transcriptional pre-mRNA processing of a large number of genes. MALAT1 expression is deregulated in various tumors, including breast cancer. However, the significance of such abnormal expression is yet to be fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate that regulation of aggressive breast cancer cell traits by MALAT1 is not predicted solely based on an elevated expression level but is context specific. By performing loss- and gain-of-function studies, both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, we demonstrate that MALAT1 facilitates cell proliferation, tumor progression and metastasis of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells despite having a comparatively lower expression level than ER or HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Furthermore, MALAT1 regulates the expression of several cancer metastasis-related genes, but displays molecular subtype specific correlations with such genes. Assessment of the prognostic significance of MALAT1 in human breast cancer (n=1992) revealed elevated MALAT1 expression was associated with decreased disease-specific survival in ER negative, lymph node negative patients of the HER2 and TNBC molecular subtypes. Multivariable analysis confirmed MALAT1 to have independent prognostic significance in the TNBC lymph node negative patient subset (HR=2.64, 95%CI 1.35 − 5.16, p=0.005). We propose that the functional significance of MALAT1 as a metastasis driver and its potential use as a prognostic marker is most promising for those patients diagnosed with ER negative, lymph node negative breast cancer who might otherwise mistakenly be stratified to have low recurrence risk. PMID:27250026

  9. Effects of miRNA-143 and the non-coding RNA MALAT1 on the pathogenesis and metastasis of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Niyazi, H E X D; Zhao, H R; Cao, X P; Abudula, M N S; Ye, W J; Zhang, S A; Yiming, R H M; Zhang, Y; Su, W P; Chen, R; Ouyang, Y; Miao, N; Bao, Y X

    2017-02-23

    Cervical cancer is a common female malignancy of global dimensions. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles in the development, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis of tumors. The non-coding RNA MALAT1 participates in various physiological processes that are important for proper functioning of the body. Here, we analyzed the expression of miRNA-143 and MALAT1 in HeLa cells to evaluate their roles in the occurrence and metastasis of cervical cancer. HeLa cells were divided into five groups depending on the treatment conditions, namely, transfected with miRNA-143, MALAT1, miRNA-143 inhibitor and the MALAT1 inhibitor, and the untreated control. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the expression of miRNA-143 and MALAT1, the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay to assess proliferation, the trans-well assay to study cell invasion and migration, and western blot to analyze the levels of E-cadherin and vimentin. The proliferation of HeLa cells increased upon treatment with the miRNA-143 inhibitor and decreased when treated with the MALAT1 inhibitor, compared to the proliferation of the groups that were transfected with miRNA-143 and MALAT1, respectively (P < 0.05). Thus, miRNA-143 decreased cell invasion and migration potency, downregulated vimentin and upregulated E-cadherin expression, while MALAT1 had the opposite effects. In conclusion, the low expression of miRNA-143 and high expression of MALAT1 in cervical cancer cells could possibly potentiate cell invasion/migration and alter the levels of vimentin and E-cadherin.

  10. Functional and prognostic significance of long non-coding RNA MALAT1 as a metastasis driver in ER negative lymph node negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jadaliha, Mahdieh; Zong, Xinying; Malakar, Pushkar; Ray, Tania; Singh, Deepak K; Freier, Susan M; Jensen, Tor; Prasanth, Supriya G; Karni, Rotem; Ray, Partha S; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V

    2016-06-28

    MALAT1 (metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript1) is a conserved long non-coding RNA, known to regulate gene expression by modulating transcription and post-transcriptional pre-mRNA processing of a large number of genes. MALAT1 expression is deregulated in various tumors, including breast cancer. However, the significance of such abnormal expression is yet to be fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate that regulation of aggressive breast cancer cell traits by MALAT1 is not predicted solely based on an elevated expression level but is context specific. By performing loss- and gain-of-function studies, both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, we demonstrate that MALAT1 facilitates cell proliferation, tumor progression and metastasis of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells despite having a comparatively lower expression level than ER or HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Furthermore, MALAT1 regulates the expression of several cancer metastasis-related genes, but displays molecular subtype specific correlations with such genes. Assessment of the prognostic significance of MALAT1 in human breast cancer (n=1992) revealed elevated MALAT1 expression was associated with decreased disease-specific survival in ER negative, lymph node negative patients of the HER2 and TNBC molecular subtypes. Multivariable analysis confirmed MALAT1 to have independent prognostic significance in the TNBC lymph node negative patient subset (HR=2.64, 95%CI 1.35- 5.16, p=0.005). We propose that the functional significance of MALAT1 as a metastasis driver and its potential use as a prognostic marker is most promising for those patients diagnosed with ER negative, lymph node negative breast cancer who might otherwise mistakenly be stratified to have low recurrence risk.

  11. Effects of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzyme levels and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats: A dose–response and curative effects study

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Weiwei; Mao, Guanghua; Li, Qian; Wang, Wei; Chen, Yao; Zhao, Ting; Li, Fang; Zou, Ye; Wu, Huiyu; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzyme levels and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats, and dose–response and curative effects. Materials and Methods The model of type 2 diabetes rats was developed, and daily treatment with chromium malate was given for 4 weeks. A rat enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit was used to assay glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzyme levels and lipid metabolism changes. Results The results showed that the antihyperglycemic activity increased with administration of chromium malate in a dose–dependent manner. The serum insulin level, insulin resistance index and C-peptide level of the chromium malate groups at a dose of 17.5, 20.0 and 20.8 μg chromium/kg bodyweight were significantly lower than that of the model, chromium trichloride and chromium picolinate groups. The hepatic glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glucokinase levels of the chromium malate groups at a dose of 17.5, 20.0 and 20.8 μg chromium/kg bodyweight were significantly higher than that of the model, chromium trichloride and chromium picolinate groups. Chromium malate at a dose of 20.0 and 20.8 μg chromium/kg bodyweight significantly changed the total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides levels compared with the chromium trichloride and chromium picolinate groups. Conclusions The results showed that chromium malate exhibits greater benefits in treating type 2 diabetes, and the curative effect of chromium malate is superior to chromium trichloride and chromium picolinate. PMID:26221518

  12. microRNA-9 targets the long non-coding RNA MALAT1 for degradation in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Leucci, Eleonora; Patella, Francesca; Waage, Johannes; Holmstrøm, Kim; Lindow, Morten; Porse, Bo; Kauppinen, Sakari; Lund, Anders H.

    2013-01-01

    microRNAs regulate the expression of over 60% of protein coding genes by targeting their mRNAs to AGO2-containing complexes in the cytoplasm and promoting their translational inhibition and/or degradation. There is little evidence so far for microRNA-mediated regulation of other classes of non-coding RNAs. Here we report that microRNA-9 (miR-9) regulates the expression of the Metastasis Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1 (MALAT-1), one of the most abundant and conserved long non-coding RNAs. Intriguingly, we find that miR-9 targets AGO2-mediated regulation of MALAT1 in the nucleus. Our findings reveal a novel direct regulatory link between two important classes of non-coding RNAs, miRs and lncRNAs, and advance our understanding of microRNA functions. PMID:23985560

  13. Role of NAD+-Dependent Malate Dehydrogenase in the Metabolism of Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b

    PubMed Central

    Rozova, Olga N.; Khmelenina, Valentina N.; Bocharova, Ksenia A.; Mustakhimov, Ildar I.; Trotsenko, Yuri A.

    2015-01-01

    We have expressed the l-malate dehydrogenase (MDH) genes from aerobic methanotrophs Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b as his-tagged proteins in Escherichia coli. The substrate specificities, enzymatic kinetics and oligomeric states of the MDHs have been characterized. Both MDHs were NAD+-specific and thermostable enzymes not affected by metal ions or various organic metabolites. The MDH from M. alcaliphilum 20Z was a homodimeric (2 × 35 kDa) enzyme displaying nearly equal reductive (malate formation) and oxidative (oxaloacetate formation) activities and higher affinity to malate (Km = 0.11 mM) than to oxaloacetate (Km = 0.34 mM). The MDH from M. trichosporium OB3b was homotetrameric (4 × 35 kDa), two-fold more active in the reaction of oxaloacetate reduction compared to malate oxidation and exhibiting higher affinity to oxaloacetate (Km = 0.059 mM) than to malate (Km = 1.28 mM). The kcat/Km ratios indicated that the enzyme from M. alcaliphilum 20Z had a remarkably high catalytic efficiency for malate oxidation, while the MDH of M. trichosporium OB3b was preferable for oxaloacetate reduction. The metabolic roles of the enzymes in the specific metabolism of the two methanotrophs are discussed. PMID:27682078

  14. Type 2 Diabetic Rats on Diet Supplemented With Chromium Malate Show Improved Glycometabolism, Glycometabolism-Related Enzyme Levels and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Weiwei; Zhao, Ting; Mao, Guanghua; Wang, Wei; Feng, Yun; Li, Fang; Zheng, Daheng; Wu, Huiyu; Jin, Dun; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that chromium malate improved the regulation of blood glucose in mice with alloxan-induced diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats. Our results showed that fasting blood glucose, serum insulin level, insulin resistance index and C-peptide level in the high dose group had a significant downward trend when compared with the model group, chromium picolinate group and chromium trichloride group. The hepatic glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucokinase, Glut4, phosphor-AMPKβ1 and Akt levels in the high dose group were significantly higher than those of the model, chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride groups. Chromium malate in a high dose group can significantly increase high density lipoprotein cholesterol level while decreasing the total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels when compared with chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride. The serum chromium content in chromium malate and chromium picolinate group is significantly higher than that of the chromium trichloride group. The results indicated that the curative effects of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes and lipid metabolism changes are better than those of chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride. Chromium malate contributes to glucose uptake and transport in order to improved glycometabolism and glycometabolism-related enzymes. PMID:25942313

  15. Type 2 diabetic rats on diet supplemented with chromium malate show improved glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzyme levels and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Feng, Weiwei; Zhao, Ting; Mao, Guanghua; Wang, Wei; Feng, Yun; Li, Fang; Zheng, Daheng; Wu, Huiyu; Jin, Dun; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that chromium malate improved the regulation of blood glucose in mice with alloxan-induced diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats. Our results showed that fasting blood glucose, serum insulin level, insulin resistance index and C-peptide level in the high dose group had a significant downward trend when compared with the model group, chromium picolinate group and chromium trichloride group. The hepatic glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucokinase, Glut4, phosphor-AMPKβ1 and Akt levels in the high dose group were significantly higher than those of the model, chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride groups. Chromium malate in a high dose group can significantly increase high density lipoprotein cholesterol level while decreasing the total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels when compared with chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride. The serum chromium content in chromium malate and chromium picolinate group is significantly higher than that of the chromium trichloride group. The results indicated that the curative effects of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes and lipid metabolism changes are better than those of chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride. Chromium malate contributes to glucose uptake and transport in order to improved glycometabolism and glycometabolism-related enzymes.

  16. Metabolic Processes in Cytoplasmic Particles of the Avocado Fruit. IX. The Oxidation of Pyruvate and Malate during the Climacteric Cycle 12

    PubMed Central

    Lance, C.; Hobson, G. E.; Young, R. E.; Biale, J. B.

    1967-01-01

    Mitochondria isolated from preclimacteric avocado fruit oxidize pyruvate at a much lower rate than those separated from climacteric fruit. The external addition of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) increased the rate of pyruvate oxidation in both cases. The study of the influence of TPP on the rate of oxidation of malate by mitochondria obtained from both preclimacteric and climacteric fruit indicated that the effect of this cofactor could be understood by assuming that malate was converted to pyruvate. TPP stimulation of malate oxidation was prevented by arsenite, an inhibitor of keto acid oxidation. The addition of glutamate increased the rate of malate oxidation through the transamination of oxaloacetate. This suggests that the rate of oxidation of malate is highly dependent upon mechanisms which remove oxaloacetate efficiently. Incubation of mitochondria from preclimacteric fruit with malate-U-14C resulted in the labeling of oxaloacetate and the accumulation of labeled pyruvate. Addition of TPP to this system induced the rapid formation of citrate. This conversion was completely inhibited by arsenite. The results indicate that the ability to carry out the oxidative decarboxylation of α-ketoacids improves as the ripening process progresses. The idea was advanced that TPP available to the mitochondria plays an important controlling role. PMID:6042356

  17. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 acts as a competing endogenous RNA to promote malignant melanoma growth and metastasis by sponging miR-22

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Xuefeng; Xia, Yun; Wang, Jinlong; Djangmah, Henry Siaw; Liu, Xiaohui; You, Yongping; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in tumorigenesis. Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), an lncRNAs, is associated with the growth and metastasis of many human tumors, but its biological roles in malignant melanoma remain unclear. In this study, the aberrant up-regulation of MALAT1 was detected in melanoma. We determined that MALAT1 promotes melanoma cells proliferation, invasion and migration by sponging miR-22. MiR-22 was decreased and acted as a tumor suppressor in melanoma, and MMP14 and Snail were the functional targets of miR-22. Furthermore, MALAT1 could modulate MMP14 and Snail by operating as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) for miR-22. The effects of MALAT1 in malignant melanoma is verified using a xenograft model. This finding elucidates a new mechanism for MALAT1 in melanoma development and provides a potential target for melanoma therapeutic intervention. PMID:27564100

  18. Malate Plays a Crucial Role in Starch Metabolism, Ripening, and Soluble Solid Content of Tomato Fruit and Affects Postharvest Softening[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Centeno, Danilo C.; Osorio, Sonia; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Bertolo, Ana L.F.; Carneiro, Raphael T.; Araújo, Wagner L.; Steinhauser, Marie-Caroline; Michalska, Justyna; Rohrmann, Johannes; Geigenberger, Peter; Oliver, Sandra N.; Stitt, Mark; Carrari, Fernando; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that the organic acid content of a fruit is regarded as one of its most commercially important quality traits when assessed by the consumer, relatively little is known concerning the physiological importance of organic acid metabolism for the fruit itself. Here, we evaluate the effect of modifying malate metabolism in a fruit-specific manner, by reduction of the activities of either mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase or fumarase, via targeted antisense approaches in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). While these genetic perturbations had relatively little effect on the total fruit yield, they had dramatic consequences for fruit metabolism, as well as unanticipated changes in postharvest shelf life and susceptibility to bacterial infection. Detailed characterization suggested that the rate of ripening was essentially unaltered but that lines containing higher malate were characterized by lower levels of transitory starch and a lower soluble sugars content at harvest, whereas those with lower malate contained higher levels of these carbohydrates. Analysis of the activation state of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase revealed that it correlated with the accumulation of transitory starch. Taken together with the altered activation state of the plastidial malate dehydrogenase and the modified pigment biosynthesis of the transgenic lines, these results suggest that the phenotypes are due to an altered cellular redox status. The combined data reveal the importance of malate metabolism in tomato fruit metabolism and development and confirm the importance of transitory starch in the determination of agronomic yield in this species. PMID:21239646

  19. Characterization of the kinetics of cardiac cytosolic malate dehydrogenase and comparative analysis of cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms.

    PubMed

    Dasika, Santosh K; Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Beard, Daniel A

    2015-01-20

    Because the mitochondrial inner membrane is impermeable to pyridine nucleotides, transport of reducing equivalents between the mitochondrial matrix and the cytoplasm relies on shuttle mechanisms, including the malate-aspartate shuttle and the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle. These shuttles are needed for reducing equivalents generated by metabolic reactions in the cytosol to be oxidized via aerobic metabolism. Two isoenzymes of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) operate as components of the malate-aspartate shuttle, in which a reducing equivalent is transported via malate, which when oxidized to oxaloacetate, transfers an electron pair to reduce NAD to NADH. Several competing mechanisms have been proposed for the MDH-catalyzed reaction. This study aims to identify the pH-dependent kinetic mechanism for cytoplasmic MDH (cMDH) catalyzed oxidation/reduction of MAL/OAA. Experiments were conducted assaying the forward and reverse directions with products initially present, varying pH between 6.5 and 9.0. By fitting time-course data to various mechanisms, it is determined that an ordered bi-bi mechanism with coenzyme binding first followed by the binding of substrate is able to explain the kinetic data. The proposed mechanism is similar to, but not identical to, the mechanism recently determined for the mitochondrial isoform, mMDH. cMDH and mMDH mechanisms are also shown to both be reduced versions of a common, more complex mechanism that can explain the kinetic data for both isoforms. Comparing the simulated activity (ratio of initial velocity to the enzyme concentration) under physiological conditions, the mitochondrial MDH (mMDH) activity is predicted to be higher than cMDH activity under mitochondrial matrix conditions while the cMDH activity is higher than mMDH activity under cytoplasmic conditions, suggesting that the functions of the isoforms are kinetically tuned to their individual physiological roles.

  20. Light-modulated NADP-malate dehydrogenases from mossfern and green algae: insights into evolution of the enzyme's regulation.

    PubMed

    Ocheretina, O; Haferkamp, I; Tellioglu, H; Scheibe, R

    2000-11-27

    Chloroplast NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase is one of the best-studied light-regulated enzymes. In C3 plants, NADP-MDH is a part of the 'malate valve' that controls the export of reducing equivalents in the form of malate to the cytosol. NADP-MDH is completely inactive in the dark and is activated in the light with reduced thioredoxin. Compared with its permanently active NAD-linked counterparts, NADP-MDH exhibits N- and C-terminal sequence extensions, each bearing one regulatory disulphide. Upon reduction of the C-terminal disulphide, the enzyme active site becomes accessible for the substrate. Reduction of the N-terminal disulphide promotes a conformational change advantageous for catalysis. To trace the evolutionary development of this intricate regulation mechanism, we isolated cDNA clones for NADP-MDH from the mossfern Selaginella and from two unicellular green algae. While the NADP-MDH sequence from Selaginella demonstrates the classic cysteine pattern of the higher plant enzyme, the sequences from the green algae are devoid of the N-terminal regulatory disulphide. Phylogenetic analysis of new sequences and of those available in the databases led to the conclusion that the chloroplast NADP-MDH and the cytosolic NAD-dependent form arose via duplication of an ancestral eubacterial gene, which preceded the separation of plant and animal lineages. Redox-sensitive NADP-MDH activity was detected only in the 'green' plant lineage starting from the primitive prasinophytic algae but not in cyanobacteria, Cyanophora paradoxa, red algae and diatoms. The latter organisms therefore appear to utilize mechanisms other than the light-regulated 'malate valve' to remove from plastids excessive electrons produced by photosynthesis.

  1. Dietary restriction and triiodothyronine (T3) regulation of malate-aspartate shuttle enzymes in the liver and kidney of mice.

    PubMed

    Goyary, Danswrang; Sharma, R

    2005-12-01

    The activities of malate-aspartate shuttle enzymes viz., cytosolic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase (c- and m-AsAT) and malate dehydrogenase (c- and m-MDH) were measured in liver and kidney of ad libitum (AL) and dietary-restricted (DR) mice and also on triiodothyronine (T3) treatment. The results show that the activity (U/mg protein) of c-AsAT is increased significantly in liver and the activities of c-MDH and m-AsAT are increased significantly in kidney during DR. On T3 treatment, the activities of both the isoenzymes (c- and m-) of MDH and AsAT are increased significantly in the liver of AL- and DR-fed mice. In the kidney, m-MDH showed no effect by T3 treatment, however, c-MDH increased significantly in both AL- and DR-fed mice. In contrast, m-AsAT is increased significantly in the kidney in AL-fed mice, but was not affected in DR-fed animals. In vitro reconstitution of malate-aspartate shuttle showed a higher activity in the liver and kidney of DR-fed mice, as compared to AL-fed ones and also in the T3-treated mice, compared to untreated ones. These findings suggest that malate-aspartate shuttle enzymes are differentially regulated during DR in mice, in order to adapt to the metabolic need of liver and kidney. T3 potentially regulates the shuttle enzymes, albeit to a varying degree in the liver and kidney of AL- and DR-fed mice.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Malate Synthase- and MPT51-Based Serodiagnostic Assay as an Adjunct to Rapid Identification of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Dong, Yuxin; Holzman, Robert S.; Belisle, John; Kourbeti, Irene S.; Sherpa, Tsering; Condos, Rany; Rom, William N.; Laal, Suman

    2006-01-01

    The 81-kDa malate synthase (MS; Rv 1837c) and the 27-kDa MPT51 (Rv 3803c) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are immunodominant antigens recognized by serum antibodies from ∼80% of human immunodeficiency virus-negative smear-positive tuberculosis patients from India. We now provide evidence that the use of the MS/MPT51-based serodiagnostic assay can serve as an adjunct to sputum microscopy in the rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:17090645

  3. Overexpression of plastidic maize NADP-malate dehydrogenase (ZmNADP-MDH) in Arabidopsis thaliana confers tolerance to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Kandoi, Deepika; Mohanty, Sasmita; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2017-09-24

    The plastidic C4 Zea mays NADP-malate dehydrogenase (ZmNADP-MDH), responsible for catalysis of oxaloacetate to malate, was overexpressed in Arabidopsis thaliana to assess its impact on photosynthesis and tolerance to salinity stress. Different transgenic lines were produced having ~3-6-fold higher MDH protein abundance and NADP-MDH enzyme activity than vector control. The overexpressors had similar chlorophyll, carotenoid, and protein content as that of vector control. Their photosynthetic electron transport rates, carbon assimilation rate, and consequently fresh weight and dry weight were almost similar. However, these overexpressors were tolerant to salt stress (150 mM NaCl). In saline environment, the Fv/Fm ratio, yield of photosystem II, chlorophyll, and protein content were higher in ZmNADP-MDH overexpressor than vector control. Under identical conditions, the generation of reactive oxygen species (H2O2) and production of malondialdehyde, a membrane lipid peroxidation product, were lower in overexpressors. In stress environment, the structural distortion of granal organization and swelling of thylakoids were less pronounced in ZmNADP-MDH overexpressing plants as compared to the vector control. Chloroplastic NADP-MDH in consort with cytosolic and mitochondrial NAD-MDH plays an important role in exporting reducing power (NADPH) and exchange of metabolites between different cellular compartments that maintain the redox homeostasis of the cell via malate valve present in chloroplast envelope membrane. The tolerance of NADP-MDH overexpressors to salt stress could be due to operation of an efficient malate valve that plays a major role in maintaining the cellular redox environment.

  4. Ab initio calculation of the Zn isotope effect in phosphates, citrates, and malates and applications to plants and soil.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Albarède, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Stable Zn isotopes are fractionated in roots and leaves of plants. Analyses demonstrate that the heavy Zn isotopes are enriched in the root system of plants with respect to shoots and leaves as well as the host soil, but the fractionation mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the origin of this isotope fractionation is due to a chemical isotope effect upon complexation by Zn malates and citrates in the aerial parts and by phosphates in the roots. We calculated the Zn isotope effect in aqueous citrates, malates, and phosphates by ab initio methods. For pH<5, the Zn isotopic compositions of the various parts of the plants are expected to be similar to those of groundwater. In the neutral to alkaline region, the calculations correctly predict that (66)Zn is enriched over (64)Zn in roots, which concentrate phosphates, with respect to leaves, which concentrate malates and citrates, by about one permil. It is proposed that Zn isotope fractionation represents a useful tracer of Zn availability and mobility in soils.

  5. Metabolic adaptation of the hypertrophied heart: role of the malate/aspartate and alpha-glycerophosphate shuttles.

    PubMed

    Rupert, B E; Segar, J L; Schutte, B C; Scholz, T D

    2000-12-01

    Activation of the malate/aspartate and alpha -glycerophosphate shuttles (the NADH shuttles) has been identified in glycolytically active newborn myocardium. The goal of this study was to determine if the NADH shuttles and their regulatory genes are activated in hypertrophied myocardium as substrate utilization shifts away from fatty acids and toward glucose and lactate. Capacity of the shuttles was determined in cardiac mitochondria isolated one week, one month, and three months following aortic banding or sham operation. Myocardial steady-state mRNA and protein levels of regulatory enzymes were also measured. Despite a significant increase in left ventricular mass and activation of the atrial natriuretic peptide gene, no change in malate/aspartate nor alpha -glycerophosphate shuttle capacity was found at any of the three time points studied. Reactivation of the genes encoding the regulatory inner mitochondrial membrane proteins was not found in the hypertrophied myocardium, though these genes were down regulated one week following aortic-banding. These results suggest that sufficient malate/aspartate and alpha -glycerophosphate shuttle capacity exists in cardiac mitochondria to accommodate increased shuttle flux as hypertrophied myocardium becomes more glycolytically active.

  6. Decarboxylation of Malate in the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Bryophyllum (Kalanchoe) fedtschenkoi (Role of NAD-Malic Enzyme).

    PubMed Central

    Cook, R. M.; Lindsay, J. G.; Wilkins, M. B.; Nimmo, H. G.

    1995-01-01

    The role of NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) in the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Bryophyllum (Kalanchoe) fedtschenkoi was investigated using preparations of intact and solubilized mitochondria from fully expanded leaves. Intact, coupled mitochondria isolated during the day or night did not differ in their ability to take up [14C]malic acid from the surrounding medium or to respire using malate or succinate as substrate. However, intact mitochondria isolated from plants during the day decarboxylated added malate to pyruvate significantly faster than mitochondria isolated from plants at night. NAD-ME activity in solubilized mitochondrial extracts showed hysteretic kinetics and was stimulated by a number of activators, including acetyl-coenzyme A, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, and sulfate ions. In the absence of these effectors, reaction progress curves were nonlinear, with a pronounced acceleration phase. The lag period before a steady-state rate was reached in assays of mitochondrial extracts decreased during the photoperiod and increased slowly during the period of darkness. However, these changes in the kinetic properties of the enzyme could not account for the changes in the rate of decarboxylation of malate by intact mitochondria. Gel-filtration experiments showed that mitochondrial extracts contained three forms of NAD-ME with different molecular weights. The relative proportions of the three forms varied somewhat throughout the light/dark cycle, but this did not account for the changes in the kinetics behavior of the enzyme during the diurnal cycle. PMID:12228671

  7. Tl+ induces the permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria energized by glutamate and malate.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Emelyanova, Larisa V; Konovalova, Svetlana A; Brailovskaya, Irina V

    2015-08-01

    It is known that Ca2+ and heavy metals more actively induce MPTP opening in mitochondria, energized by the I complex substrates. Thus, a rise in a Tl+-induced MPTP was proposed in experiments on isolated rat liver mitochondria energized by the complex I substrate (glutamate and malate). Expose of the mitochondria to Ca2+ into a medium containing TlNO3, glutamate, and malate as well as sucrose or KNO3 resulted in a decrease in state 3, state 4, or DNP-stimulated respiration as well as an increase of both mitochondrial swelling and ΔΨmito dissipation. The MPTP inhibitors, CsA and ADP, almost completely eliminated the effect of Ca2+, which was more pronounced in the presence of the complex I substrates than the complex II substrate (succinate) and rotenone (Korotkov and Saris, 2011). The present study concludes that Tl+-induced MPTP opening is more appreciable in mitochondria energized by glutamate and malate but not succinate in the presence of rotenone. We assume that the Tl+-induced MPTP opening along with followed swelling and possible structural deformations of the complex I in Ca2+-loaded mitochondria may be a part of the thallium toxicity mechanism on mitochondria in living organisms. At the same time, oxidation of Tl+ to Tl3+ by mitochondrial oxygen reactive species is proposed for the mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ab Initio Calculation of the Zn Isotope Effect in Phosphates, Citrates, and Malates and Applications to Plants and Soil

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Albarède, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Stable Zn isotopes are fractionated in roots and leaves of plants. Analyses demonstrate that the heavy Zn isotopes are enriched in the root system of plants with respect to shoots and leaves as well as the host soil, but the fractionation mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the origin of this isotope fractionation is due to a chemical isotope effect upon complexation by Zn malates and citrates in the aerial parts and by phosphates in the roots. We calculated the Zn isotope effect in aqueous citrates, malates, and phosphates by ab initio methods. For pH<5, the Zn isotopic compositions of the various parts of the plants are expected to be similar to those of groundwater. In the neutral to alkaline region, the calculations correctly predict that 66Zn is enriched over 64Zn in roots, which concentrate phosphates, with respect to leaves, which concentrate malates and citrates, by about one permil. It is proposed that Zn isotope fractionation represents a useful tracer of Zn availability and mobility in soils. PMID:22363478

  9. Characterization of a bifunctional glyoxylate cycle enzyme, malate synthase/isocitrate lyase, of Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Masami; Nishimura, Masaaki; Inoue, Kengo; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Inui, Hiroshi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2011-01-01

    The glyoxylate cycle is a modified form of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which enables organisms to synthesize carbohydrates from C2 compounds. In the protozoan Euglena gracilis, the key enzyme activities of the glyoxylate cycle, isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MS), are conferred by a single bifunctional protein named glyoxylate cycle enzyme (Euglena gracilis glyoxylate cycle enzyme [EgGCE]). We analyzed the enzymatic properties of recombinant EgGCE to determine the functions of its different domains. The 62-kDa N-terminal domain of EgGCE was sufficient to provide the MS activity as expected from an analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence. In contrast, expression of the 67-kDa C-terminal domain of EgGCE failed to yield ICL activity even though this domain was structurally similar to ICL family enzymes. Analyses of truncation mutants suggested that the N-terminal residues of EgGCE are critical for both the ICL and MS activities. The ICL activity of EgGCE increased in the presence of micro-molar concentrations of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Acetyl-CoA also increased the activity in a mutant type EgGCE with a mutation at the acetyl-CoA binding site in the MS domain of EgGCE. This suggests that acetyl-CoA regulates the ICL reaction by binding to a site other than the catalytic center of the MS reaction.

  10. Regulation of human cerebrospinal fluid malate dehydrogenase 1 in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Matthias; Llorens, Franc; Pracht, Alexander; Thom, Tobias; Correia, Ângela; Zafar, Saima; Ferrer, Isidre; Zerr, Inga

    2016-01-01

    The identification of reliable diagnostic biomarkers in differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases is an ongoing topic. A previous two-dimensional proteomic study on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed an elevated level of an enzyme, mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 1 (MDH1), in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients. Here, we could demonstrate the expression of MDH1 in neurons as well as in the neuropil. Its levels are lower in sCJD brains than in control brains. An examination of CSF-MDH1 in sCJD patients by ELISA revealed a significant elevation of CSF-MDH1 levels in sCJD patients (independently from the PRNP codon 129 MV genotype or the prion protein scrapie (PrPSc) type) in comparison to controls. In combination with total tau (tau), CSF-MDH1 detection exhibited a high diagnostic accuracy for sCJD diagnosis with a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 95.6%. A correlation study of MDH1 level in CSF with other neurodegenerative marker proteins revealed a significant positive correlation between MDH1 concentration with tau, 14-3-3 and neuron specific enolase level. In conclusion, our study indicated the potential of MDH1 in combination with tau as an additional biomarker in sCJD improving diagnostic accuracy of tau markedly. PMID:27852982

  11. Kinetic simulation of malate-aspartate and citrate-pyruvate shuttles in association with Krebs cycle.

    PubMed

    Korla, Kalyani; Vadlakonda, Lakshmipathi; Mitra, Chanchal K

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we have kinetically simulated two mitochondrial shuttles, malate-aspartate shuttle (used for transferring reducing equivalents) and citrate-pyruvate shuttle (used for transferring carbon skeletons). However, the functions of these shuttles are not limited to the points mentioned above, and they can be used in different arrangements to meet different cellular requirements. Both the shuttles are intricately associated with Krebs cycle through the metabolites involved. The study of this system of shuttles and Krebs cycle explores the response of the system in different metabolic environments. Here, we have simulated these subsets individually and then combined them to study the interactions among them and to bring out the dynamics of these pathways in focus. Four antiports and a pyruvate pump were modelled along with the metabolic reactions on both sides of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Michaelis-Menten approach was extended for deriving rate equations of every component of the system. Kinetic simulation was carried out using ordinary differential equation solver in GNU Octave. It was observed that all the components attained steady state, sooner or later, depending on the system conditions. Progress curves and phase plots were plotted to understand the steady state behaviour of the metabolites involved. A comparative analysis between experimental and simulated data show fair agreement thus validating the usefulness and applicability of the model.

  12. A Novel Malate Dehydrogenase 2 Inhibitor Suppresses Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 by Regulating Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kusik; Kim, Inhyub; Kim, Bo-Kyung; Lee, Kyeong; Won, Misun

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 inhibitor LW6, an aryloxyacetylamino benzoic acid derivative, inhibits malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2) activity during the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. In this study, we present a novel MDH2 inhibitor compound 7 containing benzohydrazide moiety, which was identified through structure-based virtual screening of chemical library. Similar to LW6, compound 7 inhibited MDH2 activity in a competitive fashion, thereby reducing NADH level. Consequently, compound 7 reduced oxygen consumption and ATP production during the mitochondrial respiration cycle, resulting in increased intracellular oxygen concentration. Therefore, compound 7 suppressed the accumulation of HIF-1α and expression of its target genes, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Moreover, reduction in ATP content activated AMPK, thereby inactivating ACC and mTOR the downstream pathways. As expected, compound 7 exhibited significant growth inhibition of human colorectal cancer HCT116 cells. Compound 7 demonstrated substantial anti-tumor efficacy in an in vivo xenograft assay using HCT116 mouse model. Taken together, a novel MDH2 inhibitor, compound 7, suppressed HIF-1α accumulation via reduction of oxygen consumption and ATP production, integrating metabolism into anti-cancer efficacy in cancer cells. PMID:27611801

  13. Analysis of lactate and malate dehydrogenase enzyme profiles of selected major carps of wetland of Calcutta.

    PubMed

    Manna, Madhumita; Chakraborty, Priyanka

    2012-07-01

    The East Calcutta Wetland (ECW), a Ramsar site in India, acts as the only sink for both city sewages as well as effluents from the surrounding small-scale industries and is alarmingly polluted with heavy metals. The three best edible major carp species rohu (Labeo rohita,), catla (Catla catla,) and mrigala (Cirrhinus mrigala) were undertaken to monitor lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) by cellulose acetate electrophoresis (CAE) to assess the effects of pollutants, if any. Crude tissue extracts were prepared from brain, eye, heart, skeletal muscle and kidney tissue respectively from each type of fish. No differences were not found in MDH of catla from both sites for all tissues analyzed in this study. Rohu also showed similar mobility for all tissues except for heart tissue which was distinctly different in fishes from ECW site than that of its counterpart from non ECW site. On the other hand, MDH of two tissues of mrigala, eye and muscle respectively showed different migration patterns. LDH profiles for all tissues of three fish species from both the sites were consistently similar, only the expression levels of muscle LDH of mrigala and kidney LDH of rohu varied little.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus lactate- and malate-quinone oxidoreductases contribute to nitric oxide resistance and virulence.

