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Sample records for alveolar epithelial repair

  1. Surface expression of CD74 by type II alveolar epithelial cells: a potential mechanism for macrophage migration inhibitory factor-induced epithelial repair.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Leigh M; Cakarova, Lidija; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna; von Wulffen, Werner; Herold, Susanne; Seeger, Werner; Lohmeyer, Juergen

    2009-03-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine involved in acute lung injury and other processes such as wound repair and tumor growth. MIF exerts pro-proliferative effects on a variety of cell types including monocytes/macrophages, B cells, and gastric epithelial cell lines through binding to the major histocompatibility complex type II-associated invariant chain, CD74. In acute lung injury, inflammatory damage of the alveolar epithelium leads to loss of type I alveolar epithelial cells (AEC-I), which are replaced by proliferation and differentiation of type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC-II). In this study we have investigated the potential of MIF to contribute to alveolar repair by stimulating alveolar epithelial cell proliferation. We show that murine AEC-II, but not AEC-I, express high surface levels of CD74 in vivo. Culture of AEC-II in vitro resulted in decreased mRNA levels for CD74 and loss of surface CD74 expression, which correlated with a transition of AEC-II to an AEC-I-like phenotype. MIF stimulation of AEC-II induced rapid and prolonged phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt, increased expression of cyclins D1 and E, as well as AEC-II proliferation. Corresponding MIF signaling and enhanced thymidine incorporation was observed after MIF stimulation of MLE-12 cells transfected to overexpress CD74. In contrast, MIF did not induce MAPK activation, gene transcription, or increased proliferation in differentiated AEC-I-like cells that lack CD74. These data suggest a previously unidentified role of MIF-CD74 interaction by inducing proliferation of AEC-II, which may contribute to alveolar repair.

  2. Hepatocyte growth factor secreted by bone marrow stem cell reduce ER stress and improves repair in alveolar epithelial II cells

    PubMed Central

    Nita, Izabela; Hostettler, Katrin; Tamo, Luca; Medová, Michaela; Bombaci, Giuseppe; Zhong, Jun; Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Zimmer, Yitzhak; Roth, Michael; Geiser, Thomas; Gazdhar, Amiq

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, irreversible lung disease with complex pathophysiology. Evidence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been reported in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in IPF patients. Secreted mediators from bone marrow stem cells (BMSC-cm) have regenerative properties. In this study we investigate the beneficial effects of BMSC-cm on ER stress response in primary AEC and ER stressed A549 cells. We hypothesize that BMSC-cm reduces ER stress. Primary AEC isolated from IPF patients were treated with BMSC-cm. To induce ER stress A549 cells were incubated with Tunicamycin or Thapsigargin and treated with BMSC-cm, or control media. Primary IPF-AEC had high Grp78 and CHOP gene expression, which was lowered after BMSC-cm treatment. Similar results were observed in ER stressed A549 cells. Alveolar epithelial repair increased in presence of BMSC-cm in ER stressed A549 cells. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) was detected in biologically relevant levels in BMSC-cm. Neutralization of HGF in BMSC-cm attenuated the beneficial effects of BMSC-cm including synthesis of surfactant protein C (SP-C) in primary AEC, indicating a crucial role of HGF in ER homeostasis and alveolar epithelial repair. Our data suggest that BMSC-cm may be a potential therapeutic option for treating pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:28157203

  3. Simulation of lung alveolar epithelial wound healing in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sean H. J.; Matthay, Michael A.; Mostov, Keith; Hunt, C. Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms that enable and regulate alveolar type II (AT II) epithelial cell wound healing in vitro and in vivo remain largely unknown and need further elucidation. We used an in silico AT II cell-mimetic analogue to explore and better understand plausible wound healing mechanisms for two conditions: cyst repair in three-dimensional cultures and monolayer wound healing. Starting with the analogue that validated for key features of AT II cystogenesis in vitro, we devised an additional cell rearrangement action enabling cyst repair. Monolayer repair was enabled by providing ‘cells’ a control mechanism to switch automatically to a repair mode in the presence of a distress signal. In cyst wound simulations, the revised analogue closed wounds by adhering to essentially the same axioms available for alveolar-like cystogenesis. In silico cell proliferation was not needed. The analogue recovered within a few simulation cycles but required a longer recovery time for larger or multiple wounds. In simulated monolayer wound repair, diffusive factor-mediated ‘cell’ migration led to repair patterns comparable to those of in vitro cultures exposed to different growth factors. Simulations predicted directional cell locomotion to be critical for successful in vitro wound repair. We anticipate that with further use and refinement, the methods used will develop as a rigorous, extensible means of unravelling mechanisms of lung alveolar repair and regeneration. PMID:20236957

  4. Modeling Alveolar Epithelial Cell Behavior In Spatially Designed Hydrogel Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Katherine Jean Reeder

    The alveolar epithelium consists of two cell phenotypes, elongated alveolar type I cells (AT1) and rounded alveolar type II cells (ATII), and exists in a complex three-dimensional environment as a polarized cell layer attached to a thin basement membrane and enclosing a roughly spherical lumen. Closely surrounding the alveolar cysts are capillary endothelial cells as well as interstitial pulmonary fibroblasts. Many factors are thought to influence alveolar epithelial cell differentiation during lung development and wound repair, including physical and biochemical signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM), and paracrine signals from the surrounding mesenchyme. In particular, disrupted signaling between the alveolar epithelium and local fibroblasts has been implicated in the progression of several pulmonary diseases. However, given the complexity of alveolar tissue architecture and the multitude of signaling pathways involved, designing appropriate experimental platforms for this biological system has been difficult. In order to isolate key factors regulating cellular behavior, the researcher ideally should have control over biophysical properties of the ECM, as well as the ability to organize multiple cell types within the scaffold. This thesis aimed to develop a 3D synthetic hydrogel platform to control alveolar epithelial cyst formation, which could then be used to explore how extracellular cues influence cell behavior in a tissue-relevant cellular arrangement. To accomplish this, a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel network containing enzymatically-degradable crosslinks and bioadhesive pendant peptides was employed as a base material for encapsulating primary alveolar epithelial cells. First, an array of microwells of various cross-sectional shapes was photopatterned into a PEG gel containing photo-labile crosslinks, and primary ATII cells were seeded into the wells to examine the role of geometric confinement on differentiation and multicellular arrangement

  5. Lung epithelial branching program antagonizes alveolar differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Daniel R; Martinez Alanis, Denise; Miller, Rachel K; Ji, Hong; Akiyama, Haruhiko; McCrea, Pierre D; Chen, Jichao

    2013-11-05

    Mammalian organs, including the lung and kidney, often adopt a branched structure to achieve high efficiency and capacity of their physiological functions. Formation of a functional lung requires two developmental processes: branching morphogenesis, which builds a tree-like tubular network, and alveolar differentiation, which generates specialized epithelial cells for gas exchange. Much progress has been made to understand each of the two processes individually; however, it is not clear whether the two processes are coordinated and how they are deployed at the correct time and location. Here we show that an epithelial branching morphogenesis program antagonizes alveolar differentiation in the mouse lung. We find a negative correlation between branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation temporally, spatially, and evolutionarily. Gain-of-function experiments show that hyperactive small GTPase Kras expands the branching program and also suppresses molecular and cellular differentiation of alveolar cells. Loss-of-function experiments show that SRY-box containing gene 9 (Sox9) functions downstream of Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf)/Kras to promote branching and also suppresses premature initiation of alveolar differentiation. We thus propose that lung epithelial progenitors continuously balance between branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation, and such a balance is mediated by dual-function regulators, including Kras and Sox9. The resulting temporal delay of differentiation by the branching program may provide new insights to lung immaturity in preterm neonates and the increase in organ complexity during evolution.

  6. Differentiation of Club Cells to Alveolar Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dahai; Soh, Boon-Seng; Yin, Lu; Hu, Guangan; Chen, Qingfeng; Choi, Hyungwon; Han, Jongyoon; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Chen, Jianzhu

    2017-01-01

    Club cells are known to function as regional progenitor cells to repair the bronchiolar epithelium in response to lung damage. By lineage tracing in mice, we have shown recently that club cells also give rise to alveolar type 2 cells (AT2s) and alveolar type 1 cells (AT1s) during the repair of the damaged alveolar epithelium. Here, we show that when highly purified, anatomically and phenotypically confirmed club cells are seeded in 3-dimensional culture either in bulk or individually, they proliferate and differentiate into both AT2- and AT1-like cells and form alveolar-like structures. This differentiation was further confirmed by transcriptomic analysis of freshly isolated club cells and their cultured progeny. Freshly isolated club cells express Sca-1 and integrin α6, markers commonly used to characterize lung stem/progenitor cells. Together, current study for the first time isolated highly purified club cells for in vitro study and demonstrated club cells’ capacity to differentiate into alveolar epithelial cells at the single-cell level. PMID:28128362

  7. Epithelial Notch signaling regulates lung alveolar morphogenesis and airway epithelial integrity

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Po-Nien; Matsuoka, Chisa; Wei, Shu-Chen; Sato, Atsuyasu; Sato, Susumu; Hasegawa, Koichi; Chen, Hung-kuan; Ling, Thai-Yen; Mori, Munemasa; Cardoso, Wellington V.; Morimoto, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal enlargement of the alveolar spaces is a hallmark of conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Notch signaling is crucial for differentiation and regeneration and repair of the airway epithelium. However, how Notch influences the alveolar compartment and integrates this process with airway development remains little understood. Here we report a prominent role of Notch signaling in the epithelial–mesenchymal interactions that lead to alveolar formation in the developing lung. We found that alveolar type II cells are major sites of Notch2 activation and show by Notch2-specific epithelial deletion (Notch2cNull) a unique contribution of this receptor to alveologenesis. Epithelial Notch2 was required for type II cell induction of the PDGF-A ligand and subsequent paracrine activation of PDGF receptor-α signaling in alveolar myofibroblast progenitors. Moreover, Notch2 was crucial in maintaining the integrity of the epithelial and smooth muscle layers of the distal conducting airways. Our data suggest that epithelial Notch signaling regulates multiple aspects of postnatal development in the distal lung and may represent a potential target for intervention in pulmonary diseases. PMID:27364009

  8. Reversible transdifferentiation of alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Danto, S I; Shannon, J M; Borok, Z; Zabski, S M; Crandall, E D

    1995-05-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) cells have been thought to be the progenitors of terminally differentiated type I (AT1) cells in the adult animal in vivo. In this study, we used an AT1 cell-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb VIII B2) to investigate expression of the AT1 cell phenotype accompanying reversible changes in expression of the AT2 cell phenotype. AT2 cells were isolated and cultured either on attached collagen gels or on gels detached 1 or 4 days after plating and maintained thereafter as floating gels. Monolayers on both attached and floating gels were harvested on days 4 and 8 and analyzed by electron microscopy for changes in morphology and binding of mAb VIII B2. Results indicate that: (1) alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) on attached gels develop characteristics of the AT1 cell phenotype, (2) AEC on gels detached on day 1 maintain features of the AT2 cell phenotype (and do not react with mAb VIII B2), and (3) the expression of AT1 cell phenotypic traits seen by day 4 on attached gels is reversed after detachment. We conclude that commitment to the AT1 and AT2 cell lineages requires continuous regulatory input to maintain the differentiated states, and that transdifferentiation between AT2 and AT1 cells may be reversible.

  9. Alveolar epithelial disintegrity in pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Joao; Zhou, Yong; Luckhardt, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic lung disease characterized by progressive decline in lung function, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Current concepts of the pathogenesis of IPF primarily center on dysregulated epithelial cell repair and altered epithelial-mesenchymal communication and extracellular matrix deposition following chronic exposure to cigarette smoke or environmental toxins. In recent years, increasing attention has been directed toward the role of the intercellular junctional complex in determining the specific properties of epithelia in pulmonary diseases. Additionally, recent genomewide association studies suggest that specific genetic variants predictive of epithelial cell dysfunction may confer susceptibility to the development of sporadic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. A number of genetic disorders linked to pulmonary fibrosis and familial interstitial pneumonias are associated with loss of epithelial integrity. However, the potential links between extrapulmonary clinical syndromes associated with defects in epithelial cells and the development of pulmonary fibrosis are not well understood. Here, we report a case of hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia that presented with pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema on high-resolution computed tomography. This case illustrates a more generalizable concept of epithelial disintegrity in the development of fibrotic lung diseases, which is explored in greater detail in this review article. PMID:27233996

  10. Neutrophil-induced injury of rat pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, R H; DeHart, P D; Todd, R F

    1986-01-01

    The damage to pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells that occurs in many inflammatory conditions is thought to be caused in part by phagocytic neutrophils. To investigate this process, we exposed monolayers of purified rat alveolar epithelial cells to stimulated human neutrophils and measured cytotoxicity using a 51Cr-release assay. We found that stimulated neutrophils killed epithelial cells by a process that did not require neutrophil-generated reactive oxygen metabolites. Pretreatment of neutrophils with an antibody (anti-Mo1) that reduced neutrophil adherence to epithelial cells limited killing. Although a variety of serine protease inhibitors partially inhibited cytotoxicity, we found that neutrophil cytoplasts, neutrophil lysates, neutrophil-conditioned medium, purified azurophilic or specific granule contents, and purified human neutrophil elastase did not duplicate the injury. We conclude that stimulated neutrophils can kill alveolar epithelial cells in an oxygen metabolite-independent manner. Tight adherence of stimulated neutrophils to epithelial cell monolayers appears to promote epithelial cell killing. Images PMID:3771800

  11. Alveolar Epithelial Dynamics in Post-pneumonectomy Lung Growth

    PubMed Central

    Chamoto, Kenji; Gibney, Barry C.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Lee, Grace S.; Konerding, Moritz A.; Tsuda, Akira; Mentzer, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    The intimate anatomic and functional relationship between epithelial cells and endothelial cells within the alveolus suggests the likelihood of a coordinated response during post-pneumonectomy lung growth. To define the population dynamics and potential contribution of alveolar epithelial cells to alveolar angiogenesis, we studied alveolar Type II and Type I cells during the 21 days after pneumonectomy. Alveolar Type II cells were defined and isolated by flow cytometry using a CD45−, MHC class II+, phosphine+ phenotype. These phenotypically defined alveolar Type II cells demonstrated an increase in cell number after pneumonectomy; the increase in cell number preceded the increase in Type I (T1α+) cells. Using a parabiotic wild type/GFP pneumonectomy model, less than 3% of the Type II cells and 1% of the Type I cells were positive for GFP—a finding consistent with the absence of a blood-borne contribution to alveolar epithelial cells. The CD45−, MHC class II+, phosphine+ Type II cells demonstrated the active transcription of angiogenesis-related genes both before and after pneumonectomy. When the Type II cells on day 7 after pneumonectomy were compared to non-surgical controls, 10 genes demonstrated significantly increased expression (p<.05). In contrast to the normal adult Type II cells, there was notable expression of inflammation-associated genes (Ccl2, Cxcl2, Ifng) as well as genes associated with epithelial growth (Ereg, Lep). Together, the data suggest an active contribution of local alveolar Type II cells to alveolar growth. PMID:23408540

  12. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin reduces human alveolar epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin; Metcalf, Jordan Patrick

    2012-12-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness.

  13. Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

  14. Senolytic drugs target alveolar epithelial cell function and attenuate experimental lung fibrosis ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Mareike; Korfei, Martina; Mutze, Kathrin; Klee, Stephan; Skronska-Wasek, Wioletta; Alsafadi, Hani N.; Ota, Chiharu; Costa, Rita; Schiller, Herbert B.; Lindner, Michael; Wagner, Darcy E.; Günther, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating lung disease with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. The incidence of IPF increases with age, and ageing-related mechanisms such as cellular senescence have been proposed as pathogenic drivers. The lung alveolar epithelium represents a major site of tissue injury in IPF and senescence of this cell population is probably detrimental to lung repair. However, the potential pathomechanisms of alveolar epithelial cell senescence and the impact of senolytic drugs on senescent lung cells and fibrosis remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that lung epithelial cells exhibit increased P16 and P21 expression as well as senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity in experimental and human lung fibrosis tissue and primary cells. Primary fibrotic mouse alveolar epithelial type (AT)II cells secreted increased amounts of senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) factors in vitro, as analysed using quantitative PCR, mass spectrometry and ELISA. Importantly, pharmacological clearance of senescent cells by induction of apoptosis in fibrotic ATII cells or ex vivo three-dimensional lung tissue cultures reduced SASP factors and extracellular matrix markers, while increasing alveolar epithelial markers. These data indicate that alveolar epithelial cell senescence contributes to lung fibrosis development and that senolytic drugs may be a viable therapeutic option for IPF. PMID:28775044

  15. Secretion of alpha 1-antitrypsin by alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Venembre, P; Boutten, A; Seta, N; Dehoux, M S; Crestani, B; Aubier, M; Durand, G

    1994-06-13

    We have investigated the ability of alveolar epithelial cells (human A549 cell line and rat type-II pneumocytes) to produce alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT). Northern blot analysis demonstrated the presence of an AAT-specific mRNA transcript in A549 cells. Unstimulated A549 cells secreted immunoreactive AAT at a rate of 0.51 +/- 0.04 ng/10(6) cells/h, with a modified glycosylation compared to serum AAT. AAT formed a complex with neutrophil elastase. Rat type-II pneumocytes secreted immunoreactive AAT. Our results suggest that alveolar epithelial cells could participate in antiprotease defense within the lung through local AAT production.

  16. Knockout Mice Reveal a Major Role for Alveolar Epithelial Type I Cells in Alveolar Fluid Clearance.

    PubMed

    Flodby, Per; Kim, Yong Ho; Beard, LaMonta L; Gao, Danping; Ji, Yanbin; Kage, Hidenori; Liebler, Janice M; Minoo, Parviz; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Borok, Zea; Crandall, Edward D

    2016-09-01

    Active ion transport by basolateral Na-K-ATPase (Na pump) creates an Na(+) gradient that drives fluid absorption across lung alveolar epithelium. The α1 and β1 subunits are the most highly expressed Na pump subunits in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). The specific contribution of the β1 subunit and the relative contributions of alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) versus type I (AT1) cells to alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) were investigated using two cell type-specific mouse knockout lines in which the β1 subunit was knocked out in either AT1 cells or both AT1 and AT2 cells. AFC was markedly decreased in both knockout lines, revealing, we believe for the first time, that AT1 cells play a major role in AFC and providing insights into AEC-specific roles in alveolar homeostasis. AEC monolayers derived from knockout mice demonstrated decreased short-circuit current and active Na(+) absorption, consistent with in vivo observations. Neither hyperoxia nor ventilator-induced lung injury increased wet-to-dry lung weight ratios in knockout lungs relative to control lungs. Knockout mice showed increases in Na pump β3 subunit expression and β2-adrenergic receptor expression. These results demonstrate a crucial role for the Na pump β1 subunit in alveolar ion and fluid transport and indicate that both AT1 and AT2 cells make major contributions to these processes and to AFC. Furthermore, they support the feasibility of a general approach to altering alveolar epithelial function in a cell-specific manner that allows direct insights into AT1 versus AT2 cell-specific roles in the lung.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELLS CULTURED IN SEMIPERMEABLE HOLLOW FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Grek, Christina L.; Newton, Danforth A.; Qiu, Yonhzhi; Wen, Xuejun; Spyropoulos, Demetri D.; Baatz, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Cell culture methods commonly used to represent alveolar epithelial cells in vivo have lacked airflow, a 3-dimensional air-liquid interface, and dynamic stretching characteristics of native lung tissue—physiological parameters critical for normal phenotypic gene expression and cellular function. Here the authors report the development of a selectively semipermeable hollow fiber culture system that more accurately mimics the in vivo microenvironment experienced by mammalian distal airway cells than in conventional or standard air-liquid interface culture. Murine lung epithelial cells (MLE-15) were cultured within semipermeable polyurethane hollow fibers and introduced to controlled airflow through the microfiber interior. Under these conditions, MLE-15 cells formed confluent monolayers, demonstrated a cuboidal morphology, formed tight junctions, and produced and secreted surfactant proteins. Numerous lamellar bodies and microvilli were present in MLE-15 cells grown in hollow fiber culture. Conversely, these alveolar type II cell characteristics were reduced in MLE-15 cells cultured in conventional 2D static culture systems. These data support the hypothesis that MLE-15 cells grown within our microfiber culture system in the presence of airflow maintain the phenotypic characteristics of type II cells to a higher degree than those grown in standard in vitro cell culture models. Application of our novel model system may prove advantageous for future studies of specific gene and protein expression involving alveolar epithelial or bronchiolar epithelial cells. PMID:19263283

  18. Activation of Type II Cells into Regenerative Stem Cell Antigen-1+ Cells during Alveolar Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Varsha Suresh; Zhang, Wei; Rehman, Jalees; Malik, Asrar B.

    2015-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium is composed of two cell types: type I cells comprise 95% of the gas exchange surface area, whereas type II cells secrete surfactant, while retaining the ability to convert into type I cells to induce alveolar repair. Using lineage-tracing analyses in the mouse model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced lung injury, we identified a population of stem cell antigen (Sca)-1–expressing type II cells with progenitor cell properties that mediate alveolar repair. These cells were shown to be distinct from previously reported Sca-1–expressing bronchioalveolar stem cells. Microarray and Wnt reporter studies showed that surfactant protein (Sp)-C+Sca-1+ cells expressed Wnt signaling pathway genes, and inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling prevented the regenerative function of Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells in vitro. Thus, P. aeruginosa–mediated lung injury induces the generation of a Sca-1+ subset of type II cells. The progenitor phenotype of the Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells that mediates alveolar epithelial repair might involve Wnt signaling. PMID:25474582

  19. Targeting of the pulmonary capillary vascular niche promotes lung alveolar repair and ameliorates fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhongwei; Lis, Raphael; Ginsberg, Michael; Chavez, Deebly; Shido, Koji; Rabbany, Sina Y.; Fong, Guo-Hua; Sakmar, Thomas P.; Rafii, Shahin; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Although the lung can undergo self-repair after injury, fibrosis in chronically injured or diseased lungs can occur at the expense of regeneration. Here we study how a hematopoietic-vascular niche regulates alveolar repair and lung fibrosis. Using intratracheal injection of bleomycin or hydrochloric acid in mice, we show that repetitive lung injury activates pulmonary capillary endothelial cells (PCECs) and perivascular macrophages, impeding alveolar repair and promoting fibrosis. Whereas the chemokine receptor CXCR7, expressed on PCECs, acts to prevent epithelial damage and ameliorate fibrosis after a single round of treatment with bleomycin or hydrochloric acid, repeated injury leads to suppression of CXCR7 expression and recruitment of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1)-expressing perivascular macrophages. This recruitment stimulates Wnt/β-catenin–dependent persistent upregulation of the Notch ligand Jagged1 (encoded by Jag1) in PCECs, which in turn stimulates exuberant Notch signaling in perivascular fibroblasts and enhances fibrosis. Administration of a CXCR7 agonist or PCEC-targeted Jag1 shRNA after lung injury promotes alveolar repair and reduces fibrosis. Thus, targeting of a maladaptbed hematopoietic-vascular niche, in which macrophages, PCECs and perivascular fibroblasts interact, may help to develop therapy to spur lung regeneration and alleviate fibrosis. PMID:26779814

  20. Targeting of the pulmonary capillary vascular niche promotes lung alveolar repair and ameliorates fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhongwei; Lis, Raphael; Ginsberg, Michael; Chavez, Deebly; Shido, Koji; Rabbany, Sina Y; Fong, Guo-Hua; Sakmar, Thomas P; Rafii, Shahin; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-02-01

    Although the lung can undergo self-repair after injury, fibrosis in chronically injured or diseased lungs can occur at the expense of regeneration. Here we study how a hematopoietic-vascular niche regulates alveolar repair and lung fibrosis. Using intratracheal injection of bleomycin or hydrochloric acid in mice, we show that repetitive lung injury activates pulmonary capillary endothelial cells (PCECs) and perivascular macrophages, impeding alveolar repair and promoting fibrosis. Whereas the chemokine receptor CXCR7, expressed on PCECs, acts to prevent epithelial damage and ameliorate fibrosis after a single round of treatment with bleomycin or hydrochloric acid, repeated injury leads to suppression of CXCR7 expression and recruitment of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1)-expressing perivascular macrophages. This recruitment stimulates Wnt/β-catenin-dependent persistent upregulation of the Notch ligand Jagged1 (encoded by Jag1) in PCECs, which in turn stimulates exuberant Notch signaling in perivascular fibroblasts and enhances fibrosis. Administration of a CXCR7 agonist or PCEC-targeted Jag1 shRNA after lung injury promotes alveolar repair and reduces fibrosis. Thus, targeting of a maladapted hematopoietic-vascular niche, in which macrophages, PCECs and perivascular fibroblasts interact, may help to develop therapy to spur lung regeneration and alleviate fibrosis.

  1. Transport Mechanism of Nicotine in Primary Cultured Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Takano, Mikihisa; Nagahiro, Machi; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is absorbed from the lungs into the systemic circulation during cigarette smoking. However, there is little information concerning the transport mechanism of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells. In this study, we characterized the uptake of nicotine in rat primary cultured type II (TII) and transdifferentiated type I-like (TIL) epithelial cells. In both TIL and TII cells, [(3)H]nicotine uptake was time and temperature-dependent, and showed saturation kinetics. [(3)H]Nicotine uptake in these cells was not affected by Na(+), but was sensitive to extracellular and intracellular pH, suggesting the involvement of a nicotine/proton antiport system. The uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in these cells was potently inhibited by organic cations such as clonidine, diphenhydramine, and pyrilamine, but was not affected by substrates and/or inhibitors of known organic cation transporters such as carnitine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, and tetraethylammonium. In addition, the uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in TIL cells was stimulated by preloading the cells with unlabeled nicotine, pyrilamine, and diphenhydramine, but not with tetraethylammonium. These results suggest that a novel proton-coupled antiporter is involved in the uptake of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells and its absorption from the lungs into the systemic circulation.

  2. Lung fibroblasts accelerate wound closure in human alveolar epithelial cells through hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling

    PubMed Central

    Correll, Kelly; Schiel, John A.; Finigan, Jay H.; Prekeris, Rytis; Mason, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    There are 190,600 cases of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) each year in the United States, and the incidence and mortality of ALI/ARDS increase dramatically with age. Patients with ALI/ARDS have alveolar epithelial injury, which may be worsened by high-pressure mechanical ventilation. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells are the progenitor cells for the alveolar epithelium and are required to reestablish the alveolar epithelium during the recovery process from ALI/ARDS. Lung fibroblasts (FBs) migrate and proliferate early after lung injury and likely are an important source of growth factors for epithelial repair. However, how lung FBs affect epithelial wound healing in the human adult lung has not been investigated in detail. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is known to be released mainly from FBs and to stimulate both migration and proliferation of primary rat ATII cells. HGF is also increased in lung tissue, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and serum in patients with ALI/ARDS. Therefore, we hypothesized that HGF secreted by FBs would enhance wound closure in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). Wound closure was measured using a scratch wound-healing assay in primary human AEC monolayers and in a coculture system with FBs. We found that wound closure was accelerated by FBs mainly through HGF/c-Met signaling. HGF also restored impaired wound healing in AECs from the elderly subjects and after exposure to cyclic stretch. We conclude that HGF is the critical factor released from FBs to close wounds in human AEC monolayers and suggest that HGF is a potential strategy for hastening alveolar repair in patients with ALI/ARDS. PMID:24748602

  3. Isolation of alveolar epithelial type II progenitor cells from adult human lungs

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Naoya; Kubo, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Takaya; Ota, Chiharu; Hegab, Ahmed E; He, Mei; Suzuki, Satoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Kondo, Takashi; Kato, Hidemasa; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2011-01-01

    Resident stem/progenitor cells in the lung are important for tissue homeostasis and repair. However, a progenitor population for alveolar type II (ATII) cells in adult human lungs has not been identified. The aim of this study is to isolate progenitor cells from adult human lungs with the ability to differentiate into ATII cells. We isolated colony-forming cells that had the capability for self-renewal and the potential to generate ATII cells in vitro. These undifferentiated progenitor cells expressed surface markers of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and surfactant proteins associated with ATII cells, such as CD90 and pro-surfactant protein-C (pro-SP-C), respectively. Microarray analyses indicated that transcripts associated with lung development were enriched in the pro-SP-C+/CD90+ cells compared with bone marrow-MSCs. Furthermore, pathological evaluation indicated that pro-SP-C and CD90 double-positive cells were present within alveolar walls in normal lungs, and significantly increased in ATII cell hyperplasias contributing to alveolar epithelial repair in damaged lungs. Our findings demonstrated that adult human lungs contain a progenitor population for ATII cells. This study is a first step toward better understanding of stem cell biology in adult human lung alveoli. PMID:21079581

  4. Targeted Type 2 Alveolar Cell Depletion. A Dynamic Functional Model for Lung Injury Repair

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Orquidea; Hiatt, Michael J.; Lundin, Amber; Lee, Jooeun; Reddy, Raghava; Navarro, Sonia; Kikuchi, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2) are regarded as the progenitor population of the alveolus responsible for injury repair and homeostatic maintenance. Depletion of this population is hypothesized to underlie various lung pathologies. Current models of lung injury rely on either uncontrolled, nonspecific destruction of alveolar epithelia or on targeted, nontitratable levels of fixed AEC2 ablation. We hypothesized that discrete levels of AEC2 ablation would trigger stereotypical and informative patterns of repair. To this end, we created a transgenic mouse model in which the surfactant protein-C promoter drives expression of a mutant SR39TK herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase specifically in AEC2. Because of the sensitivity of SR39TK, low doses of ganciclovir can be administered to these animals to induce dose-dependent AEC2 depletion ranging from mild (50%) to lethal (82%) levels. We demonstrate that specific levels of AEC2 depletion cause altered expression patterns of apoptosis and repair proteins in surviving AEC2 as well as distinct changes in distal lung morphology, pulmonary function, collagen deposition, and expression of remodeling proteins in whole lung that persist for up to 60 days. We believe SPCTK mice demonstrate the utility of cell-specific expression of the SR39TK transgene for exerting fine control of target cell depletion. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that specific levels of type 2 alveolar epithelial cell depletion produce characteristic injury repair outcomes. Most importantly, use of these mice will contribute to a better understanding of the role of AEC2 in the initiation of, and response to, lung injury. PMID:26203800

  5. Type II alveolar epithelial cell in vitro culture in aerobiosis.

    PubMed

    Aerts, C; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B

    1988-08-01

    A method of Type II alveolar epithelial cell culture in aerobiosis has been developed. Isolation of Type II cells was performed by digesting guinea-pig lung tissue with crude trypsin and elastase and using discontinuous Percoll density gradients. The Type II cells, as identified by light and electron microscopy, were cultured in aerobiosis for up to six days, in direct contact with the atmosphere in conditions mimicking those present in the lower respiratory tract. Significant activities of cellular superoxide dismutase (SOD), manganese dependent superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were found at the time of isolation. In contrast, cell glutathione content varied widely from one experiment to another. Changes of antioxidant enzymes were evaluated during cell culture in aerobiosis. SOD, Mn-SOD and catalase were significantly decreased after three days but were not significantly different between a three day and six day culture. Antioxidant changes did not influence the cell culture. In marked contrast, decrease in cell glutathione was associated with rapid cell death, whereas good cell survival was obtained at high levels of cell glutathione. Cell culture in aerobiosis will permit a precise evaluation of the effects of gases, particularly oxidant gases, on a primary culture of Type II alveolar epithelial cells.

