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Sample records for aluminum-molten salt contactor

  1. Testing of pyrochemical centrifugal contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, L.S.; Carls, E.L.; Basco, J.K.; Johnson, T.R.

    1996-08-01

    A centrifugal contactor that performs oxidation and reduction exchange reactions between molten metals and salts at 500 degrees Centigrade has been tested successfully at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The design is based on contactors for aqueous- organic systems operation near room temperature. In tests to demonstrate the performance of the pyrocontactor, cadmium and LICl- KCl eutectic salt were the immiscible solvent phases, and rare earths were the distributing solutes. The tests showed that the pyrocontactor mixed and separated the phases well, with stage efficiencies approaching 99% at rotor speeds near 2700 rpm. The contactor ran smoothly and reliably over the entire range of speeds that was tested.

  2. Centrifugal Contactor Efficiency Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mincher, Bruce Jay; Tillotson, Richard Dean; Grimes, Travis Shane

    2017-01-01

    The contactor efficiency of a 2-cm acrylic centrifugal contactor, fabricated by ANL using 3D printer technology was measured by comparing a contactor test run to 5-min batch contacts. The aqueous phase was ~ 3 ppm depleted uranium in 3 M HNO3, and the organic phase was 1 M DAAP/dodecane. Sampling during the contactor run showed that equilibrium was achieved within < 3 minutes. The contactor efficiency at equilibrium was 95% to 100 %, depending on flowrate.

  3. V5 AND V10 CONTACTOR TESTING WITH THE NEXT GENERATION (CSSX) SOLVENT FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Restivo, M.; Peters, T.; Pierce, R.; Fondeur, F.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Giddings, B.; Hickman, B.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-17

    A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium (Cs) from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A Modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive, called a suppressor, is used to improve stripping performance. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008. Subsequent development efforts by ORNL identified an improved solvent system that can raise the expected decontamination factor (DF) in MCU from {approx}200 to more than 40,000. The improved DF is attributed to an improved distribution ratio for cesium [D(Cs)] in extraction from {approx}15 to {approx}60, an increased solubility of the calixarene in the solvent from 0.007 M to >0.050 M, and use of boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) stripping that also yields improved D(Cs) values. Additionally, the changes incorporated into the Next Generation CSSX Solvent (NGS) are intended to reduce solvent entrainment by virtue of more favorable physical properties. The MCU and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) facilities are actively pursuing the changeover from the current CSSX solvent to the NGS solvent. To support this integration of the NGS into the MCU and SWPF facilities, the Savannah River Remediation (SRR)/ARP/MCU Life Extension Project requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of the new solvent for the removal of Cs from the liquid salt waste stream. Additionally, SRNL was tasked with characterizing both strip (20-in long, 10 micron pore size) and extraction (40-in long, 20 micron pore size) coalescers. SRNL designed a pilot-scale experimental

  4. Plasma contactor research, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Emissive and Langmuir probes were used to measure plasma potential profiles, plasma densities, electron energy distributions, and plasma noise levels near a hollow cathode-based plasma contactor emitting electrons. The effects of electron emission current (100 to 1500 mA) and contactor flowrate (2 to 10 sccm (Xenon)) on these data are examined. Retarding potential analyzer (RPA) measurements showing that high energy ions generally stream from a contactor along with the electrons being emitted are also presented, and a mechanism by which this occurs is postulated. This mechanism, which involves a high rate of ionization induced between electrons and atoms flowing together from the hollow cathode orifice, results in a region of high positive space charge and high positive potential. Langmuir and RPA probe data suggests that both electrons and ions expand spherically from this potential hill region. In addition to experimental observations, a simple one-dimensional model which describes the electron emission process and predicts the phenomena just mentioned is presented and is shown to agree qualitatively with these observations. Experimental results of the first stage of bilateral cooperation with the Italian Institute of Interplanetary Space Physics (IFSI CNR) are presented. Sharp, well-defined double layers were observed downstream of a contactor collecting electrons from an ambient plasma created in the IFSI Facility. The voltage drop across these double layers was observed to increase with the current drawn from the ambient plasma. This observation, which was not as clear in previous IFSI tests conducted at higher neutral pressures, is in agreement with previous experimental observations made at both Colorado State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. Greater double layer voltage drops, multiple double layers, and higher noise levels in the region near the double layers were also observed when a magnetic field was imposed and oriented perpendicular to the

  5. Plasma contactors for electrodynamic tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    The role plasma contactors play in effective electrodynamic tether operation is discussed. Hollow cathodes and hollow cathode-based plasma sources have been identified as leading candidates for the electrodynamic tether plasma contactor. Present experimental efforts to evaluate the suitability of these devices as plasma contactors, conducted concurrently at NASA Lewis Research Center and Colorado State University, are reviewed. These research programs include the definition of preliminary plasma contactor designs, and the characterization of their operation both as electron emitters and electron collectors to and from a simulated space plasma. Results indicate that ampere-level electron currents, sufficient for electrodynamic tether operation, can be exchanged between hollow cathode-based plasma contactors and a dilute plasma.

  6. Isolation contactor state control system

    DOEpatents

    Bissontz, Jay E.

    2017-05-16

    A controller area network (CAN) installed on a hybrid electric vehicle provides one node with control of high voltage power distribution system isolation contactors and the capacity to energize a secondary electro-mechanical relay device. The output of the secondary relay provides a redundant and persistent backup signal to the output of the node. The secondary relay is relatively immune to CAN message traffic interruptions and, as a result, the high voltage isolation contactor(s) are less likely to transition open in the event that the intelligent output driver should fail.

  7. Plasma contactor research - 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchholtz, Brett; Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1992-01-01

    A report describing the operating principles of hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors emitting or collecting electrons from an ambient plasma is summarized. Preliminary experiments conducted to determine the noise generated by these plasma contactors in the emission-current return line and in the plasma near it are described. These noise data are measured as current fluctuations in the return line and to the Langmuir probe and then analyzed using a fast Fourier transform technique. The spectral compositions of the data are characterized using power spectral density plots which are examined to identify possible noise source(s) and production mechanism(s). The precautions taken in the construction and calibration of the instrumentation to assure adequate frequency response are described. Experimental results show that line-current noise levels are typically 2 percent of the electron current being emitted or collected. However, noise levels increase to as much as 20 percent of the electron current at a few electron-collection operating conditions. The frequencies associated with most of the noise were harmonics of the 60 Hz input to system power supplies. Plasma noise had characteristics similar in magnitude and frequency to those for the return-line noise, but they contained additional features at frequencies considered to be related to ion-acoustic instabilities. Also discussed is a new probe positioning system built to facilitate future plasma-contractor research.

  8. FLUID CONTACTOR APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Spence, R.; Streeton, R.J.W.

    1956-04-17

    The fluid contactor apparatus comprises a cylindrical column mounted co- axially and adapted to rotate within a cylindrical vessel, for the purpose of extracting a solute from am aqueous solution by means of an organic solvent. The column is particularly designed to control the vortex pattern so as to reduce the height of the vortices while, at the same time, the width of the annular radius in the radial direction between the vessel and column is less than half the radius of the column. A plurality of thin annular fins are spaced apart along the rotor approximately twice the radial dimension of the column such that two contrarotating substantially circular vortices are contained within each pair of fins as the column is rotated.

  9. Contactor/filter improvements

    DOEpatents

    Stelman, D.

    1988-06-30

    A contactor/filter arrangement for removing particulate contaminants from a gaseous stream is described. The filter includes a housing having a substantially vertically oriented granular material retention member with upstream and downstream faces, a substantially vertically oriented microporous gas filter element, wherein the retention member and the filter element are spaced apart to provide a zone for the passage of granular material therethrough. A gaseous stream containing particulate contaminants passes through the gas inlet means as well as through the upstream face of the granular material retention member, passing through the retention member, the body of granular material, the microporous gas filter element, exiting out of the gas outlet means. A cover screen isolates the filter element from contact with the moving granular bed. In one embodiment, the granular material is comprised of porous alumina impregnated with CuO, with the cover screen cleaned by the action of the moving granular material as well as by backflow pressure pulses. 6 figs.

  10. Plasma contactor development for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Hamley, John A.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Manzella, David H.; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy; Soulas, George C.; Nelson, Amy

    1993-01-01

    Plasma contactors have been baselined for the Space Station (SS) to control the electrical potentials of surfaces to eliminate/mitigate damaging interactions with the space environment. The system represents a dual-use technology which is a direct outgrowth of the NASA electric propulsion program and, in particular, the technology development effort on ion thrustor systems. The plasma contactor subsystems include the plasma contactor unit, a power electronics unit, and an expellant management unit. Under this pre-flight development program these will all be brought to breadboard or engineering model status. Development efforts for the plasma contactor include optimizing the design and configuration of the contactor, validating its required lifetime, and characterizing the contactor plume and electromagnetic interference. The plasma contactor unit design selected for the SS is an enclosed keeper, xenon hollow cathode plasma source. This paper discusses the test results and development status of the plasma contactor unit subsystem for the SS.

  11. Contactor/filter improvements

    DOEpatents

    Stelman, David

    1989-01-01

    A contactor/filter arrangement for removing particulate contaminants from a gaseous stream includes a housing having a substantially vertically oriented granular material retention member with upstream and downstream faces, a substantially vertically oriented microporous gas filter element, wherein the retention member and the filter element are spaced apart to provide a zone for the passage of granular material therethrough. The housing further includes a gas inlet means, a gas outlet means, and means for moving a body of granular material through the zone. A gaseous stream containing particulate contaminants passes through the gas inlet means as well as through the upstream face of the granular material retention member, passing through the retention member, the body of granular material, the microporous gas filter element, exiting out of the gas outlet means. Disposed on the upstream face of the filter element is a cover screen which isolates the filter element from contact with the moving granular bed and collects a portion of the particulates so as to form a dust cake having openings small enough to exclude the granular material, yet large enough to receive the dust particles. In one embodiment, the granular material is comprised of prous alumina impregnated with CuO, with the cover screen cleaned by the action of the moving granular material as well as by backflow pressure pulses.

  12. Electric vehicle drive train with contactor protection

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, C.E.; Benson, R.A.

    1994-11-29

    A drive train for an electric vehicle includes a traction battery, a power drive circuit, a main contactor for connecting and disconnecting the traction battery and the power drive circuit, a voltage detector across contacts of the main contactor, and a controller for controlling the main contactor to prevent movement of its contacts to the closed position when the voltage across the contacts exceeds a predetermined threshold, to thereby protect the contacts of the contactor. The power drive circuit includes an electric traction motor and a DC-to-AC inverter with a capacitive input filter. The controller also inhibits the power drive circuit from driving the motor and thereby discharging the input capacitor if the contacts are inadvertently opened during motoring. A precharging contactor is controlled to charge the input filter capacitor prior to closing the main contactor to further protect the contacts of the main contactor. 3 figures.

  13. Electric vehicle drive train with contactor protection

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Charles E.; Benson, Ralph A.

    1994-01-01

    A drive train for an electric vehicle includes a traction battery, a power drive circuit, a main contactor for connecting and disconnecting the traction battery and the power drive circuit, a voltage detector across contacts of the main contactor, and a controller for controlling the main contactor to prevent movement of its contacts to the closed position when the voltage across the contacts exceeds a predetermined threshold, to thereby protect the contacts of the contactor. The power drive circuit includes an electric traction motor and a DC-to-AC inverter with a capacitive input filter. The controller also inhibits the power drive circuit from driving the motor and thereby discharging the input capacitor if the contacts are inadvertently opened during motoring. A precharging contactor is controlled to charge the input filter capacitor prior to closing the main contactor to further protect the contacts of the main contactor.

  14. Space plasma contactor research, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    A simple model describing the process of electron collection from a low pressure ambient plasma in the absence of magnetic field and contactor velocity effects is presented. Experimental measurments of the plasma surrounding the contactor are used to demonstrate that a double-sheath generally develops and separates the ambient plasma from a higher density, anode plasma located adjacent to the contactor. Agreement between the predictions of the model and experimental measurements obtained at the electron collection current levels ranging to 1 A suggests the surface area at the ambient plasma boundary of the double-sheath is equal to the electron current being collected divided by the ambient plasma random electron current density; the surface area of the higher density anode plasma boundary of the double-sheath is equal to the ion current being emitted across this boundary divided by the ion current density required to sustain a stable sheath; and the voltage drop across the sheath is determined by the requirement that the ion and electron currents counterflowing across the boundaries be at space-charge limited levels. The efficiency of contactor operation is shown to improve when significant ionization and excitation is induced by electrons that stream from the ambient plasma through the double-sheath and collide with neutral atoms being supplied through the hollow cathode.

  15. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: ROTATING BIOLOGICAL CONTACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rotating biological contactors employ aerobic fixed-film treatment to degrade either organic and/or nitrogenous (ammonia-nitrogen) constituents present in aqueous waste streams. ixed-film systems provide a surface to which the biomass can adhere. Treatment is achieved as the wast...

  16. Mass Transfer in 12-CM Centrifugal Contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chesna, J.C.

    2001-06-26

    One eight-stage unit (8-pack) of centrifugal contactors was tested in both extraction and stripping modes. Efficiencies approaching 100 percent were obtained in both modes. The contactors were operated successfully at a wide range of combined flow rates, including the HEF conditions. This report discusses the results of that test.

  17. Plasma contactor technology for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Hamley, John A.; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy; Soulas, George C.; Parkes, James; Ohlinger, Wayne L.; Schaffner, Michael S.; Nelson, Amy

    1993-01-01

    Hollow cathode plasma contactors were baselined for Space Station Freedom (SSF) to control the electrical potentials of surfaces to eliminate/mitigate damaging interactions with the space environment. The system represents a dual-use technology which is a direct outgrowth of the NASA electric propulsion program and in particular the technology development effort on ion thruster systems. Specific efforts include optimizing the design and configuration of the contactor, validating its required lifetime, and characterizing the contactor plume and electromagnetic interference. The plasma contact or subsystems include the plasma contact or unit, a power electronics unit, and an expellant management unit. Under this program these will all be brought to breadboard and engineering model development status. New test facilities were developed, and existing facilities were augmented, to support characterizations and life testing of contactor components and systems. The magnitude, scope, and status of the plasma contactor hardware development program now underway and preliminary test results on system components are discussed.

  18. Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor for Acid Gas Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiqotul Himma, Nurul; Gede Wenten, I.

    2017-07-01

    Gas-liquid membrane contactor has gained a great attention as an alternative to conventional absorption columns in acid gas removal from natural gas or post-combustion. The membrane contactor offers high mass transfer area and excellent operational flexibility. However, hydrophobic microporous membranes commonly used are still susceptible to wetting by liquid absorbents, leading to the deterioration of absorption performance in long-term operation. Therefore, many studies were recently directed to improve the membrane wetting resistant by endowing superhydrophobicity. This article then presents a review on superhydrophobic membrane development and its application for acid gas removal using membrane contactor. An overview of gas-liquid membrane contactor is firstly presented, followed by the preparation of superhydrophobic membranes. The performances of superhydrophobic membranes in acid gas absorption are then discussed, and the recommendation for future research is finally outlined. This review may provide an insight into the further development of superhydrophobic membrane contactor.

  19. Research on the displacement control method of asynchronous modular contactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Gong; Ming, Zong

    2017-01-01

    Ac contactor is a kind of low voltage electrical appliances with large usage and wide application. Because of the frequent operation, contactor life must be long enough to ensure the reliable operation of power system. The electrical life of the contactor, as the key to affect the service life of the contactor, is mainly affected by the arc developed in the breaking and closing course. This paper concentrates on a new type of asynchronous modular contactor. To get the contactor movement characteristics, the dynamic model of the electromagnetic system is established by MATLAB/SIMULINK. Then, according to the displacement curve of contactor, the breaking process and closing process is planned. The thought of closed loop control, by adjusting the parameters of PID controller, enables the contactor to operate as the planning displacement curve. In addition, to achieve no arc or micro arc breaking and no bounce or micro bounce closing , a displacement closed loop control system for contactor is designed.

  20. A Scale for Rating Fire-Prevention Contactors

    Treesearch

    M.L. Doolittle

    1979-01-01

    A scale is constructed to help fire-prevention program administrators determine if an individual contactor is effective at influencing people. The 24 items in the scale indicate the qualities that an effective contactor should have.

  1. High-current plasma contactor neutralizer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Williamson, W. S.; Matossian, J. N.; Vourgourakis, E. J.; Burch, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    A plasma-contactor neutralizer system is described, for the stabilizing the Orbiter's potential during flights of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science missions. The plasma contactor neutralizer will include a Xe plasma source that can provide steady-state ion-emission currents of up to 1.5 A. The Orbiter's potential will be maintained near that of the surrounding space plasma during electron-beam accelerator firings through a combination of ion emission from the Xe plasma source and electron collection from the ambient space plasma. Configuration diagrams and block diagrams are presented along with the performance characteristics of the system.

  2. DETERMINATION OF LIQUID FILM THICKNESS FOLLOWING DRAINING OF CONTACTORS, VESSELS, AND PIPES IN THE MCU PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-06-06

    The Department of Energy (DOE) identified the caustic side solvent extraction (CSSX) process as the preferred technology to remove cesium from radioactive waste solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As a result, Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) began designing and building a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) in the SRS tank farm to process liquid waste for an interim period until the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) begins operations. Both the solvent and the strip effluent streams could contain high concentrations of cesium which must be removed from the contactors, process tanks, and piping prior to performing contactor maintenance. When these vessels are drained, thin films or drops will remain on the equipment walls. Following draining, the vessels will be flushed with water and drained to remove the flush water. The draining reduces the cesium concentration in the vessels by reducing the volume of cesium-containing material. The flushing, and subsequent draining, reduces the cesium in the vessels by diluting the cesium that remains in the film or drops on the vessel walls. MCU personnel requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers conduct a literature search to identify models to calculate the thickness of the liquid films remaining in the contactors, process tanks, and piping following draining of salt solution, solvent, and strip solution. The conclusions from this work are: (1) The predicted film thickness of the strip effluent is 0.010 mm on vertical walls, 0.57 mm on horizontal walls and 0.081 mm in horizontal pipes. (2) The predicted film thickness of the salt solution is 0.015 mm on vertical walls, 0.74 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.106 mm in horizontal pipes. (3) The predicted film thickness of the solvent is 0.022 mm on vertical walls, 0.91 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.13 mm in horizontal pipes. (4) The calculated film volume following draining is: (a) Salt solution receipt tank--1.6 gallons; (b) Salt solution feed

  3. Micro contactor based on isotachophoretic sample transport.

    PubMed

    Goet, Gabriele; Baier, Tobias; Hardt, Steffen

    2009-12-21

    It is demonstrated how isotachophoresis (ITP) in a microfluidic device may be utilized to bring two small sample volumes into contact in a well-controlled manner. The ITP contactor serves a similar purpose as micromixers that are designed to mix two species rapidly in a microfluidic channel. In contrast to many micromixers, the ITP contactor does not require complex channel architectures and allows a sample processing in the spirit of "digital microfluidics", i.e. the samples always remain in a compact volume. It is shown that the ITP zone transport through microchannels proceeds in a reproducible and predictable manner, and that the sample trajectories follow simple relationships obtained from Ohm's law. Firstly, the micro contactor can be used to synchronize two ITP zones having reached a channel at different points in time. Secondly, fulfilling its actual purpose it is capable of bringing two samples in molecular contact via an interpenetration of ITP zones. It is demonstrated that the contacting time is proportional to the ITP zone extension. This opens up the possibility of using that type of device as a special type of micromixer with "mixing times" significantly below one second and an option to regulate the duration of contact through specific parameters such as the sample volume. Finally, it is shown how the micro contactor can be utilized to conduct a hybridization reaction between two ITP zones containing complementary DNA strands.

  4. Hollow cathode-based plasma contactor experiments for electrodynamic tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The role plasma contactors play in effective electrodynamic tether operation is discussed. Hollow cathodes and hollow cathode-based plasma sources have been identified as leading candidates for the electrodynamic tether plasma contactor. Present experimental efforts to evaluate the suitability of these devices as plasma contactors are reviewed. This research includes the definition of preliminary plasma contactor designs, and the characterization of their operation as electron collectors from a simulated space plasma. The discovery of an 'ignited mode' regime of high contactor efficiency and low impedance is discussed, as well as is the application of recent models of the plasma coupling process to contactor operation. Results indicate that ampere-level electron currents can be exchanged between hollow cathode-based plasma contactors and a dilute plasma in this regime. A discussion of design considerations for plasma contactors is given which includes expressions defining the total mass flow rate and power requirements of plasma contactors operating in both the cathodic and anodic regimes, and correlation of this to the tether current. Finally, future ground and spaceflight experiments are proposed to resolve critical issues of plasma contactor operation.

  5. Hollow cathode-based plasma contactor experiments for electrodynamic tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The role plasma contactors play in effective electrodynamic tether operation is discussed. Hollow cathodes and hollow cathode-based plasma sources have been identified as leading candidates for the electrodynamic tether plasma contactor. Present experimental efforts to evaluate the suitability of these devices as plasma contactors are reviewed. This research includes the definition of preliminary plasma contactor designs, and the characterization of their operation as electron collectors from a simulated space plasma. The discovery of an 'ignited mode' regime of high contactor efficiency and low impedance is discussed, as well as is the application of recent models of the plasma coupling process to contactor operation. Results indicate that ampere-level electron currents can be exchanged between hollow cathode-based plasma contactors and a dilute plasma in this regime. A discussion of design considerations for plasma contactors is given which includes expressions defining the total mass flow rate and power requirements of plasma contactors operating in both the cathodic and anodic regimes, and correlation of this to the tether current. Finally, future ground and spaceflight experiments are proposed to resolve critical issues of plasma contactor operation.

  6. Continuous fluidized-bed contactor with recycle of sorbent

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.; Petersen, James N.; Davison, Brian H.

    1996-01-01

    A continuous fluidized-bed contactor containing sorbent particles is used to remove solutes from liquid solvents. As the sorbent particles, for example gel beads, sorb the solute, for example metal ion species, the sorbent particles tend to decrease in diameter. These smaller loaded sorbent particles rise to the top of the contactor, as larger sorbent particles remain at the bottom of the contactor as a result of normal hydraulic forces. The smaller loaded sorbent particles are then recovered, regenerated, and reintroduced into the contactor. Alternatively, the loaded sorbent particles may also slightly increase in diameter, or exhibit no change in diameter but an increase in density. As a result of normal hydraulic forces the larger loaded sorbent particles fall to the bottom of the contactor. The larger loaded sorbent particles are then recovered, regenerated, and reintroduced into the contactor.

  7. Continuous fluidized-bed contactor with recycle of sorbent

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.; Petersen, J.N.; Davison, B.H.

    1996-07-09

    A continuous fluidized-bed contactor containing sorbent particles is used to remove solutes from liquid solvents. As the sorbent particles, for example gel beads, sorb the solute, for example metal ion species, the sorbent particles tend to decrease in diameter. These smaller loaded sorbent particles rise to the top of the contactor, and larger sorbent particles remain at the bottom of the contactor as a result of normal hydraulic forces. The smaller loaded sorbent particles are then recovered, regenerated, and reintroduced into the contactor. Alternatively, the loaded sorbent particles may also slightly increase in diameter, or exhibit no change in diameter but an increase in density. As a result of normal hydraulic forces the larger loaded sorbent particles fall to the bottom of the contactor. The larger loaded sorbent particles are then recovered, regenerated, and reintroduced into the contactor. 8 figs.

  8. Corrosion abatement in sulfuric acid alkylation unit horizontal contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Schutt, H.U.

    1997-09-01

    The need to increase throughput in alkylation plants has resulted in higher operating temperatures and higher water levels in alkylation acids than projected by design. Combined with higher flow rates, the more severe process environment causes carbon steel to corrode at increased rates. Carbon steel is the main material of construction for horizontal contactors (Stratco reactors). A leak to the atmosphere in the hydraulic end cone of one contactor and the realization that basic corrosion data are not available for high throughput process conditions in alkylation units prompted a laboratory study to develop the lacking expertise. Corrosion in alkylation unit horizontal contactors is successfully mitigated by saturating fresh alkylation acid with ferrous sulfate.

  9. Modeling the expansion of a contactor plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, E. A.; Delzanno, G.; Camporeale, E.; Borovsky, J. E.; MacDonald, E.; Thomsen, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    Plasma contactor technology is widely used on board spacecraft to keep spacecraft charging levels under control. On the International Space Station, for instance, it is used to prevent high current discharges between differently charged surfaces. It consists of emitting a neutral plasma to create a plasma reservoir near the spacecraft in order to balance the currents collected by the spacecraft from the magnetospheric environment. One approach to modeling the contactor plasma plume applies a self-similar solution in order to gain insight into the plume dynamics without requiring expensive numerical simulations [1, 2]. Typically, hydrodynamic fluid equations are used to model the plasma behavior. We present a comparison of different self-similar plume models existing in the literature [1, 2] and compare these with our Particle-In-Cell simulations in the near-field to assess their validity. We will consider both the unmagnetized and the magnetized limit, treating the magnitude and angle (relative to the plasma injection velocity) of the magnetic field as a parameter. [1] F. F. Gabdullin, A. G. Korsun, E. M. Tverdokhlebova, 'The plasma plume emitted onboard the international space station under the effect of the geomagnetic field', IEEE Trans. Plasma Science 36(5) 2207 (2008). [2] M. Merino, E. Ahedo, C. Bombardelli, H. Urrutxua, J. Pelaez, 'Hypersonic plasma plume expansion in space', 32nd International Electric Propulsion Conference, IEPC-2011-086, Wiesbaden, Germany, 2011.

  10. Model of electron collecting plasma contactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.; Parks, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    In laboratory experiments, plasma contactors are observed to collect ampere-level electron currents with low impedance. In order to extend the laboratory experience to the low-earth-orbit environment, a model of plasma contactors is being developed. Laboratory results are being used to support and validate the model development. The important physical processes observed in the laboratory are that the source plasma is separated from the background plasma by a double layer and that ionization of the expellant gas by the collected electrons creates the bulk of the ions that leave the source plasma. The model, which uses Poisson's equation with a physical charge density that includes the ion and electron components of both the source and the ambient plasmas, reproduces this phenomenon for typical experimental parameters. The calculations, in agreement with the laboratory results, show little convergence of the accelerated electrons. The angular momentum of the incoming electrons dramatically reduces the peak electron density. These electrons ionize enough gas to generate the source plasma. Calculations show that the increase in ionization rate with potential produces a steep rise in collected current with increasing potential as seen in the laboratory.

  11. Modeling the expansion of a contactor plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Erik; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Camporeale, Enrico; Borovsky, Joseph; MacDonald, Elizabeth; Thomsen, Michelle

    2012-10-01

    Plasma contactor technology is widely used on board spacecraft to keep spacecraft charging levels under control. On the International Space Station, for instance, it is used to prevent high current discharges between differently charged surfaces. It consists of emitting a neutral plasma to create a plasma reservoir near the spacecraft in order to balance the currents collected by the spacecraft from the magnetospheric environment. One approach to modeling the contactor plasma plume applies a self-similar solution in order to gain insight into the plume dynamics without requiring expensive numerical simulations [1, 2]. Typically, hydrodynamic fluid equations are used to model the plasma behavior. We present a comparison of different self-similar plume models existing in the literature [1, 2] and compare these with our Particle-In-Cell simulations in the near-field to assess their validity. We will consider both the unmagnetized and the magnetized limit. [4pt] [1] F. F. Gabdullin, A. G. Korsun, E. M. Tverdokhlebova, IEEE Trans. Plasma Science 36(5) 2207 (2008). [2] M. Merino, E. Ahedo, C. Bombardelli, H. Urrutxua, J. Pelaez, ``Hypersonic plasma plume expansion in space,'' 32nd International Electric Propulsion Conference, IEPC-2011-086, Wiesbaden, Germany, 2011.

  12. Low cost membrane contactors based on hollow fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnal, Mirko; Vesely, Tomas; Raudensky, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Membrane contactors are used to solve different chemical engineering tasks (e.g. water saturation with gases). Such elements are traditionally used for bubble less oxidation of blood. However, their industrial applications are rather limited by their high investment costs. This is probably the main reason why membrane contactors are not used so widely, e.g. classical absorbers, etc. If potted bundles of hollow fibres are available, then it is a relatively simple task to design an ad hoc membrane contactor. However, it must be emphasised that to achieve the highest mass transfer efficiency requires a rather time-consuming tuning of each ad hoc designed contactor. To check the differences by water evaporation were aligned two modes, the water inside the hollow fibre membrane and fan air outside, next with the water outsides and flowing pressure air inside the membrane.

  13. Plasma contactors for use with electodynamic tethers for power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, D. E.; Gatsonis, N. A.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma contactors are proposed as a means of making good electrical contact between biased surfaces such as found at the ends of an electrodynamic tether and the space environment. The plasma contactor emits a plasma cloud which facilitates the electrical connection. The physics of this plasma cloud is investigated for contactors used as electron collectors. The central question addressed is whether the electrons collected by a plasma contactor come from the far field or by ionization of local neutral gas. This question is important because the system implications are different for the two mechanisms. It is shown that contactor clouds in space will consist of a spherical core possibly containing a shock wave. Outside of the core the cloud will expand anisotropically across the magnetic field leading to a turbulent cigar shape structure along the field. This outer region is itself divided into two regions by the ion response to the electric field. A two-dimensional theory for the outer regions of the cloud is developed. The current voltage characteristic of an Argon plasma contactor cloud is estimated for several ion currents in the range of 1 to 100 Amperes. It is suggested that the major source of collected electrons comes by ionization of neutral gas while collection of electrons from the far field is relatively small.

  14. Development of Centrifugal Contactor with High Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, Nobuo; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Ogino, Hideki; Kase, Takeshi; Koizumi, Tsutomu

    2007-07-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), an innovative centrifugal contactor system has been developed for a future reprocessing plant. It was confirmed that it had a higher extraction capacity through the uranium test already. But it was necessary that it had the higher mechanical reliability to be applied in a reprocessing plant. In this study, two types of driving units that use a ball bearing or a magnetic bearing have been developed for it. It was confirmed that they had enough abilities trough endurance tests. The driving unit with ball bearing could be operated continuously for 5000 hours that was equal to a term of an annual operation. It was found that it could be operated for a year without maintenance. JAEA will continue to improve them and select more advantageous one on the basis of economy and lifetime in near future. (authors)

  15. Single Stage Contactor Testing Of The Next Generation Solvent Blend

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D. T.; Peters, T. B.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Poirier, M. R.; Brass, E. A.; Garrison, A. G.; Ketusky, E. T.

    2014-01-06

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent to increase the cesium decontamination factor. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facility the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing utilized a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the new extractant, MaxCalix, as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 liquid-to-liquid centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. The results indicate that hydraulically, the NGS solvent performed hydraulically similar to the current solvent which was expected. For the organic carryover 93% of the solvent is predicted to be recovered from the stripping operation and 96% from the extraction operation. As for the mass transfer, the NGS solvent significantly improved the cesium DF by at least an order of magnitude when extrapolating the One-stage results to actual Seven-stage extraction operation with a stage efficiency of 95%.

  16. Modeling of rotating disc contactor (RDC) column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Wan Nurul Aiffah; Zakaria, Siti Aisyah; Noor, Nor Fashihah Mohd; Sulong, Ibrahim; Arshad, Khairil Anuar

    2014-12-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction is one of the most important separation processes. Different kinds of liquid-liquid extractor such as Rotating Disc Contactor (RDC) Column being used in industries. The study of liquid-liquid extraction in an RDC column has become a very important subject to be discussed not just among chemical engineers but mathematician as well. In this research, the modeling of small diameter RDC column using the chemical system involving cumene/isobutryric asid/water are analyzed by the method of Artificial Neural Network (ANN). In the previous research, we begin the process of analyzed the data using methods of design of the experiments (DOE) to identify which factor and their interaction factor are significant and to determine the percentage of contribution of the variance for each factor. From the result obtained, we continue the research by discussed the development and validation of an artificial neural network model in estimating the concentration of continuous and concentration of dispersed outlet for an RDC column. It is expected that an efficient and reliable model will be formed to predict RDC column performance as an alternative to speed up the simulation process.

  17. Physical processes associated with current collection by plasma contactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Davis, Victoria A.

    1990-01-01

    Recent flight data confirms laboratory observations that the release of neutral gas increases plasma sheath currents. Plasma contactors are devices which release a partially ionized gas in order to enhance the current flow between a spacecraft and the space plasma. Ionization of the expellant gas and the formation of a double layer between the anode plasma and the space plasma are the dominant physical processes. A theory is presented of the interaction between the contactor plasma and the background plasma. The conditions for formation of a double layer between the two plasmas are derived. Double layer formation is shown to be a consequence of the nonlinear response of the plasmas to changes in potential. Numerical calculations based upon this model are compared with laboratory measurements of current collection by hollow cathode-based plasma contactors.

  18. Membrane contactors for CO2 capture processes - critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogalska, Adrianna; Trojanowska, Anna; Garcia-Valls, Ricard

    2017-07-01

    The use of membrane contactor in industrial processes is wide, and lately it started to be used in CO2 capture process mainly for gas purification or to reduce the emission. Use of the membrane contactor provides high contact surface area so the size of the absorber unit significantly decreases, which is an important factor for commercialization. The research has been caried out regarding the use of novel materials for the membrane production and absorbent solution improvements. The present review reveals the progress in membrane contactor systems for CO2 capture processes concerning solution for ceramic membrane wetting, comparison study of different polymers used for fabrication and methods of enzyme immobilization for biocomposite membrane. Also information about variety of absorbent solutions is described.

  19. Development of novel contactor for nuclear solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Shekhar; Kumar, Rajnish; Sivakumar, D.; Balamurugan, M.; Koganti, S.B.

    2008-07-01

    For current designs of radiochemical plants, solvent-extraction contactors with no periodic maintenance like pulse column are the first choice. In addition, as costs of specialty solvents for nuclear extraction are quite high, there is a demand for operation at extreme phase ratios. Recently a novel mixer-settler was visualized and developed for this kind of service. The mixer of the novel contactor is based on rotated helical tubes and does not involve any mechanical moving part. Mass-transfer runs were carried out with aqueous nitric acid and 30% TBP solvent at A/O of 0.25-200 (in extraction) and A/O of 0.25-10 (in back-extraction mode). The developed contactor exhibited nearly 100% efficiency for all the cases. (authors)

  20. Prognostic and Diagnostic Technology for DC Actuated Contactors and Motor Starters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin; Zou, Lian; Briggs, Roger

    Unpredicted contactor failure can interrupt production and affect the uptime and throughput of manufacturing. Usually the life of a contactor is based on the manufacturers' life test data. However, due to the way of how the contactor is operated and the environment it is operated in, the working life of a contactor can vary significantly. In this paper, a novel technology has been investigated to predict potential failures of DC actuated contactors by monitoring their DC coil current and contactor currents. Three parameters are derived from this set of data to monitor the health of contactors: contact over-travel, armature pull-in time and coil current differential. Contact over-travel provides information on the remaining life of contacts and coil current differential provides indication of contact weld and carrier jam due to debris. The armature pull-in time provides information on contactor closing speed. Prototype contactors have been built and AC4 tests have been carried out for evaluation. Test results show that the contact over-travel parameter agrees well with contact mass loss data taken after contactors failed. The derived armature pull-in time agrees well with that measured by a laser displacement sensor. The defined parameters provide effective monitoring and prediction of potential contactor failures.

  1. Applicability of hydroxylamine nitrate reductant in pulse-column contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, D.J.

    1983-05-01

    Uranium and plutonium separations were made from simulated breeder reactor spent fuel dissolver solution with laboratory-sized pulse column contactors. Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) was used for reduction of plutonium (1V). An integrated extraction-partition system, simulating a breeder fuel reprocessing flowsheet, carried out a partial partition of uranium and plutonium in the second contactor. Tests have shown that acceptable coprocessing can be ontained using HAN as a plutonium reductant. Pulse column performance was stable even though gaseous HAN oxidation products were present in the column. Gas evolution rates up to 0.27 cfm/ft/sup 2/ of column cross section were tested and found acceptable.

  2. Cathodes Delivered for Space Station Plasma Contactor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station's (ISS) power system is designed with high-voltage solar arrays that typically operate at output voltages of 140 to 160 volts (V). The ISS grounding scheme electrically ties the habitat modules, structure, and radiators to the negative tap of the solar arrays. Without some active charge control method, this electrical configuration and the plasma current balance would cause the habitat modules, structure, and radiators to float to voltages as large as -120 V with respect to the ambient space plasma. With such large negative floating potentials, the ISS could have deleterious interactions with the space plasma. These interactions could include arcing through insulating surfaces and sputtering of conductive surfaces as ions are accelerated by the spacecraft plasma sheath. A plasma contactor system was baselined on the ISS to prevent arcing and sputtering. The sole requirement for the system is contained within a single directive (SSP 30000, paragraph 3.1.3.2.1.8): "The Space Station structure floating potential at all points on the Space Station shall be controlled to within 40 V of the ionospheric plasma potential using a plasma contactor." NASA is developing this plasma contactor as part of the ISS electrical power system. For ISS, efficient and rapid emission of high electron currents is required from the plasma contactor system under conditions of variable and uncertain current demand. A hollow cathode plasma source is well suited for this application and was, therefore, selected as the design approach for the station plasma contactor system. In addition to the plasma source, which is referred to as a hollow cathode assembly, or HCA, the plasma contactor system includes two other subsystems. These are the power electronics unit and the xenon gas feed system. The Rocketdyne Division of Boeing North American is responsible for the design, fabrication, assembly, test, and integration of the plasma contactor system. Because of

  3. Carbon Dioxide Absorption in a Membrane Contactor with Color Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantaleao, Ines; Portugal, Ana F.; Mendes, Adelio; Gabriel, Joaquim

    2010-01-01

    A pedagogical experiment is described to examine the physical absorption of gases, in this case carbon dioxide, in a hollow fiber membrane contactor (HFMC) where the absorption concentration profile can be followed by a color change. The HFMC is used to teach important concepts and can be used in interesting applications for students, such as…

  4. Rotating Biological Contactors (RBC's). Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zickefoose, Charles S.

    This student manual provides the textual material for a unit on rotating biological contactors (RBC's). Topic areas considered include: (1) flow patterns of water through RBC installations; (2) basic concepts (shaft and stage); (3) characteristics of biomass; (4) mechanical features (bearings, mechanical drive systems, and air drive systems); (5)…

  5. Effectiveness of Forestry Agency Personnel as Fire Prevention Contactors

    Treesearch

    M.L. Doolittle

    1980-01-01

    A major responsibility of county forest rangers in North Carolina is fire prevention. Personal contact with the public is essential to the successful performance of this function. A survey of 50 North Carolina rangers revealed that the degree of success for each ranger was directly related to the specific effort put forth as a contactor.

  6. Design Attributes and Scale Up Testing of Annular Centrifugal Contactors

    SciTech Connect

    David H. Meikrantz; Jack D. Law

    2005-04-01

    Annular centrifugal contactors are being used for rapid yet efficient liquid- liquid processing in numerous industrial and government applications. Commercialization of this technology began eleven years ago and now units with throughputs ranging from 0.25 to 700 liters per minute are readily available. Separation, washing, and extraction processes all benefit from the use of this relatively new commercial tool. Processing advantages of this technology include: low in-process volume per stage, rapid mixing and separation in a single unit, connection-in-series for multi-stage use, and a wide operating range of input flow rates and phase ratios without adjustment. Recent design enhancements have been added to simplify maintenance, improve inspection ability, and provide increased reliability. Cartridge-style bearing and mechanical rotary seal assemblies that can include liquid-leak sensors are employed to enhance remote operations, minimize maintenance downtime, prevent equipment damage, and extend service life. Clean-in-place capability eliminates the need for disassembly, facilitates the use of contactors for feed clarification, and can be automated for continuous operation. In nuclear fuel cycle studies, aqueous based separations are being developed that efficiently partition uranium, actinides, and fission products via liquid-liquid solvent extraction. Thus, annular centrifugal contactors are destined to play a significant role in the design of such new processes. Laboratory scale studies using mini-contactors have demonstrated feasibility for many such separation processes but validation at an engineering scale is needed to support actual process design.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Absorption in a Membrane Contactor with Color Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantaleao, Ines; Portugal, Ana F.; Mendes, Adelio; Gabriel, Joaquim

    2010-01-01

    A pedagogical experiment is described to examine the physical absorption of gases, in this case carbon dioxide, in a hollow fiber membrane contactor (HFMC) where the absorption concentration profile can be followed by a color change. The HFMC is used to teach important concepts and can be used in interesting applications for students, such as…

  8. Advanced electric propulsion and space plasma contactor research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.

    1987-01-01

    A theory of the plasma contacting process is described and experimental results obtained using three different hollow cathode-based plasma contactors are presented. The existence of a sheath across which the bulk of the voltage drop associated with the contacting process occurs is demonstrated. Test results are shown to agree with a model of a spherical, space-charge-limited double sheath. The concept of ignited mode contactor operation is discussed, which is shown to enhance contactor efficiency when it is collecting electrons. An investigation of the potentials in the plasma plumes downstream of contactors operating at typical conditions is presented. Results of tests performed on hollow cathodes operating at high interelectrode pressures (up to about 1000 Torr) on ammonia are presented and criteria that are necessary to ensure that the cathode will operate properly in this regime are presented. These results suggest that high pressure hollow cathode operation is difficult to achieve and that special care must be taken to assure that the electron emission region remains diffuse and attached to the low work function insert. Experiments conducted to verify results obtained previously using a ring cusp ion source equipped with a moveable anode are described and test results are reported. A theoretical study of hollow cathode operation at high electron emission currents is presented. Preliminary experiments using the constrained sheath optics concept to achieve ion extraction under conditions of high beam current density, low net accelerating voltage and well columniated beamlet formation are discussed.

  9. Examination of Organic Carryover from 2-cm Contactors to Support the Modular CSSX Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Charles A.; Norato, Michael A.; Walker; D. Douglas; Pierce, Robert A.; Eubanks, Ronnye A.; Clark, James D.; Smith, Wilson M. Jr.; Crump, Stephen L.; Nelson, D. Zane; Fink, Samuel D.; Peters, Thomas B.; May, Cecil G.; Herman, David T.; Bolton, Henry L.

    2005-04-29

    A bank of four 2-cm centrifugal contactors was operated in countercurrent fashion to help address questions about organic carryover for the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). The contactors, having weirs sized for strip operation, were used to examine carryover for both strip effluent (SE) and decontaminated salt solution (DSS). Since only one bank of contactors was available in the short time frame of this work, the organic phase and only one aqueous phase were present in the flow loops at a time. Personnel maintained flowsheet-typical organic phase to aqueous phase (O:A) flow ratios when varying flow rates. Solvent from two different batches were tested with strip solution. In addition, potential mitigations of pH adjustment and coalescing media were examined. The experiment found that organic carryover after decanting averaged 220 ppm by mass with a range of 74 to 417 ppm of Isopar{reg_sign} L for strip effluent (SE)/organic solvent contacts. These values are based on measured modifier. Values were bounded by a value of 95 ppm based upon Isopar{reg_sign} L values as reported. The higher modifier-based numbers are considered more reliable at this time. Carryover of Isopar{reg_sign} L in DSS simulant averaged 77 ppm by mass with a range of 70 to 88 ppm of Isopar{reg_sign} L based on modifier content. The carryover was bounded by a value of 19 ppm based upon Isopar{reg_sign} L values as reported. More work is needed to resolve the discrepancy between modifier and Isopar{reg_sign} L values. The work did not detect organic droplets greater than 18 microns in SE. Strip output contained droplets down to 0.5 micron in size. Droplets in DSS were almost monodisperse by comparison, having a size range 4.7 +/- 1.6 micron in one test and 5.2 +/- 0.8 micron in the second demonstration. Optical microscopy provided qualitative results confirming the integrity of droplet size measurements in this work. Acidic or basic adjustments of aqueous strip solution

  10. Oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification-denitrification (OLAND) in a rotating biological contactor treating high-salinity wastewater.

    PubMed

    Windey, Kim; De Bo, Inge; Verstraete, Willy

    2005-11-01

    A lab-scale rotating biological contactor (RBC) reactor operated under OLAND conditions was slowly adapted during 178 days to increasing salt concentrations going up to 30 g NaCl L(-1). The reactor performed well during this experimental period. However, the removal capacity of the reactor was lower under high-salinity conditions. A removal efficiency of 84% was achieved at a N loading rate of 725 mg N L(-1) d(-1) and a salt concentration of 30 g L(-1). The effect of salt shock loading and adaptation to 30 g NaCl L(-1) on the specific nitritation and anammox activity of the biomass was investigated in short-term batch experiments. A salt shock loading of 30 g L(-1) caused a 43% decrease in specific nitritation activity and 96% loss of specific anammox activity compared to reference biomass (not exposed to salt). The salt-adapted biomass (3-4 weeks) showed a specific nitritation activity that was 23% lower, and a specific anammox activity that was 58% lower, compared to the reference biomass. Overall, these results demonstrate that the OLAND process can have the potential to treat ammonium-rich brines after adaptation to high salinity.

  11. High Current 270 VDC Contactor and Current Sensor System Design and Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    HVDC contactor. Eaton Corporation has developed a design, completed a critical design review, developed a test plan, constructed the prototype test...4 DISCUSSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS, CONCLUSIONS 4.1 Discussions and Recommendations The HVDC contactor incorporates an arc chute with a permanent...power supply failed and required repair. The dielectric withstands voltage of the HVDC contactor was reduced below the acceptable limits of the

  12. Modelling of nitric acid and U(VI) Co-extraction in annular centrifugal contactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubert, E. T.; Jobson, M.; Birket, J. E.; Denniss, I. S.; May, I.

    2000-07-01

    British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL) is currently developing novel flow sheets for an advanced PUREX process using centrifugal contactors. This technology provides two major advantages. Firstly, centrifugal contactors can process high throughputs of liquid, while being an equipment of small size, compared to pulsed columns for example. Secondly, during the reprocessing of actinides with diluted tributyl phosphate (TBP) solutions, centrifugal contactors also minimize solvent hydrolysis and radiolysis because of the very short contact times involved.

  13. Thirty Stage Annular Centrifugal Contactor Thermal Profile Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    David H. Meikrantz; Troy G. Garn; Jack D. Law

    2010-02-01

    A thirty stage 5 cm annular centrifugal contactor cascade has been assembled and tested to obtain thermal profiles during both ambient and heated input conditions of operation. Thermocouples were installed on every stage as well as feed inputs and Real-time data was taken during experiments lasting from two to eight hours at total flow rates of 0.5 to 1.4 liters per minute. Ambient temperature profile results show that only a small amount of heat is generated by the mechanical energy of the contactors. Steady state temperature profiles mimic the ambient temperature of the lab but are higher toward the middle of the cascade. Heated inlet solutions gave temperature profiles with smaller temperature gradients, more driven by the temperature of the inlet solutions than ambient lab temperature. Temperature effects of solution mixing, even at rotor speeds of 4000 rpm, were not measurable.

  14. Centrifugal contactor operations for UREX process flowsheet. An update

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Candido; Vandegrift, George F.

    2014-08-01

    The uranium extraction (UREX) process separates uranium, technetium, and a fraction of the iodine from the other components of the irradiated fuel in nitric acid solution. In May 2012, the time, material, and footprint requirements for treatment of 260 L batches of a solution containing 130 g-U/L were evaluated for two commercial annular centrifugal contactors from CINC Industries. These calculated values were based on the expected volume and concentration of fuel arising from treatment of a single target solution vessel (TSV). The general conclusions of that report were that a CINC V-2 contactor would occupy a footprint of 3.2 m 2 (0.25 m x 15 m) if each stage required twice the nominal footprint of an individual stage, and approximately 1,131 minutes or nearly 19 hours is required to process all of the feed solution. A CINC V-5 would require approximately 9.9 m 2 (0.4 m x 25 m) of floor space but would require only 182 minutes or ~ 3 hours to process the spent target solution. Subsequent comparison with the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) at Savannah River Site (SRS) in October 2013 suggested that a more compact arrangement is feasible, and the linear dimension for the CINC V-5 may be reduced to about 8 m; a comparable reduction for the CINC V-2 yields a length of 5 m. That report also described an intermediate-scale (10 cm) contactor design developed by Argonne in the early 1980s that would better align with the SHINE operations as they stood in May 2012. In this report, we revisit the previous evaluation of contactor operations after discussions with CINC Industries and analysis of the SHINE process flow diagrams for the cleanup of the TSV, which were not available at the time of the first assessment.

  15. Biological Treatment of Composition B Wastewaters. 1. Rotating Biological Contactor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Hazardous Materials Agency ATTN: AMXTH-TE-D Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5401 2 Commander Holston Army Ammunition Plant ATTN: SMCHO-EN Kingsport ...NA pilot-scale rotating biological contactor (RBC) was used to treat wastewaters from explosives production at Holston Army Ammunition Plant . At...waters will be similar to those from Holston Army kimunition Plant (HSAAP), presently the sole domestic source of RDX and S...... Aithoiigh more than

  16. Membrane contactor assisted extraction/reaction process employing ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Yupo J [Naperville, IL; Snyder, Seth W [Lincolnwood, IL

    2012-02-07

    The present invention relates to a functionalized membrane contactor extraction/reaction system and method for extracting target species from multi-phase solutions utilizing ionic liquids. One preferred embodiment of the invented method and system relates to an extraction/reaction system wherein the ionic liquid extraction solutions act as both extraction solutions and reaction mediums, and allow simultaneous separation/reactions not possible with prior art technology.

  17. Corrosion abatement in sulfuric acid alkylation unit horizontal contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Schutt, H.U.

    1999-03-01

    A leak to the atmosphere in the hydraulic end cone of a horizontal contactor and the realization that basic corrosion data are not available for high-throughput process conditions in alkylation units prompted a laboratory study to develop the lacking expertise. Corrosion in the horizontal contractor of an alkylation unit was mitigated successfully by saturating fresh alkylation acid with ferrous sulfate (FeSO{sub 4}).

  18. Hollow cathode heater development for the Space Station plasma contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1993-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been selected for use on the Space Station. During the operation of the plasma contactor, the hollow cathode heater will endure approximately 12000 thermal cycles. Since a hollow cathode heater failure would result in a plasma contactor failure, a hollow cathode heater development program was established to produce a reliable heater design. The development program includes the heater design, process documents for both heater fabrication and assembly, and heater testing. The heater design was a modification of a sheathed ion thruster cathode heater. Three heaters have been tested to date using direct current power supplies. Performance testing was conducted to determine input current and power requirements for achieving activation and ignition temperatures, single unit operational repeatability, and unit-to-unit operational repeatability. Comparisons of performance testing data at the ignition input current level for the three heaters show the unit-to-unit repeatability of input power and tube temperature near the cathode tip to be within 3.5 W and 44 degrees C, respectively. Cyclic testing was then conducted to evaluate reliability under thermal cycling. The first heater, although damaged during assembly, completed 5985 ignition cycles before failing. Two additional heaters were subsequently fabricated and have completed 3178 cycles to date in an on-going test.

  19. Integration issues of a plasma contactor Power Electronics Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; York, Kenneth W.; Bowers, Glen E.

    1995-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor is baselined on International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) for spacecraft charge control. The plasma contactor system consists of a hollow cathode assembly (HCA), a power electronics unit (PEU), and an expellant management unit (EMU). The plasma contactor has recently been required to operate in a cyclic mode to conserve xenon expellant and extend system life. Originally, a DC cathode heater converter was baselined for a continuous operation mode because only a few ignitions of the hollow cathode were expected. However, for cyclic operation, a DC heater supply can potentially result in hollow cathode heater component failure due to the DC electrostatic field. This can prevent the heater from attaining the proper cathode tip temperature for reliable ignition of the hollow cathode. To mitigate this problem, an AC cathode heater supply was therefore designed, fabricated, and installed into a modified PEU. The PEU was tested using resistive loads and then integrated with an engineering model hollow cathode to demonstrate stable steady-state operation. Integration issues such as the effect of line and load impedance on the output of the AC cathode heater supply and the characterization of the temperature profile of the heater under AC excitation were investigated.

  20. Integration issues of a plasma contactor Power Electronics Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; York, Kenneth W.; Bowers, Glen E.

    1995-06-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor is baselined on International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) for spacecraft charge control. The plasma contactor system consists of a hollow cathode assembly (HCA), a power electronics unit (PEU), and an expellant management unit (EMU). The plasma contactor has recently been required to operate in a cyclic mode to conserve xenon expellant and extend system life. Originally, a DC cathode heater converter was baselined for a continuous operation mode because only a few ignitions of the hollow cathode were expected. However, for cyclic operation, a DC heater supply can potentially result in hollow cathode heater component failure due to the DC electrostatic field. This can prevent the heater from attaining the proper cathode tip temperature for reliable ignition of the hollow cathode. To mitigate this problem, an AC cathode heater supply was therefore designed, fabricated, and installed into a modified PEU. The PEU was tested using resistive loads and then integrated with an engineering model hollow cathode to demonstrate stable steady-state operation. Integration issues such as the effect of line and load impedance on the output of the AC cathode heater supply and the characterization of the temperature profile of the heater under AC excitation were investigated.

  1. Functional testing of the space station plasma contactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Hamley, John A.; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Soulas, George C.

    1995-03-01

    A plasma contactor system has been baselined for the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) to control the electrical potentials of surfaces to eliminate/mitigate damaging interactions with the space environment. The system represents a dual-use technology which is a direct outgrowth of the NASA electric propulsion program and, in particular, the technology development effort on ion thruster systems. The plasma contactor subsystems include a hollow cathode assembly, a power electronics unit, and an expellant management unit. Under a pre-flight development program these subsystems are being developed to the level of maturity appropriate for transfer to U.S. industry for final development. Development efforts for the hollow cathode assembly include design selection and refinement, validating its required lifetime, and quantifying the cathode performance and interface specifications. To date, cathode components have demonstrated over 10,000 hours lifetime, and a hollow cathode assembly has demonstrated over 3,000 ignitions. Additionally, preliminary integration testing of a hollow cathode assembly with a breadboard power electronics unit has been completed. This paper discusses test results and the development status of the plasma contactor subsystems for ISSA, and in particular, the hollow cathode assembly.