    PubMed

    Spahich, Nicole A; Vitko, Nicholas P; Thurlow, Lance R; Temple, Brenda; Richardson, Anthony R

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen that resists many facets of innate immunity including nitric oxide (NO·). Staphylococcus aureus NO-resistance stems from its ability to evoke a metabolic state that circumvents the negative effects of reactive nitrogen species. The combination of l-lactate and peptides promotes S. aureus growth at moderate NO-levels, however, neither nutrient alone suffices. Here, we investigate the staphylococcal malate-quinone and l-lactate-quinone oxidoreductases (Mqo and Lqo), both of which are critical during NO-stress for the combined utilization of peptides and l-lactate. We address the specific contributions of Lqo-mediated l-lactate utilization and Mqo-dependent amino acid consumption during NO-stress. We show that Lqo conversion of l-lactate to pyruvate is required for the formation of ATP, an essential energy source for peptide utilization. Thus, both Lqo and Mqo are essential for growth under these conditions making them attractive candidates for targeted therapeutics. Accordingly, we exploited a modelled Mqo/Lqo structure to define the catalytic and substrate-binding residues.We also compare the S. aureus Mqo/Lqo enzymes to their close relatives throughout the staphylococci and explore the substrate specificities of each enzyme. This study provides the initial characterization of the mechanism of action and the immunometabolic roles for a newly defined staphylococcal enzyme family. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effect of Oxygen and Malate on NO3− Inhibition of Nitrogenase in Soybean Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Heckmann, Marie-Odile; Drevon, Jean-Jacques; Saglio, Pierre; Salsac, Louis

    1989-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max cv Hodgson) nitrogenase activity (C2H2 reduction) in the presence or absence of nitrate was studied at various external O2 tensions. Nitrogenase activity increased with oxygen partial pressure up to 30 kilopascals, which appeared to be the optimum. A parallel increase in ATP/ADP ratios indicated a limitation of respiration rate by low O2 tensions in the nodule, and the values found for adenine nucleotide ratios suggested that the nitrogenase activity was limited by the rate of ATP regeneration. In the presence of nitrate, the nitrogenase activity was low and less stimulated by increased pO2, although the nitrite content per gram of nodules decreased from 0.05 to 0.02 micromole when pO2 increased from 10 to 30 kilopascals. Therefore, the accumulation of nitrite inside the nodule was probably not the major cause of the inhibition. Instead, inhibition by nitrate could be due to competition for reducing power between nitrate reduction and bacteroid or mitochondrial respiration inside the nodule. This is supported by the observation of decrease in ATP/ADP ratios from 1.65, in absence of nitrate, to 0.93 in the presence of this anion at 30 kilopascals O2. Furthermore, the inhibition was suppressed by the addition, to the plant nutrient solution, of 15 millimolar l-malate, a carbon substrate that is considered to be the major source of reductant for the bacteroids in the symbiosis. PMID:16666740

  16. Relationship between 5S and 20S forms of malate synthase in maturing cottonseeds

    SciTech Connect

    Turley, R.B.; Trelease, R.N.

    1987-04-01

    Malate synthase (MS) activity appears and increases during seed maturation persists during desiccation, then increases again following germination. Because different modes of synthesis and organelle import of MS may occur in maturing and germinated seeds, a comparative study was performed. A comparison of immunoprecipitations from in-vivo-labeled seeds (/sup 35/S-met) and in-vitro translations of Poly A+ RNA (wheat germ) showed no detectable differences in subunit mol wt. When MS activity first appears (42 DPA) only the cytosolic 5S form is found in rate-zonal gradients (5-25% sucrose). At 48 DPA, O d, and 48 h germinated seeds both the 5S and glyoxysomal 20S forms are present, with the 20S becoming more prevalent. Western blots of SDS-PAGE gels showed that no other form(s) of MS (inactive) are present in rate-zonal fractions. Calculations of radiospecific activity (per MS activity) of 5S and 20S forms radiolabeled in vivo (/sup 35/S-met) at various time periods provided further convincing evidence that there is a 5S precursor to 20S product relationship during both seed maturation and seedling growth.

  17. Synthesis and crystal structures of two nickel coordination polymers generated from asymmetric malate ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Yaqin; Xiao Dongrong; Wang Enbo . E-mail: wangenbo@public.cc.jl.cn; Lu Ying; Lue Jian; Xu Xinxin; Xu Lin

    2005-03-15

    Two nickel coordination polymers [Ni(H{sub 2}O)(C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 5})].H{sub 2}O 1 and [Ni(H{sub 2}O)(mal)(phen)] 2, have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Crystal data for 1: C{sub 4}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}Ni, monoclinic Cc, a=13.156(3)A, b=7.5436(15)A, c=9.6982(19)A, {beta}=130.96(3){sup o}, Z=4. Crystal data for 2: C{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 2}O{sub 6}Ni, orthorhombic Pna2{sub 1}, a=9.6113(19)A, b=19.691(4)A, c=8.0944(16)A, Z=4. Compound 1 is constructed from [Ni(H{sub 2}O)(C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 5})] sheets pillared through {beta}-carboxylate groups into a 3D framework, which exhibits a diamond-like network. Compound 2 exhibits a 3D supramolecular network. To our knowledge, compound 1 represents the first diamond-like topology in the system of metal-malate. Other characterizations by elemental analysis, IR and TG are also described. The magnetic behavior of compound 1 has been studied.

  18. Comparative Genome-Wide Analysis of the Malate Dehydrogenase Gene Families in Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Imran, Muhammad; Tang, Kai; Liu, Jin-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenases (MDHs) play crucial roles in the physiological processes of plant growth and development. In this study, 13 and 25 MDH genes were identified from Gossypium raimondii and Gossypium hirsutum, respectively. Using these and 13 previously reported Gossypium arboretum MDH genes, a comparative molecular analysis between identified MDH genes from G. raimondii, G. hirsutum, and G. arboretum was performed. Based on multiple sequence alignments, cotton MDHs were divided into five subgroups: mitochondrial MDH, peroxisomal MDH, plastidial MDH, chloroplastic MDH and cytoplasmic MDH. Almost all of the MDHs within the same subgroup shared similar gene structure, amino acid sequence, and conserved motifs in their functional domains. An analysis of chromosomal localization suggested that segmental duplication played a major role in the expansion of cotton MDH gene families. Additionally, a selective pressure analysis indicated that purifying selection acted as a vital force in the evolution of MDH gene families in cotton. Meanwhile, an expression analysis showed the distinct expression profiles of GhMDHs in different vegetative tissues and at different fiber developmental stages, suggesting the functional diversification of these genes in cotton growth and fiber development. Finally, a promoter analysis indicated redundant but typical cis-regulatory elements for the potential functions and stress activity of many MDH genes. This study provides fundamental information for a better understanding of cotton MDH gene families and aids in functional analyses of the MDH genes in cotton fiber development. PMID:27829020

  19. Structural basis for the alteration of coenzyme specificity in a malate dehydrogenase mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Takeo; Fushinobu, Shinya; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto . E-mail: umanis@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-08-25

    To elucidate the structural basis for the alteration of coenzyme specificity from NADH toward NADPH in a malate dehydrogenase mutant EX7 from Thermus flavus, we determined the crystal structures at 2.0 A resolution of EX7 complexed with NADPH and NADH, respectively. In the EX7-NADPH complex, Ser42 and Ser45 form hydrogen bonds with the 2'-phosphate group of the adenine ribose of NADPH, although the adenine moiety is not seen in the electron density map. In contrast, although Ser42 and Ser45 occupy a similar position in the EX7-NADH complex structure, both the adenine and adenine ribose moieties of NADH are missing in the map. These results and kinetic analysis of site-directed mutant enzymes indicate (1) that the preference of EX7 for NADPH over NADH is ascribed to the recognition of the 2'-phosphate group by two Ser and Arg44, and (2) that the adenine moiety of NADPH is not recognized in this mutant.

  20. The functional readthrough extension of malate dehydrogenase reveals a modification of the genetic code

    PubMed Central

    Hofhuis, Julia; Schueren, Fabian; Nötzel, Christopher; Lingner, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta; Jahn, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Translational readthrough gives rise to C-terminally extended proteins, thereby providing the cell with new protein isoforms. These may have different properties from the parental proteins if the extensions contain functional domains. While for most genes amino acid incorporation at the stop codon is far lower than 0.1%, about 4% of malate dehydrogenase (MDH1) is physiologically extended by translational readthrough and the actual ratio of MDH1x (extended protein) to ‘normal' MDH1 is dependent on the cell type. In human cells, arginine and tryptophan are co-encoded by the MDH1x UGA stop codon. Readthrough is controlled by the 7-nucleotide high-readthrough stop codon context without contribution of the subsequent 50 nucleotides encoding the extension. All vertebrate MDH1x is directed to peroxisomes via a hidden peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS) in the readthrough extension, which is more highly conserved than the extension of lactate dehydrogenase B. The hidden PTS of non-mammalian MDH1x evolved to be more efficient than the PTS of mammalian MDH1x. These results provide insight into the genetic and functional co-evolution of these dually localized dehydrogenases. PMID:27881739

  1. Lactate oxidation at the mitochondria: a lactate-malate-aspartate shuttle at work

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Lactate, the conjugate base of lactic acid occurring in aqueous biological fluids, has been derided as a “dead-end” waste product of anaerobic metabolism. Catalyzed by the near-equilibrium enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), the reduction of pyruvate to lactate is thought to serve to regenerate the NAD+ necessary for continued glycolytic flux. Reaction kinetics for LDH imply that lactate oxidation is rarely favored in the tissues of its own production. However, a substantial body of research directly contradicts any notion that LDH invariably operates unidirectionally in vivo. In the current Perspective, a model is forwarded in which the continuous formation and oxidation of lactate serves as a mitochondrial electron shuttle, whereby lactate generated in the cytosol of the cell is oxidized at the mitochondria of the same cell. From this perspective, an intracellular lactate shuttle operates much like the malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS); it is also proposed that the two shuttles are necessarily interconnected in a lactate-MAS. Among the requisite features of such a model, significant compartmentalization of LDH, much like the creatine kinase of the phosphocreatine shuttle, would facilitate net cellular lactate oxidation in a variety of cell types. PMID:25505376

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of malate dehydrogenase from Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Wrenger, Carsten; Müller, Ingrid B.; Butzloff, Sabine; Jordanova, Rositsa; Lunev, Sergey; Groves, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    The expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction characterization of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) from the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfMDH) are reported. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the function and role of PfMDH, the protein was purified to homogeneity. The purified protein crystallized in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 72, b = 157, c = 159 Å, α = 105, β = 101, γ = 95°. The resulting crystals diffracted to a maximal resolution of 2.24 Å and the structure has been solved by molecular replacement, with 16 monomers in the asymmetric unit. The 16 monomers are arranged into four independent tetramers, in agreement with previous reports demonstrating the tetrameric solution state of PfMDH. The X-­ray structure of PfMDH is expected to clarify the differences in catalysis by PfMDH compared with other MDH family members and to provide a basis for the structure-based design of specific PfMDH inhibitors as well as general MDH inhibitors. PMID:22684064

  3. Alternative Oxidase Pathway Optimizes Photosynthesis During Osmotic and Temperature Stress by Regulating Cellular ROS, Malate Valve and Antioxidative Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vishwakarma, Abhaypratap; Raghavendra, Agepati S.; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    The present study reveals the importance of alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway in optimizing photosynthesis under osmotic and temperature stress conditions in the mesophyll protoplasts of Pisum sativum. The responses of photosynthesis and respiration were monitored at saturating light intensity of 1000 μmoles m–2 s–1 at 25°C under a range of sorbitol concentrations from 0.4 to 1.0 M to induce hyper-osmotic stress and by varying the temperature of the thermo-jacketed pre-incubation chamber from 25 to 10°C to impose sub-optimal temperature stress. Compared to controls (0.4 M sorbitol and 25°C), the mesophyll protoplasts showed remarkable decrease in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution (indicator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation), under both hyper-osmotic (1.0 M sorbitol) and sub-optimal temperature stress conditions (10°C), while the decrease in rates of respiratory O2 uptake were marginal. The capacity of AOX pathway increased significantly in parallel to increase in intracellular pyruvate and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels under both hyper-osmotic stress and sub-optimal temperature stress under the background of saturating light. The ratio of redox couple (Malate/OAA) related to malate valve increased in contrast to the ratio of redox couple (GSH/GSSG) related to antioxidative system during hyper-osmotic stress. Further, the ratio of GSH/GSSG decreased in the presence of sub-optimal temperature, while the ratio of Malate/OAA showed no visible changes. Also, the redox ratios of pyridine nucleotides increased under hyper-osmotic (NADH/NAD) and sub-optimal temperature (NADPH/NADP) stresses, respectively. However, upon restriction of AOX pathway by using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), the observed changes in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution, cellular ROS, redox ratios of Malate/OAA, NAD(P)H/NAD(P) and GSH/GSSG were further aggravated under stress conditions with concomitant modulations in NADP-MDH and antioxidant enzymes. Taken together, the results indicated

  4. Activation of LTBP3 gene by a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) MALAT1 transcript in mesenchymal stem cells from multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Li, Bingzong; Chen, Ping; Qu, Jing; Shi, Lei; Zhuang, Wenyue; Fu, Jinxiang; Li, Jun; Zhang, Xiaohui; Sun, Yu; Zhuang, Wenzhuo

    2014-10-17

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as important regulatory molecules in tumor suppressor and oncogenic pathways. However, the magnitude of the contribution of lncRNA expression to normal human tissues and cancers has not been investigated in a comprehensive manner. Here we explored the biology of the lncRNA MALAT1 and considered the potential significance in mesenchymal stem cells from myeloma patients. By using assays such as RNA interference, luciferase, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and RNA immunoprecipitation, we showed that in mesenchymal stem cells MALAT1 promoted the activation effect of the key transcription factor Sp1 on LTBP3 promoter by modulating recruitment of Sp1 to the LTBP3 gene that regulated the bioavailability of TGF-β in particular. Our data suggested that lncRNA MALAT1 directly interacted with Sp1 and LTBP3 promoter to increase expression of LTBP3 gene. The specificity and efficiency of activation were ensured by the formation of a stable complex between MALAT1 and the LTBP3 promoter, direct interaction of MALAT1 with Sp1, and recruitment of Sp1 to the promoter. In this study, we showed that the mechanism of transcriptional activation of LTBP3 promoter depended on MALAT1 initiated from neighboring gene LTBP3 and involved both the direct interaction of the Sp1 and promoter-specific activation. Our knowledge of the role of MALAT1 in cellular transformation is pointing toward its potential use as a biomarker and a target for novel therapeutic approaches in multiple myeloma. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Activation of LTBP3 Gene by a Long Noncoding RNA (lncRNA) MALAT1 Transcript in Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Multiple Myeloma*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bingzong; Chen, Ping; Qu, Jing; Shi, Lei; Zhuang, Wenyue; Fu, Jinxiang; Li, Jun; Zhang, Xiaohui; Sun, Yu; Zhuang, Wenzhuo

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as important regulatory molecules in tumor suppressor and oncogenic pathways. However, the magnitude of the contribution of lncRNA expression to normal human tissues and cancers has not been investigated in a comprehensive manner. Here we explored the biology of the lncRNA MALAT1 and considered the potential significance in mesenchymal stem cells from myeloma patients. By using assays such as RNA interference, luciferase, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and RNA immunoprecipitation, we showed that in mesenchymal stem cells MALAT1 promoted the activation effect of the key transcription factor Sp1 on LTBP3 promoter by modulating recruitment of Sp1 to the LTBP3 gene that regulated the bioavailability of TGF-β in particular. Our data suggested that lncRNA MALAT1 directly interacted with Sp1 and LTBP3 promoter to increase expression of LTBP3 gene. The specificity and efficiency of activation were ensured by the formation of a stable complex between MALAT1 and the LTBP3 promoter, direct interaction of MALAT1 with Sp1, and recruitment of Sp1 to the promoter. In this study, we showed that the mechanism of transcriptional activation of LTBP3 promoter depended on MALAT1 initiated from neighboring gene LTBP3 and involved both the direct interaction of the Sp1 and promoter-specific activation. Our knowledge of the role of MALAT1 in cellular transformation is pointing toward its potential use as a biomarker and a target for novel therapeutic approaches in multiple myeloma. PMID:25187517

  6. Mg2+-malate co-transport, a mechanism for Na+-independent Mg2+ transport in neurons of the leech Hirudo medicinalis.

    PubMed

    Günzel, Dorothee; Hintz, Karin; Durry, Simone; Schlue, Wolf-Rüdiger

    2005-07-01

    Mg2+-extrusion from Mg2+-loaded neurons of the leech, Hirudo medicinalis, is mediated mainly by Na+/Mg2+ antiport. However, in a number of leech neurons, Mg2+ is extruded in the nominal absence of extracellular Na+, indicating the existence of an additional, Na+-independent Mg2+ transport mechanism. This mechanism was investigated using electrophysiological and microfluorimetrical techniques. The rate of Na+-independent Mg2+ extrusion from Mg2+-loaded leech neurons was found to be independent of extracellular Ca2+, K+, NO3-, HCO3-, SO4(2-), HPO4(2-), and of intra- and extracellular pH. Na+-independent Mg2+ extrusion was not inhibited by 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), furosemide, ouabain, vanadate, iodoacetate, 4-amino-hippurate, or alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and was not influenced by changes in the membrane potential in voltage-clamp experiments. Na+-independent Mg2+ extrusion was, however, inhibited by the application of 2 mM probenecid, a blocker of organic anion transporters, suggesting that Mg2+ might be co-transported with organic anions. Extracellularly, of all organic anions tested (malate, citrate, lactate, alpha-ketoglutarate, and 4-amino-hippurate) only high, but physiological, concentrations of malate (30 mM) had a significant inhibitory effect on Na+-independent Mg2+ extrusion. Intracellularly, iontophoretically injected malate, citrate, or fura-2, but not Cl-, alpha-ketoglutarate, glutamate, succinate, or urate, were stimulating Na+-independent Mg2+ extrusion from those neurons that initially did not extrude Mg2+ in Na+-free solutions. Our data indicate that Mg2+ is co-transported with organic anions, preferably with malate, the predominant extracellular anion in the leech. The proposed model implies that, under experimental conditions, malate drives Mg2+ extrusion, whereas under physiological conditions, malate is actively taken up, driven by Mg2+, so that malate can be metabolized.

  7. Malate synthase gene expression during fruit ripening of Cavendish banana (Musa acuminata cv. Williams).

    PubMed

    Pua, Eng-Chong; Chandramouli, Sumana; Han, Ping; Liu, Pei

    2003-01-01

    Malate synthase (MS) is a key enzyme responsible for malic acid synthesis in the glyoxylate cycle, which functions to convert stored lipids to carbohydrates, by catalysing the glyoxylate condensation reaction with acetyl-CoA in the peroxisome. In this study, the cloning of an MS cDNA, designated MaMS-1, from the banana fruit is reported. MaMS-1 was 1801 bp in length encoding a single polypeptide of 556 amino acid residues. Sequence analysis revealed that MaMS-1 possessed the conserved catalytic domain and a putative peroxisomal targeting signal SK(I/L) at the carboxyl terminal. MaMS-1 also shared an extensive sequence homology (79-81.3%) with other plant MS homologues. Southern analysis indicated that MS might be present as multiple members in the banana genome. In Northern analysis, MaMS-1 was expressed specifically in ripening fruit tissue and transcripts were not detected in other organs such as roots, pseudostem, leaves, ovary, male flower, and in fruit at different stages of development. However, the transcript abundance in fruit was affected by stage of ripening, during which transcript was barely detectable at the early stage of ripening (FG and TY), but the level increased markedly in MG and in other fruits at advanced ripening stages. Furthermore, MaMS-1 expression in FG fruit could be stimulated by treatment with 1 microl l(-1) exogenous ethylene, but the stimulatory effect was abolished by the application of an ethylene inhibitor, norbornadiene. Results of this study clearly show that MS expression in banana fruit is temporally regulated during ripening and is ethylene-inducible.

  8. Lipid utilization, gluconeogenesis, and seedling growth in Arabidopsis mutants lacking the glyoxylate cycle enzyme malate synthase.

    PubMed

    Cornah, Johanna E; Germain, Véronique; Ward, Jane L; Beale, Michael H; Smith, Steven M

    2004-10-08

    The aim of this research was to test the role of the glyoxylate cycle enzyme malate synthase (MLS) in lipid utilization, gluconeogenesis, and seedling growth in Arabidopsis. We hypothesized that in the absence of MLS, succinate produced by isocitrate lyase (ICL) could still feed into the tricarboxylic acid cycle, whereas glyoxylate could be converted to sugars using enzymes of the photorespiratory pathway. To test this hypothesis we isolated knock-out mls mutants and studied their growth and metabolism in comparison to wild type and icl mutant seedlings. In contrast to icl seedlings, which grow slowly and are unable to convert lipid into sugars (Eastmond, P. J., Germain, V., Lange, P. R., Bryce, J. H., Smith, S. M. & Graham, I. A. (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 97, 5669-5674), mls seedlings grow faster, use their lipid more rapidly, and are better able to establish as plantlets. Transcriptome and metabolome analyses show that icl seedlings exhibit many features characteristic of carbohydrate starvation, whereas mls seedlings differ relatively little from wild type. In the light mls seedlings generate more sugars than icl seedlings, and when fed with [14C]acetate, 14C-labeling of sugars is three times greater than in icl seedlings and more than half that in wild type seedlings. The mls seedlings also accumulate more glycine and serine than icl or wild type seedlings, consistent with a diversion of glyoxylate into these intermediates of the photorespiratory pathway. We conclude that, in contrast to bacteria and fungi in which MLS is essential for gluconeogenesis from acetate or fatty acids, MLS is partially dispensable for lipid utilization and gluconeogenesis in Arabidopsis seedlings.

  9. Calcium absorption from apple and orange juice fortified with calcium citrate malate (CCM).

    PubMed

    Andon, M B; Peacock, M; Kanerva, R L; De Castro, J A

    1996-06-01

    Determine calcium (Ca) absorption from Ca fortified orange and apple juice. Absorbability was assessed by measuring 45Ca absorption in healthy women (mean age 57 years, n = 57/group) and whole body 47Ca retention in adult female beagle dogs (n = 6/group) and young adult male rats (n = 6/group). Women received 6.24 mmol (250 mg) Ca as calcium citrate malate fortified orange juice (CCM-OJ) or apple juice (CCM-AJ). Dogs received 3.12 mmol (125 mg) Ca as CCM-OJ or CCM-AJ. Rats were administered 0.15 mmol (6 mg) Ca as either milk, CCM-OJ, or CCM-AJ. Additional 47Ca whole body retention experiments in rats measured the effects of differences in the carbohydrate and organic acid contents of the juices on Ca absorption. Mean +/- SEM percent Ca fractional absorption was greater (p < 0.003) in women who consumed CCM-AJ (42 +/- 2%) than those who consumed CCM-OJ (36 +/- 1%). Ca retention in dogs was 15 +/- 1% for CCM-OJ and 29 +/- 2% for CCM-AJ (p < 0.001). Ca retention was significantly different (p < 0.05) in rats administered milk (42 +/- 2%), CCM-OJ (52 +/- 2%), or CCM-AJ (61 +/- 2%). By manipulating the carbohydrate and organic acid concentrations of test solutions to mimic the composition of Ca fortified juices, we found that the greater fructose and lower organic acid content of apple juice accounted for its greater Ca absorbability. CCM fortified versions of orange and apple juice have high Ca absorbability and are potentially important vehicles for increasing dietary Ca intake. The greater Ca absorption from CCM-AJ compared with CCM-OJ is accounted for by differences in the carbohydrate and organic acid content of the juices. These data suggest that by modifying common beverage ingredients, products with even greater Ca absorbability could be formulated.

  10. The health benefits of calcium citrate malate: a review of the supporting science.

    PubMed

    Reinwald, Susan; Weaver, Connie M; Kester, Jeffrey J

    2008-01-01

    There has been considerable investigation into the health benefits of calcium citrate malate (CCM) since it was first patented in the late 1980s. This chapter is a comprehensive summary of the supporting science and available evidence on the bioavailability and health benefits of consuming CCM. It highlights the important roles that CCM can play during various life stages. CCM has been shown to facilitate calcium retention and bone accrual in children and adolescents. In adults, it effectively promotes the consolidation and maintenance of bone mass. In conjunction with vitamin D, CCM also decreases bone fracture risk in the elderly, slows the rate of bone loss in old age, and is of benefit to the health and well-being of postmenopausal women. CCM is exceptional in that it confers many unique benefits that go beyond bone health. Unlike other calcium sources that necessitate supplementation be in conjunction with a meal to ensure an appreciable benefit is derived, CCM can be consumed with or without food and delivers a significant nutritional benefit to individuals of all ages. The chemistry of CCM makes it a particularly beneficial calcium source for individuals with hypochlorydia or achlorydia, which generally includes the elderly and those on medications that decrease gastric acid secretion. CCM is also recognized as a calcium source that does not increase the risk of kidney stones, and in fact it protects against stone-forming potential. The versatile nature of CCM makes it a convenient and practical calcium salt for use in moist foods and beverages. The major factor that may preclude selection of CCM as a preferred calcium source is the higher cost compared to other sources of calcium commonly used for fortification (e.g., calcium carbonate and tricalcium phosphate). However, formation of CCM directly within beverages or other fluid foods and/or preparations, and the addition of a concentrated CCM solution or slurry, are relatively cost-effective methods by

  11. Gradual neofunctionalization in the convergent evolution of trichomonad lactate and malate dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Steindel, Phillip A.; Chen, Emily H.; Wirth, Jacob D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lactate and malate dehydrogenases (LDH and MDH) are homologous, core metabolic enzymes common to nearly all living organisms. LDHs have evolved convergently from MDHs at least four times, achieving altered substrate specificity by a different mechanism each time. For instance, the LDH of anaerobic trichomonad parasites recently evolved independently from an ancestral trichomonad MDH by gene duplication. LDH plays a central role in trichomonad metabolism by catalyzing the reduction of pyruvate to lactate, thereby regenerating the NAD+ required for glycolysis. Using ancestral reconstruction methods, we identified the biochemical and evolutionary mechanisms responsible for this convergent event. The last common ancestor of these enzymes was a highly specific MDH, similar to modern trichomonad MDHs. In contrast, the LDH lineage evolved promiscuous activity by relaxing specificity in a gradual process of neofunctionalization involving one highly detrimental substitution at the “specificity residue” (R91L) and many additional mutations of small effect. L91 has different functional consequences in LDHs and in MDHs, indicating a prominent role for epistasis. Crystal structures of modern‐day and ancestral enzymes show that the evolution of substrate specificity paralleled structural changes in dimerization and α‐helix orientation. The relatively small “specificity residue” of the trichomonad LDHs can accommodate a range of substrate sizes and may permit solvent to access the active site, both of which promote substrate promiscuity. The trichomonad LDHs present a multi‐faceted counterpoint to the independent evolution of LDHs in other organisms and illustrate the diverse mechanisms by which protein function, structure, and stability coevolve. PMID:26889885

  12. Participation of phosphofructokinase, malate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase in capacitation and acrosome reaction of boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Breininger, E; Dubois, D; Pereyra, V E; Rodriguez, P C; Satorre, M M; Cetica, P D

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the enzymatic activity of phosphofructokinase (PFK), malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in boar spermatozoa and study their participation in bicarbonate-induced capacitation and follicular fluid-induced acrosome reaction. Enzymatic activity of these enzymes was determined spectrophotometrically in extracts of boar spermatozoa. Sperm suspensions were incubated in the presence of bicarbonate (40 mM), a well-known capacitation inducer, or follicular fluid (30%), as an acrosome reaction inducer, and different concentrations of oxoglutarate, oxalomalate and hydroxymalonate, inhibitors of PFK, IDH and MDH, respectively. Capacitation percentages were determined by the fluorescence technique of chlortetracycline (CTC), and true acrosome reaction was determined by trypan blue and differential-interferential contrast, optical microscopy. The activity of PFK in boar spermatozoa enzymatic extracts was 1.70 ± 0.19 U/10(10) spermatozoa, the activity of NAD- and NADP-dependent IDH was 0.111 ± 0.005 U/10(10) and 2.22 ± 0.14 U/10(10) spermatozoa, respectively, and the activity of MDH was 4.24 ± 0.38 U/10(10) spermatozoa. The addition of the specific inhibitors of these enzymes prevented sperm capacitation and decreased sperm motility during capacitation and inhibited the acrosome reaction (AR), without affecting the sperm motility during this process. Our results demonstrate the participation of PFK, IDH and MDH in bicarbonate-induced capacitation and follicular fluid-induced acrosome reaction in boar spermatozoa, contributing to elucidate the mechanisms that produce energy necessary for these processes in porcine spermatozoa. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Relative role of anions and cations in the stabilization of halophilic malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Ebel, C; Faou, P; Kernel, B; Zaccai, G

    1999-07-13

    Halophilic malate dehydrogenase unfolds at low salt, and increasing the salt concentration stabilizes, first, the folded form and then, in some cases, destabilizes it. From inactivation and fluorescence measurements performed on the protein after its incubation in the presence of various salts in a large range of concentrations, the apparent effects of anions and cations were found to superimpose. A large range of ions was examined, including conditions that are in general not of physiological relevance, to explore the physical chemistry driving adaptation to extreme environments. The order of efficiency of cations and anions to maintain the folded form is, for the low-salt transition, Ca(2+) approximately Mg(2+) > Li(+) approximately NH(4)(+) approximately Na(+) > K(+) > Rb(+) > Cs(+), and SO(4)(2)(-) approximately OAc(-) approximately F(-) > Cl(-), and for the high-salt transition, NH(4)(+) approximately Na(+) approximately K(+) approximately Cs(+) > Li(+) > Mg(2+) > Ca(2+), and SO(4)(2)(-) approximately OAc(-) approximately F(-) > Cl(-) > Br(-) > I(-). If a cation or anion is very stabilizing, the effect of the salt ion of opposite charge is limited. Anions of high charge density are always the most efficient to stabilize the folded form, in accordance with the order found in the Hofmeister series, while cations of high charge density are the most efficient only at the lower salt concentrations and tend to denature the protein at higher salt concentrations. The stabilizing efficiency of cations and anions can be related in a minor way to their effect on the surface tension of the solution, but the interaction of ions with sites only present in the folded protein has also to be taken into account. Unfolding at high salt concentrations corresponds to interactions of anions of low charge density and cations of high charge density with the peptide bond, as found for nonhalophilic proteins.

  14. Synthesis and structural characterization of hydrolysis products within the uranyl iminodiacetate and malate systems.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Daniel K; Gojdas, Kyle; Flores, Erin; Libo, Anna; Forbes, Tori Z

    2013-09-03

    The interplay of hydrolysis and chelation by organic ligands results in the formation of novel uranium species in aqueous solutions. Many of these molecular complexes have been identified by spectroscopic and potentiometric techniques, but a detailed structural understanding of these species is lacking. Identification of possible uranyl hydrolysis products in the presence of organic functional groups has been achieved by the crystallization of molecular species into a solid-state compound, followed by structural and chemical characterization of the material. The structures of three novel molecular complexes containing either iminodiacetate (ida) (Na3[(UO2)3(OH)3(ida)3]·8H2O (1)) or malate (mal) (K(pip)2[(UO2)3O(mal)3]·6H2O (2a) (pip = C4N2H12), (2b) (pip)3[(UO2)3O(mal)3]·H2O, and (pip)6[(UO2)11(O)4(OH)4(mal)6(CO3)2]·23H2O (3)) ligands have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and have been chemically characterized by IR, Raman, and NMR spectroscopies. A major structural component in compounds 1 and 2 is a trimeric 3:3 uranyl ida or mal species, but different bridging groups between the metal centers create variations in the structural topologies of the molecular units. Compound 3 contains a large polynuclear cluster with 11 U atoms, which is composed of trimeric and pentameric building units chelated by mal ligands and linked through hydroxyl groups and carbonate anions. The characterized compounds represent novel structural topologies for U(6+) hydrolysis products that may be important molecular species in near-neutral aqueous systems.

  15. Characterization of the N-Acetyl-[alpha]-d-glucosaminyl l-Malate Synthase and Deacetylase Functions for Bacillithiol Biosynthesis in Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Parsonage, Derek; Newton, Gerald L.; Holder, Robert C.; Wallace, Bret D.; Paige, Carleitta; Hamilton, Chris J.; Dos Santos, Patricia C.; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Reid, Sean D.; Claiborne, Al

    2012-02-21

    Bacillithiol (Cys-GlcN-malate, BSH) has recently been identified as a novel low-molecular weight thiol in Bacillus anthracis, Staphylococcus aureus, and several other Gram-positive bacteria lacking glutathione and mycothiol. We have now characterized the first two enzymes for the BSH biosynthetic pathway in B. anthracis, which combine to produce {alpha}-D-glucosaminyl L-malate (GlcN-malate) from UDP-GlcNAc and L-malate. The structure of the GlcNAc-malate intermediate has been determined, as have the kinetic parameters for the BaBshA glycosyltransferase ({yields}GlcNAc-malate) and the BaBshB deacetylase ({yields}GlcN-malate). BSH is one of only two natural products reported to contain a malyl glycoside, and the crystal structure of the BaBshA-UDP-malate ternary complex, determined in this work at 3.3 {angstrom} resolution, identifies several active-site interactions important for the specific recognition of L-malate, but not other {alpha}-hydroxy acids, as the acceptor substrate. In sharp contrast to the structures reported for the GlcNAc-1-D-myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MshA) apo and ternary complex forms, there is no major conformational change observed in the structures of the corresponding BaBshA forms. A mutant strain of B. anthracis deficient in the BshA glycosyltransferase fails to produce BSH, as predicted. This B. anthracis bshA locus (BA1558) has been identified in a transposon-site hybridization study as required for growth, sporulation, or germination [Day, W. A., Jr., Rasmussen, S. L., Carpenter, B. M., Peterson, S. N., and Friedlander, A. M. (2007) J. Bacteriol. 189, 3296-3301], suggesting that the biosynthesis of BSH could represent a target for the development of novel antimicrobials with broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive pathogens like B. anthracis. The metabolites that function in thiol redox buffering and homeostasis in Bacillus are not well understood, and we present a composite picture based on this and other recent work.

  16. Expression analysis and functional characterization of apple MdVHP1 gene reveals its involvement in Na(+), malate and soluble sugar accumulation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yu-Xin; Dong, Qing-Long; You, Chun-Xiang; Zhai, Heng; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2011-10-01

    The vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase (VHP) is a proton pump, which energizes transport across the tonoplast. The contributions of VHP to ion, organic acid and sugar storage are unclear in fruit. Here we characterized the role of an apple vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase gene (MdVHP1) in Na(+), malate and soluble sugar accumulation. MdVHP1 expression was consistent with VHP activities in apple fruits at most developmental stages, and highly significantly correlated with Na(+) concentration during fruit development. In apple fruits treated in vitro (i.e., fruit-bearing branches were cultured in Hoagland solution containing each of salt, malate and sucrose, respectively, or irradiated by blue light), MdVHP1 expression was significantly correlated with Na(+) and malate transporter genes MdNHX1 and MdtDT, while subunit A of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (MdVHA-A) was significantly correlated with MdtDT and sucrose transporter gene (MdSUT1). In addition, MdVHP1 overexpression noticeably promoted Na(+) and malate accumulation, but slightly increased soluble sugar accumulation in transgenic apple callus and tomato fruit, partially by regulating transporter genes MdNHX1, MdtDT and MdSUT1. Taken together, it appears that MdVHP1 favorably contributes to Na(+), malate and soluble sugar accumulation in apple fruit.