  6. Alveolar epithelial cells orchestrate DC function in murine viral pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Unkel, Barbara; Hoegner, Katrin; Clausen, Björn E.; Lewe-Schlosser, Peter; Bodner, Johannes; Gattenloehner, Stefan; Janßen, Hermann; Seeger, Werner; Lohmeyer, Juergen; Herold, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses (IVs) cause pneumonia in humans with progression to lung failure. Pulmonary DCs are key players in the antiviral immune response, which is crucial to restore alveolar barrier function. The mechanisms of expansion and activation of pulmonary DC populations in lung infection remain widely elusive. Using mouse BM chimeric and cell-specific depletion approaches, we demonstrated that alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) GM-CSF mediates recovery from IV-induced injury by affecting lung DC function. Epithelial GM-CSF induced the recruitment of CD11b+ and monocyte-derived DCs. GM-CSF was also required for the presence of CD103+ DCs in the lung parenchyma at baseline and for their sufficient activation and migration to the draining mediastinal lymph nodes (MLNs) during IV infection. These activated CD103+ DCs were indispensable for sufficient clearance of IVs by CD8+ T cells and for recovery from IV-induced lung injury. Moreover, GM-CSF applied intratracheally activated CD103+ DCs, inducing increased migration to MLNs, enhanced viral clearance, and attenuated lung injury. Together, our data reveal that GM-CSF–dependent cross-talk between IV-infected AECs and CD103+ DCs is crucial for effective viral clearance and recovery from injury, which has potential implications for GM-CSF treatment in severe IV pneumonia. PMID:22996662

  7. Cyclic deformation-induced injury and differentiation of rat alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Huan; Zhan, Qingyuan; Ren, Yanhong; Liu, Xiaoyang; Yang, Chun; Wang, Chen

    2012-03-15

    The injury and differentiation of alveolar epithelial type II cells induced by alveolar epithelial deformation play important roles in the pathophysiology of ventilator-induced lung injury and repair of the lung injury, respectively. We developed an in vitro rat model to investigate the effects of deformation amplitude, peak deformation, and minimum deformation on the viability and differentiation of type II cells. Rat primary alveolar epithelial type II cells were exposed to a variety of equibiaxial cyclic stretch protocols, and deformation-induced cell survival and differentiation were analyzed. Cell death increased when deformation consisted of change in cell surface area (ΔSA) of 0-37%, 0-50%, 12-50%, 37-50% (P=0.001, P<0.001, P<0.001, and P=0.003, respectively). When ΔSA was at 12-37% and 12-50%, mRNA transcription (P=0.034 and P=0.036) and protein expressions (P=0.008 and P=0.001) of caveolin-1 (a marker for the type I phenotype) increased, in contrast to the decrease of their mRNA transcription of surfactant protein C (a marker for the type II phenotype) (P=0.011, 0.002). These results suggest that amplitude or minimum deformation ≥ 37% ΔSA is an important cause of cell death, and amplitude ≥ 25% ΔSA promotes cell differentiation. Appropriate amplitude (25% ΔSA) can not only avoid cell death but also promote cell differentiation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Alveolocapillary model system to study alveolar re-epithelialization.

    PubMed

    Willems, Coen H M P; Zimmermann, Luc J I; Sanders, Patricia J L T; Wagendorp, Margot; Kloosterboer, Nico; Cohen Tervaert, Jan Willem; Duimel, Hans J Q; Verheyen, Fons K C P; van Iwaarden, J Freek

    2013-01-01

    In the present study an in vitro bilayer model system of the pulmonary alveolocapillary barrier was established to investigate the role of the microvascular endothelium on re-epithelialization. The model system, confluent monolayer cultures on opposing sides of a porous membrane, consisted of a human microvascular endothelial cell line (HPMEC-ST1.6R) and an alveolar type II like cell line (A549), stably expressing EGFP and mCherry, respectively. These fluorescent proteins allowed the real time assessment of the integrity of the monolayers and the automated analysis of the wound healing process after a scratch injury. The HPMECs significantly attenuated the speed of re-epithelialization, which was associated with the proximity to the A549 layer. Examination of cross-sectional transmission electron micrographs of the model system revealed protrusions through the membrane pores and close contact between the A549 cells and the HPMECs. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that these close contacts consisted of heterocellular gap-, tight- and adherens-junctions. Additional analysis, using a fluorescent probe to assess gap-junctional communication, revealed that the HPMECs and A549 cells were able to exchange the fluorophore, which could be abrogated by disrupting the gap junctions using connexin mimetic peptides. These data suggest that the pulmonary microvascular endothelium may impact the re-epithelialization process.

  9. Epithelial repair mechanisms in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Lynn M.

    2010-01-01

    The recovery of an intact epithelium following lung injury is critical for restoration of lung homeostasis. The initial processes following injury include an acute inflammatory response, recruitment of immune cells, and epithelial cell spreading and migration upon an autologously secreted provisional matrix. Injury causes the release of factors that contribute to repair mechanisms including members of the epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor families (TGF-α, KGF, HGF), chemokines (MCP-1), interleukins (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-13), and prostaglandins (PGE2), for example. These factors coordinate processes involving integrins, matrix materials (fibronectin, collagen, laminin), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, MMP-7, MMP-9), focal adhesions, and cytoskeletal structures to promote cell spreading and migration. Several key signaling pathways are important in regulating these processes, including sonic hedgehog, Rho GTPases, MAP kinase pathways, STAT3, and Wnt. Changes in mechanical forces may also affect these pathways. Both localized and distal progenitor stem cells are recruited into the injured area, and proliferation and phenotypic differentiation of these cells leads to recovery of epithelial function. Persistent injury may contribute to the pathology of diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary fibrosis. For example, dysregulated repair processes involving TGF-β and epithelial-mesenchymal transition may lead to fibrosis. This review focuses on the processes of epithelial restitution, the localization and role of epithelial progenitor stem cells, the initiating factors involved in repair, and the signaling pathways involved in these processes. PMID:20363851

  10. Lipoxin A4 promotes lung epithelial repair whilst inhibiting fibroblast proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shengxing; Dancer, Rachel C.A.; Parekh, Dhruv; Naidu, Babu; Gao-Smith, Fang; Wang, Qian; Jin, Shengwei; Lian, Qingquan

    2016-01-01

    Therapy that promotes epithelial repair whilst protecting against fibroproliferation is critical for restoring lung function in acute and chronic respiratory diseases. Primary human alveolar type II cells were used to model the effects of lipoxin A4 in vitro upon wound repair, proliferation, apoptosis and transdifferention. Effects of lipoxin A4 upon primary human lung fibroblast proliferation, collagen production, and myofibroblast differentiation were also assessed. Lipoxin A4 promoted type II cell wound repair and proliferation, blocked the negative effects of soluble Fas ligand/tumour necrosis factor α upon cell proliferation, viability and apoptosis, and augmented the epithelial cell proliferative response to bronchoaveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In contrast, Lipoxin A4 reduced fibroblast proliferation, collagen production and myofibroblast differentiation induced by transforming growth factor β and BALF from ARDS. The effects of Lipoxin A4 were phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase dependent and mediated via the lipoxin A4 receptor. Lipoxin A4 appears to promote alveolar epithelial repair by stimulating epitheial cell wound repair, proliferation, reducing apoptosis and promoting trans-differentiation of alveolar type II cells into type I cells. Lipoxin A4 reduces fibroblast proliferation, collagen production and myofibroblast differentiation. These data suggest that targeting lipoxin actions may be a therapeutic strategy for treating the resolution phase of ARDS. PMID:27957484

  11. Lipoxin A4 promotes lung epithelial repair whilst inhibiting fibroblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shengxing; D'Souza, Vijay K; Bartis, Domokos; Dancer, Rachel C A; Parekh, Dhruv; Naidu, Babu; Gao-Smith, Fang; Wang, Qian; Jin, Shengwei; Lian, Qingquan; Thickett, David R

    2016-07-01

    Therapy that promotes epithelial repair whilst protecting against fibroproliferation is critical for restoring lung function in acute and chronic respiratory diseases. Primary human alveolar type II cells were used to model the effects of lipoxin A4in vitro upon wound repair, proliferation, apoptosis and transdifferention. Effects of lipoxin A4 upon primary human lung fibroblast proliferation, collagen production, and myofibroblast differentiation were also assessed. Lipoxin A4 promoted type II cell wound repair and proliferation, blocked the negative effects of soluble Fas ligand/tumour necrosis factor α upon cell proliferation, viability and apoptosis, and augmented the epithelial cell proliferative response to bronchoaveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In contrast, Lipoxin A4 reduced fibroblast proliferation, collagen production and myofibroblast differentiation induced by transforming growth factor β and BALF from ARDS. The effects of Lipoxin A4 were phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase dependent and mediated via the lipoxin A4 receptor. Lipoxin A4 appears to promote alveolar epithelial repair by stimulating epitheial cell wound repair, proliferation, reducing apoptosis and promoting trans-differentiation of alveolar type II cells into type I cells. Lipoxin A4 reduces fibroblast proliferation, collagen production and myofibroblast differentiation. These data suggest that targeting lipoxin actions may be a therapeutic strategy for treating the resolution phase of ARDS.

  12. Alveolar Epithelial Cell Injury Due to Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Ho; Fazlollahi, Farnoosh; Kennedy, Ian M.; Yacobi, Nazanin R.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.; Borok, Zea; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Crandall, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Although inhalation of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) is known to cause systemic disease (i.e., metal fume fever), little is known about mechanisms underlying injury to alveolar epithelium. Objectives: Investigate ZnO NP–induced injury to alveolar epithelium by exposing primary cultured rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers (RAECMs) to ZnO NPs. Methods: RAECMs were exposed apically to ZnO NPs or, in some experiments, to culture fluid containing ZnCl2 or free Zn released from ZnO NPs. Transepithelial electrical resistance (RT) and equivalent short-circuit current (IEQ) were assessed as functions of concentration and time. Morphologic changes, lactate dehydrogenase release, cell membrane integrity, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial activity were measured. Measurements and Main Results: Apical exposure to 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs decreased RT and IEQ of RAECMs by 100% over 24 hours, whereas exposure to 11 μg/ml ZnO NPs had little effect. Changes in RT and IEQ caused by 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs were irreversible. ZnO NP effects on RT yielded half-maximal concentrations of approximately 20 μg/ml. Apical exposure for 24 hours to 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs induced decreases in mitochondrial activity and increases in lactate dehydrogenase release, permeability to fluorescein sulfonic acid, increased intracellular ROS, and translocation of ZnO NPs from apical to basolateral fluid (most likely across injured cells and/or damaged paracellular pathways). Conclusions: ZnO NPs cause severe injury to RAECMs in a dose- and time-dependent manner, mediated, at least in part, by free Zn released from ZnO NPs, mitochondrial dysfunction, and increased intracellular ROS. PMID:20639441

  13. Alveolocapillary model system to study alveolar re-epithelialization

    SciTech Connect

    Willems, Coen H.M.P.; Zimmermann, Luc J.I.; Sanders, Patricia J.L.T.; Wagendorp, Margot; Kloosterboer, Nico; Cohen Tervaert, Jan Willem; Duimel, Hans J.Q.; Verheyen, Fons K.C.P.; Iwaarden, J. Freek van

    2013-01-01

    In the present study an in vitro bilayer model system of the pulmonary alveolocapillary barrier was established to investigate the role of the microvascular endothelium on re-epithelialization. The model system, confluent monolayer cultures on opposing sides of a porous membrane, consisted of a human microvascular endothelial cell line (HPMEC-ST1.6R) and an alveolar type II like cell line (A549), stably expressing EGFP and mCherry, respectively. These fluorescent proteins allowed the real time assessment of the integrity of the monolayers and the automated analysis of the wound healing process after a scratch injury. The HPMECs significantly attenuated the speed of re-epithelialization, which was associated with the proximity to the A549 layer. Examination of cross-sectional transmission electron micrographs of the model system revealed protrusions through the membrane pores and close contact between the A549 cells and the HPMECs. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that these close contacts consisted of heterocellular gap-, tight- and adherens-junctions. Additional analysis, using a fluorescent probe to assess gap-junctional communication, revealed that the HPMECs and A549 cells were able to exchange the fluorophore, which could be abrogated by disrupting the gap junctions using connexin mimetic peptides. These data suggest that the pulmonary microvascular endothelium may impact the re-epithelialization process. -- Highlights: ► Model system for vital imaging and high throughput screening. ► Microvascular endothelium influences re-epithelialization. ► A549 cells form protrusions through membrane to contact HPMEC. ► A549 cells and HPMECs form heterocellular tight-, gap- and adherens-junctions.

  14. Alveolar Macrophages Prevent Lethal Influenza Pneumonia By Inhibiting Infection Of Type-1 Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardani, Amber; Boulton, Adam; Kim, Taeg S.; Braciale, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    The Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major human pathogen that produces significant morbidity and mortality. To explore the contribution of alveolar macrophages (AlvMΦs) in regulating the severity of IAV infection we employed a murine model in which the Core Binding Factor Beta gene is conditionally disrupted in myeloid cells. These mice exhibit a selective deficiency in AlvMΦs. Following IAV infection these AlvMΦ deficient mice developed severe diffuse alveolar damage, lethal respiratory compromise, and consequent lethality. Lethal injury in these mice resulted from increased infection of their Type-1 Alveolar Epithelial Cells (T1AECs) and the subsequent elimination of the infected T1AECs by the adaptive immune T cell response. Further analysis indicated AlvMΦ-mediated suppression of the cysteinyl leukotriene (cysLT) pathway genes in T1AECs in vivo and in vitro. Inhibition of the cysLT pathway enzymes in a T1AECs cell line reduced the susceptibility of T1AECs to IAV infection, suggesting that AlvMΦ-mediated suppression of this pathway contributes to the resistance of T1AECs to IAV infection. Furthermore, inhibition of the cysLT pathway enzymes, as well as blockade of the cysteinyl leukotriene receptors in the AlvMΦ deficient mice reduced the susceptibility of their T1AECs to IAV infection and protected these mice from lethal infection. These results suggest that AlvMΦs may utilize a previously unappreciated mechanism to protect T1AECs against IAV infection, and thereby reduce the severity of infection. The findings further suggest that the cysLT pathway and the receptors for cysLT metabolites represent potential therapeutic targets in severe IAV infection. PMID:28085958

  15. Protein Expression Profile of Rat Type Two Alveolar Epithelial Cells During Hyperoxic Stress and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, Maneesh

    Rationale: In rodent model systems, the sequential changes in lung morphology resulting from hyperoxic injury are well characterized, and are similar to changes in human acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In the injured lung, alveolar type two (AT2) epithelial cells play a critical role restoring the normal alveolar structure. Thus characterizing the changes in AT2 cells will provide insights into the mechanisms underpinning the recovery from lung injury. Methods: We applied an unbiased systems level proteomics approach to elucidate molecular mechanisms contributing to lung repair in a rat hyperoxic lung injury model. AT2 cells were isolated from rat lungs at predetermined intervals during hyperoxic injury and recovery. Protein expression profiles were determined by using iTRAQRTM with tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Of 959 distinct proteins identified, 183 significantly changed in abundance during the injury-recovery cycle. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis identified cell cycle, cell differentiation, cell metabolism, ion homeostasis, programmed cell death, ubiquitination, and cell migration to be significantly enriched by these proteins. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis of data acquired during lung repair revealed differential expression of gene sets that control multicellular organismal development, systems development, organ development, and chemical homeostasis. More detailed analysis identified activity in two regulatory pathways, JNK and miR 374. A Short Time-series Expression Miner (STEM) algorithm identified protein clusters with coherent changes during injury and repair. Conclusion: Coherent changes occur in the AT2 cell proteome in response to hyperoxic stress. These findings offer guidance regarding the specific molecular mechanisms governing repair of the injured lung.

  16. An Optimised Human Cell Culture Model for Alveolar Epithelial Transport.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hui; Birch, Nigel P; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Robust and reproducible in vitro models are required for investigating the pathways involved in fluid homeostasis in the human alveolar epithelium. We performed functional and phenotypic characterisation of ion transport in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines NCI-H441 and A549 to determine their similarity to primary human alveolar type II cells. NCI-H441 cells exhibited high expression of junctional proteins ZO-1, and E-cadherin, seal-forming claudin-3, -4, -5 and Na+-K+-ATPase while A549 cells exhibited high expression of pore-forming claudin-2. Consistent with this phenotype NCI-H441, but not A549, cells formed a functional barrier with active ion transport characterised by higher electrical resistance (529 ± 178 Ω cm2 vs 28 ± 4 Ω cm2), lower paracellular permeability ((176 ± 42) ×10-8 cm/s vs (738 ± 190) ×10-8 cm/s) and higher transepithelial potential difference (11.9 ± 4 mV vs 0 mV). Phenotypic and functional properties of NCI-H441 cells were tuned by varying cell seeding density and supplement concentrations. The cells formed a polarised monolayer typical of in vivo epithelium at seeding densities of 100,000 cells per 12-well insert while higher densities resulted in multiple cell layers. Dexamethasone and insulin-transferrin-selenium supplements were required for the development of high levels of electrical resistance, potential difference and expression of claudin-3 and Na+-K+-ATPase. Treatment of NCI-H441 cells with inhibitors and agonists of sodium and chloride channels indicated sodium absorption through ENaC under baseline and forskolin-stimulated conditions. Chloride transport was not sensitive to inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) under either condition. Channels inhibited by 5-nitro-1-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) contributed to chloride secretion following forskolin stimulation, but not at baseline. These data precisely define experimental conditions for the application of NCI

  17. An Optimised Human Cell Culture Model for Alveolar Epithelial Transport

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Nigel P.; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Robust and reproducible in vitro models are required for investigating the pathways involved in fluid homeostasis in the human alveolar epithelium. We performed functional and phenotypic characterisation of ion transport in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines NCI-H441 and A549 to determine their similarity to primary human alveolar type II cells. NCI-H441 cells exhibited high expression of junctional proteins ZO-1, and E-cadherin, seal-forming claudin-3, -4, -5 and Na+-K+-ATPase while A549 cells exhibited high expression of pore-forming claudin-2. Consistent with this phenotype NCI-H441, but not A549, cells formed a functional barrier with active ion transport characterised by higher electrical resistance (529 ± 178 Ω cm2 vs 28 ± 4 Ω cm2), lower paracellular permeability ((176 ± 42) ×10−8 cm/s vs (738 ± 190) ×10−8 cm/s) and higher transepithelial potential difference (11.9 ± 4 mV vs 0 mV). Phenotypic and functional properties of NCI-H441 cells were tuned by varying cell seeding density and supplement concentrations. The cells formed a polarised monolayer typical of in vivo epithelium at seeding densities of 100,000 cells per 12-well insert while higher densities resulted in multiple cell layers. Dexamethasone and insulin-transferrin-selenium supplements were required for the development of high levels of electrical resistance, potential difference and expression of claudin-3 and Na+-K+-ATPase. Treatment of NCI-H441 cells with inhibitors and agonists of sodium and chloride channels indicated sodium absorption through ENaC under baseline and forskolin-stimulated conditions. Chloride transport was not sensitive to inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) under either condition. Channels inhibited by 5-nitro-1-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) contributed to chloride secretion following forskolin stimulation, but not at baseline. These data precisely define experimental conditions for the application of NCI

  18. Simultaneous Exposure to Multiple Air Pollutants Influences Alveolar Epithelial Cell Ion Transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose. Air pollution sources generally release multiple pollutants simultaneously and yet, research has historically focused on the source-to-health linkages of individual air pollutants. We recently showed that exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to a combination of particul...

  19. Silencing hyperoxia-induced C/EBPα in neonatal mice improves lung architecture via enhanced proliferation of alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Hinson, Maurice D; Bordner, Jessica E; Lin, Qing S; Fernando, Amal P; La, Ping; Wright, Clyde J; Dennery, Phyllis A

    2011-08-01

    Postnatal lung development requires proliferation and differentiation of specific cell types at precise times to promote proper alveolar formation. Hyperoxic exposure can disrupt alveolarization by inhibiting cell growth; however, it is not fully understood how this is mediated. The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBPα) is highly expressed in the lung and plays a role in cell proliferation and differentiation in many tissues. After 72 h of hyperoxia, C/EBPα expression was significantly enhanced in the lungs of newborn mice. The increased C/EBPα protein was predominantly located in alveolar type II cells. Silencing of C/EBPα with a transpulmonary injection of C/EBPα small interfering RNA (siRNA) prior to hyperoxic exposure reduced expression of markers of type I cell and differentiation typically observed after hyperoxia but did not rescue the altered lung morphology at 72 h. Nevertheless, when C/EBPα hyperoxia-exposed siRNA-injected mice were allowed to recover for 2 wk in room air, lung epithelial cell proliferation was increased and lung morphology was restored compared with hyperoxia-exposed control siRNA-injected mice. These data suggest that C/EBPα is an important regulator of postnatal alveolar epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation during injury and repair.

  20. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Jessica L; Safi, Asmahan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D; Budinger, GR Scott; Takawira, Desire; Hopkinson, Susan B; Jones, Jonathan CR

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Methods Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Results We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM. Conclusions An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung. PMID:23204878

  1. Epithelial-fibroblast interactions in bleomycin-induced lung injury and repair.

    PubMed Central

    Young, L; Adamson, I Y

    1993-01-01

    Intercellular communication between epithelial cells and fibroblasts of the alveolar wall contributes to regulatory control of each cell type. We examined whether lung injury and subsequent fibrosis are associated with disturbance of this mutual control system. Rats received bleomycin intratracheally, and after 10 days, when acute epithelial injury occurs, and at 6 weeks, when repair with fibrosis is found, pure populations of type 2 epithelial cells and lung fibroblasts were prepared to study interactions with respect to growth control. Epithelial cells were cultured alone, on a permeable filter over fibroblasts, and in co-culture with fibroblasts. The results showed that the low growth rate of normal epithelial cells increased when cells were exposed to fibroblast supernatants. This effect was also seen using cells from the 10-day bleomycin group, but it was diminished in the group treated for 6 weeks. However, epithelial cells from exposed or control rats did not show increased DNA synthesis when grown in contact with fibroblasts in co-culture. In contrast, fibroblast growth was inhibited when exposed to epithelial cell secretions in control cultures and when using cells from the 10-day bleomycin group. No inhibition of fibroblast growth by epithelial cells was found using cells from the fibrotic lungs. These results suggest that after lung injury by bleomycin, a fibroblast-secreted factor promotes epithelial growth; however, during repair, regenerating epithelial cells lose the ability to inhibit fibro-blast proliferation. These local changes in cellular control at the alveolar wall may be sufficient to produce pulmonary fibrosis. Images Figure 3. A Figure 3. B PMID:7685692

  2. Diesel exhaust particles induce aberrant alveolar epithelial directed cell movement by disruption of polarity mechanisms.

    PubMed

    LaGier, Adriana J; Manzo, Nicholas D; Dye, Janice A

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of the respiratory epithelium contributes to the progression of a variety of respiratory diseases that are aggravated by exposure to air pollutants, specifically traffic-based pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Recognizing that lung repair following injury requires efficient and directed alveolar epithelial cell migration, this study's goal was to understand the mechanisms underlying alveolar epithelial cells response to DEP, particularly when exposure is accompanied with comorbid lung injury. Separate mechanistic steps of directed migration were investigated in confluent murine LA-4 cells exposed to noncytotoxic concentrations (0-100 μg/cm(2)) of either automobile-emitted diesel exhaust particles (DEP(A)) or carbon black (CB) particles. A scratch wound model ascertained how DEP(A) exposure affected directional cell migration and BCECF ratio fluorimetry-monitored intracellular pH (pHi). Cells were immunostained with giantin to assess cell polarity, and with paxillin to assess focal cell adhesions. Cells were immunoblotted for ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) to assess cytoskeletal anchoring. Data demonstrate herein that exposure of LA-4 cells to DEP(A) (but not CB) resulted in delayed directional cell migration, impaired de-adhesion of the trailing edge cell processes, disrupted regulation of pHi, and altered Golgi polarity of leading edge cells, along with modified focal adhesions and reduced ERM levels, indicative of decreased cytoskeletal anchoring. The ability of DEP(A) to disrupt directed cell migration at multiple levels suggests that signaling pathways such as ERM/Rho are critical for transduction of ion transport signals into cytoskeletal arrangement responses. These results provide insights into the mechanisms by which chronic exposure to traffic-based emissions may result in decrements in lung capacity.

  3. MCP-1 antibody treatment enhances damage and impedes repair of the alveolar epithelium in influenza pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Narasaraju, T; Ng, H H; Phoon, M C; Chow, Vincent T K

    2010-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated an essential role of alveolar macrophages during influenza virus infection. Enhanced mortalities were observed in macrophage-depleted mice and pigs after influenza virus infection, but the basis for the enhanced pathogenesis is unclear. This study revealed that blocking macrophage recruitment into the lungs in a mouse model of influenza pneumonitis resulted in enhanced alveolar epithelial damage and apoptosis, as evaluated by histopathology, immunohistochemistry, Western blot, RT-PCR, and TUNEL assays. Abrogation of macrophage recruitment was achieved by treatment with monoclonal antibody against monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) after sub-lethal challenge with mouse-adapted human influenza A/Aichi/2/68 virus. Interestingly, elevated levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a mitogen for alveolar epithelium, were detected in bronchoalveolar lavage samples and in lung homogenates of control untreated and nonimmune immunoglobulin (Ig)G-treated mice after infection compared with anti-MCP-1-treated infected mice. The lungs of control animals also displayed strongly positive HGF staining in alveolar macrophages as well as alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia. Co-culture of influenza virus-infected alveolar epithelial cells with freshly isolated alveolar macrophages induced HGF production and phagocytic activity of macrophages. Recombinant HGF added to mouse lung explants after influenza virus infection resulted in enhanced BrdU labeling of alveolar type II epithelial cells, indicating their proliferation, in contrast with anti-HGF treatment showing significantly reduced epithelial regeneration. Our data indicate that inhibition of macrophage recruitment augmented alveolar epithelial damage and apoptosis during influenza pneumonitis, and that HGF produced by macrophages in response to influenza participates in the resolution of alveolar epithelium.

  4. Analysis of cellular senescence induced by lipopolysaccharide in pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Oh; Huh, Ae Jung; Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, June Myung

    2012-01-01

    In this work, it was examined the possibility of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) causing cellular senescence in lung alveolar epithelial cells. Then, it was clarified how this cellular senescence phenomenon is associated with oxidative stress effect induced by LPS and whether antioxidants could inhibit reduced cellular viability by oxidant stress effect of LPS. In cell viability using cell counting kit-8, exposure to LPS decreased cellular viability and induced growth arrest in a concentration-dependent manner. The pre-apoptotic concentration of LPS was determined by caspase activation using a Caspase-Glo 3/7 luminescence assay kit. This concentration of LPS caused morphologic characteristics shown in senescent cells and elevated senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. In addition, lysosomal content associated with senescence was increased by LPS at the pre-apoptotic concentration. However, this concentration of LPS did not shorten the telomere length. Exposure to LPS resulted in the formation of hydrogen peroxide in a concentration-dependent manner. The ability of LPS to reduce cellular viability was inhibited by the presence of glutathione. This study revealed that LPS could induce cellular senescence in lung alveloar epithelial cells, and these phenomena were closely associated with hydrogen peroxide production by LPS. Taken together, it is suggested that LPS-induced cellular senescence may play an important role in limiting the tissue repair response after sepsis.

  5. Endocytic response of type I alveolar epithelial cells to hypertonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohua; Singh, Raman Deep; Godin, Lindsay; Pagano, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    We present plasma membrane (PM) internalization responses of type I alveolar epithelial cells to a 50 mosmol/l increase in tonicity. Our research is motivated by interest in ATI repair, for which endocytic retrieval of PM appears to be critical. We validated pharmacological and molecular tools to dissect the endocytic machinery of these cells and used these tools to test the hypothesis that osmotic stress triggers a pathway-specific internalization of PM domains. Validation experiments confirmed the fluorescent analogs of lactosyl-ceramide, transferrin, and dextran as pathway-specific cargo of caveolar, clathrin, and fluid-phase uptake, respectively. Pulse-chase experiments indicate that hypertonic exposure causes a downregulation of clathrin and fluid-phase endocytosis while stimulating caveolar endocytosis. The tonicity-mediated increase in caveolar endocytosis was associated with the translocation of caveolin-1 from the PM and was absent in cells that had been transfected with dominant-negative dynamin constructs. In separate experiments we show that hypertonic exposure increases the probability of PM wound repair following micropuncture from 82 ± 4 to 94 ± 2% (P < 0.01) and that this effect depends on Src pathway activation-mediated caveolar endocytosis. The therapeutic and biological implications of our findings are discussed. PMID:21257731

  6. The Role of Mitochondrial DNA in Mediating Alveolar Epithelial Cell Apoptosis and Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Jo; Cheresh, Paul; Jablonski, Renea P.; Williams, David B.; Kamp, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Convincing evidence has emerged demonstrating that impairment of mitochondrial function is critically important in regulating alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) programmed cell death (apoptosis) that may contribute to aging-related lung diseases, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and asbestosis (pulmonary fibrosis following asbestos exposure). The mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes for 13 proteins, including several essential for oxidative phosphorylation. We review the evidence implicating that oxidative stress-induced mtDNA damage promotes AEC apoptosis and pulmonary fibrosis. We focus on the emerging role for AEC mtDNA damage repair by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO-2) in maintaining mtDNA integrity which is important in preventing AEC apoptosis and asbestos-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model. We then review recent studies linking the sirtuin (SIRT) family members, especially SIRT3, to mitochondrial integrity and mtDNA damage repair and aging. We present a conceptual model of how SIRTs modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven mitochondrial metabolism that may be important for their tumor suppressor function. The emerging insights into the pathobiology underlying AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis is suggesting novel therapeutic targets that may prove useful for the management of age-related diseases, including pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer. PMID:26370974

  7. Epithelial-mesenchymal co-culture model for studying alveolar morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Rachel M; Miller, J Davin; Okoh, Victor O; Halloran, Brian A; Prince, Lawrence S

    2014-01-01

    Division of large, immature alveolar structures into smaller, more numerous alveoli increases the surface area available for gas exchange. Alveolar division requires precise epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. However, few experimental models exist for studying how these cell-cell interactions produce changes in 3-dimensional structure. Here we report an epithelial-mesenchymal cell co-culture model where 3-dimensional peaks form with similar cellular orientation as alveolar structures in vivo. Co-culturing fetal mouse lung mesenchyme with A549 epithelial cells produced tall peaks of cells covered by epithelia with cores of mesenchymal cells. These structures did not form when using adult lung fibroblasts. Peak formation did not require localized areas of cell proliferation or apoptosis. Mesenchymal cells co-cultured with epithelia adopted an elongated cell morphology closely resembling myofibroblasts within alveolar septa in vivo. Because inflammation inhibits alveolar formation, we tested the effects of E. coli lipopolysaccharide on 3-dimensional peak formation. Confocal and time-lapse imaging demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide reduced mesenchymal cell migration, resulting in fewer, shorter peaks with mesenchymal cells present predominantly at the base. This epithelial-mesenchymal co-culture model may therefore prove useful in future studies of mechanisms regulating alveolar morphogenesis. PMID:25482312

  8. Host-pathogen interactions during coronavirus infection of primary alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Tanya A.; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    2009-01-01

    Viruses that infect the lung are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in animals and humans worldwide. Coronaviruses are being associated increasingly with severe diseases in the lower respiratory tract. Alveolar epithelial cells are an important target for coronavirus infection in the lung, and infected cells can initiate innate immune responses to viral infection. In this overview, we describe in vitro models of highly differentiated alveolar epithelial cells that are currently being used to study the innate immune response to coronavirus infection. We have shown that rat coronavirus infection of rat alveolar type I epithelial cells in vitro induces expression of CXC chemokines, which may recruit and activate neutrophils. Although neutrophils are recruited early in infection in several coronavirus models including rat coronavirus. However, their role in viral clearance and/or immune-mediated tissue damage is not understood. Primary cultures of differentiated alveolar epithelial cells will be useful for identifying the interactions between coronaviruses and alveolar epithelial cells that influence the innate immune responses to infection in the lung. Understanding the molecular details of these interactions will be critical for the design of effective strategies to prevent and treat coronavirus infections in the lung. PMID:19638499

  9. MAPK pathway mediates epithelial-mesenchymal transition induced by paraquat in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Wang, Ya-Peng; Zhu, Ling-Qin; Cai, Qian; Li, Hong-Hui; Yang, Hui-Fang

    2016-11-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is believed to be involved in lung fibrosis process induced by paraquat (PQ); however, the molecular mechanism of this process has not been clearly established. The present study investigated the potential involvement of EMT after PQ poisoning. The expressions of EMT markers, such as E-cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), at multiple time points after exposure to different concentrations of PQ were evaluated by western blot analysis. Following PQ treatment, EMT induction was observed under microscopy. Related fibrosis genes, including Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), collagens type I (COL I), and type III (COL III), were also evaluated by measuring their mRNA levels using RT-PCR analysis. Signaling pathways were analyzed using selective pharmacological inhibitors for MAPK. Cell migration ability was evaluated by scratch wound and Transwell assays. The data showed that PQ-induced epithelial RLE-6NT cells to develop mesenchymal cell characteristics, as indicated by a significant decrease in the epithelial marker E-cadherin and a significant increase in the extracellular matrix (ECM) marker α-smooth muscle actin in a dose and time-dependent manner. Moreover, PQ-treated RLE-6NT cells had an EMT-like phenotype with elevated expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and COL I and COL III and enhanced migration ability. Signal pathway analysis revealed that PQ-induced EMT led to ERK-1 and Smad2 phosphorylation through activation of the MAPK pathway. The results of the current study indicate that PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis occurs via EMT, which is mediated by the MAPK pathway. This implies that the MAPK pathway is a promising therapeutic target in alveolar epithelial cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1407-1414, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Targeted gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor to alveolar type II epithelial cells reduces lung fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Gazdhar, Amiq; Temuri, Almas; Knudsen, Lars; Gugger, Mathias; Schmid, Ralph A; Ochs, Matthias; Geiser, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Inefficient alveolar wound repair contributes to the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent growth factor for alveolar type II epithelial cells (AECII) and may improve repair and reduce fibrosis. We studied whether targeted gene transfer of HGF specifically to AECII improves lung fibrosis in bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. A plasmid encoding human HGF expressed from the human surfactant protein C promoter (pSpC-hHGF) was designed, and extracorporeal electroporation-mediated gene transfer of HGF specifically to AECII was performed 7 days after bleomycin-induced lung injury in the rat. Animals were killed 7 days after hHGF gene transfer. Electroporation-mediated HGF gene transfer resulted in HGF expression specifically in AECII at biologically relevant levels. HGF gene transfer reduced pulmonary fibrosis as assessed by histology, hydroxyproline determination, and design-based stereology compared with controls. Our results indicate that the antifibrotic effect of HGF is due in part to a reduction of transforming growth factor-β(1), modulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and reduction of extravascular fibrin deposition. We conclude that targeted HGF gene transfer specifically to AECII decreases bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis and may therefore represent a novel cell-specific gene transfer technology to treat pulmonary fibrosis.