  2. Integration issues of a plasma contactor power electronics unit

    SciTech Connect

    Pinero, L.R.; York, K.W.; Bowers, G.E.

    1995-12-31

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor is baselined on International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) for spacecraft charge control. The plasma contactor system consists of a hollow cathode assembly (HCA), a power electronics unit (PEU), and an expellant management unit (EMU). The plasma contactor has recently been required to operate in a cyclic mode to conserve xenon expellant and extend system life. Originally, a DC cathode heater converter was baselined for a continuous operation mode because only a few ignitions of the hollow cathode were expected. However, for cyclic operation, a DC heater supply can potentially result in hollow cathode heater component failure due to the DC electrostatic field. This can prevent the heater from attaining the proper cathode tip temperature for reliable ignition of the hollow cathode. To mitigate this problem, an AC cathode heater supply was therefore designed, fabricated, and installed into a modified PEU. The PEU was tested using resistive loads and then integrated with an engineering model hollow cathode to demonstrate stable steady-state operation. Integration issues such as the effect of line and load impedance on the output of the AC cathode heater supply and the characterization of the temperature profile of the heater under AC excitation were investigated.

  3. A Computer Model for Teaching the Dynamic Behavior of AC Contactors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, J.-R. R.; Espinosa, A. G.; Romeral, L.

    2010-01-01

    Ac-powered contactors are extensively used in industry in applications such as automatic electrical devices, motor starters, and heaters. In this work, a practical session that allows students to model and simulate the dynamic behavior of ac-powered electromechanical contactors is presented. Simulation is carried out using a rigorous parametric…

  4. Plasma contactor modeling with NASCAP/LEO - Extending laboratory results to space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    In the laboratory, hollow cathode-based plasma contactors have been observed to both emit and collect ampere-level electron currents with low impedance. The laboratory behavior of hollow cathode-based plasma contactors and the limited space experience with hollow cathodes suggest that, for many applications, a hollow cathode-based plasma contactor is the ideal device to provide electrical connection with the space plasma. In order to confidently extend the laboratory experience to the low-earth-orbit environment, a series of plasma contactor computer models has been developed. Calculations show that a hollow cathode plasma contactor that collects 0.5 A in the laboratory will only collect 2.4 mA in space. The simplest way to boost the collected current is to increase the gas flow. A mole of gas is enough to collect ampere level currents for 5-1/2 hours.

  5. THE TESTING OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE ENGINEERING AND PLANT SCALE ANNULAR CENTRIFUGAL CONTACTORS FOR THE PROCESSING OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; David Meikrantz; Troy Garn; Nick Mann; Scott Herbst

    2006-10-01

    Annular centrifugal contactors are being evaluated for process scale solvent extraction operations in support of United State Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative goals. These contactors have the potential for high stage efficiency if properly employed and optimized for the application. Commercially available centrifugal contactors are being tested at the Idaho National Laboratory to support this program. Hydraulic performance and mass transfer efficiency have been measured for portions of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle using 5-cm diameter annular centrifugal contactors. Advanced features, including low mix sleeves and clean-in-place rotors, have also been evaluated in 5-cm and 12.5-cm contactors.

  6. Extended residence time centrifugal contactor design modification and centrifugal contactor vane plate valving apparatus for extending mixing zone residence time

    DOEpatents

    Wardle, Kent E.

    2017-06-06

    The present invention provides an annular centrifugal contactor, having a housing adapted to receive a plurality of flowing liquids; a rotor on the interior of the housing; an annular mixing zone, wherein the annular mixing zone has a plurality of fluid retention reservoirs with ingress apertures near the bottom of the annular mixing zone and egress apertures located above the ingress apertures of the annular mixing zone; and an adjustable vane plate stem, wherein the stem can be raised to restrict the flow of a liquid into the rotor or lowered to increase the flow of the liquid into the rotor.

  7. Liquid–Liquid Mixing Studies in Annular Centrifugal Contactors Comparing Stationary Mixing Vane Options

    SciTech Connect

    Wardle, Kent E.

    2015-11-10

    Comparative studies of multiphase operation of annular centrifugal contactors showing the impact of housing stationary mixing vane configuration. A number of experimental results for several different mixing vane options are reported with selected measurements in a lab-scale 5 cm contactor and 12.5 cm engineering-scale unit. Fewer straight vanes give greater mixingzone hold-up compared to curved vanes. Quantitative comparison of droplet size distribution also showed a significant decrease in mean diameter for four straight vanes versus eight curved vanes. This set of measurements gives a compelling case for careful consideration of mixing vane geometry when evaluating hydraulic operation and extraction process efficiency of annular centrifugal contactors.

  8. Liquid–liquid mixing studies in annular centrifugal contactors comparing stationary mixing vane options

    SciTech Connect

    Wardle, Kent E.

    2015-09-11

    Comparative studies of multiphase operation of an annular centrifugal contactor show the impact of housing stationary mixing vane configuration. A number of experimental results for several different mixing vane options are reported for operation of a 12.5 cm engineering-scale contactor unit. Fewer straight vanes give greater mixing-zone hold-up compared to curved vanes. Quantitative comparison of droplet size distribution also showed a significant decrease in mean diameter for four straight vanes versus eight curved vanes. This set of measurements gives a compelling case for careful consideration of mixing vane geometry when evaluating hydraulic operation and extraction process efficiency of annular centrifugal contactors.

  9. Indicators for technological, environmental and economic sustainability of ozone contactors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Tejada-Martinez, Andres E; Lei, Hongxia; Zhang, Qiong

    2016-09-15

    Various studies have attempted to improve disinfection efficiency as a way to improve the sustainability of ozone disinfection which is a critical unit process for water treatment. Baffling factor, CT10, and log-inactivation are commonly used indicators for quantifying disinfection credits. However the applicability of these indicators and the relationship between these indicators have not been investigated in depth. This study simulated flow, tracer transport, and chemical species transport in a full-scale ozone contactor operated by the City of Tampa Water Department and six other modified designs using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Through analysis of the simulation results, we found that baffling factor and CT10 are not optimal indicators of disinfection performance. We also found that the relationship between effluent CT obtained from CT transport simulation and baffling factor depends on the location of ozone release. In addition, we analyzed the environmental and economic impacts of ozone contactor designs and upgrades and developed a composite indicator to quantify the sustainability in technological, environmental and economic dimensions.

  10. Ammonia recovery from landfill leachate using hydrophobic membrane contactors.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Míriam C S; Magalhães, Nátalie C; Moravia, Wagner G; Ferreira, Carolina D

    2016-11-01

    This article aims to evaluate membrane contactors capability to remove and recover ammonia from landfill leachate (LFL). A hydrophobic hollow fiber membrane module was used to achieve such purpose. A sulfuric acid diluted solution was used as extraction solution to speed up ammonia content removal. Several factors that have influence on ammonia removal and recovery capability such as ammonia solution pH, concentration of sulfuric acid solutions and flow rate of liquid phases have been examined. Microfiltration was the method used as pretreatment. The results have shown that membrane contactor operated with LFL (pH 10), 0.1 M acid solution and liquid flow rate up to 0.5 L min(-1) achieved 99.9% of ammonia removal, which corresponds to 79.1% of ammonia recovery from the extraction solution, and it is capable to produce highly purified ammonium sulfate solutions (41.2%, wt wt(-1)) to be used as fertilizer. The concentration of total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) in the residual LFL complies with Brazilian law requirements of 20.0 mg L(-1) of TAN, regarding the disposal of effluents.

  11. Extraction of phenol in wastewater with annular centrifugal contactors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin-Quan; Duan, Wu-Hua; Zhou, Xiu-Zhu; Zhou, Jia-Zhen

    2006-04-17

    Solvent extraction is an effective way to treat and recover the phenolic compounds from the high content phenolic wastewater at present. The experimental study on treating the wastewater containing phenol has been carried out with QH-1extractant (the amine mixture) and annular centrifugal contactors. The distribution ratio of phenol was 108.6 for QH-1-phenol system. The mass-transfer process of phenol for the system was mainly controlled by diffusion. When the flow ratio (aqueous/organic) was changed from 1/1 to 4/1, the rotor speed was changed from 2500 to 4000 r/min, and the total flow of two phases was changed from 20 to 70 mL/min, the mass-transfer efficiency E of the single-stage centrifugal contactor was more than 95%. When the flow ratio was changed from 4.4/1 to 4.9/1, the rotor speed was 3000 r/min, and the total flow of two phases was changed from 43.0 to 47.0 mL/min, the extraction rate rho of the three-stage cascade was more than 99%. When 15% NaOH was used for stripping of phenol in QH-1, the stripping efficiency of the three-stage cascade was also more than 99% under the experimental conditions.

  12. Hollow fiber gas-liquid membrane contactors for acid gas capture: a review.

    PubMed

    Mansourizadeh, A; Ismail, A F

    2009-11-15

    Membrane contactors using microporous membranes for acid gas removal have been extensively reviewed and discussed. The microporous membrane acts as a fixed interface between the gas and the liquid phase without dispersing one phase into another that offers a flexible modular and energy efficient device. The gas absorption process can offer a high selectivity and a high driving force for transport even at low concentrations. Using hollow fiber gas-liquid membrane contactors is a promising alternative to conventional gas absorption systems for acid gas capture from gas streams. Important aspects of membrane contactor as an efficient energy devise for acid gas removal including liquid absorbents, membrane characteristics, combination of membrane and absorbent, mass transfer, membrane modules, model development, advantages and disadvantages were critically discussed. In addition, current status and future potential in research and development of gas-liquid membrane contactors for acid gas removal were also briefly discussed.

  13. Identification And Characterization Of The Solids Found In Extraction Contactor SEP-401 In June 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F. F.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-12-10

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) recently conducted an outage that included maintenance on the centrifugal contactors. Operations personnel observed solids or deposits in two contactors and attempted to collect samples for analyses by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The residues found in Extraction Contactor SEP-401 are a mixture of amorphous silica, aluminosilicate, titanium, and debris from low alloy steel. The solids contain low concentrations of plutonium and strontium. These isotopes are associated with the titanium that came from the monosodium titanate (MST) added in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) most likely as leached Ti from the MST that precipitated subsequently in MCU. An attempt was also made to obtain samples from the contents of Wash Contactor SEP-702. However, sampling provide ineffective.

  14. OZONE CONTACTOR FLOW VISUALIZATION AND CHARACTERIZATION USING 3-DIMENSIONAL LASER INDUCED FLUORESCENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrodynamics of ozone contactors have a crucial impact on efficient inactivation of pathogens such as Cryptosporidium as well as control of disinfection byproducts such as bromate. Improper mixing behaviors including short-circuiting, internal recirculation and presence...

  15. OZONE CONTACTOR FLOW VISUALIZATION AND CHARACTERIZATION USING 3-DIMENSIONAL LASER INDUCED FLUORESCENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrodynamics of ozone contactors have a crucial impact on efficient inactivation of pathogens such as Cryptosporidium as well as control of disinfection byproducts such as bromate. Improper mixing behaviors including short-circuiting, internal recirculation and presence...

  16. Rotating arc cutoff with a Fluarc switch or a Rollarc contactor in SF6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duplay, C.

    1983-05-01

    The principles of rotating arc cutoff are reviewed, and applications to circuit breakers and contactors are indicated. The Rollarc (trademark) contactor offers high cutoff power (10 KA at 7.2 KV) and an extremely low level of overvoltage. The Fluorarc (trademark) circuit breaker is similar to the Rollarc, using a magnetic coil to shift the arc, but uses knife switches which are separated from the coil/arc assembly. Fluorarc is sealed for life, and requires no maintenance.

  17. Status of Hollow Cathode Heater Development for the Space Station Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been selected for use on the Space Station. During the operation of the plasma contactor, the hollow cathode heater will endure approximately 12000 thermal cycles. Since a hollow cathode heater failure would result in a plasma contactor failure, a hollow cathode heater development program was established to produce a reliable heater. The development program includes the heater design, process documents for both heater fabrication and assembly, and heater testing. The heater design was a modification of a sheathed ion thruster cathode heater. Heater tests included testing of the heater unit alone and plasma contactor and ion thruster testing. To date, eight heaters have been or are being processed through heater unit testing, two through plasma contactor testing and three through ion thruster testing, all using direct current power supplies. Comparisons of data from heater unit performance tests before cyclic testing, plasma contactor tests, and ion thruster tests at the ignition input current level show the average deviation of input power and tube temperature near the cathode tip to be +/-0.9 W and +/- 21 C, respectively. Heater unit testing included cyclic testing to evaluate reliability under thermal cycling. The first heater, although damaged during assembly, completed 5985 ignition cycles before failing. Four additional heaters successfully completed 6300, 6300, 700, and 700 cycles. Heater unit testing is currently ongoing for three heaters which have to date accumulated greater than 7250, greater than 5500, and greater than 5500 cycles, respectively.

  18. An investigation of conducted and radiated emissions from a hollow-cathode plasma contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchholtz, Brett W.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation conducted on the electrical interference induced by the operation of a hollow-cathode plasma contractor in a ground-based facility is described. The types of electrical interference, or noise, which are important to Space Station Freedom designers are classified as either conducted or radiated emissions. The procedures required to perform conducted and radiated emission measurements on a plasma contactor are examined. The experimental data obtained are typically examined in the frequency domain (i.e. amplitudes of the noise fluctuations versus frequency). Results presented indicate the conducted emissions, which are the current fluctuations from the contactor into the space station wiring, are affected by operating parameters such as expellant flow rate and discharge current. The radiated emissions, which are the electromagnetic waves induced and emitted by the contactor, appear to be influenced by the contactor emission current. Other experimental results suggest possible sources which are responsible for the observed noise. For example, the influence of the plasma environment downstream from the contactor on noise emission levels is described. In addition, a brief discussion is given on the correlation between conducted and radiated emissions and the mechanisms through which both are influenced by the plasma downstream of the contactor.

  19. Stripping of acetone from water with microfabricated and membrane gas-liquid contactors.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Achilleas; Ghiotto, Francesco; Lam, Koon Fung; Gavriilidis, Asterios

    2014-01-07

    Stripping of acetone from water utilizing nitrogen as a sweeping gas in co-current flow was conducted in a microfabricated glass/silicon gas-liquid contactor. The chip consisted of a microchannel divided into a gas and a liquid chamber by 10 μm diameter micropillars located next to one of the channel walls. The channel length was 35 mm, the channel width was 220 μm and the microchannel depth 100 μm. The micropillars were wetted by the water/acetone solution and formed a 15 μm liquid film between them and the nearest channel wall, leaving a 195 μm gap for gas flow. In addition, acetone stripping was performed in a microchannel membrane contactor, utilizing a hydrophobic PTFE membrane placed between two microstructured acrylic plates. Microchannels for gas and liquid flows were machined in the plates and had a depth of 850 μm and 200 μm respectively. In both contactors the gas/liquid interface was stabilized: in the glass/silicon contactor by the hydrophilic micropillars, while in the PTFE/acrylic one by the hydrophobic membrane. For both contactors separation efficiency was found to increase by increasing the gas/liquid flow rate ratio, but was not affected when increasing the inlet acetone concentration. Separation was more efficient in the microfabricated contactor due to the very thin liquid layer employed.

  20. Cost/performance comparison between pulse columns and centrifugal contactors designed to process Clinch River Breeder Reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ciucci, J.A. Jr.

    1983-12-01

    A comparison between pulse columns and centrifugal contactors was made to determine which type of equipment was more advantageous for use in the primary decontamination cycle of a remotely operated fuel reprocessing plant. Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) fuel was chosen as the fuel to be processed in the proposed 1 metric tonne/day reprocessing facility. The pulse columns and centrifugal contactors were compared on a performance and total cost basis. From this comparison, either the pulse columns or the centrifugal contactors will be recommended for use in a fuel reprocessing plant built to reprocess CRBR fuel. The reliability, solvent exposure to radiation, required time to reach steady state, and the total costs were the primary areas of concern for the comparison. The pulse column units were determined to be more reliable than the centrifugal contactors. When a centrifugal contactor motor fails, it can be remotely changed in less than one eight hour shift. Pulse columns expose the solvent to approximately five times as much radiation dose as the centrifugal contactor units; however, the proposed solvent recovery system adequately cleans the solvent for either case. The time required for pulse columns to reach steady state is many times longer than the time required for centrifugal contactors to reach steady state. The cost comparison between the two types of contacting equipment resulted in centrifugal contactors costing 85% of the total cost of pulse columns when the contactors were stacked on three levels in the module. If the centrifugal contactors were all positioned on the top level of a module with the unoccupied volume in the module occupied by other equipment, the centrifugal contactors cost is 66% of the total cost of pulse columns. Based on these results, centrifugal contactors are recommended for use in a remotely operated reprocessing plant built to reprocess CRBR fuel.

  1. Discharge ignition behavior of the Space Station plasma contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Hamley, John A.

    1995-01-01

    Ignition testing of hollow cathode assemblies being developed for the Space Station plasma contactor system has been initiated to validate reliable multiple restart capability. An ignition approach was implemented that was derived from an earlier arcjet program that successfully demonstrated over 11,600 ignitions. For this, a test profile was developed to allow accelerated cyclic testing at expected operating conditions. To date, one hollow cathode assembly has been used to demonstrate multiple ignitions. A prototype hollow cathode assembly has achieved 3,615 successful ignitions at a nominal anode voltage of 18.0 V. During the ignition testing several parameters were investigated, of which the heater power and pre-heat time were the only parameters found to significantly impact ignition rate.

  2. Simulation of citric acid production by rotating disk contactor.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, A; Imai, H; Takenaka, Y; Sakakibara, M

    1997-12-20

    A simple model was presented to describe the time courses of citric acid production by a rotating disc contactor (RDC) using Aspergillus niger. The model is expressed by Monod-type cell growth, Luedeking-Piret-type citric acid production rate equations, and the diffusion equation for oxygen in the biofilm. The model contains five parameters which were determined by the nonlinear least squares method by fitting the numerical solution to the experimental data. In solving the equations, the cell density of the biofilm was estimated from the value of cellular mass per unit of biofilm area using an empirical equation. The experimental time courses in citric acid production period were well simulated with this model. The relation between the specific biofilm surface area and the rate of citric acid production was also explained by the simulation using the average values of five parameters of twelve runs. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 56: 689-696, 1997.

  3. Performance analysis of rotating disc contactor (RDC) column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiffah, Wan Nurul; Aisyah, Siti; Fashihah, Nor; Anuar, Khairil

    2014-06-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction is one of the most important separation processes. Different kinds of liquid-liquid extrator such as Rotating Disc Contactor (RDC) Column being used in industries. The study of liquid-liquid extraction in an RDC column has be come a very important subject to be discussed not just amongst chemical engineers but mathematicans as well. In this study, the performance of small diameter column RDC using the chemical system involving cumene/isobutryric asid/water are analyzed by the method of design of the experiments (DOE). DOE are applied to estimated the effect of four independent variable; protor speed, flow rate, concentration of continuous inlet and dispersed inlet and their interaction factor to detemine the most significant factor that effect the concentration of continuous and dispersed outlet as output parameters.

  4. Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor Process

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Howard; Zhou, S James; Ding, Yong; Bikson, Ben

    2012-03-31

    This report summarizes progress made during Phase I and Phase II of the project: "Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor Process," under contract DE-FE-0000646. The objective of this project is to develop a practical and cost effective technology for CO{sub 2} separation and capture for pre-combustion coal-based gasification plants using a membrane contactor/solvent absorption process. The goals of this technology development project are to separate and capture at least 90% of the CO{sub 2} from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants with less than 10% increase in the cost of energy services. Unlike conventional gas separation membranes, the membrane contactor is a novel gas separation process based on the gas/liquid membrane concept. The membrane contactor is an advanced mass transfer device that operates with liquid on one side of the membrane and gas on the other. The membrane contactor can operate with pressures that are almost the same on both sides of the membrane, whereas the gas separation membranes use the differential pressure across the membrane as driving force for separation. The driving force for separation for the membrane contactor process is the chemical potential difference of CO{sub 2} in the gas phase and in the absorption liquid. This process is thus easily tailored to suit the needs for pre-combustion separation and capture of CO{sub 2}. Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and PoroGen Corporation (PGC) have developed a novel hollow fiber membrane technology that is based on chemically and thermally resistant commercial engineered polymer poly(ether ether ketone) or PEEK. The PEEK membrane material used in the membrane contactor during this technology development program is a high temperature engineered plastic that is virtually non-destructible under the operating conditions encountered in typical gas absorption applications. It can withstand contact with most of the common treating

  5. Application of hollow fiber membrane contactors for catalyst recovery in the WPO process.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Inmaculada; Urtiaga, Ane; Abellán, M José; San Román, Fresnedo

    2003-03-01

    In this work the use of a membrane based liquid extraction process for recovery of the homogeneous catalyst employed in the wet peroxide oxidation process (WPO) is studied. In the WPO process the oxidation agent is the hydroxyl radical that is obtained by using a combination of hydrogen peroxide and a mixture of Fe(II), Cu(II), and Mn(II) in aqueous solution. The mixture of metallic cations permits the almost total degradation of the refractory organic compounds, but the use of metallic salts as catalysts induces additional pollution. To recover the homogeneous catalyst of the WPO process by means of non-dispersive solvent extraction (NDSX) two hollow fiber membrane contactors are employed, one for the extraction step and the second for the back-extraction step. From the initial assays, the extractant LIX 622N was selected for Cu(II) recovery and Cyanex 272 for Fe(II) and Mn(II) recovery. Selective separation of Fe(II) and Mn(II) can be obtained by adjusting the pH of the feed aqueous phase. The three metals are stripped using sulfuric acid to give concentrated solutions of CuSO(4), FeSO(4), and MnSO(4) that can be recycled to the formulation of the catalyst solution of the WPO process. A mathematical model has been proposed to describe the recovery of Cu. Two design parameters are required: the membrane mass transport coefficient of the extraction and stripping modules (k(m) = 3.07 x 10(-7) m/sec) and the equilibrium parameter of the extraction reaction (K(Ex) = 0.0832).

  6. Bath Salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Bath Salts KidsHealth > For Teens > Bath Salts Print A A ... Someone Quit? Avoiding Bath Salts What Are Bath Salts? The name "bath salts" sounds innocent, but don' ...

  7. ISS And Space Environment Interactions Without Operating Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Ferguson, Dale; Suggs,Rob; McCollum, Matt

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will be the largest, highest power spacecraft placed in orbit. Because of this the design of the electrical power system diverged markedly from previous systems. The solar arrays will operate at 160 V and the power distribution voltage will be 120 V. The structure is grounded to the negative side of the solar arrays so under the right circumstances it is possible to drive the ISS potential very negative. A plasma contactor has been added to the ISS to provide control of the ISS structure potential relative to the ambient plasma. The ISS requirement is that the ISS structure not be greater than 40 V positive or negative of local plasma. What are the ramifications of operating large structures with such high voltage power systems? The application of a plasma contactor on ISS controls the potential between the structure and the local plasma, preventing degrading effects. It is conceivable that there can be situations where the plasma contactor might be non-functional. This might be due to lack of power, the need to turn it off during some of the build-up sequences, the loss of functionality for both plasma contactors before a replacement can be installed, similar circumstances. A study was undertaken to understand how important it is to have the contactor functioning and how long it might be off before unacceptable degradation to ISS could occur. The details of interaction effects on spacecraft have not been addressed until driven by design. This was true for ISS. If the structure is allowed to float highly negative impinging ions can sputter exposed conductors which can degrade the primary surface and also generate contamination due to the sputtered material. Arcing has been known to occur on solar arrays that float negative of the ambient plasma. This can also generate electromagnetic interference and voltage transients. Much of the ISS structure and pressure module surfaces exposed to space is anodized aluminum. The anodization

  8. ISS And Space Environment Interactions Without Operating Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Ferguson, Dale; Suggs,Rob; McCollum, Matt

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will be the largest, highest power spacecraft placed in orbit. Because of this the design of the electrical power system diverged markedly from previous systems. The solar arrays will operate at 160 V and the power distribution voltage will be 120 V. The structure is grounded to the negative side of the solar arrays so under the right circumstances it is possible to drive the ISS potential very negative. A plasma contactor has been added to the ISS to provide control of the ISS structure potential relative to the ambient plasma. The ISS requirement is that the ISS structure not be greater than 40 V positive or negative of local plasma. What are the ramifications of operating large structures with such high voltage power systems? The application of a plasma contactor on ISS controls the potential between the structure and the local plasma, preventing degrading effects. It is conceivable that there can be situations where the plasma contactor might be non-functional. This might be due to lack of power, the need to turn it off during some of the build-up sequences, the loss of functionality for both plasma contactors before a replacement can be installed, similar circumstances. A study was undertaken to understand how important it is to have the contactor functioning and how long it might be off before unacceptable degradation to ISS could occur. The details of interaction effects on spacecraft have not been addressed until driven by design. This was true for ISS. If the structure is allowed to float highly negative impinging ions can sputter exposed conductors which can degrade the primary surface and also generate contamination due to the sputtered material. Arcing has been known to occur on solar arrays that float negative of the ambient plasma. This can also generate electromagnetic interference and voltage transients. Much of the ISS structure and pressure module surfaces exposed to space is anodized aluminum. The anodization

  9. Membrane contactor assisted water extraction system for separating hydrogen peroxide from a working solution, and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Seth W.; Lin, Yupo J.; Hestekin' Jamie A.; Henry, Michael P.; Pujado, Peter; Oroskar, Anil; Kulprathipanja, Santi; Randhava, Sarabjit

    2010-09-21

    The present invention relates to a membrane contactor assisted extraction system and method for extracting a single phase species from multi-phase working solutions. More specifically one preferred embodiment of the invention relates to a method and system for membrane contactor assisted water (MCAWE) extraction of hydrogen peroxide (H.sub.2O.sub.2) from a working solution.

  10. Evaluating hydraulic and disinfection efficiencies of a full-scale ozone contactor using a RANS-based modeling framework.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Tejada-Martínez, Andrés E; Zhang, Qiong; Lei, Hongxia

    2014-04-01

    The capability of predicting hydraulic and disinfection efficiencies of ozone disinfection contactors is essential for evaluating existing contactors and improving future designs. Previous attempts based on ideal and non-ideal models for the hydraulics and simplified mechanisms for chemical reaction modeling have resulted in low accuracy and are restricted to contactors with simple geometries. This manuscript develops a modeling framework for the ozonation process by combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with a kinetics-based reaction modeling for the first time. This computational framework has been applied to the full-scale ozone contactor operated by the City of Tampa Water Department. Flow fields, residence time distribution, ozone concentration distribution, and concentration-contact time (CT) distribution within the contactor have been predicted via the computational framework. The predictions of ozone and bromate concentrations at sample points agree well with physical experimental data measured in the contactor. The predicted CT values at the contactor outlet demonstrate that the disinfection performance of the ozone contactor operated by the City of Tampa Water Department is sufficient to meet regulation requirements. The impact of seasonal flow rate change on disinfection performance is found to be significant and deserves attention during the management and operation of a water treatment plant.

  11. Development of a Power Electronics Unit for the Space Station Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamley, John A.; Hill, Gerald M.; Patterson, Michael J.; Saggio, Joseph, Jr.; Terdan, Fred; Mansell, Justin D.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode plasma contactor has been baselined as a charge control device for the Space Station (SS) to prevent deleterious interactions of coated structural components with the ambient plasma. NASA LeRC Work Package 4 initiated the development of a plasma contactor system comprised of a Power Electronics Unit (PEU), an Expellant Management Unit (EMU), a command and data interface, and a Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU). A breadboard PEU was designed and fabricated. The breadboard PEU contains a cathode heater and discharge power supply, which were required to operate the PCU, a control and auxiliary power converter, an EMU interface, a command and telemetry interface, and a controller. The cathode heater and discharge supplies utilized a push-pull topology with a switching frequency of 20 kHz and pulse-width-modulated (PWM) control. A pulse ignition circuit derived from that used in arcjet power processors was incorporated in the discharge supply for discharge ignition. An 8088 based microcontroller was utilized in the breadboard model to provide a flexible platform for controller development with a simple command/data interface incorporating a direct connection to SS Mulitplexer/Demultiplexer (MDM) analog and digital I/O cards. Incorporating this in the flight model would eliminate the hardware and software overhead associated with a 1553 serial interface. The PEU autonomously operated the plasma contactor based on command inputs and was successfully integrated with a prototype plasma contactor unit demonstrating reliable ignition of the discharge and steady-state operation.

  12. Emulsion-liquid-membrane extraction of copper using a hollow-fiber contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S.Y.B.; Wiencek, J.M.

    1998-03-01

    A novel extraction technique using an emulsion liquid membrane within a hollow-fiber contactor was developed and utilized to extract copper using LIX 84 extractant. Emulsion liquid membranes are capable of extracting metals from dilute waste streams to levels much below those possible by equilibrium-limited solvent extraction. Utilizing an emulsion liquid membrane within a hollow-fiber contactor retains the advantages of emulsion-liquid-membrane extraction, namely, simultaneous extraction and stripping, while eliminating problems encountered in dispersive contacting methods, such as swelling and leakage of the liquid membrane. Mathematical models for extraction in hollow-fiber contactors were developed. The models satisfactorily predict the outcome of both simple solvent extraction and emulsion-liquid-membrane extraction of copper by LIX 84 in a hollow-fiber contactor over a wide range of conditions. Emulsion-liquid-membrane extraction performs exceptionally well when the extraction is close to equilibrium limit. It is also capable of extracting a solute f/rom very dilute solutions. Stability of the liquid membrane is not crucial when used in hollow-fiber contactors; the surfactant in liquid membrane can be reduced or even eliminated without severely impairing the performance.

  13. Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of Engineering Scale Centrifugal Contactors

    SciTech Connect

    David Meikrantz; Troy Garn; Nick Mann; Jack Law; Terry Todd

    2007-09-01

    Annular centrifugal contactors (ACCs) are being evaluated for process-scale solvent extraction operations in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) separations goals. Process-scale annular centrifugal contactors have the potential for high stage efficiency if properly employed and optimized for the application. Hydraulic performance issues related to flow instability and classical flooding are likely unimportant, especially for units with high throughputs. However, annular mixing increases rapidly with increasing rotor diameter while maintaining a fixed g force at the rotor wall. In addition, for engineering/process-scale contactors, elevated rotor speeds and/or throughput rates, can lead to organic phase foaming at the rotor discharge collector area. Foam buildup in the upper rotor head area can aspirate additional vapor from the contactor housing resulting in a complete loss of separation equilibrium. Variable speed drives are thus desirable to optimize and balance the operating parameters to help ensure acceptable performance. Proper venting of larger contactors is required to balance pressures across individual stages and prevent vapor lock due to foam aspiration.

  14. Mass Transfer And Hydraulic Testing Of The V-05 And V-10 Contactors With The Next Generation Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D. T.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Peters, T. B.; Poirier, M. R.; Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-07-31

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facilities, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing differs from prior testing by utilizing a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the full (0.05 M) concentration of the MaxCalix as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. Stage efficiency and mass distribution ratios were determined by measuring Cs concentration in the aqueous and organic phases during single contactor testing. The nominal cesium distribution ratio, D(Cs) measured for extraction ranged from 37-60. The data showed greater than 96% stage efficiency for extraction. No significant differences were noted for operations at 4, 8 or 12 gpm aqueous salt simulant feed flow rates. The first scrub test (contact with weak caustic solution) yielded average scrub D(Cs) values of 3.3 to 5.2 and the second scrub test produced an average value of 1.8 to 2.3. For stripping behavior, the “first stage” D Cs) values ranged from 0.04 to 0.08. The efficiency of the low flow (0.27 gpm aqueous) was calculated to be 82.7%. The Spreadsheet

  15. ISS Plasma Contactor Units Operations During Strong Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alred, J.; Mikatarian, R.; Barsamian, H.; Minow, J.; Koontz, S.

    2003-12-01

    The large structure and high voltage arrays of the ISS represent a complex system that interacts with the Earth's ionosphere. To mitigate spacecraft charging problems on the ISS, two Plasma Contactor Units discharge ionized xenon gas to "clamp" the potential of the ISS with respect to the low Earth orbit plasma. The Plasma Interaction Model, a model of ISS plasma interaction developed from the basic physics of the interaction phenomena, includes magnetic induction effects, plasma temperature and density effects, interaction of the high voltage solar arrays with ionospheric plasma, and accounts for other conductive areas on the ISS. To augment this model, the PCU discharge current has been monitored for the ISS in a variety of flight attitudes as well as during the annual seasons. A review of the PCU discharge currents shows a correlation to the geomagnetic activity. The variation in the PCU discharge current during strong geomagnetic activity will be presented. Also, the PCU discharge currents during periods of low geomagnetic activity will be discussed. The presentation will conclude with a comparison of satellite plasma measurements during different stages of geomagnetic activity.

  16. Advanced electric propulsion and space plasma contactor research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments performed on an 8 cm dia. ring cusp magnetic field ion thruster are described. The results show the effects of anode and cathode position and size, ring cusp axial location and discharge chamber length on plasma ion energy cost and extracted ion fraction. Thruster performance is shown to be improved substantially when optimum values of these parameters are used. Investigations into the basic plasma phenomena associated with the process of plasma contacting are described. The results show the process of electron collection from a background plasma to a hollow cathode plasma contactor exhibits a higher impedance than the process of electron emission from the hollow cathode. The importance of having cold ions present to facilitate the plasma contacting process is shown. Results of experiments into the behavior of hollow cathodes operating at high interelectrode pressures (up to approx. 100 Torr) on nitrogen and ammonia are presented. They suggest that diffuse emission from the insert of a hollow cathode can be sustained at high interelectrode pressures if the cathode is made of non-conducting material and the cathode internal pressure is reduced by evacuating the cathode interior. A theoretical model of discharge chamber operation developed for inert gas thrusters is extended so it can be used to evaluste the performance of mercury ion thrusters. Predictions of the model are compared to experimental results obtained on two 30 cm dia. thrusters.

  17. Groundwater treatment in a field pilot methanotrophic rotating biological contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Belcher, D.M.; Vira, A.; Dooley, M.A.; Johnson, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    A pilot-scale rotating biological contactor (RBC) was operated under field conditions for approximately 1 month to remove chlorinated and nonchlorinated organic compounds from groundwater. Methanotrophic conditions were successfully established and maintained in the RBC during the field program. Results of the pilot program indicated that low concentrations of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride could be treated to below the maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) of 70 ad 2 {micro}g/L, respectively. Maximum removal rates for cis-DCE and vinyl chloride measured during the pilot study were 2.14 {micro}g cis-DCE/ft{sup 2} disc media-minute (952 {micro}g cis-DCE/mg volatile solids [VS]-day) and 0.3 {micro}g vinyl chloride/ft{sup 2}-minute (143 {micro}g vinyl chloride/mg VS-day), respectively. Chlorinated ethene removal efficiencies decreased after the first 2 weeks of operation. Low concentrations of toluene, ethylbenzene, and total xylenes (TEX) were effectively removed from groundwater throughout the course of the pilot study. The maximum observed TEX removal rate was 3.0 {micro}g TEX/ft{sup 2}-minute.

  18. Life Cycle Tests on a Hollow Cathode Based Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Schneider, Todd A.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta II unmanned expendable booster with a mission duration of 12 days. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta II second stage and collects current from the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma, and a Hollow Cathode Plasma Contactor (HCPC) emits the collected electrons from the Delta II, completing the electrical circuit to the ambient plasma. The HCPC for the ProSEDS mission have made it necessary to turn off the HCPC once a minute throughout the entire mission. Because of the unusual operating requirements by the ProSEDS mission, an engineering development unit of the HCPC was built to demonstrate the HCPC design would start reliably for the life of the ProSEDS mission. During the life test the engineering unit cycled for over 10,000 on/off cycles without missing a single start, and during that same test the HCPC unit demonstrated the capability to emit 0 to 5 A electron emission current. The performance of the HCPC unit during this life test will be discussed.

  19. Life Cycle Tests on a Hollow Cathode Based Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Schneider, Todd A.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta II unmanned expendable booster with a mission duration of 12 days. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta II second stage and collects current from the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma, and a Hollow Cathode Plasma Contactor (HCPC) emits the collected electrons from the Delta II, completing the electrical circuit to the ambient plasma. The HCPC for the ProSEDS mission have made it necessary to turn off the HCPC once a minute throughout the entire mission. Because of the unusual operating requirements by the ProSEDS mission, an engineering development unit of the HCPC was built to demonstrate the HCPC design would start reliably for the life of the ProSEDS mission. During the life test the engineering unit cycled for over 10,000 on/off cycles without missing a single start, and during that same test the HCPC unit demonstrated the capability to emit 0 to 5 A electron emission current. The performance of the HCPC unit during this life test will be discussed.

  20. Liquid–liquid mixing studies in annular centrifugal contactors comparing stationary mixing vane options

    DOE PAGES

    Wardle, Kent E.

    2015-09-11

    Comparative studies of multiphase operation of an annular centrifugal contactor show the impact of housing stationary mixing vane configuration. A number of experimental results for several different mixing vane options are reported for operation of a 12.5 cm engineering-scale contactor unit. Fewer straight vanes give greater mixing-zone hold-up compared to curved vanes. Quantitative comparison of droplet size distribution also showed a significant decrease in mean diameter for four straight vanes versus eight curved vanes. This set of measurements gives a compelling case for careful consideration of mixing vane geometry when evaluating hydraulic operation and extraction process efficiency of annular centrifugalmore » contactors.« less

  1. Extended test of a xenon hollow cathode for a space plasma contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    Implementation of a hollow cathode plasma contactor for charge control on the Space Station has required validation of long-life hollow cathodes. A test series of hollow cathodes and hollow cathode plasma contactors was initiated as part of the plasma contactor development program. An on-going wear-test of a hollow cathode has demonstrated cathode operation in excess of 4700 hours with small changes in operating parameters. The discharge experienced 4 shutdowns during the test, all of which were due to test facility failures or expellant replenishment. In all cases, the cathode was reignited at approximately 42 volts and resumed typical operation. This test represents the longest demonstrated stable operation of a high current (greater than 1A) xenon hollow cathode reported to date.

  2. Continuing life test of a xenon hollow cathode for a space plasma contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    Implementation of a hollow cathode plasma contactor for charge control on the Space Station has required validation of long-life hollow cathodes. A test series of hollow cathodes and hollow cathode plasma contactors was initiated as part of the plasma contactor development program. An on-going wear-test of a hollow cathode has demonstrated cathode operation in excess of 10,000 hours with small changes in operating parameters. The discharge has experienced 10 shutdowns during the test, all of which were due to test facility failures or expellant replenishment. In all cases, the cathode was re-ignited at approximately 42 volts and resumed typical operation. This test represents the longest demonstrated stable operation of a high current (greater than 1 A) xenon hollow cathode reported to date.

  3. Application of PTFE membrane for ammonia removal in a membrane contactor.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Y T; Hwang, Y H; Shin, H S

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of a membrane contactor system for ammonia removal was studied. The mass transfer coefficient was used to quantitatively compare the effect of various operation conditions on ammonia removal efficiency. Effective removal of ammonia was possible with a Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane contactor system at all tested conditions. Among the various operation parameters, contact time and solution pH showed significant effect on the ammonia removal mechanism. The overall ammonia removal rate was not affected by influent suspended solution concentration unlike other pressure driven membrane filtration processes. Also the osmotic distillation phenomena which deteriorate the mass transfer efficiency can be minimized by preheating of influent wastewater. A membrane contactor system can be a possible alternative to treat high strength nitrogen wastewater by optimizing operation conditions such as stripping solution flow rate, influent wastewater temperature, and influent pH.

  4. Apparatus for supporting contactors used in extracting nuclear materials from liquids

    DOEpatents

    Leonard, Ralph A.; Frank, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for supporting one or more contactor stages used to remove radioactive materials from aqueous solutions. The contactor stages include a housing having an internal rotor, a motor secured to the top of the housing for rotating the rotor, and a drain in the bottom of the housing. The support apparatus includes two or more vertical members each secured to a ground support that is horizontal and perpendicular to the frame member, and a horizontally disposed frame member. The frame member may be any suitable shape, but is preferably a rectangular tube having substantially flat, spaced top and bottom surfaces separated by substantially vertical side surfaces. The top and bottom surfaces each have an opening through which the contactor housing is secured so that the motor is above the frame and the drain is below the frame during use.

  5. Separation of boric acid in liquid waste with anion exchange membrane contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.K.; Lee, K.J.

    1995-12-31

    In order to separate boric acid in liquid waste, some possible technologies were investigated and the membrane contactor without dispersion and density differences was selected. The separation experiments on a Celgard 3401{reg_sign} hydrophilic microporous membrane contactor were first performed to obtain the basic data and to determine the properties of the contactor. The experimental conditions were as follows: boric acid concentrations up to 2.0 M, pH 7.0, temperatures of 25 and 55 C, and flow rates of 100, 300, 500, and 800 cm{sup 3}/min. Secondly, an AFN{reg_sign} anion exchange membrane contactor was tested at temperatures of 40 and 55 C and flow rate 400 cm{sup 3}/min. Boric acid solutions were prepared by the same method as that for Celgard 3401{reg_sign} but contained 5.0{times}10{sup {minus}4} M cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}). To simulate membrane contractors, parameters such as the differential diffusion coefficients of boric acid and the mass transfer coefficients in the AFN membrane were measured, and regression models estimating the diffusion coefficient at several conditions were developed. The Celgard 3401{reg_sign} membrane contactor was simulated and compared with experimental data. Simulation results agreed with the experimental data well when a proper correction factor was utilized. The correction factor was independent of the solution temperature and was 8.75 at the flow rates of 300--800 cm{sup 3}/min. This correction factor was also applied to simulate the AFN{reg_sign} resulted in a good agreement with experiment at 40 C, but not 55 C. The retention on cobalt was also better at 40 c than 55 C. The simulating computer program was also applied to a life size contactor designed conceptually.

  6. Reliability Optimization Design for Contact Springs of AC Contactors Based on Adaptive Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sheng; Su, Xiuping; Wu, Ziran; Xu, Chengwen

    The paper illustrates the procedure of reliability optimization modeling for contact springs of AC contactors under nonlinear multi-constraint conditions. The adaptive genetic algorithm (AGA) is utilized to perform reliability optimization on the contact spring parameters of a type of AC contactor. A method that changes crossover and mutation rates at different times in the AGA can effectively avoid premature convergence, and experimental tests are performed after optimization. The experimental result shows that the mass of each optimized spring is reduced by 16.2%, while the reliability increases to 99.9% from 94.5%. The experimental result verifies the correctness and feasibility of this reliability optimization designing method.

  7. Design, performance, and evaluation of a direct-current contactor for space nuclear electrical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, L. A.; Medwid, D. W.; Koutnik, E. A.; Powell, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    A direct-current contactor for use in large space power systems was designed, built, and tested. It was developed to be operational in an environment of 540 C and at a pressure of 0.0001 N/sq m or lower. The contactor is rated to pass 10 A continuously and to interrupt a 20-A current at 10,000 V. It was tested to determine the corona threshold level and the leakage current at different temperatures. Also, it was tested for its closing and interruption ability.

  8. Modeling multicomponent gas separation using hollow-fiber membrane contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, D.T.; Freeman, B.D.; Fleming, G.K.

    1998-06-01

    A model developed for multicomponent gas separation using hollow-fiber contactors permits simulation of cocurrent, countercurrent, and crossflow contacting patterns with permeate purging (or sweep). The numerical approach proposed permits simulation to much higher stage cuts than previously published work and provides rapid and stable solutions for cases with many components, with widely varying permeability coefficients. This new approach also permits the rational and straightforward incorporation of effects such as permeate sweep, pressure-dependent permeability coefficients, and bore side pressure gradients. Simulation results are presented for separation of commercially significant multicomponent gas mixtures using polymer permeation properties similar to those of polysulfone. The effect of permeate purging on separation performance is explored for air separation. The influence of pressure ratio on hydrogen separation performance for a refinery stream is presented. Air is modeled as a four-component mixture of O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O and the refinery stream contains five components: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, and C{sub 3}H{sub 8}. In air separation, permeate purging with a small fraction of the residue stream provides a very effective method for improving module efficiency for drying but is not efficient for improving nitrogen purity or recovery. In multicomponent mixtures, maxima in the compositions of components of intermediate permeability may be observed as a function of distance along the hollow fiber. This result suggests the use of membrane staging to capture these components at their maximum concentration.

  9. Surface-Roughness-Based Virtual Textiles: Evaluation Using a Multi-Contactor Display.

    PubMed

    Philpott, Matthew; Summers, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    Virtual textiles, generated in response to exploratory movements, are presented to the fingertip via a 24-contactor vibrotactile array. Software models are based on surface-roughness profiles from real textiles. Results suggest that distinguishable "textile-like" surfaces are produced, but these lack the necessary accuracy for reliable matching to real textiles.

  10. An experimental investigation of hollow cathode-based plasma contactors. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which describe operation of the plasma environment associated with a hollow cathod-based plasma contactor collecting electrons from or emitting them to an ambient, low density Maxwellian plasma. A one-dimensional, phenomenological model of the near-field electron collection process, which was formulated from experimental observations, is presented. It considers three regions, namely, a plasma cloud adjacent to the contactor, an ambient plasma from which electrons are collected, and a double layer region that develops between the contactor plasma cloud and the ambient plasma regions. Results of the electron emission experiments are also presented. An important observation is made using a retarding potential analyzer (RPA) which shows that high energy ions generally stream from a contactor along with the electrons being emitted. A mechanism for this phenomenon is presented and it involves a high rate of ionization induced between electrons and atoms flowing together from the hollow cathode orifice. This can result in the development of a region of high positive potential. Langmuir and RPA probe data suggest that both electrons and ions expand spherically from this hill region. In addition to experimental observations, a one-dimensional model which describes the electron emission process and predicts the phenomena just mentioned is presented and shown to agree qualitatively with these observations.

  11. Using 3D LIF to Investigate and Improve Performance of a Multichamber Ozone Contactor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (3DLIF) was applied to visualize and quantitatively analyze hydrodynamics and mixing in a multi-chamber ozone contactor, the most widely used design for water disinfection. The results suggested that the mixing was characterized by ext...

  12. Validation of a simple method for predicting the disinfection performance in a flow-through contactor.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Valentin; Barbeau, Benoit

    2014-02-01

    Despite its shortcomings, the T10 method introduced by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in 1989 is currently the method most frequently used in North America to calculate disinfection performance. Other methods (e.g., the Integrated Disinfection Design Framework, IDDF) have been advanced as replacements, and more recently, the USEPA suggested the Extended T10 and Extended CSTR (Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor) methods to improve the inactivation calculations within ozone contactors. To develop a method that fully considers the hydraulic behavior of the contactor, two models (Plug Flow with Dispersion and N-CSTR) were successfully fitted with five tracer tests results derived from four Water Treatment Plants and a pilot-scale contactor. A new method based on the N-CSTR model was defined as the Partially Segregated (Pseg) method. The predictions from all the methods mentioned were compared under conditions of poor and good hydraulic performance, low and high disinfectant decay, and different levels of inactivation. These methods were also compared with experimental results from a chlorine pilot-scale contactor used for Escherichia coli inactivation. The T10 and Extended T10 methods led to large over- and under-estimations. The Segregated Flow Analysis (used in the IDDF) also considerably overestimated the inactivation under high disinfectant decay. Only the Extended CSTR and Pseg methods produced realistic and conservative predictions in all cases. Finally, a simple implementation procedure of the Pseg method was suggested for calculation of disinfection performance.

  13. Theory of plasma contactors in ground-based experiments and low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerver, M. J.; Hastings, Daniel E.; Oberhardt, M. R.

    1990-01-01

    Previous theoretical work on plasma contactors as current collectors has fallen into two categories: collisionless double layer theory (describing space charge limited contactor clouds) and collisional quasineutral theory. Ground based experiments at low current are well explained by double layer theory, but this theory does not scale well to power generation by electrodynamic tethers in space, since very high anode potentials are needed to draw a substantial ambient electron current across the magnetic field in the absence of collisions (or effective collisions due to turbulence). Isotropic quasineutral models of contactor clouds, extending over a region where the effective collision frequency upsilon sub e exceeds the electron cyclotron frequency omega sub ce, have low anode potentials, but would collect very little ambient electron current, much less than the emitted ion current. A new model is presented, for an anisotropic contactor cloud oriented along the magnetic field, with upsilon sub e less than omega sub ce. The electron motion along the magnetic field is nearly collisionless, forming double layers in that direction, while across the magnetic field the electrons diffuse collisionally and the potential profile is determined by quasineutrality. Using a simplified expression for upsilon sub e due to ion acoustic turbulence, an analytic solution has been found for this model, which should be applicable to current collection in space. The anode potential is low and the collected ambient electron current can be several times the emitted ion current.

  14. Rotating biological contactors: Wastewater treatment. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning wastewater treatment using rotating biological contactors (RBC). Citations focus on reaction kinetics, operational modeling, and removal efficiencies. Biological oxygen demand (BOD) and nitrogen removal are discussed. Citations examine performance of RBCs in industrial and municipal applications. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  15. Membrane contactors in the beverage industry for controlling the water gas composition.

    PubMed

    Criscuoli, Alessandra; Drioli, Enrico; Moretti, Ugo

    2003-03-01

    In the work described here, membrane contactors are used for coupling the removal of species (oxygen and hydrogen sulfide) present in the water with the water carbonation process. We include both experiments and a theoretical study devoted to the analysis of the transport phenomena that occur in the membrane contactor. The main resistance to mass transport was located at the liquid side. Correlations between Sherwood and Reynolds numbers on the shell side that are suitable for the membrane contactor used to carry out our experiments have been determined. In particular, for Re > 1.6, the expression proposed by Yang and Cussler in 1986: Sh = 0.90 Re(0.40) Sc(0.33) describes the behavior of the system; whereas, for Re between 0.03 and 0.3, a new expression is proposed: Sh = 0.435 Re(1.2)Sc(0.33). A comparison with traditional equipment is also furnished. Membrane contactors offer reduced size, CO(2) consumption, and capital costs.

  16. Research News: Emulsion Liquid Membrane Extraction in a Hollow-Fiber Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.; Hu, Shih-Yao

    2000-01-01

    This article describes how ELMs (emulsion liquid membranes) can be used for extraction. The article addresses the disadvantages of ELM extraction in a stirred contactor, and the advantages of SELMs (supported emulsion liquid membranes). The introduction of the article provides background information on liquid-liquid solvent extraction and dispersion-free solvent extraction.

  17. Evaluation of high-efficiency gas liquid contactors for natural gas processing

    SciTech Connect

    Palla, N.; Lee, A.L.

    1995-06-01

    The objectives of this program are to develop and evaluate advanced processing technologies that can reduce the cost of upgrading sub quality natural gas to pipeline standards. The successful application of cost-effective, new technologies will facilitate the production of sub quality natural gas that otherwise would be too expensive to produce. The overall program is focused on the following activities: evaluation of the potential of structured packing for the removal of acid gases from natural gases, and expansion of the currently available database of the fluid dynamics of rotating gas liquid contactors. The natural gas sweetening, structured packing field tests are scheduled to be conducted in calendar year 1995. Design, procurement and construction of the field test unit. Expansion of the available data base on the hydraulic characteristics of a rotating gas-liquid contactor is being pursued through a series of laboratory experiments. A 100 GPM, low pressure rotary contactor system has been assembled at IGT`s Energy Development Center to examine the fluid dynamic behavior of this type of contactor. The studies are determining the effects of liquid viscosity, liquid surface tension and operating conditions on liquid residence times and flooding limits.

  18. Using 3D LIF to Investigate and Improve Performance of a Multichamber Ozone Contactor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (3DLIF) was applied to visualize and quantitatively analyze hydrodynamics and mixing in a multi-chamber ozone contactor, the most widely used design for water disinfection. The results suggested that the mixing was characterized by ext...

  19. International Space Station (ISS) Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) Utilization Plan Assessment Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Pellerano, Amri; Iannello, Christopher J.; Wollack, Edward J.; Wright, Kenneth H.; Garrett, Henry B.; Ging, Andrew T.; Katz, Ira; Keith, R. Lloyd; Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily M.; Schneider, Todd A.; Whittlesey, Albert C.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request to support the Assessment of the International Space Station (ISS) Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) Utilization Update. The NESC conducted an earlier assessment of the use of the PCU in 2009. This document contains the outcome of the assessment update.

  20. Research News: Emulsion Liquid Membrane Extraction in a Hollow-Fiber Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.; Hu, Shih-Yao

    2000-01-01

    This article describes how ELMs (emulsion liquid membranes) can be used for extraction. The article addresses the disadvantages of ELM extraction in a stirred contactor, and the advantages of SELMs (supported emulsion liquid membranes). The introduction of the article provides background information on liquid-liquid solvent extraction and dispersion-free solvent extraction.