  17. Cloning and characterization of the genes encoding the malolactic enzyme and the malate permease of Leuconostoc oenos.

    PubMed Central

    Labarre, C; Guzzo, J; Cavin, J F; Diviès, C

    1996-01-01

    Using degenerated primers from conserved regions of the protein sequences of malic enzymes, we amplified a 324-bp DNA fragment by PCR from Leuconostoc oenos and used this fragment as a probe for screening a Leuconostoc oenos genomic bank. Of the 2,990 clones in the genomic bank examined, 7 with overlapping fragments were isolated by performing colony hybridization experiments. Sequencing 3,453 bp from overlapping fragments revealed two open reading frames that were 1,623 and 942 nucleotides long and were followed by a putative terminator structure. The first deduced protein (molecular weight, 59,118) is very similar (level of similarity, 66%) to the malolactic enzyme of Lactococcus lactis; as in several malic enzymes, highly conserved protein regions are present. The synthesis of a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 60 kDa was highlighted by the results of labelling experiments performed with Escherichia coli minicells. The gene was expressed in E. coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae and conferred "malolactic activity" to these species. The second open reading frame encodes a putative 34,190-Da protein which has the characteristics of a carrier protein and may have 10 membrane-spanning segments organized around a central hydrophilic core. Energy-dependent L-[14C]malate transport was observed with E. coli dicarboxylic acid transport-deficient mutants carrying the malate permease-expressing vector. Our results suggest that in Leuconostoc oenos the genes that encode the malolactic enzyme and a malate carrier protein are organized in a cluster. PMID:8919788

  18. Importance of AOX pathway in optimizing photosynthesis under high light stress: role of pyruvate and malate in activating AOX.

    PubMed

    Dinakar, Challabathula; Raghavendra, Agepati S; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2010-05-01

    The present study shows the importance of alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway in optimizing photosynthesis under high light (HL). The responses of photosynthesis and respiration were monitored as O(2) evolution and O(2) uptake in mesophyll protoplasts of pea pre-incubated under different light intensities. Under HL (3000 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), mesophyll protoplasts showed remarkable decrease in the rates of NaHCO(3)-dependent O(2) evolution (indicator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation), while decrease in the rates of respiratory O(2) uptake were marginal. While the capacity of AOX pathway increased significantly by two fold under HL, the capacity of cytochrome oxidase (COX) pathway decreased by >50% compared with capacities under darkness and normal light (NL). Further, the total cellular levels of pyruvate and malate, which are assimilatory products of active photosynthesis and stimulators of AOX activity, were increased remarkably parallel to the increase in AOX protein under HL. Upon restriction of AOX pathway using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), the observed decrease in NaHCO(3)-dependent O(2) evolution or p-benzoquinone (BQ)-dependent O(2) evolution [indicator of photosystem II (PSII) activity] and the increase in total cellular levels of pyruvate and malate were further aggravated/promoted under HL. The significance of raised malate and pyruvate levels in activation of AOX protein/AOX pathway, which in turn play an important role in dissipating excess chloroplastic reducing equivalents and sustenance of photosynthetic carbon assimilation to balance the effects of HL stress on photosynthesis, was depicted as a model.

  19. Metabolomic profiling of the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum during growth on different reduced sulfur compounds and malate.

    PubMed

    Weissgerber, Thomas; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Hoefgen, Rainer; Dahl, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Environmental fluctuations require rapid adjustment of the physiology of bacteria. Anoxygenic phototrophic purple sulfur bacteria, like Allochromatium vinosum, thrive in environments that are characterized by steep gradients of important nutrients for these organisms, i.e., reduced sulfur compounds, light, oxygen and carbon sources. Changing conditions necessitate changes on every level of the underlying cellular and molecular network. Thus far, two global analyses of A. vinosum responses to changes of nutritional conditions have been performed and these focused on gene expression and protein levels. Here, we provide a study on metabolite composition and relate it with transcriptional and proteomic profiling data to provide a more comprehensive insight on the systems level adjustment to available nutrients. We identified 131 individual metabolites and compared availability and concentration under four different growth conditions (sulfide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, and malate) and on sulfide for a ΔdsrJ mutant strain. During growth on malate, cysteine was identified to be the least abundant amino acid. Concentrations of the metabolite classes "amino acids" and "organic acids" (i.e., pyruvate and its derivatives) were higher on malate than on reduced sulfur compounds by at least 20 and 50 %, respectively. Similar observations were made for metabolites assigned to anabolism of glucose. Growth on sulfur compounds led to enhanced concentrations of sulfur containing metabolites, while other cell constituents remained unaffected or decreased. Incapability of sulfur globule oxidation of the mutant strain was reflected by a low energy level of the cell and consequently reduced levels of amino acids (40 %) and sugars (65 %).

  20. MdMYB1 Regulates Anthocyanin and Malate Accumulation by Directly Facilitating Their Transport into Vacuoles in Apples.

    PubMed

    Hu, Da-Gang; Sun, Cui-Hui; Ma, Qi-Jun; You, Chun-Xiang; Cheng, Lailiang; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2016-03-01

    Tonoplast transporters, including proton pumps and secondary transporters, are essential for plant cell function and for quality formation of fleshy fruits and ornamentals. Vacuolar transport of anthocyanins, malate, and other metabolites is directly or indirectly dependent on the H(+)-pumping activities of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (VHA) and/or vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase, but how these proton pumps are regulated in modulating vacuolar transport is largely unknown. Here, we report a transcription factor, MdMYB1, in apples that binds to the promoters of two genes encoding the B subunits of VHA, MdVHA-B1 and MdVHA-B2, to transcriptionally activate its expression, thereby enhancing VHA activity. A series of transgenic analyses in apples demonstrates that MdMYB1/10 controls cell pH and anthocyanin accumulation partially by regulating MdVHA-B1 and MdVHA-B2. Furthermore, several other direct target genes of MdMYB10 are identified, including MdVHA-E2, MdVHP1, MdMATE-LIKE1, and MdtDT, which are involved in H(+)-pumping or in the transport of anthocyanins and malates into vacuoles. Finally, we show that the mechanism by which MYB controls malate and anthocyanin accumulation in apples also operates in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These findings provide novel insights into how MYB transcription factors directly modulate the vacuolar transport system in addition to anthocyanin biosynthesis, consequently controlling organ coloration and cell pH in plants. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. MdMYB1 Regulates Anthocyanin and Malate Accumulation by Directly Facilitating Their Transport into Vacuoles in Apples1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Da-Gang; Sun, Cui-Hui; Ma, Qi-Jun; You, Chun-Xiang; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Tonoplast transporters, including proton pumps and secondary transporters, are essential for plant cell function and for quality formation of fleshy fruits and ornamentals. Vacuolar transport of anthocyanins, malate, and other metabolites is directly or indirectly dependent on the H+-pumping activities of vacuolar H+-ATPase (VHA) and/or vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase, but how these proton pumps are regulated in modulating vacuolar transport is largely unknown. Here, we report a transcription factor, MdMYB1, in apples that binds to the promoters of two genes encoding the B subunits of VHA, MdVHA-B1 and MdVHA-B2, to transcriptionally activate its expression, thereby enhancing VHA activity. A series of transgenic analyses in apples demonstrates that MdMYB1/10 controls cell pH and anthocyanin accumulation partially by regulating MdVHA-B1 and MdVHA-B2. Furthermore, several other direct target genes of MdMYB10 are identified, including MdVHA-E2, MdVHP1, MdMATE-LIKE1, and MdtDT, which are involved in H+-pumping or in the transport of anthocyanins and malates into vacuoles. Finally, we show that the mechanism by which MYB controls malate and anthocyanin accumulation in apples also operates in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These findings provide novel insights into how MYB transcription factors directly modulate the vacuolar transport system in addition to anthocyanin biosynthesis, consequently controlling organ coloration and cell pH in plants. PMID:26637549

  2. Threshold detection using indicator-displacement assays: an application in the analysis of malate in Pinot Noir grapes.

    PubMed

    Piatek, Anna M; Bomble, Yannick J; Wiskur, Sheryl L; Anslyn, Eric V

    2004-05-19

    The mathematics for modeling indicator-displacement assay isotherms is presented and contrasted to the classical host-guest binding isotherm. It is shown that the signal response can be tuned to occur closer to 1 equiv of guest relative to a standard binding algorithm. This delay in response leads to a better triggering protocol for threshold detection schemes. The determination of malate in Pinot Noir must was calculated using this new mathematical model, which demonstrates how a color change can be tuned to occur near a desired concentration of analyte.

  3. [Functional difference of malate-aspartate shuttle system in liver between plateau zokor (Myospalax baileyi) and plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae)].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rui-Juan; Rao, Xin-Feng; Wei, Deng-Bang; Wang, Duo-Wei; Wei, Lian; Sun, Sheng-Zhen

    2012-04-25

    To explore the adaptive mechanisms of plateau zokor (Myospalax baileyi) to the enduring digging activity in the hypoxic environment and of plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) to the sprint running activity, the functional differences of malate-aspartate shuttle system (MA) in liver of plateau zokor and plateau pika were studied. The ratio of liver weight to body weight, the parameters of mitochondria in hepatocyte and the contents of lactic acid in serum were measured; the open reading frame of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase (MDH1), mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (MDH2), and the partial sequence of aspartate glutamate carrier (AGC) and oxoglutarate malate carrier (OMC) genes were cloned and sequenced; MDH1, MDH2, AGC and OMC mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR; the specific activities of MDH1 and MDH2 in liver of plateau zokor and plateau pika were measured using enzymatic methods. The results showed that, (1) the ratio of liver weight to body weight, the number and the specific surface of mitochondria in hepatocyte of plateau zokor were markedly higher than those of plateau pika (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), but the content of lactic acid in serum of plateau pika was significantly higher than that of plateau zokor (P < 0.01); (2) MDH1 and MDH2 mRNA levels as well as their enzymatic activities in liver of plateau zokor were significantly higher than those of plateau pika (P < 0.01 or 0.05), AGC mRNA level of the zokor was significantly higher than that of the pika (P < 0.01), while no difference was found at OMC mRNA level between them (P > 0.05); (3) mRNA level and enzymatic activity of MDH1 was significantly lower than those of MDH2 in the pika liver (P < 0.01), MDH1 mRNA level of plateau zokor was markedly higher than that of MDH2 (P < 0.01), but the activities had no difference between MDH1 and MDH2 in liver of the zokor (P > 0.05). These results indicate that the plateau zokor obtains ATP in the enduring digging activity by enhancing the function of MA

  4. Metabolic regulation of phytoplasma malic enzyme and phosphotransacetylase supports the use of malate as an energy source in these plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Saigo, Mariana; Golic, Adrián; Alvarez, Clarisa E; Andreo, Carlos S; Hogenhout, Saskia A; Mussi, María A; Drincovich, María F

    2014-12-01

    Phytoplasmas ('Candidatus Phytoplasma') are insect-vectored plant pathogens. The genomes of these bacteria are small with limited metabolic capacities making them dependent on their plant and insect hosts for survival. In contrast to mycoplasmas and other relatives in the class Mollicutes, phytoplasmas encode genes for malate transporters and malic enzyme (ME) for conversion of malate into pyruvate. It was hypothesized that malate is probably a major energy source for phytoplasmas as these bacteria are limited in the uptake and processing of carbohydrates. In this study, we investigated the metabolic capabilities of 'Candidatus (Ca.) phytoplasma' aster yellows witches'-broom (AYWB) malic enzyme (ME). We found that AYWB-ME has malate oxidative decarboxylation activity, being able to convert malate to pyruvate and CO2 with the reduction of either NAD or NADP, and displays distinctive kinetic mechanisms depending on the relative concentration of the substrates. AYWB-ME activity was strictly modulated by the ATP/ADP ratio, a feature which has not been found in other ME isoforms characterized to date. In addition, we found that the 'Ca. Phytoplasma' AYWB PduL-like enzyme (AYWB-PduL) harbours phosphotransacetylase activity, being able to convert acetyl-CoA to acetyl phosphate downstream of pyruvate. ATP also inhibited AYWB-PduL activity, as with AYWB-ME, and the product of the reaction catalysed by AYWB-PduL, acetyl phosphate, stimulated AYWB-ME activity. Overall, our data indicate that AYWB-ME and AYWB-PduL activities are finely coordinated by common metabolic signals, like ATP/ADP ratios and acetyl phosphate, which support their participation in energy (ATP) and reducing power [NAD(P)H] generation from malate in phytoplasmas.

  5. The photorespiratory hydrogen shuttle. Synthesis of phthalonic acid and its use in the characterization of the malate/aspartate shuttle in pea (Pisum sativum) leaf mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Dry, I B; Dimitriadis, E; Ward, A D; Wiskich, J T

    1987-01-01

    A method is presented for the preparation of pure phthalonic acid (PTA) in high yields. This PTA was used to determine the capacity of the malate/aspartate shuttle in pea (Pisum sativum) leaf mitochondria. The inhibition of glycine-dependent O2 uptake in the combined presence of 5 mM-aspartate and 5 mM-2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) was decreased by 55 +/- 22% (n = 13) in washed and 50 +/- 2% (n = 11) in purified mitochondria by 0.23 mM-PTA. This concentration of PTA had no effect on the oxidation of 5 mM-2-OG, suggesting that part of the observed inhibition of O2 uptake in the presence of aspartate and 2-OG was due to the production of oxaloacetate (OAA) by aspartate aminotransferase external to the mitochondrial inner membrane. Levels of external aspartate aminotransferase were estimated to be 24 +/- 1% (n = 4) and 13 +/- 1% (n = 4) of the total mitochondrial activity in washed and purified mitochondria respectively. Malate/aspartate-shuttle activity was estimated directly by measuring rates of malate efflux from isolated mitochondria and was found to match estimates of shuttle activity based on the PTA-insensitive inhibition of O2 uptake. Comparisons of malate/aspartate- and malate/OAA-shuttle activities indicated potentially similar rates of NADH export from pea leaf mitochondria under conditions in vivo. These extrapolated to whole-tissue rates of 5-11 mumol of NADH.h-1.mg of chlorophyll-1. The potential role of the malate/aspartate shuttle in the support of photorespiratory glycine oxidation in leaf tissue is discussed. PMID:3663185

  6. Conjugated fatty acids and methane production by rumen microbes when incubated with linseed oil alone or mixed with fish oil and/or malate.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang Z; Gao, Qing S; Yan, Chang G; Choi, Seong H; Shin, Jong S; Song, Man K

    2015-08-01

    We hypothesized that manipulating metabolism with fish oil and malate as a hydrogen acceptor would affect the biohydrogenation process of α-linolenic acid by rumen microbes. This study was to examine the effect of fish oil and/or malate on the production of conjugated fatty acids and methane (CH4 ) by rumen microbes when incubated with linseed oil. Linseed oil (LO), LO with fish oil (LO-FO), LO with malate (LO-MA), or LO with fish oil and malate (LO-FO-MA) was added to diluted rumen fluid, respectively. The LO-MA and LO-FO-MA increased pH and propionate concentration compared to the other treatments. LO-MA and LO-FO-MA reduced CH4 production compared to LO. LO-MA and LO-FO-MA increased the contents of c9,t11-conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and c9,t11,c15-conjugated linolenic acid (CLnA) compared to LO. The content of malate was rapidly reduced while that of lactate was reduced in LO-MA and LO-FO-MA from 3 h incubation time. The fold change of the quantity of methanogen related to total bacteria was decreased at both 3 h and 6 h incubation times in all treatments compared to the control. Overall data indicate that supplementation of combined malate and/or fish oil when incubated with linseed oil, could depress methane generation and increase production of propionate, CLA and CLnA under the conditions of the current in vitro study.

  7. Modeling, molecular docking, probing catalytic binding mode of acetyl-CoA malate synthase G in Brucella melitensis 16M.

    PubMed

    Adi, Pradeepkiran Jangampalli; Yellapu, Nanda Kumar; Matcha, Bhaskar

    2016-12-01

    There are enormous evidences and previous reports standpoint that the enzyme of glyoxylate pathway malate synthase G (MSG) is a potential virulence factor in several pathogenic organisms, including Brucella melitensis 16M. Where the lack of crystal structures for best candidate proteins like MSG of B. melitensis 16M creates big lacuna to understand the molecular pathogenesis of brucellosis. In the present study, we have constructed a 3-D structure of MSG of Brucella melitensis 16M in MODELLER with the help of crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis malate synthase (PDB ID: 2GQ3) as template. The stereo chemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by SAVES server; remarkably we identified the catalytic functional core domain located at 4(th) cleft with conserved catalytic amino acids, start at ILE 59 to VAL 586 manifest the function of the protein. Furthermore, virtual screening and docking results reveals that best leadmolecules binds at the core domain pocket of MSG catalytic residues and these ligand leads could be the best prospective inhibitors to treat brucellosis.

  8. The mae1 gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe encodes a permease for malate and other C4 dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Grobler, J; Bauer, F; Subden, R E; Van Vuuren, H J

    1995-12-01

    The mae1 gene of the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was identified on the basis of its ability to complement a mutant defective in the transport of malic acid. Analysis of the DNA sequence revealed an open reading frame of 1314 base pairs, encoding a polypeptide of 438 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 49 kDa. A hydropathy profile of the predicted amino acid sequence revealed a protein with ten membrane-spanning or associated domains and hydrophilic N- and C- termini. The predicted secondary structure of the protein in similar to models proposed for other integral membrane proteins from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The S. pombe mae1 gene encodes a single mRNA of 1.5 kb. The mea1 gene is expressed constitutively and is not subject to catabolite repression as was previously reported for the malate permease systems of Candida utilis and Hansenula anomala. The mae1 gene was mapped 2842 bp 5' to the MFml gene on chromosome I. Transport assays revealed that the mae1 gene encodes a permease involved in the uptake of L-malate, succinate and malonic acid.

  9. Robust l-malate bienzymatic biosensor to enable the on-site monitoring of malolactic fermentation of red wines.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Gómez, Pablo; Gutiérrez-Capitán, Manuel; Capdevila, Fina; Puig-Pujol, Anna; Fernández-Sánchez, Cesar; Jiménez-Jorquera, Cecilia

    2017-02-15

    Monitoring the malolactic fermentation process is strictly required to guarantee the sensorial quality and freshness of red wines. This could be achieved by in-field and real-time continuous measurements of l-malate concentration in the fermentation tanks. The potential of a miniaturized amperometric bienzymatic biosensor as an analytical tool to be applied in such scenario is described in this paper. The biosensor comprises a thin-film gold electrode as transducer, malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and diaphorase (DP) enzymes together with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) cofactor as the selective receptor and an adequate redox mediator to record the corresponding amperometric signal. Three different biosensor architectures are studied, whose main differences lie in the immobilization of the different chemical components onto the electrode surface. In all cases a fast-electrosynthethized polypyrrole (PPy) membrane is generated for this purpose. The experimental conditions are optimized and the best architecture shows a sensitivity of 1365 ± 110 mA M(-1) cm(-2) and a detection limit of 6.3 × 10(-8) M in a concentration range of 1 × 10(-7) M - 1 × 10(-6) M. The biosensor presents an excellent working stability as it retains above 90% of its sensitivity after 37 days, thus enabling the monitoring of the malolactic fermentation of three red wines. The obtained results show excellent agreement with the standard colorimetric method.

  10. Enzyme:nanoparticle bioconjugates with two sequential enzymes: stoichiometry and activity of malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Keighron, Jacqueline D; Keating, Christine D

    2010-12-21

    We report the synthesis and characterization of bioconjugates in which the enzymes malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and/or citrate synthase (CS) were adsorbed to 30 nm diameter Au nanoparticles. Enzyme:Au stoichiometry and kinetic parameters (specific activity, k(cat), K(M), and activity per particle) were determined for MDH:Au, CS:Au, and three types of dual-activity MDH/CS:Au bioconjugates. For single-activity bioconjugates (MDH:Au and CS:Au), the number of enzyme molecules adsorbed per particle was dependent upon the enzyme concentration in solution, with multilayers forming at high enzyme:Au solution ratios. The specific activity of adsorbed enzyme increased with increasing number adsorbed per particle for CS:Au, but was less sensitive to stoichiometry for MDH:Au. Dual activity bioconjugates were prepared in three ways: (1) by adsorption of MDH followed by CS, (2) by adsorption of CS followed by MDH, and (3) by coadsorption of both enzymes from the same solution. The resulting bioconjugates differed substantially in the number of enzyme molecules adsorbed per particle, the specific activity of the adsorbed enzymes, and also the enzymatic activity per particle. Bioconjugates formed by adding CS to the Au nanoparticles before MDH was added exhibited higher specific activities for both enzymes than those formed by adding the enzymes in the reverse order. These bioconjugates also had 3-fold higher per-particle sequential activity for conversion of malate to citrate, despite substantially fewer copies of both enzymes present.

  11. Posttranscriptional silencing of the lncRNA MALAT1 by miR-217 inhibits the epithelial-mesenchymal transition via enhancer of zeste homolog 2 in the malignant transformation of HBE cells induced by cigarette smoke extract.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Luo, Fei; Liu, Yi; Liu, Xinlu; Shi, Le; Lu, Xiaolin; Liu, Qizhan

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer is regarded as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths, and cigarette smoking is one of the strongest risk factors for the development of lung cancer. However, the mechanisms for cigarette smoke-induced lung carcinogenesis remain unclear. The present study investigated the effects of an miRNA (miR-217) on levels of an lncRNA (MALAT1) and examined the role of these factors in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. In these cells, CSE caused decreases of miR-217 levels and increases in lncRNA MALAT1 levels. Over-expression of miR-217 with a mimic attenuated the CSE-induced increase of MALAT1 levels, and reduction of miR-217 levels by an inhibitor enhanced expression of MALAT1. Moreover, the CSE-induced increase of MALAT1 expression was blocked by an miR-217 mimic, indicating that miR-217 negatively regulates MALAT1 expression. Knockdown of MALAT1 reversed CSE-induced increases of EZH2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2) and H3K27me3 levels. In addition to the alteration from epithelial to spindle-like mesenchymal morphology, chronic exposure of HBE cells to CSE increased the levels of EZH2, H3K27me3, vimentin, and N-cadherin and decreased E-cadherin levels, effects that were reversed by MALAT1 siRNA or EZH2 siRNA. The results indicate that miR-217 regulation of EZH2/H3K27me3 via MALAT1 is involved in CSE-induced EMT and malignant transformation of HBE cells. The posttranscriptional silencing of MALAT1 by miR-217 provides a link, through EZH2, between ncRNAs and the EMT and establishes a mechanism for CSE-induced lung carcinogenesis.

  12. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 for promoting metastasis and proliferation by acting as a ceRNA of miR-144-3p in osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ningning; Li, Pengcheng; Zeng, Xiandong; Zhang, Weiguo

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in various biological processes and diseases including osteosarcoma. Long non-coding RNA metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is overly expressed in osteosarcoma. But the function and mechanism it works on in osteosarcoma proliferation and metastasis mediated by Rho associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) and Rho associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 2 (ROCK2) remain unclear. In the present study, an elevated MALAT1 was found in osteosarcoma tissues and cell lines, and the elevated MALAT1 was correlated with a poor prognosis in osteosarcoma patients. The functional experiments show that a decreased MALAT1 could remarkably inhibit osteosarcoma cell metastasis and proliferation but induce cell cycle arrest, indicating that MALAT1 functioned as an oncogene in osteosarcoma. Furthermore, we confirmed that MALAT1 and ROCK1/ROCK2 which were targeted by microRNA-144-3p (miR-144-3p) shared the same miR-144-3p combining site. Furthermore, the constructed luciferase assay verified that MALAT1 was a target of miR-144-3p. Additionally, the results of a qRT-PCR demonstrated that MALAT1 and miR-144-3p repressed each other's expression in a reciprocal manner. Finally, we affirmed that an overexpression of MALAT1 inhibited ROCK1/ROCK2 expression and its mediated metastasis and proliferation by working as a competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA) via miR-144-3p. In summary, the findings of this study based on the ceRNA theory, combining the research foundation of miR-144-3p, ROCK1 and ROCK2, taking MALAT1 as a new point of study, provided new insights into molecular level proliferation reversal and metastasis of osteosarcoma. PMID:28938647

  13. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 for promoting metastasis and proliferation by acting as a ceRNA of miR-144-3p in osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Zhang, Yueyang; Yang, Tao; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Ningning; Li, Pengcheng; Zeng, Xiandong; Zhang, Weiguo

    2017-08-29

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in various biological processes and diseases including osteosarcoma. Long non-coding RNA metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is overly expressed in osteosarcoma. But the function and mechanism it works on in osteosarcoma proliferation and metastasis mediated by Rho associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) and Rho associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 2 (ROCK2) remain unclear. In the present study, an elevated MALAT1 was found in osteosarcoma tissues and cell lines, and the elevated MALAT1 was correlated with a poor prognosis in osteosarcoma patients. The functional experiments show that a decreased MALAT1 could remarkably inhibit osteosarcoma cell metastasis and proliferation but induce cell cycle arrest, indicating that MALAT1 functioned as an oncogene in osteosarcoma. Furthermore, we confirmed that MALAT1 and ROCK1/ROCK2 which were targeted by microRNA-144-3p (miR-144-3p) shared the same miR-144-3p combining site. Furthermore, the constructed luciferase assay verified that MALAT1 was a target of miR-144-3p. Additionally, the results of a qRT-PCR demonstrated that MALAT1 and miR-144-3p repressed each other's expression in a reciprocal manner. Finally, we affirmed that an overexpression of MALAT1 inhibited ROCK1/ROCK2 expression and its mediated metastasis and proliferation by working as a competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA) via miR-144-3p. In summary, the findings of this study based on the ceRNA theory, combining the research foundation of miR-144-3p, ROCK1 and ROCK2, taking MALAT1 as a new point of study, provided new insights into molecular level proliferation reversal and metastasis of osteosarcoma.

  14. Design and Construction of a Non-Natural Malate to 1,2,4-Butanetriol Pathway Creates Possibility to Produce 1,2,4-Butanetriol from Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinghua; Cai, Zhen; Li, Yin; Zhang, Yanping

    2014-01-01

    1,2,4-butanetriol (BT) is an important bulk chemical mainly used for producing the superior energetic plasticizer (1,2,4-butanetriol trinitrate) in propellant and explosive formulations. BT is commercially produced by chemical synthesis from petroleum-based feedstocks; until recently a costly biosynthetic route from xylose or arabinose was reported. Here we designed a novel biosynthetic pathway for BT from malate, for the purpose of using glucose as an alternative and cheaper substrate in future. This biosynthetic pathway was achieved through six sequential enzymatic reactions. Following tests of several combinations of enzymes for the pathway, five enzymes including malate thiokinase, succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, 4-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, 4-hydroxybutyrate CoA-transferase and bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase were finally chosen. All enzyme genes were expressed on two compatible plasmids in E. coli, and their functions verified separately. Following assembly of two functional modules, BT was detected in the fermentation broth upon addition of malate, proving BT can be biosynthesized from malate. Furthermore, BT was detected in the fermentation using glucose as the sole carbon source, suggesting that such novel BT biosynthetic pathway has created the possibility for the production of BT from the cheaper substrate glucose. PMID:25008973

  15. Functional, structural and phylogenetic analysis of domains underlying the Al-sensitivity of the aluminium-activated malate/anion transporter, TaALMT1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    TaALMT1 (Triticum aestivum Aluminum Activated Malate Transporter) is the founding member of a novel gene family of anion transporters (ALMTs) that mediate the efflux of organic acids. A small subgroup of root-localized ALMTs, including TaALMT1, is physiologically associated with in planta aluminum (...

  16. Phosphorylation at S384 regulates the activity of the TaALMT1 malate transporter that underlies aluminum resistance in wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study we examined the role of protein phosphorylation & dephosphorylation in the transport properties of the wheat root malate efflux transporter underlying Al resistance, TaALMT1. Preincubation of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing TaALMT1 with protein kinase inhibitors (K252a and staurospo...

  17. MicroRNA-mediated silence of onco-lncRNA MALAT1 in different ESCC cells via ligand-functionalized hydroxyl-rich nanovectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui-Quan; Ren, Yanli; Liu, Wenjuan; Pan, Wenting; Xu, Fu-Jian; Yang, Ming

    2017-02-16

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide. Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) MALAT1 acts as an essential oncogene lncRNA (onco-lncRNA) in the development of ESCC. Down-regulation of onco-lncRNA MALAT1 mediated by microRNA-101 (miR-101) and microRNA-217 (miR-217) has been proved to effectively suppress ESCC. In this study, poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-based star-like polycations with flanking folic acid (FA) ligands and rich hydrophilic hydroxyl groups (denoted as s-PGEA-FA) were proposed as efficient nanovectors to deliver miR-101 and miR-217 for silencing onco-lncRNA MALAT1 in different ESCC cells. The inhibition of ESCC by s-PGEA-FA/miRNA nanocomplexes would be achieved via subsequently targeting onco-lncRNA MALAT1 in ESCC cells. To evaluate the ESCC tumor-suppressing efficacy mediated by s-PGEA-FA/miRNA nanocomplexes, a series of assays were carried out, including gene transfection, cell proliferation, cell migration, and cell invasion. The results revealed that s-PGEA-FA-mediated miR-101 and miR-217 delivery effectively inhibited ESCC development, indicating the s-PGEA-FA nanovector was promising for future ESCC therapy.

  18. Cancer–Osteoblast Interaction Reduces Sost Expression in Osteoblasts and Up-Regulates lncRNA MALAT1 in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Aimy; Hum, Nicholas R.; Hudson, Bryan D.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic interaction between prostate cancer and the bone microenvironment is a major contributor to metastasis of prostate cancer to bone. In this study, we utilized an in vitro co-culture model of PC3 prostate cancer cells and osteoblasts followed by microarray based gene expression profiling to identify previously unrecognized prostate cancer–bone microenvironment interactions. Factors secreted by PC3 cells resulted in the up-regulation of many genes in osteoblasts associated with bone metabolism and cancer metastasis, including Mmp13, Il-6 and Tgfb2, and down-regulation of Wnt inhibitor Sost. To determine whether altered Sost expression in the bone microenvironment has an effect on prostate cancer metastasis, we co-cultured PC3 cells with Sost knockout (SostKO) osteoblasts and wildtype (WT) osteoblasts and identified several genes differentially regulated between PC3-SostKO osteoblast co-cultures and PC3-WT osteoblast co-cultures. Co-culturing PC3 cells with WT osteoblasts up-regulated cancer-associated long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) MALAT1 in PC3 cells. MALAT1 expression was further enhanced when PC3 cells were co-cultured with SostKO osteoblasts and treatment with recombinant Sost down-regulated MALAT1 expression in these cells. Our results suggest that reduced Sost expression in the tumor microenvironment may promote bone metastasis by up-regulating MALAT1 in prostate cancer. PMID:27600237

  19. Inhibition of several enzymes by gold compounds. II. beta-Glucuronidase, acid phosphatase and L-malate dehydrogenase by sodium thiomalatoraurate (I), sodium thiosulfatoaurate (I) and thioglucosoaurate (I).

    PubMed

    Lee, M T; Ahmed, T; Haddad, R; Friedman, M E

    1989-01-01

    Bovine liver beta-D-glucuronide glucuronohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.32), wheat germ acid phosphatase (orthophosphoric monoesterphosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.2) and bovine liver L-malate dehydrogenase (L-malate: NAD oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.37) were inhibited by a series of gold (I) complexes that have been used as anti-inflammatory drugs. Both sodium thiosulfatoaurate (I) (Na AuTs) and sodium thiomalatoraurate (NaAuTM) effectively inhibited all three enzymes, while thioglucosoaurate (I) (AuTG) only inhibited L-malate dehydrogenase. The equilibrium constants (K1) ranged from nearly 4000 microM for the NaAuTM-beta-glucuronidase interaction to 24 microM for the NaAuTS-beta-glucuronidase interaction. The rate of covalent bond formation (kp) ranged from 0.00032 min-1 for NaAuTM-beta-glucuronidase formation to 1.7 min-1 for AuTG-L-malate dehydrogenase formation. The equilibrium data shows that the gold (I) drugs bind by several orders lower than the gold (III) compounds, suggesting a significantly stronger interaction between the more highly charged gold ion and the enzyme. Yet the rate of covalent bond formation depends as much on the structure of the active site as upon the lability of the gold-ligand bond. It was also observed that the more effective the gold inhibition the more toxic the compound.

  20. Effects of malate supplementation on acid-base balance and productive performance in growing/finishing bull calves fed a high-grain diet.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Cristina; Benedito, Jose Luis; Pereira, Victor; Méndez, Jesus; Vazquez, Patricia; López-Alonso, Marta; Hernández, Joaquin

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of malate supplementation on blood acid-base balance and serum lactate levels in a 137-day feedlot experiment with bull calves. Animals were allotted to one of two experimental groups: (1) A control group (no supplementation), and (2) a group receiving a salt of DL-malic acid. Blood pH, pCO2, HCO3-, base excess, serum L-lactate and productivity parameters were evaluated. Our data reveal that under the conditions of the present experiment malate supplementation did not have any significant effect on productivity parameters by comparison with non-supplemented animals. As regards acid-base balance, no significant effects attributable only to malate were observed. In conclusion, the time-course and the overall means of serum L-lactate for both groups in both growing and finishing periods (0.44 +/- 0.04 mmol/l and 0.39 +/- 0.02 mmol/l, respectively, for control animal; and 0.54 +/- 0.03 mmol/l and 0.49 +/- 0.01 mmol/l, respectively, for supplemented animals) suggests that malate does not have any beneficial effects in animals fed a diet of similar characteristics to that given in this study.

  1. Poly(methyl malate) nanoparticles: formation, degradation, and encapsulation of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Lanz-Landázuri, Alberto; García-Alvarez, Montserrat; Portilla-Arias, José; de Ilarduya, Antxon Martínez; Patil, Rameshwar; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y; Muñoz-Guerra, Sebastián

    2011-10-10

    PMLA nanoparticles with diameters of 150-250 nm are prepared, and their hydrolytic degradation is studied under physiological conditions. Degradation occurs by hydrolysis of the side chain methyl ester followed by cleavage of the main-chain ester group with methanol and L-malic acid as the final degradation products. No alteration of the cell viability is found after 1 h of incubation, but toxicity increases significantly after 3 d, probably due to the noxious effect of the released methanol. Anticancer drugs temozolomide and doxorubicin are encapsulated in the NPs with 20-40% efficiency, and their release is monitored using in vitro essays. Temozolomide is fully liberated within several hours, whereas doxorubicin is steadily released from the particles over a period of 1 month.