  11. Emerging roles for renal primary cilia in epithelial repair.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2012-01-01

    Primary cilia are microscopic sensory antennae that cells in many vertebrate tissues use to gather information about their environment. In the kidney, primary cilia sense urine flow and are essential for the maintenance of epithelial architecture. Defects of this organelle cause the cystic kidney disease characterized by epithelial abnormalities. These findings link primary cilia to the regulation of epithelial differentiation and proliferation, processes that must be precisely controlled during epithelial repair in the kidney. Here, we consider likely roles for primary cilium-based signaling during responses to renal injury and ensuing epithelial repair processes.

  12. Fibroblastic foci, covered with alveolar epithelia exhibiting epithelial-mesenchymal transition, destroy alveolar septa by disrupting blood flow in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Miki; Hirai, Sachie; Tanaka, Yusuke; Sumi, Toshiyuki; Miyajima, Masahiro; Mishina, Taijiro; Yamada, Gen; Otsuka, Mitsuo; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Kojima, Takashi; Niki, Toshiro; Watanabe, Atsushi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Sakuma, Yuji

    2017-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic, progressive interstitial lung disease of unknown cause. IPF has a distinct histopathological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia in which fibroblastic foci (FF) represent the leading edge of fibrotic destruction of the lung. Currently there are three major hypotheses for how FF are generated: (1) from resident fibroblasts, (2) from bone marrow-derived progenitors of fibroblasts, and (3) from alveolar epithelial cells that have undergone epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We found that FF dissociated capillary vessels from the alveolar epithelia, the basement membranes of which are fused in normal physiological conditions, and pushed the capillaries and elastic fibers down ~100 μm below the alveolar epithelia. Furthermore, the alveolar epithelial cells covering the FF exhibited a partial EMT phenotype. In addition, normal human alveolar epithelial cells in vitro underwent dynamic EMT in response to transforming growth factor-β signaling within 72 h. Because it seems that resident fibroblasts or bone marrow-derived cells cannot easily infiltrate and form FF between the alveolar epithelia and capillaries in tight contact with each other, FF are more likely to be derived from the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitioned alveolar epithelia located over them. Moreover, histology and immunohistochemistry suggested that the FF formed in the lung parenchyma disrupt blood flow to the alveolar septa, thus destroying them. Consequently, collapse of the alveolar septa is likely to be the first step toward honeycombing in the lung during late stage IPF. On the basis of these findings, inhibition of transforming growth factor-β signaling, which can suppress EMT of the alveolar epithelial cells in vitro, is a potential strategy for treating IPF.

  13. Mac-1 deficiency induces respiratory failure by affecting type I alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Ci, Y B; Liu, C L; Sun, H M

    2017-08-31

    As a β2 integrin family member, Mac-1 plays an important role in the inflammatory response. Inflammation and lung injury are closely associated, but the involvement of Mac-1 in the occurrence and development of such pathologies remains poorly understood. We aimed to investigate the relationship between Mac-1 deficiency and respiratory failure in Mac-1 knockout {Mac-1(-/-)} mice, using C57BL/6J mice as a control. The newborn survival rate of Mac-1(-/-) mice was calculated, and mouse lung tissue was treated with hematoxylin and eosin and subjected to immunofluorescent staining. Moreover, western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression of molecules specific to type I and type II alveolar epithelial cells, as well as alveolar surfactant proteins secreted by the latter. Survival of Mac-1(-/-) pups was significantly lower than that of newborn C57BL/6J mice. In a float test, lung tissues from C57BL/6J mice were buoyant, whereas those of Mac-1(-/-) mice were not. Compared with C57BL/6J mice, expression of proSP-C {specific to type II alveolar epithelial cells} and alveolar surfactant proteins in Mac-1(-/-) mice was not significantly different, implying that type II cell function was unaltered. However, western blotting revealed expression of T1α, Aqp5, and Snx5 {type I alveolar epithelial cell markers} in Mac-1(-/-) mice to be significantly decreased {P < 0.05}. In conclusion, Mac-1 may play an important role in respiratory failure. Its absence leads to this condition not by influencing type II alveolar epithelial cells or their secreted surfactant proteins, but rather by reducing type I alveolar cell numbers.

  14. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) inhibits epithelial sodium channel activity in primary alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Charles A.; Kreiner, Lisa; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Trac, Phi; Johnson, Nicholle M.; Hansen, Jason M.; Brown, Lou Ann

    2015-01-01

    Amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channels (ENaC) regulate fluid balance in the alveoli and are regulated by oxidative stress. Since glutathione (GSH) is the predominant antioxidant in the lungs, we proposed that changes in glutathione redox potential (Eh) would alter cell signaling and have an effect on ENaC open probability (Po). In the present study, we used single channel patch-clamp recordings to examine the effect of oxidative stress, via direct application of glutathione disulfide (GSSG), on ENaC activity. We found a linear decrease in ENaC activity as the GSH/GSSG Eh became less negative (n = 21; P < 0.05). Treatment of 400 μM GSSG to the cell bath significantly decreased ENaC Po from 0.39 ± 0.06 to 0.13 ± 0.05 (n = 8; P < 0.05). Likewise, back-filling recording electrodes with 400 μM GSSG reduced ENaC Po from 0.32 ± 0.08 to 0.17 ± 0.05 (n = 10; P < 0.05), thus implicating GSSG as an important regulatory factor. Biochemical assays indicated that oxidizing potentials promote S-glutathionylation of ENaC and irreversible oxidation of cysteine residues with N-ethylmaleimide blocked the effects of GSSG on ENaC Po. Additionally, real-time imaging studies showed that GSSG impairs alveolar fluid clearance in vivo as opposed to GSH, which did not impair clearance. Taken together, these data show that glutathione Eh is an important determinant of alveolar fluid clearance in vivo. PMID:25713321

  15. Cholinergic regulation of epithelial sodium channels in rat alveolar type 2 epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Yoshizumi; Helms, My N; Eaton, Amity F; Self, Julie; Ramosevac, Semra; Jain, Lucky; Bao, Hui-Fang; Eaton, Douglas C

    2013-03-15

    We and others have shown that epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC) in alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells are activated by β2 agonists, steroid hormones, elevated oxygen tension, and by dopamine. Although acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) have been previously described in the lung, there are few reports of whether cholinergic agonists alter sodium transport in the alveolar epithelium. Therefore, we investigated how cholinergic receptors regulate ENaC activity in primary cultures of rat AT2 cells using cell-attached patch-clamp recordings to assess ENaC activity. We found that the muscarinic agonists, carbachol (CCh) and oxotremorine, activated ENaC in a dose-dependent manner but that nicotine did not. CCh-induced activation of ENaC was blocked by atropine. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry suggested that muscarinic M2 and M3 receptors (mAChRs) but not nicotinic receptors were present in AT2 cells. Endogenous RhoA and GTP-RhoA increased in response to CCh and the increase was reduced by pretreatment with atropine. We showed that Y-27632, an inhibitor of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), abolished endogenous ENaC activity and inhibited the activation of ENaC by CCh. We also showed that ROCK signaling was necessary for ENaC stability in 2F3 cells, a model for AT2 cells. Our results showed that muscarinic agonists activated ENaC in rat AT2 cells through M2 and/or M3 mAChRs probably via a RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway.

  16. Curcumin ameliorates alveolar epithelial injury in a rat model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Xie, Yingying; Yan, Rui; Shan, Hu; Tang, Jingjing; Cai, Yan; Yin, Jiafeng; Chen, Mingxia; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Xia; Zhang, Qiuhong; Li, Yali

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the effects of curcumin on alveolar epithelial injury in a rat model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and its potential mechanism. The rat COPD model was established by cigarette smoke exposure combined with intratracheal administration of lipopolysaccharide. Thirty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: control, COPD model, COPD with curcumin and COPD with solvent groups. Neutrophil and macrophage infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated, and the levels of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α in BALF and serum were determined by ELISA. Histopathological examination and TUNEL staining were used to assess the alveolar epithelial injury. The protein expression of p66Shc and p-p66Shc in the lung tissues was determined by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Curcumin significantly decreased the numbers of total cells, neutrophils and macrophages in BALF from COPD rats. In addition, the levels of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α in BALF and serum of COPD rats were significantly decreased after treatment with curcumin. Moreover, curcumin ameliorated emphysema and ultrastructural damage of alveolar epithelial cells in COPD rats. The apoptosis index of alveolar epithelial cells in the COPD with curcumin group was significantly lower than that in the COPD model group. Furthermore, the protein expression of p66Shc and p-p66Shc in alveolar epithelia was significantly decreased in the COPD with curcumin group compared with COPD model group. Curcumin attenuates alveolar epithelial injury in COPD rats, which may be partially due to the down-regulation of p66Shc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional expression of nicotine influx transporter in A549 human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tega, Yuma; Yuzurihara, Chihiro; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is a potent addictive alkaloid, and is rapidly absorbed through the alveoli of the lung. However, the transport mechanism of nicotine at the human alveolar epithelial barrier has not been investigated in great detail. In the present study, the transport mechanism of nicotine across alveolar epithelium was investigated in vitro using A549 cells, a human adenocarcinoma-derived cell line with an alveolar epithelial cell like phenotype. Nicotine uptake by A549 cells exhibited time-, temperature-, and concentration-dependence with a Km of 50.4 μM. These results suggest that a carrier-mediated transport process is involved in nicotine transport in human alveolar epithelial cells. Nicotine uptake by A549 cells was insensitive to change in extracellular pH. Moreover, nicotine uptake by A549 cells could be inhibited by organic cations such as verapamil and pyrilamine, but not typical substrates of organic cation transporters and β2-agonist. These results suggest that a novel, not yet molecularly identified, organic cation transporter plays a role in nicotine transport which is unlikely to interact with β2-agonist transport. This nicotine influx transporter in human alveolar epithelium might have implications for the rapid absorption of nicotine into the systemic circulation.

  18. Barrier-protective effects of activated protein C in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Puig, Ferranda; Fuster, Gemma; Adda, Mélanie; Blanch, Lluís; Farre, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel; Artigas, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a clinical manifestation of respiratory failure, caused by lung inflammation and the disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier. Preservation of the physical integrity of the alveolar epithelial monolayer is of critical importance to prevent alveolar edema. Barrier integrity depends largely on the balance between physical forces on cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, and this balance might be affected by alterations in the coagulation cascade in patients with ALI. We aimed to study the effects of activated protein C (APC) on mechanical tension and barrier integrity in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) exposed to thrombin. Cells were pretreated for 3 h with APC (50 µg/ml) or vehicle (control). Subsequently, thrombin (50 nM) or medium was added to the cell culture. APC significantly reduced thrombin-induced cell monolayer permeability, cell stiffening, and cell contraction, measured by electrical impedance, optical magnetic twisting cytometry, and traction microscopy, respectively, suggesting a barrier-protective response. The dynamics of the barrier integrity was also assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis of the tight junction ZO-1. Thrombin resulted in more elongated ZO-1 aggregates at cell-cell interface areas and induced an increase in ZO-1 membrane protein content. APC attenuated the length of these ZO-1 aggregates and reduced the ZO-1 membrane protein levels induced by thrombin. In conclusion, pretreatment with APC reduced the disruption of barrier integrity induced by thrombin, thus contributing to alveolar epithelial barrier protection.

  19. NLRP3 protects alveolar barrier integrity by an inflammasome-independent increase of epithelial cell adherence

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinova, Elena; Chaput, Catherine; Gutbier, Birgitt; Lippmann, Juliane; Sander, Leif E.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin; Opitz, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, characterized by alveolar barrier disruption. NLRP3 is best known for its ability to form inflammasomes and to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production in myeloid cells. Here we show that NLRP3 protects the integrity of the alveolar barrier in a mouse model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and ex vivo upon treatment of isolated perfused and ventilated lungs with the purified bacterial toxin, pneumolysin. We reveal that the preserving effect of NLRP3 on the lung barrier is independent of inflammasomes, IL-1β and IL-18. NLRP3 improves the integrity of alveolar epithelial cell monolayers by enhancing cellular adherence. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel function of NLRP3 by demonstrating that it protects epithelial barrier function independently of inflammasomes. PMID:27476670

  20. Human alveolar epithelial cells expressing tight junctions to model the air-blood barrier.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Anna; Kletting, Stephanie; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Fischer, Ulrike; Meese, Eckart; Huwer, Hanno; Wirth, Dagmar; May, Tobias; Schneider-Daum, Nicole; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a new human alveolar epithelial cell line (hAELVi - human Alveolar Epithelial Lentivirus immortalized) with type I-like characteristics and functional tight junctions, suitable to model the air-blood barrier of the peripheral lung. Primary human alveolar epithelial cells were immortalized by a novel regimen, grown as monolayers on permeable filter supports and characterized morphologically, biochemically and biophysically. hAELVi cells maintain the capacity to form tight intercellular junctions, with high trans-epithelial electrical resistance (> 1000 Ω*cm²). The cells could be kept in culture over several days, up to passage 75, under liquid-liquid as well as air-liquid conditions. Ultrastructural analysis and real time PCR revealed type I-like cell properties, such as the presence of caveolae, expression of caveolin-1, and absence of surfactant protein C. Accounting for the barrier properties, inter-digitations sealed with tight junctions and desmosomes were also observed. Low permeability of the hydrophilic marker sodium fluorescein confirmed the suitability of hAELVi cells for in vitro transport studies across the alveolar epithelium. These results suggest that hAELVi cells reflect the essential features of the air-blood barrier, as needed for an alternative to animal testing to study absorption and toxicity of inhaled drugs, chemicals and nanomaterials.

  1. Alveolar epithelial cells express mesenchymal proteins in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Marmai, Cecilia; Sutherland, Rachel E.; Kim, Kevin K.; Dolganov, Gregory M.; Fang, Xiaohui; Kim, Sophia S.; Jiang, Shuwei; Golden, Jeffery A.; Hoopes, Charles W.; Matthay, Michael A.; Chapman, Harold A.

    2011-01-01

    Prior work has shown that transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) can mediate transition of alveolar type II cells into mesenchymal cells in mice. Evidence this occurs in humans is limited to immunohistochemical studies colocalizing epithelial and mesenchymal proteins in sections of fibrotic lungs. To acquire further evidence that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition occurs in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), we studied alveolar type II cells isolated from fibrotic and normal human lung. Unlike normal type II cells, type II cells isolated from the lungs of patients with IPF express higher levels of mRNA for the mesenchymal proteins type I collagen, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and calponin. When cultured on Matrigel/collagen, human alveolar type II cells maintain a cellular morphology consistent with epithelial cells and expression of surfactant protein C (SPC) and E-cadherin. In contrast, when cultured on fibronectin, the human type II cells flatten, spread, lose expression of pro- SPC, and increase expression of vimentin, N-cadherin, and α-SMA; markers of mesenchymal cells. Addition of a TGF-β receptor kinase inhibitor (SB431542) to cells cultured on fibronectin inhibited vimentin expression and maintained pro-SPC expression, indicating persistence of an epithelial phenotype. These data suggest that alveolar type II cells can acquire features of mesenchymal cells in IPF lungs and that TGF-β can mediate this process. PMID:21498628

  2. Sirtuin 1 Activator SRT1720 Protects Against Lung Injury via Reduction of Type II Alveolar Epithelial Cells Apoptosis in Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chao; Li, Yaqing; Xu, Wu-Lin; Yan, Jian-Ping; Xia, Ying-jie; Ma, Ying-Yu; Chen, Chun; Wang, Hui-Ju; Tao, Hou-quan

    2015-08-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), two major pathological changes that occur are the loss of alveolar structure and airspace enlargement. Type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECII) play a vital role in maintaining alveolar homeostasis and lung tissue repair. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase, regulates many pathophysiological processes including inflammation, apoptosis, cellular senescence and stress resistance. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether SRT1720, a pharmacological SIRT1 activator, could protect against AECII apoptosis in rats with emphysema caused by cigarette smoke exposure and intratracheal lipopolysaccharide instillation in vivo. During the induction of emphysema in rats, administration of SRT1720 improved lung function including airway resistance and pulmonary dynamic compliance. SRT1720 treatment up-regulated the levels of surfactant protein (SP)A, SPC, SIRT1 and forkhead box O 3, increased SIRT1 activity, down-regulated the level of p53 and inhibited AECII apoptosis. Lung injury caused by emphysema was alleviated after SRT1720 treatment. SRT1720 could protect against AECII apoptosis in rats with emphysema and thus could be used in COPD treatment.

  3. Activated alveolar epithelial cells initiate fibrosis through autocrine and paracrine secretion of connective tissue growth factor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jibing; Velikoff, Miranda; Canalis, Ernesto; Horowitz, Jeffrey C; Kim, Kevin K

    2014-04-15

    Fibrogenesis involves a pathological accumulation of activated fibroblasts and extensive matrix remodeling. Profibrotic cytokines, such as TGF-β, stimulate fibroblasts to overexpress fibrotic matrix proteins and induce further expression of profibrotic cytokines, resulting in progressive fibrosis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a profibrotic cytokine that is indicative of fibroblast activation. Epithelial cells are abundant in the normal lung, but their contribution to fibrogenesis remains poorly defined. Profibrotic cytokines may activate epithelial cells with protein expression and functions that overlap with the functions of active fibroblasts. We found that alveolar epithelial cells undergoing TGF-β-mediated mesenchymal transition in vitro were also capable of activating lung fibroblasts through production of CTGF. Alveolar epithelial cell expression of CTGF was dramatically reduced by inhibition of Rho signaling. CTGF reporter mice demonstrated increased CTGF promoter activity by lung epithelial cells acutely after bleomycin in vivo. Furthermore, mice with lung epithelial cell-specific deletion of CTGF had an attenuated fibrotic response to bleomycin. These studies provide direct evidence that epithelial cell activation initiates a cycle of fibrogenic effector cell activation during progressive fibrosis. Therapy targeted at epithelial cell production of CTGF offers a novel pathway for abrogating this progressive cycle and limiting tissue fibrosis.

  4. A Subset of Epithelial Cells with CCSP Promoter Activity Participates in Alveolar Development

    PubMed Central

    Londhe, Vedang A.; Maisonet, Tiffany M.; Lopez, Benjamin; Jeng, Jade-Ming; Li, Changgong; Minoo, Parviz

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar formation is hallmarked by the transition of distal lung saccules into gas exchange units through the emergence of secondary crests and an exponential increase in surface area. Several cell types are involved in this complex process, including families of epithelial cells that differentiate into alveolar type I and II cells. Subsets of cells expressing Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) have been identified in both lung and bone marrow compartments, and are described as a progenitor/stem cell pool involved in airway regeneration and alveolar homeostasis. Whether these cells also participate in alveolar formation during postnatal development remains unknown. Based on their regenerative capacity, we asked whether these cells participate in alveogenesis. We used a previously described transgenic mouse model (CCSP-tk) in which Ganciclovir exposure selectively depletes all cells with CCSP promoter activity through intracellular generation of a toxic metabolite of thymidine kinase. Our results showed that Ganciclovir treatment in newborn CCtk mice depleted this cell population in lung airways and bone marrow, and was associated with alveolar hypoplasia and respiratory failure. Hypoplastic lungs had fewer alveolar type I and II cells, with impaired secondary crest formation and decreased vascular endothelial growth factor expression in distal airways. These findings are consistent with a model in which a unique population of cells with CCSP promoter activity that expresses vascular endothelial growth factor participates in alveolar development. PMID:20693404

  5. Cigarette Smoke Enhances the Expression of Profibrotic Molecules in Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Checa, Marco; Hagood, James S; Velazquez-Cruz, Rafael; Ruiz, Victor; García-De-Alba, Carolina; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Urrea, Francisco; Becerril, Carina; Montaño, Martha; García-Trejo, Semiramis; Cisneros Lira, José; Aquino-Gálvez, Arnoldo; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive and lethal disease of unknown etiology. A growing body of evidence indicates that it may result from an aberrant activation of alveolar epithelium, which induces the expansion of the fibroblast population, their differentiation to myofibroblasts and the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that activate the alveolar epithelium are unknown, but several studies indicate that smoking is the main environmental risk factor for the development of IPF. In this study we explored the effect of cigarette smoke on the gene expression profile and signaling pathways in alveolar epithelial cells. Lung epithelial cell line from human (A549), was exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for 1, 3, and 5 weeks at 1, 5 and 10% and gene expression was evaluated by complete transcriptome microarrays. Signaling networks were analyzed with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. At 5 weeks of exposure, alveolar epithelial cells acquired a fibroblast-like phenotype. At this time, gene expression profile revealed a significant increase of more than 1000 genes and deregulation of canonical signaling pathways such as TGF-β and Wnt. Several profibrotic genes involved in EMT were over-expressed, and incomplete EMT was observed in these cells, and corroborated in mouse (MLE-12) and rat (RLE-6TN) epithelial cells. The secretion of activated TGF-β1 increased in cells exposed to cigarette smoke, which decreased when the integrin alpha v gene was silenced. These findings suggest that the exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to CSE induces the expression and release of a variety of profibrotic genes, and the activation of TGF-β1, which may explain at least partially, the increased risk of developing IPF in smokers.

  6. Cigarette Smoke Enhances the Expression of Profibrotic Molecules in Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Marco; Hagood, James S.; Velazquez-Cruz, Rafael; Ruiz, Victor; García-De-Alba, Carolina; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Urrea, Francisco; Becerril, Carina; Montaño, Martha; García-Trejo, Semiramis; Cisneros Lira, José; Aquino-Gálvez, Arnoldo; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive and lethal disease of unknown etiology. A growing body of evidence indicates that it may result from an aberrant activation of alveolar epithelium, which induces the expansion of the fibroblast population, their differentiation to myofibroblasts and the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that activate the alveolar epithelium are unknown, but several studies indicate that smoking is the main environmental risk factor for the development of IPF. In this study we explored the effect of cigarette smoke on the gene expression profile and signaling pathways in alveolar epithelial cells. Lung epithelial cell line from human (A549), was exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for 1, 3, and 5 weeks at 1, 5 and 10% and gene expression was evaluated by complete transcriptome microarrays. Signaling networks were analyzed with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. At 5 weeks of exposure, alveolar epithelial cells acquired a fibroblast-like phenotype. At this time, gene expression profile revealed a significant increase of more than 1000 genes and deregulation of canonical signaling pathways such as TGF-β and Wnt. Several profibrotic genes involved in EMT were over-expressed, and incomplete EMT was observed in these cells, and corroborated in mouse (MLE-12) and rat (RLE-6TN) epithelial cells. The secretion of activated TGF-β1 increased in cells exposed to cigarette smoke, which decreased when the integrin alpha v gene was silenced. These findings suggest that the exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to CSE induces the expression and release of a variety of profibrotic genes, and the activation of TGF-β1, which may explain at least partially, the increased risk of developing IPF in smokers. PMID:26934369

  7. MCP-1 expression by rat type II alveolar epithelial cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Paine, R; Rolfe, M W; Standiford, T J; Burdick, M D; Rollins, B J; Strieter, R M

    1993-05-15

    Recruitment and activation of mononuclear phagocytes are potentially critical regulatory events for control of pulmonary inflammation. Located at the boundary between the alveolar airspace and the interstitium, alveolar epithelial cells are ideally situated to regulate the recruitment and activation of mononuclear phagocytes through the production of cytokines in response to inflammatory stimulation from the alveolar space. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the production of monocyte chemotactic polypeptide-1 (MCP-1), a protein that is chemotactic for and that activates monocytes, by rat type II alveolar epithelial cells in primary culture. Immunocytochemical staining using anti-murine JE, an antibody recognizing rat MCP-1, demonstrated cell-associated MCP-1 Ag throughout the monolayer. The intensity of staining was increased in response to IL-1 beta. When type II epithelial cells formed a tight monolayer on a filter support, there was polar secretion of MCP-1 Ag into the apical compartment by both control and IL-1-stimulated cells as measured by specific MCP-1 ELISA. Northern blot analysis revealed that IL-1 and TNF-alpha stimulated MCP-1 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, whereas dexamethasone blocked MCP-1 expression by cells stimulated with IL-1. In contrast to previous results using transformed epithelial cell lines, MCP-1 mRNA was induced in these primary cultures directly by stimulation with LPS. These data suggest that alveolar epithelial cells may have an important and previously unrecognized role in the initiation and maintenance of inflammatory processes in the lung by recruiting and activating circulating monocytes through the production of MCP-1.

  8. Evaluation of alveolar epithelial cells in the sheep model of congenital diaphragmatic hernia: Type 1 alveolar epithelial cells and histopathological image analysis.

    PubMed

    Obayashi, Juma; Kawaguchi, Kohei; Koike, Junki; Tanaka, Kunihide; Seki, Yasuji; Nagae, Hideki; Manabe, Shutaro; Ohyama, Kei; Takagi, Masayuki; Kitagawa, Hiroaki; Pringle, Kevin C

    2017-09-04

    There are few reports comparing type 1 alveolar epithelial cell development with histopathological image analysis. We investigated these as indicators of maturity in fetal lambs' lungs in a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) model. We created left CDH in 4 fetal lambs at 75 or 76days' gestation (Group A). Controls were 5 sham-operated lambs (Group B); both groups delivered at term. The right lower lung lobe (RLL) and left lower lobe (LLL) were sampled. Using histopathological image analysis, alveoli/air sacs count (AC), alveoli/air sacs area percentage (AP), average area (AA), total area (TA), and perimeter (PM) were determined. We also evaluated total lung volumes, radial alveolar count (RAC), and Type 1 alveolar epithelial cells ratio (AT1 ratio), which we previously reported. Regression analysis was performed, with p<0.05 considered significant. RLL and LLL AT1 ratio and LLL RAC in Group A were lower than in Group B. There are no significant differences demonstrated by histopathological image analysis. In Group A, the AT1 ratio in the LLL was lower than in the RLL. There were no differences between LLL and RLL in Group B. AT1 ratio was superior to the other indicators evaluating lung maturity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Wound repair and proliferation of bronchial epithelial cells enhanced by bombesin receptor subtype 3 activation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yu-Rong; Qi, Ming-Ming; Qin, Xiao-Qun; Xiang, Yang; Li, Xiang; Wang, Yue; Qu, Fei; Liu, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Jian-Song

    2006-07-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of bombesin receptor subtype 3 (BRS-3) in airway wound repair. The results showed that: (1) There was few expression of BRS-3 mRNA in the control group. In contrast, the expression of BRS-3 mRNA was gradually increased in the early 2 days, and peaked on the fourth day, and then decreased in the ozone-stressed AHR animal. BRS-3 mRNA was distributed in the ciliated columnar epithelium, monolayer columnar epithelium cells, scattered mesenchymal cells and Type II alveolar cells; (2) The wound repair and proliferation of bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) were accelerated in a concentration-dependent manner by BRS-3 activation with P3513, which could be inhibited by PKA inhibitor H89. The study demostrated that activation of BRS-3 may play an important role in wound repair of AHR.

  10. Malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde adducts decrease bronchial epithelial wound repair.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Todd A; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Tuma, Dean J; Sisson, Joseph H; Spurzem, John R

    2005-05-01

    Most people who abuse alcohol are cigarette smokers. Previously, we have shown that malondialdehyde, an inflammation product of lipid peroxidation, and acetaldehyde, a component of both ethanol metabolism and cigarette smoke, form protein adducts that stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) activation in bronchial epithelial cells. We have also shown that PKC can regulate bronchial epithelial cell wound repair. We hypothesize that bovine serum albumin adducted with malondialdehyde and acetaldehyde (BSA-MAA) decreases bronchial epithelial cell wound repair via binding to scavenger receptors on bronchial epithelial cells. To test this, confluent monolayers of bovine bronchial epithelial cells were grown in serum-free media prior to wounding the cells. Bronchial epithelial cell wound closure was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner (up to 60%) in the presence of BSA-MAA than in media treated cells (Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis [LHC]-9-Roswell Park Memorial Institute [RPMI]). The specific scavenger receptor ligand, fucoidan, also stimulated PKC activation and decreased wound repair. Pretreatment with fucoidan blocked malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde binding to bronchial epithelial cells. When bronchial epithelial cells were preincubated with a PKC alpha inhibitor, Gö 6976, the inhibition of wound closure by fucoidan and BSA-MAA was blocked. Western blot demonstrated the presence of several scavenger receptors on bronchial epithelial cell membranes, including SRA, SRBI, SRBII, and CD36. Scavenger receptor-mediated activation of PKC alpha may function to reduce wound healing under conditions of alcohol and cigarette smoke exposure where malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde adducts may be present.

  11. Trans-sutural distraction osteogenesis for alveolar cleft repair: an experimental canine study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Limin; Liu, Chunming

    2012-11-01

    To explore a new method of repair of alveolar cleft by trans-sutural distraction osteogenesis. Nine 8-week-old mongrel dogs were assigned randomly to two groups with three in the control group and six in the experimental group. First, an alveolar cleft model was created surgically in all animals. After 2 weeks, a U-shaped distractor, made of nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy wire with 200 g tensile force, was inserted into the premaxilla of the experimental dogs to distract the mid-premaxillary suture for 3 weeks. Periosteoplasty of the alveolar cleft was performed when the premaxilla at the side of cleft approached the maxilla at the same side. The distractor was removed 2 weeks post periosteoplasty. The results were evaluated clinically, radiographically, and morphologically. The cleft model was stable and similar to the human alveolar cleft. No spontaneous bone union occurred in the control. In experimental dogs, the premaxilla was moved slowly toward the maxilla, and the cleft became gradually narrower and closed in the third week. Radiographically, the distracted mid-premaxillary suture showed a gradually widened triangle, with the tip of the triangle pointed posteriorly. The density of the distracted triangle suture was increased gradually. The alveolar cleft was completely bony 3 months post periosteoplasty. The morphology of the mid-premaxillary suture was also restored. The alveolar cleft could be repaired by the technique of mid-premaxillary suture distraction using the elastic device of NiTi shape memory alloy.

  12. DA-Raf-dependent inhibition of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in type 2 alveolar epithelial cells controls alveolar formation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Takano, Haruko; Takano, Kazunori; Sakamoto, Akemi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Tokuhisa, Takeshi; Endo, Takeshi; Hatano, Masahiko

    2014-06-03

    Alveolar formation is coupled to the spatiotemporally regulated differentiation of alveolar myofibroblasts (AMYFs), which contribute to the morphological changes of interalveolar walls. Although the Ras-ERK signaling pathway is one of the key regulators for alveolar formation in developing lungs, the intrinsic molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying its role remain largely unknown. By analyzing the Ras-ERK signaling pathway during postnatal development of lungs, we have identified a critical role of DA-Raf1 (DA-Raf)-a dominant-negative antagonist for the Ras-ERK signaling pathway-in alveolar formation. DA-Raf-deficient mice displayed alveolar dysgenesis as a result of the blockade of AMYF differentiation. DA-Raf is predominantly expressed in type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s) in developing lungs, and DA-Raf-dependent MEK1/2 inhibition in AEC2s suppresses expression of tissue inhibitor of matalloprotienase 4 (TIMP4), which prevents a subsequent proteolytic cascade matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)14-MMP2. Furthermore, MMP14-MMP2 proteolytic cascade regulates AMYF differentiation and alveolar formation. Therefore, DA-Raf-dependent inhibition of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in AEC2s is required for alveolar formation via triggering MMP2 activation followed by AMYF differentiation. These findings reveal a pivotal role of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in the dynamic regulation of alveolar development.