  1. Temperature control in a 30 stage, 5-cm Centrifugal Contactor Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; Troy G. Garn; David H. Meikrantz

    2009-09-01

    Temperature profile testing was performed using a 30 stage 5-cm centrifugal contactor pilot plant. These tests were performed to evaluate the ability to control process temperature by adjusting feed solution temperatures. This would eliminate the need for complex jacketed heat exchanger installation on the centrifugal contactors. Thermocouples were installed on the inlet and outlets of each stage, as well as directly in the mixing zone of several of the contactor stages. Lamp oil, a commercially available alkane mixture of C14 to C18 chains, and tap water adjusted to pH 2 with nitric acid were the solution feeds for the temperature profile testing. Temperature data profiles for an array of total throughputs and contactor rpm values for both single-phase and two-phase systems were collected with selected profiles. The total throughput ranged from 0.5-1.4 L/min with rotor speeds from 3500-4000 rpm. Inlet solution temperatures ranging from ambient up to 50 °C were tested. Results of the two-phase temperature profile testing are detailed

  2. Evaluation of Argonne 9-cm and 10-cm Annular Centrifugal Contactors for SHINE Solution Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wardle, Kent E.; Pereira, Candido; Vandegrift, George

    2015-02-01

    Work is in progress to evaluate the SHINE Medical Technologies process for producing Mo-99 for medical use from the fission of dissolved low-enriched uranium (LEU). This report addresses the use of Argonne annular centrifugal contactors for periodic treatment of the process solution. In a letter report from FY 2013, Pereira and Vandegrift compared the throughput and physical footprint for the two contactor options available from CINC Industries: the V-02 and V-05, which have rotor diameters of 5 cm and 12.7 cm, respectively. They suggested that an intermediately sized “Goldilocks” contactor might provide a better balance between throughput and footprint to meet the processing needs for the uranium extraction (UREX) processing of the SHINE solution to remove undesired fission products. Included with the submission of this letter report are the assembly drawings for two Argonne-design contactors that are in this intermediate range—9-cm and 10-cm rotors, respectively. The 9-cm contactor (drawing number CE-D6973A, stamped February 15, 1978) was designed as a single-stage unit and built and tested in the late 1970s along with other size units, both smaller and larger. In subsequent years, a significant effort to developed annular centrifugal contactors was undertaken to support work at Hanford implementing the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process. These contactors had a 10-cm rotor diameter and were fully designed as multistage units with four stages per assembly (drawing number CMT-E1104, stamped March 14, 1990). From a technology readiness perspective, these 10-cm units are much farther ahead in the design progression and, therefore, would require significantly less re-working to make them ready for UREX deployment. Additionally, the overall maximum throughput of ~12 L/min is similar to that of the 9-cm unit (10 L/min), and the former could be efficiently operated over much of the same range of throughput. As a result, only the 10-cm units are considered here

  3. Evaluation of 5-cm Centrifugal Contactor Hydraulic and Mass Transfer Performance for Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction of Cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell, J.F.

    2001-09-12

    A test program has been conducted in which the use of pilot-scale centrifugal solvent extraction contactors for cesium removal from an alkaline waste stream has been successfully demonstrated. The program was designed specifically to evaluate the use of centrifugal contactors having 5-cm-diam rotors for the removal of cesium from alkaline high-level waste (HLW) that was generated and is being stored at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). The removal of cesium from this waste is highly desirable because it will reduce the volume of waste that must be treated and disposed of as HLW. The parameters applied in the test effort are those that have been established for the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process, a multistage extraction operation that has been designed by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). In the CSSX process, cesium is extracted by calix(4)arene-bis-(fert-octylbenzo-crown-6), commonly referred to as BOBCalixC6. The extract is scrubbed with dilute (0.05 M) nitric acid, both to remove coextracted elements (primarily potassium and sodium) and to adjust the pH of the extract to facilitate recovery of the cesium. The scrubbed solvent is contacted with 0.001 M HNO{sub 3}, which results in the stripping of the cesium from the solvent into the aqueous acid. The CSSX process flow rates have been established so to produce a cesium concentration in the strip effluent that is 12 to 15 times the concentration in the waste stream that enters the extraction section of the cascade. Results from initial hydraulic testing of a commercially available 5-cm contactor under CSSX conditions indicated that the mixing of feed solutions within the unit (which is critical to efficient solute transfer) was limited by a feature of the contactor that was designed to increase throughput and improve separation performance. In the design, phase separation is improved by reducing turbulence within the

  4. Evaluation of high-efficiency gas-liquid contactors for natural gas processing. Semi-annual report, April--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    Objective was to ensure reliable supply of high-quality natural gas by reducing the cost of treating subquality natural gas containing H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and/or trace quantities of other gaseous impurities by applying high-efficiency rotating and structured packing gas liquid contactors. The work included analysis of base case residence time, viscosity studies on low pressure rotary contactor system, and surface tension studies on the contactor.

  5. Temperature Profile Measurements in a Newly Constructed 30-Stage 5 cm Centrifugal Contactor pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; Dave H. Meikrantz; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D. Law

    2008-09-01

    An annular centrifugal contactor pilot plant incorporating 30 stages of commercial 5 cm CINC V-02 units has been built and operated at INL during the past year. The pilot plant includes an automated process control and data acquisitioning system. The primary purpose of the pilot plant is to evaluate the performance of a large number of inter-connected centrifugal contactors and obtain temperature profile measurements within a 30-stage cascade. Additional solvent extraction flowsheet testing using stable surrogates is also being considered. Preliminary hydraulic testing was conducted with all 30 contactors interconnected for continuous counter-current flow. Hydraulic performance and system operational tests were conducted successfully but with higher single-stage rotor speeds found necessary to maintain steady interstage flow at flowrates of 1 L/min and higher. Initial temperature profile measurements were also completed in this configuration studying the performance during single aqueous and two-phase counter-current flow at ambient and elevated inlet solution temperatures. Temperature profile testing of two discreet sections of the cascade required additional feed and discharge connections. Lamp oil, a commercially available alkane mixture of C14 to C18 chains, and tap water adjusted to pH 2 were the solution feeds for all the testing described in this report. Numerous temperature profiles were completed using a newly constructed 30-stage centrifugal contactor pilot plant. The automated process control and data acquisition system worked very well throughout testing. Temperature data profiles for an array of total flowrates (FT) and contactor rpm values for both single-phase and two-phase systems have been collected with selected profiles and comparisons reported. Total flowrates (FT) ranged from 0.5-1.4 L/min with rotor speeds from 3500-4000 rpm. Solution inlet temperatures ranging from ambient up to 50° C were tested. Ambient temperature testing shows that a

  6. The use of emulsions, microemulsions, and hollow fiber contactors as liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Wiencek, J.M.; Hu, S.Y.; Raghuraman, B.

    1995-12-01

    Liquid membranes as a generic concept have primarily involved the use of either porous solid film impregnated with a liquid carrier or emulsified systems employed in a stirred contactor. Although such systems can display high selectivities and reasonable flux, the stability of the liquid membrane to rupture (i.e. leakage) and unwanted water transport (i.e. swell) have limited their commercial application. Our lab has focused on developing improved emulsion liquid membranes. In particular, we have investigated the possibility of employing microemulsions as liquid membranes to separate metals (especially mercury) from contaminated water. Our most current work on the use of hollow fiber contactors as a means of minimizing swell and leakage in emulsion liquid membrane systems will also be presented.

  7. Theory of plasma contactors in ground-based experiments and low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerver, M. J.; Hastings, D. E.; Oberhardt, M. R.

    1990-01-01

    An examination of several models of electron collection by plasma contactors leads to a definition of the range of validity and applicability for each model. It is noted that most present ground-based experiments are of limited relevance to space applications of plasma contactors, since they operate in a regime where the magnetic field and effective collisions are at most only marginally important. An exception is the experiment of Stenzel and Urrutia (1986), which examined a plasma whose electron Larmor radius was small by comparison to the scale of the potential, and in which the anomalous transport of electrons across the magnetic field was important. The enhanced electron current was not continuous in time, but occurred in periodic bursts as the instabilities periodically emerged, saturated, and decayed.

  8. Numerical simulation of reactive extraction of benzoic acid from wastewater via membrane contactors.

    PubMed

    Ghadiri, Mehdi; Shirazian, Saeed

    2017-04-01

    Membrane-based non-dispersive solvent extraction is used in many chemical processes due to its significant benefits such as straightforward scale-up and low energy consumption. A mechanistic model was developed to predict recovery of benzoic acid (BA) from wastewater using membrane contactors. Model equations were derived for benzoic acid transport in the membrane module, and solved using FEM. The model findings were compared with experimental results, and an average deviation of 4% was observed between experimental and simulation results. Simulations showed that change in organic phase flowrate and initial concentration of BA does not have considerable effect on the removal efficiency of benzoic acid. In addition, increasing feed flowrate leads to the enhancement of convective mass transfer flux in the tube side of membrane contactor which decreases removal efficiency of benzoic acid.

  9. Hybrid multiphase CFD simulation for liquid-liquid interfacial area prediction in annular centrifugal contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wardle, K.E.

    2013-07-01

    Liquid-liquid contacting equipment used in solvent extraction processes has the dual purpose of mixing and separating two immiscible fluids. Consequently, such devices inherently encompass a wide variety of multiphase flow regimes. A hybrid multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver which combines the Eulerian multi-fluid method with VOF (volume of fluid) sharp interface capturing has been developed for application to annular centrifugal contactors. This solver has been extended to enable prediction of mean droplet size and liquid-liquid interfacial area through a single moment population balance method. Simulations of liquid-liquid mixing in a simplified geometry and a model annular centrifugal contactor are reported with droplet breakup/coalescence models being calibrated versus available experimental data. Quantitative comparison is made for two different housing vane geometries and it is found that the predicted droplet size is significantly smaller for vane geometries which result in higher annular liquid holdup.

  10. Measurement of Noise Produced by a Plasma Contactor Operating in Ground Based Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Steve

    1996-01-01

    Methods to measure electric field fluctuations accurately in a plasma with an active monopole antenna are described. It is shown that the conductive surfaces of the antenna must be adequately isolated from the ambient plasma and that the monopole must be sufficiently short to avoid antenna amplifier saturation. Experimental results illustrate that the noise produced by plasma contactor operation and sensed by the antenna is due to plasma phenomena and is not induced by laboratory power supplies. A good correlation is shown between the current fluctuations in the contactor electrical circuit and the noise detected by the antenna. A large body of experimental data support the conclusion that the majority of noise sensed by the antenna at frequencies less than 1 MHz is due to current fluctuations (electrostatic waves) in the plasma adjacent to the antenna and not to electromagnetic wave radiation. Caution is suggested when comparing antenna noise measurements to conventional specifications for radiated emissions.

  11. Liposome and niosome preparation using a membrane contactor for scale-up.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thi Thuy; Jaafar-Maalej, Chiraz; Charcosset, Catherine; Fessi, Hatem

    2012-06-01

    The scaling-up ability of liposome and niosome production, from laboratory scale using a syringe-pump device to a pilot scale using the membrane contactor module, was investigated. For this aim, an ethanol injection-based method was applied for liposome and niosome preparation. The syringe-pump device was used for laboratory scale batches production (30 ml for liposomes, 20 ml for niosomes) then a pilot scale (750 ml for liposomes, 1000 ml for niosomes) were obtained using the SPG membrane contactor. Resulted nanovesicles were characterized in terms of mean vesicles size, polydispersity index (PdI) and zeta potential. The drug encapsulation efficiency (E.E.%) was evaluated using two drug-models: caffeine and spironolactone, a hydrophilic and a lipophilic molecule, respectively. As results, nanovectors mean size using the syringe-pump device was comprised between 82 nm and 95 nm for liposomes and between 83 nm and 127 nm for niosomes. The optimal E.E. of caffeine within niosomes, was found around 9.7% whereas the spironolactone E.E. reached 95.6% which may be attributed to its lipophilic properties. For liposomes these values were about 9.7% and 86.4%, respectively. It can be clearly seen that the spironolactone E.E. was slightly higher within niosomes than liposomes. Optimized formulations, which offered smaller size and higher E.E., were selected for pilot scale production using the SPG membrane. It has been found that vesicles characteristics (size and E.E.%) were reproducible using the membrane contactor module. Thus, the current study demonstrated the usefulness of the membrane contactor as a device for scaling-up both liposome and niosome preparations with small mean sizes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Extraction with emulsion liquid membranes in a hollow-fiber contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Raghuraman, B.; Wiencek, J. . Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    Aqueous streams contaminated with heavy metal ions may be produced as effluents from industrial plants or during attempts to remediate solids loaded with heavy metals, such as contaminated soils. Metals of particular concern include copper, zinc, cadmium, nickel, mercury, lead, and chromium. An extraction system for heavy metals recovery from dilute waste streams, which can accomplish both extraction and stripping in one step, is an emulsion liquid membrane (ELM). The ELM extraction in a stirred contactor has two main disadvantages. On prolonged contact with the feed stream (greater than 10 min), the emulsion swells with water, increasing the internal-phase volume and in a stirred contactor the internal-phase contents leak into the feed stream because of membrane rupture. This work focuses on the use of microporous hollow-fiber contactors (HFC) as an alternate contacting method to direct batch/continuous dispersion of emulsion liquid membranes. This method of contact will retain the primary advantage that emulsion liquid membrane separations offer, namely, extraction and stripping in a single processing step which circumvents the limits of equilibrium inherent in conventional solvent extraction. However, because hollow-fiber membranes, by their design, allow for high surface area contacting without the high shear rates typically encountered with an agitator, this will result in improved efficiency of extraction by reducing membrane swelling and leakage.

  13. Entrainment of Solvent in Aqueous Stream from CINC V-5 Contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, S. D.; Restivo, M. L.; Peters, T. B.; Fowley, M. D.; Burns, D. B.; Smith, W. M. Jr.; Fondeur, F. F.; Crump, S. L.; Norato, M. A.; Herman, D. T.; Nash, C. A.

    2005-04-29

    Personnel completed a rapid study of organic entrainment during operation of a CINC V-5 contactor under prototypical conditions covering the range of expected MCU operation. The study only considered the entrainment of organic into the strip acid effluent destined for the Defense Waste Processing Facility. Based on this work, the following observations are noted: (1) Concentrations of total organic from the contactor discharge, based upon modifier measurements, in the acid typically averaged 330 ppm{sub m}, for a range to 190-610 ppm{sub m}. (2) Entrained droplet sizes remained below 18 microns for samples collected at the decanter outlet and below 11 microns for samples taken from the contactor discharge. (3) Scouting tests showed that a vendor coalescer material promotes coalescence of smaller size droplets from the decanter effluent. (4) Personnel observed a previously unreported organic impurity in the solvent used for this study. Additional efforts are needed to ascertain the source of the impurity and its implication on the overall process. (5) Process throughputs and planned operating conditions result in very stable hydraulics, suggesting that the MCU stripping stages will have spare operating capacity. (6) The V-5 contactors show operated with relatively cool surfaces under the planned operating conditions. (7) If operating conditions result in an imbalance of the relative mixing and separation conditions within the contactor, a very stable emulsion may result. In this instance, the emulsion remained stable for weeks. The imbalance in this study resulted from use of improperly sized weir plates. (8) Personnel demonstrated an effective means of recovering emulsified solvent following a non-optimal equipment configuration. The protocols developed may offer benefit for MCU and SWPF operations. (9) This study developed and demonstrated the effectiveness of several analytical methods for support of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction process including infrared

  14. Characterization of full-scale carbon contactors for siloxane removal from biogas using online Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, C A; Martin, B D; Simms, N; McAdam, E J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, online Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to generate the first comprehensive characterization of full-scale carbon contactors for siloxane removal from biogas. Using FTIR, two clear operational regions within the exhaustion cycle were evidenced: an initial period of pseudo-steady state where the outlet siloxane concentration was consistently below the proposed siloxane limits; and a second period characterized by a progressive rise in outlet siloxane concentration during and after breakthrough. Due to the sharp breakthrough front identified, existing detection methods (which comprise field sampling coupled with laboratory-based chromatographic determination) are insufficiently responsive to define breakthrough, thus carbon contactors currently remain in service while providing limited protection to the combined heat and power engine. Integration of the exhaustion cycle to breakthrough identified average specific media capacities of 8.5-21.5 gsiloxane kg(-1)GAC, which are lower than that has been reported for vapour phase granular activated carbon (GAC). Further speciation of the biogas phase identified co-separation of organic compounds (alkanes and aromatics), which will inevitably reduce siloxane capacity. However, comparison of the five full-scale contactors identified that greater media capacity was accessible through operating contactors at velocities sufficient to diminish axial dispersion effects. In addition to enabling significant insight into gas phase GAC contactors, the use of FTIR for online control of GAC for siloxane removal is also presented.

  15. Hydraulic and Clean-in-Place Evaluations for a 12.5-cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at INL

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; David H. Meikrantz; Nick R. Mann; Jack D. Law; Terry A. Todd

    2008-09-01

    Hydraulic and Clean-in-Place Evaluations for a 12.5 cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at the INL Troy G. Garn, Dave H. Meikrantz, Nick R. Mann, Jack D. Law, Terry A. Todd Idaho National Laboratory Commercially available, Annular Centrifugal Contactors (ACC) are currently being evaluated for processing dissolved nuclear fuel solutions to selectively partition integrated elements using solvent extraction technologies. These evaluations include hydraulic and clean-in-place (CIP) testing of a commercially available 12.5 cm unit. Data from these evaluations is used to support design of future nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. Hydraulic testing provides contactor throughput performance data on two-phase systems for a wide range of operating conditions. Hydraulic testing results on a simple two-phase oil and water system followed by a 30 % Tributyl phosphate in N-dodecane / nitric acid pair are reported. Maximum total throughputs for this size contactor ranged from 20 to 32 liters per minute without significant other phase carryover. A relatively new contactor design enhancement providing Clean-in-Place capability for ACCs was also investigated. Spray nozzles installed into the central rotor shaft allow the rotor internals to be cleaned, offline. Testing of the solids capture of a diatomaceous earth/water slurry feed followed by CIP testing was performed. Solids capture efficiencies of >95% were observed for all tests and short cold water cleaning pulses proved successful at removing solids from the rotor.

  16. PUMA - a new mathematical model for the rapid calculation of steady-state concentration profiles in mixer-settler extraction, partitioning, and stripping contactors using the Purex process

    SciTech Connect

    Geldard, J.F.

    1986-11-01

    The mathematical basis for a computer code PUMA (Plutonium-Uranium-Matrix-Algorithm) is described. The code simulates steady-state concentration profiles of solvent extraction contactors used in the Purex process, directly without first generating the transient behavior. The computational times are reduced, with no loss of accuracy, by about tenfold over those required by codes that generate the steady-state profiles via transient state conditions. Previously developed codes that simulate the steady-state conditions directly are not applicable to partitioning contactors, whereas PUMA is applicable to all contactors in the Purex process. Since most difficulties are encountered with partitioning contactors when simulating steady-state profiles via transient state conditions, it is with these contactors that the greatest saving in computer times is achieved.

  17. INNER SALTS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    been characterized include: (1) mesomeric phosphonium salts possessing phototropic properties; (2) pentavalent phosphorus compounds; and (3) a...Products that have been characterized include: (1) mesomeric phosphonium salts possessing phototropic properties; (2) pentavalent phosphorus compounds; and (3) a mesomeric inner salt. (Author)

  18. Operational Status of the International Space Station Plasma Contactor Hollow Cathode Assemblies July 2001 to May 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Yim, John T.; Patterson, Michael J.; Dalton, Penni J.

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station has onboard two Aerojet Rocketdyne developed plasma contactor units that perform the function of charge control. The plasma contactor units contain NASA Glenn Research Center developed hollow cathode assemblies. NASA Glenn Research Center monitors the on-orbit operation of the flight hollow cathode assemblies. As of May 31, 2013, HCA.001-F has been ignited and operated 123 times and has accumulated 8072 hours of operation, whereas, HCA.003-F has been ignited and operated 112 times and has accumulated 9664 hours of operation. Monitored hollow cathode ignition times and anode voltage magnitudes indicate that they continue to operate nominally.

  19. Operational Status of the International Space Station Plasma Contactor Hollow Cathode Assemblies from July 2011 to May 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Yim, John T.; Patterson, Michael J.; Dalton, Penni J.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station has onboard two Aerojet Rocketdyne developed plasma contactor units that perform the function of charge control. The plasma contactor units contain NASA Glenn Research Center developed hollow cathode assemblies. NASA Glenn Research Center monitors the onorbit operation of the flight hollow cathode assemblies. As of May 31, 2013, HCA.001-F has been ignited and operated 123 times and has accumulated 8072 hours of operation, whereas, HCA.003-F has been ignited and operated 112 times and has accumulated 9664 hours of operation. Monitored hollow cathode ignition times and anode voltage magnitudes indicate that they continue to operate nominally.

  20. Extraction and quantification of SO2 content in wines using a hollow fiber contactor.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Andrea; Romero, Julio; Silva, Wladimir; Morales, Elizabeth; Torres, Alejandra; Aguirre, María J

    2014-10-01

    Sulfites [Formula: see text] or sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a preservative widely used in fruits and fruit-derived products. This study aims to propose a membrane contactor process for the selective removal and recovery of SO2 from wines in order to obtain its reliable quantification. Currently, the aspiration and Ripper methods offer a difficult quantification of the sulfite content in red wines because they involve evaporation steps of diluted compounds and a colorimetric assay, respectively. Therefore, an inexpensive and accurate methodology is not currently available for continuous monitoring of SO2 in the liquids food industry. Red wine initially acidified at pH < 1 was treated by membrane extraction at 25 ℃. This operation is based on a hydrophobic Hollow Fiber Contactor, which separates the acidified red wine in the shell side and a diluted aqueous sodium hydroxide solution as receiving solution into the lumenside in countercurrent. Sulfite and bisulfite in the acidified red wine become molecular SO2, which is evaporated through the membrane pores filled with gas. Thus, SO2 is trapped in a colorless solution and the membrane contactor controls its transfer, decreasing experimental error induced in classical methods. Experimental results using model solutions with known concentration values of [Formula: see text] show an average extraction percentage of 98.91 after 4 min. On the other hand, two types of Chilean Cabernet Sauvignon wines were analyzed with the same system to quantify the content of free and total sulfites. Results show a good agreement between these methods and the proposed technique, which shows a lower experimental variability.

  1. Vacuum contactor retrofit of a low-voltage power circuit breaker

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    Due to a misapplication of low-voltage power circuit breakers on high-cycling motor-starting services, the electrically operated mechanisms failed due to the large number of spring-charging, closing and opening cycles. Various options for correcting the problem were evaluated, and a vacuum contactor retrofit of the circuit breaker was selected for some of them. The vacuum starter units are electrically and mechanically interchangeable with the power circuit breakers. The paper discusses the design considerations and operating differences resulting from the technology conversion. It also discusses the differences in rating, function, and application.

  2. Correlation of Hollow Cathode Assembly and Plasma Contactor Data from Ground Testing and In-Space Operation on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalkeski, Scott D.; Patterson, Michael J.; Soulas, George C.

    2001-01-01

    Charge control on the International Space Station (ISS) is currently being provided by two plasma contactor units (PCUs). The plasma contactor includes a hollow cathode assembly (HCA), power processing unit and Xe gas feed system. The hollow cathode assemblies in use in the ISS plasma contactors were designed and fabricated at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Prequalification testing of development HCAs as well as acceptance testing of the flight HCAs is presented. Integration of the HCAs into the Boeing North America built PCU and acceptance testing of the PCU are summarized in this paper. Finally, data from the two on-orbit PCUs is presented.

  3. A Review of Testing of Hollow Cathodes for the International Space Station Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Patterson, M. J.; Soulas, G. C.; Sarver-Verhey, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    Since October 2000, two plasma contactors have been providing charge control on the International Space Station (ISS). At the heart of each of the two plasma contactors is a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) that produces the contacting xenon plasma. The HCA is the result of 9 years of design and testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This paper summarizes HCA testing that has been performed to date. As of this time, one cathode has demonstrated approximately 28,000 hr of lifetime during constant, high current use. Another cathode, HCA.014. has demonstrated 42,000 ignitions before cathode heater failure. In addition to these cathodes, four cathodes. HCA.006, HCA.003, HCA.010, and HCA.013 have undergone cyclic testing to simulate the variable current demand expected on the ISS. HCA.006 accumulated 8,000 hr of life test operation prior to being voluntarily stopped for analysis before the flight units were fabricated. HCA.010 has accumulated 15,876 hr of life testing, and 4,424 ignitions during ignition testing. HCA.003 and HCA.0 13 have accumulated 12,415 and 18,823 hr of life testing respectively.

  4. Drop mass transfer in a microfluidic chip compared to a centrifugal contactor

    DOE PAGES

    Nemer, Martin B.; Roberts, Christine C.; Hughes, Lindsey G.; ...

    2014-06-13

    A model system was developed for enabling a multiscale understanding of centrifugal-contactor liquid–liquid extraction.The system consisted of Nd(III) + xylenol orange in the aqueous phase buffered to pH =5.5 by KHP, and dodecane + thenoyltrifluroroacetone (HTTA) + tributyphosphate (TBP) in the organic phase. Diffusion constants were measured for neodymium in both the organic and aqueous phases, and the Nd(III) partition coefficients were measured at various HTTA and TBP concentrations. A microfluidic channel was used as a high-shear model environment to observe mass-transfer on a droplet scale with xylenol orange as the aqueous-phase metal indicator; mass-transfer rates were measured quantitatively inmore » both diffusion and reaction limited regimes on the droplet scale. Lastly, the microfluidic results were comparable to observations made for the same system in a laboratory scale liquid–liquid centrifugal contactor, indicating that single drop microfluidic experiments can provide information on mass transfer in complicated flows and geometries.« less

  5. Calibrating and deriving physical parameters using plasma contactor data from the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bering, Edgar A.; Koontz, Steven L.; Evans, David S.; Katz, Ira; Gardner, Barbara M.; Suggs, Robert M.; Minow, Joseph I.; Dalton, Penni J.; Feruson, Dale C.; Hillard, G. Barry; Counts, Jerry L.; Barsamian, Hagop; Kern, John; Mikatarian, Ronald

    2003-12-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) regularly passes through the southern auroral oval south of Australia. The ISS has two plasma contactors that emit the electron currents needed to balance electron collection by surfaces such as the lattice of bare rods on the solar array masts. These electron currents exceed 0.1 A at times. The largest currents are observed in the auroral oval south of Australia. On the space station, the solar array 40 m long masts each have over 400 m of stainless steel tensioning rods. When subject to orbital v × B· l induced potentials, the rods collect substantial currents from the ionosphere. Maximum v × B· l potentials are generated near the magnetic poles. The plasma contactor emission current can be converted to an estimate of plasma density and calibrated using Floating Potential Probe (FPP) and other data. These measurements show that the plasma density in the nighttime auroral ionosphere is frequently several times that predicted by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI)-90 and IRI2001 models.

  6. Emergency membrane contactor based absorption system for ammonia leaks in water treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jiahui; Fang, Xuliang; He, Yiliang; Jin, Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Because of the suspected health risks of trihalomethanes (THMs), more and more water treatment plants have replaced traditional chlorine disinfection process with chloramines but often without the proper absorption system installed in the case of ammonia leaks in the storage room. A pilot plant membrane absorption system was developed and installed in a water treatment plant for this purpose. Experimentally determined contact angle, surface tension, and corrosion tests indicated that the sulfuric acid was the proper choice as the absorbent for leaking ammonia using polypropylene hollow fiber membrane contactor. Effects of several operating conditions on the mass transfer coefficient, ammonia absorption, and removal efficiency were examined, including the liquid concentration, liquid velocity, and feed gas concentration. Under the operation conditions investigated, the gas absorption efficiency over 99.9% was achieved. This indicated that the designed pilot plant membrane absorption system was effective to absorb the leaking ammonia in the model storage room. The removal rate of the ammonia in the model storage room was also experimentally and theoretically found to be primarily determined by the ammonia suction flow rate from the ammonia storage room to the membrane contactor. The ammonia removal rate of 99.9% was expected to be achieved within 1.3 h at the ammonia gas flow rate of 500 m3/h. The success of the pilot plant membrane absorption system developed in this study illustrated the potential of this technology for ammonia leaks in water treatment plant, also paved the way towards a larger scale application.

  7. Calibrating and deriving physical parameters using plasma contactor data from the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bering, E.

    The International Space Station (ISS) regularly passes through the southern auroral oval south of Australia. The ISS has two plasma contactors that emit the electron currents needed to balance electron collection by surfaces such as the lattice of bare rods on the solar array masts. These electron currents exceed 0.1 A at times. The largest currents are observed in the auroral oval south of Australia. On the space station, the solar array 40 m long masts each have over 400 m of stainless steel tensioning rods. When subject to orbital v×B-l induced potentials, the rods collect substantial currents from the ionosphere. Maximum v×B-l potentials are generated near the magnetic poles. The plasma contactor emission current can be converted to an estimate of plasma density and calibrated using Floating potential Probe (FPP) and other data. These measurements show that the plasma density in the nighttime auroral ionosphere is frequently several times that predicted by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI)-90 and IRI-2001 models.

  8. A new process for drug loaded nanocapsules preparation using a membrane contactor.

    PubMed

    Charcosset, Catherine; Fessi, Hatem

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a new process for the preparation of drug loaded nanocapsules using a membrane contactor which may be scaled up for industrial applications. Nanocapsules are prepared according to the nanoprecipitation method. The organic phase (solvent, polymer, oil, and drug) is pressed through the pores of an ultrafiltration membrane via the filtrate side. The aqueous phase (water and surfactant) circulates inside the membrane module, and sweeps away the nanocaspules forming at the pore outlets. Two model drugs are selected for the preparation of drug loaded nanocapsules: indomethacin and vitamin E. It is shown that indomethacin loaded nanocapsules with a mean diameter of 240 nm and vitamin E loaded nanocapsules with a mean diameter of 230 nm are obtained with a 150,000 daltons ultrafiltration membrane, a transmembrane pressure of 3 bar, and a crossflow rate of 1.7 m.s(- 1). High fluxes are also obtained (around 0.6 m3/h.m2), leading to the preparation of 1.8 10(- 3) m3 drug loaded nanocapsules in 8 min. The advantage of this membrane contactor compared to other processes for drug loaded nanocapsules preparation is shown to be its scale-up ability.

  9. Drop mass transfer in a microfluidic chip compared to a centrifugal contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nemer, Martin B.; Roberts, Christine C.; Hughes, Lindsey G.; Wyatt, Nicholas B.; Brooks, Carlton F.; Rao, Rekha

    2014-06-13

    A model system was developed for enabling a multiscale understanding of centrifugal-contactor liquid–liquid extraction.The system consisted of Nd(III) + xylenol orange in the aqueous phase buffered to pH =5.5 by KHP, and dodecane + thenoyltrifluroroacetone (HTTA) + tributyphosphate (TBP) in the organic phase. Diffusion constants were measured for neodymium in both the organic and aqueous phases, and the Nd(III) partition coefficients were measured at various HTTA and TBP concentrations. A microfluidic channel was used as a high-shear model environment to observe mass-transfer on a droplet scale with xylenol orange as the aqueous-phase metal indicator; mass-transfer rates were measured quantitatively in both diffusion and reaction limited regimes on the droplet scale. Lastly, the microfluidic results were comparable to observations made for the same system in a laboratory scale liquid–liquid centrifugal contactor, indicating that single drop microfluidic experiments can provide information on mass transfer in complicated flows and geometries.

  10. Analysis of ammonia separation from purge gases in microporous hollow fiber membrane contactors.

    PubMed

    Karami, M R; Keshavarz, P; Khorram, M; Mehdipour, M

    2013-09-15

    In this study, a mathematical model was developed to analyze the separation of ammonia from the purge gas of ammonia plants using microporous hollow fiber membrane contactors. A numerical procedure was proposed to solve the simultaneous linear and non linear partial differential equations in the liquid, membrane and gas phases for non-wetted or partially wetted conditions. An equation of state was applied in the model instead of Henry's law because of high solubility of ammonia in water. The experimental data of CO₂-water system in the literature was used to validate the model due to the lack of data for ammonia-water system. The model showed that the membrane contactor can separate ammonia very effectively and with recoveries higher than 99%. SEM images demonstrated that ammonia caused some micro-cracks on the surfaces of polypropylene fibers, which could be an indication of partial wetting of membrane in long term applications. However, the model results revealed that the membrane wetting did not have significant effect on the absorption of ammonia because of very high solubility of ammonia in water. It was also found that the effect of gas velocity on the absorption flux was much more than the effect of liquid velocity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Membrane contactor/separator for an advanced ozone membrane reactor for treatment of recalcitrant organic pollutants in water

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Wai Kit; Joueet, Justine; Heng, Samuel; Yeung, King Lun; Schrotter, Jean-Christophe

    2012-05-15

    An advanced ozone membrane reactor that synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone gas, membrane contactor for pollutant adsorption and reaction, and membrane separator for clean water production is described. The membrane reactor represents an order of magnitude improvement over traditional semibatch reactor design and is capable of complete conversion of recalcitrant endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in water at less than three minutes residence time. Coating the membrane contactor with alumina and hydrotalcite (Mg/Al=3) adsorbs and traps the organics in the reaction zone resulting in 30% increase of total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Large surface area coating that diffuses surface charges from adsorbed polar organic molecules is preferred as it reduces membrane polarization that is detrimental to separation. - Graphical abstract: Advanced ozone membrane reactor synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone, membrane contactor for sorption and reaction and membrane separator for clean water production to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement in treatment performance compared to traditional ozone reactor. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel reactor using membranes for ozone distributor, reaction contactor and water separator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Designed to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement over traditional reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and hydrotalcite coatings capture and trap pollutants giving additional 30% TOC removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High surface area coating prevents polarization and improves membrane separation and life.

  12. INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN A PILOT-SCALE OZONE BUBBLE-DIFFUSER CONTACTOR - II: MODEL VALIDATION AND APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ADR model developed in Part I of this study was successfully validated with experimenta data obtained for the inactivation of C. parvum and C. muris oocysts with a pilot-scale ozone-bubble diffuser contactor operated with treated Ohio River water. Kinetic parameters, required...

  13. Design and evaluation of hydraulic baffled-channel PAC contactor for taste and odor removal from drinking water supplies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Il; Bae, Byung-Uk

    2007-05-01

    Based on the concept of hydraulic flocculator, a baffled-channel powdered activated carbon (PAC) contactor, placed before the rapid-mixing basin, was designed and evaluated for removal of taste and odor (T&O) in drinking water. PAC adsorption kinetic tests for raw water samples were conducted for selection of design parameters related to contact time and degree of mixing. Within the tested range of velocity gradient (G) from 18 to 83s(-1), mixing had a relatively minor effect on the adsorption kinetics of the PAC. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the pilot-scale horizontally and vertically baffled-channel PAC contactor were investigated by tracer tests. It was found that the plug flow fractions of vertically baffled-channel PAC contactor (vBPC) were higher than those of the horizontally baffled-channel PAC contactor (hBPC) for the same bend width or bend height. However, the hBPC seems to be more appropriate than the vBPC in terms of construction and maintenance. The geosmin and MIB removal rate increased with the number of baffles, PAC dose and contact time increased regardless of bend width in the pilot-scale hBPC. The pair of full-scale hBPCs at Pohang water treatment plant, having a design capacity of 6.5x10(4)m(3)/d with 20min of hydraulic retention time with a safety factor of 2, was designed based on lab- and pilot-scale experimental results. Under a velocity gradient of 20s(-1), the number of baffles to be installed was calculated to be 20 with a space of about 2m between each baffle, resulting in a hydraulic head loss through the contactor of about 0.056m. The successful application of hBPC for T&O removal from drinking water supplies should provide momentum for developing more effective treatment methods.

  14. Properties of the Auroral Zone Ionosphere Inferred Using Plasma Contactor Data From the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, S. L.; Bering, E. A.; Evans, D. S.; Katz, I.; Gardner, B. M.; Suggs, R. M.; Minow, J. I.; Dalton, P. J.; Ferguson, D. C.; Hillard, G. B.; Counts, J. L.; Barsamian, H.; Kern, J.; Mikatarian, R.

    2001-12-01

    Comparison of the auroral electron precipitation maps produced by the NOAA POES satellite constellation with the flight path of the International Space Station (ISS) reveals that ISS regularly passes through the southern auroral oval south of Australia. During the first few months of 2001, ISS configuration and flight attitude were such that tensioning rods on the space station solar array masts could collect current from the ionosphere in the same way as a bare wire antenna or electrodynamic tether. The ISS has two plasma contactors that emit the electron currents needed to balance electron collection by surfaces such as the lattice of bare rods on the solar array masts. During this period, these electron currents exceeded 0.1 A at times. The largest currents were observed in the auroral oval south of Australia, often after orbital sunset. On the space station, the solar array 40 m long masts each have over 400 m of stainless steel tensioning rods. When subject to orbital vxBṡl induced potentials, the rods collect substantial currents from the ionosphere. Models of the mast collection processes based upon J. R. Sanmartin's bare wire collection theory have been incorporated into computer codes that integrate models of the station geometry, orbital motion, earth's magnetic field, and ionosphere to obtain plasma contactor emission currents. During the period being analyzed, the station flew in an orientation such that the masts were perpendicular to the orbital velocity vector, and parallel to the earth's surface. Maximum vxBṡl potentials are generated near the magnetic poles. The current drawn by the masts is linearly proportional to the plasma density. The plasma contactor emission current can be converted to an estimate of plasma density. These measurements show that the plasma density in the nighttime auroral ionosphere is frequently several times that predicted by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI)-90 and IRI-2001 models. We will discuss how the

  15. On the Operational Status of the ISS Plasma Contactor Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Thomas P. (Technical Monitor); Carpenter, Christian B.

    2004-01-01

    The Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) was developed by the Rocketdyne division of The Boeing Company to control charging of the International Space Station (ISS). Each PCU contains a Hollow Cathode Assembly (HCA), which emits the charge control electrons. The HCAs were designed and fabricated at NASA s Glenn Research Center (GRC). GRC's HCA development program included manufacture of engineering, qualification, and flight model HCAs as well as qualification and wear tests. GRC tracks the on-orbit data for the flight HCAs in order to ascertain their overall health. As of April 5, 2004, 43 ignitions and over 6000 hours have been accumulated on a single unit. The flight HCAs continue to operate flawlessly. This paper will discuss the operation of the HCAs during ground tests and on-orbit operation from initial startup to April 30, 2004.

  16. Bioaugmentation for treating transient 4-fluorocinnamic acid shock loads in a rotating biological contactor.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Catarina L; Duque, Anouk F; Afonso, Carlos M M; Castro, Paula M L

    2013-09-01

    A rotating biological contactor (RBC) was used to treat shock loadings of 4-fluorocinnamic acid (4-FCA). Intermittent 4-FCA shocks of 35 mg L(-1) were applied (ca. 3 months) with only limited mineralization occurring and accumulation of 4-fluorobenzoate (4-FBA) as an intermediate. After bioaugmentation with a degrading bacterium the RBC was able to deal with 4-FCA intermittent loading of 80 mg L(-1) however, a gradual decline in RBC performance occurred, leading to 4-FBA accumulation. The degrading strain was recovered from the biofilm during 2 months but intermittent feeding may have led to diminishing strain numbers. Distinct bacterial communities in the 1st and the 5th and 10th stages of the RBC were revealed by denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis. Several isolates retrieved from the RBC transformed 4-FCA into 4-FBA but only two strains mineralized the compound. Bioaugmentation allowed removal of the fluorinated compound however intermittent feeding may have compromised the bioreactor efficiency.

  17. Hollow cathodes as electron emitting plasma contactors Theory and computer modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.; Parks, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested using hollow cathodes as plasma contactors for electrodynamic tethers, particularly to prevent the Shuttle Orbiter from charging to large negative potentials. Previous studies have shown that fluid models with anomalous scattering can describe the electron transport in hollow cathode generated plasmas. An improved theory of the hollow cathode plasmas is developed and computational results using the theory are compared with laboratory experiments. Numerical predictions for a hollow cathode plasma source of the type considered for use on the Shuttle are presented, as are three-dimensional NASCAP/LEO calculations of the emitted ion trajectories and the resulting potentials in the vicinity of the Orbiter. The computer calculations show that the hollow cathode plasma source makes vastly superior contact with the ionospheric plasma compared with either an electron gun or passive ion collection by the Orbiter.

  18. Thermal Analysis of AC Contactor Using Thermal Network Finite Difference Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chunping; Chen, Degui; Li, Xingwen; Geng, Yingsan

    To predict the thermal behavior of switchgear quickly, the Thermal Network Finite Difference Analysis method (TNFDA) is adopted in thermal analysis of AC contactor in the paper. The thermal network model is built with nodes, thermal resistors and heat generators, and it is solved using finite difference method (FDM). The main circuit and the control system are connected by thermal resistors network, which solves the problem of multi-sources interaction in the application of TNFDA. The temperature of conducting wires is calculated according to the heat transfer process and the fundamental equations of thermal conduction. It provides a method to solve the problem of boundary conditions in applying the TNFDA. The comparison between the results of TNFDA and measurements shows the feasibility and practicability of the method.

  19. Bacterial Cellulose Production by Gluconacetobacter sp. RKY5 in a Rotary Biofilm Contactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Jun; Kim, Jin-Nam; Wee, Young-Jung; Park, Don-Hee; Ryu, Hwa-Won

    A rotary biofilm contactor (RBC) inoculated with Gluconacetobacter sp. RKY5 was used as a bioreactor for improved bacterial cellulose production. The optimal number of disk for bacterial cellulose production was found to be eight, at which bacterial cellulose and cell concentrations were 5.52 and 4.98 g/L. When the aeration rate was maintained at 1.25 vvm, bacterial cellulose and cell concentrations were maximized (5.67 and 5.25 g/L, respectively). The optimal rotation speed of impeller in RBC was 15 rpm. When the culture pH in RBC was not controlled during fermentation, the maximal amount of bacterial cellulose (5.53 g/L) and cells (4.91 g/L) was obtained. Under the optimized culture conditions, bacterial cellulose and cell concentrations in RBC reached to 6.17 and 5.58 g/L, respectively.

  20. Recovery of volatile fatty acids via membrane contactor using flat membranes: experimental and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Tugtas, Adile Evren

    2014-07-01

    Volatile fatty acid (VFA) separation from synthetic VFA solutions and leachate was investigated via the use of a membrane contactor. NaOH was used as a stripping solution to provide constant concentration gradient of VFAs in both sides of a membrane. Mass flux (12.23 g/m(2)h) and selectivity (1.599) observed for acetic acid were significantly higher than those reported in the literature and were observed at feed pH of 3.0, flow rate of 31.5 ± 0.9 mL/min, and stripping solution concentration of 1.0 N. This study revealed that the flow rate, stripping solution strength, and feed pH affect the mass transfer of VFAs through the PTFE membrane. Acetic and propionic acid separation performances observed in the present study provided a cost effective and environmental alternative due to elimination of the use of extractants.

  1. The use of the fungus Dichomitus squalens for degradation in rotating biological contactor conditions.

    PubMed

    Novotný, Ceněk; Trošt, Nina; Šlušla, Martin; Svobodová, Kateřina; Mikesková, Hana; Válková, Hana; Malachová, Kateřina; Pavko, Aleksander

    2012-06-01

    Biodegradation potential of Dichomitus squalens in biofilm cultures and rotating biological contactor (RBC) was investigated. The fungus formed thick biofilms on inert and lignocellulosic supports and exhibited stable activities of laccase and manganese peroxidase to reach 40-62 and 25-32% decolorization of anthraquinone Remazol Brilliant Blue R and heterocyclic phthalocyanine dyes, respectively. The decolorization ceased when glucose concentration dropped to 1 mmol l(-1). In RBC reactor, respective decolorizations of Remazol Brilliant Blue R and heterocyclic Methylene Blue and Azure B dyes (50 mg l(-1)) attained 99%, 93%, and 59% within 7, 40 and 200 h. The fungus exhibited tolerance to coliform and non-coliform bacteria on rich organic media, the inhibition occurred only on media containing tryptone and NaCl. The degradation efficiency in RBC reactor, capability to decolorize a wide range of dye structures and tolerance to bacterial stress make D. squalens an organism applicable to remediation of textile wastewaters.

  2. Tube-side mass transfer for hollow fibre membrane contactors operated in the low Graetz range.

    PubMed

    Wang, C Y; Mercer, E; Kamranvand, F; Williams, L; Kolios, A; Parker, A; Tyrrel, S; Cartmell, E; McAdam, E J

    2017-02-01

    Transformation of the tube-side mass transfer coefficient derived in hollow fibre membrane contactors (HFMC) of different characteristic length scales (equivalent diameter and fibre length) has been studied when operated in the low Graetz range (Gz<10). Within the low Gz range, mass transfer is generally described by the Graetz problem (Sh=3.67) which assumes that the concentration profile comprises a constant shape over the fibre radius. In this study, it is experimentally evidenced that this assumption over predicts mass transfer within the low Graetz range. Furthermore, within the low Gz range (below 2), a proportional relationship between the experimentally determined mass transfer coefficient (Kov ) and the Graetz number has been identified. For Gz numbers below 2, the experimental Sh number approached unity, which suggests that mass transfer is strongly dependent upon diffusion. However, within this diffusion controlled region of mass transfer, tube-side fluid velocity remained important. For Gz numbers above 2, Sh could be satisfactorily described by extension to the Lévêque solution, which can be ascribed to the constrained growth of the concentration boundary layer adjacent to the fibre wall. Importantly this study demonstrates that whilst mass transfer in the low Graetz range does not explicitly conform to either the Graetz problem or classical Lévêque solution, it is possible to transform the experimentally derived overall mass transfer coefficient (Kov ) between characteristic length scales (dh and L). T h is was corroborated by comparison of the empirical relationship determined in this study (Sh=0.36Gz) with previously published studies operated in the low Gz range. This analysis provides important insight for process design when slow tube-side flows, or low Schmidt numbers (coincident with gases) constrain operation of hollow fibre membrane contactors to the low Gz range.

  3. Stability study and lyophilization of vitamin E-loaded nanocapsules prepared by membrane contactor.

    PubMed

    Khayata, N; Abdelwahed, W; Chehna, M F; Charcosset, C; Fessi, H

    2012-12-15

    In this research, we studied the accelerated stability of vitamin E-loaded nanocapsules (NCs) prepared by the nanoprecipitation method. Vitamin E-loaded NCs were optimized firstly at the laboratory scale and then scaled up using the membrane contactor technique. The optimum conditions of the membrane contactor preparation (pilot scale) produced vitamin E-loaded NCs with an average size of 253 nm, polydispersity index 0.19 and a zeta potential -16 mV. The average size, polydispersity index and zeta potential values were 185 nm, 0.12 and -15 mV, respectively for the NCs prepared at laboratory scale. No significant changes were noticed in these values after 3 and 6 months of storage at high temperature (40±2 °C) and relative humidity (75±5%) in spite of vitamin E sensitivity to light, heat and oxygen. The entrapment efficiency of NCs prepared at pilot scale was 97% at the beginning of the stability study, and became (95%, 59%) after 3 and 6 months of storage, respectively. These values at lab-scale were (98%, 96%, and 89%) at time zero and after 3 and 6 months of storage, respectively. This confirms the ability of vitamin E encapsulation to preserve its stability, which is one major goal of our work. Lyophilization of the optimized formula at lab-scale was also performed. Four types of cryoprotectants were tested (poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), sucrose, mannitol, and glucose). Freeze-dried NCs prepared with sucrose were found acceptable. The other lyophilized NCs obtained at different conditions presented large aggregates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Liquid-liquid extraction of uranium(VI) in the system with a membrane contactor.

    PubMed

    Biełuszka, Paweł; Zakrzewska, Grażyna; Chajduk, Ewelina; Dudek, Jakub

    Raising role of the nuclear power industry, including governmental plans for the construction of first nuclear power plant in Poland, creates increasing demand for the uranium-based nuclear fuels. The project implemented by Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology concerns the development of effective methods for uranium extraction from low-grade ores and phosphorites for production of yellow cake-U3O8. The Liqui-Cel(®) Extra-Flow 2.5 × 8 Membrane Contactor produced by CELGARD LLC (Charlotte, NC) company is the main component of the installation for liquid-liquid extraction applied for processing of post leaching liquors. In the process of membrane extraction the uranyl ions from aqueous phase are transported through the membrane into organic phase. The flow of two phases in the system was arranged in co-current mode. The very important element of the work was a selection of extracting agents appropriate for the membrane process. After preliminary experiments comprising tests of membrane resistivity and determination of extraction efficiency, di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid was found to be most favourable. An important aspect of the work was the adjustment of hydrodynamic conditions in the capillary module. To avoid the membrane wettability by organic solvent and mixing two phases equal pressure drops along the membrane module to minimize the transmembrane pressure, were assumed. Determination of pressure drop along the module was conducted using Bernoulli equation. The integrated process of extraction/re-extraction conducted in continuous mode with application of two contactors was designed.

  5. Turbulent dispersion results from gel-sphere processes and application to centrifugal contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P.A.

    1986-07-01

    Three different devices using controlled velocities of organic liquids were applied to disperse aqueous solutions as drops. One consisted of simple tubes of small diameters. A second contained motionless mixer units inside large tubes. The third employed couette flow of the organic liquid between a cylindrical rotor and a stationary cylinder. These devices were applied to gel-sphere processes in which the liquid drops are converted into solid gel spheres of hydrated metal oxides. The gel-sphere products are good, strong spheres and allow good measurement of the sphere and the drop-size distributions. The drop diameters must be controlled and predictable to allow preparation of product spheres of the desired sizes. Empirical correlations were determined for application to the gel-sphere processes. The theory of turbulent dispersion based on eddy velocities has been developed by Kolmorogoff, Hinze, and others. Davies reviewed this theory and the agreement of theory with four types of dispersion devices for energy dissipation rates of 6 to 400,000 W/g. The gel-sphere results for drop-size distribution are for energy dissipation rates of 10/sup -3/ to 1.5 W/g. Those combined results support the theory of turbulence as the dispersion mechanism over a range of 10/sup 9/ for the rate of energy dissipation. The turbulent dispersion with Couette flow is the mechanism for mixing in an advanced design of centrifugal contactors for solvent extraction. The theory of turbulence is applied to predict drop sizes and mixing power for centrifugal contactors as developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). 14 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Sliding-cavity fluid contactors in low-gravity fluids, materials, and biotechnology research.

    PubMed

    Todd, Paul; Vellinger, John C; Sengupta, Shramik; Sportiello, Michael G; Greenberg, Alan R; Krantz, William B

    2002-10-01

    The well-known method of sliding-cavity fluid contactors used by Gosting for diffusion measurements and by Tiselius in electrophoresis has found considerable use in low-gravity research. To date, sliding-cavity contactors have been used in liquid diffusion experiments, interfacial transport experiments, biomolecular crystal growth, biphasic extraction, multistage extraction, microencapsulation, seed germination, invertebrate development, and thin-film casting. Sliding-cavity technology has several advantages for spaceflight: it is simple, it accommodates small samples, samples can be fully enclosed, phases can be combined, multiple samples can be processed at high sample density, real-time observations can be made, and mixed and diffused samples can be compared. An analysis of the transport phenomena that govern the sliding-cavity method is offered. During sliding of one liquid over another flow rates between 0.001 and 0.1m/sec are developed, giving Reynolds numbers in the range 0.1-100. Assuming no slip at liquid-solid boundaries shear rates are of the order 1sec(-1). The measured consequence is the transfer of 2-5% of the content of a cavity to the opposite cavity. In the absence of gravity, buoyancy-driven transport is assumed absent. Transport processes are limited to (1) molecular diffusion, in which reactants diffuse toward one another at rates that depend on their diffusion coefficient and concentration gradient (Fick's second law), (2) solutocapillary (Marangoni) flow driven by surface-tension gradients, (3) capillary flow (drop spreading) at liquid-solid three-phase lines leading to immiscible phase demixing, and (4) vapor-phase diffusive mass transfer in evaporative processes. Quantitative treatment of these phenomena has been accomplished over the past few years in low-gravity research in space and on aircraft.

  7. Evaluation of Mass Transfer Performance for Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction of Cesium in a Conventional 5-cm Centrifugal Contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell, Jr. J.F.

    2002-02-19

    Tests have been conducted to determine if satisfactory mass transfer performance is achieved using a fully pumping 5-cm centrifugal contactor under conditions present in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. Tests utilized a commercially available contactor that had been modified by installation of a rotor housing bottom that had straight radial vanes on the process side. As received from the vendor, the housing bottom was equipped with curved (impeller-type) vanes that were intended to promote phase separation by minimizing mixing of influent solutions. Stage efficiencies exceeding 85% were obtained under conditions, present in the extraction section of the CSSX flowsheet. Under CSSX stripping conditions the stage efficiency exceeded 90%. In both cases, the efficiencies obtained exceed the minimum requirement for acceptable transfer of cesium in the CSSX process.

  8. Membrane contactor/separator for an advanced ozone membrane reactor for treatment of recalcitrant organic pollutants in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kit Chan, Wai; Jouët, Justine; Heng, Samuel; Lun Yeung, King; Schrotter, Jean-Christophe

    2012-05-01

    An advanced ozone membrane reactor that synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone gas, membrane contactor for pollutant adsorption and reaction, and membrane separator for clean water production is described. The membrane reactor represents an order of magnitude improvement over traditional semibatch reactor design and is capable of complete conversion of recalcitrant endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in water at less than three minutes residence time. Coating the membrane contactor with alumina and hydrotalcite (Mg/Al=3) adsorbs and traps the organics in the reaction zone resulting in 30% increase of total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Large surface area coating that diffuses surface charges from adsorbed polar organic molecules is preferred as it reduces membrane polarization that is detrimental to separation.

  9. Accomplishing Equilibrium in ALSEP: Demonstrations of Modified Process Chemistry on 3-D Printed Enhanced Annular Centrifugal Contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. Alex; Wardle, Kent E.; Lumetta, Gregg; Gelis, Artem V.

    2016-12-01

    Here, the major components of the modified ALSEP process have been demonstrated on a modified 2-cm annular centrifugal contactor with an enhanced mixing zone using stable fission products and radiotracers. The results show that by decreasing the pH of the minor actinide stripping solution, using HEDTA instead of DTPA, and increasing contact time, the process is very effective in separating americium from the lanthanides and the fission products.

  10. Accomplishing Equilibrium in ALSEP: Demonstrations of Modified Process Chemistry on 3-D Printed Enhanced Annular Centrifugal Contactors

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, M. Alex; Wardle, Kent E.; Lumetta, Gregg; ...

    2016-01-01

    The major components of the modified ALSEP process have been demonstrated on a modified 2-cm annular centrifugal contactor with an enhanced mixing zone using stable fission products and radiotracers. The results show that by decreasing the pH of the minor actinide stripping solution, using HEDTA instead of DTPA, and increasing contact time, the process is very effective in separating americium from the lanthanides and the fission products.