  2. Poly(methyl malate) Nanoparticles: Formation, Degradation, and Encapsulation of Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lanz-Landázuri, Alberto; García-Alvarez, Montserrat; Portilla-Arias, José; de Ilarduya, Antxon Martínez; Patil, Rameshwar; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y.

    2012-01-01

    PMLA nanoparticles with diameters of 150–250 nm are prepared, and their hydrolytic degradation is studied under physiological conditions. Degradation occurs by hydrolysis of the side chain methyl ester followed by cleavage of the main-chain ester group with methanol and L-malic acid as the final degradation products. No alteration of the cell viability is found after 1 h of incubation, but toxicity increases significantly after 3 d, probably due to the noxious effect of the released methanol. Anticancer drugs temozolomide and doxorubicin are encapsulated in the NPs with 20–40% efficiency, and their release is monitored using in vitro essays. Temozolomide is fully liberated within several hours, whereas doxorubicin is steadily released from the particles over a period of 1 month. PMID:21793213

  3. The Long Noncoding RNA MALAT-1 is A Novel Biomarker in Various Cancers: A Meta-analysis Based on the GEO Database and Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yumin; Xue, Dan; Li, Yuwei; Pan, Xuya; Zhang, Xueying; Kuang, Biao; Zhou, Ming; Li, Xiaoling; Xiong, Wei; Li, Guiyuan; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Yang, Tubao

    2016-01-01

    Background: MALAT-1 is significantly overexpressed in various cancers, suggesting that it might be a potential biomarker of cancer. Methods: A meta-analysis was performed using microarray data obtained via the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 platform found in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database and data obtained through a systematic search of PubMed and Web of Science. The pooled odds ratio (OR) and hazard ratio (HR) with 95% CI (Confidence interval) were used to judge the value of biomarkers. Results: A total of 28 studies were included in this meta-analysis, comprising a total of 3573 patients. MALAT-1 was significantly linked with over survival (OS) (HR=1.58, 95%CI: 1.12-2.23), recurrence-free survival (RFS) (HR=2.32, 95% CI: 1.68-3.19) and death-free survival (DFS) (HR=3.28, 95% CI: 1.52-7.09). We found that MALAT-1 was a risk factor in the prognoses of lung cancer (HR=1.54, 95%CI: 1.01-2.34), digestive system cancer (HR=2.16, 95% CI: 1.34-3.48) and ovarian cancer (HR=3.98, 95% CI: 1.54-10.25). In contrast, MALAT-1 was a safe factor in the prognosis of B cell lineage cancer (HR=0.45, 95% CI: 0.33-0.61). MALAT-1 was also a risk factor of RFS in breast cancer (HR=1.97, 95% CI: 1.25-3.09) and the TNM stage in pancreatic cancer (OR=3.65, 95% CI: 1.86-7.18) and glioma (OR=4.30, 95% CI: 1.90-9.73) and was a safe factor in colorectal cancer (OR=0.17, 95% CI: 0.08-0.35). MALAT-1 was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis in clear cell carcinoma (OR=5.04, 95% CI: 2.36-10.78) and distant metastasis in pancreatic cancer (OR=11.64, 95% CI: 2.13-63.78). Conclusions: MALAT-1 can serve as a molecular marker in different types of cancers. PMID:27313790

  4. Properties of Succinyl-Coenzyme A:l-Malate Coenzyme A Transferase and Its Role in the Autotrophic 3-Hydroxypropionate Cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Silke; Steindorf, Astrid; Alber, Birgit E.; Fuchs, Georg

    2006-01-01

    The 3-hydroxypropionate cycle has been proposed to operate as the autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. In this pathway, acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and two bicarbonate molecules are converted to malate. Acetyl-CoA is regenerated from malyl-CoA by l-malyl-CoA lyase. The enzyme forming malyl-CoA, succinyl-CoA:l-malate coenzyme A transferase, was purified. Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of its two subunits, the corresponding genes were identified on a gene cluster which also contains the gene for l-malyl-CoA lyase, the subsequent enzyme in the pathway. Both enzymes were severalfold up-regulated under autotrophic conditions, which is in line with their proposed function in CO2 fixation. The two CoA transferase genes were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was purified and studied. Succinyl-CoA:l-malate CoA transferase forms a large (αβ)n complex consisting of 46- and 44-kDa subunits and catalyzes the reversible reaction succinyl-CoA + l-malate → succinate + l-malyl-CoA. It is specific for succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor but accepts l-citramalate instead of l-malate as the CoA acceptor; the corresponding d-stereoisomers are not accepted. The enzyme is a member of the class III of the CoA transferase family. The demonstration of the missing CoA transferase closes the last gap in the proposed 3-hydroxypropionate cycle. PMID:16547052

  5. Alpha-secondary tritium kinetic isotope effects indicate hydrogen tunneling and coupled motion occur in the oxidation of L-malate by NAD-malic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Karsten, W E; Hwang, C C; Cook, P F

    1999-04-06

    The NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum catalyzes the divalent metal ion-dependent oxidative decarboxylation of L-malate to give pyruvate and CO2, with NAD+ as the oxidant. Alpha-secondary tritium kinetic isotope effects were measured with NAD+ or APAD+ and L-malate-2-H(D) and several different divalent metal ions. The alpha-secondary tritium kinetic isotope effects are slightly higher than 1 with NAD+ and L-malate as substrates, much larger than the expected inverse isotope effect for a hybridization change from sp2 to sp3. The alpha-secondary tritium kinetic isotope effects are reduced to values near 1 with L-malate-2-D as the substrate, regardless of the metal ion that is used. Data suggest the presence of quantum mechanical tunneling and coupled motion in the malic enzyme reaction when NAD+ and malate are used as substrates. Isotope effects were also measured using the D/T method with NAD+ and Mn2+ as the substrate pair. A Swain-Schaad exponent of 2.2 (less than the value of 3.26 expected for strictly semiclassical behavior) is estimated, suggesting the presence of other slow steps along the reaction pathway. With APAD+ and Mn2+ as the substrate pair, inverse alpha-secondary tritium kinetic isotope effects are observed, and a Swain-Schaad exponent of 3.3 is estimated, consistent with rate-limiting hydride transfer and no quantum mechanical tunneling or coupled motion. Data are discussed in terms of the malic enzyme mechanism and the theory developed by Huskey for D/T isotope effects as an indicator of tunneling [Huskey, W. P. (1991) J. Phys. Org. Chem. 4, 361-366].

  6. Characterization of the functional role of allosteric site residue Asp102 in the regulatory mechanism of human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malate dehydrogenase (malic enzyme).

    PubMed

    Hung, Hui-Chih; Kuo, Meng-Wei; Chang, Gu-Gang; Liu, Guang-Yaw

    2005-11-15

    Human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) (malic enzyme) can be specifically and allosterically activated by fumarate. X-ray crystal structures have revealed conformational changes in the enzyme in the absence and in the presence of fumarate. Previous studies have indicated that fumarate is bound to the allosteric pocket via Arg67 and Arg91. Mutation of these residues almost abolishes the activating effect of fumarate. However, these amino acid residues are conserved in some enzymes that are not activated by fumarate, suggesting that there may be additional factors controlling the activation mechanism. In the present study, we tried to delineate the detailed molecular mechanism of activation of the enzyme by fumarate. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace Asp102, which is one of the charged amino acids in the fumarate binding pocket and is not conserved in other decarboxylating malate dehydrogenases. In order to explore the charge effect of this residue, Asp102 was replaced by alanine, glutamate or lysine. Our experimental data clearly indicate the importance of Asp102 for activation by fumarate. Mutation of Asp102 to Ala or Lys significantly attenuated the activating effect of fumarate on the enzyme. Kinetic parameters indicate that the effect of fumarate was mainly to decrease the K(m) values for malate, Mg2+ and NAD+, but it did not notably elevate kcat. The apparent substrate K(m) values were reduced by increasing concentrations of fumarate. Furthermore, the greatest effect of fumarate activation was apparent at low malate, Mg2+ or NAD+ concentrations. The K(act) values were reduced with increasing concentrations of malate, Mg2+ and NAD+. The Asp102 mutants, however, are much less sensitive to regulation by fumarate. Mutation of Asp102 leads to the desensitization of the co-operative effect between fumarate and substrates of the enzyme.

  7. Structure-guided Discovery of Phenyl diketo-acids as Potent Inhibitors of M. tuberculosis Malate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Inna V.; Freundlich, Joel S.; Gawandi, Vijay B.; Roberts, Justin P.; Gawandi, Vidyadhar B.; Sun, Qingan; Owen, Joshua L.; Fraile, Maria T.; Huss, Sofia I.; Lavandera, Jose-Luis; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The glyoxylate shunt plays an important role in fatty-acid metabolism, and has been shown to be critical to survival of several pathogens involved in chronic infections. For Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), a strain with a defective glyoxylate shunt was previously shown to be unable to establish infection in a mouse model. We report the development of novel phenyl-diketo acid (PDKA) inhibitors of malate synthase (GlcB), one of two glyoxylate shunt enzymes, using structure-based methods. PDKA inhibitors were active against Mtb grown on acetate, and over-expression of GlcB ameliorated this inhibition. Crystal structures of complexes of GlcB with PDKA inhibitors were used to guide optimization of potency. A selected PDKA compound demonstrated efficacy in a mouse model of tuberculosis. The discovery of these PDKA derivatives provides chemical validation of GlcB as an attractive target for tuberculosis therapeutics. PMID:23261599

  8. Evidence for a polymorphism in gametic segregation using a malate dehydrogenase locus in the tetraploid treefrog Hyla versicolor.

    PubMed

    Danzmann, R G; Bogart, J P

    1982-02-01

    Artificial cross combinations of tetraploid Hyla versicolor were analyzed electrophoretically using a polymorphic malate dehydrogenase locus (MDH-1) to determine the mechanism of chromosome segregation. Models for differentiating between disomic and tetrasomic inheritance are presented and tested. In some crosses progeny genotypes fit a disomic mode of segregation. In other crosses there is only evidence for a tetrasomic mode of segregation. Additional crosses produced genotypic ratios which conformed to either a disomic or tetrasomic mode of segregation. The same type of inheritance was demonstrated for any individual when used in multiple cross combinations. These results suggest that there exists in H. versicolor a polymorphism with respect to segregation of gametes, resulting from differences in chromosome pairings during meiosis I.

  9. Evidence for a Polymorphism in Gametic Segregation Using a Malate Dehydrogenase Locus in the Tetraploid Treefrog HYLA VERSICOLOR

    PubMed Central

    Danzmann, Roy G.; Bogart, James P.

    1982-01-01

    Artificial cross combinations of tetraploid Hyla versicolor were analyzed electrophoretically using a polymorphic malate dehydrogenase locus (MDH-1) to determine the mechanism of chromosome segregation. Models for differentiating between disomic and tetrasomic inheritance are presented and tested. In some crosses progeny genotypes fit a disomic mode of segregation. In other crosses there is only evidence for a tetrasomic mode of segregation. Additional crosses produced genotypic ratios which conformed to either a disomic or tetrasomic mode of segregation. The same type of inheritance was demonstrated for any individual when used in multiple cross combinations. These results suggest that there exists in H. versicolor a polymorphism with respect to segregation of gametes, resulting from differences in chromosome pairings during meiosis I. PMID:7106558

  10. Alteration of coenzyme specificity of malate dehydrogenase from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Y D; Song, P; Cao, Z Y; Wang, P; Zhu, G P

    2014-07-29

    We describe here for the first time the alteration of coenzyme specificity of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) (ScMDH). In the present study, we replaced four amino acid residues in the Rossmann fold (βB-αC) region of NADH-dependent ScMDH by site-directed mutagenesis with those of NADPH-dependent MDH (Glu42Gly, Ile43Ser, Pro45Arg, and Ala46Ser). The coenzyme specificity of the mutant enzyme (ScMDH-T4) was examined. Coenzyme specificity of ScMDH-T4 was shifted 2231.3-fold toward NADPH using kcat/Km(coenzyme) as the measurement of coenzyme specificity. Accordingly, the effect of the replacements on coenzyme specificity is discussed. Our work provides further insight into the coenzyme specificity of ScMDH.

  11. The contribution of stored malate and citrate to the substrate requirements of metabolism of ripening peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) flesh is negligible. Implications for the occurrence of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Famiani, Franco; Farinelli, Daniela; Moscatello, Stefano; Battistelli, Alberto; Leegood, Richard C; Walker, Robert P

    2016-04-01

    The first aim of this study was to determine the contribution of stored malate and citrate to the substrate requirements of metabolism in the ripening flesh of the peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) cultivar Adriatica. In the flesh, stored malate accumulated before ripening could contribute little or nothing to the net substrate requirements of metabolism. This was because there was synthesis and not dissimilation of malate throughout ripening. Stored citrate could potentially contribute a very small amount (about 5.8%) of the substrate required by metabolism when the whole ripening period was considered, and a maximum of about 7.5% over the latter part of ripening. The second aim of this study was to investigate why phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) an enzyme utilised in gluconeogenesis from malate and citrate is present in peach flesh. The occurrence and localisation of enzymes utilised in the metabolism of malate, citrate and amino acids were determined in peach flesh throughout its development. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (essential for the synthesis of malate and citrate) was present in the same cells and at the same time as PEPCK and NADP-malic enzyme (both utilised in the dissimilation of malate and citrate). A hypothesis is presented to explain the presence of these enzymes and to account for the likely occurrence of gluconeogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Reduced mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity has a strong effect on photorespiratory metabolism as revealed by 13C labelling

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Pernilla; Keech, Olivier; Stenlund, Hans; Gardeström, Per; Moritz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) catalyses the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate (OAA) in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Its activity is important for redox control of the mitochondrial matrix, through which it may participate in regulation of TCA cycle turnover. In Arabidopsis, there are two isoforms of mMDH. Here, we investigated to which extent the lack of the major isoform, mMDH1 accounting for about 60% of the activity, affected leaf metabolism. In air, rosettes of mmdh1 plants were only slightly smaller than wild type plants although the fresh weight was decreased by about 50%. In low CO2 the difference was much bigger, with mutant plants accumulating only 14% of fresh weight as compared to wild type. To investigate the metabolic background to the differences in growth, we developed a 13CO2 labelling method, using a custom-built chamber that enabled simultaneous treatment of sets of plants under controlled conditions. The metabolic profiles were analysed by gas- and liquid- chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to investigate the metabolic adjustments between wild type and mmdh1. The genotypes responded similarly to high CO2 treatment both with respect to metabolite pools and 13C incorporation during a 2-h treatment. However, under low CO2 several metabolites differed between the two genotypes and, interestingly most of these were closely associated with photorespiration. We found that while the glycine/serine ratio increased, a concomitant altered glutamine/glutamate/α-ketoglutarate relation occurred. Taken together, our results indicate that adequate mMDH activity is essential to shuttle reductants out from the mitochondria to support the photorespiratory flux, and strengthen the idea that photorespiration is tightly intertwined with peripheral metabolic reactions. PMID:26889011

  13. Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenase Lowers Leaf Respiration and Alters Photorespiration and Plant Growth in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Tomaz, Tiago; Bagard, Matthieu; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Lindén, Pernilla; Lee, Chun Pong; Carroll, Adam J.; Ströher, Elke; Smith, Steven M.; Gardeström, Per; Millar, A. Harvey

    2010-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes a reversible NAD+-dependent-dehydrogenase reaction involved in central metabolism and redox homeostasis between organelle compartments. To explore the role of mitochondrial MDH (mMDH) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), knockout single and double mutants for the highly expressed mMDH1 and lower expressed mMDH2 isoforms were constructed and analyzed. A mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has no detectable mMDH activity but is viable, albeit small and slow growing. Quantitative proteome analysis of mitochondria shows changes in other mitochondrial NAD-linked dehydrogenases, indicating a reorganization of such enzymes in the mitochondrial matrix. The slow-growing mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has elevated leaf respiration rate in the dark and light, without loss of photosynthetic capacity, suggesting that mMDH normally uses NADH to reduce oxaloacetate to malate, which is then exported to the cytosol, rather than to drive mitochondrial respiration. Increased respiratory rate in leaves can account in part for the low net CO2 assimilation and slow growth rate of mmdh1mmdh2. Loss of mMDH also affects photorespiration, as evidenced by a lower postillumination burst, alterations in CO2 assimilation/intercellular CO2 curves at low CO2, and the light-dependent elevated concentration of photorespiratory metabolites. Complementation of mmdh1mmdh2 with an mMDH cDNA recovered mMDH activity, suppressed respiratory rate, ameliorated changes to photorespiration, and increased plant growth. A previously established inverse correlation between mMDH and ascorbate content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has been consolidated in Arabidopsis and may potentially be linked to decreased galactonolactone dehydrogenase content in mitochondria in the mutant. Overall, a central yet complex role for mMDH emerges in the partitioning of carbon and energy in leaves, providing new directions for bioengineering of plant growth rate and a new insight into the molecular mechanisms linking

  14. Crystal Structures and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Thermophilic Malate Dehydrogenase Reveal Critical Loop Motion for Co-Substrate Binding

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Huei-Ru; Wu, Szu-Pei; Hsu, Chun-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes the conversion of oxaloacetate and malate by using the NAD/NADH coenzyme system. The system is used as a conjugate for enzyme immunoassays of a wide variety of compounds, such as illegal drugs, drugs used in therapeutic applications and hormones. We elucidated the biochemical and structural features of MDH from Thermus thermophilus (TtMDH) for use in various biotechnological applications. The biochemical characterization of recombinant TtMDH revealed greatly increased activity above 60°C and specific activity of about 2,600 U/mg with optimal temperature of 90°C. Analysis of crystal structures of apo and NAD-bound forms of TtMDH revealed a slight movement of the binding loop and few structural elements around the co-substrate binding packet in the presence of NAD. The overall structures did not change much and retained all related positions, which agrees with the CD analyses. Further molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at higher temperatures were used to reconstruct structures from the crystal structure of TtMDH. Interestingly, at the simulated structure of 353 K, a large change occurred around the active site such that with increasing temperature, a mobile loop was closed to co-substrate binding region. From biochemical characterization, structural comparison and MD simulations, the thermal-induced conformational change of the co-substrate binding loop of TtMDH may contribute to the essential movement of the enzyme for admitting NAD and may benefit the enzyme's activity. PMID:24386145

  15. Loss of Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenase Activity Alters Seed Metabolism Impairing Seed Maturation and Post-Germination Growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sew, Yun Shin; Ströher, Elke; Fenske, Ricarda; Millar, A Harvey

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; EC 1.1.1.37) has multiple roles; the most commonly described is its catalysis of the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The roles of mMDH in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed development and germination were investigated in mMDH1 and mMDH2 double knockout plants. A significant proportion of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds were nonviable and developed only to torpedo-shaped embryos, indicative of arrested seed embryo growth during embryogenesis. The viable mmdh1mmdh2 seeds had an impaired maturation process that led to slow germination rates as well as retarded post-germination growth, shorter root length, and decreased root biomass. During seed development, mmdh1mmdh2 showed a paler green phenotype than the wild type and exhibited deficiencies in reserve accumulation and reduced final seed biomass. The respiration rate of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds was significantly elevated throughout their maturation, consistent with the previously reported higher respiration rate in mmdh1mmdh2 leaves. Mutant seeds showed a consistently higher content of free amino acids (branched-chain amino acids, alanine, serine, glycine, proline, and threonine), differences in sugar and sugar phosphate levels, and lower content of 2-oxoglutarate. Seed-aging assays showed that quiescent mmdh1mmdh2 seeds lost viability more than 3 times faster than wild-type seeds. Together, these data show the important role of mMDH in the earliest phases of the life cycle of Arabidopsis.

  16. Effects of Supplemental Citrulline-Malate Ingestion on Blood Lactate, Cardiovascular Dynamics, and Resistance Exercise Performance in Trained Males.

    PubMed

    Wax, Benjamin; Kavazis, Andreas N; Luckett, William

    2016-01-01

    Citrulline-malate (CM) has been proposed to provide an ergogenic effect during resistance exercise; however, there is a paucity of research investigating these claims. Therefore, we investigated the impact that CM supplementation would have on repeated bouts of resistance exercise. Fourteen resistance-trained males participated in a randomized, counterbalanced, double-blind study. Subjects were randomly assigned to placebo (PL) or CM (8 g) and performed three sets each of chin-ups, reverse chin-ups, and push-ups to failure. One week later, subjects ingested the other supplement and performed the same protocol. Blood lactate (BLa), heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP) were measured preexercise, with BLa measured a second time immediately following the last set, while HR and BP were measured 5 and 10 min postexercise. Citrulline-malate ingestion significantly increased the amount of repetitions performed for each exercise (chin-ups: PL = 28.4 ± 7.1, CM = 32.2 ± 5.6, p = .003; reverse chin-ups: PL = 26.6 ± 5.6, CM = 32.1 ± 7.1, p = .017; push-ups: PL = 89.1 ± 37.4, CM = 97.7 ± 36.1, p < .001). Blood lactate data indicated a time effect (p < .001), but no treatment differences (p = .935). Systolic BP data did not show differences for time (p = .078) or treatment (p = .119). Diastolic BP data did not show differences for time (p = .069), but indicated treatment differences (p = .014) for subjects ingesting CM. Collectively, these findings suggests that CM increased upper-body resistance performance in trained college-age males.

  17. Syndactyly Release.

    PubMed

    Braun, Tara L; Trost, Jeffrey G; Pederson, William C

    2016-11-01

    Syndactyly is one of the most common congenital hand anomalies treated by pediatric plastic surgeons. Established principles of syndactyly separation dictate the timing and order of syndactyly release, with the goals of surgery being the creation of an anatomically normal webspace, tension-free closure of soft tissue, and return of function to the fingers. Numerous surgical methods have been described, many of which involve the use of local flaps to reconstruct the commissure and full-thickness skin grafts for coverage of raw areas. Recently, reconstructive techniques without the use of skin grafts have been devised, which work well for certain indications. Special considerations are described for complete, complex, and syndromic syndactylies. Outcomes for simple syndactyly release are typically good when surgical principles are followed, whereas complex syndactyly release tends to have less-favorable outcomes and more complications.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE N-ACETYL-α-D-GLUCOSAMINYL L-MALATE SYNTHASE (BshA) AND DEACETYLASE (BshB) FUNCTIONS FOR BACILLITHIOL BIOSYNTHESIS IN Bacillus anthracis†‡

    PubMed Central

    Parsonage, Derek; Newton, Gerald L.; Holder, Robert C.; Wallace, Bret D.; Paige, Carleitta; Hamilton, Chris J.; Dos Santos, Patricia C.; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Reid, Sean D.; Claiborne, Al

    2010-01-01

    Bacillithiol (Cys-GlcN-malate, BSH) has recently been identified as a novel low-molecular-weight thiol in Bacillus anthracis, Staphylococcus aureus, and several other Gram-positive bacteria lacking glutathione and mycothiol. We have now characterized the first two enzymes for the BSH biosynthetic pathway in B. anthracis, which combine to produce α-D-glucosaminyl L-malate (GlcN-malate) from UDP-GlcNAc and L-malate. The structure of the GlcNAc-malate intermediate has been determined, as have the kinetic parameters for the BaBshA glycosyltransferase (→GlcNAc-malate) and the BaBshB deacetylase (→GlcN-malate). BSH is one of only two natural products reported to contain a malyl glycoside, and the crystal structure of the BaBshA-UDP-malate ternary complex, determined in this work at 3.3 Å resolution, identifies several active-site interactions important for the specific recognition of L-malate, but not other α-hydroxyacids, as acceptor substrate. In sharp contrast to the structures reported for the GlcNAc—1-D-myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MshA) apo and ternary complex forms, there is no major conformational change observed in the structures of the corresponding BaBshA forms. A mutant strain of B. anthracis deficient in the BshA glycosyltransferase fails to produce BSH, as predicted. This B. anthracis bshA locus (BA1558) has been identified in a transposon site hybridization study as required for growth, sporulation, or germination, suggesting that the biosynthesis of BSH could represent a target for development of novel antimicrobials with broad spectrum activity against Gram-positive pathogens like B. anthracis. The metabolites that function in thiol redox buffering and homeostasis in Bacillus are not well understood, and we present a composite picture based on this and other recent work. PMID:20799687

  19. Toggle release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas J. (Inventor); Yang, Robert A. (Inventor); Brown, Christopher W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A pyrotechnic actuated structural release device 10 which is mechanically two fault tolerant for release. The device 10 comprises a fastener plate 11 and fastener body 12, each attachable to a different one of a pair of structures to be joined. The fastener plate 11 and body 12 are fastenable by a toggle 13 supported at one end on the fastener plate and mounted for universal pivotal movement thereon. At its other end which is received in a central opening in the fastener body 12 and adapted for limited pivotal movement therein the toggle 13 is restrained by three retractable latching pins 61 symmetrically disposed in equiangular spacing about the axis of the toggle 13 and positionable in latching engagement with an end fitting on the toggle. Each pin 61 is individually retractable by combustion of a pyrotechnic charge 77, the expanding gases of which are applied to a pressure receiving face 67 on the latch pin 61 to effect its retraction from the toggle. While retraction of all three pins 62 releases the toggle, the fastener is mechanically two fault tolerant since the failure of any single one or pair of the latch pins to retract results in an asymmetrical loading on the toggle and its pivotal movement to effect a release. An annular bolt 18 is mounted on the fastener plate 11 as a support for the socket mounting 30, 37 of the toggle whereby its selective axial movement provides a means for preloading the toggle.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of tetrameric malate dehydrogenase from the novel Antarctic psychrophile Flavobacterium frigidimaris KUC-1

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Tomomi; Oikawa, Tadao; Muraoka, Ikuo; Soda, Kenji; Hata, Yasuo

    2007-11-01

    A psychrophilic malate dehydrogenase from the novel Antarctic bacterium F. frigidimaris KUC-1 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals contained one tetrameric molecule per asymmetric unit. The best crystal diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. Flavobacterium frigidimaris KUC-1 is a novel psychrotolerant bacterium isolated from Antarctic seawater. Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) is an essential metabolic enzyme in the citric acid cycle and has been cloned, overexpressed and purified from F. frigidimaris KUC-1. In contrast to the already known dimeric form of MDH from the psychrophile Aquaspirillium arcticum, F. frigidimaris MDH exists as a tetramer. It was crystallized at 288 K by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as the precipitating agent. The crystal diffracted to a maximum resolution of 1.80 Å. It contains one tetrameric molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  1. Structure and function of Plasmodium falciparum malate dehydrogenase: role of critical amino acids in co-substrate binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Anupam; Tripathi, Abhai K; Desai, Prashant V; Mukherjee, Prasenjit K; Avery, Mitchell A; Walker, Larry A; Tekwani, Babu L

    2009-01-01

    The malaria parasite thrives on anaerobic fermentation of glucose for energy. Earlier studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that a cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (PfMDH) with striking similarity to lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) might complement PfLDH function in Plasmodium falciparum. The N-terminal glycine motif, which forms a characteristic Rossman dinucleotide-binding fold in the co-substrate binding pocket, differentiates PfMDH (GlyXGlyXXGly) from other eukaryotic and prokaryotic malate dehydrogenases (GlyXXGlyXXGly). The amino acids lining the co-substrate binding pocket are completely conserved in MDHs from different species of human, primate and rodent malaria parasites. Based on this knowledge and conserved domains among prokaryotic and eukaryotic MDH, the role of critical amino acids lining the co-substrate binding pocket was analyzed in catalytic functions of PfMDH using site-directed mutagenesis. Insertion of Ala at the 9th or 10th position, which converts the N-terminal GlyXGlyXXGly motif (characteristic of malarial MDH and LDH) to GlyXXGlyXXGly (as in bacterial and eukaryotic MDH), uncoupled regulation of the enzyme through substrate inhibition. The dinucleotide fold GlyXGlyXXGly motif seems not to be responsible for the distinct affinity of PfMDH to 3-acetylpyridine-adenine dinucleotide (APAD, a synthetic analog of NAD), since Ala9 and Ala10 insertion mutants still utilized APADH. The Gln11Met mutation, which converts the signature glycine motif in PfMDH to that of PfLDH, did not change the enzyme function. However, the Gln11Gly mutant showed approximately a 5-fold increase in catalytic activity, and higher susceptibility to inhibition with gossypol. Asn119 and His174 participate in binding of both co-substrate and substrate. The Asn119Gly mutant exhibited approximately a 3-fold decrease in catalytic efficiency, while mutation of His174 to Asn or Ala resulted in an inactive enzyme. These studies provide critical insights into the co

  2. Prognostic impact of Bcl-2 depends on tumor histology and expression of MALAT-1 lncRNA in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Lars Henning; Görlich, Dennis; Spieker, Tilmann; Rohde, Christian; Schuler, Martin; Mohr, Michael; Humberg, Julia; Sauer, Tim; Thoenissen, Nils H; Huge, Andreas; Voss, Reinhard; Marra, Alessandro; Faldum, Andreas; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Wiewrodt, Rainer

    2014-09-01

    Apoptosis is a crucial pathway in tumor growth and metastatic development. Apoptotic proteins regulate the underlying molecular cascades and are thought to modulate the tumor response to chemotherapy and radiation. However, the prognostic value of the expression of apoptosis regulators in localized non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still unclear. We investigated the protein expression of apoptosis regulators Bcl-2, Bcl-xl, Mcl-1, and pp32/PHAPI, and the expression of the lncRNA MALAT-1 in tumor samples from 383 NSCLC patients (median age: 65.6 years; 77.5% male; paraffin-embedded tissue microarrays). For statistical analysis correlation tests, Log rank tests and Cox proportional hazard models were applied. Tumor histology was significantly associated with the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xl and Mcl-1 (all p < 0.001). Among the tested apoptotic markers only Bcl-2 demonstrated prognostic impact (hazard ratio = 0.64, p = 0.012). For NSCLC patients with non-adenocarcinoma histology, Bcl-2 expression was associated with increased overall survival (p = 0.036). Besides tumor histology, prognostic impact of Bcl-2 was also found to depend on MALAT-1 lncRNA expression. Gene expression analysis of A549 adenocarcinoma cells with differential MALAT-1 lncRNA expression demonstrated an influence on the expression of Bcl-2 and its interacting proteins. Bcl-2 expression was specifically associated with superior prognosis in localized NSCLC. An interaction of Bcl-2 with MALAT-1 lncRNA expression was revealed, which merits further investigation for risk prediction in resectable NSCLC patients.

  3. Aluminum induced encephalopathy in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lipman, J.J.; Colowick, S.P.; Lawrence, P.P.; Abumrad, N.N.

    1988-01-01

    Aluminum tartrate (AlT) but not sodium tartrate (NaT) produces a progressive encephalopathy when injected intracerebroventricularly in the rat. This syndrome, lethal within 30-35 days, is characterized by progressively deranged behavior. An early startle reaction, later joined by locomotor discoordination is followed by locomotor and electrocorticographic (ECoG) seizures in chronically instrumented AlT rats. There is early dissociation between ECoG and locomotor aspects. When tested in the shuttlebox for estimation of learning and memory function 7-8 days after AlT injection, marked impairment of both active and passive avoidance was observed. Glucose uptake capacity of synaptosomes from brain areas of AlT and NaT animals was indexed by the 2-deoxy-D-glucose method. Striatal and cortical synaptosomes showed reduced uptake activity 7 days following Alt injection. By day 14, hypothalamic areas also became affected, striatal uptake was further inhibited, and cortical uptake was reduced to 57% of control. The ECoG background rhythm remained unchanged until days 20-23, when the mean peak frequency was reduced. The model may be useful in the study of central aluminum toxicity and may have predictive validity in the testing of procedures to counter aluminum-associated encephalopathies in man. 44 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  4. Aluminum induced proteome changes in tomato cotyledons

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cotyledons of tomato seedlings that germinated in a 20 µM AlK(SO4)2 solution remained chlorotic while those germinated in an aluminum free medium were normal (green) in color. Previously, we have reported the effect of aluminum toxicity on root proteome in tomato seedlings (Zhou et al. J Exp Bot, 20...

  5. The mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 1 gene GhmMDH1 is involved in plant and root growth under phosphorus deficiency conditions in cotton

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-An; Li, Qing; Ge, Xiao-Yang; Yang, Chun-Lin; Luo, Xiao-Li; Zhang, An-Hong; Xiao, Juan-Li; Tian, Ying-Chuan; Xia, Gui-Xian; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Li, Fu-Guang; Wu, Jia-He

    2015-01-01

    Cotton, an important commercial crop, is cultivated for its natural fibers, and requires an adequate supply of soil nutrients, including phosphorus, for its growth. Soil phosporus exists primarily in insoluble forms. We isolated a mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (MDH) gene, designated as GhmMDH1, from Gossypium hirsutum L. to assess its effect in enhancing P availability and absorption. An enzyme kinetic assay showed that the recombinant GhmMDH1 possesses the capacity to catalyze the interconversion of oxaloacetate and malate. The malate contents in the roots, leaves and root exudates was significantly higher in GhmMDH1-overexpressing plants and lower in knockdown plants compared with the wild-type control. Knockdown of GhmMDH1 gene resulted in increased respiration rate and reduced biomass whilst overexpression of GhmMDH1 gave rise to decreased respiration rate and higher biomass in the transgenic plants. When cultured in medium containing only insoluble phosphorus, Al-phosphorus, Fe-phosphorus, or Ca-phosphorus, GhmMDH1-overexpressing plants produced significantly longer roots and had a higher biomass and P content than WT plants, however, knockdown plants showed the opposite results for these traits. Collectively, our results show that GhmMDH1 is involved in plant and root growth under phosphorus deficiency conditions in cotton, owing to its functions in leaf respiration and P acquisition. PMID:26179843

  6. MALAT1 and HOTAIR Long Non-Coding RNAs Play Opposite Role in Estrogen-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aiello, Aurora; Bacci, Lorenza; Re, Agnese; Ripoli, Cristian; Pierconti, Francesco; Pinto, Francesco; Masetti, Riccardo; Grassi, Claudio; Gaetano, Carlo; Bassi, Pier Francesco; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Nanni, Simona; Farsetti, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    In the complex network of nuclear hormone receptors, the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as critical determinants of hormone action. Here we investigated the involvement of selected cancer-associated lncRNAs in Estrogen Receptor (ER) signaling. Prior studies by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) Sequencing showed that in prostate cancer cells ERs form a complex with the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and that in turn these complexes associate with chromatin in an estrogen-dependent fashion. Among these associations (peaks) we focused our attention on those proximal to the regulatory region of HOTAIR and MALAT1. These transcripts appeared regulated by estrogens and able to control ERs function by interacting with ERα/ERβ as indicated by RNA-ChIP. Further studies performed by ChIRP revealed that in unstimulated condition, HOTAIR and MALAT1 were present on pS2, hTERT and HOTAIR promoters at the ERE/eNOS peaks. Interestingly, upon treatment with17β-estradiol HOTAIR recruitment to chromatin increased significantly while that of MALAT1 was reduced, suggesting an opposite regulation and function for these lncRNAs. Similar results were obtained in cells and in an ex vivo prostate organotypic slice cultures. Overall, our data provide evidence of a crosstalk between lncRNAs, estrogens and estrogen receptors in prostate cancer with important consequences on gene expression regulation. PMID:27922078

  7. The malate-aspartate NADH shuttle components are novel metabolic longevity regulators required for calorie restriction-mediated life span extension in yeast.