  13. Aberrant expression of epithelial and neuroendocrine markers in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma: a potentially serious diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Armita; Gown, Allen M; Baird, Geoffrey S; Hicks, M John; Folpe, Andrew L

    2008-07-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma may be extremely difficult to distinguish from other primitive round cell neoplasms without ancillary immunohistochemistry and/or genetic study. Particularly in adults and in the head and neck locations, the differential diagnosis of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma includes small cell carcinoma and neuroepithelial tumors, such as esthesioneuroblastoma. We have recently seen cases of genetically confirmed alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, which were misdiagnosed owing to expression of cytokeratins and neuroendocrine markers. We studied a large group of well-characterized alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas for expression of such markers. Forty-four alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas (18 genetically confirmed) were retrieved from our archives and immunostained for wide-spectrum cytokeratin (OSCAR), low molecular weight cytokeratin (Cam5.2), synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and CD56 using commercially available antibodies. Cases were scored as 'negative', 'rare' (<5% positive cells), '1+' (5-25%), '2+' (26-50%) and '3+' (>51%). The tumors occurred in 23 males and 21 females at a mean age of 18 years (range, <1-64 years), and involved many sites. Fifty percent of cases (22 of 44) expressed wide-spectrum cytokeratin, and scored almost equally as rare, 1+, and 2+, but rarely 3+. Cam5.2 was positive in 52% (14 of 27). Forty-three percent of cases (16 of 37) expressed at least one of the specific neuroendocrine markers, 32% (12 of 37) expressed synaptophysin, 22% (eight of 36) expressed chromogranin A, and 11% expressed both. Expression of synaptophysin and chromogranin A was typically confined to rare cells but could be more widespread. Thirty-two percent of cases (12 of 37) expressed the wide-spectrum cytokeratin and at least one of the neuroendocrine markers, and 8% (three of 36) expressed cytokeratin and both neuroendocrine markers. CD56 expression was nearly ubiquitous. Aberrant expression of epithelial and neuroendocrine markers is relatively common in alveolar

  14. Pulmonary surfactant mitigates silver nanoparticle toxicity in human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Leo, Bey Fen; Chen, Shu; Abraham-Thomas, Nisha; Thorley, Andrew J; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Shaffer, Milo S P; Chung, Kian Fan; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Tetley, Teresa D

    2016-09-01

    Accompanying increased commercial applications and production of silver nanomaterials is an increased probability of human exposure, with inhalation a key route. Nanomaterials that deposit in the pulmonary alveolar region following inhalation will interact firstly with pulmonary surfactant before they interact with the alveolar epithelium. It is therefore critical to understand the effects of human pulmonary surfactant when evaluating the inhalation toxicity of silver nanoparticles. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of AgNPs on human alveolar type-I-like epithelial (TT1) cells in the absence and presence of Curosurf(®) (a natural pulmonary surfactant substitute), hypothesising that the pulmonary surfactant would act to modify toxicity. We demonstrated that 20nm citrate-capped AgNPs induce toxicity in human alveolar type I-like epithelial cells and, in agreement with our hypothesis, that pulmonary surfactant acts to mitigate this toxicity, possibly through reducing AgNP dissolution into cytotoxic Ag(+) ions. For example, IL-6 and IL-8 release by TT1 cells significantly increased 10.7- and 35-fold, respectively (P<0.01), 24h after treatment with 25μg/ml AgNPs. In contrast, following pre-incubation of AgNPs with Curosurf(®), this effect was almost completely abolished. We further determined that the mechanism of this toxicity is likely associated with Ag(+) ion release and lysosomal disruption, but not with increased reactive oxygen species generation. This study provides a critical understanding of the toxicity of AgNPs in target human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells and the role of pulmonary surfactant in mitigating this toxicity. The observations reported have important implications for the manufacture and application of AgNPs, in particular for applications involving use of aerosolised AgNPs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Organotypic culture of fetal lung type II alveolar epithelial cells: applications to pulmonary toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Shami, S G; Aghajanian, J D; Sanders, R L

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for isolation and culture of fetal Type II alveolar epithelial cells, as well as the morphologic and biochemical characteristics of these histotypic cultures, are described. Type II alveolar epithelial cells can be isolated from fetal rat lungs and grown in an organotypic culture system as described in this review. The fetal Type II cells resemble differentiated rat Type II cells in morphology, biochemistry, and karyotype as they grow in culture for up to 5 weeks. The cells of the mature organotypic cultures form alveolarlike structures while growing on a gelatin sponge matrix. The Type II cells also synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant similar in biochemical composition to that produced in vivo. This system has been used to study the effects of hormones on surfactant production and composition. The organotypic model has many potential applications to the study of pulmonary toxicology. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. PMID:6548184

  16. Double impact of cigarette smoke and mechanical ventilation on the alveolar epithelial type II cell

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) impacts clinical outcomes in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is characterized by neutrophil-mediated inflammation and loss of alveolar barrier function. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that smoking may be a risk factor for the development of ARDS. Because alveolar type II cells are central to maintaining the alveolar epithelial barrier during oxidative stress, mediated in part by neutrophilic inflammation and mechanical ventilation, we hypothesized that exposure to cigarette smoke and mechanical strain have interactive effects leading to the activation of and damage to alveolar type II cells. Methods To determine if cigarette smoke increases susceptibility to VILI in vivo, a clinically relevant rat model was established. Rats were exposed to three research cigarettes per day for two weeks. After this period, some rats were mechanically ventilated for 4 hours. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and differential cell count was done and alveolar type II cells were isolated. Proteomic analysis was performed on the isolated alveolar type II cells to discover alterations in cellular pathways at the protein level that might contribute to injury. Effects on levels of proteins in pathways associated with innate immunity, oxidative stress and apoptosis were evaluated in alveolar type II cell lysates by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical comparisons were performed by t-tests, and the results were corrected for multiple comparisons using the false discovery rate. Results Tobacco smoke exposure increased airspace neutrophil influx in response to mechanical ventilation. The combined exposure to cigarette smoke and mechanical ventilation significantly increased BAL neutrophil count and protein content. Neutrophils were significantly higher after smoke exposure and ventilation than after ventilation alone. DNA fragments were significantly elevated in alveolar type II cells. Smoke exposure did not

  17. Plexins function in epithelial repair in both Drosophila and zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sa Kan; Pascoe, Heath G.; Pereira, Telmo; Kondo, Shu; Jacinto, Antonio; Zhang, Xuewu; Hariharan, Iswar K.

    2016-01-01

    In most multicellular organisms, homeostasis is contingent upon maintaining epithelial integrity. When unanticipated insults breach epithelial barriers, dormant programmes of tissue repair are immediately activated. However, many of the mechanisms that repair damaged epithelia remain poorly characterized. Here we describe a role for Plexin A (PlexA), a protein with particularly well-characterized roles in axonal pathfinding, in the healing of damaged epithelia in Drosophila. Semaphorins, which are PlexA ligands, also regulate tissue repair. We show that Drosophila PlexA has GAP activity for the Rap1 GTPase, which is known to regulate the stability of adherens junctions. Our observations suggest that the inhibition of Rap1 activity by PlexA in damaged Drosophila epithelia allows epithelial remodelling, thus facilitating wound repair. We also demonstrate a role for Plexin A1, a zebrafish orthologue of Drosophila PlexA, in epithelial repair in zebrafish tail fins. Thus, plexins function in epithelial wound healing in diverse taxa. PMID:27452696

  18. Isolation of Highly Pure Primary Mouse Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cells by Flow Cytometric Cell Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Lowell, Clifford A.

    2017-01-01

    In this protocol, we describe the method for isolating highly pure primary alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells from lungs of naïve mice. The method combines negative selection for a variety of lineage markers along with positive selection for EpCAM, a pan-epithelial cell marker. This method yields 2-3 × 106 ATII cells per mouse lung. The cell preps are highly pure and viable and can be used for genomic or proteomic analyses or cultured ex vivo to understand their roles in various biological processes. PMID:28180137

  19. Proinflammatory Cytokines Increase Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression in Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Maloney, James P; Gao, Li

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial permeability mediator that is highly expressed in lung epithelium. In nonlung cells proinflammatory cytokines have been shown to increase VEGF expression, but their effects on lung epithelium remain unclear. We hypothesized that increases in alveolar epithelial cell VEGF RNA and protein expression occur after exposure to proinflammatory cytokines. We tested this using human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) stimulated with 5 proinflammatory cytokines. VEGF RNA expression was increased 1.4-2.7-fold in response to IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, or TGF-β over 6 hours, with TGF-β having the largest response. TNF-α increased VEGF RNA as early as 1 hour. A mix of IL-1, IL-6, and IL-8 had effects similar to IL-1. TNF-α increased protein expression as early as 4 hours and had a sustained effect at 16 hours, whereas IL-1 did not increase protein expression. Only VEGF165 was present in cultured A549 cells, yet other isoforms were seen in human lung tissue. Increased expression of VEGF in alveolar epithelial cells occurs in response to proinflammatory cytokines. Increased VEGF expression likely contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory lung diseases and to the angiogenic phenotype of lung cancer, a disease typically preceded by chronic inflammation.

  20. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of macromolecules and strategy to enhance their transport in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takano, Mikihisa; Kawami, Masashi; Aoki, Ayako; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary delivery is an attractive administration route for therapeutic proteins and peptides. In this context, endocytosis/transcytosis at the distal lung epithelial barrier is an important process in the pulmonary absorption of therapeutic macromolecules. The alveolar epithelium is comprised of type I and type II cells. Understanding the transport mechanisms in these cells is essential for the development of efficient pulmonary delivery systems of therapeutic macromolecules. Endocytic pathways for albumin and insulin in alveolar epithelial cells and possible receptors for the endocytosis are discussed. Strategies to enhance the endocytosis and pulmonary absorption of macromolecules are also discussed, by focusing on the effects of cationic poly(amino acid)s. Although the surface area occupied by type II cells in alveoli is much smaller than that covered by type I cells, type II cells may significantly contribute to the endocytosis/transcytosis of macromolecules such as albumin. Identification of the receptors involved in the cellular uptake of each macromolecule is prerequisite for the understanding and regulation of its transport into and across alveolar epithelial cells. Establishment of novel in-vitro culture cell models of type I and type II cells would be a great help for the future advance of this research field.

  1. Differentiation of human amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells into type II alveolar epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqing; Xu, Wulin; Yan, Jianping; Xia, Yingjie; Gu, Chao; Ma, Yingyu; Tao, Houquan

    2014-06-01

    Type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECII) play a key role in maintaining normal alveolar homeostasis and repair. AECII derived from exogenous stem cells may provide novel treatment options for distal lung diseases. In this study, to explore whether amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSCs) may be induced to differentiate into AECII in vitro, AFMSCs were isolated from 15 independent samples of amniotic fluid, in which CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105 and CD166 were significantly expressed, but the expression of CD14, CD19, CD34 and CD45 was negative. Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4) at both the mRNA and protein level was also significantly expressed in the AFMSCs. We demonstrate that AFMSCs cannot be induced to differentiate into AECII using KnockOut™ serum replacement (KOSR) only. Surfactant protein (SP)A and SPC mRNA expression in the differentiated AFMSCs was significantly induced by the appropriate combination of KOSR, activin A and small airway basal medium (SABM). However, SPA and SPC expression was negative with an inappropriate induction. Lamellar bodies were observed only in the cells which were appropriately induced by KOSR, activin A and SABM. Thus, these results indicate that AFMSCs may be induced to differentiate into AECII-like cells in vitro with the use of the appropriate induction medium, including KOSR, activin A and SABM, suggesting that that AFMSCs have the potential for use in lung regenerative therapy.

  2. Phenotypic screening identifies Axl kinase as a negative regulator of an alveolar epithelial cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Naoya; Kubo, Hiroshi; Maciewicz, Rose A

    2017-09-01

    Loss of epithelial barrier integrity is implicated in a number of human lung diseases. However, the molecular pathways underlying this process are poorly understood. In a phenotypic screen, we identified Axl kinase as a negative regulator of epithelial phenotype and function. Furthermore, suppression of Axl activity by a small molecule kinase inhibitor or downregulation of Axl expression by small interfering RNA led to: (1) the increase in epithelial surfactant protein expression; (2) a cell morphology transition from front-rear polarity to cuboidal shape; (3) the cytoskeletal re-organization resulting in decreased cell mobility; and (4) the acquisition of epithelial junctions. Loss of Axl activity reduced activation of the Axl canonical pathway members, Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 and resulted in the loss of gene expression of a unique profile of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition transcription factors including SNAI2, HOXA5, TBX2 or TBX3. Finally, we observed that Axl was activated in hyperplasia of epithelial cells in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis where epithelial barrier integrity was lost. These results suggest that the Axl kinase signaling pathway is associated with the loss integrity of alveolar epithelium in pathological remodeling of human lung diseases.

  3. Sepsis impairs alveolar epithelial function by downregulating Na-K-ATPase pump.

    PubMed

    Berger, Gidon; Guetta, Julia; Klorin, Geula; Badarneh, Reem; Braun, Eyal; Brod, Vera; Saleh, Niroz Abu; Katz, Adriana; Bitterman, Haim; Azzam, Zaher S

    2011-07-01

    Widespread vascular endothelial injury is the major mechanism for multiorgan dysfunction in sepsis. Following this process, the permeability of the alveolar capillaries is augmented with subsequent increase in water content and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Nevertheless, the role of alveolar epithelium is less known. Therefore, we examined alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) using isolated perfused rat lung model in septic rats without ARDS. Sepsis was induced by ligating and puncturing the cecum with a 21-gauge needle. AFC was examined 24 and 48 h later. The expression of Na-K-ATPase proteins was examined in type II alveolar epithelial cells (ATII) and basolateral membrane (BLM). The rate of AFC in control rats was 0.51 ± 0.02 ml/h (means ± SE) and decreased to 0.3 ± 0.02 and 0.33 ± 0.03 ml/h in 24 and 48 h after sepsis induction, respectively (P < 0.0001). Amiloride, significantly decreased AFC in sepsis; conversely, isoproterenol reversed the inhibitory effect of sepsis. The alveolar-capillary barrier in septic rats was intact; therefore the finding of increased extravascular lung water in early sepsis could be attributed to accumulation of protein-poor fluid. The expression of epithelial sodium channel and Na-K-ATPase proteins in whole ATII cells was not different in both cecal ligation and puncture and control groups; however, the abundance of Na-K-ATPase proteins was significantly decreased in BLMs of ATII cells in sepsis. Early decrease in AFC in remote sepsis is probably related to endocytosis of the Na-K-ATPase proteins from the cell plasma membrane into intracellular pools, with resultant inhibition of active sodium transport in ATII cells.

  4. Secretion of IL-13 by airway epithelial cells enhances epithelial repair via HB-EGF.

    PubMed

    Allahverdian, Sima; Harada, Norihiro; Singhera, Gurpreet K; Knight, Darryl A; Dorscheid, Delbert R

    2008-02-01

    Inappropriate repair after injury to the epithelium generates persistent activation, which may contribute to airway remodeling. In the present study we hypothesized that IL-13 is a normal mediator of airway epithelial repair. Mechanical injury of confluent airway epithelial cell (AEC) monolayers induced expression and release of IL-13 in a time-dependent manner coordinate with repair. Neutralizing of IL-13 secreted from injured epithelial cells by shIL-13Ralpha2.FC significantly reduced epithelial repair. Moreover, exogenous IL-13 enhanced epithelial repair and induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation. We examined secretion of two EGFR ligands, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and heparin-binding EGF (HB-EGF), after mechanical injury. Our data showed a sequential release of the EGF and HB-EGF by AEC after injury. Interestingly, we found that IL-13 induces HB-EGF, but not EGF, synthesis and release from AEC. IL-13-induced EGFR phosphorylation and the IL-13-reparative effect on AEC are mediated via HB-EGF. Finally, we demonstrated that inhibition of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity by tyrphostin AG1478 increases IL-13 release after injury, suggesting negative feedback between EGFR and IL-13 during repair. Our data, for the first time, showed that IL-13 plays an important role in epithelial repair, and that its effect is mediated through the autocrine release of HB-EGF and activation of EGFR. Dysregulation of EGFR phosphorylation may contribute to a persistent repair phenotype and chronically increased IL-13 release, and in turn result in airway remodeling.

  5. Klotho, an antiaging molecule, attenuates oxidant-induced alveolar epithelial cell mtDNA damage and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Jo; Cheresh, Paul; Eren, Mesut; Jablonski, Renea P; Yeldandi, Anjana; Ridge, Karen M; Budinger, G R Scott; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Wolf, Myles; Vaughan, Douglas E; Kamp, David W

    2017-07-01

    Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis and inadequate repair resulting from "exaggerated" lung aging and mitochondrial dysfunction are critical determinants promoting lung fibrosis. α-Klotho, which is an antiaging molecule that is expressed predominantly in the kidney and secreted in the blood, can protect lung epithelial cells against hyperoxia-induced apoptosis. We reasoned that Klotho protects AEC exposed to oxidative stress in part by maintaining mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) integrity and mitigating apoptosis. We find that Klotho levels are decreased in both serum and alveolar type II (AT2) cells from asbestos-exposed mice. We show that oxidative stress reduces AEC Klotho mRNA and protein expression, whereas Klotho overexpression is protective while Klotho silencing augments AEC mtDNA damage. Compared with wild-type, Klotho heterozygous hypomorphic allele (kl/+) mice have increased asbestos-induced lung fibrosis due in part to increased AT2 cell mtDNA damage. Notably, we demonstrate that serum Klotho levels are reduced in wild-type but not mitochondrial catalase overexpressing (MCAT) mice 3 wk following exposure to asbestos and that EUK-134, a MnSOD/catalase mimetic, mitigates oxidant-induced reductions in AEC Klotho expression. Using pharmacologic and genetic silencing studies, we show that Klotho attenuates oxidant-induced AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis via mechanisms dependent on AKT activation arising from upstream fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 activation. Our findings suggest that Klotho preserves AEC mtDNA integrity in the setting of oxidative stress necessary for preventing apoptosis and asbestos-induced lung fibrosis. We reason that strategies aimed at augmenting AEC Klotho levels may be an innovative approach for mitigating age-related lung diseases.

  6. Secondary repair of alveolar clefts using human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Behnia, Hossein; Khojasteh, Arash; Soleimani, Masoud; Tehranchi, Azita; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Keshel, Saeed Hidari; Atashi, Reza

    2009-08-01

    Recently tissue engineering has become available as a regenerative treatment for bone defects; however, little has been reported on the application of tissue engineering for regeneration of cleft defect tissues. Mesenchymal-derived stem cells were applied to different kinds of bone substitute and compared in different animal models, but their usage in human critical defects remained unclear. In this study we report 2 patients with unilateral alveolar cleft, treated with the composite scaffold of demineralized bone mineral and calcium sulphate (Osteoset) loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Computed tomograms showed 34.5% regenerated bone, extending from the cleft walls and bridging the cleft after 4 months in one case and in the other there was 25.6% presentation of bone integrity. The available data revealed the conventional bone substitute was not a suitable scaffold for the MSC-induced bone regeneration.

  7. Retrospective review of 99 patients with secondary alveolar cleft repair.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lisa L; Kauffmann, Daniel; St John, Dane; Wang, Deli; Grant, John H; Waite, Peter D

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of the present review was to evaluate the protocol and technique used in a large population of patients with cleft lip and palate when secondary grafting is performed during the early mixed dentition stage, as determined by eruption of the central incisor. In the United States, most investigators have recommended alveolar grafting at the 9- to 11-year age range or before eruption of the permanent canines. An institutional review board-approved chart review of 99 patients undergoing alveolar cleft bone grafting during a 7-year period at a single institution was performed. Data were collected regarding demographics, operative time, length of hospitalization, follow-up time, complications, and additional procedures performed. The cases were divided by patient age into 2 groups: group 1, aged 6 to 8 years (n = 61); and group 2, aged 9 years and older (n = 38). Statistical analysis was performed for various comparisons in the study. The average operative time for groups 1 and 2 was 86 and 103 minutes, respectively. The complication rate, length of stay, and follow-up time between the 2 groups was not statistically significant at the P = .05 significance level. We recommend earlier bone grafting at or before the eruption of the central incisor, rather than delaying until the cuspid tooth root is 25% formed. We believe this will provide better bone support for the dentition, a decreased burden of treatment for the patient, and improved quality of life. Performing the procedure at this time can lead to decreased operative times, with comparable postoperative outcomes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition in tissue repair and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stone, Rivka C; Pastar, Irena; Ojeh, Nkemcho; Chen, Vivien; Liu, Sophia; Garzon, Karen I; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-09-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) describes the global process by which stationary epithelial cells undergo phenotypic changes, including the loss of cell-cell adhesion and apical-basal polarity, and acquire mesenchymal characteristics that confer migratory capacity. EMT and its converse, MET (mesenchymal-epithelial transition), are integral stages of many physiologic processes and, as such, are tightly coordinated by a host of molecular regulators. Converging lines of evidence have identified EMT as a component of cutaneous wound healing, during which otherwise stationary keratinocytes (the resident skin epithelial cells) migrate across the wound bed to restore the epidermal barrier. Moreover, EMT plays a role in the development of scarring and fibrosis, as the matrix-producing myofibroblasts arise from cells of the epithelial lineage in response to injury but are pathologically sustained instead of undergoing MET or apoptosis. In this review, we summarize the role of EMT in physiologic repair and pathologic fibrosis of tissues and organs. We conclude that further investigation into the contribution of EMT to the faulty repair of fibrotic wounds might identify components of EMT signaling as common therapeutic targets for impaired healing in many tissues. Graphical Abstract Model for injury-triggered EMT activation in physiologic wound repair (left) and fibrotic wound healing (right).

  9. Rhodococcus equi human clinical isolates enter and survive within human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Vivas, J; Pilares-Ortega, L; Remuzgo-Martínez, S; Padilla, D; Gutiérrez-Díaz, J L; Navas-Méndez, J

    2011-05-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an emerging opportunistic human pathogen associated with immunosuppressed people, especially those infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This pathogen resides primarily within lung macrophages of infected patients, which may explain in part its ability to escape normal pulmonary defense mechanisms. Despite numerous studies as a pulmonary pathogen in foals, where a plasmid seems to play an important role in virulence, information on the pathogenesis of this pathogen in humans is still scarce. In this study, fluorescence microscopy and vancomycin protection assays were used to investigate the ability of R. equi human isolates to adhere to and to invade the human alveolar epithelial cell line A549. Our findings indicate that some R. equi clinical strains are capable of adhering, entering and surviving within the alveolar cell line, which may contribute to the pathogen persistence in lung tissues. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Wound repair: role of immune–epithelial interactions

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, G; Neumann, P-A; Sumagin, R; Denning, TL; Nusrat, A

    2016-01-01

    The epithelium serves as a highly selective barrier at mucosal surfaces. Upon injury, epithelial wound closure is orchestrated by a series of events that emanate from the epithelium itself as well as by the temporal recruitment of immune cells into the wound bed. Epithelial cells adjoining the wound flatten out, migrate, and proliferate to rapidly cover denuded surfaces and re-establish mucosal homeostasis. This process is highly regulated by proteins and lipids, proresolving mediators such as Annexin A1 protein and resolvins released into the epithelial milieu by the epithelium itself and infiltrating innate immune cells including neutrophils and macrophages. Failure to achieve these finely tuned processes is observed in chronic inflammatory diseases that are associated with non-healing wounds. An improved understanding of mechanisms that mediate repair is important in the development of therapeutics aimed to promote mucosal wound repair. PMID:26174765

  11. Silver nanowire interactions with primary human alveolar type-II epithelial cell secretions: contrasting bioreactivity with human alveolar type-I and type-II epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Zambianchi, Martina; Chen, Shu; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Shaffer, Milo S.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Tetley, Teresa D.

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in the alveolar units of the deep lung. The alveolar epithelium is composed of type-I and type-II epithelial cells (ATI and ATII respectively) and is bathed in pulmonary surfactant. The effect of native human ATII cell secretions on nanoparticle toxicity is not known. We investigated the cellular uptake and toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs; 70 nm diameter, 1.5 μm length) with human ATI-like cells (TT1), in the absence or presence of Curosurf® (a natural porcine pulmonary surfactant with a low amount of protein) or harvested primary human ATII cell secretions (HAS; containing both the complete lipid as well as the full protein complement of human pulmonary surfactant i.e. SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). We hypothesised that Curosurf® or HAS would confer improved protection for TT1 cells, limiting the toxicity of AgNWs. In agreement with our hypothesis, HAS reduced the inflammatory and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating potential of AgNWs with exposed TT1 cells. For example, IL-8 release and ROS generation was reduced by 38% and 29%, respectively, resulting in similar levels to that of the non-treated controls. However in contrast to our hypothesis, Curosurf® had no effect. We found a significant reduction in AgNW uptake by TT1 cells in the presence of HAS but not Curosurf. Furthermore, we show that the SP-A and SP-D are likely to be involved in this process as they were found to be specifically bound to the AgNWs. While ATI cells appear to be protected by HAS, evidence suggested that ATII cells, despite no uptake, were vulnerable to AgNW exposure (indicated by increased IL-8 release and ROS generation and decreased intracellular SP-A levels one day post-exposure). This study provides unique findings that may be important for the study of lung epithelial-endothelial translocation of nanoparticles in general and associated toxicity within the alveolar unit. PMID:25996248

  12. Angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas Signaling Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced ADAM17 Shedding Activity and Apoptosis in Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xinhua; Xu, Daomiao; Ai, Yuhang; Zhao, Shuangping; Zhang, Lina; Ming, Guangfeng; Liu, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) 17, constitutively expressed in alveolar epithelium, is the pivotal shedding enzyme mediating acute lung inflammation. On the other hand, angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7)/Mas signaling has been shown to improve acute respiratory distress syndrome and protect alveolar epithelial cells from apoptosis. In this study, we explored the effect of Ang-(1-7)/Mas signaling on the expression and activity of ADAM17 and assessed its impact on apoptosis in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated human alveolar epithelial cells. LPS markedly induced the shedding activity of ADAM17 in alveolar epithelial cells, which was blocked by selective c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125. Ang-(1-7) concentration-dependently inhibited LPS-induced ADAM17 shedding activity, which was abolished by selective Mas blocker A779 and Mas shRNA. LPS and Ang-(1-7) showed no significant effect on the expression of ADAM17. Overexpression of ADAM17 synergized with LPS on increasing the shedding activity of ADAM17 and apoptosis in alveolar epithelial cells, counteracting the inhibitory effects of Ang-(1-7). In addition, LPS significantly increased the JNK activity in alveolar epithelial cells; Ang-(1-7) concentration-dependently inhibited LPS-induced JNK activity, which was abolished by A779 and Mas shRNA. In conclusion, this study suggests that Ang-(1-7)/Mas signaling inhibits LPS-induced alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis by inhibiting LPS-induced shedding activity of ADAM17, likely by a JNK-dependent mechanism. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Folliculin Controls Lung Alveolar Enlargement and Epithelial Cell Survival through E-cadherin, LKB1 and AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Goncharova, Elena A.; Goncharov, Dmitry A.; James, Melane L.; Atochina-Vasserman, Elena N.; Stepanova, Victoria; Hong, Seung-Beom; Li, Hua; Gonzales, Linda; Baba, Masaya; Linehan, W. Marston; Gow, Andrew J.; Margulies, Susan; Guttentag, Susan; Schmidt, Laura S.; Krymskaya, Vera P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Spontaneous pneumothoraces due to lung cyst rupture afflict patients with the rare disease Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome caused by mutations of the tumor suppressor gene folliculin (FLCN) by unknown mechanism. BHD lungs exhibit increased alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis. We show that Flcn deletion in lung epithelium leads to cell apoptosis, alveolar enlargement and impaired lung function. FLCN loss also impairs alveolar epithelial barrier function. Flcn-null epithelial cell apoptosis is the result of impaired AMPK activation and increased cleaved caspase-3. AMPK activator LKB1 and E-cadherin are downregulated by Flcn loss and restored by its expression. Flcn-null cell survival is rescued by AICAR or constitutively active AMPK. AICAR also improves lung condition of Flcnf/f:SP-C-Cre mice. Our data show that Flcn regulates lung epithelial cell survival and alveolar size and suggest that lung cysts in BHD may result from an underlying defect in alveolar epithelial cell survival attributable to FLCN regulation of the E-cadherin-LKB1-AMPK axis. PMID:24726356

  14. Effects of lipopolysaccharide, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and the combination on lung alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Pacurari, M; May, I; Tchounwou, PB

    2016-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been shown to induce lung fibrosis in animal models, however the underlying molecular factors/mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), MWCNT, and the combination of LPS and MWCNT on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-9, MMP-12), collagen 3A1 (Col3A1), and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) in alveolar epithelial A549 cells. MMPs are proteinases that degrade extracellular matrix and play a role in lung fibrosis. A549 cells were exposed to LPS (1 ng/ml), MWCNT (20 μg/ml), and the combination and analyzed for paracellular permeability, TGFβ, Col3A1, MMP-9, MMP-12, NF-κB activation, and cell migration by real-time PCR and immunofluorescence. LPS, the combination of LPS and MWCNT, and MWCNT only at the highest tested dose induced blue dextran extravation. LPS and MWCNT increased the expression of TGFβ and its downstream target gene Col3A, and MMP-9 and MMP-12 mRNA. MWCNT potently induced cell migration toward wound healing, whereas LPS slightly induced cell migration. Both, LPS and MWCNT, induced NF-κB nuclear translocation. Our results indicate that MWCNT activated alveolar epithelial cells to promote fibrogenesis, and that LPS differentially primes molecular factors involved in lung remodeling. These findings suggest a role of alveolar epithelial cells in fibrogenesis and also may aid in the design and development of tests for screening of fibrogenic agents. PMID:26880698

  15. Ghrelin ameliorates the human alveolar epithelial A549 cell apoptosis induced by lipopolysaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chunrong; Zheng, Haichong; He, Wanmei; Lu, Guifang; Li, Xia; Deng, Yubin; Zeng, Mian

    2016-05-20

    Ghrelin is a gastric acyl-peptide that plays an inhibitory role in cell apoptosis. Herein we investigate the protective effects of ghrelin in LPS-induced apoptosis of human alveolar epithelial A549 cells, along with the possible molecular mechanisms. LPS exposure impaired cell viability and increased apoptosis of A549 cells significantly in concentration- and time-dependent manners embodied in increased Bax and cleaved caspase-3 production, coupled with decreased Bcl-2 levels. Simultaneously, LPS remarkably decreased the expression of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinas (ERK) in A549 cells. However, ghrelin'pretreatment ameliorated LPS-caused alterations in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 expression, whereas activated the PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling. These results demonstrate that ghrelin lightens LPS-induced apoptosis of human alveolar epithelial cells partly through activating the PI3K/Akt and ERK pathway and thereby might benefit alleviating septic ALI. -- Graphical abstract: Ghrelin ameliorates the human alveolar epithelial A549 cells apoptosis induced by lipopolysaccharide partly through activating the PI3K/Akt and ERK pathway. Display Omitted -- Highlights: •It has been observed that LPS insult significantly increased apoptosis in A549 cells. •Both Akt and ERK signaling are critical adapter molecules to mediate the ghrelin-mediated proliferative effect. •Ghrelin may have a therapeutic effect in the prevention of LPS-induced apoptosis.