  11. Quantifying the loss of methane through secondary gas mass transport (or 'slip') from a micro-porous membrane contactor applied to biogas upgrading.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Andrew; Jefferson, Bruce; McAdam, Ewan J

    2013-07-01

    Secondary gas transport during the separation of a binary gas with a micro-porous hollow fibre membrane contactor (HMFC) has been studied for biogas upgrading. In this application, the loss or 'slip' of the secondary gas (methane) during separation is a known concern, specifically since methane possesses the intrinsic calorific value. Deionised (DI) water was initially used as the physical solvent. Under these conditions, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) absorption were dependent upon liquid velocity (V(L)). Whilst the highest CO2 flux was recorded at high V(L), selectivity towards CO2 declined due to low residence times and a diminished gas-side partial pressure, and resulted in slip of approximately 5.2% of the inlet methane. Sodium hydroxide was subsequently used as a comparative chemical absorption solvent. Under these conditions, CO2 mass transfer increased by increasing gas velocity (VG) which is attributed to the excess of reactive hydroxide ions present in the solvent, and the fast conversion of dissolved CO2 to carbonate species reinitiating the concentration gradient at the gas-liquid interface. At high gas velocities, CH4 slip was reduced to 0.1% under chemical conditions. Methane slip is therefore dependent upon whether the process is gas phase or liquid phase controlled, since methane mass transport can be adequately described by Henry's law within both physical and chemical solvents. The addition of an electrolyte was found to further retard CH4 absorption via the salting out effect. However, their applicability to physical solvents is limited since electrolytic concentration similarly impinges upon the solvents' capacity for CO2. This study illustrates the significance of secondary gas mass transport, and furthermore demonstrates that gas-phase controlled systems are recommended where greater selectivity is required.

  12. Operation of a breadboard liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor system for removing carbon dioxide and water vapor from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Scott B.; Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Millard, Douglas L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Foerg, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Processes to remove and recover carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor from air are essential for successful long-duration space missions. This paper presents results of a developmental program focused on the use of a liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor (LSMC) system for removal of CO2 and water vapor from air. In this system, air from the spacecraft cabin atmosphere is circulated through one side of a hollow-fiber membrane contactor. On the other side of the membrane contactor is flowed a liquid sorbent, which absorbs the CO2 and water vapor from the feed air. The liquid sorbent is then heated to desorb the CO2 and water vapor. The CO2 is subsequently removed from the system as a concentrated gas stream, whereas the water vapor is condensed, producing a water stream. A breadboard system based on this technology was designed and constructed. Tests showed that the LSMC breadboard system can produce a CO2 stream and a liquid-water stream. Details are presented on the operation of the system, as well as the effects on performance of variations in feed conditions.

  13. Future beam experiments in the magnetosphere with plasma contactors: How do we get the charge off the spacecraft?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delzanno, G. L.; Borovsky, J. E.; Thomsen, M. F.; Moulton, J. D.; MacDonald, E. A.

    2015-05-01

    The idea of using a high-voltage electron beam with substantial current to actively probe magnetic field line connectivity in space has been discussed since the 1970s. However, its experimental realization onboard a magnetospheric spacecraft has never been accomplished because the tenuous magnetospheric plasma cannot provide the return current necessary to keep spacecraft charging under control. In this work, we perform Particle-In-Cell simulations to investigate the conditions under which a high-voltage electron beam can be emitted from a spacecraft and explore solutions that can mitigate spacecraft charging. The electron beam cannot simply be compensated for by an ion beam of equal current, because the Child-Langmuir space charge limit is violated under conditions of interest. On the other hand, releasing a high-density neutral contactor plasma prior and during beam emission is critical in aiding beam emission. We show that after an initial transient controlled by the size of the contactor cloud where the spacecraft potential rises, the spacecraft potential can settle into conditions that allow for electron beam emission. A physical explanation of this result in terms of ion emission into spherical geometry from the surface of the plasma cloud is presented, together with scaling laws of the peak spacecraft potential varying the ion mass and beam current. These results suggest that a strategy where the contactor plasma and the electron beam operate simultaneously might offer a pathway to perform beam experiments in the magnetosphere.

  14. Wet air oxidation of formic acid using nanoparticle-modified polysulfone hollow fibers as gas-liquid contactors.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Seth R; Muthu, Satish; O'Callaghan, Michael; Lahitte, Jean-Francois; Bruening, Merlin L

    2012-03-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) using membrane contactors is attractive for remediation of aqueous pollutants, but previous studies of even simple reactions such as formic acid oxidation required multiple passes through tubular ceramic membrane contactors to achieve high conversion. This work aims to increase single-pass CWAO conversions by using polysulfone (PS) hollow fibers as contactors to reduce diffusion distances in the fiber lumen. Alternating adsorption of polycations and citrate-stabilized platinum colloids in fiber walls provides catalytically active PS hollow fibers. Using a single PS fiber, 50% oxidation of a 50 mM formic acid feed solution results from a single pass through the fiber lumen (15 cm length) with a solution residence time of 40 s. Increasing the number of PS fibers to five while maintaining the same volumetric flow rate leads to over 90% oxidation, suggesting that further scale up in the number of fibers will facilitate high single pass conversions at increased flow rates. The high conversion compared to prior studies with ceramic fibers stems from shorter diffusion distances in the fiber lumen. However, the activity of the Pt catalyst is 20-fold lower than in previous ceramic fibers. Focusing the Pt deposition near the fiber lumen and limiting pore wetting to this region might increase the activity of the catalyst. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  15. Operation of a breadboard liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor system for removing carbon dioxide and water vapor from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Scott B.; Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Millard, Douglas L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Foerg, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Processes to remove and recover carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor from air are essential for successful long-duration space missions. This paper presents results of a developmental program focused on the use of a liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor (LSMC) system for removal of CO2 and water vapor from air. In this system, air from the spacecraft cabin atmosphere is circulated through one side of a hollow-fiber membrane contactor. On the other side of the membrane contactor is flowed a liquid sorbent, which absorbs the CO2 and water vapor from the feed air. The liquid sorbent is then heated to desorb the CO2 and water vapor. The CO2 is subsequently removed from the system as a concentrated gas stream, whereas the water vapor is condensed, producing a water stream. A breadboard system based on this technology was designed and constructed. Tests showed that the LSMC breadboard system can produce a CO2 stream and a liquid-water stream. Details are presented on the operation of the system, as well as the effects on performance of variations in feed conditions.

  16. Effect of polymer concentration on the structure and performance of PEI hollow fiber membrane contactor for CO2 stripping.

    PubMed

    Naim, R; Ismail, A F

    2013-04-15

    A series of polyetherimide (PEI) hollow fiber membranes with various polymer concentrations (13-16 wt.%) for CO2 stripping process in membrane contactor application was fabricated via wet phase inversion method. The PEI membranes were characterized in terms of liquid entry pressure, contact angle, gas permeation and morphology analysis. CO2 stripping performance was investigated via membrane contactor system in a stainless steel module with aqueous diethanolamine as liquid absorbent. The hollow fiber membranes showed decreasing patterns in gas permeation, contact angle, mean pore size and effective surface porosity with increasing polymer concentration. On the contrary, wetting pressure of PEI membranes has enhanced significantly with polymer concentration. Various polymer concentrations have different effects on the CO2 stripping flux in which membrane with 14 wt.% polymer concentration showed the highest stripping flux of 2.7 × 10(-2)mol/m(2)s. From the performance comparison with other commercial membrane, it is anticipated that the PEI membrane has a good prospect in CO2 stripping via membrane contactor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Clean-in-Place and Reliability Testing of a Commercial 12.5 cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at the INL

    SciTech Connect

    N. R. Mann; T. G. Garn; D. H. Meikrantz; J. D. Law; T. A. Todd

    2007-09-01

    The renewed interest in advancing nuclear energy has spawned the research of advanced technologies for recycling nuclear fuel. A significant portion of the advanced fuel cycle includes the recovery of selected actinides by solvent extraction methods utilizing centrifugal contactors. Although the use of centrifugal contactors for solvent extraction is widely known, their operation is not without challenges. Solutions generated from spent fuel dissolution contain unknown quantities of undissolved solids. A majority of these solids will be removed via various methods of filtration. However, smaller particles are expected to carry through to downstream solvent extraction processes and equipment. In addition, solids/precipitates brought about by mechanical or chemical upsets are another potential area of concern. During processing, particulate captured in the rotor assembly by high centrifugal forces eventually forms a cake-like structure on the inner wall introducing balance problems and negatively affecting phase separations. One of the features recently developed for larger engineering scale Annular Centrifugal Contactors (ACCs) is the Clean-In-Place (CIP) capability. Engineered spray nozzles were installed into the hollow central rotor shaft in all four quadrants of the rotor assembly. This arrangement allows for a very convenient and effective method of solids removal from within the rotor assembly.

  18. Clean-in-Place and Reliability Testing of a Commercial 12.5-cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at the INL

    SciTech Connect

    N. R. Mann; T. G. Garn; D. H. Meikrantz; J. D. Law; T. A. Todd

    2007-09-01

    The renewed interest in advancing nuclear energy has spawned the research of advanced technologies for recycling nuclear fuel. A significant portion of the advanced fuel cycle includes the recovery of selected actinides by solvent extraction methods utilizing centrifugal contactors. Although the use of centrifugal contactors for solvent extraction is widely known, their operation is not without challenges. Solutions generated from spent fuel dissolution contain unknown quantities of undissolved solids. A majority of these solids will be removed via various methods of filtration. However, smaller particles are expected to carry through to downstream solvent extraction processes and equipment. In addition, solids/precipitates brought about by mechanical or chemical upsets are another potential area of concern. During processing, particulate captured in the rotor assembly by high centrifugal forces eventually forms a cake-like structure on the inner wall introducing balance problems and negatively affecting phase separations. One of the features recently developed for larger engineering scale Annular Centrifugal Contactors (ACCs) is the Clean-In-Place (CIP) capability. Engineered spray nozzles were installed into the hollow central rotor shaft in all four quadrants of the rotor assembly. This arrangement allows for a very convenient and effective method of solids removal from within the rotor assembly.

  19. Phosphate salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken by mouth or used as enemas. Indigestion. Aluminum phosphate and calcium phosphate are FDA-permitted ingredients ... Phosphate salts containing sodium, potassium, aluminum, or calcium are LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth short-term, when sodium phosphate is inserted into the ...

  20. Performance of polydimethylsiloxane membrane contactor process for selective hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas.

    PubMed

    Tilahun, Ebrahim; Bayrakdar, Alper; Sahinkaya, Erkan; Çalli, Bariş

    2017-03-01

    H2S in biogas affects the co-generation performance adversely by corroding some critical components within the engine and it has to be removed in order to improve the biogas quality. This work presents the use of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane contactor for selective removal of H2S from the biogas. Experiments were carried out to evaluate the effects of different pH of absorption liquid, biogas flowrate and temperature on the absorption performances. The results revealed that at the lowest loading rate (91mg H2S/m(2)·h) more than 98% H2S and 59% CO2 absorption efficiencies were achieved. The CH4 content in the treated gas increased from 60 to 80% with nearly 5% CH4 loss. Increasing the pH (7-10) and loading rate (91-355mg H2S/m(2)·h) enhanced the H2S absorption capacity, and the maximum H2S/CO2 and H2S/CH4 selectivity factors were 2.5 and 58, respectively. Temperature played a key role in the process and lower temperature was beneficial for intensifying H2S absorption performance. The highest H2S fluxes at pH 10 and 7 were 3.4g/m(2)·d and 1.8g/m(2)·d with overall mass transfer coefficients of 6.91×10(-6) and 4.99×10(-6)m/s, respectively. The results showed that moderately high H2S fluxes with low CH4 loss may be achieved by using a robust and cost-effective membrane based absorption process for desulfurization of biogas. A tubular PDMS membrane contactor was tested for the first time to remove H2S from biogas under slightly alkaline conditions and the suggested process could be a promising for real scale applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Life Testing of the Hollow Cathode Plasma Contactor for the ProSEDS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Schneider, Todd A.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta 11 unmanned expendable booster. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta 11 second stage and collects current from the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma. A hollow cathode plasma contactor emits the collected electrons from the Delta II, completing the electrical circuit with the ambient plasma. The current flowing through the tether generates thrust based on the Lorentz Force Law. The thrust will be generated opposite to the velocity vector, slowing down the spacecraft and causing it to de-orbit in approximately 14 days compared to the normal 6 months. A 10-km non-conductive tether is between the conductive tether and an endmass containing several scientific instruments. The ProSEDS mission lifetime was set at I day because most of the primary objectives can be met in that time. The extended ProSEDS mission will be for as many days as possible, until the Delta 11 second stage burns up or the tether is severed by a micrometeoroid or space debris particle. The Hollow Cathode Plasma Contactor (HCPC) unit has been designed for a 12-day mission. Because of the science requirements to measure the background ambient plasma, the HCPC must operate on a duty cycle. Later in the ProSEDS mission, the HCPC is operated in a manner to allow charging of the secondary battery. Due to the unusual operating requirements by the ProSEDS mission, a development unit of the HCPC was built for thorough testing. This developmental unit was tested for a simulated ProSEDS mission, with measurements of the ability to start and stop during the duty cycle. These tests also provided valuable data for the ProSEDS software requirements. Qualification tests of the HCPC flight hardware are also discussed.

  2. Evaluation of a New Remote Handling Design for High Throughput Annular Centrifugal Contactors

    SciTech Connect

    David H. Meikrantz; Troy G. Garn; Jack D. Law; Lawrence L. Macaluso

    2009-09-01

    Advanced designs of nuclear fuel recycling plants are expected to include more ambitious goals for aqueous based separations including; higher separations efficiency, high-level waste minimization, and a greater focus on continuous processes to minimize cost and footprint. Therefore, Annular Centrifugal Contactors (ACCs) are destined to play a more important role for such future processing schemes. Previous efforts defined and characterized the performance of commercial 5 cm and 12.5 cm single-stage ACCs in a “cold” environment. The next logical step, the design and evaluation of remote capable pilot scale ACCs in a “hot” or radioactive environment was reported earlier. This report includes the development of remote designs for ACCs that can process the large throughput rates needed in future nuclear fuel recycling plants. Novel designs were developed for the remote interconnection of contactor units, clean-in-place and drain connections, and a new solids removal collection chamber. A three stage, 12.5 cm diameter rotor module has been constructed and evaluated for operational function and remote handling in highly radioactive environments. This design is scalable to commercial CINC ACC models from V-05 to V-20 with total throughput rates ranging from 20 to 650 liters per minute. The V-05R three stage prototype was manufactured by the commercial vendor for ACCs in the U.S., CINC mfg. It employs three standard V-05 clean-in-place (CIP) units modified for remote service and replacement via new methods of connection for solution inlets, outlets, drain and CIP. Hydraulic testing and functional checks were successfully conducted and then the prototype was evaluated for remote handling and maintenance suitability. Removal and replacement of the center position V-05R ACC unit in the three stage prototype was demonstrated using an overhead rail mounted PaR manipulator. This evaluation confirmed the efficacy of this innovative design for interconnecting and cleaning

  3. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing for the Space Station Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A wear test of four hollow cathodes was conducted to resolve issues associated with the Space Station plasma contactor. The objectives of this test were to evaluate unit-to-unit dispersions, verify the transportability of contamination control protocols developed by the project, and to evaluate cathode contamination control and activation procedures to enable simplification of the gas feed system and heater power processor. These objectives were achieved by wear testing four cathodes concurrently to 2000 hours. Test results showed maximum unit-to-unit deviations for discharge voltages and cathode tip temperatures to be +/-3 percent and +/-2 percent, respectively, of the nominal values. Cathodes utilizing contamination control procedures known to increase cathode lifetime showed no trends in their monitored parameters that would indicate a possible failure, demonstrating that contamination control procedures had been successfully transferred. Comparisons of cathodes utilizing and not utilizing a purifier or simplified activation procedure showed similar behavior during wear testing and pre- and post-test performance characterizations. This behavior indicates that use of simplified cathode systems and procedures is consistent with long cathode lifetimes.

  4. Innovative use of membrane contactor as condenser for heat recovery in carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuiping; Zhao, Shuaifei; Wardhaugh, Leigh; Feron, Paul H M

    2015-02-17

    The gas-liquid membrane contactor generally used as a nonselective gas absorption enhancement device is innovatively proposed as a condenser for heat recovery in liquid-absorbent-based carbon capture. The membrane condenser is used as a heat exchanger to recover the latent heat of the exiting vapor from the desorber, and it can help achieve significant energy savings when proper membranes with high heat-transfer coefficients are used. Theoretical thermodynamic analysis of mass and heat transfer in the membrane condensation system shows that heat recovery increases dramatically as inlet gas temperature rises and outlet gas temperature falls. The optimal split mass flow rate is determined by the inlet gas temperature and the overall heat-transfer coefficient in the condensation system. The required membrane area is also strongly dependent on the overall heat-transfer coefficient, particularly at higher inlet gas temperatures. Mass transfer across the membrane has an insignificant effect on heat transfer and heat recovery, suggesting that membrane wetting may not be an issue when a membrane condenser is used for heat recovery. Our analysis provides important insights into the energy recovery performance of the membrane condensation system as well as selection of operational parameters, such as split mass flow rate and membrane area, thickness, and thermal conductivity.

  5. Surface Charging Controlling of the Chinese Space Station with Hollow Cathode Plasma Contactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kai; Wang, Xianrong; Qin, Xiaogang; Yang, Shengsheng; Yang, Wei; Zhao, Chengxuan; Chen, Yifeng; Shi, Liang; Tang, Daotan; Xie, Kan

    2016-07-01

    A highly charged manned spacecraft threatens the life of an astronaut and extravehicular activity, which can be effectively reduced by controlling the spacecraft surface charging. In this article, the controlling of surface charging on Chinese Space Station (CSS) is investigated, and a method to reduce the negative potential to the CSS is the emission electron with a hollow cathode plasma contactor. The analysis is obtained that the high voltage (HV) solar array of the CSS collecting electron current can reach 4.5 A, which can be eliminated by emitting an adequate electron current on the CSS. The theoretical analysis and experimental results are addressed, when the minimum xenon flow rate of the hollow cathode is 4.0 sccm, the emission electron current can neutralize the collected electron current, which ensures that the potential of the CSS can be controlled in a range of less than 21 V, satisfied with safety voltage. The results can provide a significant reference value to define a flow rate to the potential controlling programme for CSS.

  6. Energy-efficient treatment of organic wastewater streams using a rotatable bioelectrochemical contactor (RBEC).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ka Yu; Ho, Goen; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2012-12-01

    A membraneless bioelectrochemical system - rotatable bio-electrochemical contactor (RBEC) consists of an array of rotatable electrode disks was developed to convert the chemical energy from wastewater organics (acetate) directly into electricity. Each rotatable electrode disk had an upper-air exposing and a lower-water submerging halves. Intermittent rotation (180°) enabled each halve to alternately serve as anode and cathode. Removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was increased by 15% (from 0.79 to 0.91 kg COD m(-3) d(-1)) by allowing electron flow from the lower to the upper disk halves. Coupling with a potentiostat could alleviate cathodic limitation and increased COD removal to 1.32 kg COD m(-3) day(-1) (HRT 5h). About 40% of the COD removed was via current, indicating that the biofilm could use the lower half disk as electron acceptor. The RBEC removed COD more energy-efficiently than conventional activated sludge processes as active aeration is not required (0.47 vs. 0.7-2.0 kW h kg COD(-1)).

  7. Continuous treatment of coloured industry wastewater using immobilized Phanerochaete chrysosporium in a rotating biological contactor reactor.

    PubMed

    Pakshirajan, Kannan; Kheria, Sumeet

    2012-06-30

    Coloured industry wastewaters often contain dyes and other toxic ingredients, and, therefore, pose serious threat to the receiving environment. Among the available methods the eco-friendly biological method has gained maximum attention due to its many advantages over the traditional methods. In the present study, continuous biological treatment of coloured wastewater from a textile dyeing industry was investigated using the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium in a rotating biological contactor (RBC) reactor. The raw wastewater was diluted with an equal volume of either distilled water or media containing glucose at varying concentrations to study its effect on the decolourization process. Results revealed that the wastewater could be decolourized to an extent of more than 64% when diluted with media containing glucose; and, a maximum decolourization efficiency of 83% was obtained with 10 g/l glucose concentration. COD removal efficiencies were also found to be consistent with the decolourization efficiencies of the wastewaters. Further, the results were correlated with the enzyme activities of manganese peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP) by the fungus, which were found to play some significant role in decolourization of the wastewater. Results of replacing the costly carbon source glucose in the decolourization media with the more cheap molasses, however, revealed very high COD removal efficiency, but low decolourization efficiency of the industry wastewater. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A portable membrane contactor sampler for analysis of noble gases in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Han, Liang-Feng; Jaklitsch, Manfred; Aggarwal, Pradeep K

    2013-01-01

    To enable a wider use of dissolved noble gas concentrations and isotope ratios in groundwater studies, we have developed an efficient and portable sampling device using a commercially available membrane contactor. The device separates dissolved gases from a stream of water and collects them in a small copper tube (6 mm in diameter and 100 mm in length with two pinch-off clamps) for noble gas analysis by mass spectrometry. We have examined the performance of the sampler using a tank of homogeneous water prepared in the laboratory and by field testing. We find that our sampling device can extract heavier noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) more efficiently than the lighter ones (He and Ne). An extraction time of about 60 min at a flow rate of 3 L/min is sufficient for all noble gases extracted in the sampler to attain equilibrium with the dissolved phase. The extracted gas sample did not indicate fractionation of helium ((3) He/(4) He) isotopes or other noble gas isotopes. Field performance of the sampling device was tested using a groundwater well in Vienna and results were in excellent agreement with those obtained from the conventional copper tube sampling method. © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  9. Microbial degradation of phenol in high-salinity solutions in suspensions and hollow fiber membrane contactors.

    PubMed

    Juang, Ruey-Shin; Wu, Cheng-Ying

    2007-01-01

    A microporous polypropylene (PP) hollow fiber membrane contactor was used as a bioreactor to degrade phenol in aqueous solutions by Pseudomonas putida BCRC 14365 at 30 degrees C. The fibers were pre-wetted by ethanol to make them more hydrophilic. The initial cell density was fixed at 0.025 gl(-1). The effects of added NaCl concentration (0-1.78 M) and pH (3-8) in substrate solution on the biodegradation were studied. The experimental results by suspended cells were discussed. It was shown that the cells in microporous hollow fibers were unable to tolerate substrate solution pH to a larger range than those in suspensions. The suspended cells grew well on 100 mg l(-1) of phenol only at NaCl concentrations below 0.44 M. However, the cells in microporous hollow fibers could completely degrade 500 mg l(-1) of phenol in solutions containing NaCl concentration up to 1.52 M, which was due to the enhanced tolerance limit to salinity effect by the membrane-attached biofilms and the sufficiently slow mass transfer of NaCl through the membrane pores.

  10. Experimental design and statistical analysis in Rotating Disc Contactor (RDC) column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Wan Nurul Aiffah; Zakaria, Siti Aisyah; Noor, Nor Fashihah Mohd; Ariffin, Wan Nor Munirah

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the performance of the liquid-liquid extraction in Rotating Disc Contactor (RDC) Column that being used in industries. In this study, the performance of small diameter column RDC using the chemical system involving cumene/isobutryric asid/water are analyzed by the method of design of the experiments (DOE) and also Multiple Linear Regression (MLR). The DOE method are used to estimated the effect of four independent. Otherwise, by using Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) is to justify the relationship between the input variables and output variables and also to determine which variable are more influence for both output variable. The input variables for both method include rotor speed (Nr); ratio of flow (Fd); concentration of continuous inlet (Ccin); concentration of dispersed inlet (Cdin); interaction between Nr with Fd; interaction between Nr with Ccin; interaction Nr with Cdin. Meanwhile the output variables are concentration of continuous outlet (Ccout) and concentration of dispersed outlet (Cdout) on RDC column performance. By using this two method, we have two linear model represent two output of Ccout and Cdout for MLR. Lastly, the researcher want to determine which input variable that give more influence to output variable by using this two method. Based on the result, we obtained that rotor speed (Nr) more influence to dependent variable, Ccout and concentration of continuous inlet (Ccin) more influence to dependent variable, Cdout according the two method that was used.

  11. Experimental and modeling study on removal of pharmaceutically active compounds in rotating biological contactors.

    PubMed

    Vasiliadou, I A; Molina, R; Martínez, F; Melero, J A

    2014-06-15

    The aim of this work was to study the biological removal of pharmaceutical compounds in rotating biological contactors (RBCs) under continuous operation. A two-stage RBC was used, providing a total surface area of 1.41 m(2). Four pharmaceuticals of different therapeutic classes; caffeine, sulfamethoxazole, ranitidine and carbamazepine, were studied. Six experimental scenarios were applied to the RBC-system by varying substrates' loadings (12-54 gCOD/d), volumetric flow rate (2-5L/d), and pharmaceuticals' concentration (20-50 μg/L). The different conditions resulted to different solid retention times (SRT: 7-21 d) in each scenario. The increase of SRT due to variations of the operating conditions seemed to have a positive effect on pharmaceuticals' removal. Likewise, a negative correlation was observed between substrates' loading and pharmaceuticals' removal. An increase of initial pharmaceuticals' concentration resulted to decrease of SRT and pharmaceuticals' removal, suggesting a toxic effect to the biofilm. The maximum removals achieved were greater than 85% for all pharmaceuticals. Finally, a mathematical model which includes biofilm growth, substrates' utilization and pharmaceuticals' elimination was developed. The model predicts the contribution of sorption and biodegradation on pharmaceuticals' elimination taking into account the diffusion of pharmaceuticals inside biofilm.

  12. Hydraulic characteristics of an anoxic rotating biological contactor: influence of biofilm.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, P; Alves, M; Oliveira, R

    2001-10-01

    The hydraulic characteristics of an anoxic rotating biological contactor were studied under different flow rates. The experiments were carried out with the reactor clean (without biomass) and containing denitrifying biofilm (Alcaligenes denitrificans) covering the disks. Residence Time Distribution (RTD) experiments were performed by the stimulus-response technique using lithium chloride as tracer. Experiments without biomass revealed the existence of hydraulic dead volumes (around 40% for hydraulic residence time of 0.94 and 2 hours) that occur in corners, where stagnant eddies form. When in normal operation, with the disks covered by biofilm and with biogas production, these values decreased significantly. For hydraulic residence time (HRT) of 2 hours a minimum dead volume was observed, being appropriate to run the reactor under this condition, from the hydraulic viewpoint. The Dispersion number decreased with increasing HRT from 0.94 h on, for both types of experiment, without, and in the presence of biomass. For this HRT the dispersion number was maximal in both situations. A considerable diffusion of tracer into the biofilm was detected, being faster in the more hydrated biofilm, and Justifying the long tails observed in the RTD experimental curves.

  13. Rotating biological contactor reactor with biofilm promoting mats for treatment of benzene and xylene containing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sarayu, K; Sandhya, S

    2012-12-01

    A novel rotating biological contactor (RBC) bioreactor immobilized with microorganisms was designed to remove volatile organic compounds (VOC), such as benzene and xylene from emissions, and its performance was investigated. Gas-phase VOCs stripped by air injection were 98 % removed in the RBC when the superficial air flow rate was 375 ml/h (1,193 and 1,226 mg/l of benzene and xylene, respectively). The maximum removal rate was observed to be 1,007 and 1,872 mg/m(3)/day for benzene and xylene, respectively. The concentration profile of benzene and xylene along the RBC was dependent on the air flow rate and the degree of microbial adaptation. Air flow rate and residence time were found to be the most important operational parameters for the RBC reactor. By manipulating these operational parameters, the removal efficiency and capacity of the bioreactor could be enhanced. The kinetic constant K (s) demonstrated a linear relationship that indicated the maximum removal of benzene and xylene in RBC reactor. The phylogenic profile shows the presence of bacterium like Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp., and Enterococcus sp., which belonged to the phylum Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria that were responsible for the 98 % organic removal in the RBC.

  14. Mass Transfer Testing of a 12.5-cm Rotor Centrifugal Contactor

    SciTech Connect

    D. H. Meikrantz; T. G. Garn; J. D. Law; N. R. Mann; T. A. Todd

    2008-09-01

    TRUEX mass transfer tests were performed using a single stage commercially available 12.5 cm centrifugal contactor and stable cerium (Ce) and europium (Eu). Test conditions included throughputs ranging from 2.5 to 15 Lpm and rotor speeds of 1750 and 2250 rpm. Ce and Eu extraction forward distribution coefficients ranged from 13 to 19. The first and second stage strip back distributions were 0.5 to 1.4 and .002 to .004, respectively, throughout the dynamic test conditions studied. Visual carryover of aqueous entrainment in all organic phase samples was estimated at < 0.1 % and organic carryover into all aqueous phase samples was about ten times less. Mass transfer efficiencies of = 98 % for both Ce and Eu in the extraction section were obtained over the entire range of test conditions. The first strip stage mass transfer efficiencies ranged from 75 to 93% trending higher with increasing throughput. Second stage mass transfer was greater than 99% in all cases. Increasing the rotor speed from 1750 to 2250 rpm had no significant effect on efficiency for all throughputs tested.

  15. Recovery of methane from anaerobic process effluent using poly-di-methyl-siloxane membrane contactors.

    PubMed

    Cookney, J; Cartmell, E; Jefferson, B; McAdam, E J

    2012-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential for recovering dissolved methane from low temperature anaerobic processes treating domestic wastewater. In the absence of methane recovery, ca. 45% of the produced methane is released as a fugitive emission which results in a net carbon footprint of -0.47 kg CO(2e) m(-3). A poly-di-methyl-siloxane (PDMS) membrane contactor was applied to support sweep gas desorption of dissolved methane using nitrogen. The dense membrane structure controlled gaseous mass transfer thus recovery was maximised at low liquid velocities. At the lowest liquid velocity, V(L), of 0.0025 m s(-1), 72% of the dissolved methane was recovered. A vacuum was also trialled as an alternative to sweep-gas operation. At vacuum pressures below 30 mbar, reasonable methane recovery was observed at an intermediate V(L) of 0.0056 m s(-1). Results from this study demonstrate that dissolved methane recovery could increase net electrical production from low temperature anaerobic processes by ca. +0.043 kWh(e) m(-3) and reduce the net carbon footprint to +0.01 kg CO(2e) m(-3). However, further experimental work to optimise the gas-side hydrodynamics is required as well as validation of the long-term impacts of biofouling on process performance.

  16. Absorption of sparingly soluble gases by reactive media in self-aerated gas-liquid contactors: A scale-up procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Zundelevich, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Absorption of sparingly soluble gases, such as NO or O{sub 2}, is greatly enhanced if the latter react with the media. Among a dozen of reactive solvents for NO{sub x} abatement, aqueous acidic urea appears the most economically and environmentally attractive because urea is a cheap reagent and because products of reaction of urea with nitrous acid, formed in the liquid phase via absorption of NO and NO{sub 2}, are carbon dioxide and nitrogen, which can be directly released into the atmosphere. That makes urea process unique among other wet scrubbing processes that routinely produce secondary waste. Its full potential has never been realized, perhaps due to the lack of an efficient gas-liquid contactor to overcome low solubility of NO in aqueous solutions. LLNL has recently designed and built a bench scale gas-liquid contactor for nitric acid regeneration with oxygen. The contactor proved very effective in overcoming the problem of low solubility of oxygen converting back to nitric acid approximately 99% of nitrous acid formed at the cathode (which would otherwise convert to NO{sub x}). The bench scale contactor consists of a 12 inch diameter tank with self-inducting impeller/aerator of very high gas capacity. The aerator represents a 3.5 inch turbine mounted on a vertical shaft inside the draft tube equipped with a stator. During operation the lower half of the turbine induces liquid and the upper half induces gas from the draft tube. The new contactor offers two approaches to solving the NO{sub x} pollution problem. Where full recovery of nitric acid is desired, oxygen can be fed into the contactor to convert nitrous acid into nitric. This approach was demonstrated at LLNL. Alternately, in the proposed acidic urea process nitrous acid, as it forms from NO{sub x}, would be converted to nitrogen, water and carbon dioxide.

  17. Preparation of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) nanoparticles by desolvation using a membrane contactor: a new tool for large scale production.

    PubMed

    Yedomon, B; Fessi, H; Charcosset, C

    2013-11-01

    Albumin nanoparticles are attractive drug delivery systems as they can be prepared under soft conditions and incorporate several kinds of molecules. The aim of this study was to upscale the desolvation process for preparing Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) nanoparticles using a membrane contactor. At a first step, the BSA nanoparticles were prepared at small scale using a syringe pump. BSA nanoparticles of 139 nm in size, with a polydispersity index of 0.046, were obtained at the optimal conditions: pH 8.2, 100 mg mL(-1) BSA albumin solution (2 mL), and 1 mL min(-1) flow rate of ethanol addition (8 mL). The upscaling with a membrane contactor was achieved by permeating ethanol through the pores of a Shirasu Porous Glass (SPG Technology Co., Japan) membrane and circulating the aqueous phase tangentially to the membrane surface. By increasing the pressure of the ethanol from 1 to 2.7 bars, a progressive decrease in nanoparticle size was obtained with a high nanoparticles yield (around 94-96%). In addition, the flow rate of the circulating phase did not affect the BSA nanoparticle characteristics. At the optimal conditions (pH 8.2, 100 mg mL(-1) BSA albumin solution, pressure of ethanol 2.7 bars, flow rate of the circulating phase 30.7 mL s(-1)), the BSA nanoparticles showed similar characteristics to those obtained with the syringe pump. Large batches of BSA nanoparticles were prepared up to 10 g BSA. The BSA nanoparticles were stable at least during 2 months at 4 °C, and their characteristics were reproducible. It was then concluded that the membrane contactor technique could be a suitable method for the preparation of albumin nanoparticles at large scale with properties similar to that obtained at small scale.

  18. Packed cage rotating biological contactor system for treatment of cyanide wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sirianuntapiboon, Suntud; Chuamkaew, Chollada

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the efficiency of the packed cage rotating biological contactor (RBC) system with synthetic wastewater (SWW) containing 800 mg/l BOD(5) with various cyanide residue concentrations and hydraulic loading time. The results showed that cyanide had a negative effect to both the system's efficiency and bio-film quality. An increase in cyanide concentration led to a decrease in bio-film growth and the consequent reduction in the removal efficiency of the system. Also, the effluent suspended solids (SS) of the system was increased with increasing cyanide concentrations because the bio-film detached from the media due to the toxicity of the cyanide residue. The system showed the highest COD, BOD(5), TKN and cyanide removal efficiencies of 94.0 +/- 1.6%, 94.8 +/- 0.9%, 59.1 +/- 2.8% and 95.5 +/- 0.6%, respectively, with SWW containing 5 mg/l cyanide under HRT of 8 days, while they were only 88.8 +/- 0.7%, 89.5 +/- 0.5%, 40.3 +/- 1.1% and 93.60 +/- 0.09%, respectively, with SWW containing 40 mg/l cyanide. In addition, the effluent ammonia, nitrite and nitrate were increased with increases in cyanide concentration or loading. However, the system with SWW containing the highest cyanide concentration of 40 mg/l showed almost constant COD and BOD(5) removal efficiencies of 89% and 90%, even when the system was controlled under the lowest HRT of 8 h.

  19. Biofilm growth of Chlorella sorokiniana in a rotating biological contactor based photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Blanken, W; Janssen, M; Cuaresma, M; Libor, Z; Bhaiji, T; Wijffels, R H

    2014-12-01

    Microalgae biofilms could be used as a production platform for microalgae biomass. In this study, a photobioreactor design based on a rotating biological contactor (RBC) was used as a production platform for microalgae biomass cultivated in biofilm. In the photobioreactor, referred to as Algadisk, microalgae grow in biofilm on vertical rotating disks partially submerged in a growth medium. The objective is to evaluate the potential of the Algadisk photobioreactor with respect to the effects of disk roughness, disk rotation speed and CO2 concentration. These objectives where evaluated in relationship to productivity, photosynthetic efficiency, and long-term cultivation stability in a lab-scale Algadisk system. Although the lab-scale Algadisk system is used, operation parameters evaluated are relevant for scale-up. Chlorella Sorokiniana was used as model microalgae. In the lab-scale Algadisk reactor, productivity of 20.1 ± 0.7 g per m(2) disk surface per day and a biomass yield on light of 0.9 ± 0.04 g dry weight biomass per mol photons were obtained. Different disk rotation speeds did demonstrate minimal effects on biofilm growth and on the diffusion of substrate into the biofilm. CO2 limitation, however, drastically reduced productivity to 2-4 g per m(2) disk surface per day. Productivity could be maintained over a period of 21 weeks without re-inoculation of the Algadisk. Productivity decreased under extreme conditions such as pH 9-10, temperature above 40°C, and with low CO2 concentrations. Maximal productivity, however, was promptly recovered when optimal cultivation conditions were reinstated. These results exhibit an apparent opportunity to employ the Algadisk photobioreactor at large scale for microalgae biomass production if diffusion does not limit the CO2 supply. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Ammonia removal in the carbon contactor of a hybrid membrane process.

    PubMed

    Stoquart, Céline; Servais, Pierre; Barbeau, Benoit

    2014-12-15

    The hybrid membrane process (HMP) coupling powdered activated carbon (PAC) and low-pressure membrane filtration is emerging as a promising new option to remove dissolved contaminants from drinking water. Yet, defining optimal HMP operating conditions has not been confirmed. In this study, ammonia removal occurring in the PAC contactor of an HMP was simulated at lab-scale. Kinetics were monitored using three PAC concentrations (1-5-10 g L(-1)), three PAC ages (0-10-60 days), two temperatures (7-22 °C), in ambient influent condition (100 μg N-NH4 L(-1)) as well as with a simulated peak pollution scenario (1000 μg N-NH4L(-1)). The following conclusions were drawn: i) Using a colonized PAC in the HMP is essential to reach complete ammonia removal, ii) an older PAC offers a higher resilience to temperature decrease as well as lower operating costs; ii) PAC concentration inside the HMP reactor is not a key operating parameter as under the conditions tested, PAC colonization was not limited by the available surface; iii) ammonia flux limited biomass growth and iv) hydraulic retention time was a critical parameter. In the case of a peak pollution, the process was most probably phosphate-limited but a mixed adsorption/nitrification still allowed reaching a 50% ammonia removal. Finally, a kinetic model based on these experiments is proposed to predict ammonia removal occurring in the PAC reactor of the HMP. The model determines the relative importance of the adsorption and biological oxidation of ammonia on colonized PAC, and demonstrates the combined role of nitrification and residual adsorption capacity of colonized PAC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An electrically driven gas-liquid-liquid contactor for bioreactor and other applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, C.; Borole, A.P.; Kaufman, E.N.; DePaoli, D.W.

    1999-05-01

    An electrically driven gas-liquid-liquid bioreactor is described here, in which an aqueous medium containing a biocatalyst is introduced as a discontinuous phase into an organic-continuous liquid phase containing a substrate to be converted by the biocatalyst. A gas discontinuous phase, which may be needed to provide oxygen or a gaseous substrate to the biocatalyst, is also introduced into the bioreactor. In contrast to previous work on electrically driven contactors, it was found that the electroconvection generated by the electric field between parallel-plate electrodes may be employed to increase the volume fraction of the discontinuous gas phase in the bioreactor, providing the means for enhanced mass transfer. The electrically driven bioreactor was utilized for oil desulfurization experiments with Rhodococcus sp. IGTS8 bacteria as the biocatalyst. The organic phase used in the experiments was hexadecane containing dibenzothiophene, a model sulfur compound, that is oxidatively desulfurized to 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) by the bacteria in the presence of air or oxygen. The gas volume fraction was increased by 60% by the application of a pulsed electric field, thus providing a means for increased transport of oxygen needed for oxidative desulfurization. The velocity of droplets and bubbles was measured by a phase Doppler velocimeter. The average rising velocity of bubbles was decreased from 13 to less than 3 cm/s and the average horizontal velocity was increased from 0 to 5 cm/s as the field strength was increased from 0 to 4 kV/cm. Desulfurization rates ranged from 1.0 to 5.50 mg of 2-HBP/g of dry cells/h. The desulfurization rate with aeration was doubled under the electric field as compared to the zero-field desulfurization under the same conditions.

  2. Evaluation of the Hydraulic Capacity and Mass Transfer Efficiency of the CSSX Process with the Optimized Solvent in a Single Stage of 5.5-cm-Diameter Centrifugal Contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Jack Douglas; Tillotson, Richard Dean; Todd, Terry Allen

    2002-09-01

    The Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process has been selected for the separation of cesium from Savannah River Site high-level waste. The solvent composition used in the CSSX process was recently optimized so that the solvent is no longer supersaturated with respect to the calixarene crown ether extractant. Hydraulic performance and mass transfer efficiency testing of a single stage of 5.5-cm ORNL-designed centrifugal contactor has been performed for the CSSX process with the optimized solvent. Maximum throughputs of the 5.5-cm centrifugal contactor, as a function of contactor rotor speed, have been measured for the extraction, scrub, strip, and wash sections of the CSSX flowsheet at the baseline organic/aqueous flow ratios (O/A) of the process, as well as at O/A’s 20% higher and 20% lower than the baseline. Maximum throughputs are comparable to the design throughput of the contactor, as well as with throughputs obtained previously in a 5-cm centrifugal contactor with the non-optimized CSSX solvent formulation. The 20% variation in O/A had minimal effect on contactor throughput. Additionally, mass transfer efficiencies have been determined for the extraction and strip sections of the flowsheet. Efficiencies were lower than the process goal of greater than or equal to 80%, ranging from 72 to 75% for the extraction section and from 36 to 60% in the strip section. Increasing the mixing intensity and/or the solution level in the mixing zone of the centrifugal contactor (residence time) could potentially increase efficiencies. Several methods are available to accomplish this including (1) increasing the size of the opening in the bottom of the rotor, resulting in a contactor which is partially pumping instead of fully pumping, (2) decreasing the number of vanes in the contactor, (3) increasing the vane height, or (4) adding vanes on the rotor and baffles on the housing of the contactor. The low efficiency results obtained stress the importance of proper design

  3. Evaluation of the Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of the CSSX Process with the Optimized Solvent in a Single Stage of 5.5-Cm Diameter Centrifugal Contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Law, J.D.; Tillotson, R.D.; Todd, T.A.

    2002-09-19

    The Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process has been selected for the separation of cesium from Savannah River Site high-level waste. The solvent composition used in the CSSX process was recently optimized so that the solvent is no longer supersaturated with respect to the calixarene crown ether extractant. Hydraulic performance and mass transfer efficiency testing of a single stage of 5.5-cm ORNL-designed centrifugal contactor has been performed for the CSSX process with the optimized solvent. Maximum throughputs of the 5.5-cm centrifugal contactor, as a function of contactor rotor speed, have been measured for the extraction, scrub, strip, and wash sections of the CSSX flowsheet at the baseline organic/aqueous flow ratios (O/A) of the process, as well as at O/A's 20% higher and 20% lower than the baseline. Maximum throughputs are comparable to the design throughput of the contactor, as well as with throughputs obtained previously in a 5-cm centrifugal contactor with the non-optimized CSSX solvent formulation. The 20% variation in O/A had minimal effect on contactor throughput. Additionally, mass transfer efficiencies have been determined for the extraction and strip sections of the flowsheet. Efficiencies were lower than the process goal of greater than or equal to 80%, ranging from 72 to 75% for the extraction section and from 36 to 60% in the strip section. Increasing the mixing intensity and/or the solution level in the mixing zone of the centrifugal contactor (residence time) could potentially increase efficiencies. Several methods are available to accomplish this including (1) increasing the size of the opening in the bottom of the rotor, resulting in a contactor which is partially pumping instead of fully pumping, (2) decreasing the number of vanes in the contactor, (3) increasing the vane height, or (4) adding vanes on the rotor and baffles on the housing of the contactor. The low efficiency results obtained stress the importance of proper design of

  4. Centrifugal contactor with liquid mixing and flow control vanes and method of mixing liquids of different phases

    DOEpatents

    Jubin, Robert T.; Randolph, John D.

    1991-01-01

    The invention is directed to a centrifugal contactor for solvent extraction systems. The centrifugal contactor is provided with an annular vertically oriented mixing chamber between the rotor housing and the rotor for mixing process liquids such as the aqueous and organic phases of the solvent extraction process used for nuclear fuel reprocessing. A set of stationary helically disposed vanes carried by the housing is in the lower region of the mixing chamber at a location below the process-liquid inlets for the purpose of urging the liquids in an upward direction toward the inlets and enhancing the mixing of the liquids and mass transfer between the liquids. The upper region of the mixing vessel above the inlets for the process liquids is also provided with a set helically disposed vanes carried by the housing for urging the process liquids in a downward direction when the liquid flow rates through the inlets are relatively high and the liquids contact the vane set in the upper region. The use of these opposing vane sets in the mixing zone maintains the liquid in the mixing zone at suitable levels.

  5. A system for field gas-extraction of 85Kr, 39Ar and 81Kr using SuperPhobic membrane contactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burk, L.; Suckow, A.; Cook, P.; Mathouchanh, E.

    2013-12-01

    Radioactive noble gas isotopes are established tools for assessing groundwater movement and transport processes on time scales of decades (85Kr), centuries (39Ar) and many millenia (81Kr). While the atomic trap trace analysis (ATTA) technology promises small sample sizes for these isotopes, field gas extraction will remain the method of choice for several years to come. Recently CSIRO obtained decommissioned radiocarbon gas proportional counters and targets to use them for 85Kr. We aim for a sample size of 50μL Kr corresponding to the gas extracted from 500-1000L water. Flinders University and CSIRO have developed a field-deployable extraction system for large volume gas-extraction in the field. It uses two membrane contactors (MEMBRANA SuperPhobic 4x13) allowing flow rates of up to 50L/min in serial mode. Switching to parallel flow through both contactors is possible, allowing even higher water flow rates. The system automatically logs water temperature, water pressure, water flow rate, gas pressure of the sample, vacuum pressure at the contactor and all valve states, using an Endress + Hauser RSG40 Memograph M. The use of SuperPhobic contactors results in ten times less water in the gas fraction than reported for earlier systems. With the two contactors in serial configuration, gas extraction efficiencies, determined for O2, N2 and Ar, are better than 95% at 5L/min water flow. They are still above 80% for flow rates up to 20L/min in parallel configuration for O2, N2 and Ar. No measurable isotopic fractionation of the target isotope ratios of argon and krypton is to be expected at these high extraction efficiencies.

  6. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, Narayan; Ingersoll, David

    1995-01-01

    Electrolyte salts for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts.

  7. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-11-28

    Electrolyte salts are disclosed for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts. 2 figs.

  8. CaBr{sub 2} hydrolysis for HBr production using a direct sparging contactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Panchal, C. B.; Doctor, R. D.; Energy Systems

    2009-09-01

    The calcium-bromine cycle being investigated is a novel continuous hybrid cycle for hydrogen production employing both heat and electricity. Calcium bromide (CaBr{sub 2}) hydrolysis generates hydrogen bromide (HBr) which is electrolyzed to produce hydrogen. The CaBr{sub 2} hydrolysis at 1050 K (777 C) is endothermic with the heat of reaction {delta}G{sub T} = 181.5 KJ/mol (43.38 kcal/mol) and the Gibbs free energy change is positive at 99.6 kJ/mol (23.81 kcal/mol). What makes this hydrolysis reaction attractive is both its rate and that well over half the thermodynamic requirements for water-splitting heat of reaction of {delta}G{sub T} = 285.8 KJ/mol (68.32 kcal/mol) are supplied at this stage using heat rather than electricity. Molten-phase calcium bromide reactors may overcome the technical barriers associated with earlier hydrolysis approaches using supported solid-phase calcium bromide studied in the Japanese UT-3 cycle. Before constructing the experiment two design concepts were evaluated using COMSOL{trademark} multi-physics models; (1) the first involved sparging steam into a calcium-bromide melt, while (2) the second considered a 'spray-dryer' contactor spraying molten calcium bromide counter-currently to upward-flowing steam. A recent paper describes this work. These studies indicated that sparging steam into a calcium-bromide melt is more feasible than spraying molten calcium bromide droplets into steam. Hence, an experimental sparging hydrolysis reactor using a mullite tube (ID 70 mm) was constructed capable of holding 0.3-0.5 kg (1.5-2.5 x 10{sup -3} kg mol) CaBr{sub 2} forming a melt with a maximum 0.08 m (8 cm) depth. Sparging steam at a steam rate of 0.02 mol/mol of CaBr{sub 2} per minute (1.2-2.3 x 10{sup -5} kg/s), into this molten bath promptly yielded HBr in a stable operation that converted up to 25% of the calcium bromide. The kinetic constant derived from the experimental data was 2.17 x 10{sup -12} kmol s{sup -1} m{sup -2} MPa{sup -1} for

  9. Modeling the Transverse Shell-side Mass Transfer in Hollow Fiber Membrane Contactors at Low Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, V. A.; Volkov, V. V.; Bildukevich, A. V.

    A method for calculating the external mass transfer in a contactor with a transverse confined flow of a viscous incompressible liquid (gas) past hollow fibers at low Reynolds numbers is proposed. The method is based on the concept of regular arrays of parallel fibers with a well-defined flowfield. As a simplest model system, a row of parallel fibers is considered, for which dependences of a drag force and an efficiency of a solute retention on the inter-fiber distance, membrane mass transfer coefficient, Peclet and Reynolds numbers are computed. The influence of the fluid inertia on the mass transport is studied. It is shown that a linear Stokes equations can be used for as higher Re numbers, as denser is the fiber array. In this case the flow field is independent on the Re number, and analytical solutions for the flowfield and fiber sorption efficiency (fiber Sherwood number) can be used.

  10. Use of the electrically driven emulsion-phase contactor for a biphasic liquid-liquid enzyme system

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, T.C.; Cosgrove, J.M.; DePaoli, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    An alternative approach to the operation of bioprocessing systems within non-aqueous environments would require the development of reaction systems that would provide effective interfacial contact between the biocatalyst, contained within an aqueous phase, and the organic phase containing the substrate. A biphasic liquid-liquid (BLL) reactor that provides for intimate liquid-liquid contact would be the most probable approach for this application. For the BLL reactions considered in this work, the overall effectiveness of the system will depend on both compatibility of the biocatalyst with the chemical species present and intrinsic reaction and interfacial transport phenomena typically involved with liquid-liquid operations. The focus of this article is to investigate the removal and oxidation of p-cresol dissolved in toluene by aqueous-phase horseradish peroxidase. Contacting of the liquid-liquid biphasic enzyme system is carried out in an advanced solvent extraction contacting device, the electrically driven emulsion-phase contactor (EPC).

  11. 3D printed modular centrifugal contactors and method for separating moieties using 3D printed optimized surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wardle, Kent E.

    2017-08-29

    The present invention provides an annular centrifugal contactor, having a housing to receive a plurality of liquids; a rotor inside the housing; an annular mixing zone, with a plurality of fluid retention reservoirs; and an adjustable stem that can be raised to restrict the flow of a liquid into the rotor or lowered to increase the flow of liquid into the rotor. The invention also provides a method for transferring moieties from a first liquid to a second liquid, the method having the steps of combining the fluids in a housing whose interior has helically shaped first channels; subjecting the fluids to a spinning rotor to produce a mixture, whereby the channels simultaneously conduct the mixture downwardly and upwardly; and passing the mixture through the rotor to contact second channels, whereby the channels pump the second liquid through a first aperture while the first fluid exits a second aperture.

  12. Control of nitratation in an oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification/denitrification rotating biological contactor through disc immersion level variation.

    PubMed

    Courtens, Emilie N P; Boon, Nico; De Clippeleir, Haydée; Berckmoes, Karla; Mosquera, Mariela; Seuntjens, Dries; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E

    2014-03-01

    With oxygen supply playing a crucial role in an oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification/denitrification (OLAND) rotating biological contactor (RBC), its controlling factors were investigated in this study. Disc rotation speeds (1.8 and 3.6rpm) showed no influence on the process performance of a lab-scale RBC, although abiotic experiments showed a significant effect on the oxygenation capacity. Estimations of the biological oxygen uptake rate revealed that 85-89% of the oxygen was absorbed by the microorganisms during the air exposure of the discs. Indeed, increasing the disc immersion (50 to 75-80%) could significantly suppress undesired nitratation, on the short and long term. The presented results demonstrated that nitratation could be controlled by the immersion level and revealed that oxygen control in an OLAND RBC should be predominantly based on the atmospheric exposure percentage of the discs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. International Space Station (ISS) Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) Utilization Plan Assessment Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Pellerano, Amri; Iannello, Christopher J.; Garrett, Henry B.; Ging, Andrew T.; Katz, Ira; Keith, R. Lloyd; Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily M.; Schneider, Todd A.; Whittlesey, Edward J.; Wollack, Edward J.; Wright, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) vehicle undergoes spacecraft charging as it interacts with Earth's ionosphere and magnetic field. The interaction can result in a large potential difference developing between the ISS metal chassis and the local ionosphere plasma environment. If an astronaut conducting extravehicular activities (EVA) is exposed to the potential difference, then a possible electrical shock hazard arises. The control of this hazard was addressed by a number of documents within the ISS Program (ISSP) including Catastrophic Safety Hazard for Astronauts on EVA (ISS-EVA-312-4A_revE). The safety hazard identified the risk for an astronaut to experience an electrical shock in the event an arc was generated on an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) surface. A catastrophic safety hazard, by the ISS requirements, necessitates mitigation by a two-fault tolerant system of hazard controls. Traditionally, the plasma contactor units (PCUs) on the ISS have been used to limit the charging and serve as a "ground strap" between the ISS structure and the surrounding ionospheric plasma. In 2009, a previous NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) team evaluated the PCU utilization plan (NESC Request #07-054-E) with the objective to assess whether leaving PCUs off during non-EVA time periods presented risk to the ISS through assembly completion. For this study, in situ measurements of ISS charging, covering the installation of three of the four photovoltaic arrays, and laboratory testing results provided key data to underpin the assessment. The conclusion stated, "there appears to be no significant risk of damage to critical equipment nor excessive ISS thermal coating damage as a result of eliminating PCU operations during non- EVA times." In 2013, the ISSP was presented with recommendations from Boeing Space Environments for the "Conditional" Marginalization of Plasma Hazard. These recommendations include a plan that would keep the PCUs off during EVAs when the

  14. Salt tectonics on Venus

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.A.; Amsbury, D.