    PubMed

    Easlon, Erin; Tsang, Felicia; Skinner, Craig; Wang, Chen; Lin, Su-Ju

    2008-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that increased mitochondrial metabolism and the concomitant decrease in NADH levels mediate calorie restriction (CR)-induced life span extension. The mitochondrial inner membrane is impermeable to NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form) and NADH, and it is unclear how CR relays increased mitochondrial metabolism to multiple cellular pathways that reside in spatially distinct compartments. Here we show that the mitochondrial components of the malate-aspartate NADH shuttle (Mdh1 [malate dehydrogenase] and Aat1 [aspartate amino transferase]) and the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle (Gut2, glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) are novel longevity factors in the CR pathway in yeast. Overexpressing Mdh1, Aat1, and Gut2 extend life span and do not synergize with CR. Mdh1 and Aat1 overexpressions require both respiration and the Sir2 family to extend life span. The mdh1Deltaaat1Delta double mutation blocks CR-mediated life span extension and also prevents the characteristic decrease in the NADH levels in the cytosolic/nuclear pool, suggesting that the malate-aspartate shuttle plays a major role in the activation of the downstream targets of CR such as Sir2. Overexpression of the NADH shuttles may also extend life span by increasing the metabolic fitness of the cells. Together, these data suggest that CR may extend life span and ameliorate age-associated metabolic diseases by activating components of the NADH shuttles.

  8. The Malat1 long non-coding RNA is upregulated by signalling through the PERK axis of unfolded protein response during flavivirus infection.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Vrati, Sudhanshu

    2015-12-04

    Flavivirus infection causes host cell death by initiation of an unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR is initiated following activation of three ER-membrane resident sensors, PERK, IRE1α and ATF6, which are otherwise kept inactive through association with the ER-chaperone GRP78. Activation precedes cellular and molecular changes that act to restore homeostasis but might eventually initiate apoptosis. These changes involve influencing function of multiple genes by either transcriptional or post-transcriptional or post-translational mechanisms. Transcriptional control includes expression of transcription factor cascades, which influence cognate gene expression. Malat1 is a long non-coding RNA which is over-expressed in many human oncogenic tissues and regulates cell cycle and survival. In this report, for the first time we show activation of Malat1 following infection by two flaviviruses, both of which activate the UPR in host cells. The temporal kinetics of expression was restricted to later time points. Further, Malat1 was also activated by pharmacological inducer of UPR, to a similar degree. Using drugs that specifically inhibit or activate the PERK or IRE1α sensors, we demonstrate that signalling through the PERK axis activates this expression, through a transcriptional mechanism. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an UPR pathway regulating the expression of an lncRNA.

  9. Late onset of dietary restriction reverses age-related decline of malate-aspartate shuttle enzymes in the liver and kidney of mice.

    PubMed

    Goyary, Danswrang; Sharma, Ramesh

    2008-02-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) influences several physiological processes, retards the incidences and severity of various age-related diseases and extends lifespan of various animal species. The effect of DR on the activities of malate-aspartate shuttle enzymes, viz. cytosolic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase (c- and m-AsAT) and malate dehydrogenase (c- and m-MDH) was investigated in the liver and kidney of adult (5-months) and old (21-months) male mice. The results show that the activity (U/mg protein) of both c- and m-MDH and AsAT is decreased significantly in the liver and kidney of old mice compared to adult ones. However, DR in old mice reverses significantly the enzyme activities to a level closer to adult animals. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and specific staining of c-AsAT, one of the selected isoenzymes of the shuttle, showed a similar pattern of activity expression as observed by activity measurements in both the tissues studied. Slot blot analysis of c-AsAT confirmed the lower protein content of this isoenzyme in old mice compared to adult ones and a higher level in old-dietary restricted mice. Thus, our results suggest that the late onset of DR in older mice reverses decline in malate-aspartate shuttle enzymes and that it may allow a better metabolic regulation in older animals.

  10. Analysis of Arabidopsis with Highly Reduced Levels of Malate and Fumarate Sheds Light on the Role of These Organic Acids as Storage Carbon Molecules1[W

    PubMed Central

    Zell, Martina B.; Fahnenstich, Holger; Maier, Alexandra; Saigo, Mariana; Voznesenskaya, Elena V.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Andreo, Carlos; Schleifenbaum, Frank; Zell, Christiane; Drincovich, María F.; Maurino, Verónica G.

    2010-01-01

    While malate and fumarate participate in a multiplicity of pathways in plant metabolism, the function of these organic acids as carbon stores in C3 plants has not been deeply addressed. Here, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants overexpressing a maize (Zea mays) plastidic NADP-malic enzyme (MEm plants) were used to analyze the consequences of sustained low malate and fumarate levels on the physiology of this C3 plant. When grown in short days (sd), MEm plants developed a pale-green phenotype with decreased biomass and increased specific leaf area, with thin leaves having lower photosynthetic performance. These features were absent in plants growing in long days. The analysis of metabolite levels of rosettes from transgenic plants indicated similar disturbances in both sd and long days, with very low levels of malate and fumarate. Determinations of the respiratory quotient by the end of the night indicated a shift from carbohydrates to organic acids as the main substrates for respiration in the wild type, while MEm plants use more reduced compounds, like fatty acids and proteins, to fuel respiration. It is concluded that the alterations observed in sd MEm plants are a consequence of impairment in the supply of carbon skeletons during a long dark period. This carbon starvation phenotype observed at the end of the night demonstrates a physiological role of the C4 acids, which may be a constitutive function in plants. PMID:20107023

  11. The malate synthase of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a linked surface protein that behaves as an anchorless adhesin

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). This is a pulmonary mycosis acquired by inhalation of fungal airborne propagules that can disseminate to several organs and tissues leading to a severe form of the disease. Adhesion and invasion to host cells are essential steps involved in the internalization and dissemination of pathogens. Inside the host, P. brasiliensis may use the glyoxylate cycle for intracellular survival. Results Here, we provide evidence that the malate synthase of P. brasiliensis (PbMLS) is located on the fungal cell surface, and is secreted. PbMLS was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and polyclonal antibody was obtained against this protein. By using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy, PbMLS was detected in the cytoplasm and in the cell wall of the mother, but mainly of budding cells of the P. brasiliensis yeast phase. PbMLSr and its respective polyclonal antibody produced against this protein inhibited the interaction of P. brasiliensis with in vitro cultured epithelial cells A549. Conclusion These observations indicated that cell wall-associated PbMLS could be mediating the binding of fungal cells to the host, thus contributing to the adhesion of fungus to host tissues and to the dissemination of infection, behaving as an anchorless adhesin. PMID:20034376

  12. Synthesis, growth, thermal, optical, dielectric and mechanical properties of semi-organic NLO crystal: Potassium hydrogen malate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandha babu, G.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Ramasamy, P.

    2008-05-01

    Potassium hydrogen malate monohydrate (PHMM), a semi-organic nonlinear optical material, has been synthesized and single crystals were grown from aqueous solution. Single crystals of PHMM have been grown by slow evaporation of solvent at room temperature up to dimensions of 22 mm×16 mm×14 mm. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction study on grown crystals shows that they belong to monoclinic system and non-centrosymmetry spacegroup Cc. The structural perfection of the grown crystals has been analyzed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) rocking curve measurements. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic study was performed for the identification of different modes of functional groups present in the compound. The UV-Vis transmission spectrum has been recorded in the range 200-1100 nm. The thermal stability of the compound has been determined by TG-DTA curves. The dielectric studies were performed. From the microhardness measurements, Vicker's hardness number ( Hv), Stiffness constant ( C11), fracture toughness ( kc), Brittle index ( Bi) and yield strength ( σy) have been calculated. The Young's modulus was calculated using the Knoop hardness measurement. The SHG relative efficiency of PHMM crystal was found to be 1.2 times higher than that of KDP.

  13. Purification and characterization of malate synthase from the glucose-grown wood-rotting basidiomycete Fomitopsis palustris.

    PubMed

    Munir, Erman; Hattori, Takefumi; Shimada, Mikio

    2002-03-01

    Malate synthase (EC 4.1.3.2), the key enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, was purified to a homogeneous protein from the wood-rotting basidiomycete Fomitopsis palustris grown on glucose. The purified enzyme, with a molecular mass of 520 kDa, was found to consist of eight 65-kDa subunits, and to have Km of 45 and 2.2 microM for glyoxylate and acetyl-CoA, respectively. The enzyme activity was competitively inhibited by oxalate (K1, 8.5 microM) and glycolate (Ki, 17 microM), and uncompetitively by coenzyme A (Ki, 100 microM). The potent inhibition of the activity by p-chloromercuribenzoate suggests that the enzyme has a sulfhydryl group at the active center. However, the enzyme was inhibited moderately by adenine nucleotides and weakly by some of the metabolic intermediates of glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle. The enzyme was completely inactive in the absence of metal ions and was maximally activated by Mg2+ (Km, 0.4 microM), which also served to significantly prevent enzyme inactivation during storage.

  14. Structure of porcine heart cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase: combining x-ray diffraction and chemical sequence data in structural studies

    SciTech Connect

    Birktoft, J.J.; Bradshaw, R.A.; Banaszak, L.J.

    1987-05-19

    The amino acid sequence of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase (sMDH) has been determined by a combination of X-ray crystallographic and chemical sequencing methods. The initial molecular model incorporated an X-ray amino acid sequence that derived primarily from an evaluation of a multiple isomorphous replacement phased electron density map calculated at 2.5-A resolution. Following restrained least-squares crystallographic refinement, difference electron density maps were calculated from model phases, and attempts were made to upgrade the X-ray amino acid sequence. The method used to find the positions of peptides in the X-ray structure was similar to those used for studying protein homology and was shown to be successful for large fragments. For sMDH, X-ray methods by themselves were insufficient to derive a complete amino acid sequence, even with partial chemical sequence data. However, for this relatively large molecule at medium resolution, the electron density maps were of considerable help in determining the linear position of peptide fragments. The N-acetylated polypeptide chain of sMDH has 331 amino acids and has been crystallographically refined to an R factor of 19% for 2.5-A resolution diffraction data.

  15. Targeted drug delivery of Sunitinib Malate to tumor blood vessels by cRGD-chiotosan-gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Saber, Mohaddeseh Mahmoudi; Bahrainian, Sara; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2017-01-30

    The unique characteristics of tumor vasculature represent an attractive strategy for targeted delivery of antitumor and antiangiogenic agents to the tumor. The purpose of this study was to prepare c(RGDfK) labeled chitosan capped gold nanoparticles [cRGD(CS-Au) NPs] as a carrier for selective intracellular delivery of Sunitinib Malate (STB) to the tumor vasculature. cRGD(CS-Au) NPs was formed by electrostatic interaction between cationic CS and anionic AuNPs. cRGD modified CS-Au NPs had a spherical shape with a narrow size distribution. The entrapment efficiency of sunitinib molecule was found to be 45.2%±2.05. Confocal microscopy showed enhanced and selective uptake of cRGD(CS-Au) NPs into MCF-7 and HUVEC cells compared with non-targeted CS-Au NPs. Our results suggest that it may be possible to use cRGD(CS-Au) NPs as a carrier for delivery of anticancer drugs, genes and biomolecules for inhibiting tumor vasculature. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Implication of citrate, malate and histidine in the accumulation and transport of nickel in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum and Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Amari, Taoufik; Lutts, Stanley; Taamali, Manel; Lucchini, Giorgio; Sacchi, Gian Attilio; Abdelly, Chedly; Ghnaya, Tahar

    2016-04-01

    Citrate, malate and histidine have been involved in many processes including metal tolerance and accumulation in plants. These molecules have been frequently reported to be the potential nickel chelators, which most likely facilitate metal transport through xylem. In this context, we assess here, the relationship between organics acids and histidine content and nickel accumulation in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum and Brassica juncea grown in hydroponic media added with 25, 50 and 100 µM NiCl2. Results showed that M. crystallinum is relatively more tolerant to Ni toxicity than B. juncea. For both species, xylem transport rate of Ni increased with increasing Ni supply. A positive correlation was established between nickel and citrate concentrations in the xylem sap. In the shoot of B. juncea, citric and malic acids concentrations were significantly higher than in the shoot of M. crystallinum. Also, the shoots and roots of B. juncea accumulated much more histidine. In contrast, a higher root citrate concentration was observed in M. crystallinum. These findings suggest a specific involvement of malic and citric acid in Ni translocation and accumulation in M. crystallinum and B. juncea. The high citrate and histidine accumulation especially at 100µM NiCl2, in the roots of M. crystallinum might be among the important factors associated with the tolerance of this halophyte to toxic Ni levels.

  17. Decreased mitochondrial activities of malate dehydrogenase and fumarase in tomato lead to altered root growth and architecture via diverse mechanisms.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Margaretha J; Osorio, Sonia; Moritz, Thomas; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2009-02-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants in which either mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase or fumarase was antisense inhibited have previously been characterized to exhibit altered photosynthetic metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that these manipulations also resulted in differences in root growth, with both transgenics being characterized by a dramatic reduction of root dry matter deposition and respiratory activity but opposite changes with respect to root area. A range of physiological, molecular, and biochemical experiments were carried out in order to determine whether changes in root morphology were due to altered metabolism within the root itself, alterations in the nature of the transformants' root exudation, consequences of alteration in the efficiency of photoassimilate delivery to the root, or a combination of these factors. Grafting experiments in which the transformants were reciprocally grafted to wild-type controls suggested that root length and area were determined by the aerial part of the plant but that biomass was not. Despite the transgenic roots displaying alteration in the expression of phytohormone-associated genes, evaluation of the levels of the hormones themselves revealed that, with the exception of gibberellins, they were largely unaltered. When taken together, these combined experiments suggest that root biomass and growth are retarded by root-specific alterations in metabolism and gibberellin contents. These data are discussed in the context of current models of root growth and biomass partitioning.

  18. Opposite variations in fumarate and malate dominate metabolic phenotypes of Arabidopsis salicylate mutants with abnormal biomass under chilling.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian M; Ward, Jane L; Miller, Sonia J; Beale, Michael H

    2014-12-01

    In chilling conditions (5°C), salicylic acid (SA)-deficient mutants (sid2, eds5 and NahG) of Arabidopsis thaliana produced more biomass than wild type (Col-0), whereas the SA overproducer cpr1 was extremely stunted. The hypothesis that these phenotypes were reflected in metabolism was explored using 600 MHz (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of unfractionated polar shoot extracts. Biomass-related metabolic phenotypes were identified as multivariate data models of these NMR 'fingerprints'. These included principal components that correlated with biomass. Also, partial least squares-regression models were found to predict the relative size of plants in previously unseen experiments in different light intensities, or relative size of one genotype from the others. The dominant signal in these models was fumarate, which was high in SA-deficient mutants, intermediate in Col-0 and low in cpr1 at 5°C. Among signals negatively correlated with biomass, malate was prominent. Abundance of transcripts of the FUM2 cytosolic fumarase (At5g50950) showed strong positive correlation with fumarate levels and with biomass, whereas no significant differences were found for the FUM1 mitochondrial fumarase (At2g47510). It was confirmed that the morphological effects of SA under chilling find expression in the metabolome, with a role of fumarate highlighted.

  19. Diurnal modulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylation in pea leaves and roots as related to tissue malate concentrations and to the nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Leport, Laurent; Kandlbinder, Andrea; Baur, Bernhard; Kaiser, Werner M

    1996-04-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation was measured as dark (14)CO2 fixation in leaves and roots (in vivo) or as PEP carboxylase (PEPCase) activity in desalted leaf and roof extracts (in vitro) from Pisum sativum L. cv. Kleine Rheinländerin. Its relation to the malate content and to the nitrogen source (nitrate or ammonium) was investigated. In tissue from nitrate-grown plants, PEP carboxylation varied diurnally, showing an increase upon illumination and a decrease upon darkening. Diurnal variations in roots were much lower than in leaves. Fixation rates in leaves remained constantly low in continuous darkness or high in continuous light. Dark CO2 fixation of leaf slices also decreased when leaves were preilluminated for 1 h in CO2-free air, suggesting that the modulation of dark CO2 fixation was related to assimilate availability in leaves and roots. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity was also measured in vitro. However, no difference in maximum enzyme activity was found in extracts from illuminated or darkened leaves, and the response to substrate and effectors (PEP, malate, glucose-6-phosphate, pH) was also identical. The serine/threonine protein kinase inhibitors K252b, H7 and staurosporine, and the protein phosphatase 2A inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin, fed through the leaf petiole, did not have the effects on dark CO2 fixation predicted by a regulatory system in which PEPCase is modulated via reversible protein phosphorylation. Therefore, it is suggested that the diurnal modulation of PEP carboxylation in vivo in leaves and roots of pea is not caused by protein phosphorylation, but rather by direct allosteric effects. Upon transfer of plants to ammonium-N or to an N-free nutrient solution, mean daily malate levels in leaves decreased drastically within 4-5 d. At that time, the diurnal oscillations of PEP carboxylation in vivo disappeared and rates remained at the high light-level. The coincidence of the two events suggests that PEPCase was de

  20. A genetic variant in long non-coding RNA MALAT1 associated with survival outcome among patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma: a survival cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Zhong; Xiang, Jing-Jun; Wu, Li-Ge; Bai, Yan-Sen; Chen, Zhuo-Wang; Yin, Xiang-Qian; Wang, Qing; Guo, Wen-Hao; Peng, Ying; Guo, Huan; Xu, Ping

    2017-03-03

    Recently studies have demonstrated that the long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) may participate in the development and progression of lung cancer. In this study, we hypothesized that genetic variant of this lncRNA may affect the prognosis of lung cancer patients. We conducted a follow-up study for 538 patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), including 140 early-staged (stage I and II) and 398 advanced staged (stage III and IV) patients. The genetic variant rs3200401 in MALAT1 was then genotyped among this population by using TaqMan assay. The association of this variant with overall survival of these patients was further analyzed. It was shown that among the advanced lung adenoma patients, subjects carrying rs3200401 CT and CT + TT genotypes had significantly longer median survival time (MST = 29.9, 28.9 vs. 19.3 month, Long-rank P = 0.019 and 0.024, respectively) and decreased death risks [crude HR (95% CI) = 0.65 (0.43-0.98) and 0.64 (0.44-0.95), P = 0.040 and 0.025, respectively], when compared to subjects wtih the MALAT1 rs3200401 CC genotype. However, the beneficial effect of rs3200401 was not seen among early NSCLC and advanced lung squamous cell carcinoma patients. We further tested the TCGA data, and found that a higher expression of MALAT1 was associated with metastatic of advanced lung adenocarcinoma but not with lung squamous cell carcinoma. The rs3200401 T allele located on the lncRNA MALAT1 was associated with a better survival for advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients, which may offer a novel prognostic biomarker for this patient subgroup. However, these results need to be validated in larger populations of lung cancer and the biological function of this variant still warrants further investigation.

  1. MiR-375 Is Epigenetically Downregulated by HPV-16 E6 Mediated DNMT1 Upregulation and Modulates EMT of Cervical Cancer Cells by Suppressing lncRNA MALAT1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shikai; Song, Lili; Yao, Hairong; Zhang, Liang; Xu, Dongkui; Gao, Fangyuan; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modulation is an important mechanism of miRNA dysregulation in cervical cancer. In this study, we firstly studied how this mechanism contributes to miR-375 downregulation in cervical cancer cells. Then, we further studied the association between miR-375 and MALAT1 (metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1) in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the cancer cells. HPV-16 positive SiHa and CaSki cells were used as in vitro model. Our data showed that HPV-16 E6 positively modulated DNMT1 expression in both SiHa and CaSki cells. Knockdown of DNMT1 partly restored miR-375 levels in the cells. The following methylation-specific PCR (MSP) assay and qRT-PCR analysis showed that methylation was common in the promoter region of miR-375 in both SiHa and CaSki cells and demethylation partly restored miR-375 levels in the cells. Therefore, we infer that miR-375 is downregulated partly due to promoter hypermethylation mediated by DNMT1 in HPV-16 positive cervical cancer cells. Our bioinformatics analysis showed that MALAT1 has three putative binding sites with miR-375 and the following dual luciferase assay confirmed two of them. QRT-PCR analysis showed that miR-375 overexpression significantly reduced MALAT1 expression, while MALAT1 overexpression reversely suppressed miR-375 levels. Therefore, we infer that there is a reciprocal regulation between miR-375 and MALAT1 in the cells. In SiHa cells, miR-375 overexpression or MALAT1 siRNA partly restored E-cadherin expression, significantly reduced N-cadherin and also reduced invasion capacity of SiHa cells. Therefore, these results suggest that miR-375 and MALAT1 form a functional axis modulating EMT in cervical cancer. PMID:27658300

  2. The role of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent malate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase in the supply of reduced nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide phosphate for steroidogenesis in the superovulated rat ovary

    PubMed Central

    Flint, A. P. F.; Denton, R. M.

    1970-01-01

    1. Superovulated rat ovary was found to contain high activities of NADP–malate dehydrogenase and NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase. The activity of each enzyme was approximately four times that of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and equalled or exceeded the activities reported to be present in other mammalian tissues. Fractionation of a whole tissue homogenate of superovulated rat ovary indicated that both enzymes were exclusively cytoplasmic. The tissue was also found to contain pyruvate carboxylase (exclusively mitochondrial), NAD–malate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase (both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic) and ATP–citrate lyase (exclusively cytoplasmic). 2. The kinetic properties of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, NADP–malate dehydrogenase and NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase were determined and compared with the whole-tissue concentrations of their substrates and NADPH; NADPH is a competitive inhibitor of all three enzymes. The concentrations of glucose 6-phosphate, malate and isocitrate in incubated tissue slices were raised at least tenfold by the addition of glucose to the incubation medium, from the values below to values above the respective Km values of the dehydrogenases. Glucose doubled the tissue concentration of NADPH. 3. Steroidogenesis from acetate is stimulated by glucose in slices of superovulated rat ovary incubated in vitro. It was found that this stimulatory effect of glucose can be mimicked by malate, isocitrate, lactate and pyruvate. 4. It is concluded that NADP–malate dehydrogenase or NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase or both may play an important role in the formation of NADPH in the superovulated rat ovary. It is suggested that the stimulatory effect of glucose on steroidogenesis from acetate results from an increased rate of NADPH formation through one or both dehydrogenases, brought about by the increases in the concentrations of malate, isocitrate or both. Possible pathways involving the two enzymes are discussed

  3. Acute citrulline-malate supplementation improves maximal strength and anaerobic power in female, masters athletes tennis players.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Jordan M; Gray, Michelle; Jensen, Austen; Stone, Matthew S; Vincenzo, Jennifer L

    2016-11-01

    Citrulline-malate (CM) is a precursor to nitric-oxide (NO) in the NO synthase (NOS) pathway and is suggested to increase exercise performance in younger individuals. With age, NO production decreases and augmented NO production may provide beneficial effects on sports performance among masters athletes (MAs). To examine the effects of acute CM supplementation on grip strength, vertical power, and anaerobic cycling performance in female, MA tennis players. Seventeen female MA (51 ± 9 years) completed two double-blind, randomized trials consuming CM (12 g dextrose + 8 g CM) and placebo (PLA) (12 g dextrose). One hour after consumption, subjects completed grip strength, vertical power, and Wingate anaerobic cycling assessments in respective order. Maximal and average grip strength, peak and average vertical power, anaerobic capacity, peak power, explosive power, and ability to sustain anaerobic power were calculated from the tests. When consuming CM, participants exhibited greater maximal (p = .042) and average (p = .045) grip strength compared to PLA. No differences existed between trials for peak (p = .51) or average (p = .51) vertical power. For the Wingate, peak power (p < .001) and explosive power (p < .001) were significantly greater when consuming CM compared to PLA. For the ability to sustain power, a significant effect (p < .001) was observed for time within trials, but no significant differences were observed between trials regarding supplement consumed. These data suggest that consuming CM before competition has the potential to improve tennis match-play performance in masters tennis athletes. However, this study utilized a controlled laboratory environment and research evaluating direct application to on-court performance is warranted.

  4. Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongchao; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Engle, Nancy L; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Liao, James C; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Guss, Adam M; Yang, Yunfeng; Graham, David E

    2012-01-01

    Background: The model bacterium Clostridium cellulolyticum efficiently hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose, using cellulosomes to degrade lignocellulosic biomass. Although it imports and ferments both pentose and hexose sugars to produce a mixture of ethanol, acetate, lactate, H2 and CO2, the proportion of ethanol is low, which impedes its use in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels. Therefore genetic engineering will likely be required to improve the ethanol yield. Random mutagenesis, plasmid transformation, and heterologous expression systems have previously been developed for C. cellulolyticum, but targeted mutagenesis has not been reported for this organism. Results: The first targeted gene inactivation system was developed for C. cellulolyticum, based on a mobile group II intron originating from the Lactococcus lactis L1.LtrB intron. This markerless mutagenesis system was used to disrupt both the paralogous L-lactate dehydrogenase (Ccel_2485; ldh) and L-malate dehydrogenase (Ccel_0137; mdh) genes, distinguishing the overlapping substrate specificities of these enzymes. Both mutations were then combined in a single strain. This double mutant produced 8.5-times more ethanol than wild-type cells growing on crystalline cellulose. Ethanol constituted 93% of the major fermentation products (by molarity), corresponding to a molar ratio of ethanol to organic acids of 15, versus 0.18 in wild-type cells. During growth on acid-pretreated switchgrass, the double mutant also produced four-times as much ethanol as wild-type cells. Detailed metabolomic analyses identified increased flux through the oxidative branch of the mutant s TCA pathway. Conclusions: The efficient intron-based gene inactivation system produced the first gene-targeted mutations in C. cellulolyticum. As a key component of the genetic toolbox for this bacterium, markerless targeted mutagenesis enables functional genomic research in C. cellulolyticum and rapid genetic engineering to

  5. Improved Production of Propionic Acid in Propionibacterium jensenii via Combinational Overexpression of Glycerol Dehydrogenase and Malate Dehydrogenase from Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Zhuge, Xin; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua

    2015-01-01

    Microbial production of propionic acid (PA), an important chemical building block used as a preservative and chemical intermediate, has gained increasing attention for its environmental friendliness over traditional petrochemical processes. In previous studies, we constructed a shuttle vector as a useful tool for engineering Propionibacterium jensenii, a potential candidate for efficient PA synthesis. In this study, we identified the key metabolites for PA synthesis in P. jensenii by examining the influence of metabolic intermediate addition on PA synthesis with glycerol as a carbon source under anaerobic conditions. We also further improved PA production via the overexpression of the identified corresponding enzymes, namely, glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and fumarate hydratase (FUM). Compared to those in wild-type P. jensenii, the activities of these enzymes in the engineered strains were 2.91- ± 0.17- to 8.12- ± 0.37-fold higher. The transcription levels of the corresponding enzymes in the engineered strains were 2.85- ± 0.19- to 8.07- ± 0.63-fold higher than those in the wild type. The coexpression of GDH and MDH increased the PA titer from 26.95 ± 1.21 g/liter in wild-type P. jensenii to 39.43 ± 1.90 g/liter in the engineered strains. This study identified the key metabolic nodes limiting PA overproduction in P. jensenii and further improved PA titers via the coexpression of GDH and MDH, making the engineered P. jensenii strain a potential industrial producer of PA. PMID:25595755

  6. Thermal adaptation of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenases of eastern Pacific barracuda (Sphyraena spp): the role of differential isoenzyme expression

    PubMed

    Lin; Somero

    1995-01-01

    Kinetic properties, electrophoretic patterns and thermal stabilities of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenases (cMDHs) were compared in Eastern Pacific barracuda (Sphyraena spp) from different latitudes. All tissues of the tropical species S. ensis contained only a single, thermostable form of cMDH. Subtropical (S. lucasana) as well as north (S. argentea) and south (S. idiastes) temperate barracuda contained both thermostable and thermolabile cMDHs, the pattern characteristic of most teleosts. Kinetic studies using unfractioned cMDHs showed that the apparent Michaelis­Menten constant (Km) of cofactor (NADH) increased with temperature, but at the physiological temperatures of the four species, Km of NADH was conserved within a narrow range (20­23 µmol l-1). Thermostable and thermolabile cMDHs were chromatographically separated and compared. Thermolabile cMDHs had higher Km values for NADH at all measurement temperatures than did thermostable cMDHs. Thermolabile cMDHs isolated from congeneric barracuda exhibited similar kinetic properties (Km versus temperature, optimal pH, optimal substrate and cofactor concentrations). Thermostable cMDHs, likewise, were similar among the barracuda. Conservation of Km in the differently thermally adapted barracudas is, therefore, apparently due to adjustments in the ratio of expression of the thermostable and thermolabile isoforms, rather than to temperature-adaptive differences among orthologous homologues, as is commonly found for enzymes encoded by a single gene locus. The effects of temperature on the Km of NADH for isolated thermostable and thermolabile cMDHs of a eurythermal goby, Gillichthys mirabilis, however, were consistent with adaptive change in orthologous homologues of cMDH. The selective basis for the absence of thermolabile cMDH in warm-adapted ectotherms, mammals and birds is discussed.

  7. A targeted proteomic multiplex CSF assay identifies increased malate dehydrogenase and other neurodegenerative biomarkers in individuals with Alzheimer's disease pathology

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R W; Heywood, W E; Heslegrave, A J; Magdalinou, N K; Andreasson, U; Sirka, E; Bliss, E; Slattery, C F; Toombs, J; Svensson, J; Johansson, P; Fox, N C; Zetterberg, H; Mills, K; Schott, J M

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. Biomarkers are required to identify individuals in the preclinical phase, explain phenotypic diversity, measure progression and estimate prognosis. The development of assays to validate candidate biomarkers is costly and time-consuming. Targeted proteomics is an attractive means of quantifying novel proteins in cerebrospinal and other fluids, and has potential to help overcome this bottleneck in biomarker development. We used a previously validated multiplexed 10-min, targeted proteomic assay to assess 54 candidate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in two independent cohorts comprising individuals with neurodegenerative dementias and healthy controls. Individuals were classified as ‘AD' or ‘non-AD' on the basis of their CSF T-tau and amyloid Aβ1–42 profile measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; biomarkers of interest were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. In all, 35/31 individuals in Cohort 1 and 46/36 in Cohort 2 fulfilled criteria for AD/non-AD profile CSF, respectively. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, five proteins were elevated significantly in AD CSF compared with non-AD CSF in both cohorts: malate dehydrogenase; total APOE; chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40); osteopontin and cystatin C. In an independent multivariate orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), these proteins were also identified as major contributors to the separation between AD and non-AD in both cohorts. Independent of CSF Aβ1–42 and tau, a combination of these biomarkers differentiated AD and non-AD with an area under curve (AUC)=0.88. This targeted proteomic multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-based assay can simultaneously and rapidly measure multiple candidate CSF biomarkers. Applying this technique to AD we demonstrate differences in proteins involved in glucose metabolism and neuroinflammation that collectively have potential clinical

  8. Combination of SL327 and Sunitinib Malate leads to an additive anti-cancer effect in doxorubicin resistant thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Jin; Zhao, Lujie; Chen, Shulin

    2017-04-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play crucial roles in numerous cancer cell processes including cell survival, proliferation, and migration. MEK1/2 MAPK kinases are very important for cancer survival and development. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is a deadly type of thyroid cancer and there are no very effective systemic treatment strategies for ATC so far. Also, ATC can easily become resistant to therapy of traditional therapeutic drugs for ATC, such as doxorubicin. Drug combination treatment could be a promising therapeutic strategy for ATC, especially for drug resistant ATC. We explored the combination effect between a MEK1/2 inhibitor SL327 and a multi-targeted RTK inhibitor Sunitinib Malate in doxorubicin resistant ATC cells using cell viability assay, cell migration assay, nuclei morphology and caspase-3 activity analysis, as well as in vivo tumor growth assay. There is a significant additive effect between SL327 and Sunitinib Malate in reducing viability, increasing apoptosis, and suppressing migration of doxorubicin-resistant ATC cells. Importantly, combination of SL327 and Sunitinib Malate induced significant additive suppression of in vivo doxorubicin-resistant ATC tumor growth. Our results suggest that the combination of MEK1/2 inhibitor and RTK inhibitor is promising for treatment of ATC especially doxorubicin-resistant ATC. The combination might not only enhance the anti-cancer efficacy, but also reduce the side effects and overcome drug resistance developed in ATC treatment. All these might provide useful information for clinical therapeutics of ATC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. An alpha-proteobacterial type malate dehydrogenase may complement LDH function in Plasmodium falciparum. Cloning and biochemical characterization of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Abhai K; Desai, Prashant V; Pradhan, Anupam; Khan, Shabana I; Avery, Mitchell A; Walker, Larry A; Tekwani, Babu L

    2004-09-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) may be important in carbohydrate and energy metabolism in malarial parasites. The cDNA corresponding to the MDH gene, identified on chromosome 6 of the Plasmodium falciparum genome, was amplified by RT-PCR, cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant Pf MDH was purified to homogeneity and biochemically characterized as an NAD(+)(H)-specific MDH, which catalysed reversible interconversion of malate to oxaloacetate. Pf MDH could not use NADP/NADPH as a cofactor, but used acetylpyridine adenine dinucleoide, an analogue of NAD. The enzyme exhibited strict substrate and cofactor specificity. The highest levels of Pf MDH transcripts were detected in trophozoites while the Pf MDH protein level remained high in trophozoites as well as schizonts. A highly refined model of Pf MDH revealed distinct structural characteristics of substrate and cofactor binding sites and important amino acid residues lining these pockets. The active site amino acid residues involved in substrate binding were conserved in Pf MDH but the N-terminal glycine motif, which is involved in nucleotide binding, was similar to the GXGXXG signature sequence found in Pf LDH and also in alpha-proteobacterial MDHs. Oxamic acid did not inhibit Pf MDH, while gossypol, which interacts at the nucleotide binding site of oxidoreductases and shows antimalarial activity, inhibited Pf MDH also. Treatment of a synchronized culture of P. falciparum trophozoites with gossypol caused induction in expression of Pf MDH, while expression of Pf LDH was reduced and expression of malate:quinone oxidoreductase remained unchanged. Pf MDH may complement Pf LDH function of NAD/NADH coupling in malaria parasites. Thus, dual inhibitors of Pf MDH and Pf LDH may be required to target this pathway and to develop potential new antimalarial drugs.

  10. Perturbations of malate accumulation and the endogenous rhythms of gas exchange in the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana: testing the tonoplast-as-oscillator model.