  16. Stress failure of alveolar epithelial cells studied by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Costello, M L; Mathieu-Costello, O; West, J B

    1992-06-01

    Stress failure of capillary walls has previously been demonstrated in anesthetized rabbit lungs at high capillary transmural pressures, and the ultrastructural changes in the walls have been described with transmission electron microscopy. In the present study, the pattern of alveolar epithelial disruptions was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Lungs of anesthetized rabbits were perfused with autologous blood at capillary transmural pressures of 12.5, 32.5, 52.5, and 72.5 +/- 2.5 cm H2O and fixed by intravascular perfusion. Samples for SEM were processed by critical point-drying and freeze-drying, and the results of the two techniques agreed well. Out of a total of 433 alveolar epithelial breaks examined, 93% were elongated, with the remainder being roughly circular; 68% of the elongated breaks were oriented perpendicular to the capillary axis, suggesting that the surface tension of the alveolar lining layer played an important role in protecting the blood-gas barrier against stress failure. Most of the breaks involved the full blood-gas barrier, but 17% were limited to the epithelial cells. This finding is consistent with our earlier conclusion that the extracellular matrix, particularly the type IV collagen, is responsible for much of the strength of the blood-gas barrier. The dimensions of the elongated breaks of the epithelium were approximately 4 microns (length) and 1 micron (width). They varied little with pressure, suggesting that once the disruption had occurred the stresses were greatly relieved. Breaks affecting the complete blood-gas barrier tended to be larger than those confined to the epithelium, again consistent with the protective role of the extracellular matrix. Almost no breaks occurred at intercellular junctions although many were seen within 1 micron of the junctions. This finding suggests that the junctions themselves have considerable mechanical strength, but that their rigidity may make the cell in the vicinity of the

  17. Reactivity of alveolar epithelial cells in primary culture with type I cell monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Danto, S I; Zabski, S M; Crandall, E D

    1992-03-01

    An understanding of the process of alveolar epithelial cell growth and differentiation requires the ability to trace and analyze the phenotypic transitions that the cells undergo. This analysis demands specific phenotypic probes to type II and, especially, type I pneumocytes. To this end, monoclonal antibodies have been generated to type I alveolar epithelial cells using an approach designed to enhance production of lung-specific clones from a crude lung membrane preparation. The monoclonal antibodies were screened by a combination of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemical techniques, with the determination of type I cell specificity resting primarily on immunoelectron microscopic localization. Two of these new markers of the type I pneumocyte phenotype (II F1 and VIII B2) were used to analyze primary cultures of type II cells growing on standard tissue culture plastic and on a variety of substrata reported to affect the morphology of these cells in culture. On tissue culture plastic, the antibodies fail to react with early (days 1 to 3) type II cell cultures. The cells become progressively more reactive with time in culture to a plateau of approximately 6 times background by day 8, with a maximum rate of increase between days 3 and 5. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that type II cells in primary culture undergo at least partial differentiation into type I cells. Type II cells grown on laminin, which reportedly delays the loss of type II cell appearance, and on fibronectin, which has been reported to facilitate cell spreading and loss of type II cell features, develop the type I cell markers during cultivation in vitro with kinetics similar to those on uncoated tissue culture plastic. Cells on type I collagen and on tissue culture-treated Nuclepore filters, which have been reported to support monolayers with type I cell-like morphology, also increase their expression of the II F1 and VIII B2 epitopes around days 3 to 5. Taken

  18. Silver nanowire interactions with primary human alveolar type-II epithelial cell secretions: contrasting bioreactivity with human alveolar type-I and type-II epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Zambianchi, Marta; Chen, Shu; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Tetley, Teresa D.

    2015-06-01

    Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in the alveolar units of the deep lung. The alveolar epithelium is composed of type-I and type-II epithelial cells (ATI and ATII respectively) and is bathed in pulmonary surfactant. The effect of native human ATII cell secretions on nanoparticle toxicity is not known. We investigated the cellular uptake and toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs; 70 nm diameter, 1.5 μm length) with human ATI-like cells (TT1), in the absence or presence of Curosurf® (a natural porcine pulmonary surfactant with a low amount of protein) or harvested primary human ATII cell secretions (HAS; containing both the complete lipid as well as the full protein complement of human pulmonary surfactant i.e. SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). We hypothesised that Curosurf® or HAS would confer improved protection for TT1 cells, limiting the toxicity of AgNWs. In agreement with our hypothesis, HAS reduced the inflammatory and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating potential of AgNWs with exposed TT1 cells. For example, IL-8 release and ROS generation was reduced by 38% and 29%, respectively, resulting in similar levels to that of the non-treated controls. However in contrast to our hypothesis, Curosurf® had no effect. We found a significant reduction in AgNW uptake by TT1 cells in the presence of HAS but not Curosurf. Furthermore, we show that the SP-A and SP-D are likely to be involved in this process as they were found to be specifically bound to the AgNWs. While ATI cells appear to be protected by HAS, evidence suggested that ATII cells, despite no uptake, were vulnerable to AgNW exposure (indicated by increased IL-8 release and ROS generation and decreased intracellular SP-A levels one day post-exposure). This study provides unique findings that may be important for the study of lung epithelial-endothelial translocation of nanoparticles in general and associated toxicity within the alveolar unit.Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in

  19. Species differences in lectin binding to pulmonary cells: Soybean agglutinin (SBA) as a marker of type I alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages in mini pigs.

    PubMed

    Kasper, M; Haroske, G; Müller, M

    1994-03-01

    We compared lectin staining patterns in rat and mini pig tissues of normal and fibrotic (irradiation-induced) lungs. Two lectins were studied: Dolichos biflorus (DBA) and Soybean (SBA). Both lectins strongly stained a subpopulation of alveolar macrophages. In the rat, DBA positive macrophages were a subpopulation of the SBA binding cells. In mini pig lungs, a further specific binding of DBA and SBA was observed: DBA reacted with endothelia, and SBA stained the alveolar type I cells. Double immunofluorescence experiments using a type II cell-specific cytokeratin antibody confirmed the selective reactivity of SBA with type I cells, which was also present in fibrotic areas with epithelial cell proliferation.

  20. Airway epithelial cell wound repair mediated by alpha-dystroglycan.

    PubMed

    White, S R; Wojcik, K R; Gruenert, D; Sun, S; Dorscheid, D R

    2001-02-01

    Dystroglycans (DGs) bind laminin matrix proteins in skeletal and cardiac muscle and are expressed in other nonmuscle tissues. However, their expression in airway epithelial cells has not been demonstrated. We examined expression of DGs in the human airway epithelial cell line 1HAEo(-), and in human primary airway epithelial cells. Expression of the common gene for alpha- and beta-DG was demonstrated by reverse transcriptase/ polymerase chain reaction in 1HAEo(-) cells. Protein expression of beta-DG was demonstrated by both Western blot and flow cytometry in cultured cells. Localization of alpha-DG, using both a monoclonal antibody and the alpha-DG binding lectin wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA), was to the cell membrane and nucleus. We then examined the function of DGs in modulating wound repair over laminin matrix. Blocking alpha-DG binding to laminin in 1HAEo(-) monolayers using either glycosyaminoglycans or WGA attenuated cell migration and spreading after mechanical injury. alpha-DG was not expressed in epithelial cells at the wound edge immediately after wound creation, but localized to the cell membrane in these cells within 12 h of injury. These data demonstrate the presence of DGs in airway epithelium. alpha-DG is dynamically expressed and serves as a lectin to bind laminin during airway epithelial cell repair.

  1. Shared epithelial pathways to lung repair and disease.

    PubMed

    Spella, Magda; Lilis, Ioannis; Stathopoulos, Georgios T

    2017-06-30

    Chronic lung diseases present tremendous health burdens and share a common pathobiology of dysfunctional epithelial repair. Lung adenocarcinoma, the leading cancer killer worldwide, is caused mainly by chemical carcinogens of tobacco smoke that induce mutations in pulmonary epithelial cells leading to uncontrolled epithelial proliferation. Lung epithelial cells that possess the capacity for self-renewal and regeneration of other lung cell types are believed to underlie the pathobiology of chronic obstructive, fibrotic and neoplastic lung disorders. However, the understanding of lung epithelial progenitor cell hierarchy and turnover is incomplete and a comprehensive model of the cellular and transcriptional events that underlie lung regeneration and carcinogenesis is missing. The mapping of these processes is extremely important, since their modulation would potentially allow effective cure and/or prevention of chronic lung diseases. In this review we describe current knowledge on cellular and molecular pathways at play during lung repair and carcinogenesis and summarise the critical lung cell populations with regenerative and cancerous potential. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  2. Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition of Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qian; Zhou, Beiyun; Ann, David K.; Minoo, Parviz; Liu, Yixin; Banfalvi, Agnes; Krishnaveni, Manda S.; Dubourd, Mickael; Demaio, Lucas; Willis, Brigham C.; Kim, Kwang-Jin; duBois, Roland M.; Crandall, Edward D.; Beers, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) cell apoptosis in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We hypothesized that ER stress (either chemically induced or due to accumulation of misfolded proteins) is also associated with epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). ER stress inducers, thapsigargin (TG) or tunicamycin (TN), increased expression of ER chaperone, Grp78, and spliced X-box binding protein 1, decreased epithelial markers, E-cadherin and zonula occludens–1 (ZO-1), increased the myofibroblast marker, α–smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and induced fibroblast-like morphology in both primary AECs and the AT2 cell line, RLE-6TN, consistent with EMT. Overexpression of the surfactant protein (SP)–C BRICHOS mutant SP-CΔExon4 in A549 cells increased Grp78 and α-SMA and disrupted ZO-1 distribution, and, in primary AECs, SP-CΔExon4 induced fibroblastic-like morphology, decreased ZO-1 and E-cadherin and increased α-SMA, mechanistically linking ER stress associated with mutant SP to fibrosis through EMT. Whereas EMT was evident at lower concentrations of TG or TN, higher concentrations caused apoptosis. The Src inhibitor, 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4]pyramidine) (PP2), abrogated EMT associated with TN or TG in primary AECs, whereas overexpression of SP-CΔExon4 increased Src phosphorylation, suggesting a common mechanism. Furthermore, increased Grp78 immunoreactivity was observed in AT2 cells of mice after bleomycin injury, supporting a role for ER stress in epithelial abnormalities in fibrosis in vivo. These results demonstrate that ER stress induces EMT in AECs, at least in part through Src-dependent pathways, suggesting a novel role for ER stress in fibroblast accumulation in pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:21169555

  3. Rat coronaviruses infect rat alveolar type I epithelial cells and induce expression of CXC chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Tanya A.; Wang, Jieru; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Mason, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the ability of two rat coronavirus (RCoV) strains, sialodacryoadenitis virus (SDAV) and Parker’s RCoV (RCoV-P), to infect rat alveolar type I cells and induce chemokine expression. Primary rat alveolar type II cells were transdifferentiated into the type I cell phenotype. Type I cells were productively infected with SDAV and RCoV-P, and both live virus and UV-inactivated virus induced mRNA and protein expression of three CXC chemokines: CINC-2, CINC-3, and LIX, which are neutrophil chemoattractants. Dual immunolabeling of type I cells for viral antigen and CXC chemokines showed that chemokines were expressed primarily by uninfected cells. Virus-induced chemokine expression was reduced by the IL-1 receptor antagonist, suggesting that IL-1 produced by infected cells induces uninfected cells to express chemokines. Primary cultures of alveolar epithelial cells are an important model for the early events in viral infection that lead to pulmonary inflammation. PMID:17804032

  4. Cigarette smoke extract inhibits the proliferation of alveolar epithelial cells and augments the expression of P21WAF1.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Zongxian; Ao, Qilin; Ge, Xiaona; Xiong, Mi

    2008-02-01

    Cigarette smoking is intimately related with the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and alveolar epithelium is a major target for the exposure of cigarette smoke extract. In order to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke extract on the proliferation of alveolar epithelial cell type II and its relationship with P21WAF1, the alveolar epithelial type II cell line (A549) cells were chosen as surrogate cells to represent alveolar epithelial type II cells. MTT assay was used to detect cell viability after interfered with different concentrations of cigarette smoke extract. It was observed cigarette smoke extract inhibited the growth of A549 cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner. The morphological changes, involving the condensation and margination of nuclear chromatin, even karyorrhexis, were observed by both Hoechst staining and electronic microscopy. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated the increased cell percentages in G1 and subG1 phases after the cells were incubated with cigarette smoke extract. The expression of p21WAF1 protein and mRNA was also significantly increased as detected by the methods of Western blot or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction respectively. In conclusion, cigarette smoke extract inhibits the proliferation of alveolar epithelial cell type II and blocks them in G1/S phase. The intracellular accumulation of P21WAF1 may be one of the mechanisms which contribute to cigarette smoke extract-induced inhibition of cell proliferation.

  5. Disruption of sorting nexin 5 causes respiratory failure associated with undifferentiated alveolar epithelial type I cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Im, Sun-Kyoung; Jeong, HyoBin; Jeong, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Hwang, Daehee; Ikegami, Machiko; Kong, Young-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Sorting nexin 5 (Snx5) has been posited to regulate the degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor and the retrograde trafficking of cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor/insulin-like growth factor II receptor. Snx5 has also been suggested to interact with Mind bomb-1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates the activation of Notch signaling. However, the in vivo functions of Snx5 are largely unknown. Here, we report that disruption of the Snx5 gene in mice (Snx5(-/-) mice) resulted in partial perinatal lethality; 40% of Snx5(-/-) mice died shortly after birth due to cyanosis, reduced air space in the lungs, and respiratory failure. Histological analysis revealed that Snx5(-/-) mice exhibited thickened alveolar walls associated with undifferentiated alveolar epithelial type I cells. In contrast, alveolar epithelial type II cells were intact, exhibiting normal surfactant synthesis and secretion. Although the expression levels of surfactant proteins and saturated phosphatidylcholine in the lungs of Snx5(-/-) mice were comparable to those of Snx5(+/+) mice, the expression levels of T1α, Aqp5, and Rage, markers for distal alveolar epithelial type I cells, were significantly decreased in Snx5 (-/-) mice. These results demonstrate that Snx5 is necessary for the differentiation of alveolar epithelial type I cells, which may underlie the adaptation to air breathing at birth.

  6. Coactivator-Associated Arginine Methyltransferase-1 Function in Alveolar Epithelial Senescence and Elastase-Induced Emphysema Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Rim S J; John-Schuster, Gerrit; Bohla, Alexander; Mutze, Kathrin; Burgstaller, Gerald; Bedford, Mark T; Königshoff, Melanie; Eickelberg, Oliver; Yildirim, Ali Ö

    2015-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by an irreversible loss of lung function and is one of the most prevalent and severe diseases worldwide. A major feature of COPD is emphysema, which is the progressive loss of alveolar tissue. Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase-1 (CARM1) regulates histone methylation and the transcription of genes involved in senescence, proliferation, and differentiation. Complete loss of CARM1 leads to disrupted differentiation and maturation of alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells. We thus hypothesized that CARM1 regulates the development and progression of emphysema. To address this, we investigated the contribution of CARM1 to alveolar rarefication using the mouse model of elastase-induced emphysema in vivo and small interfering (si)RNA-mediated knockdown in ATII-like LA4 cells in vitro. We demonstrate that emphysema progression in vivo is associated with a time-dependent down-regulation of CARM1. Importantly, elastase-treated CARM1 haploinsufficient mice show significantly increased airspace enlargement (52.5 ± 9.6 μm versus 38.8 ± 5.5 μm; P < 0.01) and lung compliance (2.8 ± 0.32 μl/cm H2O versus 2.4 ± 0.4 μl/cm H2O; P < 0.04) compared with controls. The knockdown of CARM1 in LA4 cells led to decreased sirtuin 1 expression (0.034 ± 0.003 versus 0.022 ± 0.001; P < 0.05) but increased expression of p16 (0.27 ± 0.013 versus 0.31 ± 0.010; P < 0.5) and p21 (0.81 ± 0.088 versus 1.28 ± 0.063; P < 0.01) and higher β-galactosidase-positive senescent cells (50.57 ± 7.36% versus 2.21 ± 0.34%; P < 0.001) compared with scrambled siRNA. We further demonstrated that CARM1 haploinsufficiency impairs transdifferentiation and wound healing (32.18 ± 0.9512% versus 8.769 ± 1.967%; P < 0.001) of alveolar epithelial cells. Overall, these results reveal a novel function of CARM1 in regulating emphysema development

  7. Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Amniotic Epithelial Cells and Its Application in Alveolar Defect Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Jiawen, Si; Jianjun, Zhang; Jiewen, Dai; Dedong, Yu; Hongbo, Yu; Jun, Shi; Xudong, Wang; Shen, Steve G.F.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the detailed in vitro osteogenic differentiation process and in vivo bone regenerative property of human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs). The in vitro osteogenic differentiation process of hAECs was evaluated by biochemical staining, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence. Next, β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds alone or loaded with hAECs were implanted into the alveolar defects of rats. Micro-computed tomography evaluation and histologic studies were conducted. Our results validated the in vitro osteogenic capacity of hAECs by upregulation of Runx2, osterix, alkaline phosphatase, collagen I, and osteopontin, with positive biochemical staining for osteoblasts. An epithelial-mesenchymal transformation process might be involved in the osteogenic differentiation of hAECs by increased expression of transforming growth factor-β1. Our data also demonstrated that in vivo implantation of hAECs loaded on β-TCP scaffolds, not only improved bone regeneration by direct participation, but also reduced the early host immune response to the scaffolds. The presented data indicate that hAECs possess proper osteogenic differentiation potential and a modulatory influence on the early tissue remodeling process, making these cells a potential source of progenitor cells for clinical restoration of the alveolar defect. PMID:25368378

  8. Glucocorticoid pretreatment increases toxicity due to peroxides in alveolar epithelial-like cell lines.

    PubMed

    Walther, Udo I; Stets, Regine

    2009-02-04

    In previous experiments an increase in zinc-mediated toxicity was found after pretreatment of alveolar epithelial type II-like cells with glucocorticoids. In this work toxicity of two peroxides (tertiary butyl hydroperoxide [tBHP], hydrogene peroxide [HP]) was assessed in L2 and A549 cells compared to dexamethasone (DEX) pretreated cells. Pretreatment of cells with 7.5micromol/l DEX for 72h decreased cellular glutathione content in both cell lines. Furthermore compared to not pretreated cells toxicity of both peroxides was increased in A549 cells, while in L2 cells only toxicity of tBHP was significantly increased by the glucocorticoid pretreatment. HP toxicity only showed a tendency to be increased in L2 cells after DEX pretreatment. The results point to a glucocorticoid-dependent increased oxidative stress of alveolar epithelial type II cells as antagonised by antioxidative enzymes such as catalase and/or preferentially by the glutathione system. This furthermore should be considered for all glucocorticoid applications in vivo as well.

  9. S-carboxymethylcysteine inhibits adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae to human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major pathogen of respiratory infections that utilizes platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) for firm adherence to host cells. The mucolytic agent S-carboxymethylcysteine (S-CMC) has been shown to exert inhibitory effects against infection by several respiratory pathogens including S. pneumoniae in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, clinical studies have implicated the benefits of S-CMC in preventing exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which is considered to be related to respiratory infections. In this study, to assess whether the potency of S-CMC is attributable to inhibition of pneumococcal adherence to host cells, an alveolar epithelial cell line stimulated with interleukin-1α was used as a model of inflamed epithelial cells. Despite upregulation of PAFR by inflammatory activation, treatment with S-CMC efficiently inhibited pneumococcal adherence to host epithelial cells. In order to gain insight into the inhibitory mechanism, the effects of S-CMC on PAFR expression were also investigated. Following treatment with S-CMC, PAFR expression was reduced at both mRNA and post-transcriptional levels. Interestingly, S-CMC was also effective in inhibiting pneumococcal adherence to cells transfected with PAFR small interfering RNAs. These results indicate S-CMC as a probable inhibitor targeting numerous epithelial receptors that interact with S. pneumoniae.

  10. [Medial proximal tibia donor site: contribution to alveolar cleft repair in children].

    PubMed

    Corre, P; Khonsari, R H; Laure, B; Cordova Jara, L; Bonnet, R; Mercier, J-M

    2011-11-01

    Cancellous bone is the best material for alveolar cleft repair (or secondary alveolar cleft repair). It is usually harvested from the iliac bone but morbidity of this donor site is high. Among the other possible donor sites the tibial harvesting procedure seems safe with lower morbidity. The authors assessed the medio-proximal tibial harvesting procedure on a consecutive series of 55 children having undergone secondary alveoloplasty. An individual questionnaire was used to assess retrospectively the intensity and duration of postoperative pain, functional impotence, possible late complications, and scar length. Postoperative tibial in frontal and profile radiographs were used to assess corticotomy diameter, the distance between corticotomy and growth plate, and local complications. The mean patient age was nine years. No complications were reported. Sixty nine percent of patients complained of postoperative pain with an average intensity of four out of 10 for a period of 17 days. Sixty five percent of patients complained of discomfort in walking for an average of 12 days. The average scar length was 10 mm. Two patients (3.6%) presented with sequels two years after surgery, residual scar pain for one, and painless ectopic tibial ossification next to the sampling site for the other. The medio-proximal tibial site bone harvesting morbidity is low. The surgical procedure is easy, rapid, and safe. The amount of cancellous bone collected is sufficient for two simultaneous alveolar defect grafts. This site seems especially well adapted for secondary alveoloplasty in children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Late appearance of a type I alveolar epithelial cell marker during fetal rat lung development.

    PubMed

    Danto, S I; Zabski, S M; Crandall, E D

    1994-10-01

    Recent studies in fetal lung using immunological and molecular probes have revealed type I and type II cell phenotypic markers in primordial lung epithelial cells prior to the morphogenesis of these cell types. We have recently developed monoclonal antibodies specific for adult type I cells. To evaluate further the temporal appearance of the type I cell phenotype during alveolar epithelial cell ontogeny, we analyzed fetal lung development using one of our monoclonal antibodies (mAb VIII B2). The epitope recognized by mAb VIII B2 first appears in the canalicular stage of fetal lung development, at approx. embryonic day 19 (E19), in occasional, faintly stained tubules. Staining with this type I cell probe becomes more intense and more widespread with increasing gestational age, during which time the pattern of staining changes. Initially, all cells of the distal epithelial tubules are uniformly labelled along their apical and basolateral surfaces. As morphological differentiation of the alveolar epithelium proceeds, type I cell immunoreactivity appears to become restricted to the apical surface of the primitive type I cells in a pattern approaching that seen in the mature lung. We concurrently analyzed developing fetal lung with an antiserum to surfactant apoprotein-A (alpha-SP-A). Consistent with the findings of others, labeling of SP-A was first detectable in scattered cuboidal cells at E18. Careful examination of the double-labeled specimens suggested that some cells were reactive with both the VIII B2 and SP-A antibodies, particularly at E20. Confocal microscopic analysis of such sections from E20 lung confirmed this impression. Three populations of cells were detected: cells labeled only with alpha-SP-A, cells labeled only with mAb VIII B2, and a smaller subset of cells labeled by both.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. The common anesthetic, sevoflurane, induces apoptosis in A549 lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Gui-Hua; Zhang, Juan; Liao, Da-Qing; Li, Zhuo; Yang, Jing; Luo, Nan-Fu; Gu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Lung alveolar epithelial cells are the first barrier exposed to volatile anesthetics, such as sevoflurane, prior to reaching the targeted neuronal cells. Previously, the effects of volatile anesthetics on lung surfactant were studied primarily with physicochemical models and there has been little experimental data from cell cultures. Therefore it was investigated whether sevoflurane induces apoptosis of A549 lung epithelial cells. A549 cells were exposed to sevoflurane via a calibrated vaporizer with a 2 l/min flow in a gas‑tight chamber at 37˚C. The concentration of sevoflurane in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium was detected with gas chromatography. Untreated cells and cells treated with 2 µM daunorubicin hydrochloride (DRB) were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. Apoptosis factors, including the level of ATP, apoptotic‑bodies by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, DNA damage and the level of caspase 3/7 were analyzed. Cells treated with sevoflurane showed a significant reduction in ATP compared with untreated cells. Effects in the DRB group were greater than in the sevoflurane group. The difference of TUNEL staining between the sevoflurane and untreated groups was statistically significant. DNA degradation was observed in the sevoflurane and DRB groups, however this was not observed in the untreated group. The sevoflurane and DRB groups induced increased caspase 3/7 activation compared with untreated cells. These results suggest that sevoflurane induces apoptosis in A549 cells. In conclusion, 5% sevoflurane induced apoptosis of A549 lung alveolar epithelial cells, which resulted in decreased cell viability, increased apoptotic bodies, impaired DNA integrality and increased levels of caspase 3/7.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells protect from hypoxia-induced alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Uzunhan, Yurdagül; Bernard, Olivier; Marchant, Dominique; Dard, Nicolas; Vanneaux, Valérie; Larghero, Jérôme; Gille, Thomas; Clerici, Christine; Valeyre, Dominique; Nunes, Hilario; Boncoeur, Emilie; Planès, Carole

    2016-03-01

    Administration of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) reduces lung inflammation, fibrosis, and mortality in animal models of lung injury, by a mechanism not completely understood. We investigated whether hMSC would prevent epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by hypoxia in primary rat alveolar epithelial cell (AEC). In AEC cultured on semipermeable filters, prolonged hypoxic exposure (1.5% O2 for up to 12 days) induced phenotypic changes consistent with EMT, i.e., a change in cell morphology, a decrease in transepithelial resistance (Rte) and in the expression of epithelial markers [zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), E-cadherin, AQP-5, TTF-1], together with an increase in mesenchymal markers [vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)]. Expression of transcription factors driving EMT such as SNAIL1, ZEB1, and TWIST1 increased after 2, 24, and 48 h of hypoxia, respectively. Hypoxia also induced TGF-β1 mRNA expression and the secretion of active TGF-β1 in apical medium, and the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), two inducers of EMT. Coculture of AEC with hMSC partially prevented the decrease in Rte and in ZO-1, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 expression, and the increase in vimentin expression induced by hypoxia. It also abolished the increase in TGF-β1 expression and in TGF-β1-induced genes ZEB1, TWIST1, and CTGF. Finally, incubation with human recombinant KGF at a concentration similar to what was measured in hMSC-conditioned media restored the expression of TTF-1 and prevented the increase in TWIST1, TGF-β1, and CTGF in hypoxic AEC. Our results indicate that hMSC prevent hypoxia-induced alveolar EMT through the paracrine modulation of EMT signaling pathways and suggest that this effect is partly mediated by KGF. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Sex-specific effects of sex steroids on alveolar epithelial Na(+) transport.

    PubMed

    Haase, Melanie; Laube, Mandy; Thome, Ulrich H

    2017-03-01

    Alveolar fluid clearance mediates perinatal lung transition to air breathing in newborn infants, which is accomplished by epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC) and Na-K-ATPase. Male sex represents a major risk factor for developing respiratory distress, especially in preterm infants. We previously showed that male sex is associated with reduced epithelial Na(+) transport, possibly contributing to the sexual dimorphism in newborn respiratory distress. This study aimed to determine sex-specific effects of sex steroids on epithelial Na(+) transport. The effects of testosterone, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estradiol, and progesterone on Na(+) transport and Na(+) channel expression were determined in fetal distal lung epithelial (FDLE) cells of male and female rat fetuses by Ussing chamber and mRNA expression analyses. DHT showed a minor effect only in male FDLE cells by decreasing epithelial Na(+) transport. However, flutamide, an androgen receptor antagonist, did not abolish the gender imbalance, and testosterone lacked any effect on Na(+) transport in male and female FDLE cells. In contrast, estradiol and progesterone increased Na(+) transport and Na(+) channel expression especially in females, and prevented the inhibiting effect of DHT in males. Estrogen receptor inhibition decreased Na(+) channel expression and eliminated the sex differences. In conclusion, female sex steroids stimulate Na(+) transport especially in females and prevent the inhibitory effect of DHT in males. The ineffectiveness of testosterone suggests that Na(+) transport is largely unaffected by androgens. Thus, the higher responsiveness of female cells to female sex steroids explains the higher Na(+) transport activity, possibly leading to a functional advantage in females. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Environmental Particulate (PM2.5) Augments Stiffness-Induced Alveolar Epithelial Cell Mechanoactivation of Transforming Growth Factor Beta

    PubMed Central

    Dysart, Marilyn M.; Galvis, Boris R.; Russell, Armistead G.; Barker, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunctional pulmonary homeostasis and repair, including diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis (PF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and tumorigenesis have been increasing over the past decade, a fact that heavily implicates environmental influences. Several investigations have suggested that in response to increased transforming growth factor - beta (TGFβ) signaling, the alveolar type II (ATII) epithelial cell undergoes phenotypic changes that may contribute to the complex pathobiology of PF. We have previously demonstrated that increased tissue stiffness associated with PF is a potent extracellular matrix (ECM) signal for epithelial cell activation of TGFβ. The work reported here explores the relationship between tissue stiffness and exposure to environmental stimuli in the activation of TGFβ. We hypothesized that exposure of ATII cells to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) will result in enhanced cell contractility, TGFβ activation, and subsequent changes to ATII cell phenotype. ATII cells were cultured on increasingly stiff substrates with or without addition of PM2.5. Exposure to PM2.5 resulted in increased activation of TGFβ, increased cell contractility, and elongation of ATII cells. Most notably, on 8 kPa substrates, a stiffness greater than normal but less than established fibrotic lung, addition of PM2.5 resulted in increased cortical cell stiffness, enhanced actin staining and cell elongation; a result not seen in the absence of PM2.5. Our work suggests that PM2.5 exposure additionally enhances the existing interaction between ECM stiffness and TGFβ that has been previously reported. Furthermore, we show that this additional enhancement is likely a consequence of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to increased TGFβ signaling events. These results highlight the importance of both the micromechanical and biochemical environment in lung disease initiation and suggest that individuals in early stages of lung remodeling

  16. Propolis inhibits TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human alveolar epithelial cells via PPARγ activation.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hui-Fang; Chang-Chien, Pei-Wen; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Wang, Jiu-Yao

    2013-03-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) may contribute to airway remodeling in severe asthma and fibrotic lung diseases. Studies have shown that extracts from propolis protect chemical-induced cardiac and liver fibrosis in animals. This study assesses the inhibitory effect of propolis on TGF-β1-induced EMT in serum-deprived A549 cells (human AECs). Experimental results show progressive cell morphological changes, decreased E-cadherin, increased N-cadherin production, intracellular F-actin rearrangement, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and increased cell motility with increasing TGF-β1 concentration. A549 cells pretreated with propolis and then treated with TGF-β1 for 24 h regained epithelial cell morphology, decreased the production of N-cadherin and ROS, and had reduced motility. Propolis prevents the effects of TGF-β1-induced Smad2 and AKT activation pathways and Snail expression. Moreover, propolis pretreatment may prevent the TGF-β1-induced down-regulation of nuclear hormone receptors and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) protein in A549 cells, whose effect was blocked by adding PPARγ antagonist, GW9662. Two active components of propolis, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and pinocembrin (PIN), only had partial effects on TGF-β1-induced EMT in A549 cells. The results of this study suggest that natural propolis extracts may prevent TGF-β1-induced EMT in immortalized type II AECs via multiple inhibitory pathways, which may be clinically applied in the prevention and/or treatment of EMT-related fibrotic diseases as well as airway remodeling in chronic asthma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Malnutrition causes a reduction in alveolar epithelial sodium and chloride transport which predisposes to death from lung injury.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Michael

    2007-01-01

    All forms of malnutrition have been associated with increased severity of pneumonia, an increased pneumonia associated mortality and an increased risk of pulmonary fluid overload. Malnutrition was found to be associated with increased sweat sodium and chloride concentrations. A reduction of systemic sodium and chloride transport reflected in sweat sodium and chloride levels has been linked to increased severity of pulmonary edema in children with septicemia. Malnutrition causes a reduction in alveolar epithelial sodium and chloride transport which predisposes to death from lung injury. SUPPORTING EVIDENCE FOR THE HYPOTHESIS: Malnutrition caused reduced pulmonary fluid clearance in the rat model. Amiloride insensitive pulmonary fluid clearance in malnourished rats was reduced. The reduction in fluid clearance was reversible by beta agonists which increases epithelial sodium and chloride transport. Reduction of alveolar ion and fluid transport capacity explains the predisposition to death from pulmonary edema associated with intravenous fluids and blood transfusions in inpatients with malnutrition. Reduced alveolar epithelial ion transport impairs absorption of intra-alveolar inflammatory exudate in pneumonia leading to a increased severity of respiratory compromise and increased mortality. MEANS TO TEST THE HYPOTHESIS: Nasal potential difference measurements could compare airway epithelial sodium and chloride transport in patients with and without malnutrition and malnutrition associated lung disease. Sweat sodium and chloride concentrations could be compared in patients with and without respiratory disease associated with malnutrition and correlated with the severity of respiratory compromise.