    1986-05-01

    The discovery of a surprisingly high deuterium/hydrogen ratio on Venus immediately led to the speculation that Venus may have once had a volume of surface water comparable to that of the terrestrial oceans. The authors propose that the evaporation of this putative ocean may have yielded residual salt deposits that formed various terrain features depicted in Venera 15 and 16 radar images. By analogy with models for the total evaporation of the terrestrial oceans, evaporite deposits on Venus should be at least tens to hundreds of meters thick. From photogeologic evidence and in-situ chemical analyses, it appears that the salt plains were later buried by lava flows. On Earth, salt diapirism leads to the formation of salt domes, anticlines, and elongated salt intrusions - features having dimensions of roughly 1 to 100 km. Due to the rapid erosion of salt by water, surface evaporite landforms are only common in dry regions such as the Zagros Mountains of Iran, where salt plugs and glaciers exist. Venus is far drier than Iran; extruded salt should be preserved, although the high surface temperature (470/sup 0/C) would probably stimulate rapid salt flow. Venus possesses a variety of circular landforms, tens to hundreds of kilometers wide, which could be either megasalt domes or salt intrusions colonizing impact craters. Additionally, arcurate bands seen in the Maxwell area of Venus could be salt intrusions formed in a region of tectonic stress. These large structures may not be salt features; nonetheless, salt features should exist on Venus.

  15. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    A molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication.

  16. Evaluation of high-efficiency gas-liquid contactors for natural gas processing. Second semiannual technical progress report, April 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this proposed program is to evaluate the potential of rotating gas-liquid contactors for natural gas processing by expanding the currently available database. This expansion will focus on application of this technology to environments representative of those typically encountered in natural gas processing plants. Operational and reliability concerns will be addressed while generating pertinent engineering data relating to the mass-transfer process. Work to be performed this reporting period are: complete all negotiations and processing of agreements; complete assembly, modifications, shakedown, and conduct fluid dynamic studies using the plastic rotary contactor unit; confirmation of project test matrix; and locate, and transport an amine plant and dehydration plant. Accomplishment for this period are presented.

  17. Liquid-phase membrane extraction of targeted pesticides from manufacturing wastewaters in a hollow fibre contactor with feed-stream recycle.

    PubMed

    Đorđević, Jelena; Vladisavljević, Goran T; Trtić-Petrović, Tatjana

    2017-01-01

    A two-phase membrane extraction in a hollow fibre contactor with feed-stream recycle was applied to remove selected pesticides (tebufenozide, linuron, imidacloprid, acetamiprid and dimethoate) from their mixed aqueous solutions. The contactor consisted of 50 polypropylene hollow fibres impregnated with 5% tri-n-octylphosphine oxide in di-n-hexyl ether. For low-polar pesticides with log P ≥ 2 (tebufenozide and linuron), the maximum removal efficiency increased linearly from 85% to 96% with increasing the feed flow rate. The maximum removal efficiencies of more polar pesticides were significantly higher under feed recirculation (86%) than in a continuous single-pass operation (30%). It was found from the Wilson's plot that the mass transfer resistance of the liquid membrane can be neglected for low-polar pesticides. The pesticide removals from commercial formulations were similar to those from pure pesticide solutions, indicating that built-in adjuvants did not affect the extraction process.

  18. Retrospective salt tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.P.A.

    1996-12-31

    The conceptual breakthroughs in understanding salt tectonics can be recognized by reviewing the history of salt tectonics, which divides naturally into three parts: the pioneering era, the fluid era, and the brittle era. The pioneering era (1856-1933) featured the search for a general hypothesis of salt diapirism, initially dominated by bizarre, erroneous notions of igneous activity, residual islands, in situ crystallization, osmotic pressures, and expansive crystallization. Gradually data from oil exploration constrained speculation. The effects of buoyancy versus orogeny were debated, contact relations were characterized, salt glaciers were discovered, and the concepts of downbuilding and differential loading were proposed as diapiric mechanisms. The fluid era (1933-{approximately}1989) was dominated by the view that salt tectonics resulted from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in which a dense fluid overburden having negligible yield strength sinks into a less dense fluid salt layer, displacing it upward. Density contrasts, viscosity contrasts, and dominant wavelengths were emphasized, whereas strength and faulting of the overburden were ignored. During this era, palinspastic reconstructions were attempted; salt upwelling below thin overburdens was recognized; internal structures of mined diapirs were discovered; peripheral sinks, turtle structures, and diapir families were comprehended; flow laws for dry salt were formulated; and contractional belts on divergent margins and allochthonous salt sheets were recognized. The 1970s revealed the basic driving force of salt allochthons, intrasalt minibasins, finite strains in diapirs, the possibility of thermal convection in salt, direct measurement of salt glacial flow stimulated by rainfall, and the internal structure of convecting evaporites and salt glaciers. The 1980`s revealed salt rollers, subtle traps, flow laws for damp salt, salt canopies, and mushroom diapirs.

  19. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-08-04

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport.

  20. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  1. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  2. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  3. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  4. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  5. Contactor Energy Requirements for Capturing CO2 From ambient air using NaOH determined in a pilot-scale prototype system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolaroff, J. K.; Keith, D.; Lowry, G.

    2005-12-01

    Systems for capturing CO2 from ambient air for sequestration have recently been proposed (e.g. Dubey et al., 2002; Zeman and Lackner, 2004; Keith et al., 2004). Capture from ambient air has a number of structural advantages over capture from point sources; in particular it makes possible future emissions scenarios with negative net CO2 emissions. The systems suggested use either a Ca(OH)2 or NaOH solution to capture CO2 and then regenerate the solution in a chemical loop. The energy requirements of such a system, however, have been hotly disputed (Herzog, 2003). The energy requirements and effectiveness of the chemical regeneration are well established as they are practiced on a large scale in the industrial kraft process used in pulp and paper production, but the energy and land use requirements of a contactor for this system are uncertain as this component of the system is not implemented industrially. In this research, we address the most controversial component of the system, the contactor, which extracts CO2 from air into solution. A prototype contactor with a spray tower design is constructed (1m by 6m), and CO2 absorption by a NaOH solution spray (5 l/min) is measured. The CO2 absorption efficiency and energy requirements per unit CO2 absorbed are calculated. The energy requirements of the contactor are found to be on the order of 10-40 kJ/mol-CO2, which is small compared to the energy of combustion of fossil fuels, and compared with the energy required for the regeneration steps. Thus, a NaOH-based spray tower design can serve as an energy-efficient contactor for capturing CO2 from ambient air. Dubey, M. K., Ziock, H., Rueff, G., Elliott, S., and Smith, W. S. (2002). ``Extraction of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through engineered chemical sinkage''. ACS -- Division of Fuel Chemistry Reprints, 47(1):81--84. Herzog, H. (2003). Assessing the feasibility of capturing co2 from the air. Technical report, MIT Laboratory for Energy and the Environment. Keith

  6. SALT Science Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David; Schroeder, Anja

    2015-06-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) has seen great changes in the last years following the beginning of full time science operations in 2011. The three first generation instruments, namely the SALTICAM imager, the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) and its multiple modes and finally in 2014, the new High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS), have commissioned it. The SALT community now eagerly anticipate the installation and commissioning of the near-infrared arm of RSS, likely to commence in 2016. The the third "Science with SALT" conference was held at the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Study from 1-5 June 2015. The goals of this conference were to: -Present and discuss recent results from SALT observations; -Anticipate scientific programs that will be carried out with new SALT instrumentation such as RSS-NIR; -Provide a scientific environment in which to foster inter-institutional and inter-facility collaborations between scientists at the different SALT partners; -Provide an opportunity for students and postdocs to become more engaged in SALT science and operations; -Encourage the scientific strategic planning that will be necessary to insure an important role for SALT in an era of large astronomical facilities in the southern hemisphere such as MeerKAT, the SKA, LSST, and ALMA; -Consider options for future instrumentation and technical development of SALT; and, -Present, discuss, and engage in the SALT Collateral Benefits program led by SAAO. Conference proceedings editors: David Buckley and Anja Schroeder

  7. New photocatalytic contactors obtained by PECVD deposition of TiO 2 thin layers on the surface of macroporous supports. PECVD TiO2-based membranes as photocatalytic contactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M.; Roualdès, S.; Ayral, A.

    2015-07-01

    Two different kinds of PECVD anatase-based composite membranes have been successfully prepared by PECVD synthesis (at 150 °C)/post-annealing (at 300 °C) of a titania film deposited on macroporous supports as a top-layer or a skin-coverage. Photocatalytic activity of PECVD anatase films has been proved performing Pilkington test and methylene blue degradation determination in a lab-scale diffusion cell. Measurements of methylene blue degradation and water flow in a pilot-scale dynamic unit have enabled to show the performance of PECVD anatase-based membranes in terms of permeation and photocatalytic properties. Whereas bi-layered membranes present higher photo-degradation ability (up to 2.5 × 10-8 mol s-1 m-2 destroyed methylene blue moles per unit of time and of membrane surface area), skin-covered membranes are characterized by higher water permeance (up to 6800 L h-1 m-2 bar-1). So both kinds of membranes should have an interest as photocatalytic contactors.

  8. Photochemistry of triarylsulfonium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Dektar, J.L.; Hacker, N.P. )

    1990-08-01

    The photolysis of triphenylsulfonium, tris(4-methylphenyl)sulfonium, tris(4-chlorophenyl)sulfonium, several monosubstituted (4-F, 4-Cl, 4-Me, 4-MeO, 4-PhS, and 4-PhCO), and disubstituted (4,4{prime}-Me{sub 2} and 4,4{prime}-(MeO){sub 2}) triphenylsulfonium salts was examined in solution. It was found that direct irradiation of triphenylsulfonium salts produced new rearrangement products, phenylthiobiphenyls, along with diphenyl sulfide, which had been previously reported. Similarly, the triarylsulfonium salts, with the exception of the (4-(phenylthio)phenyl)diphenylsulfonium salts produced new rearrangement products, phenylthiobiphenyls, along with diphenyl sulfide, which had been previously reported. Similarly, the triarylsulfonium salts, with the exception of the (4-(phenylthio)phenyl)diphenylsulfonium salts, gave the new rearrangement products. The mechanism for direct photolysis is proposed to occur from the singlet excited states to give a predominant heterolytic cleavage along with some homolytic cleavage.

  9. A history of salt.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, M; Capasso, G; Di Leo, V A; De Santo, N G

    1994-01-01

    The medical history of salt begins in ancient times and is closely related to different aspects of human history. Salt may be extracted from sea water, mineral deposits, surface encrustations, saline lakes and brine springs. In many inland areas, wood was used as a fuel source for evaporation of brine and this practice led to major deafforestation in central Europe. Salt played a central role in the economies of many regions, and is often reflected in place names. Salt was also used as a basis for population censuses and taxation, and salt monopolies were practised in many states. Salt was sometimes implicated in the outbreak of conflict, e.g. the French Revolution and the Indian War of Independence. Salt has also been invested with many cultural and religious meanings, from the ancient Egyptians to the Middle Ages. Man's innate appetite for salt may be related to his evolution from predominantly vegetarian anthropoids, and it is noteworthy that those people who live mainly on protein and milk or who drink salty water do not generally salt their food, whereas those who live mainly on vegetables, rice and cereals use much more salt. Medicinal use tended to emphasize the positive aspects of salt, e.g. prevention of putrefaction, reduction of tissue swelling, treatment of diarrhea. Evidence was also available to ancient peoples of its relationship to fertility, particularly in domestic animals. The history of salt thus represents a unique example for studying the impact of a widely used dietary substance on different important aspects of man's life, including medical philosophy.

  10. Molten Salt Electrochemical Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-31

    metal tetrafluoroborates were examined for similar behavior. Commercial samples of the lithium, sodium and potassium salts were used, while the...REPORT a PERID C £0 inal, 1 June 1980-31 March Molten Salt Electrochemical Systems 1983 6 PERFORMING OŘG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(a) I CONTRACT OR...dilfferent from Reporl) IS. KEY WORDS (Continue ora ow... side 55 n~cssay and Identify by block number ) Molten Salt , Phase Diagram, Electrolyte 30

  11. Dosimetry using silver salts

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.

    2003-06-24

    The present invention provides a method for detecting ionizing radiation. Exposure of silver salt AgX to ionizing radiation results in the partial reduction of the salt to a mixture of silver salt and silver metal. The mixture is further reduced by a reducing agent, which causes the production of acid (HX) and the oxidized form of the reducing agent (R). Detection of HX indicates that the silver salt has been exposed to ionizing radiation. The oxidized form of the reducing agent (R) may also be detected. The invention also includes dosimeters employing the above method for detecting ionizing radiation.

  12. Oxygen-limited nitrogen removal in a lab-scale rotating biological contactor treating an ammonium-rich wastewater.

    PubMed

    Pynaert, K; Wyffels, S; Sprengers, R; Boeckx, P; Van Cleemput, O; Verstraete, W

    2002-01-01

    A lab-scale Rotating Biological Contactor (RBC) was operated with the purpose of oxygen-limited (autotrophic) nitrification-denitrification of an ammonium-rich synthetic wastewater without Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). Based on the field observations that RBCs receiving anaerobic effluents come to anoxic ammonium removal, the RBC was inoculated with methanogenic sludge. Some 100 days after the addition of the anaerobic sludge to the reactor as a possible means of a rapid initiation of the nitrogen (N) removal process, a maximum ammonium removal of 1,550 mg N m(-2) d(-1) was achieved. Batch tests with 15N labeled ammonium and nitrite indicated that a large part of that N was removed via oxygen-limited oxidation of ammonium with nitrite as the electron acceptor. The other part was removed via conventional denitrification, presumably with COD released from lysis of cells. Species identification of the most abundant microorganisms revealed that Nitrosomonas spp. were the dominant ammonium-oxidizers in the sludge. Thus far, the molecular characterization of the sludge could not show the presence of Planctomycetes among the most dominant species. Overall this experiment confirms the property of the RBC system to remove ammonium to nitrogen gas without the use of heterotrophic carbon source.

  13. Application of annular centrifugal contactors in the hot test of the improved total partitioning process for high level liquid waste.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wuhua; Chen, Jing; Wang, Jianchen; Wang, Shuwei; Feng, Xiaogui; Wang, Xinghai; Li, Shaowei; Xu, Chao

    2014-08-15

    High level liquid waste (HLLW) produced from the reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel still contains moderate amounts of uranium, transuranium (TRU) actinides, (90)Sr, (137)Cs, etc., and thus constitutes a permanent hazard to the environment. The partitioning and transmutation (P&T) strategy has increasingly attracted interest for the safe treatment and disposal of HLLW, in which the partitioning of HLLW is one of the critical technical issues. An improved total partitioning process, including a TRPO (tri-alkylphosphine oxide) process for the removal of actinides, a CESE (crown ether strontium extraction) process for the removal of Sr, and a CECE (calixcrown ether cesium extraction) process for the removal of Cs, has been developed to treat Chinese HLLW. A 160-hour hot test of the improved total partitioning process was carried out using 72-stage 10-mm-dia annular centrifugal contactors (ACCs) and genuine HLLW. The hot test results showed that the average DFs of total α activity, Sr and Cs were 3.57 × 10(3), 2.25 × 10(4) and 1.68 × 10(4) after the hot test reached equilibrium, respectively. During the hot test, 72-stage 10-mm-dia ACCs worked stable, continuously with no stage failing or interruption of the operation.

  14. Biological waste gas treatment with a modified rotating biological contactor. Iota. Control of biofilm growth and long-term performance.

    PubMed

    Vinage, I; von Rohr, P Rudolf

    2003-11-01

    In this work, we introduce a modified rotating biological contactor (RBC) system and demonstrate its feasibility by applying the newly devised process to the biological treatment of artificial waste gas. In the proposed system, the waste gas is introduced to the bioreactor in the spacings between the rotating discs through a hollow shaft, thus allowing for intimate gas-liquid contact. A 91-l modified RBC containing 20 biofilm support discs 40 cm in diameter was used in the experiments. Toluene was used as the model pollutant, and the system was operated under standard operating conditions for more than one year in order to investigate its long-term performance and assess its ability to control the growth of the biofilm. It was demonstrated that the proposed system allows to efficiently control the growth of the biofilm, thus overcoming the clogging problem inherent in most conventional methods for the biological treatment of waste gas. Moreover, the system was shown to exhibit stationary long-term performance for a period of more than one year, hence indicating its feasibility for industrial application.

  15. Biological nitrogen removal from landfill leachate by deammonification assisted by heterotrophic denitrification in a rotating biological contactor (RBC).

    PubMed

    Cema, G; Wiszniowski, J; Zabczyński, S; Zabłocka-Godlewska, E; Raszka, A; Surmacz-Górska, J

    2007-01-01

    Due to negative environmental effects of nitrogen discharge to recipients and increasingly stringent effluent standards, effective nitrogen removal is necessity. Biological methods are the simplest and cheapest way to treat wastewater; however, it may become an extremely expensive option when high influent nitrogen concentrations are measured and there is a lack of biodegradable organic carbon. Therefore, there is a great need to find new solutions and improve existing technologies. The deammonification is an excellent example of such a new process that requires considerably low amounts of organic carbon and oxygen in comparison to conventional nitrification/denitrification. The main objective of presented research was to investigate an Anammox process accompanied with autotrophic nitrification and heterotrophic denitrification in one rotating biological contactor (RBC). During the research period, it was possible to carry out the Anammox process in low temperature below 20 'C. Additionally, it was found that the process is insensitive to high nitrite concentration in the reactor, up to 100 g NO2-N m(-3), resulting only in a temporary decrease in removal rates. Furthermore, analysis of data indicated that the Stover-Kincannon model can be used for the description of ammonium and nitrite removal processes.

  16. Decolorization of bleach plant effluent by mucoralean and white-rot fungi in a rotating biological contactor reactor.

    PubMed

    Driessel, B V; Christov, L

    2001-01-01

    Bleach plant effluents from the pulp and paper industry generated during bleaching with chlorine-containing chemicals are highly colored and also partly toxic due to the presence of chloro-organics, hence the need for pretreatment prior to discharge. In a rotating biological contactor (RBC) reactor effluent decolorization was studied using Coriolus versicolor, a white-rot fungus and Rhizomucor pusillus strain RM7, a mucoralean fungus. Decolorization by both fungi was directly proportional to initial color intensities. It was found that the extent of decolorization was not adversely affected by color intensity, except at the lowest level tested. It was shown that decolorization of 53 to 73% could be attained using a hydraulic retention time of 23 h. With R. pusillus, 55% of AOX were removed compared to 40% by C. versicolor. Fungal treatment with both R. pusillus and C. versicolor rendered the effluent essentially nontoxic. Addition of glucose to decolorization media stimulated color removal by C. versicolor, but not with R. pusillus. Ligninolytic enzymes (manganese peroxidase and laccase) were only detected in effluent treated by C. versicolor. It seems that there are definite differences in the decoloring mechanisms between the white-rot fungus (adsorption + biodegradation) and the mucoralean fungus (adsorption). This aspect needs to be investigated in greater detail to verify the mode responsible for the decolorization activity in both types of fungi.

  17. Low-ammonia niche of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in rotating biological contactors of a municipal wastewater treatment plant

    PubMed Central

    Sauder, Laura A; Peterse, Francien; Schouten, Stefan; Neufeld, Josh D

    2012-01-01

    The first step of nitrification is catalysed by both ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA), but physicochemical controls on the relative abundance and function of these two groups are not yet fully understood, especially in freshwater environments. This study investigated ammonia-oxidizing populations in nitrifying rotating biological contactors (RBCs) from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Individual RBC stages are arranged in series, with nitrification at each stage creating an ammonia gradient along the flowpath. This RBC system provides a valuable experimental system for testing the hypothesis that ammonia concentration determines the relative abundance of AOA and AOB. The results demonstrate that AOA increased as ammonium decreased across the RBC flowpath, as indicated by qPCR for thaumarchaeal amoA and 16S rRNA genes, and core lipid (CL) and intact polar lipid (IPL) crenarchaeol abundances. Overall, there was a negative logarithmic relationship (R2 = 0.51) between ammonium concentration and the relative abundance of AOA amoA genes. A single AOA population was detected in the RBC biofilms; this phylotype shared low amoA and 16S rRNA gene homology with existing AOA cultures and enrichments. These results provide evidence that ammonia availability influences the relative abundances of AOA and AOB, and that AOA are abundant in some municipal wastewater treatment systems. PMID:22639927

  18. Landfill leachate treatment using a rotating biological contactor and an upward-flow anaerobic sludge bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, E. Vergara, M.; Moreno, Y.

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes the feasibility of an aerobic system (rotating biological contactor, RBC) and a biological anaerobic system (upward-flow anaerobic sludge bed reactor) at small scale for the treatment of a landfill leachate. In the first phase of the aerobic system study, a cyclic-batch RBC system was used to select perforated acetate discs among three different acetate disc configurations. These discs were chosen on the basis of high COD removal (65%) and biological stability. In the second phase, the RBC system (using four stages) was operated continuously at different hydraulic retention times (HRT), at different rotational speeds, and with varying organic concentrations of the influent leachate (2500-9000 mg L{sup -1}). Forty percent of the total surface area of each perforated disc was submerged in the leachate. A COD removal of about 52% was obtained at an HRT of 24 h and a rotational speed of 6 rpm. For the anaerobic system, the reactor was evaluated with a volumetric organic load of 3273 g-COD m{sup -3} day{sup -1} at an HRT of 54, 44, 39, 24 and 17 h. At these conditions, the system reached COD removal efficiencies of 62%, 61%, 59%, 44% and 24%, respectively.

  19. Effect of disintegrated sludge recycling on membrane permeability in a membrane bioreactor combined with a turbulent jet flow ozone contactor.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Byung-Kook; Kim, Jae-Hyuk; Ahn, Chang Hoon; Lee, Chung-Hak; Song, Jae-Yoon; Ra, Young-Hyun

    2010-03-01

    We have combined a turbulent jet flow ozone contactor (TJC) with a membrane bioreactor (MBR) to establish a zero-discharge system in terms of excess sludge in the MBR. The TJC-MBR system was compared with the conventional MBR (Control-MBR) with respect to i) the size and zeta potential of the sludge particles, ii) the loosely bound extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPSs) and tightly bound EPS of the microbial flocs, iii) the porosity and biovolume of the bio-cake accumulated on the membrane, and iv) the membrane permeability. The TJC system generated the ozonated sludge with a negligible amount of loosely bound EPS and a positive zeta potential. As a result, when such ozonated sludge was recycled, the average size of the sludge particles (e.g., microbial flocs) increased in the TJC-MBR. Consequently the bio-cake formed in the TJC-MBR had greater porosity than that in the Control-MBR, giving rise to higher membrane permeability in the TJC-MBR.

  20. Biodegradation and detoxification potential of rotating biological contactor (RBC) with Irpex lacteus for remediation of dye-containing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Malachova, Katerina; Rybkova, Zuzana; Sezimova, Hana; Cerven, Jiri; Novotny, Cenek

    2013-12-01

    Use of fungal organisms in rotating biological contactors (RBC) for bioremediation of liquid industrial wastes has so far been limited in spite of their significant biodegradation potential. The purpose was to investigate the power of RBC using Irpex lacteus for decolorization and detoxification of industrial dyes and dyeing textile liquors. Recalcitrant dye Methylene Blue (150 mg L(-1)) was decolorized within 70 days, its mutagenicity removed, and the biological toxicity decreased more than 10-fold. I. lacteus biofilm in the RBC completely decolorized within 26 and 47 days dyeing liquors containing disperse or reactive dyes adjusted to pH4.5 and 5-fold diluted with the growth medium, respectively. Their respective biological toxicity values were reduced 10- to 10(4)-fold in dependence of the test used. A battery of toxicity tests comprising Vibrio fisheri, Lemna minor and Sinapis alba was efficient to monitor the toxicity of textile dyes and wastewaters. Strong decolorization and detoxification power of RBC using I. lacteus biofilms was demonstrated.

  1. Salt Weathering on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, E.

    2006-12-01

    Large well rounded boulders and angular rock fragments characterizes the Martian landscape as seen on the recent excellent quality photos. Analyzing the different rock-shapes indicates a time sequence of emplacement, fragmentation and transport of different rocks on Mars, which might give interesting insight into transport and weathering processes. Larger commonly well rounded boulders were emplaced onto gravel plains. After emplacement, these rocks were fragmented and disassembled. Nests of angular rock fragments are marking the locations of preexisting larger rocks. Frequently it is possible to reconstruct larger rounded rocks from smaller angular fragments. In other cases transport after fragmentation obscured the relationship of the fragments. However, a strewn field of fragments is still reminiscent of the preexisting rock. Mechanical salt weathering could be a plausible explanation for the insitu fragmentation of larger rounded blocks into angular fragments. Impact or secondary air fall induced fragmentation produces very different patterns, as observed around impact crates on Earth. Salt weathering of rocks is a common process in terrestrial environments. Salt crystallization in capillaries causes fragmentation of rocks, irrespective of the process of salt transportation and concentration. On Earth significant salt weathering can be observed in different climatic environments: in the transition zone of alluvial aprons and salt playas in desserts and in dry valleys of Antarctica. In terrestrial semi-arid areas the salt is transported by salt solution, which is progressively concentrated by evaporation. In Antarctic dry valleys freeze-thaw cycles causes salt transportation and crystallization resulting in rock fragmentation. This salt induced process can lead to complete destruction of rocks and converts rocks to fine sand. The efficient breakdown of rocks is dominating the landscape in some dry valleys of the Earth but possibly also on Mars. (Malin, 1974

  2. Progress in Studying Salt Secretion from the Salt Glands in Recretohalophytes: How Do Plants Secrete Salt?

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fang; Leng, Bingying; Wang, Baoshan

    2016-01-01

    To survive in a saline environment, halophytes have evolved many strategies to resist salt stress. The salt glands of recretohalophytes are exceptional features for directly secreting salt out of a plant. Knowledge of the pathway(s) of salt secretion in relation to the function of salt glands may help us to change the salt-tolerance of crops and to cultivate the extensive saline lands that are available. Recently, ultrastructural studies of salt glands and the mechanism of salt secretion, particularly the candidate genes involved in salt secretion, have been illustrated in detail. In this review, we summarize current researches on salt gland structure, salt secretion mechanism and candidate genes involved, and provide an overview of the salt secretion pathway and the asymmetric ion transport of the salt gland. A new model recretohalophyte is also proposed. PMID:27446195

  3. Integrated Salt Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Janos L.; Kukla, Peter A.

    2015-04-01

    The growing importance of salt in the energy, subsurface storage, and chemical and food industries also increases the challenges with prediction of geometries, kinematics, stress and transport in salt. This requires an approach, which integrates a broader range of knowledge than is traditionally available in the different scientific and engineering disciplines. We aim to provide a starting point for a more integrated understanding of salt, by presenting an overview of the state of the art in a wide range of salt-related topics, from (i) the formation and metamorphism of evaporites, (ii) rheology and transport properties, (iii) salt tectonics and basin evolution, (iv) internal structure of evaporites, (v) fluid flow through salt, to (vi) salt engineering. With selected case studies we show how integration of these domains of knowledge can bring better predictions of (i) sediment architecture and reservoir distribution, (ii) internal structure of salt for optimized drilling and better cavern design, (iii) reliable long-term predictions of deformations and fluid flow in subsurface storage. A fully integrated workflow is based on geomechanical models, which include all laboratory and natural observations and links macro- and micro-scale studies. We present emerging concepts for (i) the initiation dynamics of halokinesis, (ii) the rheology and deformation of the evaporites by brittle and ductile processes, (iii) the coupling of processes in evaporites and the under- and overburden, and (iv) the impact of the layered evaporite rheology on the structural evolution.

  4. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  5. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... mountains including the Wasatch Range to the east, and the temperature difference between the Great Salt Lake and the overlying atmosphere ... snow cover between the winter and summer views, water color changes in parts of the Great Salt Lake are apparent in these images. The ...

  6. SALT for Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bancroft, W. Jane

    1996-01-01

    Discusses Schuster's Suggestive-Accelerative Learning Techniques (SALT) Method, which combines Lozanov's Suggestopedia with such American methods as Asher's Total Physical Response and Galyean's Confluent Education. The article argues that students trained with the SALT Method have higher achievement scores and better attitudes than others. (14…

  7. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-09

    The patent describes a molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication. 5 figs.

  8. SALT for Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bancroft, W. Jane

    1996-01-01

    Discusses Schuster's Suggestive-Accelerative Learning Techniques (SALT) Method, which combines Lozanov's Suggestopedia with such American methods as Asher's Total Physical Response and Galyean's Confluent Education. The article argues that students trained with the SALT Method have higher achievement scores and better attitudes than others. (14…

  9. [Salt and cancer].

    PubMed

    Strnad, Marija

    2010-05-01

    Besides cardiovascular disease, a high salt intake causes other adverse health effects, i.e., gastric and some other cancers, obesity (risk factor for many cancer sites), Meniere's disease, worsening of renal disease, triggering an asthma attack, osteoporosis, exacerbation of fluid retention, renal calculi, etc. Diets containing high amounts of food preserved by salting and pickling are associated with an increased risk of cancers of the stomach, nose and throat. Because gastric cancer is still the most common cancer in some countries (especially in Japan), its prevention is one of the most important aspects of cancer control strategy. Observations among Japanese immigrants in the U.S.A. and Brazil based on the geographic differences, the trend in cancer incidence with time, and change in the incidence patterns indicate that gastric cancer is closely associated with dietary factors such as the intake of salt and salted food. The findings of many epidemiological studies suggest that high dietary salt intake is a significant risk factor for gastric cancer and this association was found to be strong in the presence of Helicobacter (H.) pylori infection with atrophic gastritis. A high-salt intake strips the lining of the stomach and may make infection with H. pylori more likely or may exacerbate the infection. Salting, pickling and smoking are traditionally popular ways of preparing food in Japan and some parts of Asia. In addition to salt intake, cigarette smoking and low consumption of fruit and vegetables increase the risk of stomach cancer. However, it is not known whether it is specifically the salt in these foods or a combination of salt and other chemicals that can cause cancer. One study identified a mutagen in nitrite-treated Japanese salted fish, and chemical structure of this mutagen suggests that it is derived from methionine and that salt and nitrite are precursors for its formation. Working under conditions of heat stress greatly increased the workers

  10. Salt and nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Ticinesi, Andrea; Nouvenne, Antonio; Maalouf, Naim M; Borghi, Loris; Meschi, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Dietary sodium chloride intake is nowadays globally known as one of the major threats for cardiovascular health. However, there is also important evidence that it may influence idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis onset and recurrence. Higher salt intake has been associated with hypercalciuria and hypocitraturia, which are major risk factors for calcium stone formation. Dietary salt restriction can be an effective means for secondary prevention of nephrolithiasis as well. Thus in this paper, we review the complex relationship between salt and nephrolithiasis, pointing out the difference between dietary sodium and salt intake and the best methods to assess them, highlighting the main findings of epidemiologic, laboratory and intervention studies and focusing on open issues such as the role of dietary salt in secondary causes of nephrolithiasis.

  11. Lowering Salt in Your Diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Lowering Salt in Your Diet Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... mail Consumer Updates RSS Feed Everyone needs some salt to function. Also known as sodium chloride, salt ...

  12. The plasma properties and electron emission characteristics of near-zero differential resistance of hollow cathode-based plasma contactors with a discharge chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Kan; Farnell, Casey C.; Williams, John D.

    2014-08-15

    The formation of electron emission-bias voltage (I-V) characteristics of near-zero differential resistance in the cathodic plasma contactor for bare electrodynamic tether applications, based on a hollow cathode embedded in a ring-cusp ionization stage, is studied. The existence of such an I-V regime is important to achieve low impedance performance without being affected by the space plasma properties for a cathodic plasma contactor. Experimental data on the plasma structure and properties downstream from the ionization stage are presented as functions of the xenon flow rate and the electron emission current. The electrons were emitted from the cathode to the cylindrical vacuum chamber wall (r = 0.9 m) under ≈10{sup −5 }Torr of vacuum pressure. The ring-cusp configuration selected for the plasma contactor created a 125-Gauss axial field near the cathode orifice, along with a large-volume 50-Gauss magnitude pocket in the stage. A baseline ion energy cost of ≈300 eV/ion was measured in the ionization stage when no electrons were emitted to the vacuum chamber wall. In addition, the anode fall growth limited the maximum propellant unitization to below ≈75% in the discharge loss curves for this ion stage. Detailed measurements on the plasma properties were carried out for the no-electron emission and 3 A emission conditions. The experimental data are compared with 1-D models, and the effectiveness of the model is discussed. The four key issues that played important roles in the process of building the near-zero different resistance I-V regime are: a significant amount of ionization by the emission electrons, a decrease in the number of reflected electrons in the plume, the electron-temperature increment, and low initial ion energy at the source outlet.

  13. Water purification using organic salts

    DOEpatents

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  14. Evaluation of high-efficiency gas-liquid contactors for natural gas processing. Semi-annual report, October 1993--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this proposed program is to evaluate the potential of rotating gas-liquid contactors for natural gas processing by expanding the currently available database. This expansion will focus on application of this technology to environments representative of those typically encountered in natural gas processing plants. Operational and reliability concerns will be addressed while generating pertinent engineering data relating to the mass-transfer process. Accomplishments for this period are described for Task 6 -- Fluid Dynamic Studies and Task 7 -- Mass Transfer Coefficient Studies.

  15. Evaluation of high-efficiency gas-liquid contactors for natural gas processing. Semi-annual report, April--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this proposed program is to ensure reliable supply of high-quality natural gas by reducing the cost of treating subquality natural gas containing H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and/or trace quantities of other gaseous impurities by applying high-efficiency rotating and structured packing gas liquid contactors. Work accomplished during this reporting period are discussed for the following tasks: Task 2, field experimental site seletion; Task 3, field experimental skid unit design and preliminary economic evaluations; and Task 6, fluid dynamic studies.

  16. Crushed Salt Constitutive Model

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, G.D.

    1999-02-01

    The constitutive model used to describe the deformation of crushed salt is presented in this report. Two mechanisms -- dislocation creep and grain boundary diffusional pressure solution -- are combined to form the basis for the constitutive model governing the deformation of crushed salt. The constitutive model is generalized to represent three-dimensional states of stress. Upon complete consolidation, the crushed-salt model reproduces the Multimechanism Deformation (M-D) model typically used for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) host geological formation salt. New shear consolidation tests are combined with an existing database that includes hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on WIPP and southeastern New Mexico salt. Nonlinear least-squares model fitting to the database produced two sets of material parameter values for the model -- one for the shear consolidation tests and one for a combination of the shear and hydrostatic consolidation tests. Using the parameter values determined from the fitted database, the constitutive model is validated against constant strain-rate tests. Shaft seal problems are analyzed to demonstrate model-predicted consolidation of the shaft seal crushed-salt component. Based on the fitting statistics, the ability of the model to predict the test data, and the ability of the model to predict load paths and test data outside of the fitted database, the model appears to capture the creep consolidation behavior of crushed salt reasonably well.

  17. Salt weathering on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, E.

    Large well rounded boulders and angular rock fragments characterizes the Martian landscape as seen on the recent excellent quality photos. Analyzing the different rock-shapes indicates a time sequence of emplacement, fragmentation and transport of different rocks on Mars, which might give interesting insight into transport and weathering processes. Larger commonly well rounded boulders were emplaced onto gravel plains. After emplacement, these rocks were fragmented and disassembled. Nests of angular rock fragments are marking the locations of preexisting larger rocks. Frequently it is possible to reconstruct larger rounded rocks from smaller angular fragments. In other cases transport after fragmentation obscured the relationship of the fragments. However, a strewn field of fragments is still reminiscent of the preexisting rock. Mechanical salt weathering could be a plausible explanation for the insitu fragmentation of larger rounded blocks into angular fragments. Impact or secondary air fall induced fragmentation produces very different patterns, as observed around impact crates on Earth. Salt weathering of rocks is a common process in terrestrial environments. Salt crystallization in capillaries causes fragmentation of rocks, irrespective of the process of salt transportation and concentration. On Earth significant salt weathering can be observed in different climatic environments: in the transition zone of alluvial aprons and salt playas in desserts and in dry valleys of Antarctica. In terrestrial semi-arid areas the salt is transported by salt solution, which is progressively concentrated by evaporation. In Antarctic dry valleys freeze-thaw cycles causes salt transportation and crystallization resulting in rock fragmentation. This salt induced process can lead to complete destruction of rocks and converts rocks to fine sand. The efficient breakdown of rocks is dominating the landscape in some dry valleys of the Earth but possibly also on Mars. (Malin, 1974

  18. Recovery of ammonia from domestic wastewater effluents as liquid fertilizers by integration of natural zeolites and hollow fibre membrane contactors.

    PubMed

    Sancho, I; Licon, E; Valderrama, C; de Arespacochaga, N; López-Palau, S; Cortina, J L

    2017-04-15

    The integration of up-concentration processes to increase the efficiency of primary sedimentation, as a solution to achieve energy neutral wastewater treatment plants, requires further post-treatment due to the missing ammonium removal stage. This study evaluated the use of zeolites as a post-treatment step, an alternative to the biological removal process. A natural granular clinoptilolite zeolite was evaluated as a sorbent media to remove low levels (up to 100mg-N/L) of ammonium from treated wastewater using batch and fixed bed columns. After being activated to the Na-form (Z-Na), the granular zeolite shown an ammonium exchange capacity of 29±0.8mgN-NH4(+)/g in single ammonium solutions and 23±0.8mgN-NH4(+)/g in treated wastewater simulating up-concentration effluent at pH=8. The equilibrium removal data were well described by the Langmuir isotherm. The ammonium adsorption into zeolites is a very fast process when compared with polymeric materials (zeolite particle diffusion coefficient around 3×10(-12)m(2)/s). Column experiments with solutions containing 100mgN-NH4(+)/L provide effective sorption and elution rates with concentration factors between 20 and 30 in consecutive operation cycles. The loaded zeolite was regenerated using 2g NaOH/L solution and the rich ammonium/ammonia concentrates 2-3g/L in NaOH were used in a liquid-liquid membrane contactor system in a closed-loop configuration with nitric and phosphoric acid as stripping solutions. The ammonia recovery ratio exceeded 98%. Ammonia nitrate and di-ammonium phosphate concentrated solutions reached up to 2-5% wt. of N.

  19. Enrichment and characterization of an anammox bacterium from a rotating biological contactor treating ammonium-rich leachate.

    PubMed

    Egli, K; Fanger, U; Alvarez, P J; Siegrist, H; van der Meer, J R; Zehnder, A J

    2001-03-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation with nitrite to N2 (anammox) is a recently discovered microbial reaction with interesting potential for nitrogen removal from wastewater. We enriched an anammox culture from a rotating disk contactor (near Kölliken, Switzerland) that was used to treat ammonium-rich leachate with low organic carbon content. This enrichment led to a relative population size of 88% anammox bacteria. The microorganism carrying out the anammox reaction was identified by analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 16S-rRNA-targeting probes. The percentage sequence identity between the 16S rDNA sequences of the Kölliken anammox organism and the archetype anammox strain Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans was 90.9%, but between 98.5 and 98.9% with Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, an organism identified in biofilms by molecular methods. The Kölliken culture catalyzed the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium with nitrite in a manner seemingly identical to that of Candidatus B. anammoxidans, but exhibited higher tolerance to phosphate (up to 20 mM) and to nitrite (up to 13 mM) and was active at lower cell densities. Anammox activity was observed only between pH 6.5 and 9, with an optimum at pH 8 and a temperature optimum at 37 degrees C. Hydroxylamine and hydrazine, which are intermediates of the anammox reaction of Candidatus B. anammoxidans, were utilized by the Kölliken organisms, and approximately 15% of the nitrite utilized during autotrophic growth was converted to nitrate. Electron microscopy showed a protein-rich region in the center of the cells surrounded by a doughnut-shaped region containing ribosomes and DNA. This doughnut-shape region was observed with FISH as having a higher fluorescence intensity. Similar to Candidatus B. anammoxidans, the Kölliken anammox organism typically formed homogenous clusters containing up to several hundred cells within an extracellular matrix.

  20. The effects of a realistic hollow cathode plasma contactor model on the simulation of bare electrodynamic tether systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blash, Derek M.

    The region known as Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) has become populated with artificial satellites and space debris since humanities initial venture into the region. This has turned LEO into a hazardous region. Since LEO is very valuable to many different countries, there has been a push to prevent further buildup and talk of even deorbiting spent satellites and debris already in LEO. One of the more attractive concepts available for deorbiting debris and spent satellites is a Bare Electrodynamic Tether (BET). A BET is a propellantless propulsion technique in which two objects are joined together by a thin conducting material. When these tethered objects are placed in LEO, the tether sweeps across the magnetic field lines of the Earth and induces an electromotive force (emf) along the tether. Current from the space plasma is collected on the bare tether under the action of the induced emf, and this current interacts with the Earth's magnetic field to create a drag force that can be used to deorbit spent satellites and space debris. A Plasma Contactor (PC) is used to close the electrical circuit between the BET and the ionospheric plasma. The PC requires a voltage and, depending on the device, a gas flow to emit electrons through a plasma bridge to the ionospheric plasma. The PC also can require a plasma discharge electrode and a heater to condition the PC for operation. These parameters as well as the PC performance are required to build an accurate simulation of a PC and, therefore, a BET deorbiting system. This thesis focuses on the development, validation, and implementation of a simulation tool to model the effects of a realistic hollow cathode PC system model on a BET deorbit system.

  1. Simultaneous Production and Recovery of Fumaric Acid from Immobilized Rhizopus oryzae with a Rotary Biofilm Contactor and an Adsorption Column

    PubMed Central

    Cao, N.; Du, J.; Gong, C. S.; Tsao, G. T.

    1996-01-01

    An integrated system of simultaneous fermentation-adsorption for the production and recovery of fumaric acid from glucose by Rhizopus oryzae was investigated. The system was constructed such that growing Rhizopus mycelia were self-immobilized on the plastic discs of a rotary biofilm contactor during the nitrogen-rich growth phase. During the nongrowth, production phase, the biofilm was alternately exposed to liquid medium and air upon rotation of the discs in the horizontal fermentation vessel. The product of fermentation, fumaric acid, was removed simultaneously and continuously by a coupled adsorption column, thereby moderating inhibition, enhancing the fermentation rate, and sustaining cell viability. Another beneficial effect of the removal of fumaric acid is release of hydroxyl ions from a polyvinyl pyridine adsorbent into the circulating fermentation broth. This moderates the decrease in pH that would otherwise occur. Polyvinyl pyridine and IRA-900 gave the highest loading for this type of fermentation. This fermentation system is capable of producing fumaric acid with an average yield of 85 g/liter from 100 g of glucose per liter within 20 h under repetitive fed-batch cycles. On a weight yield basis, 91% of the theoretical maximum was obtained with a productivity of 4.25 g/liter/h. This is in contrast to stirred-tank fermentation supplemented with calcium carbonate, whose average weight yield was 65% after 72 h with a productivity of 0.9 g/liter/h. The immobilized reactor was operated repetitively for 2 weeks without loss of biological activity. PMID:16535381

  2. Electrodialysis technology for salt recovery from aluminum salt cake

    SciTech Connect

    Hryn, J. N.; Krumdick, G.; Graziano, D.; Sreenivasarao, K.

    2000-02-02

    Electrodialysis technology for recovering salt from aluminum salt cake is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Salt cake, a slag-like aluminum-industry waste stream, contains aluminum metal, salt (NaCl and KCl), and nonmetallics (primarily aluminum oxide). Salt cake can be recycled by digesting with water and filtering to recover the metal and oxide values. A major obstacle to widespread salt cake recycling is the cost of recovering salt from the process brine. Electrodialysis technology developed at Argonne appears to be a cost-effective approach to handling the salt brines, compared to evaporation or disposal. In Argonne's technology, the salt brine is concentrated until salt crystals are precipitated in the electrodialysis stack; the crystals are recovered downstream. The technology is being evaluated on the pilot scale using Eurodia's EUR 40-76-5 stack.

  3. Amine salts of nitroazoles

    DOEpatents

    Kienyin Lee; Stinecipher, M.M.

    1993-10-26

    Compositions of matter, a method of providing chemical energy by burning said compositions, and methods of making said compositions are described. These compositions are amine salts of nitroazoles. 1 figure.

  4. Salt fluoridation: a review.

    PubMed

    Pollick, Howard F

    2013-06-01

    Salt fluoridation is sometimes suggested as a prospect for communities that have a low water fluoride concentration and have no possibility of implementing community water fluoridation. School-based milk fluoridation programs also are practiced in some countries as an alternative. This paper reviews the evidence of effectiveness in dental caries prevention and risks of dental fluorosis in countries where salt or milk fluoridation is practiced.

  5. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Salt Lake City, Utah, will host the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The city is located on the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake and sits to the west of the Wasatch Mountains, which rise more than 3,500 meters (10,000 feet) above sea level. The city was first settled in 1847 by pioneers seeking relief from religious persecution. Today Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, is home to more than 170,000 residents. This true-color image of Salt Lake City was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard Landsat 7, on May 26, 2000. The southeastern tip of the Great Salt Lake is visible in the upper left of the image. The furrowed green and brown landscape running north-south is a portion of the Wasatch Mountains, some of which are snow-capped (white pixels). The greyish pixels in the center of the image show the developed areas of the city. A number of water reservoirs can be seen east of the mountain range. Salt Lake City International Airport is visible on the northwestern edge of the city. About 20 miles south of the airport is the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine (tan pixels), the world's largest open pit excavation. See also this MODIS image of Utah. Image courtesy NASA Landsat7 Science Team and USGS Eros Data Center

  6. Hygroscopic Salts on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchiorri, R.; Davila, A. F.; Chittenden, J.; Haberle, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    We present preliminary results on the influence of a salt-rich regolith in the water cycle of Mars. Global climate modeling shows that the relative humidity on the Martian surface often reaches values above the deliquescence point of salts that are common components of the regolith. At the deliquescence point, these salts will absorb atmospheric water vapor and form a saturated, transient liquid solution that is stable under a range of temperatures. If atmospheric temperatures fall below the eutectic point of the solution, the later will freeze in the pore space of the regolith, thereby resulting in a net transport of water from the vapor phase in the atmosphere, to the solid state in the regolith. This simple model partially accounts for some the distribution of water on the Martian surface as revealed by Mars Odyssey, in particular, we find that: even though the Cl and surface water distributions detected by HEND/ODYSSEY are highly correlated, salt deliquescence under the the present atmospheric conditions does not explain the overall distribution of water in the near surface regolith. However deliquescence of salt-rich soils could be an important contributor to the distribution of water in the regolith at high obliquity. In that scenario the water in the near-surface regolith would be the remnant of high obliquity conditions salt deliquescence is still active in different regions on Mars today, and it should be introduced as a parameter in the modern GCMs as a new ground/atmosphere interaction

  7. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Salt Lake City, Utah, will host the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The city is located on the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake and sits to the west of the Wasatch Mountains, which rise more than 3,500 meters (10,000 feet) above sea level. The city was first settled in 1847 by pioneers seeking relief from religious persecution. Today Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, is home to more than 170,000 residents. This true-color image of Salt Lake City was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard Landsat 7, on May 26, 2000. The southeastern tip of the Great Salt Lake is visible in the upper left of the image. The furrowed green and brown landscape running north-south is a portion of the Wasatch Mountains, some of which are snow-capped (white pixels). The greyish pixels in the center of the image show the developed areas of the city. A number of water reservoirs can be seen east of the mountain range. Salt Lake City International Airport is visible on the northwestern edge of the city. About 20 miles south of the airport is the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine (tan pixels), the world's largest open pit excavation. See also this MODIS image of Utah. Image courtesy NASA Landsat7 Science Team and USGS Eros Data Center

  8. Salt and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Joossens, J V; Geboers, J

    1983-01-01

    The salt hypothesis states that salt is a necessary condition for the genesis of essential hypertension; however, it is not a sufficient condition. Other factors---primarily genetics--are necessary for the expression of the disease. The arguments in favor of this still controversial subject originate from pathophysiology, evolution, history, pharmacology, experimental and clinical medicine, and epidemiology. Epidemiologic observations favoring the hypothesis mostly relate to comparisons between populations, and much less to comparisons within populations. The arguments against this hypothesis are related mostly to the well known difficulties of proving a within-population relationship of a relatively homogeneously distributed variable to an age-related variable (blood pressure). Mortality data derived from stomach cancer and stroke, compared within and between populations, provide only circumstantial, but nevertheless important, evidence in favor of the salt hypothesis. The strong, consistent, and independent association between stomach cancer and stroke mortality is best explained by the level of salt intake in the population. The observations made in Belgium over the last years are consistent with the salt hypothesis. A decrease in salt intake at the population level correlated with a marked decrease in stroke and stomach cancer mortality, larger than in any other European country, except Finland.

  9. Not salt taste perception but self-reported salt eating habit predicts actual salt intake.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hajeong; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Bae, Eunjin; Kim, Yong Chul; Kim, Suhnggwon; Chin, Ho Jun

    2014-09-01

    Excessive dietary salt intake is related to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although dietary salt restriction is essential, it is difficult to achieve because of salt palatability. However, the association between salt perception or salt eating habit and actual salt intake remains uncertain. In this study, we recruited 74 healthy young individuals. We investigated their salt-eating habits by questionnaire and salt taste threshold through a rating scale that used serial dilution of a sodium chloride solution. Predicted 24-hr urinary salt excretions using Kawasaki's and Tanaka's equations estimated dietary salt intake. Participants' mean age was 35 yr, and 59.5% were male. Salt sense threshold did not show any relationship with actual salt intake and a salt-eating habit. However, those eating "salty" foods showed higher blood pressure (P for trend=0.048) and higher body mass index (BMI; P for trend=0.043). Moreover, a salty eating habit was a significant predictor for actual salt intake (regression coefficient [β] for Kawasaki's equation 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 10-2.69, P=0.048; β for Tanaka's equation 0.66, 95% CI 0.01-1.31, P=0.047). In conclusion, a self-reported salt-eating habit, not salt taste threshold predicts actual salt intake.

  10. Fetal bile salt metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, R. A.; Lester, R.; Piasecki, G. J.; Klein, P. D.; Greco, R.; Jackson, B. T.

    1972-01-01

    Bile salt metabolism was studied in fetal dogs 1 wk before term. The size and distribution of the fetal bile salt pool were measured, and individual bile salts were identified. The hepatic excretion of endogenous bile salts was studied in bile fistula fetuses, and the capacity of this excretory mechanism was investigated by the i.v. infusion of a load of sodium taurocholate-14C up to 20 times the endogenous pool size. The total fetal bile salt pool was 30.9±2.7 μmoles, of which two-thirds was in the fetal gallbladder. Expressed on a body weight basis, this was equal to approximately one-half the estimated pool size in the adult dog (119.2±11.3 vs. 247.5±33.1 μmoles/kg body wt). Measurable quantities of bile salt were found in small bowel (6.0±1.8 μmoles), large bowel (1.1±0.3 μmoles), liver (1.2±0.5 μmoles), and plasma (0.1±0.03 μmoles). Plasma bile salt levels were significantly greater in fetal than in maternal plasma (1.01±0.24 μg/ml vs. 0.36±0.06 μg/ml; P < 0.05). Fetal hepatic bile salt excretion showed a fall over the period of study from 2.04±0.34 to 0.30±0.07 μmoles/hr. The maximal endogenous bile salt concentration in fetal hepatic bile was 18.7±1.5 μmoles/ml. The concentration in fetal gallbladder bile was 73.9±8.6 μmoles/ml; and, in those studies in which hepatic and gallbladder bile could be compared directly, the gallbladder appeared to concentrate bile four- to fivefold. Taurocholate, taurochenodeoxycholate, and taurodeoxycholate were present in fetal bile, but no free bile salts were identified. The presence of deoxycholate was confirmed by thin-layer chromatography and gas liquid chromatography, and the absence of microorganisms in fetal gut suggests that it was probably transferred from the maternal circulation. After infusion of a taurocholate load, fetal hepatic bile salt excretion increased 30-fold, so that 85-95% of the dose was excreted by the fetal liver during the period of observation. Placental transfer accounted

  11. Fundamental Properties of Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Y Gutknecht; Guy L Fredrickson

    2012-11-01

    Thermal properties of molten salt systems are of interest to electrorefining operations, pertaining to both the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program (FCR&D) and Spent Fuel Treatment Mission, currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE). The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely impacted by the build-up of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided, during electrorefining operations, include (i) fissile elements build up in the salt that might approach the criticality limits specified for the vessel, (ii) electrolyte freezing at the operating temperature of the electrorefiner due to changes in the liquidus temperature, and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution). The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can be monitored by studying the thermal characteristics of the molten salts as a function of impurity concentration. Simulated salt compositions consisting of the selected rare earth and alkaline earth chlorides, with a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl as the carrier electrolyte, were studied to determine the melting points (thermal characteristics) using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The experimental data were used to model the liquidus temperature. On the basis of the this data, it became possible to predict a spent fuel treatment processing scenario under which electrorefining could no longer be performed as a result of increasing liquidus temperatures of the electrolyte.

  12. Great Salt Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Gardner, Joe F.

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended as a source of general information and facts about Great Salt Lake, Utah. This U.S. Geological Survey information sheet answers frequently asked questions about Great Salt Lake. Topics include: History, salinity, brine shrimp, brine flies, migratory birds, and recreation. Great Salt Lake, the shrunken remnant of prehistoric Lake Bonneville, has no outlet. Dissolved salts accumulate in the lake by evaporation. Salinity south of the causeway has ranged from 6 percent to 27 percent over a period of 22 years (2 to 7 times saltier than the ocean). The high salinity supports a mineral industry that extracts about 2 million tons of salt from the lake each year. The aquatic ecosystem consists of more than 30 species of organisms. Harvest of its best-known species, the brine shrimp, annually supplies millions of pounds of food for the aquaculture industry worldwide. The lake is used extensively by millions of migratory and nesting birds and is a place of solitude for people. All this occurs in a lake that is located at the bottom of a 35,000-square-mile drainage basin that has a human population of more than 1.5 million.