    PubMed

    Wyka, Tomasz P; Bohn, Andreas; Duarte, Heitor M; Kaiser, Friedemann; Lüttge, Ulrich E

    2004-08-01

    In continuous light, leaves of the Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier exhibit a circadian rhythm of CO2 uptake, stomatal conductance and leaf-internal CO2 pressure. According to a current quantitative model of CAM, the pacemaking mechanism involves periodic turgor-related tension and relaxation of the tonoplast, which determines the direction of the net flux of malate between the vacuole and the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic malate, in turn, through its inhibitory effect on phospho enolpyruvate carboxylase, controls the rate of CO2 uptake. According to this mechanism, when the accumulation of malate is disrupted by removing CO2 from the ambient air, the induction of a phase delay with respect to an unperturbed control plant is expected. First, using the mathematical model, such phase delays were observed in numerical simulations of three scenarios of CO2 removal: (i) starting at a trough of CO2 uptake, lasting for about half a cycle (ca. 12 h in vivo); (ii) with the identical starting phase, but lasting for 1.5 cycles (ca. 36 h); and (iii) starting while CO2 increases, lasting for half a cycle again. Applying the same protocols to leaves of K. daigremontiana in vivo did not induce the predicted phase shifts, i.e. after the end of the CO2 removal the perturbed rhythm adopted nearly the same phase as that of the control plant. Second, when leaves were exposed to a nitrogen atmosphere for three nights prior to onset of continuous light to prevent malate accumulation, a small, 4-h phase advance was observed instead of a delay, again contrary to the model-based expectations. Hence, vacuolar malic acid accumulation is ruled out as the central pacemaking process. This observation is in line with our earlier suggestion [T.P. Wyka, U. Lüttge (2003) J Exp Bot 54:1471-1479] that in extended continuous light, CO2 uptake switches gradually from a CAM-like to a C3-like mechanism, with oscillations of the two CO2 uptake systems being

  11. Crystal structure of the MJ0490 gene product of the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Methanococcus jannaschii, a novel member of the lactate/malate family of dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Lee, B I; Chang, C; Cho, S J; Eom, S H; Kim, K K; Yu, Y G; Suh, S W

    2001-04-13

    The MJ0490 gene, one of the only two genes of Methanococcus jannaschii showing sequence similarity to the lactate/malate family of dehydrogenases, was classified initially as coding for a putative l-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). It has been re-classified as a malate dehydrogenase (MDH) gene, because it shows significant sequence similarity to MT0188, MDH II from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum strain DeltaH. The three-dimensional structure of its gene product has been determined in two crystal forms: a "dimeric" structure in the orthorhombic crystal at 1.9 A resolution and a "tetrameric" structure in the tetragonal crystal at 2.8 A. These structures share a similar subunit fold with other LDHs and MDHs. The tetrameric structure resembles typical tetrameric LDHs. The dimeric structure is equivalent to the P-dimer of tetrameric LDHs, unlike dimeric MDHs, which correspond to the Q-dimer. The structure reveals that the cofactor NADP(H) is bound at the active site, despite the fact that it was not intentionally added during protein purification and crystallization. The preference of NADP(H) over NAD(H) has been supported by activity assays. The cofactor preference is explained by the presence of a glycine residue in the cofactor binding pocket (Gly33), which replaces a conserved aspartate (or glutamate) residue in other NAD-dependent LDHs or MDHs. Preference for NADP(H) is contributed by hydrogen bonds between the oxygen atoms of the monophosphate group and the ribose sugar of adenosine in NADP(H) and the side-chains of Ser9, Arg34, His36, and Ser37. The MDH activity of MJ0490 is made possible by Arg86, which is conserved in MDHs but not in LDHs. The enzymatic assay showed that the MJ0490 protein possesses the fructose-1,6-bisphosphate-activated LDH activity (reduction). Thus the MJ0490 gene product appears to be a novel member of the lactate/malate dehydrogenase family, displaying an LDH scaffold and exhibiting a relaxed substrate and cofactor specificities in NADP

  12. Chorion peroxidase-mediated NADH/O2 oxidoreduction cooperated by chorion malate dehydrogenase-catalyzed NADH production: a feasible pathway leading to H2O2 formation during chorion hardening in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qian; Li, Guoyu; Li, Jianyong

    2010-01-01

    A specific chorion peroxidase is present in Aedes aegypti and this enzyme is responsible for catalyzing chorion protein cross-linking through dityrosine formation during chorion hardening. Peroxidase-mediated dityrosine cross-linking requires H2O2, and this study discusses the possible involvement of the chorion peroxidase in H2O2 formation by mediating NADH/O2 oxidoreduction during chorion hardening in A. aegypti eggs. Our data show that mosquito chorion peroxidase is able to catalyze pH-dependent NADH oxidation, which is enhanced in the presence of Mn2+. Molecular oxygen is the electron acceptor during peroxidase-catalyzed NADH oxidation, and reduction of O2 leads to the production of H2O2, demonstrated by the formation of dityrosine in a NADH/peroxidase reaction mixture following addition of tyrosine. An oxidoreductase capable of catalyzing malate/NAD+ oxidoreduction is also present in the egg chorion of A. aegypti. The cooperative roles of chorion malate/NAD+ oxidoreductase and chorion peroxidase on generating H2O2 with NAD+ and malate as initial substrates were demonstrated by the production of dityrosine after addition of tyrosine to a reaction mixture containing NAD+ and malate in the presence of both malate dehydrogenase fractions and purified chorion peroxidase. Data suggest that chorion peroxidase-mediated NADH/O2 oxidoreduction may contribute to the formation of the H2O2 required for chorion protein cross-linking mediated by the same peroxidase, and that the chorion associated malate dehydrogenase may be responsible for the supply of NADH for the H2O2 production. PMID:11042391

  13. 17β-Estradiol regulates cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion and promotes apoptosis by upregulating miR-9 and thus degrades MALAT-1 in osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an estrogen receptor-independent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Dengfeng; Yang, Hui; Lin, Jing; Teng, Yi; Jiang, Yingying; Chen, Jiao; Li, Yu

    2015-02-20

    In bone, different concentration of estrogen leads to various of physiological processes in osteoblast, such as the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner. But little was known about the estrogen effects on osteosarcoma (OS). In this study, OS cell MG-63 was treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) with the presence or absence of estrogen receptor α (ERα), for evaluating the E2 effects on proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis. Consistent with a previous study, high dose of E2 treatment dramatically downregulated expressing level of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1). The observation of upregulation of miR-9 after a high dose of E2 treatment indicated the cause of MALAT-1 reduction. Downregulation of MALAT-1 promoted the combination of SFPQ/PTBP2 complex. It was also observed that the proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis of OS cells were remarkably affected by high dose of E2 treatment, but not by low dose, in an ERα independent manner. Furthermore, the abolishment of the effects on these physiological processes caused by ectopic expression of miR-9 ASOs suggested the necessity of miR-9 in MALAT-1 regulation. Here we found that the high dose of E2 treatment upregulated miR-9 thus posttranscriptionally regulated MALAT-1 RNA level in OS cells, and then the downregulation of MALAT-1 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes in the E2-dose dependent and ER-independent ways. - Highlights: • E2 affects osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an Estrogen receptor-independent way. • High dose of E2 treatment upregulates miR-9 which target to MALAT-1 RNA. • Upregulated miR-9 degrades MALAT-1 and thus affects combination of SFPQ/PTBP2. • E2 treatment block cell proliferation, colony formation, mobility, and enhance apoptosis.

  14. Phenotypes of gene disruptants in relation to a putative mitochondrial malate-citrate shuttle protein in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Kirimura, Kohtaro; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Ueda, Yuka; Hattori, Takasumi

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial citrate transport protein (CTP) functions as a malate-citrate shuttle catalyzing the exchange of citrate plus a proton for malate between mitochondria and cytosol across the inner mitochondrial membrane in higher eukaryotic organisms. In this study, for functional analysis, we cloned the gene encoding putative CTP (ctpA) of citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L. The gene ctpA encodes a polypeptide consisting 296 amino acids conserved active residues required for citrate transport function. Only in early-log phase, the ctpA disruptant DCTPA-1 showed growth delay, and the amount of citric acid produced by strain DCTPA-1 was smaller than that by parental strain WU-2223L. These results indicate that the CTPA affects growth and thereby citric acid metabolism of A. niger changes, especially in early-log phase, but not citric acid-producing period. This is the first report showing that disruption of ctpA causes changes of phenotypes in relation to citric acid production in A. niger.

  15. Malate-aspartate shuttle and exogenous NADH/cytochrome c electron transport pathway as two independent cytosolic reducing equivalent transfer systems.

    PubMed

    Abbrescia, Daniela Isabel; La Piana, Gianluigi; Lofrumento, Nicola Elio

    2012-02-15

    In mammalian cells aerobic oxidation of glucose requires reducing equivalents produced in glycolytic phase to be channelled into the phosphorylating respiratory chain for the reduction of molecular oxygen. Data never presented before show that the oxidation rate of exogenous NADH supported by the malate-aspartate shuttle system (reconstituted in vitro with isolated liver mitochondria) is comparable to the rate obtained on activation of the cytosolic NADH/cytochrome c electron transport pathway. The activities of these two reducing equivalent transport systems are independent of each other and additive. NADH oxidation induced by the malate-aspartate shuttle is inhibited by aminooxyacetate and by rotenone and/or antimycin A, two inhibitors of the respiratory chain, while the NADH/cytochrome c system remains insensitive to all of them. The two systems may simultaneously or mutually operate in the transfer of reducing equivalents from the cytosol to inside the mitochondria. In previous reports we suggested that the NADH/cytochrome c system is expected to be functioning in apoptotic cells characterized by the presence of cytochrome c in the cytosol. As additional new finding the activity of reconstituted shuttle system is linked to the amount of α-ketoglutarate generated inside the mitochondria by glutamate dehydrogenase rather than by aspartate aminotransferase. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Decreasing the mitochondrial synthesis of malate in potato tubers does not affect plastidial starch synthesis, suggesting that the physiological regulation of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase is context dependent.

    PubMed

    Szecowka, Marek; Osorio, Sonia; Obata, Toshihiro; Araújo, Wagner L; Rohrmann, Johannes; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2012-12-01

    Modulation of the malate content of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit by altering the expression of mitochondrially localized enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle resulted in enhanced transitory starch accumulation and subsequent effects on postharvest fruit physiology. In this study, we assessed whether such a manipulation would similarly affect starch biosynthesis in an organ that displays a linear, as opposed to a transient, kinetic of starch accumulation. For this purpose, we used RNA interference to down-regulate the expression of fumarase in potato (Solanum tuberosum) under the control of the tuber-specific B33 promoter. Despite displaying similar reductions in both fumarase activity and malate content as observed in tomato fruit expressing the same construct, the resultant transformants were neither characterized by an increased flux to, or accumulation of, starch, nor by alteration in yield parameters. Since the effect in tomato was mechanistically linked to derepression of the reaction catalyzed by ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, we evaluated whether the lack of effect on starch biosynthesis was due to differences in enzymatic properties of the enzyme from potato and tomato or rather due to differential subcellular compartmentation of reductant in the different organs. The results are discussed in the context both of current models of metabolic compartmentation and engineering.

  17. Stabilisation of halophilic malate dehydrogenase from Haloarcula marismortui by divalent cations -- effects of temperature, water isotope, cofactor and pH.

    PubMed

    Madern, D; Zaccai, G

    1997-10-15

    Halophilic malate dehydrogenase is stable in a limited concentration range of MgCl2 or CaCl2. Thermal deactivation of the protein at low concentrations of these divalent salts is very different from that occurring at high concentrations. In low salt, stability always increases as the temperature is lowered. In high salt, stability shows bell-shaped behaviour as a function of temperature: increasing to a maximum at 4 degrees C, and subsequently decreasing as the temperature is lowered. This is in contrast to other salts, for which the deactivation behaviour depends on the salt type but not on its concentration. Cofactor addition or replacement of H2O by D2O modify only the deactivation at low MgCl2 or CaCl2 concentrations. A pH transition between pH 7 and pH 8, however, modified enzyme deactivation at both low and high MgCl2 or CaCl2 concentrations. The pH effect on stability was also observed in other salts. By comparing the effect of CaCl2, MgCl2, and NaCl, a strong correlation was found between the minimum salt concentration required for the stabilisation of halophilic malate dehydrogenase and the hydration of the cation.

  18. Comparison of Malated Ringer's with Two Other Balanced Crystalloid Solutions in Resuscitation of Both Severe and Moderate Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Keitel, Judith; Lendemans, Sven; de Groot, Herbert; Rohrig, Ricarda

    2015-01-01

    In preclinical treatment of polytraumatized patients crystalloids are preferentially used. To avoid metabolic acidosis, metabolizable anions like lactate or acetate are used to replace chloride in these solutions. We here studied the effects of malated Ringer's in resuscitation of both shock severities in comparison to lactated and acetated Ringer's. Male Wistar rats underwent severe (mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of 25–30 mmHg) or moderate (MAP 40–45 mmHg) hemorrhagic shock. Adjacent to the shock period animals were resuscitated with acetated (AR), lactated (LR), or malated Ringer's (MR) and observed for 150 min. MR improved survival compared with LR and AR in severe hemorrhagic shock whereas it was equally effective to LR and superior to AR in moderate hemorrhagic shock. In all other parameters tested, MR was also effective similar to the other solutions under these conditions. We conclude that MR is preferable to AR and LR in resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock independent of shock depth. The positive effects of MR may stem from the absence of any adverse impact on energy metabolism under both conditions. PMID:26106600

  19. Crystallization and crystallographic analysis of the ligand-binding domain of the Pseudomonas putida chemoreceptor McpS in complex with malate and succinate

    PubMed Central

    Gavira, J. A.; Lacal, J.; Ramos, J. L.; García-Ruiz, J. M.; Krell, T.; Pineda-Molina, E.

    2012-01-01

    Methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) are transmembrane proteins that sense changes in environmental signals, generating a chemotactic response and regulating other cellular processes. MCPs are composed of two main domains: a ligand-binding domain (LBD) and a cytosolic signalling domain (CSD). Here, the crystallization of the LBD of the chemoreceptor McpS (McpS-LBD) is reported. McpS-LBD is responsible for sensing most of the TCA-cycle intermediates in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. McpS-LBD was expressed, purified and crystallized in complex with two of its natural ligands (malate and succinate). Crystals were obtained by both the counter-diffusion and the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion techniques after pre-incubation of McpS-LBD with the ligands. The crystals were isomorphous and belonged to space group C2, with two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected at the ESRF synchrotron X-ray source to resolutions of 1.8 and 1.9 Å for the malate and succinate complexes, respectively. PMID:22505412

  20. Complex I generated, mitochondrial matrix-directed superoxide is released from the mitochondria through voltage dependent anion channels.

    PubMed

    Lustgarten, Michael S; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Muller, Florian L; Jang, Youngmok C; Shimizu, Takahiko; Shirasawa, Takuji; Richardson, Arlan; Van Remmen, Holly

    2012-06-08

    Mitochondrial complex I has previously been shown to release superoxide exclusively towards the mitochondrial matrix, whereas complex III releases superoxide to both the matrix and the cytosol. Superoxide produced at complex III has been shown to exit the mitochondria through voltage dependent anion channels (VDAC). To test whether complex I-derived, mitochondrial matrix-directed superoxide can be released to the cytosol, we measured superoxide generation in mitochondria isolated from wild type and from mice genetically altered to be deficient in MnSOD activity (TnIFastCreSod2(fl/fl)). Under experimental conditions that produce superoxide primarily by complex I (glutamate/malate plus rotenone, GM+R), MnSOD-deficient mitochondria release ∼4-fold more superoxide than mitochondria isolated from wild type mice. Exogenous CuZnSOD completely abolished the EPR-derived GM+R signal in mitochondria isolated from both genotypes, evidence that confirms mitochondrial superoxide release. Addition of the VDAC inhibitor DIDS significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide release (∼75%) in mitochondria from either genotype respiring on GM+R. Conversely, inhibition of potential inner membrane sites of superoxide exit, including the matrix face of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the inner membrane anion channel did not reduce mitochondrial superoxide release in the presence of GM+R in mitochondria isolated from either genotype. These data support the concept that complex I-derived mitochondrial superoxide release does indeed occur and that the majority of this release occurs through VDACs.

  1. Stable Colloidal Drug Aggregates Catch and Release Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Christopher K.; Duan, Da; Ganesh, Ahil N.; Torosyan, Hayarpi

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule aggregates are considered nuisance compounds in drug discovery, but their unusual properties as colloids could be exploited to form stable vehicles to preserve protein activity. We investigated the co-aggregation of seven molecules chosen because they had been previously intensely studied as colloidal aggregators, co-formulating them with bis-azo dyes. The co-formulation reduced colloid sizes to <100 nm, and improved uniformity of the particle size distribution. The new colloid formulations are more stable than previous aggregator particles. Specifically, co-aggregation of Congo Red with sorafenib, tetraiodophenolphthalein (TIPT) or vemurafenib produced particles that are stable in solutions of high ionic strength and high protein concentrations. Like traditional, single compound colloidal aggregates, the stabilized colloids adsorbed and inhibited enzymes like β-lactamase, malate dehydrogenase and trypsin. Unlike traditional aggregates, the co-formulated colloid-protein particles could be centrifuged and re-suspended multiple times, and from re-suspended particles, active trypsin could be released up to 72 hours after adsorption. Unexpectedly, the stable colloidal formulations can sequester, stabilize, and isolate enzymes by spin-down, resuspension and release. PMID:26741163

  2. Reusable Release Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, J. W.; Ritchie, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Slider release mechanism reusable. Bears heavy loads while latched, yet gives smooth release motion. Release effected by explosively driving perpendicular slider out of engagement with load-bearing shank. Device has potential industrial applications such as emergency release of lifting cables from helicopters, cranes and hoists.

  3. Red Clover Coumarate 3'-Hydroxylase (CYP98A44) is Capable of Hydroxylating P-Coumaroyl-Shikimate but not P-Coumaroyl-Malate: Implications for the Biosynthesis of Phaselic Acid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense) leaves accumulate several µmol of phaselic acid [2-O-caffeoyl-L-malate] per gram fresh weight. Post-harvest oxidation of such o-diphenols to o-quinones by endogenous polyphenol oxidases prevents breakdown of forage protein during storage. Forages like alfalfa (Medicag...

  4. Functional roles of the N-terminal amino acid residues in the Mn(II)-L-malate binding and subunit interactions of pigeon liver malic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Chou, W Y; Huang, S M; Chang, G G

    1997-10-01

    Pigeon liver malic enzyme has an N-terminal amino acid sequence of Met-Lys-Lys-Gly-Tyr-Glu-. In this work, various mutants of the enzyme with individual or combinational deletion (delta) or substitution at these amino acids were constructed and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli cells. A major protein band corresponding to an Mr of approximately 65000 was observed for all recombinant enzymes in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. However, when examining by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under native conditions, the recombinant enzymes were found to possess a tetrameric structure with Mr approximately 260000 or a mixture of tetramers and dimers with the exception of delta(K2K3G4) and delta(1-16) mutants, which existed exclusively as dimers at the protein concentration we employed. K3A and K3E also dissociated substantially. K(2,3)A was a tetramer but K(2,3)E essentially existed as dimers. All tetramers and dimers were enzymatically active in the gels. All mutants displayed a similar apparent Km value for NADP+. The apparent Km for L-malate and Mn(II), on the other hand, was increased by 4-27-fold for the delta(K2/K3) and the delta(1-16) mutants. The small binding affinity of delta(K2/K3) with Mn(II)-L-malate was specific. With additional deletion at positions 3 and/or 4, the delta(K2K3), delta(K2G4/K3G4) or delta(K2K3G4) mutants exhibited similar kinetic properties for the wild type. The lysine residues at the positions 2 or 3 seem to be crucial for the correct active site conformation. The results indicate that the N-terminus of malic enzyme is located at the Mn(II)-L-malate binding domain of the active center and is also near the subunit's interface. These results were interpreted with our asymmetric double-dimer model for the enzyme in which the N-terminus was involved in the head-to-tail monomer-monomer interactions but not the dimer-dimer interactions.

  5. Modification of a thiol at the active site of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme results in changes in the rate-determining steps for oxidative decarboxylation of L-malate

    SciTech Connect

    Gavva, S.R.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F. ); Weiss, P.M. )

    1991-06-11

    A thiol group at the malate-binding site of the NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum has been modified to thiocyanate. The modified enzyme generally exhibits slight increases in K{sub NAD} and K{sub i metal} and decreases in V{sub max} as the metal size increases from Mg{sup 2+} to Mn{sup 2+} to Cd{sup 2+}, indicative of crowding in the site. The K{sub malate} value increases 10- to 30-fold, suggesting that malate does not bind optimally to the modified enzyme. Deuterium isotope effects on V and V/K{sub malate} increase with all three metal ions compared to the native enzyme concomitant with a decrease in the {sup 13}C isotope effect, suggesting a switch in the rate limitation of the hydride transfer and decarboxylation steps with hydride transfer becoming more rate limiting. The {sup 13}C effect decreases only slightly when obtained with deuterated malate, suggestive of the presence of a secondary {sup 13}C effect in the hydride transfer step, similar to data obtained with non-nicotinamide-containing dinucleotide substrates for the native enzyme (see the preceding paper in this issue). The native enzyme is inactivated in a time-dependent manner by Cd{sup 2+}. This inactivation occurs whether the enzyme alone is present or whether the enzyme is turning over with Cd{sup 2+} as the divalent metal activator. Upon inactivation, only Cd{sup 2+} ions are bound at high stoichiometry to the enzyme, which eventually becomes denatured. Conversion of the active-site thiol to thiocyanate makes it more difficult to inactivate the enzyme by treatment with Cd{sup 2+}.

  6. Phase II Study of Sunitinib Malate, a Multi-Targeted Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Soft Tissue Sarcomas. Focus on 3 Prevalent Histologies: Leiomyosarcoma, Liposarcoma, and Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, S. Tariq; Agresta, Samuel; Vigil, Carlos; Zhao, Xiuhua; Han, Gang; D’Amato, Gina; Calitri, Ciara E.; Dean, Michelle; Garrett, Christopher; Schell, Michael J.; Antonia, Scott; Chiappori, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) represent a diverse group of histologic subtypes with targetable molecular alterations, often treated as a single disease. Sunitinib malate is a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor active in other solid tumors carrying similar alterations (i.e., imatinib mesylate-refractory gastrointestinal stromal tumors). This single-institution phase II study investigated the safety and efficacy of sunitinib malate in three common STS subtypes. Patients with documented unresectable or metastatic STS (liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, and malignant fibrous histiocytoma [MFH]), measurable disease, and 3 or less prior lines of therapy were eligible. Treatment consisted of sunitinib malate, 50 mg daily, for 4 weeks every 6 weeks. Forty-eight patients were enrolled, and 35% were heavily pretreated (≥2 prior lines of chemotherapy). The safety profile resembled previously known sunitinib malate toxicities. Median progression-free and overall survivals for liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, and MFH were 3.9 and 18.6, 4.2 and 10.1, and 2.5 and 13.6 months, respectively. The 3-month progression-free rates in the untreated and pretreated (chemotherapy) patients with liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, and MFH were 75% and 69.2%, 60%, and 62.5%, and and 25% and 44.4%, respectively. With the caveats that a minority of patients with potentially indolent or low-grade disease could have been included and the small numbers, a 3-month progression-free rate of >40% suggests activity for sunitinib malate at least in liposarcomas and leiomyosarcomas. Thus, we believe that further investigation in these susceptible STS subtypes is warranted. PMID:21154746

  7. Malate dehydrogenase from the mesophile Chlorobium vibrioforme and from the mild thermophile Chlorobium tepidum: molecular cloning, construction of a hybrid, and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Naterstad, K; Lauvrak, V; Sirevåg, R

    1996-12-01

    The genes (mdh) encoding malate dehydrogenase (MDH) from the mesophile Chlorobium vibrioforme and the moderate thermophile C. tepidum were cloned and sequenced, and the complete amino acid sequences were deduced. When the region upstream of mdh was analyzed, a sequence with high homology to an operon encoding ribosomal proteins from Escherichia coli was found. Each mdh gene consists of a 930-bp open reading frame and encodes 310 amino acid residues, corresponding to a subunit weight of 33,200 Da for the dimeric enzyme. The amino acid sequence identity of the two MDHs is 86%. Homology searches using the primary structures of the two MDHs revealed significant sequence similarity to lactate dehydrogenases. A hybrid mdh was constructed from the 3' part of mdh from C. tepidum and the 5' part of mdh from C. vibrioforme. The thermostabilities of the hybrid enzyme and of MDH from C. vibrioforme and C. tepidum were compared.

  8. Mineral Ion composition and occurrence of CAM-like diurnal malate fluctuations in plants of coastal and desert habitats of israel and the Sinai.

    PubMed

    Winter, Klaus; Troughton, John H; Evenari, Michael; Läuchli, André; Lüttge, Ulrich

    1976-06-01

    1. The mineral ion composition and the occurrence of CAM-like diurnal malate fluctuations in species from 6 field locations in Israel and the Sinai were studied during the spring of 1974. The sites were a) a salt swamp near Acre on the Mediterranean Sea shore in the northern part of Israel, b) the high coast near Tel Aviv, c) the southern Dead Sea area near Sedom, d) the Negev highlands surrounding the ancient town of Avdat, e) the Wadi Paran in the southern Negev desert, and f) the Red Sea shore near the southeastern tip of the Sinai peninsula close to the Bedouin village of Nabek. The carbon assimilatory organs of the plants were analysed for Na(+), K(+), Cl(-) and SO4(2-) as well as for malate at dawn and dusk. 2. Most species analysed are characterized by high levels of mineral ions (mainly Na(+)/and Cl(-)) often exceeding 300-400 μeq per g fresh weight, and by high Na(+)/K(+) ratios in their tissues mainly ranging from 10 to 20. These typical halophytic attributes are particularly found in species of the Acre salt swamp, of the Dead Sea area and the Red Sea shore and in many species of the Negev highlands. 3. In plants occupying the Tel Aviv high coast habitats Na(+) and Cl(-) are lower averaging 100 to 200 μeq per g fresh weight. The Na(+)/K(+) ratio is about 5. 4. Numerous species mainly inhabiting the less saline loessial plains and wadis of the Negev desert contain only up to 100 μeq Na(+) and Cl(-) per g fresh weight and are characterized by Na(+)/K(+) ratios of about 1 and below. 5. The salt-accumulating species of the coastal habitats contain Na(+) and Cl(-) in more or less equivalent amounts, i.e. halophytes of the "chloride type" in the terminology of Walter dominate these sites. In contrast, many inland halophytes chiefly belonging to the Chenopodiaceae accumulate much more Na(+) than Cl(-) and/or SO4(2-). 6. The special feature of Na(+) contents which far exceed the sum of Cl(-) and SO4(2-) distinguishes the inland Chenopodiaceae as a "physiotype

  9. Phenanthrenes, 9,10-dihydrophenanthrenes, bibenzyls with their derivatives, and malate or tartrate benzyl ester glucosides from tubers of Cremastra appendiculata.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Guan, Shu-Hong; Meng, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Yi-Bei; Cheng, Chun-Ru; Shi, Yang-Yang; Feng, Rui-Hong; Zeng, Feng; Wu, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Jing-Xian; Yang, Min; Liu, Xuan; Li, Qing; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Bi, Kai-Shun; Guo, De-An

    2013-10-01

    Eleven previously unknown compounds and 23 known compounds, including 20 phenanthrene or 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene derivatives, five bibenzyls, seven malate or tartrate benzyl ester glucosides, adenosine and gastrodin were isolated from tubers of Cremastra appendiculata. Among the obtained compounds, two are the first isolated dimers with one phenanthrene or bibenzyl unit connected to C-3 of 2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-phenanthro[2,1-b]furan moiety. In addition, 33 of these compounds were evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxic activity against two cancer cell lines. Among the compounds examined, one compound showed moderate cytotoxic activity, while five showed weak cytotoxic activity against the A549 cell line. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Organohalogen compounds in human breast milk from mothers living in Payatas and Malate, the Philippines: levels, accumulation kinetics and infant health risk.

    PubMed

    Malarvannan, Govindan; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Isobe, Tomohiko; Sudaryanto, Agus; Takahashi, Shin; Prudente, Maricar; Subramanian, Annamalai; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2009-06-01

    Human breast milk samples (n=33) from primipara and multipara mothers from Payatas a waste dump site, and Malate a reference site in the Phillipines were collected in 2004 and analyzed for eight organohalogen compounds, viz., PCBs, DDTs, CHLs, HCHs, HCB, TCPMe, PBDEs and HBCDs. DDTs and PCBs were predominant in all the samples. Overall mean concentrations of PBDEs found in our study were higher (7.5 ng/g lipid wt.) than those reported for Japan and many other Asian countries. Primipara mothers had significantly higher levels of DDTs, CHLs and HCHs than multipara mothers, but not PBDEs and HBCDs. A few individuals accumulated CHLs close to or even higher than the tolerable daily intake guidelines proposed by Health Canada.

  11. Delayed simultaneous release mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, X. W.; Webb, J. B. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The disclosed appendage release mechanism is particularly adapted for use with spacecraft operating with despin mechanisms and releasable appendages. It includes a flexible loop and a number of appendage releasing devices which are attached to the flexible loop. The appendage releasing devices are made up of piston-cams and ball latches which hold the appendages as long as the flexible loop is maintained in a taut condition, but which release the appendages upon relaxation of the flexible loop. The flexible loop remains taut as long as the despin weights remain attached, but relaxes when the despin weights are released.

  12. Alkaloids as Inhibitors of Malate Synthase from Paracoccidioides spp.: Receptor-Ligand Interaction-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Docking Studies, Antifungal Activity, and the Adhesion Process

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Fausto Guimaraes; Neto, Benedito Rodrigues da Silva; Gonçalves, Ricardo Lemes; da Silva, Roosevelt Alves; de Oliveira, Cecília Maria Alves; Kato, Lucília; Freitas, Carla dos Santos; Giannini, Maria José Soares Mendes; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioides is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis. Malate synthase plays a crucial role in the pathogenicity and virulence of various fungi, such as those that are human pathogens. Thus, an inhibitor of this enzyme may be used as a powerful antifungal without side effects in patients once these enzymes are absent in humans. Here, we searched for compounds with inhibitory capacity against the malate synthase of Paracoccidioides species (PbMLS). The three-dimensional (3D) structure of PbMLS was determined using the I-TASSER server. Compounds were selected from the ZINC database. Based on the mechanism underlying the interaction of the compounds with PbMLS, it was possible to identify β-carboline moiety as a standard key structure. The compounds with β-carboline moiety that are available in our laboratories were investigated. A total of nine alkaloid compounds were selected. The primary mechanisms of interaction of the alkaloid compounds in the binding pocket of PbMLS were identified and compared with the mechanism of interaction of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). We discovered that the amphipathic nature of the compounds, concomitant with the presence of β-carboline moiety, was crucial for their stability in the binding pocket of PbMLS. In addition, the importance of a critical balance of the polar and nonpolar contacts of the compounds in this region was observed. Four β-carboline alkaloid compounds showed the ability to inhibit recombinant PbMLS (PbMLSr) activity, Paracoccidioides species growth, and adhesion of the fungus and PbMLSr to the extracellular matrix components. The cytotoxicity of the alkaloids was also evaluated. PMID:26124176

  13. Alkaloids as inhibitors of malate synthase from Paracoccidioides spp.: receptor-ligand interaction-based virtual screening and molecular docking studies, antifungal activity, and the adhesion process.

    PubMed

    Costa, Fausto Guimaraes; Neto, Benedito Rodrigues da Silva; Gonçalves, Ricardo Lemes; da Silva, Roosevelt Alves; de Oliveira, Cecília Maria Alves; Kato, Lucília; Freitas, Carla Dos Santos; Giannini, Maria José Soares Mendes; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Pereira, Maristela

    2015-09-01

    Paracoccidioides is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis. Malate synthase plays a crucial role in the pathogenicity and virulence of various fungi, such as those that are human pathogens. Thus, an inhibitor of this enzyme may be used as a powerful antifungal without side effects in patients once these enzymes are absent in humans. Here, we searched for compounds with inhibitory capacity against the malate synthase of Paracoccidioides species (PbMLS). The three-dimensional (3D) structure of PbMLS was determined using the I-TASSER server. Compounds were selected from the ZINC database. Based on the mechanism underlying the interaction of the compounds with PbMLS, it was possible to identify β-carboline moiety as a standard key structure. The compounds with β-carboline moiety that are available in our laboratories were investigated. A total of nine alkaloid compounds were selected. The primary mechanisms of interaction of the alkaloid compounds in the binding pocket of PbMLS were identified and compared with the mechanism of interaction of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). We discovered that the amphipathic nature of the compounds, concomitant with the presence of β-carboline moiety, was crucial for their stability in the binding pocket of PbMLS. In addition, the importance of a critical balance of the polar and nonpolar contacts of the compounds in this region was observed. Four β-carboline alkaloid compounds showed the ability to inhibit recombinant PbMLS (PbMLSr) activity, Paracoccidioides species growth, and adhesion of the fungus and PbMLSr to the extracellular matrix components. The cytotoxicity of the alkaloids was also evaluated.