  18. Febrile-Range Hyperthermia Augments Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Lung Injury by a Mechanism of Enhanced Alveolar Epithelial Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lipke, Anne B.; Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Herrero, Raquel; Kurahashi, Kiyoyasu; Wong, Venus A.; Mongovin, Stephen M.; Martin, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Fever is common in critically ill patients and is associated with worse clinical outcomes, including increased intensive care unit mortality. In animal models, febrile-range hyperthermia (FRH) worsens acute lung injury, but the mechanisms by which this occurs remain uncertain. We hypothesized that FRH augments the response of the alveolar epithelium to TNF-α receptor family signaling. We found that FRH augmented LPS-induced lung injury and increased LPS-induced mortality in mice. At 24 h, animals exposed to hyperthermia and LPS had significant increases in alveolar permeability without changes in inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or lung tissue as compared with animals exposed to LPS alone. The increase in alveolar permeability was associated with an increase in alveolar epithelial apoptosis and was attenuated by caspase inhibition with zVAD.fmk. At 48 h, the animals exposed to hyperthermia and LPS had an enhanced lung inflammatory response. In murine lung epithelial cell lines (MLE-15, LA-4) and in primary type II alveolar epithelial cells, FRH enhanced apoptosis in response to TNF-α but not Fas ligand. The increase in apoptosis was caspase-8 dependent and associated with suppression of NF-κB activity. The FRH-associated NF-κB suppression was not associated with persistence of IκB-α, suggesting that FRH-mediated suppression of NF-κB occurs by means other than alteration of IκB-α kinetics. These data show for the first time that FRH promotes lung injury in part by increasing lung epithelial apoptosis. The enhanced apoptotic response might relate to FRH-mediated suppression of NF-κB activity in the alveolar epithelium with a resultant increase in susceptibility to TNF-α–mediated cell death. PMID:20200273

  19. Distribution characteristics of grepafloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, in lung epithelial lining fluid and alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Yoshiharu; Sun, Jin; Tauchi, Yoshihiko; Sakai, Shigeko; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution of Grepafloxacin (GPFX), a new quinolone antimicrobial agent, in the lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and the alveolar macrophage (AM) in rats, which are potential infection sites in respiratory tract infections. We also aimed to clarify the mechanism governing the transferability of GPFX into the alveolus compartment from a kinetic point of view. The AUC ratios of ELF/plasma and AM/plasma after the oral administration of GPFX were 5.69 +/- 1.00 and 352 +/- 57, respectively, which were several-fold greater than those of ciprofloxacin (CPFX). Pharmacokinetic analyses of time profiles of GPFX concentrations in ELF and AM revealed that the influx clearance from plasma to ELF across the alveolar barrier is 5-fold greater than the efflux clearance from ELF. In addition, the permeability of GPFX across the cultured AM cell membrane was 7-fold and 11-fold greater than that of levofloxacin (LVFX) and CPFX, respectively. The extent of intracellular binding to AM cells (expressed as a constant (alpha)) was the greatest for GPFX, followed by CPFX and LVFX. There was a significant correlation between the alpha value and the partitioning to the immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) column, which consists of phospholipid residues covalently bound to silica. These results suggest that GPFX is highly distributed in ELF and AM, and that the high transferability of GPFX into ELF may be attributable to the existence of asymmetrical transport across the alveolar barrier. In addition, it was suggested that both rapid permeability across the AM cell membrane and avid binding to the membrane phospholipids may be responsible for the high accumulation of GPFX in AM.

  20. Combinations of differentiation markers distinguish subpopulations of alveolar epithelial cells in adult lung

    PubMed Central

    Marconett, Crystal N.; Juul, Nicholas; Wang, Hongjun; Liu, Yixin; Flodby, Per; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.; Minoo, Parviz

    2015-01-01

    Distal lung epithelium is maintained by proliferation of alveolar type II (AT2) cells and, for some daughter AT2 cells, transdifferentiation into alveolar type I (AT1) cells. We investigated if subpopulations of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) exist that represent various stages in transdifferentiation from AT2 to AT1 cell phenotypes in normal adult lung and if they can be identified using combinations of cell-specific markers. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that, in distal rat and mouse lungs, ∼20–30% of NKX2.1+ (or thyroid transcription factor 1+) cells did not colocalize with pro-surfactant protein C (pro-SP-C), a highly specific AT2 cell marker. In distal rat lung, NKX2.1+ cells coexpressed either pro-SP-C or the AT1 cell marker homeodomain only protein x (HOPX). Not all HOPX+ cells colocalize with the AT1 cell marker aquaporin 5 (AQP5), and some AQP5+ cells were NKX2.1+. HOPX was expressed earlier than AQP5 during transdifferentiation in rat AEC primary culture, with robust expression of both by day 7. We speculate that NKX2.1 and pro-SP-C colocalize in AT2 cells, NKX2.1 and HOPX or AQP5 colocalize in intermediate or transitional cells, and HOPX and AQP5 are expressed without NKX2.1 in AT1 cells. These findings suggest marked heterogeneity among cells previously identified as exclusively AT1 or AT2 cells, implying the presence of subpopulations of intermediate or transitional AEC in normal adult lung. PMID:26545903

  1. Influenza Virus Infects Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells of the Distal Lung: Impact on Fgfr2b-Driven Epithelial Repair

    PubMed Central

    Quantius, Jennifer; Schmoldt, Carole; Vazquez-Armendariz, Ana I.; Becker, Christin; El Agha, Elie; Wilhelm, Jochen; Morty, Rory E.; Vadász, István; Mayer, Konstantin; Gattenloehner, Stefan; Fink, Ludger; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Li, Xiaokun; Seeger, Werner; Lohmeyer, Juergen; Bellusci, Saverio; Herold, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Influenza Virus (IV) pneumonia is associated with severe damage of the lung epithelium and respiratory failure. Apart from efficient host defense, structural repair of the injured epithelium is crucial for survival of severe pneumonia. The molecular mechanisms underlying stem/progenitor cell mediated regenerative responses are not well characterized. In particular, the impact of IV infection on lung stem cells and their regenerative responses remains elusive. Our study demonstrates that a highly pathogenic IV infects various cell populations in the murine lung, but displays a strong tropism to an epithelial cell subset with high proliferative capacity, defined by the signature EpCamhighCD24lowintegrin(α6)high. This cell fraction expressed the stem cell antigen-1, highly enriched lung stem/progenitor cells previously characterized by the signature integrin(β4)+CD200+, and upregulated the p63/krt5 regeneration program after IV-induced injury. Using 3-dimensional organoid cultures derived from these epithelial stem/progenitor cells (EpiSPC), and in vivo infection models including transgenic mice, we reveal that their expansion, barrier renewal and outcome after IV-induced injury critically depended on Fgfr2b signaling. Importantly, IV infected EpiSPC exhibited severely impaired renewal capacity due to IV-induced blockade of β-catenin-dependent Fgfr2b signaling, evidenced by loss of alveolar tissue repair capacity after intrapulmonary EpiSPC transplantation in vivo. Intratracheal application of exogenous Fgf10, however, resulted in increased engagement of non-infected EpiSPC for tissue regeneration, demonstrated by improved proliferative potential, restoration of alveolar barrier function and increased survival following IV pneumonia. Together, these data suggest that tropism of IV to distal lung stem cell niches represents an important factor of pathogenicity and highlight impaired Fgfr2b signaling as underlying mechanism. Furthermore, increase of alveolar Fgf10

  2. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER INDUCES ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELL CYCLE ARREST: ROLE OF G1 CYCLINS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingmei; Ghio, Andrew J.; Gao, Mingxing; Wei, Ke; Rosen, Glenn D.; Upadhyay, Daya

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that the ambient air pollution particles (PM) induce cell cycle arrest in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Exposure of PM (25μg/cm2) to AEC induced cells cycle arrest in G1 phase, inhibited DNA synthesis, blocked cell proliferation and caused decrease in cyclin E, A, D1 and Cyclin E- cyclin-dependent kinase(CDK)-2 kinase activity after 4h. PM induced upregulation of CDK inhibitor, p21 protein and p21 activity in AEC. SiRNAp21 blocked PM–induced downregulation of cyclins and AEC G1 arrest. Accordingly, we provide the evidence that PM induces AEC G1 arrest by altered regulation of G1 cyclins and CDKs. PMID:17977533

  3. Ambient particulate matter induces alveolar epithelial cell cycle arrest: role of G1 cyclins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingmei; Ghio, Andrew J; Gao, Mingxing; Wei, Ke; Rosen, Glenn D; Upadhyay, Daya

    2007-11-13

    We hypothesized that the ambient air pollution particles (particulate matter; PM) induce cell cycle arrest in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Exposure of PM (25microg/cm(2)) to AEC induced cells cycle arrest in G1 phase, inhibited DNA synthesis, blocked cell proliferation and caused decrease in cyclin E, A, D1 and Cyclin E- cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-2 kinase activity after 4h. PM induced upregulation of CDK inhibitor, p21 protein and p21 activity in AEC. SiRNAp21 blocked PM-induced downregulation of cyclins and AEC G1 arrest. Accordingly, we provide the evidence that PM induces AEC G1 arrest by altered regulation of G1 cyclins and CDKs.

  4. Proteolysis of synaptobrevin, syntaxin, and SNAP-25 in alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, U J; Malek, S K; Liu, L; Li, H L

    1999-10-01

    Synaptobrevin-2, syntaxin-1, and SNAP-25 were identified in rat alveolar epithelial type II cells by Western blot analysis. Synaptobrevin-2 was localized in the lamellar bodies, and syntaxin-1 and SNAP-25 were found in 0.4% Nonidet P40-soluble and -insoluble fractions, respectively, of the type II cells. When the isolated type II cells were stimulated for secretion with calcium ionophore A23187 or with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, these proteins were found to have been proteolyzed. Preincubation of cells with calpain inhibitor II (N-acetylleucylleucylmethionine), however, prevented the proteolysis. Treatment of the cell lysate with exogenous calpain resulted in a time-dependent decrease of these proteins. The data suggest that synaptobrevin, syntaxin, and SNAP-25 are subject to proteolytic modification by activated calpain in intact type II cells stimulated for secretion.

  5. SPC-Cre-ERT2 Transgenic Mouse for Temporal Gene Deletion in Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Yao-Song; Wang, Lianmei; Tian, Xinlun; Feng, Ruie; Ma, Aiping; Cai, Baiqiang; Zhang, Hongbing; Xu, Kai-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Although several Cre-loxP-based gene knockout mouse models have been generated for the study of gene function in alveolar epithelia in the lung, their applications are still limited. In this study, we developed a SPC-Cre-ERT2 mouse model, in which a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase (Cre-ERT2) is under the control of the human surfactant protein C (SPC) promoter. The specificity and efficiency of Cre-ERT2 activity was first evaluated by crossing SPC-Cre-ERT2 mouse with ROSA26R mouse, a β-galactosidase reporter strain. We found that Cre-ERT2 was expressed in 30.7% type II alveolar epithelial cells of SPC-Cre-ERT2/ROSA26R mouse lung tissues in the presence of tamoxifen. We then tested the tamoxifen-inducible recombinase activity of Cre-ERT2 in a mouse strain bearing TSC1 conditional knockout alleles (TSC1fx/fx). TSC1 deletion was detected in the lungs of tamoxifen treated SPC-Cre-ERT2/TSC1fx/fx mice. Therefore this SPC-Cre-ERT2 mouse model may be a valuable tool to investigate functions of genes in lung development, physiology and disease. PMID:23049940

  6. SPC-Cre-ERT2 transgenic mouse for temporal gene deletion in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gui, Yao-Song; Wang, Lianmei; Tian, Xinlun; Feng, Ruie; Ma, Aiping; Cai, Baiqiang; Zhang, Hongbing; Xu, Kai-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Although several Cre-loxP-based gene knockout mouse models have been generated for the study of gene function in alveolar epithelia in the lung, their applications are still limited. In this study, we developed a SPC-Cre-ER(T2) mouse model, in which a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase (Cre-ER(T2)) is under the control of the human surfactant protein C (SPC) promoter. The specificity and efficiency of Cre-ER(T2) activity was first evaluated by crossing SPC-Cre-ER(T2) mouse with ROSA26R mouse, a β-galactosidase reporter strain. We found that Cre-ER(T2) was expressed in 30.7% type II alveolar epithelial cells of SPC-Cre-ER(T2)/ROSA26R mouse lung tissues in the presence of tamoxifen. We then tested the tamoxifen-inducible recombinase activity of Cre-ER(T2) in a mouse strain bearing TSC1 conditional knockout alleles (TSC1(fx/fx)). TSC1 deletion was detected in the lungs of tamoxifen treated SPC-Cre-ER(T2)/TSC1(fx/fx) mice. Therefore this SPC-Cre-ER(T2) mouse model may be a valuable tool to investigate functions of genes in lung development, physiology and disease.

  7. Oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Wallaert, B; Aerts, C; Gressier, B; Gosset, P; Voisin, C

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of guinea pig alveolar epithelial type II cells to generate significant amounts of reactive oxygen species to inactivate alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI). Inactivation of alpha 1-PI was evaluated by its inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic elastase and was expressed as a percentage. The same experiments were performed in parallel with alveolar macrophages (AM) obtained from the same animals and with MRC-5 fibroblasts. Both type II cells and AM released significant amounts of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, whereas the fibroblasts did not. Unstimulated type II cells (0.5 +/- 2%), AM (1.2 +/- 1.5%), and fibroblasts (0.5 +/- 0.5%) were unable to inactivate alpha 1-PI. Addition of phorbol myristate acetate did not increase their ability to inactivate alpha 1-PI. In contrast, type II cells (79.7 +/- 7%) and AM (80.1 +/- 8%) dramatically inactivated alpha 1-PI in the presence of myeloperoxidase (25 mU/ml), whereas fibroblasts did not. Addition of catalase to the reaction significantly prevented the inactivation of alpha 1-PI. Western blot analysis of alpha 1-PI did not reveal a significant proteolysis of alpha 1-PI, which supports the hypothesis that, in the presence of neutrophil-derived myeloperoxidase, type II cells may oxidatively inactivate alpha 1-PI.

  8. Sustained distribution of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in epithelial lining fluids on alveolar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Keita; Togami, Kohei; Yamamoto, Eri; Wang, Shujun; Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Itagaki, Shirou; Chono, Sumio

    2016-10-01

    The distribution characteristics of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were examined in rats, and the ensuing mechanisms were investigated in the in vitro uptake and protein adsorption experiments. Nonmodified or PEGylated liposomes (particle size 100 nm) were aerosolized into rat lungs. PEGylated liposomes were distributed more sustainably in ELFs than nonmodified liposomes. Furthermore, the uptake of PEGylated liposomes by alveolar macrophages (AMs) was less than that of nonmodified liposomes. In further in vitro uptake experiments, nonmodified and PEGylated liposomes were opsonized with rat ELF components and then added to NR8383 cells as cultured rat AMs. The uptake of opsonized PEGylated liposomes by NR8383 cells was lower than that of opsonized nonmodified liposomes. Moreover, the protein absorption levels in opsonized PEGylated liposomes were lower than those in opsonized nonmodified liposomes. These findings suggest that sustained distributions of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in ELFs reflect evasion of liposomal opsonization with surfactant proteins and consequent reductions in uptake by AMs. These data indicate the potential of PEGylated liposomes as aerosol-based drug delivery system that target ELF for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

  9. Isolation and characterization of alveolar epithelial type II cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huanhuan; Quan, Yuan; Yan, Qing; Peng, Xinmiao; Mao, Zhengmei; Wetsel, Rick A; Wang, Dachun

    2014-06-01

    The use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to regenerate distal lung epithelia damaged by injuries or diseases requires development of safe and efficient methodologies that direct ESC differentiation into transplantable distal lung epithelial progenitors. Time-consuming culture procedure and low differentiation efficiency are major problems that are associated with conventional differentiation approaches via embryoid body formation. The use of a growth factor cocktail or a lung-specific cell-conditioned medium to enrich definitive endoderm for efficient differentiation of mouse ESCs (mESC) into alveolar epithelial progenitor type II cells (ATIICs) has been reported, but not yet successful for generating a homogenous population of ATIICs for tissue regeneration purpose, and it remains unclear whether or not those mESC-derived ATIICs possess normal biological functions. Here, we report a novel method using a genetically modified mESC line harboring an ATIIC-specific neomycin(R) transgene in Rosa 26 locus. We showed that ATIICs can be efficiently differentiated from mESCs as early as day 7 by culturing them directly on Matrigel-coated plates in DMEM containing 15% knockout serum replacement. With this culture condition, the genetically modified mESCs can be selectively differentiated into a homogenous population (>99%) of ATIICs. Importantly, the mESC-derived ATIICs (mESC-ATIICs) exhibited typical lamellar bodies and expressed surfactant protein A, B, and C as normal control ATIICs. When cultured with an air-liquid-interface culture system in Small Airway Epithelial Cell Growth Medium, the mESC-ATIICs can be induced to secrete surfactant proteins after being treated with dibutyryl cAMP+dexamethasone. These mESC-ATIICs can synthesize and secrete surfactant lipid in response to secretagogue, demonstrating active surfactant metabolism in mESC-ATIICs as that seen in normal control ATIICs. In addition, we demonstrated that the selected mESC-ATIICs can be maintained on Matrigel

  10. Male Sex is Associated with a Reduced Alveolar Epithelial Sodium Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kaltofen, Till; Haase, Melanie; Thome, Ulrich H.; Laube, Mandy

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the most frequent pulmonary complication in preterm infants. RDS incidence differs between genders, which has been called the male disadvantage. Besides maturation of the surfactant system, Na+ transport driven alveolar fluid clearance is crucial for the prevention of RDS. Na+ transport is mediated by the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and the Na,K-ATPase, therefore potential differences in their expression or activity possibly contribute to the gender imbalance observed in RDS. Fetal distal lung epithelial (FDLE) cells of rat fetuses were separated by sex and analyzed regarding expression and activity of the Na+ transporters. Ussing chamber experiments showed a higher baseline short-circuit current (ISC) and amiloride-sensitive ΔISC in FDLE cells of female origin. In addition, maximal amiloride-sensitive ΔISC and maximal ouabain-sensitive ΔISC of female cells were higher when measured in the presence of a permeabilized basolateral or apical membrane, respectively. The number of FDLE cells per fetus recoverable during cell isolation was also significantly higher in females. In addition, lung wet-to-dry weight ratio was lower in fetal and newborn female pups. Female derived FDLE cells had higher mRNA levels of the ENaC- and Na,K-ATPase subunits. Furthermore, estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) mRNA levels were higher in female cells, which might render female cells more responsive, while concentrations of placenta-derived sex steroids do not differ between both genders during fetal life. Inhibition of ER-β abolished the sex differences in Na+ transport and female cells were more responsive to estradiol stimulation. In conclusion, a higher alveolar Na+ transport, possibly attributable to a higher expression of hormone receptors in female FDLE cells, provides an explanation for the well known sex-related difference in RDS occurrence and outcome. PMID:26291531

  11. Mechanisms of EGF-induced stimulation of sodium reabsorption by alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Danto, S I; Borok, Z; Zhang, X L; Lopez, M Z; Patel, P; Crandall, E D; Lubman, R L

    1998-07-01

    We investigated the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on active Na+ absorption by alveolar epithelium. Rat alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) were isolated and cultivated in serum-free medium on tissue culture-treated polycarbonate filters. mRNA for rat epithelial Na+ channel (rENaC) alpha-, beta-, and gamma-subunits and Na+ pump alpha1- and beta1-subunits were detected in day 4 monolayers by Northern analysis and were unchanged in abundance in day 5 monolayers in the absence of EGF. Monolayers cultivated in the presence of EGF (20 ng/ml) for 24 h from day 4 to day 5 showed an increase in both alpha1 and beta1 Na+ pump subunit mRNA but no increase in rENaC subunit mRNA. EGF-treated monolayers showed parallel increases in Na+ pump alpha1- and beta1-subunit protein by immunoblot relative to untreated monolayers. Fixed AEC monolayers demonstrated predominantly membrane-associated immunofluorescent labeling with anti-Na+ pump alpha1- and beta1-subunit antibodies, with increased intensity of cell labeling for both subunits seen at 24 h following exposure to EGF. These changes in Na+ pump mRNA and protein preceded a delayed (>12 h) increase in short-current circuit (measure of active transepithelial Na+ transport) across monolayers treated with EGF compared with untreated monolayers. We conclude that EGF increases active Na+ resorption across AEC monolayers primarily via direct effects on Na+ pump subunit mRNA expression and protein synthesis, leading to increased numbers of functional Na+ pumps in the basolateral membranes.

  12. Effect of cigarette smoke and dexamethasone on Hsp72 system of alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gál, Krisztina; Cseh, Aron; Szalay, Balázs; Rusai, Krisztina; Vannay, Adám; Lukácsovits, József; Heemann, Uwe; Szabó, Attila J; Losonczy, György; Tamási, Lilla; Müller, Veronika

    2011-07-01

    Smoking is the leading risk factor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. Corticosteroids are abundantly used in these patients; however, the interaction of smoking and steroid treatment is not fully understood. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) play a central role in the maintenance of cell integrity, apoptosis and cellular steroid action. To better understand cigarette smoke-steroid interaction, we examined the effect of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and/or dexamethasone (DEX) on changes of intracellular heat shock protein-72 (Hsp72) in lung cells. Alveolar epithelial cells (A549) were exposed to increasing doses (0; 0.1; 1; and 10 μM/μl) of DEX in the medium in the absence(C) and presence of CSE. Apoptosis, necrosis, Hsp72 messenger-ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein expression of cells were measured, and the role of Hsp72 on steroid effect examined. CSE reduced the number of viable cells by significantly increasing the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells. DEX dose-dependently decreased the ratio of apoptosis when CSE was administered, without change in necrosis. CSE - DEX co-treatment dose-dependently increased Hsp72 mRNA and protein expression, with the highest level measured in CSE + DEX (10) cells, while significantly lower levels were noted in all respective C groups. Pretreatment with Hsp72 silencing RNA confirmed that increased survival observed following DEX administration in CSE-treated cells was mainly mediated via the Hsp72 system. CSE significantly decreases cell survival by inducing apoptosis and necrosis. DEX significantly increases Hsp72 mRNA and protein expression only in the presence of CSE resulting in increased cellular protection and survival. DEX exerts its cell protective effects by decreasing apoptotic cell death via the Hsp72 system in CSE-treated alveolar epithelial cells.

  13. Asbestos causes apoptosis in alveolar epithelial cells: role of iron-induced free radicals.

    PubMed

    Aljandali, A; Pollack, H; Yeldandi, A; Li, Y; Weitzman, S A; Kamp, D W

    2001-05-01

    Asbestos causes asbestosis and malignancies by mechanisms that are not fully understood. Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) injury by iron-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one important mechanism. To determine whether asbestos causes apoptosis in AECs, we exposed WI-26 (human type I-like cells), A549 (human type II-like cells), and rat alveolar type II cells to amosite asbestos and assessed apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine-5'-triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, nuclear morphology, annexin V staining, DNA nucleosome formation, and caspase 3 activation. In contrast to control medium and TiO2, amosite asbestos and H2O2 each caused AEC apoptosis. A role for iron-catalyzed ROS was suggested by the finding that asbestos-induced AEC apoptosis and caspase 3 activation were each attenuated by either an iron chelator (phytic acid and deferoxamine) or a.OH scavenger (dimethyl-thiourea, salicylate, and sodium benzoate) but not by iron-loaded phytic acid. To determine whether asbestos causes apoptosis in vivo, rats received a single intratracheal instillation of amosite (5 mg) or normal saline solution, and apoptosis in epithelial cells in the bronchoalveolar duct regions was assessed by TUNEL staining. One week after exposure, amosite asbestos caused a 3-fold increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells in the bronchoalveolar duct regions as compared with control (control, 2.1% +/- 0.35%; asbestos, 7.61% +/- 0.15%; n = 3). However, by 4 weeks the number of apoptotic cells was similar to control. We conclude that asbestos-induced pulmonary toxicity may partly be caused by apoptosis in the lung epithelium that is mediated by iron-catalyzed ROS and caspase 3 activation.

  14. Influenza induces IL-8 and GM-CSF secretion by human alveolar epithelial cells through HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Correll, Kelly; Zemans, Rachel L.; Leslie, Christina C.; Murphy, Robert C.; Mason, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The most severe complication of influenza is viral pneumonia, which can lead to the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) are the first cells that influenza virus encounters upon entering the alveolus. Infected epithelial cells produce cytokines that attract and activate neutrophils and macrophages, which in turn induce damage to the epithelial-endothelial barrier. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α)/epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are well known to regulate repair of damaged alveolar epithelium by stimulating cell migration and proliferation. Recently, TGF-α/EGFR signaling has also been shown to regulate innate immune responses in bronchial epithelial cells. However, little is known about whether HGF/c-Met signaling alters the innate immune responses and whether the innate immune responses in AECs are regulated by HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR. We hypothesized that HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR would regulate innate immune responses to influenza A virus infection in human AECs. We found that recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) and rhTGF-α stimulated primary human AECs to secrete IL-8 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) strongly and IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 moderately. Influenza infection stimulated the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF by AECs plated on rat-tail collagen through EGFR activation likely by TGF-α released from AECs and through c-Met activated by HGF secreted from lung fibroblasts. HGF secretion by fibroblasts was stimulated by AEC production of prostaglandin E2 during influenza infection. We conclude that HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR signaling enhances the innate immune responses by human AECs during influenza infections. PMID:26033355

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Conditioned Medium Promotes Proliferation and Migration of Alveolar Epithelial Cells under Septic Conditions In Vitro via the JNK-P38 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Li, Yanqin; Hao, Haojie; Li, Chonghui; Du, Yu; Hu, Ye; Li, Jian; Liang, Zhixin; Li, Chunsun; Liu, Jiejie; Chen, Liangan

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) based therapies may be useful for treating acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. We investigated the impact of human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived MSC (hUC-MSC) secreted factors on alveolar epithelial cells under septic conditions and determined the relevant intracellular signaling pathways. Human alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) and primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) were subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without the presence of hUC-MSC-conditioned medium (CM). Proliferation and migration of AEC and SAEC were determined via an MTT assay, a wound healing assay and a transwell migration assay (only for AEC). Protein phosphorylation was determined by western blot and the experiments were repeated in presence of small-molecule inhibitors. The hMSC-secretory proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry. MSC-CM enhanced proliferation and migration. Activation of JNK and P38, but not ERK, was required for the proliferation and migration of AEC and SAEC. Pretreatment of AEC or SAEC with SP600125, an inhibitor of JNK1 or SB200358, an inhibitor of P38, significantly reduced cell proliferation and migration. An array of proteins including TGF-beta receptor type-1, TGF-beta receptor type-2, Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 2 which influencing the proliferation and migration of AEC and SAEC were detected in MSC-CM. Our data suggest MSC promote epithelial cell repair through releasing a repertoire of paracrine factors via activation of JNK and P38 MAPK. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Influenza induces IL-8 and GM-CSF secretion by human alveolar epithelial cells through HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoko; Correll, Kelly; Zemans, Rachel L; Leslie, Christina C; Murphy, Robert C; Mason, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    The most severe complication of influenza is viral pneumonia, which can lead to the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) are the first cells that influenza virus encounters upon entering the alveolus. Infected epithelial cells produce cytokines that attract and activate neutrophils and macrophages, which in turn induce damage to the epithelial-endothelial barrier. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α)/epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are well known to regulate repair of damaged alveolar epithelium by stimulating cell migration and proliferation. Recently, TGF-α/EGFR signaling has also been shown to regulate innate immune responses in bronchial epithelial cells. However, little is known about whether HGF/c-Met signaling alters the innate immune responses and whether the innate immune responses in AECs are regulated by HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR. We hypothesized that HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR would regulate innate immune responses to influenza A virus infection in human AECs. We found that recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) and rhTGF-α stimulated primary human AECs to secrete IL-8 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) strongly and IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 moderately. Influenza infection stimulated the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF by AECs plated on rat-tail collagen through EGFR activation likely by TGF-α released from AECs and through c-Met activated by HGF secreted from lung fibroblasts. HGF secretion by fibroblasts was stimulated by AEC production of prostaglandin E2 during influenza infection. We conclude that HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR signaling enhances the innate immune responses by human AECs during influenza infections.

  17. Effects of PPAR gamma ligands on TGF-beta1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiahui; Dagher, Hayat; Hutton, Craig A; Bourke, Jane E

    2010-02-23

    Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1)-mediated epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) may contribute to lung fibrosis. Since PPAR gamma ligands have been shown to inhibit fibroblast activation by TGF-beta1, we assessed the ability of the thiazolidinediones rosiglitazone (RGZ) and ciglitazone (CGZ) to regulate TGF-beta1-mediated EMT of A549 cells, assessing changes in cell morphology, and expression of cell adhesion molecules E-cadherin (epithelial cell marker) and N-cadherin (mesenchymal cell marker), and collagen 1 alpha 1 (COL1A1), CTGF and MMP-2 mRNA. Serum-deprived A549 cells (human AEC cell line) were pre-incubated with RGZ and CGZ (1 - 30 microM) in the absence or presence of the PPAR gamma antagonist GW9662 (10 microM) before TGFbeta-1 (0.075-7.5 ng/ml) treatment for up to 72 hrs. Changes in E-cadherin, N-cadherin and phosphorylated Smad2 and Smad3 levels were analysed by Western blot, and changes in mRNA levels including COL1A1 assessed by RT-PCR. TGFbeta-1 (2.5 ng/ml)-induced reductions in E-cadherin expression were associated with a loss of epithelial morphology and cell-cell contact. Concomitant increases in N-cadherin, MMP-2, CTGF and COL1A1 were evident in predominantly elongated fibroblast-like cells. Neither RGZ nor CGZ prevented TGF beta 1-induced changes in cell morphology, and PPAR gamma-dependent inhibitory effects of both ligands on changes in E-cadherin were only evident at submaximal TGF-beta1 (0.25 ng/ml). However, both RGZ and CGZ inhibited the marked elevation of N-cadherin and COL1A1 induced by TGF-beta1 (2.5 ng/ml), with effects on COL1A1 prevented by GW9662. Phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 by TGF-beta1 was not inhibited by RGZ or CGZ. RGZ and CGZ inhibited profibrotic changes in TGF-beta1-stimulated A549 cells independently of inhibition of Smad phosphorylation. Their inhibitory effects on changes in collagen I and E-cadherin, but not N-cadherin or CTGF, appeared to be PPAR gamma

  18. Cigarette smoke augments asbestos-induced alveolar epithelial cell injury: role of free radicals.

    PubMed

    Kamp, D W; Greenberger, M J; Sbalchierro, J S; Preusen, S E; Weitzman, S A

    1998-10-01

    Cigarette smoke augments asbestos-induced bronchogenic carcinoma by mechanisms that are not established. Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) injury due to oxidant-induced DNA damage and depletion of glutathione (GSH) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) may be one important mechanism. We previously showed that amosite asbestos-induces hydroxyl radical production and DNA damage to cultured AEC and that phytic acid, an iron chelator, is protective. We hypothesized that whole cigarette smoke extracts (CSE) augment amosite asbestos-induced AEC injury by generating iron-induced free radicals that damage DNA and reduce cellular GSH and ATP levels. Asbestos or CSE each caused dose-dependent toxicity to AEC (WI-26 and rat alveolar type I-like cells) as assessed by 51chromium release. The combination of asbestos (5 microg/cm2) and CSE (0.O1-0.1%) caused synergistic injury whereas higher doses of each agent primarily had an additive toxic effect. Asbestos (5 microg/cm2) augmented CSE-induced (0.01-1.0%) AEC DNA damage over a 4 h exposure period as assessed by an alkaline unwinding, ethidium bromide fluorometric technique. These effects were synergistic in A549 cells and additive in WI-26 cells. Asbestos (5 microg/cm2) and CSE (0.5-1.0%) reduced A549 and WI-26 cell GSH levels as assessed spectrophotometrically and ATP levels as assessed by luciferin/luciferase chemiluminescence but a synergistic interaction was not detected. Phytic acid (500 microM) and catalase (100 microg/ml) each attenuated A549 cell DNA damage and depletion of ATP caused by asbestos and CSE. However, neither agent attenuated WI-26 cell DNA damage nor the reductions in GSH levels in WI-26 and A549 cells exposed to asbestos and CSE. We conclude that CSE enhance asbestos-induced DNA damage in cultured alveolar epithelial cells. These data provide additional support that asbestos and cigarette smoke are genotoxic to relevant target cells in the lung and that iron-induced free radicals may in part cause these effects.