  13. Characterization of an Autotrophic Nitrogen-Removing Biofilm from a Highly Loaded Lab-Scale Rotating Biological Contactor

    PubMed Central

    Pynaert, Kris; Smets, Barth F.; Wyffels, Stijn; Beheydt, Daan; Siciliano, Steven D.; Verstraete, Willy

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a lab-scale rotating biological contactor (RBC) treating a synthetic NH4+ wastewater devoid of organic carbon and showing high N losses was examined for several important physiological and microbial characteristics. The RBC biofilm removed 89% ± 5% of the influent N at the highest surface load of approximately 8.3 g of N m−2 day−1, with N2 as the main end product. In batch tests, the RBC biomass showed good aerobic and anoxic ammonium oxidation (147.8 ± 7.6 and 76.5 ± 6.4 mg of NH4+-N g of volatile suspended solids [VSS]−1 day−1, respectively) and almost no nitrite oxidation (< 1 mg of N g of VSS−1 day−1). The diversity of aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AAOB) and planctomycetes in the biofilm was characterized by cloning and sequencing of PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the clones revealed that the AAOB community was fairly homogeneous and was dominated by Nitrosomonas-like species. Close relatives of the known anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AnAOB) Kuenenia stuttgartiensis dominated the planctomycete community and were most probably responsible for anoxic ammonium oxidation in the RBC. Use of a less specific planctomycete primer set, not amplifying the AnAOB, showed a high diversity among other planctomycetes, with representatives of all known groups present in the biofilm. The spatial organization of the biofilm was characterized using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The latter showed that AAOB occurred side by side with putative AnAOB (cells hybridizing with probe PLA46 and AMX820/KST1275) throughout the biofilm, while other planctomycetes hybridizing with probe PLA886 (not detecting the known AnAOB) were present as very conspicuous spherical structures. This study reveals that long-term operation of a lab-scale RBC on a synthetic NH4+ wastewater devoid of organic carbon yields a stable biofilm in which two bacterial groups, thought

  14. Photocatalytic oxidation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol in water using a cocurrent downflow contactor reactor (CDCR).

    PubMed

    Ochuma, Idoko J; Fishwick, Robert P; Wood, Joseph; Winterbottom, J Mike

    2007-06-18

    The heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation of aqueous solutions of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) as a model pollutant in industrial wastewater has been carried out in a pilot scale cocurrent downflow contactor reactor (CDCR). The reactions were carried out in the presence of Ultra-Violet radiation, O(2) and TiO(2) photocatalyst (VP Aeroperl P25/20). The TiO(2) was characterized by Dynamic Vapour Sorption (DVS) technique giving specific surface area and surface energy of 46.06 m(2)g(-1) and 80.12 mJ m(-2), respectively. The CDC reactor was fitted with an internally and vertically mounted 1.0 kW or 2.0 kW UV lamp. The reactions were carried out at 50 degrees C and 1 bar, with the reactor being operated in closed loop recycle mode and suspended photocatalyst being re-circulated. The CDC reactor, a device of very high mass transfer efficiency giving unusually large gas hold-up of approximately 50%, was operated with oxygen mass transfer and dissolution in the zone above the UV lamp (high mass transfer zone) and along and around the UV lamp housing (reaction zone). Under optimized reaction conditions, 100% conversion of 2,4,6-TCP was achieved in 180 min using 15 dm(3) solutions with initial concentration of 120 mg dm(-3). A combination of TiO(2) photocatalyst, UV irradiation and oxidant was observed to give the most rapid photodegradation and photomineralization of the 2,4,6-TCP in comparison with irradiation only. Using the 1 kW or 2 kW UV lamps, conversion of 100 mg dm(-3) of 2,4,6-TCP after 30 min was 62.51% and 90.71%, respectively, with initial reaction rates of 1.33 x 10(-5) and 4.22 x 10(-5) mol min(-1), respectively, and rate constants 0.0046 and 0.29 min(-1), respectively.

  15. Mineral resource of the month: salt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kostick, Dennis S.

    2010-01-01

    The article presents information on various types of salt. Rock salt is either found from underground halite deposits or near the surface. Other types of salt include solar salt, salt brine, and vacuum pan salt. The different uses of salt are also given including its use as a flavor enhancer, as a road deicing agent, and to manufacture sodium hydroxide.

  16. Clean Salt integrated flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, T.R.

    1994-09-27

    The Clean Salt Process (CSP) is a novel waste management scheme that removes sodium nitrate and aluminum nitrate nonahydrate as decontaminated (low specific activity) salts from Hanford`s high-level waste (HLW). The full scale process will separate the bulk of the waste that exists as sodium salts from the small portion of the waste that is by definition radioactive and dangerous. This report presents initial conceptual CSP flowsheets and demonstrates the benefit of integrating the process into the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Reference Flowsheet. Total HLW and low-level (LLW) volumes are reported for two different CSP integration options and are compared to the TWRS Reference Flowsheet values. The results for a single glass option eliminating LLW disposal are also reported.

  17. Gas releases from salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  18. [Salt intake in children].

    PubMed

    Girardet, J-P; Rieu, D; Bocquet, A; Bresson, J-L; Briend, A; Chouraqui, J-P; Darmaun, D; Dupont, C; Frelut, M-L; Hankard, R; Goulet, O; Simeoni, U; Turck, D; Vidailhet, M

    2014-05-01

    Very early in life, sodium intake correlates with blood pressure level. This warrants limiting the consumption of sodium by children. However, evidence regarding exact sodium requirements in that age range is lacking. This article focuses on the desirable sodium intake according to age as suggested by various groups of experts, on the levels of sodium intake recorded in consumption surveys, and on the public health strategies implemented to reduce salt consumption in the pediatric population. Practical recommendations are given by the Committee on nutrition of the French Society of Pediatrics in order to limit salt intake in children.

  19. Mechanism for salt scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, John J., II

    Salt scaling is superficial damage caused by freezing a saline solution on the surface of a cementitious body. The damage consists of the removal of small chips or flakes of binder. The discovery of this phenomenon in the early 1950's prompted hundreds of experimental studies, which clearly elucidated the characteristics of this damage. In particular it was shown that a pessimum salt concentration exists, where a moderate salt concentration (˜3%) results in the most damage. Despite the numerous studies, the mechanism responsible for salt scaling has not been identified. In this work it is shown that salt scaling is a result of the large thermal expansion mismatch between ice and the cementitious body, and that the mechanism responsible for damage is analogous to glue-spalling. When ice forms on a cementitious body a bi-material composite is formed. The thermal expansion coefficient of the ice is ˜5 times that of the underlying body, so when the temperature of the composite is lowered below the melting point, the ice goes into tension. Once this stress exceeds the strength of the ice, cracks initiate in the ice and propagate into the surface of the cementitious body, removing a flake of material. The glue-spall mechanism accounts for all of the characteristics of salt scaling. In particular, a theoretical analysis is presented which shows that the pessimum concentration is a consequence of the effect of brine pockets on the mechanical properties of ice, and that the damage morphology is accounted for by fracture mechanics. Finally, empirical evidence is presented that proves that the glue-small mechanism is the primary cause of salt scaling. The primary experimental tool used in this study is a novel warping experiment, where a pool of liquid is formed on top of a thin (˜3 mm) plate of cement paste. Stresses in the plate, including thermal expansion mismatch, result in warping of the plate, which is easily detected. This technique revealed the existence of

  20. Unitized paramagnetic salt thermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, B.M.

    1982-06-01

    The details of construction and assembly of a cerous magnesium nitrate (CMN) paramagnetic thermometer are presented. The thermometer is a small unit consisting of a primary, two secondaries, the salt pill, and thermal links. The thermometer calibration changes very little on successive coolings and is reliable to 35 mK. A typical calibration curve is also presented.

  1. Uranium, soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Uranium , soluble salts ; no CASRN Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  2. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  3. Dalapon, sodium salt

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Dalapon , sodium salt ; CASRN 75 - 99 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  4. Utah: Salt Lake City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... mountains surrounding Salt Lake City are renowned for the dry, powdery snow that results from the arid climate and location at the ... should be used with the red filter placed over your left eye. The canyons and peaks of the Uinta and Wasatch Mountains are ...

  5. Salt repository design approach

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a summary discussion of the approaches that have been and will be taken in design of repository facilities for use with disposal of radioactive wastes in salt formations. Since specific sites have yet to be identified, the discussion is at a general level, supplemented with illustrative examples where appropriate. 5 references, 1 figure.

  6. Nickel, soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel , soluble salts ; CASRN Various Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  7. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  8. Photoluminescence of urine salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordun, O.; Drobchak, O.

    2008-02-01

    Photoexcitation and luminescence spectra of dried urine sample under laser excitation were studied. Luminescence spectra of urine are determined by luminescence of urea which is the main component of urine. The presence of pathological salts in urine leads to the long-wave shifting of maxima of luminescence and to the decreasing of luminescence intensity.

  9. Actinide removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

  10. Metals removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; Von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Brummond, William A.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

  11. Bile salts and calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Webling, D D; Holdsworth, E S

    1966-09-01

    1. The study of the effect of bile salts on enhancing calcium absorption in the rachitic chick has been extended to bile salts not present in chick bile, e.g. glycine conjugates and bile alcohol sulphates. 2. Bile and bile salts cause an increase in calcium absorption from sparingly soluble calcium hydrogen phosphate when compared with a suspension of calcium hydrogen phosphate in saline. 3. If the bile ducts of normal rats are tied the absorption of calcium from calcium hydrogen phosphate decreases but can be restored by giving bile salts with the calcium salt. 4. Bile salts increase solubility in water of the sparingly soluble calcium salts, phytate and phosphate at pH values between 6 and 8. 5. Bile salts increase the solubility in lipid solvents of calcium in approximately the same proportion as they increase the absorption of calcium from the gut. 6. The physiological role of bile in calcium absorption and its mode of action are discussed.

  12. Sulfonamide antibiotic removal and nitrogen recovery from synthetic urine by the combination of rotating advanced oxidation contactor and methylene urea synthesis process.

    PubMed

    Fukahori, S; Fujiwara, T; Ito, R; Funamizu, N

    2015-01-01

    The combination of nitrogen recovery and pharmaceutical removal processes for livestock urine treatment were investigated to suppress the discharge of pollutants and recover nitrogen as resources. We combined methylene urea synthesis from urea and adsorption and photocatalytic decomposition of sulfonamide antibiotic using rotating advanced oxidation contactor (RAOC) contained for obtaining both safe fertilizer and reclaimed water. The methylene urea synthesis could recover urea in synthetic urine, however, almost all sulfonamide antibiotic was also incorporated, which is unfavorable from a safety aspect if the methylene urea is to be used as fertilizer. Conversely, RAOC could remove sulfonamide antibiotic without consuming urea. It was also confirmed that the methylene urea could be synthesized from synthetic urine treated by RAOC. Thus, we concluded that RAOC should be inserted prior to the nitrogen recovery process for effective treatment of urine and safe use of methylene urea as fertilizer.

  13. Large-scale preparation of clove essential oil and eugenol-loaded liposomes using a membrane contactor and a pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Sebaaly, Carine; Greige-Gerges, Hélène; Agusti, Géraldine; Fessi, Hatem; Charcosset, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Based on our previous study where optimal conditions were defined to encapsulate clove essential oil (CEO) into liposomes at laboratory scale, we scaled-up the preparation of CEO and eugenol (Eug)-loaded liposomes using a membrane contactor (600 mL) and a pilot plant (3 L) based on the principle of ethanol injection method, both equipped with a Shirasu Porous Glass membrane for injection of the organic phase into the aqueous phase. Homogenous, stable, nanometric-sized and multilamellar liposomes with high phospholipid, Eug loading rates and encapsulation efficiency of CEO components were obtained. Saturation of phospholipids and drug concentration in the organic phase may control the liposome stability. Liposomes loaded with other hydrophobic volatile compounds could be prepared at large scale using the ethanol injection method and a membrane for injection.

  14. Improving crop salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Flowers, T J

    2004-02-01

    Salinity is an ever-present threat to crop yields, especially in countries where irrigation is an essential aid to agriculture. Although the tolerance of saline conditions by plants is variable, crop species are generally intolerant of one-third of the concentration of salts found in seawater. Attempts to improve the salt tolerance of crops through conventional breeding programmes have met with very limited success, due to the complexity of the trait: salt tolerance is complex genetically and physiologically. Tolerance often shows the characteristics of a multigenic trait, with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with tolerance identified in barley, citrus, rice, and tomato and with ion transport under saline conditions in barley, citrus and rice. Physiologically salt tolerance is also complex, with halophytes and less tolerant plants showing a wide range of adaptations. Attempts to enhance tolerance have involved conventional breeding programmes, the use of in vitro selection, pooling physiological traits, interspecific hybridization, using halophytes as alternative crops, the use of marker-aided selection, and the use of transgenic plants. It is surprising that, in spite of the complexity of salt tolerance, there are commonly claims in the literature that the transfer of a single or a few genes can increase the tolerance of plants to saline conditions. Evaluation of such claims reveals that, of the 68 papers produced between 1993 and early 2003, only 19 report quantitative estimates of plant growth. Of these, four papers contain quantitative data on the response of transformants and wild-type of six species without and with salinity applied in an appropriate manner. About half of all the papers report data on experiments conducted under conditions where there is little or no transpiration: such experiments may provide insights into components of tolerance, but are not grounds for claims of enhanced tolerance at the whole plant level. Whether enhanced

  15. TPE/REE separation with the use of zirconium salt of HDBP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glekov, R. G.; Shmidt, O. V.; Palenik, Yu. V.; Goletsky, N. D.; Sukhareva, S. Yu.; Fedorov, Yu. S.; Zilberman, B. Ya.

    2003-01-01

    Partitioning of long-lived radionuclides (minor actinides, fission products) is considered as TBP-compatible ZEALEX-process for extraction separation of transplutonium elements (TPE) and rare-earth elements (REE), as well as Y, Mo, Fe and residual amounts of Np, Pu, U. Zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid (ZS-HDBP) dissolved in 30 % TBP is used as a solvent. The process was tested in multistage centrifugal contactors. Lanthanides, Y and TPE, as well as Mo, Fe were extracted from high-level Purex raffinate, Am and ceric subgroup of REE being separated from the polyvalent elements by stripping with HNO3. TPE/REE partitioning was achieved in the second cycle of the ZEALEX-process using DTPA in formic acid media. The integral decontamination factor of Am from La and Ce after both cycles is >200, from Pr and Nd 20-30 and from Sm and Eu 3.6; REE strips in both cycles contained <0,1% of the initial amount of TPE.

  16. Frost formation with salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadarrama-Cetina, J.; Mongruel, A.; González-Viñas, W.; Beysens, D.

    2015-06-01

    The formation of frost in presence of salt (NaCl) crystal is experimentally investigated on a hydrophobic surface. It presents several remarkable features due to the interplay of salty-water saturation pressure evolution, initially lower than the saturation pressure of ice and water, and the percolating propagation of ice dendrites from defects throughout the supercooled water droplet pattern. In particular, it is remarkable that nucleation of supercooled water and/or ice is prevented around the salty drop in a region of inhibited condensation where the substrate remains dry. As condensation proceeds, salt concentration decreases to eventually become lower than ice's, allowing ice dendrites to hit the salty drop. Salty water then melts ice but eventually freezes as an effect of dilution.

  17. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-02-07

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This simulated natural color image presents a late spring view of north central Utah that includes all of the Olympic sites. The image extends from Ogden in the north, to Provo in the south; and includes the snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and the eastern part of the Great Salt Lake. This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03464

  18. SALT IN AYURVEDA I

    PubMed Central

    Mooss, N S

    1987-01-01

    In basic Ayurveda texts, Susruta, Caraka and Vagbhata, some quite specific Salts (Lavanam) have been described and their properties and actions are enumerated. By comparing those accounts with the present methods of preparation, conclusions have been made and evidently spurious methods are pointed out. The reported properties of Saindhava, Samudra, Vida, Sauvarcha, Romaka, Audbhida, Gutika, the Katu Group, Krsna and Pamsuja Lavanas are discussed in terms of their chemical constituents here and, thus, the authors establish its inter-connections. PMID:22557573

  19. Is Salt at Fault

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-28

    because the kidney requires 3 - 5 days (and sweat glands Ve - : re -Q L0 dar ., to adant to full sal t-cc, nservino C. a r- a.CE i _"/ It h-so cEhoLLld -,e...TITLE: Estimating Salt Losses During Exercise 1. Measure your sweat rate (qt/hr) by weighing yourself nude on an accurate scale , before and after

  20. A Trail of Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the relative abundances of sulfur (in the form of sulfur tri-oxide) and chlorine at three Meridiani Planum sites: soil measured in the small crater where Opportunity landed; the rock dubbed 'McKittrick' in the outcrop lining the inner edge of the crater; and the rock nicknamed 'Guadalupe,' also in the outcrop. The 'McKittrick' data shown here were taken both before and after the rover finished grinding the rock with its rock abrasion tool to expose fresh rock underneath. The 'Guadalupe' data were taken after the rover grounded the rock. After grinding both rocks, the sulfur abundance rose to high levels, nearly five times higher than that of the soil. This very high sulfur concentration reflects the heavy presence of sulfate salts (approximately 30 percent by weight) in the rocks. Chloride and bromide salts are also indicated. Such high levels of salts strongly suggest the rocks contain evaporite deposits, which form when water evaporates or ice sublimes into the atmosphere.

  1. A Trail of Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the relative abundances of sulfur (in the form of sulfur tri-oxide) and chlorine at three Meridiani Planum sites: soil measured in the small crater where Opportunity landed; the rock dubbed 'McKittrick' in the outcrop lining the inner edge of the crater; and the rock nicknamed 'Guadalupe,' also in the outcrop. The 'McKittrick' data shown here were taken both before and after the rover finished grinding the rock with its rock abrasion tool to expose fresh rock underneath. The 'Guadalupe' data were taken after the rover grounded the rock. After grinding both rocks, the sulfur abundance rose to high levels, nearly five times higher than that of the soil. This very high sulfur concentration reflects the heavy presence of sulfate salts (approximately 30 percent by weight) in the rocks. Chloride and bromide salts are also indicated. Such high levels of salts strongly suggest the rocks contain evaporite deposits, which form when water evaporates or ice sublimes into the atmosphere.

  2. LIQUID CYCLONE CONTACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Whatley, M.E.; Woods, W.M.

    1962-09-01

    This invention relates to liquid-liquid extraction systems. The invention, an improved hydroclone system, comprises a series of serially connected, axially aligned hydroclones, each of which is provided with an axially aligned overflow chamber. The chambers are so arranged that rotational motion of a fluid being passed through the system is not lost in passing from chamber to chamber; consequently, this system is highly efficient in contacting and separating two immiscible liquids. (AEC)

  3. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-18

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

  4. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  5. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1982-02-09

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  6. Electrolyte salts for nonaqueous electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Amine, Khalil; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Chen, Zonghai

    2012-10-09

    Metal complex salts may be used in lithium ion batteries. Such metal complex salts not only perform as an electrolyte salt in a lithium ion batteries with high solubility and conductivity, but also can act as redox shuttles that provide overcharge protection of individual cells in a battery pack and/or as electrolyte additives to provide other mechanisms to provide overcharge protection to lithium ion batteries. The metal complex salts have at least one aromatic ring. The aromatic moiety may be reversibly oxidized/reduced at a potential slightly higher than the working potential of the positive electrode in the lithium ion battery. The metal complex salts may also be known as overcharge protection salts.

  7. Salt acclimation processes in wheat.

    PubMed

    Janda, Tibor; Darko, Éva; Shehata, Sami; Kovács, Viktória; Pál, Magda; Szalai, Gabriella

    2016-04-01

    Young wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Mv Béres) were exposed to 0 or 25 mM NaCl for 11 days (salt acclimation). Thereafter the plants were irrigated with 500 mM NaCl for 5 days (salt stress). Irrigating the plants with a low concentration of NaCl successfully led to a reduction in chlorotic symptoms and in the impairment of the photosynthetic processes when the plants were exposed to subsequent high-dose salt treatment. After exposure to a high concentration of NaCl there was no difference in leaf Na content between the salt-acclimated and non-acclimated plants, indicating that salt acclimation did not significantly modify Na transport to the shoots. While the polyamine level was lower in salt-treated plants than in the control, salt acclimation led to increased osmotic potential in the leaves. Similarly, the activities of certain antioxidant enzymes, namely glutathione reductase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, were significantly higher in salt-acclimated plants. The results also suggest that while SOS1, SOS2 or NHX2 do not play a decisive role in the salt acclimation processes in young wheat plants; another stress-related gene, WALI6, may contribute to the success of the salt acclimation processes. The present study suggested that the responses of wheat plants to acclimation with low level of salt and to treatment with high doses of salt may be fundamentally different. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Batteries using molten salt electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Guidotti, Ronald A.

    2003-04-08

    An electrolyte system suitable for a molten salt electrolyte battery is described where the electrolyte system is a molten nitrate compound, an organic compound containing dissolved lithium salts, or a 1-ethyl-3-methlyimidazolium salt with a melting temperature between approximately room temperature and approximately 250.degree. C. With a compatible anode and cathode, the electrolyte system is utilized in a battery as a power source suitable for oil/gas borehole applications and in heat sensors.

  9. Salt fluoridation and oral health.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the caries-protective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich, and several other cantons followed suit. Studies initiated in the early seventies showed that fluoride, when added to salt, inhibits dental caries. The addition of fluoride to salt for human consumption was officially authorized in 1980-82. In Switzerland 85% of domestic salt consumed is fluoridated and 67% in Germany. Salt fluoridation schemes are reaching more than one hundred million in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Cuba. The cost of salt fluoridation is very low, within 0.02 and 0.05 € per year and capita. Children and adults of the low socio-economic strata tend to have substantially more untreated caries than higher strata. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method for improving oral health. Salt fluoridation has cariostatic potential like water fluoridation (caries reductions up to 50%). In Europe, meaningful percentages of users have been attained only in Germany (67%) and Switzerland (85%). In Latin America, there are more than 100 million users, and several countries have arrived at coverage of 90 to 99%. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method of caries prevention, and billions of people throughout the world could benefit from this method. Copyright © 2013 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  10. Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McClesky, T. Mark

    2008-10-14

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  11. Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McClesky, T. Mark

    2008-11-11

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  12. Electrochromic salts, solutions, and devices

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McClesky,7,064,212 T. Mark

    2006-06-20

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  13. Salt appetite in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Hendi, Khadeja; Leshem, Micah

    2014-11-28

    The present study investigated whether salt appetite in the elderly is impaired similar to thirst because of the commonality of their physiological substrates and whether alterations in salt appetite are related to mood. Elderly (65-85 years, n 30) and middle-aged (45-58 years, n 30) men and women were compared in two test sessions. Thirst, psychophysical ratings of taste solutions, dietary Na and energy intakes, seasoning with salt and sugar, number of salty and sweet snacks consumed, preferred amounts of salt in soup and sugar in tea, and an overall measure of salt appetite and its relationship with mood, nocturia and sleep were measured. Elderly participants were found to be less thirsty and respond less to thirst. In contrast, no impairment of salt appetite was found in them, and although they had a reduced dietary Na intake, it dissipated when corrected for their reduced dietary energy intake. Diet composition and Na intake were found to be similar in middle-aged and elderly participants, despite the lesser intake in elderly participants. There were no age-related differences in the intensity of taste or hedonic profile of Na, in salting habits, in tests of salting soup, or number of salty snacks consumed. No relationship of any measure of salt appetite with mood measured by the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, frequency of nocturia, or sleep duration was observed. The age-related impairment of the physiology of mineralofluid regulation, while compromising thirst and fluid intake, spares salt appetite, suggesting that salt appetite in humans is not regulated physiologically. Intact salt appetite in the elderly might be utilised judiciously to prevent hyponatraemia, increase thirst and improve appetite.

  14. Dietary Salt Intake and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Over the past century, salt has been the subject of intense scientific research related to blood pressure elevation and cardiovascular mortalities. Moderate reduction of dietary salt intake is generally an effective measure to reduce blood pressure. However, recently some in the academic society and lay media dispute the benefits of salt restriction, pointing to inconsistent outcomes noted in some observational studies. A reduction in dietary salt from the current intake of 9-12 g/day to the recommended level of less than 5-6 g/day will have major beneficial effects on cardiovascular health along with major healthcare cost savings around the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) strongly recommended to reduce dietary salt intake as one of the top priority actions to tackle the global non-communicable disease crisis and has urged member nations to take action to reduce population wide dietary salt intake to decrease the number of deaths from hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. However, some scientists still advocate the possibility of increased risk of CVD morbidity and mortality at extremes of low salt intake. Future research may inform the optimal sodium reduction strategies and intake targets for general populations. Until then, we have to continue to build consensus around the greatest benefits of salt reduction for CVD prevention, and dietary salt intake reduction strategies must remain at the top of the public health agenda. PMID:25061468

  15. Should we eat less salt?

    PubMed

    Delahaye, François

    2013-05-01

    High blood pressure is a major cardiovascular risk factor. There is overwhelming evidence that high salt consumption is a major cause of increased blood pressure. There is also a link between high salt consumption and risk of stroke, left ventricular hypertrophy, renal disease, obesity, renal stones and stomach cancer. Reducing salt consumption leads to a decrease in blood pressure and the incidence of cardiovascular disease. There are no deleterious effects associated with reducing salt consumption and it is also very cost-effective. Many organizations and state governments have issued recommendations regarding the suitable amount of salt consumption. In France, the objective is a salt consumption<8g/day in men and<6.5g/day in women and children. As 80% of consumed salt comes from manufactured products in developed countries, reduction of salt consumption requires the participation of the food industry. The other tool is consumer information and education. Salt consumption has already decreased in France in recent years, but efforts must continue.

  16. Pathophysiology of salt sensitivity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ando, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2012-06-01

    Dietary salt intake is the most important factor contributing to hypertension, but the salt susceptibility of blood pressure (BP) is different in individual subjects. Although the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension is heterogeneous, it is mainly attributable to an impaired renal capacity to excrete sodium (Na(+) ). We recently identified two novel mechanisms that impair renal Na(+) -excreting function and result in an increase in BP. First, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation in the kidney, which facilitates distal Na(+) reabsorption through epithelial Na(+) channel activation, causes salt-sensitive hypertension. This mechanism exists not only in models of high-aldosterone hypertension as seen in conditions of obesity or metabolic syndrome, but also in normal- or low-aldosterone type of salt-sensitive hypertension. In the latter, Rac1 activation by salt excess causes MR stimulation. Second, renospecific sympathoactivation may cause an increase in BP under conditions of salt excess. Renal beta2 adrenoceptor stimulation in the kidney leads to decreased transcription of the gene encoding WNK4, a negative regulator of Na(+) reabsorption through Na(+) -Cl (-) cotransporter in the distal convoluted tubules, resulting in salt-dependent hypertension. Abnormalities identified in these two pathways of Na(+) reabsorption in the distal nephron may present therapeutic targets for the treatment of salt-sensitive hypertension.

  17. Diclofenac salts. III. Alkaline and earth alkaline salts.

    PubMed

    Fini, Adamo; Fazio, Giuseppe; Rosetti, Francesca; Angeles Holgado, M; Iruín, Ana; Alvarez-Fuentes, Josefa

    2005-11-01

    Diclofenac salts containing the alkaline and two earth alkaline cations have been prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDAX spectroscopy; and by thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA): all of them crystallize as hydrate when precipitated from water. The salts dehydrate at room temperature and more easily on heating, but recovery the hydration, when placed in a humid environment. X-ray diffraction spectra suggest that on dehydration new peaks appear on diffractograms and the lattice of the salts partially looses crystallinity. This phenomenon is readily visible in the case of the calcium and magnesium salts, whose thermograms display a crystallization exotherm, before melting or decomposing at temperatures near or above 200 degrees C; these last salts appear to form solvates, when prepared from methanol. The thermogram of each salt shows a complex endotherm of dehydration about 100 degrees C; the calcium salt displays two endotherms, well separated at about 120 and 160 degrees C, which disappear after prolonged heating. Decomposition exotherms, before or soon after the melting, appear below 300 degrees C. The ammonium salt is thermally unstable and, when heated to start dehydration, dissociates and leaves acidic diclofenac.

  18. Reactor performance in terms of COD and nitrogen removal and bacterial community structure of a three-stage rotating bioelectrochemical contactor.

    PubMed

    Sayess, Rassil R; Saikaly, Pascal E; El-Fadel, Mutasem; Li, Dong; Semerjian, Lucy

    2013-02-01

    Integrating microbial fuel cell (MFC) into rotating biological contactor (RBC) creates an opportunity for enhanced removal of COD and nitrogen coupled with energy generation from wastewater. In this study, a three-stage rotating bioelectrochemical contactor (referred to as RBC-MFC unit) integrating MFC with RBC technology was constructed for simultaneous removal of carbonaceous and nitrogenous compounds and electricity generation from a synthetic medium containing acetate and ammonium. The performance of the RBC-MFC unit was compared to a control reactor (referred to as RBC unit) that was operated under the same conditions but without current generation (i.e. open-circuit mode). The effect of hydraulic loading rate (HLR) and COD/N ratio on the performance of the two units was investigated. At low (3.05 gCOD g⁻¹N) and high COD/N ratio (6.64 gCOD g⁻¹N), both units achieved almost similar COD and ammonia-nitrogen removal. However, the RBC-MFC unit achieved significantly higher denitrification and nitrogen removal compared to the RBC unit indicating improved denitrification at the cathode due to current flow. The average voltage under 1000 Ω external resistance ranged between 0.03 and 0.30 V and between 0.02 and 0.21 V for stages 1 and 2 of the RBC-MFC unit. Pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene revealed high bacterial diversity at the anode and cathode of both units. Genera that play a role in nitrification (Nitrospira; Nitrosomonas), denitrification (Comamonas; Thauera) and electricity generation (Geobacter) were identified at the electrodes. Geobacter was only detected on the anode of the RBC-MFC unit. Nitrifiers and denitrifiers were more abundant in the RBC-MFC unit compared to the RBC unit and were largely present on the cathode of both units suggesting that most of the nitrogen removal occurred at the cathode. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sodium: How to Tame Your Salt Habit

    MedlinePlus

    ... same amount of sodium as table salt. Use salt substitutes wisely. Some salt substitutes or light salts contain a mixture of table ... substitute — and get too much sodium. Also, many salt substitutes contain potassium chloride. Although potassium can lessen some ...

  20. Theory Of Salt Effects On Protein Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Yuba; Schmit, Jeremy

    Salt is one of the major factors that effects protein solubility. Often, at low salt concentration regime, protein solubility increases with the salt concentration(salting in) whereas at high salt concentration regime, solubility decreases with the increase in salt concentration(salting out). There are no quantitative theories to explain salting in and salting out. We have developed a model to describe the salting in and salting out. Our model accounts for the electrostatic Coulomb energy, salt entropy and non-electrostatic interaction between proteins. We analytically solve the linearized Poisson Boltzmann equation modelling the protein charge by a first order multipole expansion. In our model, protein charges are modulated by the anion binding. Consideration of only the zeroth order term in protein charge doesn't help to describe salting in phenomenon because of the repulsive interaction. To capture the salting in behaviour, it requires an attractive electrostatic interaction in low salt regime. Our work shows that at low salt concentration, dipole interaction is the cause for salting in and at high salt concentration a salt-dependent depletion interaction dominates and gives the salting out. Our theoretical result is consistent with the experimental result for Chymosin protein NIH Grant No R01GM107487.

  1. CHED Events: Salt Lake City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, Donald J.

    2009-03-01

    The Division of Chemical Education (CHED) Committee meetings planned for the Spring 2009 ACS Meeting in Salt Lake City will be in the Marriott City Center Hotel. Check the location of other CHED events, the CHED Social Event, the Undergraduate Program, Sci-Mix, etc. because many will be in the Salt Palace Convention Center.

  2. Bile salts and calcium absorption

    PubMed Central

    Webling, D. D'A.; Holdsworth, E. S.

    1966-01-01

    1. The study of the effect of bile salts on enhancing calcium absorption in the rachitic chick has been extended to bile salts not present in chick bile, e.g. glycine conjugates and bile alcohol sulphates. 2. Bile and bile salts cause an increase in calcium absorption from sparingly soluble calcium hydrogen phosphate when compared with a suspension of calcium hydrogen phosphate in saline. 3. If the bile ducts of normal rats are tied the absorption of calcium from calcium hydrogen phosphate decreases but can be restored by giving bile salts with the calcium salt. 4. Bile salts increase solubility in water of the sparingly soluble calcium salts, phytate and phosphate at pH values between 6 and 8. 5. Bile salts increase the solubility in lipid solvents of calcium in approximately the same proportion as they increase the absorption of calcium from the gut. 6. The physiological role of bile in calcium absorption and its mode of action are discussed. PMID:4291037

  3. Studies of Absorption in Salt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    Pressed Salt ........................................... 9 2.5.2 Natural Salt ........................................... 14 3.0 EXPERIMENTAL METHODS ...micrographs with sufficient contrast could not be obtained. 2.3 Crack Decoration We found that the most effective method to enhance the grain boundaries and...corrections based on the methods developed by Johnson (1946), Saltikov (1958) and more recently discussed by Underwood (1968). Corrected values for grain

  4. History Leaves Salts Behind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    These plots, or spectra, show that a rock dubbed 'McKittrick' near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site at Meridiani Planum, Mars, has higher concentrations of sulfur and bromine than a nearby patch of soil nicknamed 'Tarmac.' These data were taken by Opportunity's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, which uses curium-244 to assess the elemental composition of rocks and soil. Only portions of the targets' full spectra are shown to highlight the significant differences in elemental concentrations between 'McKittrick' and 'Tarmac.' Intensities are plotted on a logarithmic scale.

    A nearby rock named Guadalupe similarly has extremely high concentrations of sulfur, but very little bromine. This 'element fractionation' typically occurs when a watery brine slowly evaporates and various salt compounds are precipitated in sequence.

  5. Ammoniated salt heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, W. R.; Jaeger, F. J.; Giordano, T. J.

    A thermochemical heat pump/energy storage system using liquid ammoniate salts is described. The system, which can be used for space heating or cooling, provides energy storage for both functions. The bulk of the energy is stored as chemical energy and thus can be stored indefinitely. The system is well suited to use with a solar energy source or industrial waste heat. Several liquid ammoniates are identified and the critical properties of three of the most promising are presented. Results of small scale (5000 Btu) system tests are discussed and a design concept for a prototype system is given. This system represents a significant improvement over the system using solid ammoniates investigated previously because of the increase in heat transfer rates (5 to 60 Btu/hr sq ft F) and the resulting reduction in heat exchanger size. As a result the concept shows promise of being cost competitive with conventional systems.

  6. Salt resistant crop plants.

    PubMed

    Roy, Stuart J; Negrão, Sónia; Tester, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Soil salinity is a major constraint to agriculture. To improve salinity tolerance of crops, various traits can be incorporated, including ion exclusion, osmotic tolerance and tissue tolerance. We review the roles of a range of genes involved in salt tolerance traits. Different tissues and cells are adapted for specific and often diverse function, so it is important to express the genes in specific cell-types and to pyramid a range of traits. Modern biotechnology (marker-assisted selection or genetic engineering) needs to be increasingly used to introduce the correct combination of genes into elite crop cultivars. Importantly, the effects of introduced genes need to be evaluated in the field to determine their effect on salinity tolerance and yield improvement. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Molten nitrate salt technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, R. W.; Kramer, C. M.; Bradshaw, R. W.; Nissen, D. A.; Goods, S. H.; Mar, R. W.; Munford, J. W.; Karnowsky, M. M.; Biefeld, R. N.; Norem, N. J.

    1981-03-01

    Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage, molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO3 and KNO3. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures were used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use was at temperatures of about 4500 C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 6000 C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program was developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms.

  8. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-01-01

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components may play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made toward engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future. PMID:24630845

  9. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-06-01

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

  10. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I

    2014-06-01

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

  11. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    DOE PAGES

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; ...

    2014-06-01

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selectionmore » and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.« less

  12. Genesis of Tuzla salt basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sušić, Amir; Baraković, Amir; Komatina, Snezana

    2017-04-01

    Salt is condition for the survival of the human race, and holds a special place in the exploitation of mineral resources. It is the only mineral raw material used in direct feeding, and therefore has its own specialty. Salt is a crystalline mineral that is found in seawater, as well as in underground areas where it is formed by deposition of salt sediments. Occurrences of salt water near Tuzla and Gornja Tuzla have been known since the time of the Romans as "ad salinas". The name itself connects Bosnia with its richness in salt, because the word barefoot, which is preserved in a north-Albanian dialect, means a place where boiling salted water are obtained. At the time of the Bosnian kings, these regions are named Soli, which is in connection with occurences of saline sources. Geological studies of rock salt in the area of Tuzla basin are practically began after the annexation of Bosnia and Herzegovina by the Austro-Hungarian Empire, in the period from 1878 to 1918. Geological field work was conducted K. Paul, H. Hefer, E. Tietze and F. Katzer. Monomineral deposit of rock salt Tetima is made of halite and anhydrite mixed with marl belt, while the bay of salt in Tuzla is polymineral and contains a considerable amount of thenardite (Na2SO4) and rare minerals: nortupit, nahkolit, bradleit, probertit, glauberite and others. Both salt deposits were created as a product of chemical sedimentation in the lower Miocene Badenian sediments. The main objective of this paper is to show the genesis of the deposits and the spatial and genetic connection. In addition, genesis of geological research in the areas of Tuzla basin will be presented.

  13. Molten Salt Promoting Effect in Double Salt CO2 Absorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keling; Li, Xiaohong S.; Chen, Haobo; Singh, Prabhakar; King, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the concept of molten salts as catalysts for CO2 absorption by MgO, and extend these observations to the MgO-containing double salt oxides. We will show that the phenomena involved with CO2 absorption by MgO and MgO-based double salts are similar and general, but with some important differences. This paper focuses on the following key concepts: i) identification of conditions that favor or disfavor participation of isolated MgO during double salt absorption, and investigation of methods to increase the absorption capacity of double salt systems by including MgO participation; ii) examination of the relationship between CO2 uptake and melting point of the promoter salt, leading to the recognition of the role of pre-melting (surface melting) in these systems; and iii) extension of the reaction pathway model developed for the MgO-NaNO3 system to the double salt systems. This information advances our understanding of MgO-based CO2 absorption systems for application with pre-combustion gas streams.

  14. Salting-out and Salting-in in Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Wu, Jianzhong; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    The phase behavior of polyelectrolyte (PE) solutions is governed by complicated interplay involving the mixing entropy, excluded volume, chain connectivity, and electrostatic interactions. Here we study the phase behavior of PE solutions in both salt-free condition and with added salt using a liquid-state (LS) theory based thermodynamic model. The LS model accounts or the hard-core repulsion by the Canahan-Starling equation of state, correlations due to chain connectivity by the first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory, and electrostatic correlations by the mean-spherical approximation. In comparison to the prediction from the well-known Voorn-Overbeek theory, the LS model predicts loop-type binodal curves in the salt-PE concentration diagram at temperatures slightly above the critical temperature of PE solution in salt-free case, consistent with the experimental study. The phase separated region shrinks with increasing temperature. Three scenarios of salting-out and salting-in phenomenon are predicted with addition of salts based, depending on the PE concentration.

  15. Salt brickwork as long-term sealing in salt formations

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, F.; Yaramanci, U.

    1993-12-31

    Radioactive wastes can be disposed of in deep salt formations. Rock salt is a suitable geologic medium because of its unique characteristics. Open boreholes, shafts and drifts are created to provide physical access to the repository. Long-term seals must be emplaced in these potential pathways to prevent radioactive release into the biosphere. The sealing materials must be mechanically and, most important, geochemically stable within the host rock. Salt bricks made from compressed salt-powder are understood to be the first choice long-term sealing material. Seals built of salt bricks will be ductile. Large sealing systems are built by combining the individual bricks with mortar. Raw materials for mortar are fine-grained halite powder and ground saliferous clay. This provides for the good adhesive strength of the mortar to the bricks and the high shear-strength of the mortar itself. To test the interaction of rock salt with an emplaced long-term seal, experiments will be carried out in situ, in the Asse salt mine in Germany. Simple borehole sealing experiments will be performed in horizontal holes and a complicated drift sealing experiment is planned, to demonstrate the technology of sealing a standard size drift or shaft inside a disturbed rock mass. Especially, the mechanical stability of the sealing system has to be demonstrated.

  16. Collaborative flowsheet development studies using cobalt dicarbollide and phosphine oxide for the partitioning of radionuclides from Idaho Chemical Processing Plant high-activity liquid waste with centrifugal contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Law, J.D.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    Two solvent extraction technologies under development in Russia for the partitioning of radionuclides from radioactive wastes were tested at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) with simulated high-activity liquid waste (HAW) on a continuous basis using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Two flowsheet tests were conducted with chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (ChCoDiC) to evaluate the separation of cesium and strontium from ICPP HAW. Also, a flowsheet test was performed with a derivative of phosphine oxide (POR) to evaluate the separation of actinides, rare earths, and technetium from ICPP HAW. All experiments utilized a non-radioactive HAW simulant prepared to emulate the macro (or matrix) constituents of actual ICPP HAW at their average tank composition. The behavior of the species of interest was monitored using the stable forms of Sr and Cs, europium as a surrogate for americium, and rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. Removal efficiencies and distribution coefficients were determined for each flowsheet at steady-state conditions. Results of this testing indicate the POR and ChCoDiC processes can be used to effectively treat ICPP HAW. This series of tests is a continuation of ongoing efforts to evaluate the applicability of these Russian developed technologies to U.S. nuclear wastes under the auspices of a joint program between the U.S. Department of Energy and the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy.

  17. Clove essential oil-in-cyclodextrin-in-liposomes in the aqueous and lyophilized states: From laboratory to large scale using a membrane contactor.

    PubMed

    Sebaaly, Carine; Charcosset, Catherine; Stainmesse, Serge; Fessi, Hatem; Greige-Gerges, Hélène

    2016-03-15

    This work is dedicated to prepare liposomal dry powder formulations of inclusion complexes of clove essential oil (CEO) and its main component eugenol (Eug). Ethanol injection method and membrane contactor were applied to prepare liposomes at laboratory and large scale, respectively. Various liposomal formulations were tested: (1) free hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin loaded liposomes; (2) drug in hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in liposomes (DCL); (3) DCL2 obtained by double loading technique, where the drug is added in the organic phase and the inclusion complex in the aqueous phase. Liposomes were characterized for their particle size, polydispersity index, Zeta potential, morphology, encapsulation efficiency of CEO components and Eug loading rate. Reproducible results were obtained with both injection devices. Compared to Eug-loaded liposomes, DCL and DCL2 improved the loading rate of Eug and possessed smaller vesicles size. The DPPH(•) scavenging activity of Eug and CEO was maintained upon incorporation of Eug and CEO into DCL and DCL2. Contrary to DCL2, DCL formulations were stable after 1 month of storage at 4°C and upon reconstitution of the dried lyophilized cakes. Hence, DCL in aqueous and lyophilized forms, are considered as a promising carrier system to preserve volatile and hydrophobic drugs enlarging their application in cosmetic, pharmaceutical and food industries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Improvement of anaerobic digestion performance by continuous nitrogen removal with a membrane contactor treating a substrate rich in ammonia and sulfide.

    PubMed

    Lauterböck, B; Nikolausz, M; Lv, Z; Baumgartner, M; Liebhard, G; Fuchs, W

    2014-04-01

    The effect of reduced ammonia levels on anaerobic digestion was investigated. Two reactors were fed with slaughterhouse waste, one with a hollow fiber membrane contractor for ammonia removal and one without. Different organic loading rates (OLR) and free ammonia and sulfide concentrations were investigated. In the reactor with the membrane contactor, the NH4-N concentration was reduced threefold. At a moderate OLR (3.1 kg chemical oxygen demand - COD/m(3)/d), this reactor performed significantly better than the reference reactor. At high OLR (4.2 kg COD/m(3)/d), the reference reactor almost stopped producing methane (0.01 Nl/gCOD). The membrane reactor also showed a stable process with a methane yield of 0.23 Nl/g COD was achieved. Both reactors had predominantly a hydrogenotrophic microbial consortium, however in the membrane reactor the genus Methanosaeta (acetoclastic) was also detected. In general, all relevant parameters and the methanogenic consortium indicated improved anaerobic digestion of the reactor with the membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental and Model Studies on Continuous Separation of 2-Phenylpropionic Acid Enantiomers by Enantioselective Liquid-Liquid Extraction in Centrifugal Contactor Separators.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaofeng; Tang, Kewen; Zhang, Pangliang; Yin, Shuangfeng

    2016-03-01

    Multistage enantioselective liquid-liquid extraction (ELLE) of 2-phenylpropionic acid (2-PPA) enantiomers using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) as extractant was studied experimentally in a counter-current cascade of centrifugal contactor separators (CCSs). Performance of the process was evaluated by purity (enantiomeric excess, ee) and yield (Y). A multistage equilibrium model was established on the basis of single-stage model for chiral extraction of 2-PPA enantiomers and the law of mass conservation. A series of experiments on the extract phase/washing phase ratio (W/O ratio), extractant concentration, the pH value of aqueous phase, and the number of stages was conducted to verify the multistage equilibrium model. It was found that model predictions were in good agreement with the experimental results. The model was applied to predict and optimize the symmetrical separation of 2-PPA enantiomers. The optimal conditions for symmetric separation involves a W/O ratio of 0.6, pH of 2.5, and HP-β-CD concentration of 0.1 mol L(-1) at a temperature of 278 K, where eeeq (equal enantiomeric excess) can reach up to 37% and Yeq (equal yield) to 69%. By simulation and optimization, the minimum number of stages was evaluated at 98 and 106 for eeeq > 95% and eeeq > 97%.

  20. Biofilm establishment and heavy metal removal capacity of an indigenous mining algal-microbial consortium in a photo-rotating biological contactor.

    PubMed

    Orandi, S; Lewis, D M; Moheimani, N R

    2012-09-01

    An indigenous mining algal-microbial consortium was immobilised within a laboratory-scale photo-rotating biological contactor (PRBC) that was used to investigate the potential for heavy metal removal from acid mine drainage (AMD). The microbial consortium, dominated by Ulothrix sp., was collected from the AMD at the Sar Cheshmeh copper mine in Iran. This paper discusses the parameters required to establish an algal-microbial biofilm used for heavy metal removal, including nutrient requirements and rotational speed. The PRBC was tested using synthesised AMD with the multi-ion and acidic composition of wastewater (containing 18 elements, and with a pH of 3.5 ± 0.5), from which the microbial consortium was collected. The biofilm was successfully developed on the PRBC's disc consortium over 60 days of batch-mode operation. The PRBC was then run continuously with a 24 h hydraulic residence time (HRT) over a ten-week period. Water analysis, performed on a weekly basis, demonstrated the ability of the algal-microbial biofilm to remove 20-50 % of the various metals in the order Cu > Ni > Mn > Zn > Sb > Se > Co > Al. These results clearly indicate the significant potential for indigenous AMD microorganisms to be exploited within a PRBC for AMD treatment.

  1. Developments in Molten Salt and Liquid-Salt-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    2006-07-01

    In the last 5 years, there has been a rapid growth in interest in the use of high-temperature (700 to 1000 deg C) molten and liquid fluoride salts as coolants in nuclear systems. This renewed interest is a consequence of new applications for high-temperature heat and the development of new reactor concepts. Fluoride salts have melting points between 350 and 500 deg C; thus, they are of use only in high-temperature systems. Historically, steam cycles with temperature limits of {approx}550 deg C have been the only efficient method to convert heat to electricity. This limitation produced few incentives to develop high-temperature reactors for electricity production. However, recent advances in Brayton gas turbine technology now make it possible to convert higher-temperature heat efficiency into electricity on an industrial scale and thus have created the enabling technology for more efficient nuclear reactors. Simultaneously, there is a growing interest in using high-temperature nuclear heat for the production of hydrogen and shale oil. Five nuclear-related applications are being investigated: (1) liquid-salt heat-transport systems in hydrogen and shale oil production systems; (2) the advanced high-temperature reactor, which uses a graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel and a liquid salt coolant; (3) the liquid-salt-cooled fast reactor which uses metal-clad fuel and a liquid salt coolant; (4) the molten salt reactor, with the fuel dissolved in the molten salt coolant; and (5) fusion energy systems. The reasons for the new interest in liquid salt coolants, the reactor concepts, and the relevant programs are described. (author)

  2. Great Salt Lake and Bonneville Salt Flats, UT, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This is a view of the Great Salt Lake and nearby Bonneville Salt Flats, UT, (41.0N, 112.5W). A railroad causeway divides the lake with a stark straight line changing the water level and chemistry of the lake as a result. Fresh water runoff enters from the south adding to the depth and reducing the salinity. The north half receives little frsh water and is more saline and shallow. The Bonnieville Salt Flats is the lakebed of a onetime larger lake.

  3. Great Salt Lake and Bonneville Salt Flats, UT, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-04-02

    This is a view of the Great Salt Lake and nearby Bonneville Salt Flats, UT, (41.0N, 112.5W). A railroad causeway divides the lake with a stark straight line changing the water level and chemistry of the lake as a result. Fresh water runoff enters from the south adding to the depth and reducing the salinity. The north half receives little frsh water and is more saline and shallow. The Bonnieville Salt Flats is the lakebed of a onetime larger lake.

  4. Iodized Salt Sales in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Maalouf, Joyce; Barron, Jessica; Gunn, Janelle P.; Yuan, Keming; Perrine, Cria G.; Cogswell, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Iodized salt has been an important source of dietary iodine, a trace element important for regulating human growth, development, and metabolic functions. This analysis identified iodized table salt sales as a percentage of retail salt sales using Nielsen ScanTrack. We identified 1117 salt products, including 701 salt blends and 416 other salt products, 57 of which were iodized. When weighted by sales volume in ounces or per item, 53% contained iodized salt. These findings may provide a baseline for future monitoring of sales of iodized salt. PMID:25763528

  5. Iodized salt sales in the United States.

    PubMed

    Maalouf, Joyce; Barron, Jessica; Gunn, Janelle P; Yuan, Keming; Perrine, Cria G; Cogswell, Mary E

    2015-03-10

    Iodized salt has been an important source of dietary iodine, a trace element important for regulating human growth, development, and metabolic functions. This analysis identified iodized table salt sales as a percentage of retail salt sales using Nielsen ScanTrack. We identified 1117 salt products, including 701 salt blends and 416 other salt products, 57 of which were iodized. When weighted by sales volume in ounces or per item, 53% contained iodized salt. These findings may provide a baseline for future monitoring of sales of iodized salt.

  6. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This simulated natural color image presents a late spring view of north central Utah that includes all of the Olympic sites. The image extends from Ogden in the north, to Provo in the south; and includes the snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and the eastern part of the Great Salt Lake.

    This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution

  7. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This simulated natural color image presents a late spring view of north central Utah that includes all of the Olympic sites. The image extends from Ogden in the north, to Provo in the south; and includes the snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and the eastern part of the Great Salt Lake.

    This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution

  8. Sea Salt vs. Table Salt: What's the Difference?

    MedlinePlus

    ... processed to eliminate minerals and usually contains an additive to prevent clumping. Most table salt also has ... A salty subject. In: American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide. 4th ed. Hoboken, N.J.: ...

  9. Early evolution of salt structures in north Louisiana salt basin

    SciTech Connect

    Lobao, J.J.; Pilger, R.H. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    Several salt diapirs and pillows in southern and central north Louisiana have been studied using approximately 355 mi (570 km) of seismic reflection data and information from 57 deep well holes. Using seismic profiles with deep well-hole data is the most advantageous method to document regional salt tectonism through time. The following conclusions were reached on diapirism in the North Louisiana Salt basin. (1) The diapiric event began early (early Coahuilan) in the southern and central part of the basin, and later (late Coahuilan to Comanchean) in the northern part. (2) The initial diapiric event is much more abrupt and intense in the southern and central diapirs when compared with the later diapiric event in the northern diapirs. (3) Regional depocenter shifting, relative sea level, local erosion with salt extrusion, and rapid depositional loading of sediments are the major controls on diapirism in the basin.

  10. Young Stars with SALT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Adric R.; Alam, Munazza K.; Rice, Emily L.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Henry, Todd J.

    2017-05-01

    We present a spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of 79 nearby M dwarfs in 77 systems. All of these dwarfs are low-proper-motion southern hemisphere objects and were identified in a nearby star survey with a demonstrated sensitivity to young stars. Using low-resolution optical spectroscopy from the Red Side Spectrograph on the South African Large Telescope, we have determined radial velocities, H-alpha, lithium 6708 Å, and potassium 7699 Å equivalent widths linked to age and activity, and spectral types for all of our targets. Combined with astrometric information from literature sources, we identify 44 young stars. Eighteen are previously known members of moving groups within 100 pc of the Sun. Twelve are new members, including one member of the TW Hydra moving group, one member of the 32 Orionis moving group, 9 members of Tucana-Horologium, one member of Argus, and two new members of AB Doradus. We also find 14 young star systems that are not members of any known groups. The remaining 33 star systems do not appear to be young. This appears to be evidence of a new population of nearby young stars not related to the known nearby young moving groups. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).