  14. Loss of Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenase Activity Alters Seed Metabolism Impairing Seed Maturation and Post-Germination Growth in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; EC 1.1.1.37) has multiple roles; the most commonly described is its catalysis of the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The roles of mMDH in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed development and germination were investigated in mMDH1 and mMDH2 double knockout plants. A significant proportion of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds were nonviable and developed only to torpedo-shaped embryos, indicative of arrested seed embryo growth during embryogenesis. The viable mmdh1mmdh2 seeds had an impaired maturation process that led to slow germination rates as well as retarded post-germination growth, shorter root length, and decreased root biomass. During seed development, mmdh1mmdh2 showed a paler green phenotype than the wild type and exhibited deficiencies in reserve accumulation and reduced final seed biomass. The respiration rate of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds was significantly elevated throughout their maturation, consistent with the previously reported higher respiration rate in mmdh1mmdh2 leaves. Mutant seeds showed a consistently higher content of free amino acids (branched-chain amino acids, alanine, serine, glycine, proline, and threonine), differences in sugar and sugar phosphate levels, and lower content of 2-oxoglutarate. Seed-aging assays showed that quiescent mmdh1mmdh2 seeds lost viability more than 3 times faster than wild-type seeds. Together, these data show the important role of mMDH in the earliest phases of the life cycle of Arabidopsis. PMID:27208265

  15. Use of the sulphite adduct of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide to study ionizations and the kinetics of lactate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Parker, David M.; Lodola, Alberto; Holbrook, J. John

    1978-01-01

    1. The formation of the non-enzymic adduct of NAD+ and sulphite was investigated. In agreement with others we conclude that the dianion of sulphite adds to NAD+. 2. The formation of ternary complexes of either lactate dehydrogenase or malate dehydrogenase with NAD+ and sulphite was investigated. The u.v. spectrum of the NAD–sulphite adduct was the same whether free or enzyme-bound at either pH6 or pH8. This suggests that the free and enzyme-bound adducts have a similar electronic structure. 3. The effect of pH on the concentration of NAD–sulphite bound to both enzymes was measured in a new titration apparatus. Unlike the non-enzymic adduct (where the stability change with pH simply reflects HSO3−=SO32−+H+), the enzyme-bound adduct showed a bell-shaped pH–stability curve, which indicated that an enzyme side chain of pK=6.2 must be protonated for the complex to form. Since the adduct does not bind to the enzyme when histidine-195 of lactate dehydrogenase is ethoxycarbonylated we conclude that the protein group involved is histidine-195. 4. The pH-dependence of the formation of a ternary complex of lactate dehydrogenase, NAD+ and oxalate suggested that an enzyme group is protonated when this complex forms. 5. The rate at which NAD+ binds to lactate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase was measured by trapping the enzyme-bound NAD+ by rapid reaction with sulphite. The rate of NAD+ dissociation from the enzymes was calculated from the bimolecular association kinetic constant and from the equilibrium binding constant and was in both cases much faster than the forward Vmax.. No kinetic evidence was found that suggested that there were interactions between protein subunits on binding NAD+. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:30452

  16. SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1, CALMODULIN BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2, and Other Transcription Factors Are Involved in ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 Expression1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Saito, Tatsunori; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y.; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the root apex is protected from aluminum (Al) rhizotoxicity by excretion of malate, an Al chelator, by ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 (AtALMT1). AtALMT1 expression is fundamentally regulated by the SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1 (STOP1) zinc finger protein, but other transcription factors have roles that enable Al-inducible expression with a broad dynamic range. In this study, we characterized multiple cis-elements in the AtALMT1 promoter that interact with transcription factors. In planta complementation assays of AtALMT1 driven by 5′ truncated promoters of different lengths showed that the promoter region between –540 and 0 (the first ATG) restored the Al-sensitive phenotype of atalm1 and thus contains cis-elements essential for AtALMT1 expression for Al tolerance. Computation of overrepresented octamers showed that eight regions in this promoter region contained potential cis-elements involved in Al induction and STOP1 regulation. Mutation in a position around –297 from the first ATG completely inactivated AtALMT1 expression and Al response. In vitro binding assays showed that this region contained the STOP1 binding site, which accounted for the recognition by four zinc finger domains of the protein. Other positions were characterized as cis-elements that regulated expression by repressors and activators and a transcription factor that determines root tip expression of AtALMT1. From the consensus of known cis-elements, we identified CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2 to be an activator of AtALMT1 expression. Al-inducible expression of AtALMT1 changed transcription starting sites, which increased the abundance of transcripts with a shortened 5′ untranslated region. The present analyses identified multiple mechanisms that regulate AtALMT1 expression. PMID:25627216

  17. SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1, CALMODULIN BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2, and other transcription factors are involved in ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 expression.

    PubMed

    Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Saito, Tatsunori; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the root apex is protected from aluminum (Al) rhizotoxicity by excretion of malate, an Al chelator, by ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 (AtALMT1). AtALMT1 expression is fundamentally regulated by the SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1 (STOP1) zinc finger protein, but other transcription factors have roles that enable Al-inducible expression with a broad dynamic range. In this study, we characterized multiple cis-elements in the AtALMT1 promoter that interact with transcription factors. In planta complementation assays of AtALMT1 driven by 5' truncated promoters of different lengths showed that the promoter region between -540 and 0 (the first ATG) restored the Al-sensitive phenotype of atalm1 and thus contains cis-elements essential for AtALMT1 expression for Al tolerance. Computation of overrepresented octamers showed that eight regions in this promoter region contained potential cis-elements involved in Al induction and STOP1 regulation. Mutation in a position around -297 from the first ATG completely inactivated AtALMT1 expression and Al response. In vitro binding assays showed that this region contained the STOP1 binding site, which accounted for the recognition by four zinc finger domains of the protein. Other positions were characterized as cis-elements that regulated expression by repressors and activators and a transcription factor that determines root tip expression of AtALMT1. From the consensus of known cis-elements, we identified CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2 to be an activator of AtALMT1 expression. Al-inducible expression of AtALMT1 changed transcription starting sites, which increased the abundance of transcripts with a shortened 5' untranslated region. The present analyses identified multiple mechanisms that regulate AtALMT1 expression. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. The Ribonucleic Complex HuR-MALAT1 Represses CD133 Expression and Suppresses Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Elisa; Carelli, Stephana; Raimondi, Ivan; D'Agostino, Vito; Castiglioni, Ilaria; Zucal, Chiara; Moro, Giacomina; Luciani, Andrea; Ghilardi, Giorgio; Monti, Eleonora; Inga, Alberto; Di Giulio, Anna Maria; Gorio, Alfredo; Provenzani, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a core process underlying cell movement during embryonic development and morphogenesis. Cancer cells hijack this developmental program to execute a multi-step cascade, leading to tumorigenesis and metastasis. CD133 (PROM1), a marker of cancer stem cells, has been shown to facilitate EMT in various cancers, but the regulatory networks controlling CD133 gene expression and function in cancer remain incompletely delineated. In this study, we show that a ribonucleoprotein complex including the long noncoding RNA MALAT1 and the RNA-binding protein HuR (ELAVL1) binds the CD133 promoter region to regulate its expression. In luminal nonmetastatic MCF-7 breast cancer cells, HuR silencing was sufficient to upregulate N-cadherin (CDH2) and CD133 along with a migratory and mesenchymal-like phenotype. Furthermore, we found that in the basal-like metastatic cell line MDA-MB-231 and primary triple-negative breast cancer tumor cells, the repressor complex was absent from the CD133-regulatory region, but was present in the MCF-7 and primary ER+ tumor cells. The absence of the complex from basal-like cells was attributed to diminished expression of MALAT1, which, when overexpressed, dampened CD133 levels. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the failure of a repressive complex to form or stabilize in breast cancer promotes CD133 upregulation and an EMT-like program, providing new mechanistic insights underlying the control of prometastatic processes. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2626-36. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Direct evidence that genetic variation in glycerol-3-phosphate and malate dehydrogenase genes (Gpdh and Mdh1) affects adult ethanol tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Eanes, Walter F; Merritt, Thomas J S; Flowers, Jonathan M; Kumagai, Seiji; Zhu, Chen-Tseh

    2009-02-01

    Many studies of alcohol adaptation in Drosophila melanogaster have focused on the Adh polymorphism, yet the metabolic elimination of alcohol should involve many enzymes and pathways. Here we evaluate the effects of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gpdh) and cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (Mdh1) genotype activity on adult tolerance to ethanol. We have created a set of P-element-excision-derived Gpdh, Mdh1, and Adh alleles that generate a range of activity phenotypes from full to zero activity. Comparisons of paired Gpdh genotypes possessing 10 and 60% normal activity and 66 and 100% normal activity show significant effects where higher activity increases tolerance. Mdh1 null allele homozygotes show reductions in tolerance. We use piggyBac FLP-FRT site-specific recombination to create deletions and duplications of Gpdh. Duplications show an increase of 50% in activity and an increase of adult tolerance to ethanol exposure. These studies show that the molecular polymorphism associated with GPDH activity could be maintained in natural populations by selection related to adaptation to alcohols. Finally, we examine the interactions between activity genotypes for Gpdh, Mdh1, and Adh. We find no significant interlocus interactions. Observations on Mdh1 in both Gpdh and Adh backgrounds demonstrate significant increases in ethanol tolerance with partial reductions (50%) in cytosolic MDH activity. This observation strongly suggests the operation of pyruvate-malate and, in particular, pyruvate-citrate cycling in adaptation to alcohol exposure. We propose that an understanding of the evolution of tolerance to alcohols will require a system-level approach, rather than a focus on single enzymes.

  20. [Lateral retinacular release].

    PubMed

    Verdonk, P; Bonte, F; Verdonk, R

    2008-09-01

    This overview of numerous studies discusses, based on short-term and long-term results, which diagnoses are indications for lateral retinacular release. No significant differences in outcome between arthroscopic and open lateral release could be documented. Isolated lateral release offers a good success rate for treating a stable patella with excessive lateral pressure. In patellar instability, the results are less favorable in long-term follow-up evaluation. Hyperlaxity with hypermobility of the patella is an absolute contraindication. Lateral release provides only temporary benefit for patellofemoral osteoarthritis. Proximal and/or distal realignment of the extensor mechanism gives better results than isolated lateral release.

  1. ELECTROMAGNETIC RELEASE MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Michelson, C.

    1960-09-13

    An electromagnetic release mechanism is offered that may be used, for example, for supporting a safety rod for a nuclear reactor. The release mechanism is designed to have a large excess holding force and a rapid, uniform, and dependable release. The fast release is accomplished by providing the electromagnet with slotttd polts separated by an insulating potting resin, and by constructing the poles with a ferro-nickel alloy. The combination of these two features materially reduces the eddy current power density whenever the magnetic field changes during a release operation. In addition to these features, the design of the armature is such as to provide ready entrance of fluid into any void that might tend to form during release of the armature. This also improves the release time for the mechanism. The large holding force for the mechanism is accomplished by providing a small, selected, uniform air gap between the inner pole piece and the armature.

  2. Novel Characteristics of Succinate Coenzyme A (Succinate-CoA) Ligases: Conversion of Malate to Malyl-CoA and CoA-Thioester Formation of Succinate Analogues In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Johannes Christoph; Schürmann, Marc; Schepers, Catherine-Louise; Vogel, Elvira; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Three succinate coenzyme A (succinate-CoA) ligases (SucCD) from Escherichia coli, Advenella mimigardefordensis DPN7T, and Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 were characterized regarding their substrate specificity concerning succinate analogues. Previous studies had suggested that SucCD enzymes might be promiscuous toward succinate analogues, such as itaconate and 3-sulfinopropionate (3SP). The latter is an intermediate of the degradation pathway of 3,3′-dithiodipropionate (DTDP), a precursor for the biotechnical production of polythioesters (PTEs) in bacteria. The sucCD genes were expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3)/pLysS. The SucCD enzymes of E. coli and A. mimigardefordensis DPN7T were purified in the native state using stepwise purification protocols, while SucCD from A. borkumensis SK2 was equipped with a C-terminal hexahistidine tag at the SucD subunit. Besides the preference for the physiological substrates succinate, itaconate, ATP, and CoA, high enzyme activity was additionally determined for both enantiomeric forms of malate, amounting to 10 to 21% of the activity with succinate. Km values ranged from 2.5 to 3.6 mM for l-malate and from 3.6 to 4.2 mM for d-malate for the SucCD enzymes investigated in this study. As l-malate-CoA ligase is present in the serine cycle for assimilation of C1 compounds in methylotrophs, structural comparison of these two enzymes as members of the same subsubclass suggested a strong resemblance of SucCD to l-malate-CoA ligase and gave rise to the speculation that malate-CoA ligases and succinate-CoA ligases have the same evolutionary origin. Although enzyme activities were very low for the additional substrates investigated, liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry analyses proved the ability of SucCD enzymes to form CoA-thioesters of adipate, glutarate, and fumarate. Since all SucCD enzymes were able to activate 3SP to 3SP-CoA, we consequently demonstrated that the activation of 3SP is not a unique characteristic

  3. Extended-release oxybutynin.

    PubMed

    Comer, A M; Goa, K L

    2000-02-01

    Extended-release oxybutynin (Ditropan XL) uses an osmotic system (OROS) to deliver a controlled amount of oxybutynin chloride into the gastrointestinal tract over a 24-hour period when taken once daily. Oxybutynin binds to M3 muscarinic receptors on the detrusor muscle of the bladder, preventing acetylcholinergic activation and relaxing the muscle. Mean peak plasma concentrations are lower with extended-release oxybutynin 15mg once daily than with conventional immediate-release oxybutynin 5mg taken 3 times daily. Relative bioavailabilities of parent drug and metabolite N-desethoxybutynin are 153 and 69%, respectively, for extended-release oxybutynin when compared with immediate-release oxybutynin. In short (< or =6 weeks) randomised, double-blind clinical trials of patients with detrusor instability, extended-release oxybutynin 5 to 30mg once daily significantly reduced the mean weekly number of urge incontinence episodes by 84 to 90%. Extended-release oxybutynin had similar efficacy to immediate-release oxybutynin. Adverse events reported by patients taking extended-release oxybutynin were dose-related anticholinergic effects, most frequently dry mouth, somnolence, constipation, blurred vision and dizziness. A large noncomparative study demonstrated that approximately two thirds of the patients prescribed extended-release oxybutynin for detrusor instability were still taking the medication 6 months later.

  4. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  5. Dendritic Release of Neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Mike; Apps, David; Menzies, John; Patel, Jyoti C; Rice, Margaret E

    2016-12-06

    Release of neuroactive substances by exocytosis from dendrites is surprisingly widespread and is not confined to a particular class of transmitters: it occurs in multiple brain regions, and includes a range of neuropeptides, classical neurotransmitters, and signaling molecules, such as nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, ATP, and arachidonic acid. This review is focused on hypothalamic neuroendocrine cells that release vasopressin and oxytocin and midbrain neurons that release dopamine. For these two model systems, the stimuli, mechanisms, and physiological functions of dendritic release have been explored in greater detail than is yet available for other neurons and neuroactive substances. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:235-252, 2017.

  6. [Effect of electric fields on the living organism. III. Activity of fructose-1,6-diphosphate aldolase and malate dehydrogenase in whole liver homogenate and in subcellular liver fractions in guinea pigs].

    PubMed

    Kula, B; Wardas, M

    1990-01-01

    Guinea pigs were exposed to electric field of 50 Hz in different times of day. Activity of aldolase and malate dehydrogenase in whole liver homogenate as well as in nuclear, mitochondrial and supernatant liver fractions of guinea pigs was examined. A remarkable increase in enzyme activity in all studied groups was observed which may prove that a relevant electric stimulus can result in certain disorders in carbohydrate changes in liver cells.

  7. Release the Body, Release the Mind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoner, Martha Goff

    1998-01-01

    A college English teacher describes the anxiety and resentment of students during in-class writing assignments and the successful classroom use of meditation and body movement. Movement seemed to relax the students, change their attitudes, and release their creative impulses to write. Implications related to the body-mind connection are pondered.…

  8. Common catabolic enzyme patterns in a microplankton community of the Humboldt Current System off northern and central-south Chile: Malate dehydrogenase activity as an index of water-column metabolism in an oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, R. R.; Quiñones, R. A.

    2009-07-01

    An extensive subsurface oxygen minimum zone off northern and central-south Chile, associated with the Peru-Chile undercurrent, has important effects on the metabolism of the organisms inhabiting therein. Planktonic species deal with the hypoxic and anoxic environments by relying on biochemical as well as physiological processes related to their anaerobic metabolisms. Here we characterize, for the first time, the potential enzymatic activities involved in the aerobic and anaerobic energy production pathways of microplanktonic organisms (<100 μm), their relationship, and this relationship's association with the oxygen concentration and microplanktonic biomass in the oxygen minimum zone and adjacent areas of the Humboldt Current System water column. Our results demonstrate significant potential enzymatic activity of catabolic pathways in the oxygen minimum zone. Malate dehydrogenase had the highest oxidizing activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form) in the batch of catabolic enzymatic activities assayed, including potential pyruvate oxidoreductases activity, the electron transport system, and dissimilatory nitrate reductase. Malate dehydrogenase correlated significantly with almost all the enzymes analyzed within and above the oxygen minimum zone, and also with the oxygen concentration and microplankton biomass in the water column of the Humboldt Current System, especially in the oxygen minimum zone off Iquique. These results suggest a possible specific pattern for the catabolic activity of the microplanktonic realm associated with the oxygen minimum zone spread along the Humboldt Current System off Chile. We hypothesize that malate dehydrogenase activity could be an appropriate indicator of microplankton catabolism in the oxygen minimum zone and adjacent areas.

  9. Malate dehydrogenase isozymes (MDH; EC 1.1.1.37) in long-term callus culture of Cereus peruvianus (Cactaceae) exposed to sugar and temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Jorge, I C; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F

    1997-06-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH; EC 1.1.1.37) isozymes in long-term callus tissue culture of Cereus peruvianus were studied in starch gel electrophoresis to investigate the control of differential Mdh gene expression under sugar and temperature stress. While two cytosol MDH isozymes showed an unchanged phenotype when the callus tissues were transferred to medium maintained at 22 or 37 degrees C and containing different concentrations of sucrose, glucose, and fructose, the different combinations of five mitochondrial MDH (mtMDH) and two micro-body MDH (mbMDH) showed different MDH isozyme patterns in the callus populations. Differential expression of mtMDH isozymes seems to be modulated at the posttranslational level in callus tissues exposed to different concentrations and types of sugar and to high-temperature and low-temperature stress. An inductor effect on the expression of mbMDH isozymes was observed under stress conditions and in long-term callus tissue, and they may also present different responses.

  10. Malate-Aspartate Shuttle Inhibitor Aminooxyacetate Acid Induces Apoptosis and Impairs Energy Metabolism of Both Resting Microglia and LPS-Activated Microglia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Heyu; Wang, Caixia; Wei, Xunbin; Ding, Xianting; Ying, Weihai

    2015-06-01

    NADH shuttles mediate the transfer of the reducing equivalents of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria. Cumulating evidence has suggested that malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS), one of the two types of NADH shuttles, plays significant roles in such biological processes as glutamate synthesis in neurons. However, there has been no information regarding the roles of NADH shuttle in the survival and energy metabolism of microglia. In current study, using microglial BV2 cells as a cellular model, we determined the roles of MAS in the survival and energy metabolism of microglia by using aminooxyacetate acid (AOAA)-a widely used MAS inhibitor. Our study has suggested that AOAA can effectively inhibit the MAS activity of the cells. We also found that AOAA can induce both early- and late-stage apoptosis of resting microglia and lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-activated microglia. AOAA also induced mitochondrial depolarization, increases in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations, and decreases in the intracellular ATP levels. Moreover, our study has excluded the possibility that the major nonspecific effect of AOAA-inhibition of GABA transaminase-is involved in theses effects of AOAA. Collectively, our study has provided first information suggesting significant roles of MAS in the survival and energy metabolism in both resting microglia and LPS-activated microglia.

  11. The malate-aspartate NADH shuttle member Aralar1 determines glucose metabolic fate, mitochondrial activity, and insulin secretion in beta cells.

    PubMed

    Rubi, Blanca; del Arco, Araceli; Bartley, Clarissa; Satrustegui, Jorgina; Maechler, Pierre

    2004-12-31

    The NADH shuttle system, which transports reducing equivalents from the cytosol to the mitochondria, is essential for the coupling of glucose metabolism to insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells. Aralar1 and citrin are two isoforms of the mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier, one key constituent of the malate-aspartate NADH shuttle. Here, the effects of Aralar1 overexpression in INS-1E beta cells and isolated rat islets were investigated for the first time. We prepared a recombinant adenovirus encoding for human Aralar1 (AdCA-Aralar1), tagged with the small FLAG epitope. Transduction of INS-1E cells and isolated rat islets with AdCA-Aralar1 increased aralar1 protein levels and immunostaining revealed mitochondrial localization. Compared with control INS-1E cells, overexpression of Aralar1 potentiated metabolism secretion coupling stimulated by 15 mm glucose. In particular, there was an increase of NAD(P)H generation, of mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization, ATP levels, glucose oxidation, and insulin secretion (+45%, p < 0.01). Remarkably, this was accompanied by reduced lactate production. Rat islets overexpressing Aralar1 secreted more insulin at 16.7 mm glucose (+65%, p < 0.05) compared with controls. These results show that aspartate-glutamate carrier capacity limits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and that Aralar1 overexpression enhances mitochondrial metabolism.

  12. Enhanced anti-diabetic activity of a combination of chromium(III) malate complex and propolis and its acute oral toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang-Yang; Li, Fang; Zhao, Ting; Mao, Guang-Hua; Li, Jing; Qu, Hong-Yuan; Ren, Yue-Na; Yang, Liu-Qing

    2012-07-01

    In order to obtain the additional benefit of anti-diabetic activity and protective effects of liver injury for diabetes, the anti-diabetic effect and acute oral toxicity of a combination of chromium(III) malate complex (Cr(2)(LMA)(3)) and propolis were assessed. The anti-diabetic activity of the combination of the Cr(2)LMA(3) and propolis was compared with Cr(2)(LMA)(3) and propolis alone in alloxan-induced diabetic mice by daily oral gavage for a period of 2 weeks. Acute oral toxicity of the combination of the Cr(2)LMA(3) and propolis was tested using ICR mice at the dose of 1.0-5.0 g/kg body mass by a single oral gavage and observed for a period of 2 weeks. The results of the anti-diabetic activity of the combination from the aspects of blood glucose level, liver glycogen level, and the activities of aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase indicated that the increased anti-diabetic activity and the protective efficacy of liver injury for diabetes were observed. In acute toxicity study, LD(50) (median lethal dose) value for the combination was greater than 5.0 g/kg body mass. The combination of Cr(2)LMA(3) and propolis might represent the nutritional supplement with potential therapeutic value to control blood glucose and exhibit protective efficacy of liver injury for diabetes and non-toxicity in acute toxicity.

  13. Insertion of transposon Tn5tac1 in the Sinorhizobium meliloti malate dehydrogenase (mdh) gene results in conditional polar effects on downstream TCA cycle genes.

    PubMed

    Dymov, Sergiy I; Meek, David J J; Steven, Blaire; Driscoll, Brian T

    2004-12-01

    To isolate Sinorhizobium meliloti mutants deficient in malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity, random transposon Tn5tac1 insertion mutants were screened for conditional lethal phenotypes on complex medium. Tn5tac1 has an outward-oriented isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible promoter (Ptac). The insertion in strain Rm30049 was mapped to the mdh gene, which was found to lie directly upstream of the genes encoding succinyl-CoA synthetase (sucCD) and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (sucAB and lpdA). Rm30049 required IPTG for wild-type growth in complex media, and had a complex growth phenotype in minimal media with different carbon sources. The mdh:: Tn5tacl insertion eliminated MDH activity under all growth conditions, and activities of succinyl-CoA synthetase, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase were affected by the addition of IPTG. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies confirmed that expression from Ptac was induced by IPTG and leaky in its absence. Alfalfa plants inoculated with Rm30049 were chlorotic and stunted, with small white root nodules, and had shoot dry weight and percent-N content values similar to those of uninoculated plants. Cosmid clone pDS15 restored MDH activity to Rm30049, complemented both the mutant growth and symbiotic phenotypes, and was found to carry six complete (sdhB, mdh, sucCDAB) and two partial (IpdA, sdhA) tricarboxylic acid cycle genes.

  14. Hypersensitivity of Arabidopsis TAXIMIN1 overexpression lines to light stress is correlated with decreased sinapoyl malate abundance and countered by the antibiotic cefotaxime.

    PubMed

    Colling, Janine; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Makunga, Nokwanda Pearl; Pauwels, Laurens; Goossens, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Peptide signaling in plants is involved in regulating development, (1,2) ensuring cross pollination through initiation of self-incompatibility (4) and assisting with recognition of beneficial (nitrogen fixing bacteria (5)) or unfavorable organisms (pathogens (6) or herbivores (7)). Peptides function to help plants to respond to a changing environment and improve their chances of survival. Constitutive expression of the gene encoding a novel cysteine rich peptide TAXIMIN1 (TAX1) resulted in fusion of lateral organs and in abnormal fruit morphology. TAX1 signaling functions independently from transcription factors known to play a role in this process such as LATERAL ORGAN FUSION1 (LOF1). Here, we report that the TAX1 promoter is not induced by the LOF1 transcription factor and that the TAX1 peptide neither interferes with transcriptional activation by LOF1.1 or transcriptional repression by LOF1.2. Furthermore, we found that TAX1 overexpressing lines were hypersensitive to continuous light, which may be reflected by a decreased accumulation of the UV-B protecting compound sinapoyl-malate. Finally, adding the antibiotic cefotaxime to the medium surprisingly countered the light hypersensitivity phenotype of TAX1 overexpressing seedlings.

  15. Hypersensitivity of Arabidopsis TAXIMIN1 overexpression lines to light stress is correlated with decreased sinapoyl malate abundance and countered by the antibiotic cefotaxime

    PubMed Central

    Colling, Janine; Pollier, Jacob; Bossche, Robin Vanden; Makunga, Nokwanda Pearl; Pauwels, Laurens; Goossens, Alain

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Peptide signaling in plants is involved in regulating development,1,2 ensuring cross pollination through initiation of self-incompatibility4 and assisting with recognition of beneficial (nitrogen fixing bacteria5) or unfavorable organisms (pathogens6 or herbivores7). Peptides function to help plants to respond to a changing environment and improve their chances of survival. Constitutive expression of the gene encoding a novel cysteine rich peptide TAXIMIN1 (TAX1) resulted in fusion of lateral organs and in abnormal fruit morphology. TAX1 signaling functions independently from transcription factors known to play a role in this process such as LATERAL ORGAN FUSION1 (LOF1). Here, we report that the TAX1 promoter is not induced by the LOF1 transcription factor and that the TAX1 peptide neither interferes with transcriptional activation by LOF1.1 or transcriptional repression by LOF1.2. Furthermore, we found that TAX1 overexpressing lines were hypersensitive to continuous light, which may be reflected by a decreased accumulation of the UV-B protecting compound sinapoyl-malate. Finally, adding the antibiotic cefotaxime to the medium surprisingly countered the light hypersensitivity phenotype of TAX1 overexpressing seedlings. PMID:26967827

  16. NADP-Malate Dehydrogenase in the C4 Plant Flaveria bidentis (Cosense Suppression of Activity in Mesophyll and Bundle-Sheath Cells and Consequences for Photosynthesis).

    PubMed Central

    Trevanion, S. J.; Furbank, R. T.; Ashton, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Flaveria bidentis, a C4 dicot, was transformed with sorghum (a monocot) cDNA clones encoding NADP-malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH; EC 1.1.1.82) driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Although these constructs were designed for over-expression, many transformants contained between 5 and 50% of normal NADP-MDH activity, presumably by cosense suppression of the native gene. The activities of a range of other photosynthetic enzymes were unaffected. Rates of photosynthesis in plants with less than about 10% of normal activity were reduced at high light and at high [CO2], but were unaffected at low light or at [CO2] below about 150 [mu]L L-1. The large decrease in maximum activity of NADP-MDH was accompanied by an increase in the activation state of the enzyme. However, the activation state was unaffected in plants with 50% of normal activity. Metabolic flux control analysis of plants with a range of activities demonstrates that this enzyme is not important in regulating the steady-state flux through C4 photosynthesis in F. bidentis. Cosense suppression of gene expression was similarly effective in both the mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells. Photosynthesis of plants with very low activity of NADP-MDH in the bundle-sheath cells was only slightly inhibited, suggesting that the presence of the enzyme in this compartment is not essential for supporting maximum rates of photosynthesis. PMID:12223666

  17. The malate sensing two-component system MaeKR is a non-canonical class of sensory complex for C4-dicarboxylates.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Romero, L; Casino, P; Landete, J M; Monedero, V; Zúñiga, M; Marina, A

    2017-06-02

    Microbial colonization of different environments is enabled to a great extent by the plasticity of their sensory mechanisms, among them, the two-component signal transduction systems (TCS). Here, an example of TCS plasticity is presented: the regulation of L-malate catabolism via malic enzyme by MaeRK in Lactobacillales. MaeKR belongs to the citrate family of TCS as the Escherichia coli DcuSR system. We show that the Lactobacillus casei histidine-kinase MaeK is defective in autophosphorylation activity as it lacks a functional catalytic and ATP binding domain. The cognate response regulator MaeR was poorly phosphorylated at its phosphoacceptor Asp in vitro. This phosphorylation, however, enhanced MaeR binding in vitro to its target sites and it was required for induction of regulated genes in vivo. Elucidation of the MaeR structure revealed that response regulator dimerization is accomplished by the swapping of α4-β5-α5 elements between two monomers, generating a phosphoacceptor competent conformation. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses showed that the MaeKR peculiarities are not exclusive to L. casei as they are shared by the rest of orthologous systems of Lactobacillales. Our results reveal MaeKR as a non-canonical TCS displaying distinctive features: a swapped response regulator and a sensor histidine kinase lacking ATP-dependent kinase activity.

  18. DSCOVR Public Release Statement

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-11-23

    ... DSCOVR Public Release Statement Wednesday, July 20, 2016 The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) is a ... is limited to the near infrared solar reflected signal. The fourth detector is a high signal-to-noise photodiode spanning UV, Visible, and ...

  19. The 2017 Release Cloudy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferland, G. J.; Chatzikos, M.; Guzmán, F.; Lykins, M. L.; van Hoof, P. A. M.; Williams, R. J. R.; Abel, N. P.; Badnell, N. R.; Keenan, F. P.; Porter, R. L.; Stancil, P. C.

    2017-10-01

    We describe the 2017 release of the spectral synthesis code Cloudy, summarizing the many improvements to the scope and accuracy of the physics which have been made since the previous release. Exporting the atomic data into external data files has enabled many new large datasets to be incorporated into the code. The use of the complete datasets is not realistic for most calculations, so we describe the limited subset of data used by default, which predicts significantly more lines than the previous release of Cloudy. This version is nevertheless faster than the previous release, as a result of code optimizations. We give examples of the accuracy limits using small models, and the performance requirements of large complete models. We summarize several advances in the H- and He-like iso-electronic sequences and use our complete collisional-radiative models to establish the densities where the coronal and local thermodynamic equilibrium approximations work.

  20. Rad-Release

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The R&D 100 Award winning Rad-Release Chemical Decontamination Technology is a highly effective (up to 99% removal rate), affordable, patented chemical-foam-clay decontamination process tailored to specific radiological and metal contaminants, which is applicable to a wide variety of substrates. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/rad-release/

  1. Rad-Release

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    The R&D 100 Award winning Rad-Release Chemical Decontamination Technology is a highly effective (up to 99% removal rate), affordable, patented chemical-foam-clay decontamination process tailored to specific radiological and metal contaminants, which is applicable to a wide variety of substrates. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/rad-release/

  2. Advanced release technologies program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdy, Bill

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the ARTS program was to develop lighter and less expensive spacecraft ordnance and release systems that answer to the requirements of a wide variety of spacecraft applications. These improvements were to be evaluated at the spacecraft system level, as it was determined that there were substantial system-level costs associated with the present ordnance and release subsystems. New, better devices were to be developed, then flight qualified, then integrated into a flight experiment in order to prove the reliability required for their subsequent use on high-reliability spacecraft. The secondary goal of the program was to quantify the system-level benefits of these new subsystems based upon the development program results. Three non-explosive release mechanisms and one laser-diode-based ordnance system were qualified under the program. The release devices being developed were required to release high preloads because it is easier to scale down a release mechanism than to scale it up. The laser initiator developed was required to be a direct replacement for NASA Standard Initiators, since these are the most common initiator in use presently. The program began in October, 1991, with completion of the flight experiment scheduled for February, 1994. This paper provides an overview of the ARTS program, discusses the benefits of using the ARTS components, introduces the new components, compares them with conventional systems and each other, and provides recommendations on how best to implement them.

  3. Ca2+ Activation kinetics of the two aspartate-glutamate mitochondrial carriers, aralar and citrin: role in the heart malate-aspartate NADH shuttle.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Laura; Gomez-Puertas, Paulino; Iijima, Mikio; Kobayashi, Keiko; Saheki, Takeyori; Satrústegui, Jorgina

    2007-03-09

    Ca(2+) regulation of the Ca(2+) binding mitochondrial carriers for aspartate/glutamate (AGCs) is provided by their N-terminal extensions, which face the intermembrane space. The two mammalian AGCs, aralar and citrin, are members of the malate-aspartate NADH shuttle. We report that their N-terminal extensions contain up to four pairs of EF-hand motifs plus a single vestigial EF-hand, and have no known homolog. Aralar and citrin contain one fully canonical EF-hand pair and aralar two additional half-pairs, in which a single EF-hand is predicted to bind Ca(2+). Shuttle activity in brain or skeletal muscle mitochondria, which contain aralar as the major AGC, is activated by Ca(2+) with S(0.5) values of 280-350 nm; higher than those obtained in liver mitochondria (100-150 nm) that contain citrin as the major AGC. We have used aralar- and citrin-deficient mice to study the role of the two isoforms in heart, which expresses both AGCs. The S(0.5) for Ca(2+) activation of the shuttle in heart mitochondria is about 300 nm, and it remains essentially unchanged in citrin-deficient mice, although it undergoes a drastic reduction to about 100 nm in aralar-deficient mice. Therefore, aralar and citrin, when expressed as single isoforms in heart, confer differences in Ca(2+) activation of shuttle activity, probably associated with their structural differences. In addition, the results reveal that the two AGCs fully account for shuttle activity in mouse heart mitochondria and that no other glutamate transporter can replace the AGCs in this pathway.

  4. Long term intensive exercise training leads to a higher plasma malate/lactate dehydrogenase (M/L) ratio and increased level of lipid mobilization in horses.

    PubMed

    Li, Gebin; Lee, Peter; Mori, Nobuko; Yamamoto, Ichiro; Arai, Toshiro

    2012-06-01

    Continuous high intensity training may induce alterations to enzyme activities related to glucose and lipid metabolism in horses. In our study, five Thoroughbred race horses (3 male and 2 female, avg age=5 yrs old) were compared against five riding horses (1 male, 1 female, 3 gelding, avg age=13 yrs old) in terms of energy metabolism, by examining plasma malate (MDH) and lactate (LDH) dehydrogenase activities and M/L ratio. MDH is involved in NADH and ATP generation, whereas LDH can convert NADH back into NAD(+) for ATP generation. An increase in plasma M/L ratio can reflect heightened energy metabolism in the liver and skeletal muscle of horses adapted to continuous intensive exercise. Moreover, plasma lipid metabolism analytes (adiponectin, NEFA, total cholesterol (T-Cho), and triglycerides (TG)) can reflect changes to lipolysis rate, which can also indicate a change in energy metabolism. Overall, race horses demonstrated increased MDH and LDH activity in plasma (4x and 2x greater, respectively), in addition to a plasma M/L ratio twice as high as that of riding horses (2.0 vs 1.0). In addition, race horses also demonstrated significantly higher levels of plasma NEFA (50% greater), TG (2x greater), and T-Cho (20% greater) as compared to riding horses. Therefore, race horse muscles may have adapted to prolonged high intensity endurance exercise by gaining a higher oxidative capacity and an increased capacity for fat utilization as an energy source, resulting in heightened energy metabolism and increased rate of lipid mobilization.

  5. Oxaloacetate-to-malate conversion by mineral photoelectrochemistry: implications for the viability of the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle in prebiotic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Marcelo I.; Martin, Scot T.