  19. Nanomaterial interactions with and trafficking across the lung alveolar epithelial barrier: implications for health effects of air-pollution particles

    PubMed Central

    Yacobi, Nazanin R.; Fazllolahi, Farnoosh; Kim, Yong Ho; Sipos, Arnold; Borok, Zea; Kim, Kwang-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the health effects of air-pollution particles suggest that injury may result from inhalation of airborne ultrafine particles (<100 nm in diameter). Engineered nanomaterials (<100 nm in at least one dimension) may also be harmful if inhaled. Nanomaterials deposited on the respiratory epithelial tract are thought to cross the air-blood barrier, especially via the expansive alveolar region, into the systemic circulation to reach end organs (e.g., myocardium, liver, pancreas, kidney, and spleen). Since ambient ultrafine particles are difficult to track, studies of defined engineered nanomaterials have been used to obtain valuable information on how nanomaterials interact with and traffic across the air-blood barrier of mammalian lungs. Since specific mechanistic information on how nanomaterials interact with the lung is difficult to obtain using in vivo or ex vivo lungs due to their complex anatomy, in vitro alveolar epithelial models have been of considerable value in determining nanomaterial-lung interactions. In this review, we provide information on mechanisms underlying lung alveolar epithelial injury caused by various nanomaterials and on nanomaterial trafficking across alveolar epithelium that may lead to end-organ injury. PMID:25568662

  20. Apoptosis in Macrophages and Alveolar Epithelial Cells during Early Stages of Infection by Legionella pneumophila and Its Role in Cytopathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lian-Yong; Abu Kwaik, Yousef

    1999-01-01

    The hallmark of Legionnaires’ disease is intracellular replication of Legionella pneumophila within cells in the alveolar spaces. Cytopathogenicity of this bacterium to the host cell has been well demonstrated, but the mechanisms of host cell death due to infection by L. pneumophila are not well understood. In this study, induction of apoptosis in macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells by L. pneumophila during early stages of infection was confirmed by using multiple criteria, including DNA fragmentation by agarose gel electrophoresis, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling, surface exposure of phosphatidylserine, and cellular morphology by transmission electron microscopy. Induction of nuclear apoptosis in L. pneumophila-infected macrophages is mediated by activation of the caspase cascade death machinery. We provide genetic and biochemical evidence that L. pneumophila-induced apoptosis in macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells does not require intracellular bacterial replication or new protein synthesis. In addition, extracellular L. pneumophila is capable of inducing apoptosis. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis by L. pneumophila correlates with cytopathogenicity. We conclude that L. pneumophila-induced apoptosis in macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells plays an important role in cytopathogenicity to the host cell during early stages of infection. PMID:9916101

  1. Effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase on alveolar epithelial permeability in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Azghani, A.O.; Connelly, J.C.; Peterson, B.T.; Gray, L.D.; Collins, M.L.; Johnson, A.R. )

    1990-02-01

    Elastase-deficient mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are less virulent than the wild type and are easily cleared from the lungs of guinea pigs. The effect of P. aeruginosa elastase on lung epithelium, however, is not yet understood. We addressed the hypothesis that breach of the epithelial barrier by elastase from P. aeruginosa allows invading organisms and toxic substances to penetrate the interstitium. We measured the clearance of aerosolized technetium-labeled albumin (molecular weight, 69,000) from the lungs of anesthetized guinea pigs with the aid of a gamma camera and a dedicated computer. Aerosols of the elastase (0.1 to 5 micrograms) increased the rate of clearance of labeled albumin from the lungs in proportion to the elastase dose. Electron microscopic studies using horseradish peroxidase as a tracer revealed that elastase interrupts intercellular tight junctions of the epithelial lining, thereby increasing the permeability to macromolecules. The amounts of elastase used in this report did not cause interstitial or alveolar edema, as determined by both postmortem extravascular lung water volume measurement and morphological examination. The data indicate that the elastase is a potentially important virulence factor in acute lung infection.

  2. Telomere dysfunction in alveolar epithelial cells causes lung remodeling and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Naikawadi, Ram P; Disayabutr, Supparerk; Mallavia, Benat; Donne, Matthew L; Green, Gary; La, Janet L; Rock, Jason R; Looney, Mark R; Wolters, Paul J

    2016-09-08

    Telomeres are short in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Whether dysfunctional telomeres contribute directly to development of lung fibrosis remains unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate whether telomere dysfunction in type II AECs, mediated by deletion of the telomere shelterin protein TRF1, leads to pulmonary fibrosis in mice (SPC-Cre TRF1(fl/fl) mice). Deletion of TRF1 in type II AECs for 2 weeks increased γH2AX DNA damage foci, but not histopathologic changes in the lung. Deletion of TRF1 in type II AECs for up to 9 months resulted in short telomeres and lung remodeling characterized by increased numbers of type II AECs, α-smooth muscle actin(+) mesenchymal cells, collagen deposition, and accumulation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase(+) lung epithelial cells. Deletion of TRF1 in collagen-expressing cells caused pulmonary edema, but not fibrosis. These results demonstrate that prolonged telomere dysfunction in type II AECs, but not collagen-expressing cells, leads to age-dependent lung remodeling and fibrosis. We conclude that telomere dysfunction in type II AECs is sufficient to cause lung fibrosis, and may be a dominant molecular defect causing IPF. SPC-Cre TRF1(fl/fl) mice will be useful for assessing cellular and molecular mechanisms of lung fibrosis mediated by telomere dysfunction.

  3. Telomere dysfunction in alveolar epithelial cells causes lung remodeling and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Naikawadi, Ram P.; Disayabutr, Supparerk; Mallavia, Benat; Donne, Matthew L.; Green, Gary; La, Janet L.; Rock, Jason R.; Looney, Mark R.; Wolters, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are short in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Whether dysfunctional telomeres contribute directly to development of lung fibrosis remains unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate whether telomere dysfunction in type II AECs, mediated by deletion of the telomere shelterin protein TRF1, leads to pulmonary fibrosis in mice (SPC-Cre TRF1fl/fl mice). Deletion of TRF1 in type II AECs for 2 weeks increased γH2AX DNA damage foci, but not histopathologic changes in the lung. Deletion of TRF1 in type II AECs for up to 9 months resulted in short telomeres and lung remodeling characterized by increased numbers of type II AECs, α-smooth muscle actin+ mesenchymal cells, collagen deposition, and accumulation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase+ lung epithelial cells. Deletion of TRF1 in collagen-expressing cells caused pulmonary edema, but not fibrosis. These results demonstrate that prolonged telomere dysfunction in type II AECs, but not collagen-expressing cells, leads to age-dependent lung remodeling and fibrosis. We conclude that telomere dysfunction in type II AECs is sufficient to cause lung fibrosis, and may be a dominant molecular defect causing IPF. SPC-Cre TRF1fl/fl mice will be useful for assessing cellular and molecular mechanisms of lung fibrosis mediated by telomere dysfunction. PMID:27699234

  4. Cigarette smoke inhibits alveolar repair: a mechanism for the development of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Rennard, Stephen I; Togo, Shinsaku; Holz, Olaf

    2006-11-01

    Classically, emphysema has been believed to develop when mediators of tissue injury exceed protective mechanisms within the lung. Evidence also supports the concept that tissue destruction represents a balance between tissue injury and tissue repair. In this context, cigarette smoke is directly toxic to cells within the lung and can impair the repair functions of fibroblasts, epithelial cells, and mesenchymal cells. This may occur in the absence of overt cytotoxicity and may result from alteration of selected biochemical pathways. A variety of repair functions can be affected, including chemotaxis, proliferation, production of extracellular matrix, and remodeling of extracellular matrix. Finally, cigarette smoke can damage DNA but can also compromise apoptosis. As a result, DNA repair mechanisms can be initiated, leading to recovery of cells that potentially contain somatic cell mutations. This pathway may contribute not only to the development of cancer but to the persistent abnormalities in tissue structure that characterize chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Understanding the mechanisms that mediate normal tissue repair and understanding the bases for altered tissue repair in the face of cigarette smoking offer new opportunities designed to address the structural alterations that characterize chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  5. Is bone transplantation the gold standard for repair of alveolar bone defects?

    PubMed

    Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Bueno, Daniela Franco; Almeida, Ana Beatriz; Jorgetti, Vanda; Costa, Cristiane Cabral; Gouveia, Cecília Helena; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Fanganiello, Roberto D; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2014-01-01

    New strategies to fulfill craniofacial bone defects have gained attention in recent years due to the morbidity of autologous bone graft harvesting. We aimed to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of bone tissue engineering strategy using mesenchymal stem cells associated with two matrices (bovine bone mineral and α-tricalcium phosphate), compared to an autologous bone transfer. A total of 28 adult, male, non-immunosuppressed Wistar rats underwent a critical-sized osseous defect of 5 mm diameter in the alveolar region. Animals were divided into five groups. Group 1 (n = 7) defects were repaired with autogenous bone grafts; Group 2 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral free of cells; Group 3 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral loaded with mesenchymal stem cells; Group 4 (n = 5) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate free of cells; and Group 5 (n = 6) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate loaded with mesenchymal stem cells. Groups 2-5 were compared to Group 1, the reference group. Healing response was evaluated by histomorphometry and computerized tomography. Histomorphometrically, Group 1 showed 60.27% ± 16.13% of bone in the defect. Groups 2 and 3 showed 23.02% ± 8.6% (p = 0.01) and 38.35% ± 19.59% (p = 0.06) of bone in the defect, respectively. Groups 4 and 5 showed 51.48% ± 11.7% (p = 0.30) and 61.80% ± 2.14% (p = 0.88) of bone in the defect, respectively. Animals whose bone defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate and mesenchymal stem cells presented the highest bone volume filling the defects; both were not statistically different from autogenous bone.

  6. Is bone transplantation the gold standard for repair of alveolar bone defects?

    PubMed Central

    Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Bueno, Daniela Franco; Almeida, Ana Beatriz; Jorgetti, Vanda; Costa, Cristiane Cabral; Gouveia, Cecília Helena; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Fanganiello, Roberto D; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2014-01-01

    New strategies to fulfill craniofacial bone defects have gained attention in recent years due to the morbidity of autologous bone graft harvesting. We aimed to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of bone tissue engineering strategy using mesenchymal stem cells associated with two matrices (bovine bone mineral and α-tricalcium phosphate), compared to an autologous bone transfer. A total of 28 adult, male, non-immunosuppressed Wistar rats underwent a critical-sized osseous defect of 5 mm diameter in the alveolar region. Animals were divided into five groups. Group 1 (n = 7) defects were repaired with autogenous bone grafts; Group 2 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral free of cells; Group 3 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral loaded with mesenchymal stem cells; Group 4 (n = 5) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate free of cells; and Group 5 (n = 6) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate loaded with mesenchymal stem cells. Groups 2–5 were compared to Group 1, the reference group. Healing response was evaluated by histomorphometry and computerized tomography. Histomorphometrically, Group 1 showed 60.27% ± 16.13% of bone in the defect. Groups 2 and 3 showed 23.02% ± 8.6% (p = 0.01) and 38.35% ± 19.59% (p = 0.06) of bone in the defect, respectively. Groups 4 and 5 showed 51.48% ± 11.7% (p = 0.30) and 61.80% ± 2.14% (p = 0.88) of bone in the defect, respectively. Animals whose bone defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate and mesenchymal stem cells presented the highest bone volume filling the defects; both were not statistically different from autogenous bone. PMID:24551445

  7. Lung epithelial GM-CSF improves host defense function and epithelial repair in influenza virus pneumonia-a new therapeutic strategy?

    PubMed

    Rösler, Barbara; Herold, Susanne

    2016-12-01

    Influenza viruses (IVs) circulate seasonally and are a common cause of respiratory infections in pediatric and adult patients. Additionally, recurrent pandemics cause massive morbidity and mortality worldwide. Infection may result in rapid progressive viral pneumonia with fatal outcome. Since accurate treatment strategies are still missing, research refocuses attention to lung pathology and cellular crosstalk to develop new therapeutic options.Alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) play an important role in orchestrating the pulmonary antiviral host response. After IV infection they release a cascade of immune mediators, one of which is granulocyte and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). GM-CSF is known to promote differentiation, activation and mobilization of myeloid cells. In the lung, GM-CSF drives immune functions of alveolar macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) and also improves epithelial repair processes through direct interaction with AECs. During IV infection, AEC-derived GM-CSF shows a lung-protective effect that is also present after local GM-CSF application. This mini-review provides an overview on GM-CSF-modulated immune responses to IV pneumonia and its therapeutic potential in severe IV pneumonia.

  8. Trichomonas vaginalis induces cytopathic effect on human lung alveolar basal carcinoma epithelial cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Salvador-Membreve, Daile Meek C; Jacinto, Sonia D; Rivera, Windell L

    2014-12-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, the causative agent of trichomoniasis is generally known to inhabit the genitourinary tract. However, several case reports with supporting molecular and immunological identifications have documented its occurrence in the respiratory tract of neonates and adults. In addition, the reports have documented that its occurrence is associated with respiratory failures. The medical significance or consequence of this association is unclear. Thus, to establish the possible outcome from the interaction of T. vaginalis with lung cells, the cytopathic effects of the parasites were evaluated using monolayer cultures of the human lung alveolar basal carcinoma epithelial cell line A549. The possible effect of association of T. vaginalis with A549 epithelial cells was analyzed using phase-contrast, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide), crystal-violet and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling) assays were conducted for cytotoxicity testing. The results demonstrate that T. vaginalis: (1) adheres to A549 epithelial cells, suggesting a density-dependent parasite-cell association; (2) adherence on A549 is through flagella, membrane and axostyle; (3) causes cell detachment and cytotoxicity (50-72.4%) to A549 and this effect is a function of parasite density; and (4) induces apoptosis in A549 about 20% after 6 h of incubation. These observations indicate that T. vaginalis causes cytopathic effects on A549 cell. To date, this is the first report showing a possible interaction of T. vaginalis with the lung cells using A549 monolayer cultures. Further studies are recommended to completely elucidate this association.

  9. Folliculin controls lung alveolar enlargement and epithelial cell survival through E-cadherin, LKB1, and AMPK.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Goncharov, Dmitry A; James, Melane L; Atochina-Vasserman, Elena N; Stepanova, Victoria; Hong, Seung-Beom; Li, Hua; Gonzales, Linda; Baba, Masaya; Linehan, W Marston; Gow, Andrew J; Margulies, Susan; Guttentag, Susan; Schmidt, Laura S; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2014-04-24

    Spontaneous pneumothoraces due to lung cyst rupture afflict patients with the rare disease Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, which is caused by mutations of the tumor suppressor gene folliculin (FLCN). The underlying mechanism of the lung manifestations in BHD is unclear. We show that BHD lungs exhibit increased alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis and that Flcn deletion in mouse lung epithelium leads to cell apoptosis, alveolar enlargement, and an impairment of both epithelial barrier and overall lung function. We find that Flcn-null epithelial cell apoptosis is the result of impaired AMPK activation and increased cleaved caspase-3. AMPK activator LKB1 and E-cadherin are downregulated by Flcn loss and restored by its expression. Correspondingly, Flcn-null cell survival is rescued by the AMPK activator AICAR or constitutively active AMPK. AICAR also improves lung condition of Flcn(f/f):SP-C-Cre mice. Our data suggest that lung cysts in BHD may result from an underlying defect in alveolar epithelial cell survival, attributable to FLCN regulation of the E-cadherin-LKB1-AMPK axis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Protandim does not influence alveolar epithelial permeability or intrapulmonary oxidative stress in human subjects with alcohol use disorders

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Joe M.; Bose, Swapan; Brown, Lou Ann S.; House, Robert; Moss, Marc; Gaydos, Jeanette

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs), including alcohol abuse and dependence, have been linked to the development of acute lung injury (ALI). Prior clinical investigations suggested an association between AUDs and abnormal alveolar epithelial permeability mediated through pulmonary oxidative stress that may partially explain this relationship. We sought to determine if correcting pulmonary oxidative stress in the setting of AUDs would normalize alveolar epithelial permeability in a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Protandim, a nutraceutical reported to enhance antioxidant activity. We randomized 30 otherwise healthy AUD subjects to receive directly observed inpatient oral therapy with either Protandim (1,350 mg/day) or placebo. Subjects underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and blood sampling before study drug administration and after 7 days of therapy; all AUD subjects completed the study protocol without adverse events. BAL total protein was measured at each timepoint as an indicator of alveolar epithelial permeability. In subjects with AUDs, before study drug initiation, BAL total protein values were not significantly higher than in 11 concurrently enrolled controls (P = 0.07). Over the 7-day study period, AUD subjects did not exhibit a significant change in BAL total protein, regardless of their randomization to Protandim {n = 14, −2% [intraquartile range (IQR), −56–146%]} or to placebo [n = 16, 77% (IQR −20–290%); P = 0.19]. Additionally, among those with AUDs, no significant changes in BAL oxidative stress indexes, epithelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, interleukin-1β, or interleukin-10 were observed regardless of drug type received. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, a marker of lipid peroxidation, decreased significantly over time among AUD subjects randomized to placebo (P < 0.01). These results suggest that Protandim for 7 days in individuals with AUDs who are newly abstinent does not alter alveolar

  11. Protandim does not influence alveolar epithelial permeability or intrapulmonary oxidative stress in human subjects with alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Ellen L; McCord, Joe M; Bose, Swapan; Brown, Lou Ann S; House, Robert; Moss, Marc; Gaydos, Jeanette

    2012-04-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs), including alcohol abuse and dependence, have been linked to the development of acute lung injury (ALI). Prior clinical investigations suggested an association between AUDs and abnormal alveolar epithelial permeability mediated through pulmonary oxidative stress that may partially explain this relationship. We sought to determine if correcting pulmonary oxidative stress in the setting of AUDs would normalize alveolar epithelial permeability in a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Protandim, a nutraceutical reported to enhance antioxidant activity. We randomized 30 otherwise healthy AUD subjects to receive directly observed inpatient oral therapy with either Protandim (1,350 mg/day) or placebo. Subjects underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and blood sampling before study drug administration and after 7 days of therapy; all AUD subjects completed the study protocol without adverse events. BAL total protein was measured at each timepoint as an indicator of alveolar epithelial permeability. In subjects with AUDs, before study drug initiation, BAL total protein values were not significantly higher than in 11 concurrently enrolled controls (P = 0.07). Over the 7-day study period, AUD subjects did not exhibit a significant change in BAL total protein, regardless of their randomization to Protandim {n = 14, -2% [intraquartile range (IQR), -56-146%]} or to placebo [n = 16, 77% (IQR -20-290%); P = 0.19]. Additionally, among those with AUDs, no significant changes in BAL oxidative stress indexes, epithelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, interleukin-1β, or interleukin-10 were observed regardless of drug type received. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, a marker of lipid peroxidation, decreased significantly over time among AUD subjects randomized to placebo (P < 0.01). These results suggest that Protandim for 7 days in individuals with AUDs who are newly abstinent does not alter alveolar epithelial

  12. Mitochondria-targeted Ogg1 and aconitase-2 prevent oxidant-induced mitochondrial DNA damage in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Jo; Cheresh, Paul; Williams, David; Cheng, Yuan; Ridge, Karen; Schumacker, Paul T; Weitzman, Sigmund; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Kamp, David W

    2014-02-28

    Mitochondria-targeted human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (mt-hOgg1) and aconitase-2 (Aco-2) each reduce oxidant-induced alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis, but it is unclear whether protection occurs by preventing AEC mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage. Using quantitative PCR-based measurements of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage, mtDNA damage was preferentially noted in AEC after exposure to oxidative stress (e.g. amosite asbestos (5-25 μg/cm(2)) or H2O2 (100-250 μM)) for 24 h. Overexpression of wild-type mt-hOgg1 or mt-long α/β 317-323 hOgg1 mutant incapable of DNA repair (mt-hOgg1-Mut) each blocked A549 cell oxidant-induced mtDNA damage, mitochondrial p53 translocation, and intrinsic apoptosis as assessed by DNA fragmentation and cleaved caspase-9. In contrast, compared with controls, knockdown of Ogg1 (using Ogg1 shRNA in A549 cells or primary alveolar type 2 cells from ogg1(-/-) mice) augmented mtDNA lesions and intrinsic apoptosis at base line, and these effects were increased further after exposure to oxidative stress. Notably, overexpression of Aco-2 reduced oxidant-induced mtDNA lesions, mitochondrial p53 translocation, and apoptosis, whereas siRNA for Aco-2 (siAco-2) enhanced mtDNA damage, mitochondrial p53 translocation, and apoptosis. Finally, siAco-2 attenuated the protective effects of mt-hOgg1-Mut but not wild-type mt-hOgg1 against oxidant-induced mtDNA damage and apoptosis. Collectively, these data demonstrate a novel role for mt-hOgg1 and Aco-2 in preserving AEC mtDNA integrity, thereby preventing oxidant-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, p53 mitochondrial translocation, and intrinsic apoptosis. Furthermore, mt-hOgg1 chaperoning of Aco-2 in preventing oxidant-mediated mtDNA damage and apoptosis may afford an innovative target for the molecular events underlying oxidant-induced toxicity.

  13. Asbestos-induced alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis. The role of endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    PubMed

    Kamp, David W; Liu, Gang; Cheresh, Paul; Kim, Seok-Jo; Mueller, Amanda; Lam, Anna P; Trejo, Humberto; Williams, David; Tulasiram, Sandhya; Baker, Margaret; Ridge, Karen; Chandel, Navdeep S; Beri, Rohinee

    2013-12-01

    Asbestos exposure results in pulmonary fibrosis (asbestosis) and malignancies (bronchogenic lung cancer and mesothelioma) by mechanisms that are not fully understood. Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis is important in the development of pulmonary fibrosis after exposure to an array of toxins, including asbestos. An endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response and mitochondria-regulated (intrinsic) apoptosis occur in AECs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a disease with similarities to asbestosis. Asbestos induces AEC intrinsic apoptosis, but the role of the ER is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine whether asbestos causes an AEC ER stress response that promotes apoptosis. Using human A549 and rat primary isolated alveolar type II cells, amosite asbestos fibers increased AEC mRNA and protein expression of ER stress proteins involved in the unfolded protein response, such as inositol-requiring kinase (IRE) 1 and X-box-binding protein-1, as well as ER Ca²(2+) release ,as assessed by a FURA-2 assay. Eukarion-134, a superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic, as well as overexpression of Bcl-XL in A549 cells each attenuate asbestos-induced AEC ER stress (IRE-1 and X-box-binding protein-1 protein expression; ER Ca²(2+) release) and apoptosis. Thapsigargin, a known ER stress inducer, augments AEC apoptosis, and eukarion-134 or Bcl-XL overexpression are protective. Finally, 4-phenylbutyric acid, a chemical chaperone that attenuates ER stress, blocks asbestos- and thapsigargin-induced AEC IRE-1 protein expression, but does not reduce ER Ca²(2+) release or apoptosis. These results show that asbestos triggers an AEC ER stress response and subsequent intrinsic apoptosis that is mediated in part by ER Ca²(2+) release.

  14. The mitochondria-regulated death pathway mediates asbestos-induced alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Panduri, Vijayalakshmi; Weitzman, Sigmund A; Chandel, Navdeep; Kamp, David W

    2003-02-01

    The mechanisms underlying asbestos-induced pulmonary toxicity are not fully understood. Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis by iron-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one important mechanism implicated. The two major pathways regulating apoptosis include (i) the mitochondrial death (intrinsic) pathway caused by DNA damage, and (ii) the plasma-membrane death receptor (extrinsic) pathway. However, it is unknown whether asbestos activates either death pathway in AEC. We determined whether asbestos triggers AEC mitochondrial dysfunction by exposing cells (A549 and rat alveolar type II) to amosite asbestos and assessing mitochondrial membrane potential changes (deltapsi(m)) using a fluorometric technique involving tetremethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) and mitotracker green. Unlike inert particulates (titanium dioxide and glass beads), amosite asbestos caused dose- and time-dependent reductions in deltapsi(m). Asbestos-induced deltapsi(m) was associated with the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm as well as activation of caspase 9, a mitochondrial-activated caspase. In contrast, a lower level of caspase 8, the death receptor-activated caspase, was detected in asbestos-exposed AEC. An iron chelator (phytic acid or deferoxamine) or a hydroxyl radical scavenger (sodium benzoate) each blocked asbestos-induced reductions in deltapsi(m) and caspase 9 activation, suggesting a role for iron-derived ROS. Finally, Bcl-X(L), a mitochondrial antiapoptotic protein that prevents cell death by preserving the outer mitochondrial membrane integrity, blocked asbestos-induced decreases in A549 cell deltapsi(m) and reduced apoptosis as assessed by DNA fragmentation. We conclude that asbestos-induced AEC apoptosis results from mitochondrial dysfunction, in part due to iron-derived ROS, which is followed by the release of cytochrome c and caspase 9 activation. Our findings suggest an important role for the mitochondria-regulated death pathway in the

  15. Collective epithelial migration drives kidney repair after acute injury.

    PubMed

    Palmyre, Aurélien; Lee, Jeongeun; Ryklin, Gennadiy; Camarata, Troy; Selig, Martin K; Duchemin, Anne-Laure; Nowak, Paul; Arnaout, M Amin; Drummond, Iain A; Vasilyev, Aleksandr

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and significant medical problem. Despite the kidney's remarkable regenerative capacity, the mortality rate for the AKI patients is high. Thus, there remains a need to better understand the cellular mechanisms of nephron repair in order to develop new strategies that would enhance the intrinsic ability of kidney tissue to regenerate. Here, using a novel, laser ablation-based, zebrafish model of AKI, we show that collective migration of kidney epithelial cells is a primary early response to acute injury. We also show that cell proliferation is a late response of regenerating kidney epithelia that follows cell migration during kidney repair. We propose a computational model that predicts this temporal relationship and suggests that cell stretch is a mechanical link between migration and proliferation, and present experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis. Overall, this study advances our understanding of kidney repair mechanisms by highlighting a primary role for collective cell migration, laying a foundation for new approaches to treatment of AKI.

  16. Sulfidation of silver nanowires inside human alveolar epithelial cells: a potential detoxification mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu; Goode, Angela E.; Sweeney, Sinbad; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Thorley, Andrew J.; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Chang, Yan; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Skepper, Jeremy; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Shaffer, Milo S.; Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa D.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2013-09-01

    Silver nanowires (AgNWs) are being developed for use in optoelectronics. However before widespread usage, it is crucial to determine their potential effects on human health. It is accepted that Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) exert toxic effects by releasing Ag+ ions, but much less is known about whether Ag+ reacts with compounds, or any downstream bioactive effects of transformed AgNPs. Analytical high-resolution transmission electron microscopy has been employed to elucidate cellular uptake and reactivity of AgNWs inside human alveolar epithelial type 1-like cells. AgNWs were observed in the cytoplasm and membrane-bound vesicles, and precipitation of Ag2S within the cell occurred after 1 h exposure. Cell viability studies showed no evidence of cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species were not observed on exposure of cells to AgNWs. We suggest that Ag2S formation acts as a `trap' for free Ag+, significantly limiting short-term toxicological effects - with important consequences for the safety of Ag-nanomaterials to human health.Silver nanowires (AgNWs) are being developed for use in optoelectronics. However before widespread usage, it is crucial to determine their potential effects on human health. It is accepted that Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) exert toxic effects by releasing Ag+ ions, but much less is known about whether Ag+ reacts with compounds, or any downstream bioactive effects of transformed AgNPs. Analytical high-resolution transmission electron microscopy has been employed to elucidate cellular uptake and reactivity of AgNWs inside human alveolar epithelial type 1-like cells. AgNWs were observed in the cytoplasm and membrane-bound vesicles, and precipitation of Ag2S within the cell occurred after 1 h exposure. Cell viability studies showed no evidence of cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species were not observed on exposure of cells to AgNWs. We suggest that Ag2S formation acts as a `trap' for free Ag+, significantly limiting short-term toxicological effects

  17. Autophagy protects type II alveolar epithelial cells from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xu-Guang; Ji, Tian-Xing; Xia, Yong; Ma, Yue-Yun

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► We investigated the protective effect of autophagy pathway against MTB infection. ► MTB-infected A549 cells had higher LDH release. ► Inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced the MTB-induced necrosis. ► Autophagy prevents apoptosis and promotes cell survival in infected cells. -- Abstract: This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of the autophagy signaling pathway against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in type II alveolar epithelial cells. An in vitro M. tuberculosis system was established using human A549 cells. Infection-induced changes in the expression of the autophagic marker LC3 were assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Morphological changes in autophagosomes were detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The function of the autophagy signaling pathway during infection was assessed by measuring the level of cell death and the amount of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released in the presence or absence of the inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). In addition, effects on LDH release were assessed after the siRNA-mediated knockdown of the essential autophagosomal structural membrane protein Atg5. LC3 mRNA expression was significantly reduced in M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells (16888.76 ± 1576.34 vs. uninfected: 12744.29 ± 1089.37; P < 0.05). TEM revealed M.tuberculosis bacilli-containing compartments that were surrounded by double membranes characteristic of the autophagic process. M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells released more LDH (1.45 ± 0.12 vs. uninfected: 0.45 ± 0.04; P < 0.05). The inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced M.tuberculosis-induced necrosis (3-MA: 75 ± 5% vs. untreated: 15 ± 1%; P < 0.05) and LDH release (3-MA: 2.50 ± 0.24 vs. untreated: 0.45 ± 0.04; Atg5 knockdown: 3.19 ± 0.29 vs. untreated: 1.28 ± 0.11; P < 0.05). Our results indicate that autophagy signaling pathway prevents apoptosis in type II alveolar epithelial cells

  18. Beta2-adrenergic receptor signaling mediates corneal epithelial wound repair.

    PubMed

    Ghoghawala, Shahed Y; Mannis, Mark J; Pullar, Christine E; Rosenblatt, Mark I; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2008-05-01

    Beta-adrenergic receptor (AR) antagonists are frequently prescribed ophthalmic drugs, yet previous investigations into how catecholamines affect corneal wound healing have yielded conflicting With the use of an integrated pharmacologic and genetic approach, the authors investigated how the beta-AR impacts corneal epithelial healing. Migratory rates of cultured adult murine corneal epithelial (AMCE) cells and in vivo corneal wound healing were examined in beta2-AR(+/+) and beta2-AR(-/-) mice. Signaling pathways were evaluated by immunoblotting. results. The beta-AR agonist isoproterenol decreased AMCE cell migratory speed to 70% of untreated controls, and this was correlated with a 0.60-fold decrease in levels of activated phospho-ERK (P-ERK). Treatment with the beta-AR antagonist (timolol) increased speed 33% and increased P-ERK 2.4-fold (P < 0.05). The same treatment protocols had no effect on AMCE cells derived from beta2-AR(-/-) mice; all treatment groups showed statistically equivalent migratory speeds and ERK phosphorylation. In beta2-AR(+/+) animals, the beta-AR agonist (isoproterenol) delayed the rate of in vivo corneal wound healing by 79%, whereas beta-AR antagonist (timolol) treatment increased the rate of healing by 16% (P < 0.05) compared with saline-treated controls. In contrast, in the beta2-AR(-/-) mice, all treatment groups demonstrated equivalent rates of wound healing. Additionally, murine corneal epithelial cell expressed the catecholamine-synthesizing enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase and detectable levels of epinephrine (184.5 pg/mg protein). The authors provide evidence of an endogenous autocrine catecholamine signaling pathway dependent on an intact beta2-AR for the modulation of corneal epithelial wound repair.