  11. Does salt increase thirst?

    PubMed

    Leshem, Micah

    2015-02-01

    Our diet is believed to be overly rich in sodium, and it is commonly believed that sodium intake increases drinking. Hence the concern of a possible contribution of dietary sodium to beverage intake which in turn may contribute to obesity and ill health. Here we examine whether voluntary, acute intake of a sodium load, as occurs in routine eating and snacking, increases thirst and drinking. We find that after ingesting 3.5 or 4.4 g NaCl (men) and 1.9 or 3.7 g (women) on nuts during 15 minutes, there is no increase in thirst or drinking of freely available water in the following 2 h compared with eating similar amounts of sugared or unflavored nuts. This suggests that routine ingestion of boluses of salt (~30-40% of daily intake for men, ~ 20-40% for women) does not increase drinking. Methodological concerns such as about nuts as vehicle for sodium suggest further research to establish the generalizability of this unexpected result. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Salt intake, plasma sodium, and worldwide salt reduction.

    PubMed

    He, Feng J; Macgregor, Graham A

    2012-06-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that a reduction in salt intake from the current level of approximately 9-12 g/d in most countries of the world to the recommended level of 5-6 g/d lowers blood pressure (BP) in both hypertensive and normotensive individuals. A further reduction to 3-4 g/d has a greater effect. Prospective studies and outcome trials have demonstrated that a lower salt intake is related to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Cost-effectiveness analyses have documented that salt reduction is more or at the very least just as cost-effective as tobacco control in reducing cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The mechanisms whereby salt raises blood pressure and increases cardiovascular risk are not fully understood. The existing concepts focus on the tendency for an increase in extracellular fluid volume. Increasing evidence suggests that small increases in plasma sodium may have a direct effect on BP and the cardiovascular system, independent of extracellular volume. All countries should adopt a coherent and workable strategy to reduce salt intake in the whole population. Even a modest reduction in population salt intake will have major beneficial effects on health, along with major cost savings.

  13. Salt supply to and significance of asymmetric salt diapirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyi, H.; Burliga, S.; Chemia, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Salt diapirs can be asymmetric both internally and externally reflecting their evolution history. As such, this asymmetry bear a significant amount of information about the differential loading (± lateral forces) and in turn the salt supply that have shaped the diapir. In two dimensions, In this study we compare results of analogue and numerical models of diapirs with two natural salt diapris (Klodawa and Gorleben diapirs) to explain their salt supply and asymmetric evolution. In a NW-SE section, the Gorleben salt diapir possesses an asymmetric external geometry represented by a large southeastern overhang due to salt extrusion during Middle Cretaceous followed by its burial in Tertiary. This external asymmetry is also reflected in the internal configuration of the diapir which shows different rates of salt flow on the two halves of the structure. The asymmetric external and internal geometry of the Gorleben diapir reflect an asymmetric salt supply driven by an asymmetric differential loading. The Kłodawa Salt Structure of Poland is also an asymmetric salt structure driven by asymmetric differential loading from the overlying sediments. The KSS is a salt ridge built of Zechstein evaporite series located in the axial part of the former Mid-Polish Trough. This extensional basin was filled with Zechstein to Cretaceous sediments and was inverted in the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene time. The diapir was triggered in Triassic above a basement fault. In late Triassic, after intruding cover sediments, the diapir extruded an overhang. Using the asymmetric Kłodawa Salt Structure (KSS) in central Poland as a prototype, a series of analogue models were carried out to investigate the evolution history and salt supply driven by asymmetric differential loading. During extension of the model, a daipir was upbuilt by the sand cover above the basement fault. The ductile layer was allowed to extrude a wide overhang at the model "late Triassic" time. The diapir was later downbuilt

  14. Salting-in and salting-out of water-soluble polymers in aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Jahani, Farahnaz

    2012-05-03

    To obtain further experimental evidence for the mechanisms of the salting effect produced by the addition of salting-out or sating-in inducing electrolytes to aqueous solutions of water-soluble polymers, systematic studies on the vapor-liquid equilibria and liquid-liquid equilibria of aqueous solutions of several polymers are performed in the presence of a large series of electrolytes. Polymers are polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400), polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether 250 (PEGDME250), polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether 2000 (PEGDME2000), and polypropylene glycol 400 (PPG400), and the investigated electrolytes are KCl, NH(4)Cl, MgCl(2), (CH(3))(4)NCl, NaCl, NaNO(3), Na(2)CO(3), Na(2)SO(4), and Na(3)Cit (tri-sodium citrate). Aqueous solutions of PPG400 form aqueous two-phase systems with all the investigated salts; however, other investigated polymers form aqueous two-phase systems only with Na(2)CO(3), Na(2)SO(4), and Na(3)Cit. A relation was found between the salting-out or sating-in effects of electrolyte on the polymer aqueous solutions and the slopes of the constant water activity lines of ternary polymer-salt aqueous solutions, so that, in the case of the salting-out effect, the constant water activity lines had a concave slope, but in the case of the salting-in effects, the constant water activity lines had a convex slope. The effect of temperature, anion of electrolyte, cation of electrolyte, and type and molar mass of polymers were studied and the results interpreted in terms of the solute-water and solute-solute interactions. The salting-out effect results from the formation of ion (specially anion)-water hydration complexes, which, in turn, decreases hydration, and hence, the solubility of the polymer and the salting-in effect results from a direct binding of the cations to the ether oxygens of the polymers.

  15. Nucleophilic arylation with tetraarylphosphonium salts

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zuyong; Lin, Jin-Hong; Xiao, Ji-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Organic phosphonium salts have served as important intermediates in synthetic chemistry. But the use of a substituent on the positive phosphorus as a nucleophile to construct C–C bond remains a significant challenge. Here we report an efficient transition-metal-free protocol for the direct nucleophilic arylation of carbonyls and imines with tetraarylphosphonium salts in the presence of caesium carbonate. The aryl nucleophile generated from phosphonium salt shows low basicity and good nucleophilicity, as evidenced by the successful conversion of enolizable aldehydes and ketones. The reaction is not particularly sensitive to water, shows wide substrate scope, and is compatible with a variety of functional groups including cyano and ester groups. Compared with the arylmetallic reagents that are usually moisture sensitive, the phosphonium salts are shelf-stable and can be easily handled. PMID:26822205

  16. The SALT observation control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Janus; Charles, Anne; Hettlage, Christian; Husser, Tim-Oliver; Koeslag, Anthony; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni

    2008-08-01

    With the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) on the brink of entering its fully operational phase, its suite of telescope control software has matured significantly towards the fully fledged control system intended to meet the demands of the user community. In this paper the authors present an overview of the design and implementation of the SALT Telescope Control System (TCS); detailing its main components and the interfaces between them - specifically in relation to the Observation Control System (OCS) that will allow the SALT to be used in an efficient queue-scheduled fashion. Finally, the capabilities and constraints of the design are highlighted to guide the SALT user community in preparing proposals that make optimal use of the available telescope time.

  17. Synthesis of Quaternary Heterocyclic Salts

    PubMed Central

    Winstead, Angela J.; Nyambura, Grace; Matthews, Rachael; Toney, Deveine; Oyaghire, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    The microwave synthesis of twenty quaternary ammonium salts is described. The syntheses feature comparable yields to conventional synthetic methods reported in the current literature with reduced reaction times and the absence of solvent or minimal solvent. PMID:24256924

  18. Recycling of aluminum salt cake

    SciTech Connect

    Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Karvelas, D.E.

    1991-12-01

    The secondary aluminum industry generates more than 110 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of salt-cake waste every year. This waste stream contains about 3--5% aluminum, 15--30% aluminum oxide, 30--40% sodium chloride, and 20--30% potassium chloride. As much as 50% of the content of this waste is combined salt (sodium and potassium chlorides). Salt-cake waste is currently disposed of in conventional landfills. In addition, over 50 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of black dross that is not economical to reprocess a rotary furnace for aluminum recovery ends up in landfills. The composition of the dross is similar to that of salt cake, except that it contains higher concentrations of aluminum (up to 20%) and correspondingly lower amounts of salts. Because of the high solubility of the salts in water, these residues, when put in landfills, represent a potential source of pollution to surface-water and groundwater supplies. The increasing number of environmental regulations on the generation and disposal of industrial wastes are likely to restrict the disposal of these salt-containing wastes in conventional landfills. Processes exist that employ the dissolution and recovery of the salts from the waste stream. These wet-processing methods are economical only when the aluminum concentration in that waste exceeds about 10%. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a study in which existing technologies were reviewed and new concepts that are potentially more cost-effective than existing processes were developed and evaluated. These include freeze crystallization, solvent/antisolvent extraction, common-ion effect, high-pressure/high-temperature process, and capillary-effect systems. This paper presents some of the technical and economic results of the aforementioned ANL study.

  19. Microbiology of solar salt ponds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javor, B.

    1985-01-01

    Solar salt ponds are shallow ponds of brines that range in salinity from that of normal seawater (3.4 percent) through NaCl saturation. Some salterns evaporate brines to the potash stage of concentration (bitterns). All the brines (except the bitterns, which are devoid of life) harbor high concentrations of microorganisms. The high concentrations of microorganisms and their adaptation to life in the salt pond are discussed.

  20. Microplastics in Spanish Table Salt.

    PubMed

    Iñiguez, Maria E; Conesa, Juan A; Fullana, Andres

    2017-08-17

    Marine debris is widely recognized as a global environmental problem. One of its main components, microplastics, has been found in several sea salt samples from different countries, indicating that sea products are irremediably contaminated by microplastics. Previous studies show very confusing results, reporting amounts of microparticles (MPs) in salt ranging from zero to 680 MPs/kg, with no mention of the possible causes of such differences. Several errors in the experimental procedures used were found and are reported in the present work. Likewise, 21 different samples of commercial table salt from Spain have been analyzed for MPs content and nature. The samples comprise sea salts and well salts, before and after packing. The microplastic content found was of 50-280 MPs/kg salt, being polyethylene-terephthalate (PET) the most frequently found polymer, followed by polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE), with no significant differences among all the samples. The results indicate that even though the micro-particles might originate from multiple sources, there is a background presence of microplastics in the environment.

  1. Liking, salt taste perception and use of table salt when consuming reduced-salt chicken stews in light of South Africa's new salt regulations.

    PubMed

    De Kock, H L; Zandstra, E H; Sayed, N; Wentzel-Viljoen, E

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of salt reduction on liking, salt taste perception, and use of table salt when consuming chicken stew in light of South Africa's new salt recommendations. In total, 432 South-African consumers (aged 35.2 ± 12.3 years) consumed a full portion of a chicken stew meal once at a central location. Four stock cube powders varying in salt content were used to prepare chicken stews: 1) no reduction - 2013 Na level; regular salt level as currently available on the South African market (24473 mg Na/100 g), 2) salt reduction smaller than 2016 level, i.e. 10%-reduced (22025 mg Na/100 g), 3) 2016 salt level, as per regulatory prescriptions (18000 mg Na/100 g), 4) 2019 salt level, as per regulatory prescriptions (13000 mg Na/100 g). Consumers were randomly allocated to consume one of the four meals. Liking, salt taste perception, and use of table salt and pepper were measured. Chicken stews prepared with reduced-salt stock powders were equally well-liked as chicken stews with the current salt level. Moreover, a gradual reduction of the salt in the chicken stews resulted in a reduced salt intake, up to an average of 19% for the total group compared to the benchmark 2013 Na level stew. However, 19% of consumers compensated by adding salt back to full compensation in some cases. More salt was added with increased reductions of salt in the meals, even to the point of full compensation. Further investigation into the impacts of nutrition communication and education about salt reduction on salt taste perception and use is needed. This research provides new consumer insights on salt use and emphasises the need for consumer-focused behaviour change approaches, in addition to reformulation of products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. PLAT X41601 EAST (SALT LAKE CITY CEMETERY LOCATER), SALT LAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLAT X-4-160-1 EAST (SALT LAKE CITY CEMETERY LOCATER), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT CEMETERY BETWEEN OLIVE STREET (1020 EAST) AND 1000 EAST STREET, REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 12049, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  3. Salt excretion in Suaeda fruticosa.

    PubMed

    Labidi, Nehla; Ammari, Manel; Mssedi, Dorsaf; Benzerti, Maali; Snoussi, Sana; Abdelly, C

    2010-09-01

    Suaeda fruticosa is a perennial "includer" halophyte devoid of glands or trichomes with a strong ability of accumulating and sequestrating Na(+) and Cl(-). We were interested in determining whether leaf cuticle salt excretion could be involved as a further mechanism in salt response of this species after long-term treatment with high salinity levels. Seedlings had been treated for three months with seawater (SW) diluted with tap water (0, 25, 50 and 75% SW). Leaf scanning electron microscopy revealed a convex adaxial side sculpture and a higher accumulation of saline crystals at the lamina margin, with a large variability on repartition and size between treatments. No salt gland or salt bladder was found. Threedimensional wax decorations were the only structures found on leaf surface. Washing the leaf surface with water indicated that sodium and chloride predominated in excreted salts, and that potassium was poorly represented. Optimal growth of whole plant was recorded at 25% SW, correlating with maximum Na(+) and Cl(-) absolute secretion rate. The leaves of plants treated with SW retained more water than those of plants treated with tap water due to lower solute potential, especially at 25% SW. Analysis of compatible solute, such as proline, total soluble carbohydrates and glycinebetaine disclosed strong relationship between glycinebetaine and osmotic potential (r = 0.92) suggesting that tissue hydration was partly maintained by glycinebetaine accumulation. Thus in S. fruticosa , increased solute accumulation associated with water retention, and steady intracellular ion homeostasis confirms the "includer" strategy of salt tolerance previously demonstrated. However, salt excretion at leaf surface also participated in conferring to this species a capacity in high salinity tolerance.

  4. Pattern formation in Salt Playa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasser, Jana; Goehring, Lucas; Nield, Joanna

    2017-04-01

    Salt Playa, or crusts, often exhibit polygonal salt-ridge patterns with a diameter of roughly 1 m. Several mechanisms, like cracking or wrinkling of the surface crust have been discussed, but none of these can explain the scale of the observed patterns. We investigate a theory where we link the crust pattern to buoyancy-driven flows in the porous ground beneath them. In this model, salinity gradients arise due to evaporation at the ground surface. These gradients lead to the formation of convection cells, much like the convection caused by temperature gradients. The spatial scaling of these convection rolls significantly depends on the evaporation rate, while the onset of convection is controlled by the permeability of the soil. Here we will show a link between surface salt patterns and subsurface dynamics. We investigate the onset of convection, the scaling of convection cells, and the formation of salt crusts in a sandy soil confined to a Hele-Shaw cell in analogue experiments and link subsurface concentration gradients to surface crust patterns by means of a field study. The aim of the experiments and the field study is to explore how porous media convection can affect salt crust patterns in arid environments.

  5. Sedimentation dynamics about salt features

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrie, A.; Blake, D.W.

    1985-02-01

    Detailed side-scan sonar and gridded bathymetric surveys on continental margins reveal the existence of numerous submarine canyons. Recently published compilations of current velocities in submarine canyons indicate that alternating and undirectionaly flows often exceed 20-30 cm/sec with peak velocities ranging from 70 to 100 cm/sec. Current meters attached to the ocean floor have been lost at current velocities of 190 cm/sec. Such velocities are ample to transport sand-size sediments. The results of DSDP Leg 96 show the existence of massive sands and gravels on the Louisiana slope, deposited during the last glacial advance. Thus, present physical oceanographic data may be an analog to conditions during glacially induced lowered sea levels. Salt ridges and domes underlie much of the Louisiana slope, determining morphology. Submarine canyons lace the slope. Given a prograding shelf, the net sediment transport routes will be down the submarine canyons. Sediment deposition patterns around the salt ridges and domes include parallel-bedded foredrifts on the upslope side, lee drifts on the downslope side, and moats along the lateral flanks of the salt features. Major differences exist between the sedimentation patterns around a ridge and a dome. The size and shape of the flow pattern will determine whether there can be a flow over the salt feature with a resulting turbulent wave that may influence sedimentation. Sedimentation patterns about salt features on the present slope should be applicable to similar paleoenvironments.

  6. Antioxidative defense under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Abogadallah, Gaber M

    2010-04-01

    Salt tolerance is a complex trait involving the coordinated action of many gene families that perform a variety of functions such as control of water loss through stomata, ion sequestration, metabolic adjustment, osmotic adjustment and antioxidative defense. In spite of the large number of publications on the role of antioxidative defense under salt stress, the relative importance of this process to overall plant salt tolerance is still a matter of controversy. In this article, the generation and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under normal and salt stress conditions in relation to the type of photosynthesis is discussed. The CO(2) concentrating mechanism in C4 and CAM plants is expected to contribute to decreasing ROS generation. However, the available data supports this hypothesis in CAM but not in C4 plants. We discuss the specific roles of enzymatic and non enzymatic antioxidants in relation to the oxidative load in the context of whole plant salt tolerance. The possible preventive antioxidative mechanisms are also discussed.

  7. Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

    1999-03-01

    In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in

  8. Oxidation of Pu(III) by nitric acid in tri-n-butyl phosphate solutions. Part II. Chemical methods for the suppression of oxidation to improve plutonium separation in contactor operation

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, Y.K.; Gosselin, J.A.

    1983-12-01

    A systematic method has been used to screen a number of potential stabilizers (holding reductants) for Pu(III) in tri-n-butyl phosphate/diluent solutions used in irradiated fuel reprocessing systems. The conditions assumed were similar to those used in solvent extraction contactor operations. Of the reagents tested, oximes as a group appeared to be very effective. Acetaldoxime, in particular, was selected for extensive tests and was used as a Pu(III) stabilizer, in both the aqueous and organic phases, in contactor runs for plutonium partition from thorium and uranium. In the best results, the plutonium loss to the thorium/uranium stream was 2.8 X 10/sup -5/ g/l or 0.0046%; without using acetaldoxime, the loss was 12%. Rates of plutonium reduction in 1.5 M nitric acid have been compared for a number of reducing agents under identical conditions. Some derivatives of hydroxylamine were found to be much more effective than hydroxylamine itself.

  9. COMPLEX EVOLUTION OF BILE SALTS IN BIRDS

    PubMed Central

    Hagey, Lee R.; Vidal, Nicolas; Hofmann, Alan F.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    Bile salts are the major end-metabolites of cholesterol and are important in lipid digestion and shaping of the gut microflora. There have been limited studies of bile-salt variation in birds. The purpose of our study was to determine bile-salt variation among birds and relate this variation to current avian phylogenies and hypotheses on the evolution of bile salt pathways. We determined the biliary bile-salt composition of 405 phylogenetically diverse bird species, including 7 paleognath species. Bile salt profiles were generally stable within bird families. Complex bile-salt profiles were more common in omnivores and herbivores than in carnivores. The structural variation of bile salts in birds is extensive and comparable to that seen in surveys of bile salts in reptiles and mammals. Birds produce many of the bile salts found throughout nonavian vertebrates and some previously uncharacterized bile salts. One difference between birds and other vertebrates is extensive hydroxylation of carbon-16 of bile salts in bird species. Comparison of our data set of bird bile salts with that of other vertebrates, especially reptiles, allowed us to infer evolutionary changes in the bile salt synthetic pathway. PMID:21113274

  10. Salt: important element, invisible menace.

    PubMed

    Wick, Jeannette Y

    2012-11-01

    Public health authorities have mounted campaigns aimed at educating Americans about the obesity epidemic and urging them to consume less sugar. Another food additive-salt-is also a culprit, and many experts believe it should be the target of our next major public health campaign. In addition to obesity, salt is associated with increased rates of cardiovascular disease (especially hypertension), gastric cancer, and osteoporosis. Most Americans consume much more salt than they need or is healthy, with up to 75% of it coming from prepared foods. To be successful, these campaigns must educate young consumers. These campaigns must also incorporate food manufacturers and change our dining environments so that low-sodium foods are accessible and affordable.

  11. Protein aggregation in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V.; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein–protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim’s thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid–liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer–salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization. PMID:25964322

  12. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures.

  13. Salt release from potato crisps.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xing; Fisk, Ian D

    2012-04-01

    The rate of salt release in-mouth from salted potato crisps was evaluated. It was hypothesised that a slow steady release of sodium would occur on chewing and hydration; to test this a crisp was chewed and held in the oral cavity without swallowing for 60 s. Sodium release was measured over the entire holding period, after 20-30 s a peak in salivary sodium levels was recorded. A similar trend was observed with sensory perceived saltiness by trained panellists. The results suggest that a significant proportion of the crisp's salt flavouring is released in a pulse-type mechanism which would not be encountered when the crisp is exposed to normal eating patterns and would result in the consumption of a large proportion of unperceived sodium.

  14. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome: review.

    PubMed

    Cerdà-Esteve, M; Cuadrado-Godia, E; Chillaron, J J; Pont-Sunyer, C; Cucurella, G; Fernández, M; Goday, A; Cano-Pérez, J F; Rodríguez-Campello, A; Roquer, J

    2008-06-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequent electrolyte disorder in critically neurological patients. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW) is defined as a renal loss of sodium during intracranial disease leading to hyponatremia and a decrease in extracellular fluid volume. The pathogenesis of this disorder is still not completely understood. Sympathetic responses as well as some natriuretic factors play a role in this syndrome. Distinction between SIADH and CSW might be difficult. The essential point is the volemic state. It is necessary to rule out other intermediate causes. Treatment requires volume replacement and maintenance of a positive salt balance. Mineral corticoids may be useful in complicated cases.

  16. Production of chlorine from chloride salts

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1981-01-01

    A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

  17. Sources of household salt in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jooste, Pieter L

    2005-01-01

    Marketing of non-iodized salt through unconventional distribution channels is one of the factors weakening the national salt iodization program in South Africa. The aim of this study was therefore to quantify the various sources of household salt, and to relate this information to socio-economic status. Questionnaire information was collected by personal interview during home visits from a multistage, cluster, probability sample of 2164 adults representative of the adult population. Nationally 77.7% of households obtained their table salt from the typical food shops distributing iodized salt. However, in the nine different provinces between 8 and 37.3% of households used unconventional sources, distributing mainly non-iodized salt, to obtain their household salt. These alternative sources include distributors of agricultural salt, small general dealer shops called spaza shops, in peri-urban and rural townships, street vendors and salt saches placed in the packaging of maize meal bags. Country-wide around 30% of low socio-economic households obtained their salt from unconventional sources compared to less than 5% in high socio-economic households, emphasizing the vulnerability of low socio-economic groups to the use of non-iodized salt. Intervention strategies should mobilize all role players involved in unconventional marketing channels of household salt to provide only iodized salt to consumers, as required by law.

  18. Microplastic Pollution in Table Salts from China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongqi; Shi, Huahong; Li, Lan; Li, Jiana; Jabeen, Khalida; Kolandhasamy, Prabhu

    2015-11-17

    Microplastics have been found in seas all over the world. We hypothesize that sea salts might contain microplastics, because they are directly supplied by seawater. To test our hypothesis, we collected 15 brands of sea salts, lake salts, and rock/well salts from supermarkets throughout China. The microplastics content was 550-681 particles/kg in sea salts, 43-364 particles/kg in lake salts, and 7-204 particles/kg in rock/well salts. In sea salts, fragments and fibers were the prevalent types of particles compared with pellets and sheets. Microplastics measuring less than 200 μm represented the majority of the particles, accounting for 55% of the total microplastics, and the most common microplastics were polyethylene terephthalate, followed by polyethylene and cellophane in sea salts. The abundance of microplastics in sea salts was significantly higher than that in lake salts and rock/well salts. This result indicates that sea products, such as sea salts, are contaminated by microplastics. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on microplastic pollution in abiotic sea products.

  19. Why does salt start to move?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, David

    1997-12-01

    This paper concerns mechanisms of salt (and ductile shale) movement. It investigates salt flow due to differential loading, folding of the overburden during compression and drag by a moving overburden. The approach is to compare the salt flux caused by these processes to that generated by buoyancy. It is demonstrated that overburden folding and drag by the overburden can, under commonly encountered conditions, result in greater amounts of salt movement than that produced by buoyancy or differential loading. These conclusions apply during the early stages of salt anticline, salt pillow and salt roller formation but not during the later stages of salt diapir and salt wall growth when buoyancy dominates. The quantitative significance of these alternatives to buoyancy is determined by considering an elastic plate overlying a viscous fluid. This is the simplest mathematical model that can reproduce the processes considered. The model shows that: (1) Under certain conditions, these mechanisms produce more salt movement than buoyancy. Differential loading dominates when the surface slopes become more than a small fraction of the slope of the salt top. Overburden buckling dominates if the in-plane stress exceeds a critical value. Drag dominates when the salt layer is thinner than a few hundred metres. (2) The strength of the overburden inhibits formation of salt diapirs, even those due to buoyancy, on wavelengths less than about 12 km.

  20. Iodisation of Salt in Slovenia: Increased Availability of Non-Iodised Salt in the Food Supply.

    PubMed

    Žmitek, Katja; Pravst, Igor

    2016-07-16

    Salt iodisation is considered a key public health measure for assuring adequate iodine intake in iodine-deficient countries. In Slovenia, the iodisation of all salt was made mandatory in 1953. A considerable regulatory change came in 2003 with the mandatory iodisation of rock and evaporated salt only. In addition, joining the European Union's free single market in 2004 enabled the import of non-iodised salt. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of salt iodising in the food supply. We examined both the availability and sale of (non-)iodised salt. Average sales-weighted iodine levels in salt were calculated using the results of a national monitoring of salt quality. Data on the availability and sales of salts were collected in major food retailers in 2014. Iodised salt represented 59.2% of the salt samples, and 95.9% of salt sales, with an average (sales-weighted) level of 24.2 mg KI/kg of salt. The average sales-weighted KI level in non-iodised salts was 3.5 mg KI/kg. We may conclude that the sales-weighted average iodine levels in iodised salt are in line with the regulatory requirements. However, the regulatory changes and the EU single market have considerably affected the availability of non-iodised salt. While sales of non-iodised salt are still low, non-iodised salt represented 33.7% of the salts in our sample. This indicates the existence of a niche market which could pose a risk of inadequate iodine intake in those who deliberately decide to consume non-iodised salt only. Policymakers need to provide efficient salt iodisation intervention to assure sufficient iodine supply in the future. The reported sales-weighting approach enables cost-efficient monitoring of the iodisation of salt in the food supply.

  1. Iodisation of Salt in Slovenia: Increased Availability of Non-Iodised Salt in the Food Supply

    PubMed Central

    Žmitek, Katja; Pravst, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Salt iodisation is considered a key public health measure for assuring adequate iodine intake in iodine-deficient countries. In Slovenia, the iodisation of all salt was made mandatory in 1953. A considerable regulatory change came in 2003 with the mandatory iodisation of rock and evaporated salt only. In addition, joining the European Union’s free single market in 2004 enabled the import of non-iodised salt. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of salt iodising in the food supply. We examined both the availability and sale of (non-)iodised salt. Average sales-weighted iodine levels in salt were calculated using the results of a national monitoring of salt quality. Data on the availability and sales of salts were collected in major food retailers in 2014. Iodised salt represented 59.2% of the salt samples, and 95.9% of salt sales, with an average (sales-weighted) level of 24.2 mg KI/kg of salt. The average sales-weighted KI level in non-iodised salts was 3.5 mg KI/kg. We may conclude that the sales-weighted average iodine levels in iodised salt are in line with the regulatory requirements. However, the regulatory changes and the EU single market have considerably affected the availability of non-iodised salt. While sales of non-iodised salt are still low, non-iodised salt represented 33.7% of the salts in our sample. This indicates the existence of a niche market which could pose a risk of inadequate iodine intake in those who deliberately decide to consume non-iodised salt only. Policymakers need to provide efficient salt iodisation intervention to assure sufficient iodine supply in the future. The reported sales-weighting approach enables cost-efficient monitoring of the iodisation of salt in the food supply. PMID:27438852

  2. Clean salt process final report

    SciTech Connect

    Herting, D.L.

    1996-09-30

    A process has been demonstrated in the laboratory for separating clean, virtually non-radioactive sodium nitrate from Hanford tank waste using fractional crystallization. The name of the process is the Clean Salt Process. Flowsheet modeling has shown that the process is capable of reducing the volume of vitrified low activity waste (LAW) by 80 to 90 %. Construction of the Clean Salt processing plant would cost less than $1 10 million, and would eliminate the need for building a $2.2 billion large scale vitrification plant planned for Privatization Phase 11. Disposal costs for the vitrified LAW would also be reduced by an estimated $240 million. This report provides a summary of five years of laboratory and engineering development activities, beginning in fiscal year 1992. Topics covered include laboratory testing of a variety of processing options; proof-of-principle demonstrations with actual waste samples from Hanford tanks 241-U-110 (U-110), 241-SY-101 (101-SY), and 241-AN-102 (102-AN); descriptions of the primary solubility phase diagrams that govem the process; a review of environmental regulations governing disposition of the reclaimed salt and an assessment of the potential beneficial uses of the reclaimed salt; preliminary plant design and construction cost estimates. A detailed description is given for the large scale laboratory demonstration of the process using waste from tank 241-AW-101 (101-AW), a candidate waste for 0044vitrification during Phase I Privatization.

  3. Cathode for molten salt batteries

    DOEpatents

    Mamantov, Gleb; Marassi, Roberto

    1977-01-01

    A molten salt electrochemical system for battery applications comprises tetravalent sulfur as the active cathode material with a molten chloroaluminate solvent comprising a mixture of AlCl.sub.3 and MCl having a molar ratio of AlCl.sub.3 /MCl from greater than 50.0/50.0 to 80/20.

  4. Hydrogen Cyanide and Cyanide Salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 08 / 016 F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HYDROGEN CYANIDE AND CYANIDE SALTS ( CAS No . various ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2010 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This docu

  5. Infrared Spectrometry of Inorganic Salts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackermann, Martin N.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a general chemistry experiment which uses infrared spectroscopy to analyze inorganic ions and thereby serves to introduce an important instrumental method of analysis. Presents a table of eight anions and the ammonium ion with the frequencies of their normal modes, as well as the spectra of three sulfate salts. (RR)

  6. Salt RNA protection against thermodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, J.; Maurel, M.-C.

    2003-04-01

    We shown the structural integrity of tRNA at high temperature, 82^oC for 30h, in high salt concentrations (Tehei et al, 2002). Stability were also performed by measuring the residual specific tRNA charge capacity after heat treatment for 30 h at 82^oC. We have undertaken in vitro selection of RNA molecules at high temperature in presence of an ancient halite (NaCl) sample (reference : EZ08-K6-C9). This sample, collected in a borehole at 720.15 m depth, belongs to the Rupelian Upper Salt Formation of the Bresse salt basin (France). Its age is estimated to about 31±3 millions years. These studies provide support for the importance of salt to protect macromolecules against thermal degradation allowing activity to be recovered. These could be useful for searching traces of life in ancient sediments and in planetary exploration. Reference: Tehei Moeva, Franzetti Bruno, Maurel Marie-Christine, Vergne Jacques, Hountondji Codjo and Zaccai Giuseppe, Extremophiles, (2002), 6: 427-430.

  7. Chlorine Salts at the Phoenix Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, J.; Horgan, B.

    2016-09-01

    Although chlorine salts (perchlorates, chlorides) are known to exist at the Phoenix landing site, their distribution and type have not been positively identified yet. We look for these salts through a novel NIR remote sensing technique.

  8. Salt dome discoveries mounting in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Ericksen, R.L.

    1996-06-17

    Exploratory drilling around piercement salt domes in Mississippi has met with a string of successes in recent months. Exploration of these salt features is reported to have been initiated through the review of non-proprietary, 2D seismic data and subsurface control. This preliminary data and work were then selectively upgraded by the acquisition of additional, generally higher quality, conventional 2D seismic lines. This current flurry of successful exploration and ensuing development drilling by Amerada Hess Corp. on the flanks of salt domes in Mississippi has resulted in a number of significant Hosston discoveries/producers at: Carson salt dome in Jefferson Davis County; Dry Creek salt dome in Covington County, Midway salt dome in lamar County, Monticello salt dome in Lawrence County, and Prentiss salt dome in Jefferson Davis County. The resulting production from these fields is gas and condensate, with wells being completed on 640 acre production units.

  9. Effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt-sensitive versus salt-resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt-sensitive versus salt-resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after 1 week of high salt (200 mmol per day sodium) and 1 week of low salt (10 mmol per day sodium) diet. Salt sensitivity was defined as the fall in systolic blood pressure>15 mm Hg on low salt diet. The study includes 389 subjects (44% women; 16% blacks; body mass index, 28.5±4.2 kg/m2). As expected, blood pressure was lower on low salt (129±16/78±9 mm Hg) as compared with high salt diet (145±18/86±10 mm Hg). Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment were higher on low salt diet (95.4±19.4 mg/dL; 10.8±7.3 mIU/L; 2.6±1.9) as compared with high salt diet (90.6±10.8 mg/dL; 9.4±5.8 mIU/L; 2.1±1.4; P<0.0001 for all). There was no difference in homeostasis model assessment between salt-sensitive (n=193) versus salt-resistant (n=196) subjects on either diet. Increase in homeostasis model assessment on low salt diet was 0.5±1.4 in salt-sensitive and 0.4±1.5 in salt-resistant subjects (P=NS). On multivariate regression analysis, change in systolic blood pressure was not associated with change in homeostasis model assessment after including age, body mass index, sex, change in serum and urine aldosterone, and cortisol into the model. We conclude that the increase in insulin resistance on low salt diet is not affected by salt sensitivity of blood pressure. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Salt Filler For Making Covered Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, Timothy N.; Holmes, Richard R.

    1991-01-01

    In simple fabrication technique, metal salts used to create such subsurface channels as those for coolant in metallic heat exchanger. Layer of metal deposited on structure by vacuum plasma spraying, sealing channels. Metal salt or salt mixture has melting temperature higher than those of waxes and aluminum and withstands high temperature of plasma spraying. After plasma spraying, salt filler dissolved quickly and easily and flushed away with water or other appropriate solvent, leaving behind covered channels.

  11. EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXCESS SALT FEEDING

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Lewis K.; Heine, Martha

    1961-01-01

    Female rats were fed diets containing either excess sea salt or excess sodium chloride for periods up to 14 months. The hypertension produced by sea salt was more pronounced than that caused by sodium chloride alone, although the average amount of sodium chloride contained in the sea salt feeding was slightly less. The ions involved in this incremental effect of sea salt were not identified. PMID:13719314

  12. Reconsolidated Salt as a Geotechnical Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Francis D.; Gadbury, Casey

    2015-11-01

    Salt as a geologic medium has several attributes favorable to long-term isolation of waste placed in mined openings. Salt formations are largely impermeable and induced fractures heal as stress returns to equilibrium. Permanent isolation also depends upon the ability to construct geotechnical barriers that achieve nearly the same high-performance characteristics attributed to the native salt formation. Salt repository seal concepts often include elements of reconstituted granular salt. As a specific case in point, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant recently received regulatory approval to change the disposal panel closure design from an engineered barrier constructed of a salt-based concrete to one that employs simple run-of-mine salt and temporary bulkheads for isolation from ventilation. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is a radioactive waste disposal repository for defense-related transuranic elements mined from the Permian evaporite salt beds in southeast New Mexico. Its approved shaft seal design incorporates barrier components comprising salt-based concrete, bentonite, and substantial depths of crushed salt compacted to enhance reconsolidation. This paper will focus on crushed salt behavior when applied as drift closures to isolate disposal rooms during operations. Scientific aspects of salt reconsolidation have been studied extensively. The technical basis for geotechnical barrier performance has been strengthened by recent experimental findings and analogue comparisons. The panel closure change was accompanied by recognition that granular salt will return to a physical state similar to the halite surrounding it. Use of run-of-mine salt ensures physical and chemical compatibility with the repository environment and simplifies ongoing disposal operations. Our current knowledge and expected outcome of research can be assimilated with lessons learned to put forward designs and operational concepts for the next generation of salt repositories. Mined salt

  13. Fenofibrate lowers blood pressure in salt-sensitive but not salt-resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kimberly; Nian, Hui; Yu, Chang; Luther, James M.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonists reduce blood pressure in rodents, but clinical trials provide conflicting data regarding their effects in humans. We tested the hypothesis that the effect of fenofibrate on blood pressure depends on salt sensitivity. Methods Thirty-one hypertensive volunteers (17 salt-resistant, 14 salt-sensitive) completed a randomized, crossover, double-blind protocol with three dietary phases: low salt diet (10 mmol/day) followed by two consecutive high salt diets (200 mmol/day), each for 6 days. During high salt, volunteers were randomized to fenofibrate 160 mg/day or placebo. Hemodynamic and metabolic parameters were measured on the last morning of each treatment arm. Results Fenofibrate reduced triglycerides similarly in salt-sensitive and salt-resistant volunteers. Fenofibrate did not affect blood pressure in salt-resistant volunteers. In salt-sensitive volunteers, fenofibrate significantly decreased diastolic (P =0.02 versus placebo) and mean arterial (P = 0.04 versus placebo) blood pressure during high salt. In all volunteers, the decrease in systolic pressure during fenofibrate correlated inversely with the salt sensitivity of mean arterial pressure as a continuous variable. Fenofibrate significantly decreased heart rate, plasma renin activity, and renal vascular resistance during high salt in salt-sensitive volunteers, but not salt-resistant volunteers. Fenofibrate did not affect sodium excretion or weight gain during high salt. The effect of salt intake and fenofibrate on plasma and urine epoxyeicosatrienoic acid concentrations differed in salt-resistant and salt-sensitive volunteers. Conclusion Fenofibrate reduces blood pressure, heart rate and renal vasoconstriction in salt-sensitive volunteers, but not in salt-resistant volunteers. These findings have implications for the treatment of hyperlipidemia in hypertensive individuals. PMID:23385647

  14. Cardiovascular and other effects of salt consumption

    PubMed Central

    Cappuccio, Francesco P

    2013-01-01

    Salt is one of the most important determinants of high blood pressure and increased cardiovascular risk worldwide. However, a high salt intake has other adverse effects beyond those involving the cardiovascular system, so that there is renewed interest in the relationships between high salt intake and other diseases. PMID:25019010

  15. DEVELOPING INDICATORS OF SALT MARSH HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    We relate plant zonation in salt marshes to key ecosystem services such as erosion control and wildlife habitat. Ten salt marshes in Narragansett Bay, with similar geological bedrock and sea exchange, were identified to examine plant zonation. Sub-watersheds adjacent to the salt ...

  16. The economics of salt cake recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano, D.; Hryn, J.N.; Daniels, E.J.

    1996-03-01

    The Process Evaluation Section at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has a major program aimed at developing cost-effective technologies for salt cake recycling. This paper addresses the economic feasibility of technologies for the recovery of aluminum, salt, and residue-oxide fractions from salt cake. Four processes were assessed for salt recovery from salt cake: (1) base case: leaching in water at 25{degree}C, with evaporation to crystallize salts; (2) high-temperature case: leaching in water at 250{degree}C, with flash crystallization to precipitate salts; (3) solventlantisolvent case: leaching in water at 25{degree}C, concentrating by evaporation, and reacting with acetone to precipitate salts; and (4) electrodialysis: leaching in water at 25{degree}C, with concentration and recovery of salts by electrodialysis. All test cases for salt recovery had a negative present value, given current pricing structure and 20% return on investment. Although manufacturing costs (variable plus fixed) could reasonably be recovered in the sales price of the salt product, capital costs cannot. The economics for the recycling processes are improved, however, if the residueoxide can be sold instead of landfilled. For example, the base case process would be profitable at a wet oxide value of $220/metric ton. The economics of alternative scenarios were also considered, including aluminum recovery with landfilling of salts and oxides.

  17. 7 CFR 58.721 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Salt. 58.721 Section 58.721 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....721 Salt. Salt shall be free flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet the requirements...

  18. 40 CFR 721.7655 - Alkylsulfonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkylsulfonium salt. 721.7655 Section... Substances § 721.7655 Alkylsulfonium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylsulfonium salt (PMN P-93-1166)...

  19. 40 CFR 721.6085 - Phosphonocarboxylate salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphonocarboxylate salts. 721.6085... Substances § 721.6085 Phosphonocarboxylate salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as phosphonocarboxylate salts (PMNs...

  20. 7 CFR 58.437 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Salt. 58.437 Section 58.437 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....437 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  1. 40 CFR 721.7655 - Alkylsulfonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylsulfonium salt. 721.7655 Section... Substances § 721.7655 Alkylsulfonium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylsulfonium salt (PMN P-93-1166)...

  2. 7 CFR 58.328 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Salt. 58.328 Section 58.328 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....328 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  3. 7 CFR 58.437 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Salt. 58.437 Section 58.437 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....437 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  4. 7 CFR 58.437 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Salt. 58.437 Section 58.437 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....437 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  5. 40 CFR 721.6085 - Phosphonocarboxylate salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphonocarboxylate salts. 721.6085... Substances § 721.6085 Phosphonocarboxylate salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as phosphonocarboxylate salts (PMNs...

  6. 40 CFR 721.7655 - Alkylsulfonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkylsulfonium salt. 721.7655 Section... Substances § 721.7655 Alkylsulfonium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylsulfonium salt (PMN P-93-1166)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.6085 - Phosphonocarboxylate salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphonocarboxylate salts. 721.6085... Substances § 721.6085 Phosphonocarboxylate salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as phosphonocarboxylate salts (PMNs...

  8. 40 CFR 721.6085 - Phosphonocarboxylate salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphonocarboxylate salts. 721.6085... Substances § 721.6085 Phosphonocarboxylate salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as phosphonocarboxylate salts (PMNs...

  9. 7 CFR 58.721 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Salt. 58.721 Section 58.721 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....721 Salt. Salt shall be free flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet the requirements...

  10. 40 CFR 721.7655 - Alkylsulfonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkylsulfonium salt. 721.7655 Section... Substances § 721.7655 Alkylsulfonium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylsulfonium salt (PMN P-93-1166)...

  11. 7 CFR 58.721 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Salt. 58.721 Section 58.721 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....721 Salt. Salt shall be free flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet the requirements...

  12. 7 CFR 58.328 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Salt. 58.328 Section 58.328 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....328 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  13. 7 CFR 58.328 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Salt. 58.328 Section 58.328 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....328 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  14. 7 CFR 58.721 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Salt. 58.721 Section 58.721 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....721 Salt. Salt shall be free flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet the requirements...

  15. 7 CFR 58.328 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Salt. 58.328 Section 58.328 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....328 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  16. 7 CFR 58.721 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Salt. 58.721 Section 58.721 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....721 Salt. Salt shall be free flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet the requirements...

  17. 40 CFR 721.6085 - Phosphonocarboxylate salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphonocarboxylate salts. 721.6085... Substances § 721.6085 Phosphonocarboxylate salts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as phosphonocarboxylate salts (PMNs...

  18. 40 CFR 721.7655 - Alkylsulfonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkylsulfonium salt. 721.7655 Section... Substances § 721.7655 Alkylsulfonium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylsulfonium salt (PMN P-93-1166)...

  19. 7 CFR 58.437 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Salt. 58.437 Section 58.437 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....437 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  20. 7 CFR 58.328 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Salt. 58.328 Section 58.328 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....328 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  1. 7 CFR 58.437 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Salt. 58.437 Section 58.437 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....437 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  2. Biodegradation of resin acid sodium salts

    Treesearch

    Richard W. Hemingway; H. Greaves

    1973-01-01

    The sodium salts of resin acids were readily degraded by microflora from two types of river water and from an activated sewage sludge. A lag phase with little or no resin acid salt degradation but rapid bacterial development occurred which was greatly extended by a decrease in incubation temperature. After this initial lag phase, the resin acid salts were rapidly...

  3. Structural properties of scandium inorganic salts

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Jeremiah M.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-16

    Here, the structural properties of reported inorganic scandium (Sc) salts were reviewed, including the halide (Cl, Br, and I), nitrate, sulfate, and phosphate salts. Additional analytical techniques used for characterization of these complexes (metrical data, FTIR and 45Sc NMR spectroscopy) were tabulated. A structural comparison of Sc to select lanthanide (La, Gd, Lu) salt complexes was briefly evaluated.

  4. Structural properties of scandium inorganic salts

    DOE PAGES

    Sears, Jeremiah M.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-16

    Here, the structural properties of reported inorganic scandium (Sc) salts were reviewed, including the halide (Cl, Br, and I), nitrate, sulfate, and phosphate salts. Additional analytical techniques used for characterization of these complexes (metrical data, FTIR and 45Sc NMR spectroscopy) were tabulated. A structural comparison of Sc to select lanthanide (La, Gd, Lu) salt complexes was briefly evaluated.

  5. Molecular biology of cyanobacterial salt acclimation.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    High and changing salt concentrations represent major abiotic factors limiting the growth of microorganisms. During their long evolution, cyanobacteria have adapted to aquatic habitats with various salt concentrations. High salt concentrations in the medium challenge the cell with reduced water availability and high contents of inorganic ions. The basic mechanism of salt acclimation involves the active extrusion of toxic inorganic ions and the accumulation of compatible solutes, including sucrose, trehalose, glucosylglycerol, and glycine betaine. The kinetics of these physiological processes has been exceptionally well studied in the model Synechocystis 6803, leading to the definition of five subsequent phases in reaching a new salt acclimation steady state. Recent '-omics' technologies using the advanced model Synechocystis 6803 have revealed a comprehensive picture of the dynamic process of salt acclimation involving the differential expression of hundreds of genes. However, the mechanisms involved in sensing specific salt stress signals are not well resolved. In the future, analysis of cyanobacterial salt acclimation will be directed toward defining the functions of the many unknown proteins upregulated in salt-stressed cells, identifying specific salt-sensing mechanisms, using salt-resistant strains of cyanobacteria for the production of bioenergy, and applying cyanobacterial stress genes to improve the salt tolerance of sensitive organisms.

  6. Reactivity of pyrylium salts toward basic reactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neidlein, R.; Witerzens, P.

    1981-01-01

    The reactivity of some N-acyl and N-sulfonyl-hydrazines 2-4, 10a-10g, 12, 13, 16a, 16b and of hydrazones 18, benzyldihydrazone 21 towards pyrylium salts 1 was examined. By reaction of 2,4,6-trimethyl-pyrylium salt 1 with substituted hydrazines some pyridinium salts were obtained. Relationships between basicity and reactivity were discussed.

  7. DEVELOPING INDICATORS OF SALT MARSH HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    We relate plant zonation in salt marshes to key ecosystem services such as erosion control and wildlife habitat. Ten salt marshes in Narragansett Bay, with similar geological bedrock and sea exchange, were identified to examine plant zonation. Sub-watersheds adjacent to the salt ...

  8. 200 MAIN STREET, SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    200 MAIN STREET, SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING EAST OF "MAIN' STREET. REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18273, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  9. INTERSECTION OF 445 NORTH & 1040 EAST, SALT LAKE CITY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERSECTION OF 445 NORTH & 1040 EAST, SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18272, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  10. Pharmaceutical salts: a summary on doses of salt formers from the Orange Book.

    PubMed

    Saal, C; Becker, A

    2013-07-16

    Over half of the active pharmaceutical ingredients currently approved within the US are pharmaceutical salts. Selection of suitable pharmaceutical salts is carried out during late research or early development phase. Therefore several properties of different pharmaceutical salts of a new chemical entity are assessed during salt screening and salt selection. This typically includes physico-chemical behavior, dissolution rate and pharmacokinetics of a pharmaceutical salt. Beyond these properties also toxicological aspects have to be taken into account. As a starting point for a toxicological assessment we present an overview of the usage of pharmaceutical salts as described in the FDA's Orange Book including maximum daily doses for the most important administration routes.

  11. Dry Creek salt dome, Mississippi Interior Salt basin

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, S.L.; Ericksen, R.L.

    1997-03-01

    Recent drilling of salt dome flanks in the Mississippi Salt basin has resulted in important new discoveries and the opening of a frontier play. This play is focused on gas/condensate reserves in several Cretaceous formations, most notably the Upper Cretaceous Eutaw and lower Tuscaloosa intervals and Lower Cretaceous Paluxy and Hosston formations. As many as eight domes have been drilled thus far; sandstones in the upper Hosston Formation comprise the primary target. Production has been as high as 3-5 Mcf and 500-1200 bbl of condensate per day, with estimated ultimate reserves in the range of 0.2 to 1.5 MBOE (million barrels oil equivalent) per well. As typified by discovery at Dry Creek salt dome, traps are related to faulting, unconformities, and updip loss of permeability. Previous drilling at Dry Creek, and in the basin generally, avoided the flank areas of most domes, due to geologic models that predicted latestage (Tertiary) piercement and breached accumulations. Recent data from Dry Creek and other productive domes suggest that growth was episodic and that piercement of Tertiary strata did not affect deeper reservoirs charged with hydrocarbons in the Late Cretaceous.

  12. Ultrasonic characterization of pork meat salting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pérez, J. V.; De Prados, M.; Pérez-Muelas, N.; Cárcel, J. A.; Benedito, J.

    2012-12-01

    Salting process plays a key role in the preservation and quality of dry-cured meat products. Therefore, an adequate monitoring of salt content during salting is necessary to reach high quality products. Thus, the main objective of this work was to test the ability of low intensity ultrasound to monitor the salting process of pork meat. Cylindrical samples (diameter 36 mm, height 60±10 mm) of Biceps femoris were salted (brine 20% NaCl, w/w) at 2 °C for 1, 2, 4 and 7 days. During salting and at each experimental time, three cylinders were taken in order to measure the ultrasonic velocity at 2 °C. Afterwards, the cylinders were split in three sections (height 20 mm), measuring again the ultrasonic velocity and determining the salt and the moisture content by AOAC standards. In the whole cylinders, moisture content was reduced from 763 (g/kg sample) in fresh samples to 723 (g/kg sample) in samples salted for 7 days, while the maximum salt gain was 37.3 (g/kg sample). Although, moisture and salt contents up to 673 and 118 (g/kg sample) were reached in the sections of meat cylinders, respectively. During salting, the ultrasonic velocity increased due to salt gain and water loss. Thus, significant (p<0.05) linear relationships were found between the ultrasonic velocity and the salt (R2 = 0.975) and moisture (R2 = 0.863) contents. In addition, the change of the ultrasonic velocity with the increase of the salt content showed a good agreement with the Kinsler equation. Therefore, low intensity ultrasound emerges as a potential technique to monitor, in a non destructive way, the meat salting processes carried out in the food industry.

  13. Community solar salt production in Goa, India.

    PubMed

    Mani, Kabilan; Salgaonkar, Bhakti B; Das, Deepthi; Bragança, Judith M

    2012-12-01

    Traditional salt farming in Goa, India has been practised for the past 1,500 years by a few communities. Goa's riverine estuaries, easy access to sea water and favourable climatic conditions makes salt production attractive during summer. Salt produced through this natural evaporation process also played an important role in the economy of Goa even during the Portuguese rule as salt was the chief export commodity. In the past there were 36 villages involved in salt production, which is now reduced to 9. Low income, lack of skilled labour, competition from industrially produced salt, losses incurred on the yearly damage of embankments are the major reasons responsible for the reduction in the number of salt pans.Salt pans (Mithagar or Mithache agor) form a part of the reclaimed waterlogged khazan lands, which are also utilised for aquaculture, pisciculture and agriculture. Salt pans in Goa experience three phases namely, the ceased phase during monsoon period of June to October, preparatory phase from December to January, and salt harvesting phase, from February to June. After the monsoons, the salt pans are prepared manually for salt production. During high tide, an influx of sea water occurs, which enters the reservoir pans through sluice gates. The sea water after 1-2 days on attaining a salinity of approximately 5ºBé, is released into the evaporator pans and kept till it attains a salinity of 23 - 25ºBé. The brine is then released to crystallizer pans, where the salt crystallises out 25 - 27ºBé and is then harvested.Salt pans form a unique ecosystem where succession of different organisms with varying environmental conditions occurs. Organisms ranging from bacteria, archaea to fungi, algae, etc., are known to colonise salt pans and may influence the quality of salt produced.The aim of this review is to describe salt farming in Goa's history, importance of salt production as a community activity, traditional method of salt production and the biota

  14. Community solar salt production in Goa, India

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Traditional salt farming in Goa, India has been practised for the past 1,500 years by a few communities. Goa’s riverine estuaries, easy access to sea water and favourable climatic conditions makes salt production attractive during summer. Salt produced through this natural evaporation process also played an important role in the economy of Goa even during the Portuguese rule as salt was the chief export commodity. In the past there were 36 villages involved in salt production, which is now reduced to 9. Low income, lack of skilled labour, competition from industrially produced salt, losses incurred on the yearly damage of embankments are the major reasons responsible for the reduction in the number of salt pans. Salt pans (Mithagar or Mithache agor) form a part of the reclaimed waterlogged khazan lands, which are also utilised for aquaculture, pisciculture and agriculture. Salt pans in Goa experience three phases namely, the ceased phase during monsoon period of June to October, preparatory phase from December to January, and salt harvesting phase, from February to June. After the monsoons, the salt pans are prepared manually for salt production. During high tide, an influx of sea water occurs, which enters the reservoir pans through sluice gates. The sea water after 1–2 days on attaining a salinity of approximately 5ºBé, is released into the evaporator pans and kept till it attains a salinity of 23 - 25ºBé. The brine is then released to crystallizer pans, where the salt crystallises out 25 - 27ºBé and is then harvested. Salt pans form a unique ecosystem where succession of different organisms with varying environmental conditions occurs. Organisms ranging from bacteria, archaea to fungi, algae, etc., are known to colonise salt pans and may influence the quality of salt produced. The aim of this review is to describe salt farming in Goa’s history, importance of salt production as a community activity, traditional method of salt production and the

  15. Awareness of salt restriction is not reflected in the actual salt intake in Japanese hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Adachi, Tomoko; Nakashima, Ryuma; Sugamori, Takashi; Endo, Akihiro; Ito, Takafumi; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese guidelines for hypertension management recommend reducing salt intake to <6 g/day for hypertensive patients. However, it is not currently known whether hypertensive patients' awareness of the recommended reduced salt diet correlates with their actual intake. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between actual salt intake of Japanese hypertensive patients and their awareness of the recommended guidelines for reduced dietary salt intake. In total, 236 outpatients (146 males and 90 females) with a mean age 69.7 ± 12.5 years were included in this study. Daily dietary salt intake was estimated using sodium and creatinine concentrations detected in spot urine samples. The patients filled out a questionnaire regarding their awareness of recommended salt restriction for hypertension management. The questionnaire distinguished the patients' awareness of recommended salt restriction in four levels (low, moderate, high and very high). The mean estimated salt intake was 9.72 ± 2.43 g/day. Patients' awareness regarding salt intake in all levels provided in the questionnaire did not correlate with actual salt intake (p = 0.731). Our results demonstrated that Japanese hypertensive outpatients consumed higher levels of salt than the target value recommended by Japanese guidelines. There was no correlation between actual salt intake and patients' awareness of the recommended reduction in salt. These results suggest that monitoring salt intake and informing patients of their actual salt intake are necessary for effective hypertension management.