    2008-10-01

    The carboxylic acids produced by the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle are possibly a biosynthetic core of initial life, although several steps such as the reductive kinetics of oxaloacetate (OAA) to malate (MA) are problematic by conventional chemical routes. In this context, we studied the kinetics of this reaction as promoted by ZnS mineral photoelectrochemistry. The quantum efficiency φMA of MA production from the photoelectrochemical reduction of OAA followed φMA=0.13 [OAA] (2.1×10-3+[OAA])-1 and was independent of temperature (5 to 50°C). To evaluate the importance of this forward rate under a prebiotic scenario, we also studied the temperature-dependent rate of the backward thermal decarboxylation of OAA to pyruvate (PA), which followed an Arrhenius behavior as log (k-2)=11.74 4956/T, where k-2 is in units of s-1. These measured rates were employed in conjunction with the indirectly estimated carboxylation rate of PA to OAA to assess the possible importance of mineral photoelectrochemistry in the conversion of OAA to MA under several scenarios of prebiotic conditions on early Earth. As an example, our analysis shows that there is 90% efficiency with a forward velocity of 3 yr/cycle for the OAA→MA step of the rTCA cycle at 280 K. Efficiency and velocity both decrease for increasing temperature. These results suggest high viability for mineral photoelectrochemistry as an enzyme-free engine to drive the rTCA cycle through the early aeons of early Earth, at least for the investigated OAA→MA step.

  6. Calcium-regulation of mitochondrial respiration maintains ATP homeostasis and requires ARALAR/AGC1-malate aspartate shuttle in intact cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Llorente-Folch, Irene; Rueda, Carlos B; Amigo, Ignacio; del Arco, Araceli; Saheki, Takeyori; Pardo, Beatriz; Satrústegui, Jorgina

    2013-08-28

    Neuronal respiration is controlled by ATP demand and Ca2+ but the roles played by each are unknown, as any Ca2+ signal also impacts on ATP demand. Ca2+ can control mitochondrial function through Ca2+-regulated mitochondrial carriers, the aspartate-glutamate and ATP-Mg/Pi carriers, ARALAR/AGC1 and SCaMC-3, respectively, or in the matrix after Ca2+ transport through the Ca2+ uniporter. We have studied the role of Ca2+ signaling in the regulation of mitochondrial respiration in intact mouse cortical neurons in basal conditions and in response to increased workload caused by increases in [Na+]cyt (veratridine, high-K+ depolarization) and/or [Ca2+]cyt (carbachol). Respiration in nonstimulated neurons on 2.5-5 mm glucose depends on ARALAR-malate aspartate shuttle (MAS), with a 46% drop in aralar KO neurons. All stimulation conditions induced increased OCR (oxygen consumption rate) in the presence of Ca2+, which was prevented by BAPTA-AM loading (to preserve the workload), or in Ca2+-free medium (which also lowers cell workload). SCaMC-3 limits respiration only in response to high workloads and robust Ca2+ signals. In every condition tested Ca2+ activation of ARALAR-MAS was required to fully stimulate coupled respiration by promoting pyruvate entry into mitochondria. In aralar KO neurons, respiration was stimulated by veratridine, but not by KCl or carbachol, indicating that the Ca2+ uniporter pathway played a role in the first, but not in the second condition, even though KCl caused an increase in [Ca2+]mit. The results suggest a requirement for ARALAR-MAS in priming pyruvate entry in mitochondria as a step needed to activate respiration by Ca2+ in response to moderate workloads.

  7. Long-range effects in anion-π interactions: their crucial role in the inhibition mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis malate synthase.

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Antonio; Quiñonero, David; Deyà, Pere M; Frontera, Antonio

    2014-06-02

    The glyoxylate shunt is an anaplerotic bypass of the traditional Krebs cycle. It plays a prominent role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence, so it can be exploited for the development of antitubercular therapeutics. The shunt involves two enzymes: isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (GlcB). The shunt bypasses two steps of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, allowing the incorporation of carbon, and thus, refilling oxaloacetate under carbon-limiting conditions. The targeting of ICL is complicated; however, GlcB, which accommodates the pantothenate tail of acetyl-CoA in the active site, is easier to target. A catalytic Mg(2+) unit is located at the bottom of the cavity, and plays a very important role. Recently, the development of effective antituberculosis drugs based on phenyldiketo acids (PDKAs) has been reported. Interestingly, all the crystal structures of GlcB-inhibitor complexes exhibit close contact between the carboxylate of Asp633 and the face of the aromatic ring of the inhibitor. Remarkably, the replacement of the phenyl ring in PDKA by aliphatic moieties yields inactive inhibitors, suggesting that the aromatic moiety is crucial for inhibition. However, the aromatic ring of PDKA is not electron-deficient, and consequently, the anion-π interaction is expected to be very weak (dominated only by polarization effects). Herein, through a combination analysis of the recent X-ray structures of GlcB-PDKA complexes retrieved from the protein data bank (PDB) and computational ab initio studies (RI-MP2/def2-TZVP level of theory), we demonstrate the prominent role of the Mg(2+) ion in the active site, which promotes long-range enhancement of the anion-π interaction.

  8. Constitutive and carbon source-responsive promoter elements are involved in the regulated expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae malate synthase gene MLS1.

    PubMed

    Caspary, F; Hartig, A; Schüller, H J

    1997-08-01

    The malate synthase gene, MLS1, of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is transcriptionally regulated by the carbon source in the growth medium. A MLS1-lacZ fusion gene, expressed at a basal level in the presence of 2% glucose, is derepressed more than 100-fold under conditions of sugar limitation. No evidence for MLS1 induction by oleic acid was found. By deletion analysis of the MLS1 control region, we identified two sites, UAS1 and UAS2, as important for efficient derepression of the gene. Both sites contain sequences that resemble the previously characterized carbon source-responsive element (CSRE) found in the promoter of the isocitrate lyase gene ICL1. Indeed, UAS1 and UAS2 in the MLS1 upstream region turn out to be functional CSRE sequence variants. This finding allowed us to define a modified version of the CSRE consensus sequence (CCRTYSRNCCG). Protein binding to UAS1MLS1 was observed with extracts from derepressed but not from repressed cells, and could be competed for by an excess of the unlabelled CSRE (ICL1) sequence. No competition was observed with a mutated CSRE variant. Site-directed mutagenesis of both CSREs in the MLS1 promoter reduced gene activation under derepressing conditions to 20% of the wild-type level. The same decrease was observed with the wild-type MLS1 promoter in a cat8 mutant, lacking an activator of CSRE-dependent transcription. The CSRE/Cat8p-independent activation of MLS1 is mediated by constitutive UAS elements. The pleiotropic transcription factor Abf1p, which binds to the MLS1 upstream region, may contribute to constitutive activation. Thus, in order to ensure the severe glucose repression of MLS1 observed, repressor elements that respond to the carbon source must counteract constitutive activation. In summary, ICL1 and MLS1 share common cis-acting elements, although a distinct mechanism of carbon source control also contributes to MLS1 regulation.

  9. Plants Possess a Cyclic Mitochondrial Metabolic Pathway similar to the Mammalian Metabolic Repair Mechanism Involving Malate Dehydrogenase and l-2-Hydroxyglutarate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hüdig, Meike; Maier, Alexander; Scherrers, Isabell; Seidel, Laura; Jansen, Erwin E W; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Engqvist, Martin K M; Maurino, Veronica G

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic side reactions can give rise to the formation of wasteful and toxic products that are removed by metabolite repair pathways. In this work, we identify and characterize a mitochondrial metabolic repair mechanism in Arabidopsis thaliana involving malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) and l-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (l-2HGDH). We analyze the kinetic properties of both A. thaliana mMDH isoforms, and show that they produce l-2-hydroxyglutarate (l-2HG) from 2-ketoglutarate (2-KG) at low rates in side reactions. We identify A. thaliana l-2HGDH as a mitochondrial FAD-containing oxidase that converts l-2HG back to 2-KG. Using loss-of-function mutants, we show that the electrons produced in the l-2HGDH reaction are transferred to the mitochondrial electron transport chain through the electron transfer protein (ETF). Thus, plants possess the biochemical components of an l-2HG metabolic repair system identical to that found in mammals. While deficiencies in the metabolism of l-2HG result in fatal disorders in mammals, accumulation of l-2HG in plants does not adversely affect their development under a range of tested conditions. However, orthologs of l-2HGDH are found in all examined genomes of viridiplantae, indicating that the repair reaction we identified makes an essential contribution to plant fitness in as yet unidentified conditions in the wild. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Proteomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 reveals the upregulation of an alternative transhydrogenase-malate pathway and nitrogen assimilation in cells grown on cellulose.

    PubMed

    Burton, Euan; Martin, Vincent J J

    2012-12-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a Gram-positive thermophilic anaerobic bacterium with the ability to directly convert cellulosic biomass into useful products such as ethanol and hydrogen. In this study, a quantitative comparative proteomic analysis of the organism was performed to identify proteins and biochemical pathways that are differentially utilized by the organism after growth on cellobiose or cellulose. The cytoplasmic and membrane proteomes of C. thermocellum grown on cellulose or cellobiose were quantitatively compared using a metabolic (15)N isotope labelling method in conjunction with nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS (liquid chromatography - electrospray ionization - tandem mass spectrometry). In total, 1255 proteins were identified in the study, and 129 of those were able to have their relative abundance per cell compared in at least one cellular compartment in response to the substrate provided. This study reveals that cells grown on cellulose increase their abundance of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase while decreasing the abundance of pyruvate dikinase and oxaloacetate decarboxylase, suggesting that the organism diverts carbon flow into a transhydrogenase-malate pathway that can increase the production of the biosynthetic intermediates NADPH and GTP. Glutamate dehydrogenase was also found to have increased abundance in cellulose-grown cells, suggesting that the assimilation of ammonia is upregulated in cells grown on the cellulosic substrates. The results illustrate a mechanism by which C. thermocellum can divert carbon into alternative pathways for the purpose of producing biosynthetic intermediates necessary to respond to growth on cellulose, including transhydrogenation of NADH to NADPH and increased nitrogen assimilation.

  11. The enhancement of tolerance to salt and cold stresses by modifying the redox state and salicylic acid content via the cytosolic malate dehydrogenase gene in transgenic apple plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Jie; Sun, Hong; Dong, Qing-Long; Sun, Tian-Yu; Jin, Zhong-Xin; Hao, Yu-Jin; Yao, Yu-Xin

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we characterized the role of an apple cytosolic malate dehydrogenase gene (MdcyMDH) in the tolerance to salt and cold stresses and investigated its regulation mechanism in stress tolerance. The MdcyMDH transcript was induced by mild cold and salt treatments, and MdcyMDH-overexpressing apple plants possessed improved cold and salt tolerance compared to wild-type (WT) plants. A digital gene expression tag profiling analysis revealed that MdcyMDH overexpression largely altered some biological processes, including hormone signal transduction, photosynthesis, citrate cycle and oxidation-reduction. Further experiments verified that MdcyMDH overexpression modified the mitochondrial and chloroplast metabolisms and elevated the level of reducing power, primarily caused by increased ascorbate and glutathione, as well as the increased ratios of ascorbate/dehydroascorbate and glutathione/glutathione disulphide, under normal and especially stress conditions. Concurrently, the transgenic plants produced a high H2 O2 content, but a low O2·- production rate was observed compared to the WT plants. On the other hand, the transgenic plants accumulated more free and total salicylic acid (SA) than the WT plants under normal and stress conditions. Taken together, MdcyMDH conferred the transgenic apple plants a higher stress tolerance by producing more reductive redox states and increasing the SA level; MdcyMDH could serve as a target gene to genetically engineer salt- and cold-tolerant trees. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A fluoride release-adsorption-release system applied to fluoride-releasing restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Suljak, J P; Hatibovic-Kofman, S

    1996-09-01

    This investigation compared the initial fluoride release and release following refluoridation of three resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (Photac-Fil Applicap, Vitremer, and Fuji II LC) and a new polyacid-modified resin composite material (Dyract). After daily flouride release was measured for 8 days, specimens were refluoridated in 1,000-ppm solutions of fluoride ion for 10 minutes and fluoride release was measured for 5 days. Two further 5-day refluoridation-release periods were carried out. All materials released fluoride initially. Photac released the most; Dyract released the least. Initial release was greatest over the first few days. All materials released significantly more fluoride for 24 to 48 hours after refluoridation. Less fluoride was released with each successive refluoridation for the three glass-ionomer cements. The release from the Dyract compomer remained at a comparatively constant and significantly lower level following each refluoridation.

  13. RAVEN Beta Release

    SciTech Connect

    Rabiti, Cristian; Alfonsi, Andrea; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Mandelli, Diego; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur; Wang, Congjian; Maljovec, Daniel Patrick; Talbot, Paul William

    2016-02-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  14. Altitude release mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Kulhanek, Frank C.

    1977-01-01

    An altitude release mechanism for releasing a radiosonde or other measuring instrument from a balloon carrying it up into the atmosphere includes a bottle partially filled with water, a tube sealed into the bottle having one end submerged in the water in the bottle and the free end extending above the top of the bottle and a strip of water-disintegrable paper held within the free end of the tube linking the balloon to the remainder of the package. As the balloon ascends, the lowered atmospheric air pressure causes the air in the bottle to expand, forcing the water in the bottle up the tubing to wet and disintegrate the paper, releasing the package from the balloon.

  15. Controlled-release microchips.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sadhana; Nijdam, A Jasper; Sinha, Piyush M; Walczak, Robbie J; Liu, Xuewu; Cheng, Mark M-C; Ferrari, Mauro

    2006-05-01

    Efficient drug delivery remains an important challenge in medicine: continuous release of therapeutic agents over extended time periods in accordance with a predetermined temporal profile; local delivery at a constant rate to the tumour microenvironment to overcome much of the systemic toxicity and to improve antitumour efficacy; improved ease of administration, and increasing patient compliance required are some of the unmet needs of the present drug delivery technology. Microfabrication technology has enabled the development of novel controlled-release microchips with capabilities not present in the current treatment modalities. In this review, the current status and future prospects of different types of controlled-release microchips are summarised and analysed with reference to microneedle-based microchips, as well as providing an in-depth focus on microreservoir-based and nanoporous microchips.

  16. Benzene release. status report

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.; Rappe, K.G.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1997-11-04

    Scoping benzene release measurements were conducted on 4 wt percent KTPB `DEMO` formulation slurry using a round, flat bottomed 100-mL flask containing 75 mL slurry. The slurry was agitated with a magnetic stirrer bar to keep the surface refreshed without creating a vortex. Benzene release measurements were made by purging the vapor space at a constant rate and analyzing for benzene by gas chromatography with automatic data acquisition. Some of the data have been rounded or simplified in view of the scoping nature of this study.

  17. Barium release system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A chemical system is described for releasing a good yield of free barium neutral atoms and barium ions in the upper atmosphere and interplanetary space for the study of the geophysical properties of the medium. The barium is released in the vapor phase so that it can be ionized by solar radiation and also be excited to emit resonance radiation in the visible range. The ionized luminous cloud of barium becomes a visible indication of magnetic and electrical characteristics in space and allows determination of these properties over relatively large areas at a given time.

  18. N-arachidonylglycine causes ROS production and cytochrome c release in liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zaccagnino, Patrizia; Saltarella, Maddalena; D'Oria, Susanna; Corcelli, Angela; Saponetti, Matilde Sublimi; Lorusso, Michele

    2009-09-01

    N-arachidonylglycine (NA-Gly) is an amino acid derivative of arachidonic acid. This compound is structurally related to anandamide (arachidonylethanolamine), which is considered an endogenous ligand of the cannabinoid receptor. NA-Gly is present at relatively high levels in the spinal cord, small intestine, and kidneys and at lower, but remarkable, levels in testes, lungs, and liver. The presence of varying levels in different organs suggests multiple functions in addition to the reported anti-inflammatory and pain suppression actions. Here a study on the interaction of NA-Gly with isolated mitochondria is reported. The results show that micromolar concentrations of NA-Gly cause: (i) an increase in the resting state respiration with both glutamate plus malate and succinate as substrates and (ii) a decrease in either ADP- or uncoupler-activated respiration. Whereas the stimulated resting state respiration was substantially reduced by cyclosporin A (CsA), the NA-Gly-inhibited State 3 respiration was almost unaffected. Measurements by blot analysis showed that NA-Gly caused a CsA-sensitive cytochrome c release. Under these conditions no matrix swelling could be detected. Experiments are also presented showing that NA-Gly caused a respiration-dependent large ROS production, which seems in turn to be responsible for the inhibition of electron transport activity and cytochrome c release.

  19. Data Release Summary Statement

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-11-14

    ... 3 CALIOP Level 1 data are released with a product maturity classification of Validated Stage1 , indicating that initial validation of ... users for evaluation and to provide feedback to the CALIOP algorithm development team. Users should carefully read the section of the Data ...

  20. Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asbestos aerosolization (or releasability) is the potential for fibrous asbestos structures that are present in a material or on a solid surface to become airborne when the source is disturbed by human activities or natural forces. In turn, the magnitude of the airborne concentra...

  1. Release of OLe peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    OLe is a high oleic Spanish-type peanut that has excellent yield and enhanced Sclerotinia blight and pod rot resistance when compared to other high oleic Spanish cultivars. The purpose for releasing OLe is to provide peanut producers with a true Spanish peanut that is high oleic and has enhanced yi...

  2. NASTRAN: April 1982 Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugh, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Latest public release of NASTRAN, April 1982 most efficient and versatile to date. Intended range of applications of NASTRAN includes almost every kind of structure and construction. Users may develop their own analysis capabilities by using Direct Matrix Abstraction Programming (DMAP) language to direct NASTRAN in solution of general matrix problems.

  3. Release the Prisoners Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hecke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the mathematical approach of the optimal strategy to win the "Release the prisoners" game and the integration of this analysis in a math class. Outline lesson plans at three different levels are given, where simulations are suggested as well as theoretical findings about the probability distribution function and its mean…

  4. Hydraulic release oil tool

    SciTech Connect

    Mims, M.G.; Mueller, M.D.; Ehlinger, J.C.

    1992-03-11

    This patent describes a hydraulic release tool. It comprises a setting assembly; a coupling member for coupling to drill string or petroleum production components, the coupling member being a plurality of sockets for receiving the dogs in the extended position and attaching the coupling member the setting assembly; whereby the setting assembly couples to the coupling member by engagement of the dogs in the sockets of releases from and disengages the coupling member in movement of the piston from its setting to its reposition in response to a pressure in the body in exceeding the predetermined pressure; and a relief port from outside the body into its bore and means to prevent communication between the relief port and the bore of the body axially of the piston when the piston is in the setting position and to establish such communication upon movement of the piston from the setting position to the release position and reduce the pressure in the body bore axially of the piston, whereby the reduction of the pressure signals that the tool has released the coupling member.

  5. Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asbestos aerosolization (or releasability) is the potential for fibrous asbestos structures that are present in a material or on a solid surface to become airborne when the source is disturbed by human activities or natural forces. In turn, the magnitude of the airborne concentra...

  6. Aluminum-induced calcium deficiency syndrome in declining red spruce

    Treesearch

    Walter C. Shortle; Kevin T. Smith

    1988-01-01

    Prolonged suppression of cambial growth has apparently caused a decline in radial growth in many mature red spruce, Picea rubens. Surveys indicate that this decline occurs in trees throughout the natural range of red spruce and is independent of elevation, tree size, and age class. In addition, crowns of mature red spruce at high elevations across...

  7. Protective role of zinc during aluminum-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Punita; Singla, Neha; Dhawan, D K

    2014-03-01

    The study was carried out to assess the role of zinc (Zn) in mitigating the biochemical alterations induced by aluminum (Al) in rat liver. Rats were divided into four groups: normal control, Al treated (AlCl3, 100 mg/kg b.wt./day), Zn treated (ZnSO4, 227 mg/L drinking water), and combined Al + Zn treated. Al and zinc treatments were given for a total duration of 2 months. Al treatment caused a significant increase in the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), but decreased aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotranferase (ALT) activities, which showed the reverse trend following Zn supplementation. Levels of lipid peroxidation (LPx) and activities of catalase and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) were significantly decreased following Al treatment, which, however, were increased significantly in Zn co-treated rats. Further Al exposure showed a significant increase in reduced glutathione (GSH) content as well as activities, of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR). However, Zn supplementation to Al-treated rats brought down the raised levels of reduced (GSH) and SOD to within normal limits, but caused no effect on GR activity. Furthermore, Al treatment also resulted in alterations in liver histoarchitecture with disruption of hepatic cords and increased vacuolization, which were close to normal following Zn supplementation. The present study reveals that Zn is effective in attenuating the liver damage inflicted by Al toxicity. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Aluminum Induces Oxidative Stress Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Keith D.; Schott, Eric J.; Sharma, Yogesh K.; Davis, Keith R.; Gardner, Richard C.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in gene expression induced by toxic levels of Al were characterized to investigate the nature of Al stress. A cDNA library was constructed from Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with Al for 2 h. We identified five cDNA clones that showed a transient induction of their mRNA levels, four cDNA clones that showed a longer induction period, and two down-regulated genes. Expression of the four long-term-induced genes remained at elevated levels for at least 48 h. The genes encoded peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, blue copper-binding protein, and a protein homologous to the reticuline:oxygen oxidoreductase enzyme. Three of these genes are known to be induced by oxidative stresses and the fourth is induced by pathogen treatment. Another oxidative stress gene, superoxide dismutase, and a gene for Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor were also induced by Al in A. thaliana. These results suggested that Al treatment of Arabidopsis induces oxidative stress. In confirmation of this hypothesis, three of four genes induced by Al stress in A. thaliana were also shown to be induced by ozone. Our results demonstrate that oxidative stress is an important component of the plant's reaction to toxic levels of Al. PMID:9449849

  9. Aluminum-induced acute cholinergic neurotoxicity in rat.

    PubMed

    Peng, J H; Xu, Z C; Xu, Z X; Parker, J C; Friedlander, E R; Tang, J P; Melethil, S

    1992-08-01

    In the present study the acute effect of intravenous aluminum chloride (1 mg/kg) on choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities of rats was investigated. Aluminum was found to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) as indicated by the detection of aluminum in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 30 min after femoral vein injection. Two hours following aluminum injection, ChAT activity in the basal forebrain and hippocampus was significantly reduced by 30% and 22%, respectively, whereas no change was observed in the caudate nuclei. On the other hand, AChE activity was significantly increased by 45% in the caudate nuclei, whereas little change was observed in other brain areas. This report demonstrates that rapid transport of Al across the BBB, and the acute nature of Al neurotoxicity in rats.

  10. Aluminum induces tau aggregation in vitro but not in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mizoroki, Tatsuya; Meshitsuka, Shunsuke; Maeda, Sumihiro; Murayama, Miyuki; Sahara, Naruhiko; Takashima, Akihiko

    2007-07-01

    Etiological studies suggest that aluminum (Al) intake might increase an individual's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Biochemical analysis data on the effects of Al, however, are inconsistent. Hence, the pathological involvement of Al in AD remains unclear. If Al is involved in AD, then it is reasonable to hypothesize that Al might be involved in the formation of either amyloid plaques or neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Here, we investigated whether Al might be involved in NFT formation by using an in vitro tau aggregation paradigm, a tau-overexpressing neuronal cell line (N2a), and a tau-overexpressing mouse model. Although Al induced tau aggregation in a heparin-induced tau assembly assay, these aggregates were neither thioflavin T positive nor did they resemble tau fibrils seen in human AD brains. With cell lysates from stable cell lines overexpressing tau, the accumulation of SDS-insoluble tau increased when the lysates were treated with at least 100 muM Al-maltolate. Yet Al-maltolate caused illness or death in transgenic mice overexpressing human tau and in non-transgenic littermates well before the Al concentration in the brain reached 100 muM. These results indicate that Al has no direct link to AD pathology.

  11. [Aluminum induces chromosome aberrations in wheat root meristem cells].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, N V; Synzynys, B I; Koz'min, G V

    2001-12-01

    The yield and pattern of chromosome structure aberrations in wheat seedlings treated with aluminum nitrate and aluminum sulfate at various concentrations have been determined by the anaphase method. Aluminum has a genotoxic effect causing genome, chromatid, and chromosome aberrations in apical root meristem cells. The relationship between the total yield of structural mutations and the aluminum concentration follows a bell-shaped curve. The mutagenic activity of aluminum nitrate peaks at 10(-3) mg/ml, which is twice as high as the permissible concentration limit (PCL) of aluminum in potable water. The maximum of the mutagenic activity of aluminum sulfate is observed at 5 x 10(-4) mg/ml, i.e., one PCL. Tap water boiled for 2 h in an aluminum vessel has virtually no genotoxic effect on wheat cells.

  12. Aluminum induces cross-resistance of potato to Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena; Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta; Drzewiecka, Kinga; Chmielowska-Bąk, Jagna; Abramowski, Dariusz; Izbiańska, Karolina

    2014-03-01

    The phenomenon of cross-resistance allows plants to acquire resistance to a broad range of stresses after previous exposure to one specific factor. Although this stress-response relationship has been known for decades, the sequence of events that underpin cross-resistance remains unknown. Our experiments revealed that susceptible potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Bintje) undergoing aluminum (Al) stress at the root level showed enhanced defense responses correlated with reduced disease symptoms after leaf inoculation with Phytophthora infestans. The protection capacity of Al to subsequent stress was associated with the local accumulation of H2O2 in roots and systemic activation of salicylic acid (SA) and nitric oxide (NO) dependent pathways. The most crucial Al-mediated changes involved coding of NO message in an enhanced S-nitrosothiol formation in leaves tuned with an abundant SNOs accumulation in the main vein of leaves. Al-induced distal NO generation was correlated with the overexpression of PR-2 and PR-3 at both mRNA and protein activity levels. In turn, after contact with a pathogen we observed early up-regulation of SA-mediated defense genes, e.g. PR1, PR-2, PR-3 and PAL, and subsequent disease limitation. Taken together Al exposure induced distal changes in the biochemical stress imprint, facilitating more effective responses to a subsequent pathogen attack.

  13. The tissue-specific expression and developmental regulation of two nuclear genes encoding rat mitochondrial proteins. Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D P; Gordon, J I; Alpers, R; Strauss, A W

    1989-11-15

    To study the regulation of nuclear genes which encode mitochondrial enzymes involved in oxidative metabolism, absolute levels of mRNA encoding rat medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) and rat mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) were determined in developing and adult male rat tissues. MCAD mRNA is expressed in a variety of adult male tissues with highest steady state levels in heart, adrenal, and skeletal muscle and lowest levels in brain, lung, and testes. In comparison, steady state levels of mMDH mRNA in adult male rat tissues were similar to those of MCAD mRNA in heart, small intestine, adrenal, and skeletal muscle but markedly different in brain, stomach, and testes. Thus, the steady-state levels of MCAD and mMDH mRNA are highest in adult tissues with high energy requirements. Dot blot analysis of RNA prepared from late fetal, suckling, and weaning rat heart, liver, and brain demonstrated the presence of MCAD and mMDH mRNA during the fetal period in all three tissues. Both MCAD and mMDH mRNA levels increased 2-2.5-fold at birth followed by a decline during the first postnatal week in heart and liver. The patterns of accumulation of these mRNAs in heart and liver during the weaning and early adult periods were also similar, although the absolute levels were significantly different. Brain MCAD mRNA levels were consistently low (less than 0.1 pg/micrograms total cellular RNA) throughout the developmental stages. However, brain mMDH mRNA levels exhibited a marked increase during the weaning period, reaching a peak concentration which is higher than the level of mMDH mRNA in heart and liver at any point during development. These results indicate that the level of expression of the nuclear genes encoding MCAD and mMDH is tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. The patterns of MCAD and mMDH mRNA accumulation parallel the changes in energy metabolism which occur during development and among adult tissues.

  14. Root transcriptome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to beneficial Bacillus subtilis FB17 rhizobacteria revealed genes for bacterial recruitment and plant defense independent of malate efflux.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Castaneda, Rafael; Rudrappa, Thimmaraju; Bais, Harsh P

    2013-10-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated that Arabidopsis thaliana can actively recruit beneficial rhizobacteria Bacillus subtilis strain FB17 (hereafter FB17) through an unknown shoot-to-root long-distance signaling pathway post a foliar bacterial pathogen attack. However, it is still not well understood which genetic targets FB17 affects in plants. Microarray analysis of A. thaliana roots treated with FB17 post 24 h of treatment showed 168 and 129 genes that were up- and down-regulated, respectively, compared with the untreated control roots. Those up-regulated include auxin-regulated genes as well as genes involved in metabolism, stress response, and plant defense. In addition, other defense-related genes, as well as cell-wall modification genes were also down-regulated with FB17 colonization. Expression patterns of 20 selected genes were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, validating the microarray results. A. thaliana insertion mutants were used against FB17 to further study the functional response of the differentially expressed genes. Five mutants for the up-regulated genes were tested for FB17 colonization, three (at3g28360, at3g20190 and at1g21240) mutants showed decreased FB17 colonization on the roots while increased FB17 titers was seen with three mutants of the down-regulated genes (at3g27980, at4g19690 and at5g56320). Further, these mutants for up-regulated genes and down-regulated genes were foliar infected with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (hereafter PstDC3000) and analyzed for Aluminum activated malate transporter (ALMT1) expression which showed that ALMT1 may be the key regulator for root FB17 colonization. Our microarray showed that under natural condition, FB17 triggers plant responses in a manner similar to known plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and to some extent also suppresses defense-related genes expression in roots, enabling stable colonization. The possible implication of this study opens up a new dialogin terms of how beneficial

  15. Analysis of carbon source-regulated gene expression by the upstream region of the Candida tropicalis malate synthase gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Umemura, K; Atomi, H; Izuta, M; Kanai, T; Takeshita, S; Ueda, M; Tanaka, A

    1997-01-03

    We investigated the regulation of expression of a gene encoding malate synthase (MS) of an n-alkane-utilizable yeast Candida tropicalis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where its expression is highly induced by acetate. By comparing levels of gene expression in cells grown on glucose, acetate, lactate, and oleic acid, we found that the increase in gene expression was due to a glucose repression-derepression mechanism. In order to obtain information concerning the regulation of the gene expression, a fusion gene which consists of the 5'-upstream region of MS-2 (UPR-MS-2) and the lacZ gene (encoding Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase), was introduced into S. cerevisiae, and beta-galactosidase activities were measured with cells grown on glucose or acetate. Deletion analysis of UPR-MS-2 revealed that the region between -777 and -448 (against the translation initiation codon) enhanced the level of gene expression in both glucose- and acetate-grown cells. In this region, sequences which resemble binding sites of Rap1p/Grf1p/Tufp, a global transcription activator, were found at seven locations and one was found for another pleiotropic activator Abf1p. The result also suggested the presence of multiple upstream repression sequences (URSs), which function specifically in glucose-grown cells, in the region between -368 and -126. In the repressing region, there were three tandem C(A/T)CTCCC sequences and also a putative binding site of Mig1p, a transcriptional repressor which mediates glucose repression of several other genes. When MIG1 gene of S. cerevisiae was disrupted, the expression of the UPR-MS-2-lacZ gene in glucose-grown cells increased approx. 10-fold. Furthermore, the effect of deletion of a putative Mig1p binding site was abolished in the MIG1-disrupted strain, suggesting Mig1p binds to this site and brings about glucose repression. When the SNF1 gene was disrupted, the high level gene expression observed in acetate-grown cells bearing UPR-MS-2 was

  16. Temperature sensitivities of cytosolic malate dehydrogenases from native and invasive species of marine mussels (genus Mytilus): sequence-function linkages and correlations with biogeographic distribution.

    PubMed

    Fields, Peter A; Rudomin, Emily L; Somero, George N

    2006-02-01

    The blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, a native of the Mediterranean Sea, has invaded the west coast of North America in the past century, displacing the native blue mussel, Mytilus trossulus, from most of its former habitats in central and southern California. The invasive success of M. galloprovincialis is conjectured to be due, in part, to physiological adaptations that enable it to outperform M. trossulus at high temperatures. We have examined the structure and function of the enzyme cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (cMDH) from these species, as well as from the more distantly related ribbed mussel, Mytilus californianus, to characterize the effects of temperature on kinetic properties thought to exhibit thermal adaptation. The M. trossulus cMDH ortholog differs from the other cMDHs in a direction consistent with cold adaptation, as evidenced by a higher and more temperature-sensitive Michaelis-Menten constant for the cofactor NADH (Km(NADH)). This difference results from minor changes in sequence: the M. trossulus ortholog differs from the M. galloprovincialis ortholog by only two substitutions in the 334 amino acid monomer, and the M. californianus and M. trossulus orthologs differ by five substitutions. In each case, only one of these substitutions is non-conservative. To test the effects of individual substitutions on kinetic properties, we used site-directed mutagenesis to create recombinant cMDHs. Recombinant wild-type M. trossulus cMDH (rWT) has high Km(NADH) compared with mutants incorporating the non-conservative substitutions found in M. californianus and M. galloprovincialis - V114H and V114N, respectively - demonstrating that these mutations are responsible for the differences found in substrate affinity. Turnover number (kcat) is also higher in rWT compared with the two mutants, consistent with cold adaptation in the M. trossulus ortholog. Conversely, rWT and V114H appear more thermostable than V114N. Based on a comparison of Km(NADH) and kcat

  17. Two Members of the Aluminum-Activated Malate Transporter Family, SlALMT4 and SlALMT5, are Expressed during Fruit Development, and the Overexpression of SlALMT5 Alters Organic Acid Contents in Seeds in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Tsuchiya, Yoshiyuki; Ariyoshi, Michiyo; Nakano, Ryohei; Ushijima, Koichiro; Kubo, Yasutaka; Mori, Izumi C; Higashiizumi, Emi; Galis, Ivan; Yamamoto, Yoko

    2016-11-01

    The aluminum-activated malate transporter (ALMT) family of proteins transports malate and/or inorganic anions across plant membranes. To demonstrate the possible role of ALMT genes in tomato fruit development, we focused on SlALMT4 and SlALMT5, the two major genes expressed during fruit development. Predicted proteins were classified into clade 2 of the family, many members of which localize to endomembranes. Tissue-specific gene expression was determined using transgenic tomato expressing the β-glucuronidase reporter gene controlled by their own promoters. Both the genes were expressed in vascular bundles connecting to developing seeds in fruit and in the embryo of mature seeds. Further, SlALMT5 was expressed in embryo in developing seeds in fruit. Subcellular localization of both proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was established by transiently expressing the green fluorescent protein fusions in plant protoplasts. SlALMT5 probably localized to other endomembranes as well. Localization of SlALMT5 to the ER was also confirmed by immunoblot analysis. The transport function of both SlALMT proteins was investigated electrophysiologically in Xenopus oocytes. SlALMT5 transported malate and inorganic anions such as nitrate and chloride, but not citrate. SlALMT4 also transported malate, but the results were less consistent perhaps because it did not localize strongly to the plasma membrane. To elucidate the physiological role of SlALMT5 further, we overexpressed SlALMT5 in tomato. Compared with the wild type, overexpressors exhibited higher malate and citrate contents in mature seeds, but not in fruit. We conclude that the malate transport function of SlALMT5 expressed in developing fruit influences the organic acid contents in mature seeds. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Release Fraction Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This docume