  16. Molten nitrate salt technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, R. W.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the experimental programs underway in support of the Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) program. The experimental programs are concentrating on molten nitrate salts which have been proposed as heat transfer and energy storage medium. The salt composition of greatest interest is drawsalt, nominally a 50-50 molar mixture of NaNO3 and KNO3 with a melting point of 220 C. Several technical uncertainties have been identified that must be resolved before nitrate based solar plants can be commercialized. Research programs at Sandia National Laboratories, universities, and industrial suppliers have been implemented to resolve these technical uncertainties. The experimental programs involve corrosion, decomposition, physical properties, and environmental cracking. Summaries of each project and how they impact central receiver applications such as the repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration program are presented.

  17. Beryllium Interactions in Molten Salts

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Smolik; M. F. Simpson; P. J. Pinhero; M. Hara; Y. Hatano; R. A. Anderl; J. P. Sharpe; T. Terai; S. Tanaka; D. A. Petti; D.-K. Sze

    2006-01-01

    Molten flibe (2LiF·BeF2) is a candidate as a cooling and tritium breeding media for future fusion power plants. Neutron interactions with the salt will produce tritium and release excess free fluorine ions. Beryllium metal has been demonstrated as an effective redox control agent to prevent free fluorine, or HF species, from reacting with structural metal components. The extent and rate of beryllium solubility in a pot design experiments to suppress continuously supplied hydrogen fluoride gas has been measured and modeled[ ]. This paper presents evidence of beryllium loss from specimens, a dependence of the loss upon bi-metal coupling, i.e., galvanic effect, and the partitioning of the beryllium to the salt and container materials. Various posttest investigative methods, viz., scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to explore this behavior.

  18. Salt toxicosis in commercial turkeys.

    PubMed

    Wages, D P; Ficken, M D; Cook, M E; Mitchell, J

    1995-01-01

    Salt toxicosis was confirmed in a flock of 20,000 thirteen-week-old tom turkeys experiencing an increase in mortality. Clinical signs included polydipsia, diarrhea, ataxia, incoordination, tremors that progressed to depression, sternal and lateral recumbency accompanied by torticollis, and death. Mortality over a 5-day period was 6.7%. Necropsy lesions included pallor and dehydration of pectoral muscles, hepatic congestion, and fluid-filled small and large intestines. Microscopic lesions consisted of bilaterally symmetrical areas of necrosis within the cerebral hemispheres accompanied by vascular congestion and edema, as well as hyalinization of the glomerular capillary walls of the kidney and eosinophilic granular casts in the renal tubules. Average salt concentration in the feed from affected houses with 8.04%.

  19. The taste of table salt.

    PubMed

    Roper, Stephen D

    2015-03-01

    Solutions of table salt (NaCl) elicit several tastes, including of course saltiness but also sweet, sour, and bitter. This brief review touches on some of the mileposts concerning what is known about taste transduction for the Na(+) ion, the main contributor to saltiness. Electrophysiological recordings, initially from single gustatory nerve fibers, and later, integrated impulse activity from gustatory nerves led researchers to predict that Na(+) ions interacted with a surface molecule. Subsequent studies have resolved that this molecule is likely to be an epithelial sodium channel, ENaC. Other Na(+) transduction mechanisms are also present in taste buds but have not yet been identified. The specific type(s) of taste cells responsible for salt taste also remains unknown.

  20. Thermophysical properties of reconsolidating crushed salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Urquhart, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Reconsolidated crushed salt is being considered as a backfilling material placed upon nuclear waste within a salt repository environment. In-depth knowledge of thermal and mechanical properties of the crushed salt as it reconsolidates is critical to thermal/mechanical modeling of the reconsolidation process. An experimental study was completed to quantitatively evaluate the thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt as a function of porosity and temperature. The crushed salt for this study came from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In this work the thermal conductivity of crushed salt with porosity ranging from 1% to 40% was determined from room temperature up to 300°C, using two different experimental methods. Thermal properties (including thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat) of single-crystal salt were determined for the same temperature range. The salt was observed to dewater during heating; weight loss from the dewatering was quantified. The thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt decreases with increasing porosity; conversely, thermal conductivity increases as the salt consolidates. The thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt for a given porosity decreases with increasing temperature. A simple mixture theory model is presented to predict and compare to the data developed in this study.

  1. Molten nitrate salt materials studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, R. M.

    1981-03-01

    An overview of the experimental programs underway in support of the Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) program is presented. The experimental programs are concentrating on molten nitrate salts which were proposed as heat transfer and energy storage medium. The experimental programs involve corrosion, decomposition, physical properties, and environmental cracking. Summaries of each project and how they impact central receiver applications are presented.

  2. Bile salts as semiochemicals in fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchinger, Tyler J.; Li, Weiming; Johnson, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    Bile salts are potent olfactory stimuli in fishes; however the biological functions driving such sensitivity remain poorly understood. We provide an integrative review of bile salts as semiochemicals in fish. First, we present characteristics of bile salt structure, metabolism, and function that are particularly relevant to chemical communication. Bile salts display a systematic pattern of structural variation across taxa, are efficiently synthesized, and are stable in the environment. Bile salts are released into the water via the intestine, urinary tract, or gills, and are highly water soluble. Second, we consider the potential role of bile salts as semiochemicals in the contexts of detecting nearby fish, foraging, assessing risk, migrating, and spawning. Lastly, we suggest future studies on bile salts as semiochemicals further characterize release into the environment, behavioral responses by receivers, and directly test the biological contexts underlying olfactory sensitivity.

  3. Salt stains from evaporating droplets

    PubMed Central

    Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Schut, Marthe F. L.; Desarnaud, Julie; Prat, Marc; Bonn, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The study of the behavior of sessile droplets on solid substrates is not only associated with common everyday phenomena, such as the coffee stain effect, limescale deposits on our bathroom walls , but also very important in many applications such as purification of pharmaceuticals, de-icing of airplanes, inkjet printing and coating applications. In many of these processes, a phase change happens within the drop because of solvent evaporation, temperature changes or chemical reactions, which consequently lead to liquid to solid transitions in the droplets. Here we show that crystallization patterns of evaporating of water drops containing dissolved salts are different from the stains reported for evaporating colloidal suspensions. This happens because during the solvent evaporation, the salts crystallize and grow during the drying. Our results show that the patterns of the resulting salt crystal stains are mainly governed by wetting properties of the emerging crystal as well as the pathway of nucleation and growth, and are independent of the evaporation rate and thermal conductivity of the substrates. PMID:26012481

  4. Early Holocene Great Salt Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oviatt, Charles G.; Madsen, David B.; Miller, David; Thompson, Robert S.; McGeehin, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Shorelines and surficial deposits (including buried forest-floor mats and organic-rich wetland sediments) show that Great Salt Lake did not rise higher than modern lake levels during the earliest Holocene (11.5–10.2 cal ka BP; 10–9 14C ka BP). During that period, finely laminated, organic-rich muds (sapropel) containing brine-shrimp cysts and pellets and interbedded sodium-sulfate salts were deposited on the lake floor. Sapropel deposition was probably caused by stratification of the water column — a freshwater cap possibly was formed by groundwater, which had been stored in upland aquifers during the immediately preceding late-Pleistocene deep-lake cycle (Lake Bonneville), and was actively discharging on the basin floor. A climate characterized by low precipitation and runoff, combined with local areas of groundwater discharge in piedmont settings, could explain the apparent conflict between evidence for a shallow lake (a dry climate) and previously published interpretations for a moist climate in the Great Salt Lake basin of the eastern Great Basin.

  5. Metals Electroprocessing in Molten Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoway, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The present study seeks to explain the poor quality of solid electrodeposits in molten salts through a consideration of the effects of fluid flow of the electrolyte. Transparent cells allow observation of electrolyte circulation by a laser schlieren optical technique during the electrodeposition of solid zinc from the molten salt electrolyte, ZnCl2 - LiCl-KCl. Experimental variables are current, density, electrolyte composition, and cell geometry. Based on the results of earlier electrodeposition studies as well as reports in the literature, these parameters are identified as having the primary influence on cell performance and deposit quality. Experiments are conducted to measure the fluid flow patterns and the electrochemical cell characteristics, and to correlate this information with the morphology of the solid electrodeposit produced. Specifically, cell voltage, cell current, characteristic time for dendrite evolution, and dendrite growth directions are noted. Their relationship to electrolyte flow patterns and the morphology of the resulting electrodeposit are derived. Results to date indicate that laser schlieren imaging is capable of revealing fluid flow patterns in a molten salt electrolyte.

  6. Renal arteriolar injury by salt intake contributes to salt memory for the development of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, Hideyo; Sasamura, Hiroyuki; Shinoda, Kazunobu; Morita, Shinya; Kono, Hidaka; Nakagawa, Ken; Ishiguro, Kimiko; Hayashi, Kaori; Nakamura, Mari; Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Oya, Mototsugu; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    The role of salt intake in the development of hypertension is prominent, but its mechanism has not been fully elucidated. Our aim was to examine the effect of transient salt intake during the prehypertensive period in hypertensive model animals. Dahl salt-sensitive rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats were fed from 6 to 14 weeks with low-salt (0.12% NaCl), normal-salt (0.8% NaCl), high-salt (7% NaCl), or high-sodium/normal-chloride diet and returned to normal-salt diet for 3 months. Rats in the high-salt group saw elevations in blood pressure (BP) not only during the treatment period but also for the 3 months after returning to normal-salt diet. We named this phenomenon salt memory. Renal arteriolar injury was found in the high-salt group at the end of experiment. Dahl salt-sensitive rats were fed from 6 to 14 weeks with high-salt diet with angiotensin receptor blocker, vasodilator, calcium channel blocker, and calcium channel blocker+angiotensin receptor blocker and returned to normal-salt diet. Although BP was suppressed to control levels by vasodilator or calcium channel blocker, elevated renal angiotensin II and renal arteriolar injury were observed, and salt memory did not disappear because of sustained renal arteriolar injury. Calcium channel blocker+angiotensin receptor blocker suppressed renal arteriolar injury, resulting in the disappearance of salt memory. Cross-transplantation of kidneys from Dahl salt-sensitive rats on high salt to control rats caused increase of BP, whereas control kidneys caused reduction in BP of hypertensive rats, inducing the central role of the kidney. These results suggest that renal arteriolar injury through BP and renal angiotensin II elevation plays important roles in the development of salt memory for hypertension. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Salt-occluded zeolites as an immobilization matrix for chloride waste salt

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.; Fischer, D.F.; Smith, L.J. . Chemical Technology Div.)

    1993-11-01

    The pyrometallurgical processing of spent fuel from the integral fast reactor (IFR), an advanced reactor under development at Argonne National Laboratory, will generate a chloride salt waste containing the alkali-metal, alkaline-earth, and some of the rare-earth fission products. Salt-occluded zeolite A, formed by equilibrating simulated molten waste salt and zeolite A, has been investigated as an immobilization matrix for this salt waste. In this concept, the chloride waste salt is loaded into the zeolite cavities, and cesium and strontium from the salt are preferentially sorbed by the zeolite. Experiments showed that the salt occluded zeolite powders are leach resistant and radiation stable. The conclusion is that the salt-occluded zeolite is a promising immobilization matrix for the IFR waste salt.

  8. Genetics of Salt-Sensitive Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sanada, Hironobu; Jones, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of salt sensitivity of blood pressure is difficult because of the lack of universal consensus on definition. Regardless of the variability in the definition of salt sensitivity, increased salt intake, independent of the actual level of blood pressure, is also a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and kidney disease. A modest reduction in salt intake results in an immediate decrease in blood pressure, with long-term beneficial consequences. However, some have suggested that dietary sodium restriction may not be beneficial to everyone. Thus, there is a need to distinguish salt-sensitive from salt-resistant individuals, but it has been difficult to do so with phenotypic studies. Therefore, there is a need to determine the genes that are involved in salt sensitivity. This review focuses on genes associated with salt sensitivity, with emphasis on the variants associated with salt sensitivity in humans that are not due to monogenic causes. Special emphasis is given to gene variants associated with salt sensitivity whose protein products interfere with cell function and increase blood pressure in transgenic mice. PMID:21058046

  9. Salt bridges: geometrically specific, designable interactions.

    PubMed

    Donald, Jason E; Kulp, Daniel W; DeGrado, William F

    2011-03-01

    Salt bridges occur frequently in proteins, providing conformational specificity and contributing to molecular recognition and catalysis. We present a comprehensive analysis of these interactions in protein structures by surveying a large database of protein structures. Salt bridges between Asp or Glu and His, Arg, or Lys display extremely well-defined geometric preferences. Several previously observed preferences are confirmed, and others that were previously unrecognized are discovered. Salt bridges are explored for their preferences for different separations in sequence and in space, geometric preferences within proteins and at protein-protein interfaces, co-operativity in networked salt bridges, inclusion within metal-binding sites, preference for acidic electrons, apparent conformational side chain entropy reduction on formation, and degree of burial. Salt bridges occur far more frequently between residues at close than distant sequence separations, but, at close distances, there remain strong preferences for salt bridges at specific separations. Specific types of complex salt bridges, involving three or more members, are also discovered. As we observe a strong relationship between the propensity to form a salt bridge and the placement of salt-bridging residues in protein sequences, we discuss the role that salt bridges might play in kinetically influencing protein folding and thermodynamically stabilizing the native conformation. We also develop a quantitative method to select appropriate crystal structure resolution and B-factor cutoffs. Detailed knowledge of these geometric and sequence dependences should aid de novo design and prediction algorithms. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Preformulation investigation of some clopidogrel addition salts.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Vinko; Smrkolj, Matej; Benkič, Promož; Simonič, Igor; Plevnik, Miha; Ritlop, Gregor; Kristl, Albin; Vrečer, Franc

    2010-06-01

    Physico-chemical properties of active substances such as solubility, dissolution rate, chemical stability, pharmaceutical processibility, etc. can be improved by salt formation of active substances. Characterization of physical properties of such salts is important for selection of an optimal salt having required biopharmaceutical properties, stability and manufacturability. The present study deals with the preformulation study of selected clopidogrel acid addition salts, i.e. hydrogen sulfate, hydrochloride (HCl), hydrobromide (HBr), besylate and (-)-camphor-10-sulfonate salt (CSA) and two commercially available polymorphic forms of hydrogen sulphate salt, i.e. form 1 (HS F1) and form 2 (HS F2). Clopidogrel salts were characterized by means of thermal analysis (TG, DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), dynamic vapor sorption (DVS), true density, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and solubility. Distinct differences in tested parameters were found among acid addition salts and crystalline forms of clopidogrel. Higher melting point of both hydrogen sulphate salt was attributed to presence of hydrogen bonds among HS anions, connecting them into a chain. All salts included in the present study were anhydrous, except HBr which was in the form of monohydrate. The two tested polymorphic forms of clopidogrel HS salt are enantiotropically related to each other and showed the highest hygroscopicity among the tested salts. This is important for development of solid dosage form containing both polymorphic forms and for selection of primary packaging. Solubility studies in different aqueous media showed comparable solubility for clopidogrel hydrogen sulfate (polymorphic forms 1 and 2), hydrochloride (form 1) and hydrobromide hydrate (form 1) whereas clopidogrel camphorsulfonate (CSA) and besylate salt showed slightly lower solubility.

  11. Salt splitting using ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    Many radioactive aqueous wastes in the DOE complex have high concentrations of sodium that can negatively affect waste treatment and disposal operations. Sodium can decrease the durability of waste forms such as glass and is the primary contributor to large disposal volumes. Waste treatment processes such as cesium ion exchange, sludge washing, and calcination are made less efficient and more expensive because of the high sodium concentrations. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City UT) are developing an electrochemical salt splitting process based on inorganic ceramic sodium (Na), super-ionic conductor (NaSICON) membranes that shows promise for mitigating the impact of sodium. In this process, the waste is added to the anode compartment, and an electrical potential is applied to the cell. This drives sodium ions through the membrane, but the membrane rejects most other cations (e.g., Sr{sup +2}, Cs{sup +}). The charge balance in the anode compartment is maintained by generating H{sup +} from the electrolysis of water. The charge balance in the cathode is maintained by generating OH{sup {minus}}, either from the electrolysis of water or from oxygen and water using an oxygen cathode. The normal gaseous products of the electrolysis of water are oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at the cathode. Potentially flammable gas mixtures can be prevented by providing adequate volumes of a sweep gas, using an alternative reductant or destruction of the hydrogen as it is generated. As H{sup +} is generated in the anode compartment, the pH drops. The process may be operated with either an alkaline (pH>12) or an acidic anolyte (pH <1). The benefits of salt splitting using ceramic membranes are (1) waste volume reduction and reduced chemical procurement costs by recycling of NaOH; and (2) direct reduction of sodium in process streams, which enhances subsequent operations such as cesium ion exchange, calcination, and vitrification.

  12. Carpinteria salt marsh habitat polygons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Dunham, Eleca J.; Mancini, Frank T.; Stewart, Tara E.; Hechinger, Ryan F.

    2017-01-01

    We identified five common habitat types in Carpinteria Salt Marsh: channels, pans (flats), marsh, salt flat and upland.  We then drew polygons around each habitat type identified from a registered and orthorectified aerial photograph and created a GIS shapefile. Polygons were ground-truthed in the field. From these habitat polygons, one can use GIS applications to estimate the area of each habitat type in this estuary. These data support the following publications: Kuris, Armand M., et al. "Ecosystem energetic implications of parasite and free-living biomass in three estuaries." Nature 454.7203 (2008): 515-518.Hechinger, Ryan F., Kevin D. Lafferty, Andy P. Dobson, James H. Brown, and Armand M. Kuris. "A common scaling rule for abundance, energetics, and production of parasitic and free-living species." Science 333, no. 6041 (2011): 445-448.Hechinger, Ryan F., Kevin D. Lafferty, John P. McLaughlin, Brian L. Fredensborg, Todd C. Huspeni, Julio Lorda, Parwant K. Sandhu et al. "Food webs including parasites, biomass, body sizes, and life stages for three California/Baja California estuaries." Ecology 92, no. 3 (2011): 791-791.Buck, J.C., Hechinger, R.F., Wood, A.C., Stewart, T.E., Kuris, A.M., and Lafferty, K.D., "Host density increases parasite recruitment but decreases host risk in a snail-trematode system." Manuscript submitted for publication. Lafferty, K.D., Stewart, T.E., and Hechinger, R.F. (in press). Bird distribution surveys at Carpinteria Salt Marsh, California USA, January 2012 to March 2013: U.S. Geological Survey data release, http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7F47M95. 

  13. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established.

  14. Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    As seen from space, the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA (41.5N, 112.5W) appears as two separate bodies of water with a narrow divider in the middle. At the turn of the century, a railroad bridge without culverts, was built across the lake and ever since, the water and salinity levels have been uneqal on either side. Fed by snowmelt from the nearby Wasatch Mountains, the lake in recent years has had record high water levels, threatening to flood the local areas.

  15. Makgadikgadi Salt Pan, Botswana, Africa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-01-19

    STS054-151-015 (13-19 Jan 1993) --- The Makgadikgadi Salt Pan is one of the largest features in Botswana visible from space. Any water that spills out of the Okavango Swamplands flows down to the Makgadikgadi where it evaporates. An ancient beach line can be seen as a smooth line around the west (left) side of the Pan. Orapa diamond mine can be detected due south of the pan as a small rectangle. The large geological feature known as the Great Dike of Zimbabwe can be seen far right. This large panorama shows clouds in southern Angola, Zambia and Zimbabwe in the distance.

  16. Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-03-04

    As seen from space, the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA (41.5N, 112.5W) appears as two separate bodies of water with a narrow divider in the middle. At the turn of the century, a railroad bridge without culverts, was built across the lake and ever since, the water and salinity levels have been uneqal on either side. Fed by snowmelt from the nearby Wasatch Mountains, the lake in recent years has had record high water levels, threatening to flood the local areas.

  17. Salt Complexation in Block Copolymer Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Kim,S.; Misner, M.; Yang, L.; Gang, O.; Ocko, B.; Russell, T.

    2006-01-01

    Ion complexation within cylinder-forming block copolymer thin films was found to affect the ordering process of the copolymer films during solvent annealing, significantly enhancing the long-range positional order. Small amounts of alkali halide or metal salts were added to PS-b-PEO, on the order of a few ions per chain, where the salt complexed with the PEO block. The orientation of the cylindrical microdomains strongly depended on the salt concentration and the ability of the ions to complex with PEO. The process shows large flexibility in the choice of salt used, including gold or cobalt salts, whereby well-organized patterns of nanoparticles can be generated inside the copolymer microdomains. By further increasing the amount of added salts, the copolymer remained highly ordered at large degrees of swelling and demonstrated long-range positional correlations of the microdomains in the swollen state, which holds promise as a route to addressable media.

  18. [Study on Salt Tolerance of Echinacea purpurea].

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Jia, Xiao-dong; Liu, Yong-zhi; Xuan, Ji-ping; Guo, Zhong-ren; Qiao, Yu-shan

    2015-12-01

    To explore the salt tolerance of Echiancea purpurea and its mechanism. Echiancea purpurea was used as test material in this study and six salinity levels (0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 mmol/L NaCl) were set. Effects on seed germination and salt tolerance relevant physiological and biochemical indexes of Echiancea purpurea were studied. Salt stress suppressed the germination of Echiancea purpurea seeds, induced osmotic adjustment substances proline, soluble sugar and K+ to increase, and activities of POD and SOD to rise, and meanwhile resulted in accumulation of Na+ and decrease of K+/Na+. Echiancea purpurea can tolerant salt stress to a certain degree, but in case of high salt concentrations, severe salt injury would remarkably suppress the growth of Echinacea purpurea.

  19. Monitoring Change in Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naftz, David; Angeroth, Cory; Freeman, Michael; Rowland, Ryan; Carling, Gregory

    2013-08-01

    Great Salt Lake is the largest hypersaline lake in the Western Hemisphere and the fourth largest terminal lake in the world (Figure 1). The open water and adjacent wetlands of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem support millions of migratory waterfowl and shorebirds from throughout the Western Hemisphere [Aldrich and Paul, 2002]. In addition, the area is of important economic value: Brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) residing in Great Salt Lake support an aquaculture shrimp cyst industry with annual revenues as high as $60 million.

  20. Salt Block II: description and results

    SciTech Connect

    Hohlfelder, J.J.

    1980-06-01

    A description of and results from the Salt Block II experiment, which involved the heating of and measurement of water transport within a large sample of rock salt, are presented. These results include the measurement of water released into a heated borehole in the sample as well as measured temperatures within the salt. Measured temperatures are compared with the results of a mathematical model of the experiment.

  1. Molten Salt Thermal Energy Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maru, H. C.; Dullea, J. F.; Kardas, A.; Paul, L.; Marianowski, L. G.; Ong, E.; Sampath, V.; Huang, V. M.; Wolak, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of storing thermal energy at temperatures of 450 C to 535 C in the form of latent heat of fusion was examined for over 30 inorganic salts and salt mixtures. Alkali carbonate mixtures were chosen as phase-change storage materials in this temperature range because of their relatively high storage capacity and thermal conductivity, moderate cost, low volumetric expansion upon melting, low corrosivity, and good chemical stability. Means of improving heat conduction through the solid salt were explored.

  2. Advanced salt receiver for solar power towers

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, M.; Sanchez, M.; Barrera, G.

    1995-11-01

    Falling Film receivers constitute an alternative to the traditional Salt in Tube receivers, widely used and tested in the Central Receiver Systems. This report presents an innovative concept of Internal Film Receiver (IFR), in which a film made of a eutectic mixture of molten salts flows down the back side of a stainless steel panel. The installation with 550 kW nominal power, molten salt inlet temperature 300 C and outlet temperature 550 C is described.

  3. Louisiana slope salt-ridge continuity confirmed

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrie, A.; Hoffman, K.S.; Sullivan, N.

    1989-03-01

    The Louisiana offshore is a world-class hydrocarbon province. Abundant reservoirs develop as the result of interaction between salt tectonics and sedimentation. Thus, it is essential to know both regional and local characteristics of the extent and timing of salt tectonics as an aid in hydrocarbon exploration. Exploration mythology mandates that salt domes and ridges are virtually random across the slope area. In sharp contrast, the authors describe a definite pattern to the salt ridges of slightly concave (to the north) arcs, with the southernmost arc located along the Sigsbee Escarpment and the northernmost along the shelf break. Furthermore, salt domes may not be truly randomly located but rather part of ancestral or existent salt ridges. Confirming data are provided by dip bathymatric and seismic profiles. The bathymetric profiles are at 5-mi (8-km) spacings from 1987 published charts of the Gulf of Mexico. Dip seismic lines reveal that bathymetric highs are associated with underlying salt. Buried salt accumulations are surficially expressed by actual ridges and domes, a leveling of sea floor, or a local decrease in the rate of regional slope descent. Salt is the Neogene-age basement of the Louisiana slope. The existence of an overall salt-ridge pattern implies that there is a single dynamic geologic system controlling the evolution of this slope. As salt tectonic rates and timing are deciphered for specific sites along dip, intervening rates may be interpolated to unmapped zones. Confirming an overall salt tectonic pattern is mandatory prior to quantifying regional and specific rates for the whole slope.

  4. Metal Oxide Solubility and Molten Salt Corrosion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-29

    METAL OXIDE SOLUBILITY AND MOLTEN SALT CORROSION.(U) MAR 82 K H STERN UNCLASSI E DL R L-4772NL EL .2. MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BURALU...METAL OXIDE SOLUBILITY AND MOLTEN SALT Interim report on a continuing CORROSION NRL problem. S. PERFORMING a4. REPORT NUMlER 7. AuTtwORr) S. CONTRACT OR...EQUILIBRIA AND OXIDE SOLUTION RELATIONS IN MOLTEN SALTS ............................................. 2 IV. METHODS FOR DETERMINING SOLUBILITIES

  5. Conjugated polymer/molten salt blend optimization.

    PubMed

    Habrard, F; Ouisse, T; Stéphan, O

    2006-08-10

    Light-emitting electrochemical cells with low current threshold can be realized through mixing conjugated polymers and molten salts. Current drive capability is proportional to the overall interface perimeter of the planar, discotic molten salt domains inserted into the polymer matrix. Electric force microscopy indicates that this interface perimeter exhibits a specific dependence on the molten salt content in the active layer, with a well-defined maximum. We show that this maximum corresponds to an optimal current drive.

  6. Strategies for salt reduction in foods.

    PubMed

    Toldrá, Fidel; Barat, José M

    2012-04-01

    The amounts of sodium chloride in the formulation of a variety of foods like bakery, meats and dairy foods, ready meals, sauces and snacks, are relatively large and thus, have a strong contribution on the salt dietary intake. There is a clear demand by the consumers and medical associations to reduce the salt content in foods. Different strategies have been proposed and most of them consist of the replacement of sodium chloride by other salts and the addition of other substances for an acceptable sensory quality. The recent patents for salt reduction and their applications in foods are reviewed in this manuscript.

  7. Granular Salt Summary: Reconsolidation Principles and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Frank; Popp, Till; Wieczorek, Klaus; Stuehrenberg, Dieter

    2014-07-01

    The purposes of this paper are to review the vast amount of knowledge concerning crushed salt reconsolidation and its attendant hydraulic properties (i.e., its capability for fluid or gas transport) and to provide a sufficient basis to understand reconsolidation and healing rates under repository conditions. Topics covered include: deformation mechanisms and hydro-mechanical interactions during reconsolidation; the experimental data base pertaining to crushed salt reconsolidation; transport properties of consolidating granulated salt and provides quantitative substantiation of its evolution to characteristics emulating undisturbed rock salt; and extension of microscopic and laboratory observations and data to the applicable field scale.

  8. SEPARATION OF INORGANIC SALTS FROM ORGANIC SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Katzin, L.I.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1958-06-24

    A process is described for recovering the nitrates of uranium and plutonium from solution in oxygen-containing organic solvents such as ketones or ethers. The solution of such salts dissolved in an oxygen-containing organic compound is contacted with an ion exchange resin whereby sorption of the entire salt on the resin takes place and then the salt-depleted liquid and the resin are separated from each other. The reaction seems to be based on an anion formation of the entire salt by complexing with the anion of the resin. Strong base or quaternary ammonium type resins can be used successfully in this process.

  9. Brine Transport Experiments in Granular Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Amy B.; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Caporuscio, Florie Andre; Stauffer, Philip H.

    2016-06-06

    To gain confidence in the predictive capability of numerical models, experimental validation must be performed to ensure that parameters and processes are correctly simulated. The laboratory investigations presented herein aim to address knowledge gaps for heat-generating nuclear waste (HGNW) disposal in bedded salt that remain after examination of prior field and laboratory test data. Primarily, we are interested in better constraining the thermal, hydrological, and physicochemical behavior of brine, water vapor, and salt when moist salt is heated. The target of this work is to use run-of-mine (RoM) salt; however during FY2015 progress was made using high-purity, granular sodium chloride.

  10. Salt reduction initiatives around the world.

    PubMed

    Webster, Jacqueline L; Dunford, Elizabeth K; Hawkes, Corinna; Neal, Bruce C

    2011-06-01

    To provide an overview of national salt reduction initiatives around the world, describe core characteristics and develop a framework for future strategy development. National strategies were identified from existing reviews and from searches of the literature and relevant websites. Standardized information was extracted about governance and strategy development, baseline assessments and monitoring and implementation. Thirty-two country salt reduction initiatives were identified. The majority of activity was in Europe (19 countries). Most countries (27) had maximum population salt intake targets, ranging from 5 to 8 g/person per day. Twenty-six of the 32 strategies were led by government, five by nongovernment organizations and one by industry. Twenty-eight countries had some baseline data on salt consumption and 18 had data on sodium levels in foods. Twenty-eight countries were working with the food industry to reduce salt in foods, 10 had front-of-pack labelling schemes and 28 had consumer awareness or behaviour change programs. Five countries had demonstrated an impact, either on population salt consumption, salt levels in foods or consumer awareness. These strategies were led by government and were multifaceted including food reformulation, consumer awareness initiatives and labelling actions. This is the first review to concisely summarize the most important elements of the many existing salt reduction programmes and highlight the characteristics most likely to be important to programme efficacy. For most countries, implementing a national salt reduction programme is likely to be one of simplest and most cost-effective ways of improving public health.

  11. Electrolytic orthoborate salts for lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Angell, Charles Austen; Xu, Wu

    2008-01-01

    Orthoborate salts suitable for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries and methods for making the electrolyte salts are provided. The electrolytic salts have one of the formulae (I). In this formula anionic orthoborate groups are capped with two bidentate chelating groups, Y1 and Y2. Certain preferred chelating groups are dibasic acid residues, most preferably oxalyl, malonyl and succinyl, disulfonic acid residues, sulfoacetic acid residues and halo-substituted alkylenes. The salts are soluble in non-aqueous solvents and polymeric gels and are useful components of lithium batteries in electrochemical devices.

  12. Electrolytic orthoborate salts for lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Angell, Charles Austen; Xu, Wu

    2009-05-05

    Orthoborate salts suitable for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries and methods for making the electrolyte salts are provided. The electrolytic salts have one of the formulae (I). In this formula anionic orthoborate groups are capped with two bidentate chelating groups, Y1 and Y2. Certain preferred chelating groups are dibasic acid residues, most preferably oxalyl, malonyl and succinyl, disulfonic acid residues, sulfoacetic acid residues and halo-substituted alkylenes. The salts are soluble in non-aqueous solvents and polymeric gels and are useful components of lithium batteries in electrochemical devices.

  13. Helping crops stand up to salt

    SciTech Connect

    Raeburn, P.

    1985-05-01

    A new approach to the problem of increasing soil salinity is to raise salt-tolerant plants. The search for such plants involves finding new applications for naturally occurring salt-resistant plants (halophytes), using conventional breeding techniques to identify and strengthen crop varieties known to have better-than-average salt tolerance, and applying recombinant DNA methods to introduce salt resistance into existing plants. One promising plant is salicornia, which produces oil high in polyunsaturates at a greater yield than soybeans. Two varieties of atriplex yield as much animal feed as alfalfa and can be harvested several times a year. Seed companies are supporting the research.

  14. Salt formation to improve drug solubility.

    PubMed

    Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2007-07-30

    Salt formation is the most common and effective method of increasing solubility and dissolution rates of acidic and basic drugs. In this article, physicochemical principles of salt solubility are presented, with special reference to the influence of pH-solubility profiles of acidic and basic drugs on salt formation and dissolution. Non-ideality of salt solubility due to self-association in solution is also discussed. Whether certain acidic or basic drugs would form salts and, if salts are formed, how easily they would dissociate back into their free acid or base forms depend on interrelationships of several factors, such as S0 (intrinsic solubility), pH, pKa, Ksp (solubility product) and pHmax (pH of maximum solubility). The interrelationships of these factors are elaborated and their influence on salt screening and the selection of optimal salt forms for development are discussed. Factors influencing salt dissolution under various pH conditions, and especially in reactive media and in presence of excess common ions, are discussed, with practical reference to the development of solid dosage forms.

  15. Salt induced gene expression in Prosopis farcta

    SciTech Connect

    Heimer, I.M.; Golan, A.; Lips, H.

    1987-04-01

    The authors hypothesize that in facultative halophytes, the genes which impart salt tolerance are expressed when the plants are exposed to salt. As a first step towards possible identification of these genes, they examined salt induced changes of gene expression in the facultative halophyte Prosopis farcta at the protein level, by SDS-PAGE. Exposure to salt of aseptically grown, two-week old seedlings, was carried out in one of two ways: (1) a one step transfer of seedlings from medium without salt to that with the indicated concentrations followed by 5 hr or 24 hr incubation periods. During the last 2 hrs of each incubation period the seedlings were pulse-labelled with /sup 35/S Sulfate or L-Methionine; (2) a gradual increase of the salt concentration at 50 mM increments at 2-4 day intervals. Two days after reaching the desired salt concentration, the seedlings were pulse-labelled for 2 hrs with /sup 35/S sulfate or L-methionine. Protein from roots were extracted and analyzed. Polypeptides were visualized by staining with coomassie blue or by fluorography. Qualitative as well as quantitative changes of gene expression as induced by salt could be observed. Their significance regarding salt tolerance will be discussed.

  16. Thermally stimulated luminescence of urine salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordun, O. M.; Drobchak, O. Z.

    2007-07-01

    We investigated thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) of urine salts in the normal state and with oxalate, urate, and phosphate salts. We found that the presence of pathological salts leads to a decrease of TSL intensity and to the appearance of additional TLS bands with maxima at 118 and 205 K in addition to the characteristic bands at 173 and 260 K. The TLS bands are related to the urine components. The TSL intensities of urine salts of different chemical composition are compared. The thermal activation energy of the strongest TSL bands is determined.

  17. Multiphase Flow and Cavern Abandonment in Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian; Tidwell, Vince

    2001-02-13

    This report will explore the hypothesis that an underground cavity in gassy salt will eventually be gas filled as is observed on a small scale in some naturally occurring salt inclusions. First, a summary is presented on what is known about gas occurrences, flow mechanisms, and cavern behavior after abandonment. Then, background information is synthesized into theory on how gas can fill a cavern and simultaneously displace cavern fluids into the surrounding salt. Lastly, two-phase (gas and brine) flow visualization experiments are presented that demonstrate some of the associated flow mechanisms and support the theory and hypothesis that a cavity in salt can become gas filled after plugging and abandonment

  18. Salt intake and reproductive function in sheep.

    PubMed

    Digby, S N; Chadwick, M A; Blache, D

    2011-06-01

    Producers have the possibility to combat human-induced dryland salinity by planting salt-tolerant plants such as saltbush. Saltbush has the potential to be used as a source of food for livestock at a time and place where pasture is not viable. However, saltbush contains high concentrations of sodium chloride salt and some other anti-nutritional factors that have the potential to affect feed and water intake and, directly or indirectly, the reproductive capacity of sheep. High-salt diet during gestation induces a small modification of the activity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) that has an important role in the maintenance of the salt-water balance in non-pregnant and pregnant sheep. In contrast, the main effect of salt ingestion during pregnancy is observed on the biology of the offspring, with changes in the response of the RAS to salt ingestion and altered thirst threshold in response to an oral salt ingestion. These changes, observed later in life, are the result of fetal programming following the ingestion of salt by the mother. It seems that the exposure to salt during pregnancy could provide an advantage to the offspring because of this adaptive response. The response may be particularly useful, for example, when grazing herbivores are fed halophytic forages adapted to saline soils.

  19. Metal salts of alkyl catechol dithiophosphoric acids and oil compositions containing the salts

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, E.S.; Liston, T.V.

    1988-03-08

    Metal salts of alkyl catechol esters of dithiophosphoric acid suitable as additives in oil compositions are disclosed in this patent. Oil compositions containing the salts of such esters show improved extreme pressure/anti-wear and anit-oxidant properties.

  20. Noncentrosymmetric salt inclusion oxides: Role of salt lattices and counter ions in bulk polarity

    SciTech Connect

    West, J. Palmer; Hwu, Shiou-Jyh

    2012-11-15

    The synthesis and structural features of a newly emerged class of salt-inclusion solids (SISs) are reviewed. The descriptive chemistry with respect to the role of ionic salt and its correlation with bulk noncentrosymmetricity and polarity of the covalent oxide lattice in question is discussed by means of structure analysis. These unprecedented discoveries have opened doors to novel materials synthesis via the utilities of salt-inclusion chemistry (SIC) that are otherwise known as the molten-salt approach. The result of these investigations prove that the bulk acentricity, or cancellation of which, can be accounted for from the perspective of ionic and/or salt lattices. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis and structure of newly emerged salt-inclusion solids are reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salt lattice and its symmetry correlation with polar framework are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preservation of acentricity is accounted for from the perspective of ionic and salt lattices.

  1. Identifying acid salts of magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Plumb, R.; Thivierge, R.F. Jr.; Xu, W.W.

    1987-11-05

    In preliminary work they found that significant quantities of certain nitrogen oxides and of sulfuric acid were absorbed by lower hydrates of magnesium sulfate. It appeared that acid salts were being formed but the known chemistry of group IIA (group 2) sulfates and acid sulfates which was worked out many years ago did not provide an explanation of their observations. They developed a new technique for delineating the solidus boundary of ternary mixtures using friability tests and applied it to the systems of interest. Magnesium acid salt hydrates with compositions on the solidus boundary could be readily identified. X-ray powder patterns confirmed the existence of two previously unknown ternary compounds, Mg/sub 2/(HSO/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ x 4H/sub 2/O and Mg(HSO/sub 4/)/sub 2/ x H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ x 3H/sub 2/O. Mixed acid sulfate-nitrate-hydrates could be detected but fuming at room temperatures interfered with quantitative determinations of the solidus boundary and X-ray measurements.

  2. The bioenergetics of salt tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, L.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this project was to try to understand the adaptive mechanisms that organisms develop in order to respond to a sudden transformation in their environment to a salt shock.'' To study this problem we used a fresh water oxygenic photosynthetic cyanobacterium known as Synecoccus 6311. This organism suffers injury after this sudden exposure to high concentrations of sodium chloride equivalent to or even higher than that in sea water. Yet they are able to re-establish their photosynthetic activity which is partially injured and return to virtually normal growth rates. Identification of the temporal sequence of changes involved in adaptation to this stress was the rationale. Indeed this project employed a wide variety of biochemical and biophysical methods, including electron spin resonance techniques and nuclear magnetic resonance to study the bioenergetics and transport mechanisms, growth and energy changes in these organisms and how the structural components of the cells changed in response to adaptation to growth at high salinity. The problem has relevance for higher plants because most of the arable farmland in the work is already under use and that which is not used is usually in salite environments. Hence, understanding basic mechanisms of salt tolerance is a fundamental biological problem with great applications for bioproductivity and agriculture. 18 refs.

  3. Anaglyph, Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This anaglyph image provides a stereoscopic map view of north central Utah that includes all of these Olympic sites. In the south, next to Utah Lake, Provo hosts the ice hockey competition. In the north, northeast of the Great Salt Lake, Ogden hosts curling and the nearby Snowbasin ski area hosts the downhill events. In between, southeast of the Great Salt Lake, Salt Lake City hosts the Olympic Village and the various skating events. Further east, across the Wasatch Mountains, the Park City ski resort hosts the bobsled, ski jumping, and snowboarding events. The Winter Olympics are always hosted in mountainous terrain. This view shows the dramatic landscape that makes the Salt Lake City region a world-class center for winter sports.

    The stereoscopic effect of this anaglyph was created by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM

  4. Anaglyph, Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This anaglyph image provides a stereoscopic map view of north central Utah that includes all of these Olympic sites. In the south, next to Utah Lake, Provo hosts the ice hockey competition. In the north, northeast of the Great Salt Lake, Ogden hosts curling and the nearby Snowbasin ski area hosts the downhill events. In between, southeast of the Great Salt Lake, Salt Lake City hosts the Olympic Village and the various skating events. Further east, across the Wasatch Mountains, the Park City ski resort hosts the bobsled, ski jumping, and snowboarding events. The Winter Olympics are always hosted in mountainous terrain. This view shows the dramatic landscape that makes the Salt Lake City region a world-class center for winter sports.

    The stereoscopic effect of this anaglyph was created by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM

  5. Salt domes: is there more energy available from their salt than from their oil?

    PubMed

    Wick, G L; Isaacs, J D

    1978-03-31

    Calculations indicate that a typical oil-bearing salt dome along the Gulf Coast of the United States contains more energy in its salt than is present in its oil. The magnitude of the potential salinity gradient energy is even greater when all of the salt domes are considered.

  6. Investigation of salt loss from the Bonneville Salt Flats, northwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, James L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.

    1997-01-01

    The Bonneville Salt Flats study area is located in the western part of the Great Salt Lake Desert in northwestern Utah, about 110 miles west of Salt Lake City. The salt crust covers about 50 square miles, but the extent varies yearly as a result of salt being dissolved by the formation and movement of surface ponds during the winter and redeposited with the evaporation of these ponds during the summer.A decrease in thickness and extent of the salt crust on the Bonneville Salt Flats has been documented during 1960-88 (S. Brooks, Bureau of Land Management, written commun., 1989). Maximum salt-crust thickness was 7 feet in 1960 and 5.5 feet in 1988. No definitive data are available to identify and quantify the processes that cause salt loss. More than 55 million tons of salt are estimated to have been lost from the salt crust during the 28-year period. The Bureau of Land Management needs to know the causes of salt loss to make appropriate management decisions.

  7. 250 NORTH & MAIN STREET (PARK 83, SALT LAKE CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    250 NORTH & MAIN STREET (PARK 8-3, SALT LAKE CITY CEMETERY LOCATER), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING NORTH - REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18271, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  8. Physicochemical changes of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) muscle during salting.

    PubMed

    Chaijan, Manat

    2011-12-01

    The effect of wet and dry saltings on the physicochemical changes of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) muscle was investigated. Dry salting resulted in the higher rate of salt uptake into tilapia muscle facilitating the faster decrease in Aw (p<0.05). The pH of both dry and wet salted fish muscles tended to decrease throughout the salting time and the lower pH was found in dry salted fish (p<0.05). The increase in the protein content in the salting medium was found during wet salted tilapia production (p<0.05). The TCA-soluble peptide content tended to decrease with increasing the salting time in both salting methods (p<0.05), suggesting a leaching effect of the salting medium or the exudative loss occurred in salted tilapia. Wet salting caused the greater formation of metmyoglobin in tilapia muscle when compared to dry salting at all time points (p<0.05) and the content of metmyoglobin increased as salting time increased in both salting methods (p<0.05). A lowered metmyoglobin with a lowered redness index of dry salted tilapia muscle was found, indicating the continuous oxidation of metmyoglobin to other hypervalent derivatives and hence the discolouration of salted tilapia. Lipid hydrolysis and oxidation of tilapia meat occurred with varying degrees in both salting methods and these changes depended on salting time. Dry salting resulted in a higher oxidation of tilapia muscle lipid as indicated by the higher PV and TBARS throughout the salting period when compared with that of wet salting (p<0.05). In conclusion, the physicochemical changes of tilapia muscle during salting are governed by the salting method and the salting time applied. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Salt Lake City, Utah 2002

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Salt Lake City, Utah, Winter 2001 The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This simulated natural color image presents a snowy, winter view of north central Utah that includes all of the Olympic sites. The image extends from Ogden in the north, to Provo in the south; and includes the snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and the eastern part of the Great Salt Lake. This image was acquired on February 8, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands

  10. Rheological contrasts in salt and their effects on flow in salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Janos L.; Kukla, Peter A.

    2014-05-01

    The majority of numerical and analogue models of salt tectonics assume homogeneous rheological models, and consequently produce simple internal structures. This is in contrast to observations in salt mines and 3D seismic, showing complex folding at a wide range of scales, in combination with boudinage and fracturing, which point to large rheological contrasts in salt bodies. The rheology of rock salt during slow deformation can be both Newtonian and Power law. Dislocation creep and dissolution-precipitation processes, such as solution-precipitation creep and dynamic recrystallisation, both play a significant role and grain boundary healing in deforming salt may result in cyclic softening and hardening behaviour. The switch between these processes can cause major changes in rock salt rheology, at time scales both relevant to geologic evolution and subsurface operations. In the dislocation creep field, a compilation of laboratory data show that different rock salts can creep at four orders of magnitude different strain rates under otherwise the same conditions. Potassium - Magnesium salts are in turn much weaker, and Anhydrite much stronger than rock salt. Anhydrite - carbonate inclusions embedded in deforming salt bodies respond to the movements of the salt in a variety of ways including boudinage and folding. New methods of microstructure analysis integrated with paleorheology indicators observed in natural laboratories allows an integration of these data and the development of a unified model for salt creep for both underground cavities and natural deformation, including the effect of high fluid pressures in salt which lead to a dramatic increases in permeability. For example, modeling of anhydrite stringer sinking is an important way to obtain the long term rheology of the halite, indicating that the rheology of Zechstein salt during the Tertiary was dominated by dislocation creep. These form the basis of a new generation of mechanical models to predict the

  11. Salt and cocrystals of sildenafil with dicarboxylic acids: solubility and pharmacokinetic advantage of the glutarate salt.

    PubMed

    Sanphui, Palash; Tothadi, Srinu; Ganguly, Somnath; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2013-12-02

    Sildenafil is a drug used to treat erectile dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Because of poor aqueous solubility of the drug, the citrate salt, with improved solubility and pharmacokinetics, has been marketed. However, the citrate salt requires an hour to reach its peak plasma concentration. Thus, to improve solubility and bioavailability characteristics, cocrystals and salts of the drug have been prepared by treating aliphatic dicarboxylic acids with sildenafil; the N-methylated piperazine of the drug molecule interacts with the carboxyl group of the acid to form a heterosynthon. Salts are formed with oxalic and fumaric acid; salt monoanions are formed with succinic and glutaric acid. Sildenafil forms cocrystals with longer chain dicarboxylic acids such as adipic, pimelic, suberic, and sebacic acids. Auxiliary stabilization via C-H···O interactions is also present in these cocrystals and salts. Solubility experiments of sildenafil cocrystal/salts were carried out in 0.1N HCl aqueous medium and compared with the solubility of the citrate salt. The glutarate salt and pimelic acid cocrystal dissolve faster than the citrate salt in a two hour dissolution experiment. The glutarate salt exhibits improved solubility (3.2-fold) compared to the citrate salt in water. Solubilities of the binary salts follow an inverse correlation with their melting points, while the solubilities of the cocrystals follow solubilities of the coformer. Pharmacokinetic studies on rats showed that the glutarate salt exhibits doubled plasma AUC values in a single dose within an hour compared to the citrate salt. The high solubility of glutaric acid, in part originating from the strained conformation of the molecule and its high permeability, may be the reason for higher plasma levels of the drug.

  12. Grains of Salt. Young Discovery Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joly, Dominique

    This book is written for children ages 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume provides information on the origin and uses of salt, both in the ancient world and today. Topics are: (1) relationship of salt to the human body; (2) collection methods; (3) uses for human life;…

  13. [Global strategies to reduce salt intake].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela Landaeta, Karen; Atalah Samur, Eduardo

    2011-06-01

    Currently, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of death worldwide. High blood pressure is one of the main risk factors for the development of CVD and blood pressure levels are strongly associated with salt intake. Worldwide, salt consumptions accounts more than two fold the recommended daily intake, which has been described to be associated with CVD and some cancers. Benefits of decrease salt intake (reduction of morbidity, mortality and health related costs) have promoted several public health strategies to reduce salt consumption globally. Among the most commonly used strategies include educational campaigns and the gradual decrease of added salt in processed foods. Chile has joined these initiatives with an agreement between the producers of bread and the Ministry of Health to gradually decrease the concentration of salt in bread nationwide. The purpose of this review is to provide updated information regarding recommended intakes of salt, real intake, adverse effects of excess consumption, profits attributable to a decline and analyze the global strategies to reduce salt intake in the population.

  14. Skin Sensitizing Potency of Halogenated Platinum Salts.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between occupational exposure to halogenated platinum (Pt) salts and Pt-specific allergic sensitization is well-established. Although human case reports and clinical studies demonstrate that Pt salts are potent skin sensitizers, no studies have been published tha...

  15. Morning sickness: impact on offspring salt preference.

    PubMed

    Crystal, S R; Bernstein, I L

    1995-12-01

    These studies examined the relationship between salt preference of adult offspring and their mothers' symptoms of morning sickness during pregnancy. College students who could provide information about their mothers' symptoms of morning sickness completed a survey about their dietary salt intake (study 1; n = 169) or rated and consumed ten snack foods (study 2; n = 66). In study 1 a salt-use score was calculated based on responses to the Salt Intake Questionnaire; offspring of women with moderate or severe vomiting reported a significantly higher level of salt use (p < 0.01) than those whose mothers report little or no symptoms. In study 2 saltiness and pleasantness ratings of high-salt foods, intake of those foods and total sodium intake were the focus of analysis. Offspring of women reporting moderate or severe vomiting showed a significantly greater preference for the snack food subjects rated as saltiest than those whose mothers reported no or mild vomiting. They also ate more of that food and consumed more total sodium during the test session. Effects were stronger in Caucasian than Asian subjects. These studies suggest that moderate to severe vomiting during pregnancy can be associated with significantly higher salt intake in offspring. Thus, a gestational event may be an important determinant of salt intake and preference in adulthood.

  16. Secondary Aluminum Processing Waste: Salt Cake ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Thirty-nine salt cake samples were collected from 10 SAP facilities across the U.S. The facilities were identified by the Aluminum Association to cover a wide range of processes. Results suggest that while the percent metal leached from the salt cake was relatively low, the leachable metal content may still pose a contamination concern and potential human and ecological exposure if uncontrollably released to the environment. As a result, salt cake should always be managed at facilities that utilize synthetic liner systems with leachate collection (the salt content of the leachate will increase the hydraulic conductivity of clay liners within a few years of installation). The mineral phase analysis showed that various species of aluminum are present in the salt cake samples with a large degree of variability. The relative abundance of various aluminum species was evaluated but it is noted that the method used is a semi-quantitative method and as a result there is a limitation for the data use. The analysis only showed a few aluminum species present in salt cake which does not exclude the presence of other crystalline species especially in light of the variability observed in the samples. Results presented in this document are of particular importance when trying to understand concerns associated with the disposal of salt cake in MSW landfills. From the end-of-life management perspective, data presented here suggest that salt cake should not be size reduce

  17. Nitrate Salt Surrogate Blending Scoping Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Anast, Kurt Roy

    2015-11-13

    Test blending equipment identified in the “Engineering Options Assessment Report: Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing”. Determine if the equipment will provide adequate mixing of zeolite and surrogate salt/Swheat stream; optimize equipment type and operational sequencing; impact of baffles and inserts on mixing performance; and means of validating mixing performance

  18. Metal salt catalysts for enhancing hydrogen spillover

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T; Wang, Yuhe

    2013-04-23

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a receptor, a hydrogen dissociating metal doped on the receptor, and a metal salt doped on the receptor. The hydrogen dissociating metal is configured to spill over hydrogen to the receptor, and the metal salt is configured to increase a rate of the spill over of the hydrogen to the receptor.

  19. Salt, blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    He, Feng J; MacGregor, Graham A

    2007-07-01

    To review the evidence that relates salt intake to blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Raised blood pressure throughout the range seen in developed countries is the major cause of cardiovascular disease, responsible for 62% of strokes and 49% of coronary heart disease. There is overwhelming evidence that dietary salt is a major cause of raised blood pressure, and a modest reduction in salt intake lowers blood pressure, which is predicted to reduce cardiovascular disease. Several lines of evidence including ecological, population and prospective cohort studies, as well as follow-up studies of individuals who participated in short-term salt reduction trials, have consistently shown a direct relation between salt intake and cardiovascular risk, and a reduction in population salt intake is associated with a reduction in cardiovascular mortality in the population. The evidence for universal salt reduction is strong, and reducing salt from the current intake of 10-12 g/day to the recommended level of 5-6 g/day will have a major effect on blood pressure and cardiovascular mortality. Additionally, this will result in considerable savings on health expenditure as, not only is raised blood pressure the biggest cause of death, but the second biggest cause of disability worldwide.

  20. Grains of Salt. Young Discovery Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joly, Dominique

    This book is written for children ages 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume provides information on the origin and uses of salt, both in the ancient world and today. Topics are: (1) relationship of salt to the human body; (2) collection methods; (3) uses for human life;…