  19. Translocation of PEGylated quantum dots across rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Fazlollahi, Farnoosh; Sipos, Arnold; Kim, Yong Ho; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F; Borok, Zea; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Crandall, Edward D

    2011-01-01

    Background In this study, primary rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers (RAECM) were used to investigate transalveolar epithelial quantum dot trafficking rates and underlying transport mechanisms. Methods Trafficking rates of quantum dots (PEGylated CdSe/ZnS, core size 5.3 nm, hydrodynamic size 25 nm) in the apical-to-basolateral direction across RAECM were determined. Changes in bioelectric properties (ie, transmonolayer resistance and equivalent active ion transport rate) of RAECM in the presence or absence of quantum dots were measured. Involvement of endocytic pathways in quantum dot trafficking across RAECM was assessed using specific inhibitors (eg, methyl-β-cyclodextrin, chlorpromazine, and dynasore for caveolin-, clathrin-, and dynamin-mediated endocytosis, respectively). The effects of lowering tight junctional resistance on quantum dot trafficking were determined by depleting Ca2+ in apical and basolateral bathing fluids of RAECM using 2 mM EGTA. Effects of temperature on quantum dot trafficking were studied by lowering temperature from 37°C to 4°C. Results Apical exposure of RAECM to quantum dots did not elicit changes in transmonolayer resistance or ion transport rate for up to 24 hours; quantum dot trafficking rates were not surface charge-dependent; methyl-β-cyclodextrin, chlorpromazine, and dynasore did not decrease quantum dot trafficking rates; lowering of temperature decreased transmonolayer resistance by approximately 90% with a concomitant increase in quantum dot trafficking by about 80%; and 24 hours of treatment of RAECM with EGTA decreased transmonolayer resistance by about 95%, with increased quantum dot trafficking of up to approximately 130%. Conclusion These data indicate that quantum dots do not injure RAECM and that quantum dot trafficking does not appear to take place via endocytic pathways involving caveolin, clathrin, or dynamin. We conclude that quantum dot translocation across RAECM takes place via both transcellular and

  20. Translocation of PEGylated quantum dots across rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Fazlollahi, Farnoosh; Sipos, Arnold; Kim, Yong Ho; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F; Borok, Zea; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Crandall, Edward D

    2011-01-01

    In this study, primary rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers (RAECM) were used to investigate transalveolar epithelial quantum dot trafficking rates and underlying transport mechanisms. Trafficking rates of quantum dots (PEGylated CdSe/ZnS, core size 5.3 nm, hydrodynamic size 25 nm) in the apical-to-basolateral direction across RAECM were determined. Changes in bioelectric properties (ie, transmonolayer resistance and equivalent active ion transport rate) of RAECM in the presence or absence of quantum dots were measured. Involvement of endocytic pathways in quantum dot trafficking across RAECM was assessed using specific inhibitors (eg, methyl-β-cyclodextrin, chlorpromazine, and dynasore for caveolin-, clathrin-, and dynamin-mediated endocytosis, respectively). The effects of lowering tight junctional resistance on quantum dot trafficking were determined by depleting Ca(2+) in apical and basolateral bathing fluids of RAECM using 2 mM EGTA. Effects of temperature on quantum dot trafficking were studied by lowering temperature from 37°C to 4°C. Apical exposure of RAECM to quantum dots did not elicit changes in transmonolayer resistance or ion transport rate for up to 24 hours; quantum dot trafficking rates were not surface charge-dependent; methyl-β-cyclodextrin, chlorpromazine, and dynasore did not decrease quantum dot trafficking rates; lowering of temperature decreased transmonolayer resistance by approximately 90% with a concomitant increase in quantum dot trafficking by about 80%; and 24 hours of treatment of RAECM with EGTA decreased transmonolayer resistance by about 95%, with increased quantum dot trafficking of up to approximately 130%. These data indicate that quantum dots do not injure RAECM and that quantum dot trafficking does not appear to take place via endocytic pathways involving caveolin, clathrin, or dynamin. We conclude that quantum dot translocation across RAECM takes place via both transcellular and paracellular pathways and, based on

  1. Effect of P2X7 Receptor Knockout on AQP-5 Expression of Type I Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, Georg; Bläsche, Robert; Hofmann, Falk; Augstein, Antje; Kasper, Michael; Barth, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    P2X7 receptors, ATP-gated cation channels, are specifically expressed in alveolar epithelial cells. The pathophysiological function of this lung cell type, except a recently reported putative involvement in surfactant secretion, is unknown. In addition, P2X7 receptor-deficient mice show reduced inflammation and lung fibrosis after exposure with bleomycin. To elucidate the role of the P2X7 receptor in alveolar epithelial type I cells we characterized the pulmonary phenotype of P2X7 receptor knockout mice by using immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and real-time RT PCR. No pathomorphological signs of fibrosis were found. Results revealed, however, a remarkable loss of aquaporin-5 protein and mRNA in young knockout animals. Additional in vitro experiments with bleomycin treated precision cut lung slices showed a greater sensitivity of the P2X7 receptor knockout mice in terms of aquaporin-5 reduction as wild type animals. Finally, P2X7 receptor function was examined by using the alveolar epithelial cell lines E10 and MLE-12 for stimulation experiments with bleomycin. The in vitro activation of P2X7 receptor was connected with an increase of aquaporin-5, whereas the inhibition of the receptor with oxidized ATP resulted in down regulation of aquaporin-5. The early loss of aquaporin-5 which can be found in different pulmonary fibrosis models does not implicate a specific pathogenetic role during fibrogenesis. PMID:24941004

  2. Efficient protection by cationized catalase against H2O2 injury in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Takayuki; Kawakami, Shigeru; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2007-08-16

    Increasing evidence suggests that hydrogen peroxide plays an important role in alveolar epithelial injury produced during many inflammatory lung diseases. In this study, the successful prevention of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced injury in primary cultured rabbit alveolar epithelial cells by cationized catalase is described. Cationized catalase was synthesized by direct chemical modification to enhance its association with alveolar epithelial cells. Cationized catalase exhibited a 22.3-fold higher cellular association at 2 h than native catalase, and incubation of cationized catalase with the cells produced a 2.19-fold intracellular catalase activity, which suggested that cationized catalase distributed both to the cell membrane and into the cell interior. Cationized catalase markedly suppressed H(2)O(2)-induced cell injury. In addition, electron spin resonance spectrometry analysis revealed that cationized catalase effectively eliminated H(2)O(2) produced in the medium by glucose plus glucose oxidase. On the other hand, polyethylene glycol-modified catalase (PEG-catalase) did not have any protective effect against H(2)O(2)-induced cell injury although PEG-catalase exhibited a 2.49-fold higher cellular association at 2 h than native catalase. These results suggest that cationization of catalase is a promising strategy for the treatment of many of inflammatory lung diseases.

  3. Regulation of alveolar procoagulant activity and permeability in direct acute lung injury by lung epithelial tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Ciara M; Grove, Brandon S; Putz, Nathan D; Clune, Jennifer K; Lawson, William E; Carnahan, Robert H; Mackman, Nigel; Ware, Lorraine B; Bastarache, Julie A

    2015-11-01

    Tissue factor (TF) initiates the extrinsic coagulation cascade in response to tissue injury, leading to local fibrin deposition. Low levels of TF in mice are associated with increased severity of acute lung injury (ALI) after intratracheal LPS administration. However, the cellular sources of the TF required for protection from LPS-induced ALI remain unknown. In the current study, transgenic mice with cell-specific deletions of TF in the lung epithelium or myeloid cells were treated with intratracheal LPS to determine the cellular sources of TF important in direct ALI. Cell-specific deletion of TF in the lung epithelium reduced total lung TF expression to 39% of wild-type (WT) levels at baseline and to 29% of WT levels after intratracheal LPS. In contrast, there was no reduction of TF with myeloid cell TF deletion. Mice lacking myeloid cell TF did not differ from WT mice in coagulation, inflammation, permeability, or hemorrhage. However, mice lacking lung epithelial TF had increased tissue injury, impaired activation of coagulation in the airspace, disrupted alveolar permeability, and increased alveolar hemorrhage after intratracheal LPS. Deletion of epithelial TF did not affect alveolar permeability in an indirect model of ALI caused by systemic LPS infusion. These studies demonstrate that the lung epithelium is the primary source of TF in the lung, contributing 60-70% of total lung TF, and that lung epithelial, but not myeloid, TF may be protective in direct ALI.

  4. Apoptosis induced by ozone and oxysterols in human alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kosmider, Beata; Loader, Joan E.; Murphy, Robert C.; Mason, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of ozone-induced lung cell injury is poorly understood. One hypothesis is that ozone induces lipid peroxidation and that these peroxidased lipids produce oxidative stress and DNA damage. Oxysterols are lipid peroxide formed by the direct effect of ozone on pulmonary surfactant and cell membranes. We studied the effects of ozone and the oxysterol 5β,6β-epoxycholesterol (β-epoxide) and its metabolite cholestan-6-oxo-3,5-diol (6-oxo-3,5-diol) on human alveolar epithelial type I-like cells (ATI-like cells) and type II cells (ATII cells). Ozone and oxysterols induced apoptosis and cytotoxicity in ATI-like cells. They also generated reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. Ozone and β-epoxide were strong inducers of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and Fos-related antigen 1 (Fra1) protein expressions. Furthermore, we found higher sensitivity of ATI-like cells than ATII cells exposed to ozone or treated with β-epoxide or 6-oxo-3,5-diol. In general the response to the cholesterol epoxides was similar to the effect of ozone. The importance of understanding the response of human ATI-like cells and ATII cells to oxysterols may be useful for further studies, because these compounds may represent useful biomarkers in other diseases. PMID:20219673

  5. P53 mediates amosite asbestos-induced alveolar epithelial cell mitochondria-regulated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Panduri, Vijayalakshmi; Surapureddi, Sailesh; Soberanes, Saul; Weitzman, Sigmund A; Chandel, Navdeep; Kamp, David W

    2006-04-01

    Asbestos causes pulmonary toxicity in part by generating reactive oxygen species that cause DNA damage. We previously showed that the mitochondria-regulated (intrinsic) death pathway mediates alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) DNA damage and apoptosis. Because p53 regulates the DNA damage response in part by inducing intrinsic cell death, we determined whether p53-dependent transcriptional activity mediates asbestos-induced AEC mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. We show that inhibitors of p53-dependent transcriptional activation (pifithrin and type 16-E6 protein) block asbestos-induced AEC mitochondrial membrane potential change (DeltaPsim), caspase 9 activation, and apoptosis. We demonstrate that asbestos activates p53 promoter activity, mRNA levels, protein expression, and Bax and p53 mitochondrial translocation. Further, pifithrin, E6, phytic acid, or rho(0)-A549 cells (cells incapable of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production) block asbestos-induced p53 activation. Finally, we show that asbestos augments p53 expression in cells at the bronchoalveolar duct junctions of rat lungs and that phytic acid prevents this. These data suggest that p53-dependent transcription pathways mediate asbestos-induced AEC mitochondria-regulated apoptosis. This suggests an important interactive effect between p53 and the mitochondria in the pathogenesis of asbestos-induced pulmonary toxicity that may have broader implications for our understanding of pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer.

  6. Characterization of type II alveolar epithelial cells by flow cytometry and fluorescent markers.

    PubMed

    Rochat, T R; Casale, J M; Hunninghake, G W

    1988-10-01

    Type II alveolar epithelial cells play a crucial role in maintaining the structure and functions of pulmonary alveoli. A number of techniques have been described to isolate type II cells for in vitro studies; however, type II cell suspensions isolated by each technique are still contaminated by macrophages or monocytes. The present studies describe the use of flow cytometry to accurately characterize the composition of these cell suspensions. With freshly isolated type II cell suspensions, type II cells could be distinguished from macrophages and monocytes by two methods: (1) the combination of natural fluorescence and orthogonal light scatter, or (2) the use of monoclonal antibodies OX-1 (directed against a common leukocyte antigen present on rat macrophages and monocytes) and PKK-1 (directed against cytokeratin intermediate filaments present in type II cells). With cultured type II cells, the combination of natural fluorescence and orthogonal light scatter did not distinguish between type II cells and macrophages or monocytes; however, the monoclonal antibodies OX-I and PKK-1 continued to distinguish between these cell types. As an example of the use of these techniques, the methods were used to define the sequential expression of class I and II major histocompatibility antigens on both type II cells and on macrophages or monocytes in the same cell preparations. These methods are of potential value in isolating pure populations either of type II cells or of macrophages or monocytes by cell sorting and in accurately identifying the cells present in type II cell suspensions or cultures.

  7. Integrin alpha(3)-subunit expression modulates alveolar epithelial cell monolayer formation.

    PubMed

    Lubman, R L; Zhang, X L; Zheng, J; Ocampo, L; Lopez, M Z; Veeraraghavan, S; Zabski, S M; Danto, S I; Borok, Z

    2000-07-01

    We investigated expression of the alpha(3)-integrin subunit by rat alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) grown in primary culture as well as the effects of monoclonal antibodies with blocking activity against the alpha(3)-integrin subunit on AEC monolayer formation. alpha(3)-Integrin subunit mRNA and protein were detectable in AECs on day 1 and increased with time in culture. alpha(3)- and beta(1)-integrin subunits coprecipitated in immunoprecipitation experiments with alpha(3)- and beta(1)-subunit-specific antibodies, consistent with their association as the alpha(3)beta(1)-integrin receptor at the cell membrane. Treatment with blocking anti-alpha(3) monoclonal antibody from day 0 delayed development of transepithelial resistance, reduced transepithelial resistance through day 5 compared with that in untreated AECs, and resulted in large subconfluent patches in monolayers viewed by scanning electron microscopy on day 3. These data indicate that alpha(3)- and beta(1)-integrin subunits are expressed in AEC monolayers where they form the heterodimeric alpha(3)beta(1)-integrin receptor at the cell membrane. Blockade of the alpha(3)-integrin subunit inhibits formation of confluent AEC monolayers. We conclude that the alpha(3)-integrin subunit modulates formation of AEC monolayers by virtue of the key role of the alpha(3)beta(1)-integrin receptor in AEC adhesion.

  8. Protective effects of chebulic acid on alveolar epithelial damage induced by urban particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Won; Nam, Mi-Hyun; Lee, Hee-Ra; Hong, Chung-Oui; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2017-07-19

    Chebulic acid (CA) isolated from T. chebula, which has been reported for treating asthma, as a potent anti-oxidant resources. Exposure to ambient urban particulate matter (UPM) considered as a risk for cardiopulmonary vascular dysfunction. To investigate the protective effect of CA against UPM-mediated collapse of the pulmonary alveolar epithelial (PAE) cell (NCI-H441), barrier integrity parameters, and their elements were evaluated in PAE. CA was acquired from the laboratory previous reports. UPM was obtained from the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, and these were collected in St. Louis, MO, over a 24-month period and used as a standard reference. To confirm the protection of PAE barrier integrity, paracellular permeability and the junctional molecules were estimated with determination of transepithelial electrical resistance, Western Blotting, RT-PCR, and fluorescent staining. UPM aggravated the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in PAE and also decreased mRNA and protein levels of junction molecules and barrier integrity in NCI-H441. However, CA repressed the ROS in PAE, also improved barrier integrity by protecting the junctional parameters in NCI-H411. These data showed that CA resulted in decreased UPM-induced ROS formation, and the protected the integrity of the tight junctions against UPM exposure to PAE barrier.

  9. Rv3351c, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene that affects bacterial growth and alveolar epithelial cell viability.

    PubMed

    Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Fine-Coulson, Kari; Gupta, Tuhina; Quinn, Frederick D; Posey, James E; Willby, Melisa; Castro-Garza, Jorge; Karls, Russell K

    2015-12-01

    Despite the interactions known to occur between various lower respiratory tract pathogens and alveolar epithelial cells (AECs), few reports examine factors influencing the interplay between Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli and AECs during infection. Importantly, in vitro studies have demonstrated that the M. tuberculosis hbha and esxA gene products HBHA and ESAT6 directly or indirectly influence AEC survival. In this report, we identify Rv3351c as another M. tuberculosis gene that impacts the fate of both the pathogen and AEC host. Intracellular replication of an Rv3351c mutant in the human AEC type II pneumocyte cell line A549 was markedly reduced relative to the complemented mutant and parent strain. Deletion of Rv3351c diminished the release of lactate dehydrogenase and decreased uptake of trypan blue vital stain by host cells infected with M. tuberculosis bacilli, suggesting attenuated cytotoxic effects. Interestingly, an isogenic hbha mutant displayed reductions in AEC killing similar to those observed for the Rv3351c mutant. This opens the possibility that multiple M. tuberculosis gene products interact with AECs. We also observed that Rv3351c aids intracellular replication and survival of M. tuberculosis in macrophages. This places Rv3351c in the same standing as HBHA and ESAT6, which are important factors in AECs and macrophages. Defining the mechanism(s) by which Rv3351c functions to aid pathogen survival within the host may lead to new drug or vaccine targets.

  10. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Resveratrol on Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Alveolar Epithelial Cell Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Po-Len; Chong, Inn-Wen; Lee, Yi-Chen; Tsai, Jong-Rung; Wang, Hui-Min; Hsieh, Chong-Chao; Kuo, Hsuan-Fu; Liu, Wei-Lun; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Chen, Hsiu-Lin

    2015-11-04

    Reducing oxidative stress is crucial to prevent hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R)-induced lung injury. Resveratrol has excellent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, and this study investigated its role in H/R-induced type II pneumocyte dysfunction. H/R conditions increased expression of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β (142.3 ± 21.2%, P < 0.05) and IL-6 (301.9 ± 35.1%, P < 0.01) in a type II alveolar epithelial cell line (A549), while the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 (64.6 ± 9.8%, P < 0.05) and surfactant proteins (SPs) decreased. However, resveratrol treatment effectively inhibited these effects. H/R significantly activated an inflammatory transcription factor, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, while resveratrol significantly inhibited H/R-induced NF-κB transcription activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing resveratrol-mediated reversal of H/R-induced inflammatory responses and dysfunction of type II pneumocyte cells in vitro. The effects of resveratrol were partially mediated by promoting SP expression and inhibiting inflammation with NF-κB pathway involvement. Therefore, our study provides new insights into mechanisms underlying the action of resveratrol in type II pneumocyte dysfunction.

  11. D-4F, an apolipoprotein A-I mimetic, inhibits TGF-β1 induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human alveolar epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    You, Jia; Wang, Jintao; Xie, Linshen; Zhu, Chengwen; Xiong, Jingyuan

    2016-10-01

    Emerging evidences support that transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) participates in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis and asthmatic airway remodeling. Recent studies demonstrated that apolipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I) is the only known substance that can resolve established pulmonary fibrotic nodules, and Apo A-I mimetic D-4F (a synthetic polypeptide consisting of 18 amino acids) plays an inhibitory role in murine asthmatic model. However, cellular mechanisms for such therapeutic effects of Apo A-I and D-4F remain to be elucidated. This study evaluated the effects of D-4F on TGF-β1 induced EMT in human type II alveolar epithelial cell line A549. A549 cells treated with 10ng/ml of TGF-β1 manifested distinct EMT, including fibroblastic morphological changes, down-regulation of epithelial marker E-cadherin and up-regulation of mesenchymal marker vimentin. These EMT related changes were all inhibited by D-4F in a concentration dependent manner. Transcriptional investigation demonstrated clearly that D-4F dose-dependently compensated for the reduced E-cadherin mRNA level and the increased vimentin mRNA level in TGF-β1 treated A549 cells. Translational analysis revealed that D-4F significantly reversed the TGF-β1 induced changes of E-cadherin and vimentin levels. These results suggested that D-4F inhibits TGF-β1 induced EMT in human alveolar epithelial cell. Given the functional similarities between D-4F and Apo A-I, it is speculated that D-4F and Apo A-I are able to exert possible anti-fibrotic and anti-asthmatic effects via inhibiting alveolar EMT, and D-4F may possess beneficial clinical potential for patients suffering from pulmonary fibrosis and asthma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of β-catenin-regulated CCN matricellular proteins in epithelial repair after inflammatory lung injury

    PubMed Central

    McClendon, Jazalle; Aschner, Yael; Briones, Natalie; Young, Scott K.; Lau, Lester F.; Kahn, Michael; Downey, Gregory P.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of the lung epithelium after injury is integral to the pathogenesis and outcomes of diverse inflammatory lung diseases. We previously reported that β-catenin signaling promotes epithelial repair after inflammatory injury, but the β-catenin target genes that mediate this effect are unknown. Herein, we examined which β-catenin transcriptional coactivators and target genes promote epithelial repair after inflammatory injury. Transmigration of human neutrophils across cultured monolayers of human lung epithelial cells resulted in a fall in transepithelial resistance and the formation of discrete areas of epithelial denudation (“microinjury”), which repaired via cell spreading by 96 h. In mice treated with intratracheal (i.t.) LPS or keratinocyte chemokine, neutrophil emigration was associated with increased permeability of the lung epithelium, as determined by increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid albumin concentration, which decreased over 3–6 days. Activation of β-catenin/p300-dependent gene expression using the compound ICG-001 accelerated epithelial repair in vitro and in murine models. Neutrophil transmigration induced epithelial expression of the β-catenin/p300 target genes Wnt-induced secreted protein (WISP) 1 and cysteine-rich (Cyr) 61, as determined by real-time PCR (qPCR) and immunostaining. Purified neutrophil elastase induced WISP1 upregulation in lung epithelial cells, as determined by qPCR. WISP1 expression increased in murine lungs after i.t. LPS, as determined by ELISA of the BAL fluid and qPCR of whole lung extracts. Finally, recombinant WISP1 and Cyr61 accelerated repair, and Cyr61-neutralizing antibodies delayed repair of the injured epithelium in vitro. We conclude that β-catenin/p300-dependent expression of WISP1 and Cyr61 is critical for epithelial repair and represents a potential therapeutic target to promote epithelial repair after inflammatory injury. PMID:23316072

  13. Alcohol Causes Alveolar Epithelial Oxidative Stress by Inhibiting the Nuclear Factor (Erythroid-Derived 2)–Like 2–Antioxidant Response Element Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, J. Spencer; Fan, Xian

    2013-01-01

    Excessive alcohol use increases the risk of acute lung injury and pneumonia. Chronic alcohol ingestion causes oxidative stress within the alveolar space, including near depletion of glutathione (GSH), which impairs alveolar epithelial and macrophage function, in experimental animals and human subjects. However, the fundamental mechanism(s) by which alcohol induces such profound lung oxidative stress is unknown. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)–like 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive master transcription factor that regulates activation of the antioxidant response element (ARE). As the alveolar epithelium controls GSH levels within the alveolar space, we hypothesized that alcohol also decreases Nrf2 expression and/or activation within the alveolar epithelium. In this study, we determined that alcohol ingestion in vivo or direct alcohol exposure in vitro down-regulated the Nrf2–ARE pathway in lung epithelial cells, decreased the expression of antioxidant genes, and lowered intracellular GSH levels. RNA silencing of Nrf2 gene expression in alveolar epithelial cells in vitro decreased expression of these same antioxidant genes, and likewise lowered intracellular GSH levels, findings that mirrored the effects of alcohol. In contrast, treating alcohol-exposed alveolar epithelial cells in vitro with the Nrf2 activator, sulforaphane, preserved Nrf2 expression, ARE activation, intracellular GSH levels, and epithelial barrier function. These new experimental findings implicate down-regulation of the Nrf2–ARE signaling pathway as a fundamental mechanism by which alcohol causes profound oxidative stress and alveolar epithelial dysfunction, and suggest that treatments, such as sulforaphane, that activate this pathway could mitigate the pathophysiological consequences of alcohol on the lung and other organs. PMID:23306837

  14. Alcohol causes alveolar epithelial oxidative stress by inhibiting the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2-antioxidant response element signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jensen, J Spencer; Fan, Xian; Guidot, David M

    2013-04-01

    Excessive alcohol use increases the risk of acute lung injury and pneumonia. Chronic alcohol ingestion causes oxidative stress within the alveolar space, including near depletion of glutathione (GSH), which impairs alveolar epithelial and macrophage function, in experimental animals and human subjects. However, the fundamental mechanism(s) by which alcohol induces such profound lung oxidative stress is unknown. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive master transcription factor that regulates activation of the antioxidant response element (ARE). As the alveolar epithelium controls GSH levels within the alveolar space, we hypothesized that alcohol also decreases Nrf2 expression and/or activation within the alveolar epithelium. In this study, we determined that alcohol ingestion in vivo or direct alcohol exposure in vitro down-regulated the Nrf2-ARE pathway in lung epithelial cells, decreased the expression of antioxidant genes, and lowered intracellular GSH levels. RNA silencing of Nrf2 gene expression in alveolar epithelial cells in vitro decreased expression of these same antioxidant genes, and likewise lowered intracellular GSH levels, findings that mirrored the effects of alcohol. In contrast, treating alcohol-exposed alveolar epithelial cells in vitro with the Nrf2 activator, sulforaphane, preserved Nrf2 expression, ARE activation, intracellular GSH levels, and epithelial barrier function. These new experimental findings implicate down-regulation of the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway as a fundamental mechanism by which alcohol causes profound oxidative stress and alveolar epithelial dysfunction, and suggest that treatments, such as sulforaphane, that activate this pathway could mitigate the pathophysiological consequences of alcohol on the lung and other organs.

  15. Peptidoglycan-mediated IL-8 expression in human alveolar type II epithelial cells requires lipid raft formation and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Cheon, In Su; Woo, Sang Su; Kang, Seok-Seong; Im, Jintaek; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Chung, Dae Kyun; Park, Dong Ki; Han, Seung Hyun

    2008-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a major sepsis-causing Gram-positive bacterium, invades pulmonary epithelial cells and causes lung diseases. In the lung, alveolar type II epithelial cells play an important role in innate immunity by secreting chemokines and antimicrobial peptides upon bacterial infection whereas type I cells mainly function in gas-exchange. In this study, we investigated the ability of S. aureus peptidoglycan (PGN) to induce expression of a chemokine, IL-8, in a human alveolar type II epithelial cell line, A549. PGN induces IL-8 mRNA and protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Supplementation of soluble CD14 further enhanced the PGN-induced IL-8 expression. Interestingly, PGN-induced IL-8 expression was inhibited by nystatin, a specific inhibitor for lipid rafts, but not by chlorpromazine, a specific inhibitor for clathrin-coated pits. Furthermore, PGN-induced IL-8 expression was attenuated by inhibitors for MAP kinases such as ERK, p38 kinase, and JNK/SAPK, whereas no inhibitory effect was observed by inhibitors for reactive oxygen species or protein kinase C. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrates that PGN increased the DNA binding of the transcription factors, AP-1 and NF-kappaB while minimally, NF-IL6, all of which are involved in the transcription of IL-8. Taken together, these results suggest that PGN induces IL-8 expression in a CD14-enhanced manner in human alveolar type II epithelial cells, through the formation of lipid rafts and the activation of MAP kinases, which ultimately leads to activation of AP-1, NF-kappaB, and NF-IL6.

  16. Detection of alveolar epithelial injury by 99mTC-DTPA radioaerosol inhalation lung scan following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Okudan, Berna; Han, Serdar; Baldemir, Makbule; Yildiz, Mustafa

    2004-10-01

    DTPA clearance rate is a reliable index of alveolar epithelial permeability, and is a highly sensitive marker of pulmonary epithelial damage, even of mild degree. In this study, 99mTc-DTPA aerosol inhalation scintigraphy was used to assesss the pulmonary epithelial membrane permeability and to investigate the possible application of this permeability value as an indicator of early alveolar or interstitial changes in patients with blunt chest trauma. A total of 26 patients was chest trauma (4 female, 22 male, 31-80 yrs, mean age; 53+/-13 yrs) who were referred to the emergency department in our hospital participated in this tsudy. Technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) aerosol inhalation scintigraphy was performed on the first and thirtieth days after trauma. Clearance half times (T1/2) were calculated by placing a mono-exponential fit on the curves. Penetration index (PI) was calculated on the first-minute image. On the first day, mean T1/2 value of the whole lung was 63+/-19 minutes (min), and thirtieth day mean T1/2 value was 67+/-21 min. On the first day, mean PI values of the lung and 30th day mean PI value were 0.60+/-0.05, and 0.63+/-0.05, respectively. Significant changes were observed in radioaerosol clearance and penetration indices. Following chest trauma, clearance of 99mTc-DTPA increased owing to breakdown of the alveolar-capillary barrier. This increase in the epithelial permeability of the lung appears to be an early manifestation of lung disease that may lead to efficient therapy in the early phase.

  17. Pulmonary alveolar epithelial uptake of S-nitrosothiols is regulated by L-type amino acid transporter

    PubMed Central

    Granillo, Olivia M.; Brahmajothi, Mulugu V.; Li, Sheng; Whorton, A. Richard; Mason, S. Nicholas; McMahon, Timothy J.; Auten, Richard L.

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) effects are often mediated via S-nitrosothiol (SNO) formation; SNO uptake has recently been shown to be mediated in some cell types via system L-type amino acid transporters (LAT-1, 2). Inhaled NO therapy may exert some biological effects via SNO formation. We therefore sought to determine if pulmonary epithelial SNO uptake depended on LAT or peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2). Both LAT-1 and PEPT2 proteins were detected by immunoblot and immunocytochemistry in L2 cells and rat lung. We tested SNO uptake through the transporters by exposing rat alveolar epithelial cells (L2 and type II) to RSNOs: S-nitrosoglutathione, S-nitrosocysteinylglycine (SNO-Cys-Gly), S-nitrosocysteine (CSNO), and to NO donor diethylamine NONOate (DEA-NONOate). SNO was detected in cell lysates by ozone chemiluminescence. NO uptake was detected by fluorescence in alveolar epithelial cells loaded with 4-amino-5-methylamino-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein (DAF-FM) diacetate cultured in submersion and exposed to RSNOs and DEA NONOate. Addition of l-Cys but not d-Cys to RSNOs or DEA NONOate increased SNO and DAF-FM signal that was inhibited by coincubation with LAT competitors. Incubation of cells with PEPT2 substrate SNO-Cys-Gly showed no increase in SNO or DAF-FM signal unless incubated with l-Cys. This was unaffected by PEPT2 inhibition. We conclude that RSNOs (thionitrites, S-nitrosothiols) and NO enter alveolar epithelial cells predominantly by S-nitrosation of l-Cys, which is then imported through LAT. PMID:18441097

  18. Cyclic mechanical stretch-induced oxidative stress occurs via a NOX-dependent mechanism in type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toru; Saito, Yoshinobu; Matsuda, Kuniko; Kamio, Koichiro; Abe, Shinji; Kubota, Kaoru; Azuma, Arata; Gemma, Akihiko

    2017-08-01

    Cyclic mechanical stretching (CMS) of the alveolar epithelium is thought to contribute to alveolar epithelial injury through an increase in oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of CMS-induced oxidative stress in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). A549 cells were subjected to CMS, and the levels of 8-isoprostane and 3-nytrotyrosine were measured. Twenty-four hours of CMS induced a significant increase in the levels of 8-isoprostane and 3-nytrotyrosine. Although CMS did not increase the xanthine oxidase activity or the mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species, it upregulated the expression of nicotine adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX) 2, 4, 5 and DUOX2. The NOX inhibitors DPI and GKT137831 significantly attenuated CMS-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, the measurement of annexin V/propidium iodide by flow cytometry showed that CMS induced late-phase apoptosis/necrosis, which was also attenuated by both DPI and GKT137831. These data suggest that CMS mainly induces oxidative stress, which may lead to cell injury by activating NOX in AECs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Lactate as substrate for mitochondrial respiration in alveolar epithelial type II cells

    PubMed Central

    Lottes, Robyn G.; Newton, Danforth A.; Spyropoulos, Demetri D.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the many energy-demanding functions they perform and their physical location in the lung, alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells have a rapid cellular metabolism and the potential to influence substrate availability and bioenergetics both locally in the lung and throughout the body. A thorough understanding of ATII cell metabolic function in the healthy lung is necessary for determining how metabolic changes may contribute to pulmonary disease pathogenesis; however, lung metabolism is poorly understood at the cellular level. Here, we examine lactate utilization by primary ATII cells and the ATII model cell line, MLE-15, and link lactate consumption directly to mitochondrial ATP generation. ATII cells cultured in lactate undergo mitochondrial respiration at near-maximal levels, two times the rates of those grown in glucose, and oxygen consumption under these conditions is directly linked to mitochondrial ATP generation. When both lactate and glucose are available as metabolic substrate, the presence of lactate alters glucose metabolism in ATII to favor reduced glycolytic function in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that lactate is used in addition to glucose when both substrates are available. Lactate use by ATII mitochondria is dependent on monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)-mediated import, and ATII cells express MCT1, the isoform that mediates lactate import by cells in other lactate-consuming tissues. The balance of lactate production and consumption may play an important role in the maintenance of healthy lung homeostasis, whereas disruption of lactate consumption by factors that impair mitochondrial metabolism, such as hypoxia, may contribute to lactic acid build-up in disease. PMID:25747963

  20. Essential role for cathepsin D in bleomycin-induced apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaopeng; Rayford, Heather; Shu, Ruijie; Zhuang, Jiaju; Uhal, Bruce D

    2004-07-01

    Our earlier studies showed that bleomycin-induced apoptosis of type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) requires the autocrine synthesis and proteolytic processing of angiotensinogen into ANG II and that inhibitors of ANG-converting enzyme (ACEis) block bleomycin-induced apoptosis (Li X, Zhang H, Soledad-Conrad V, Zhuang J, and Uhal BD. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 284: L501-L507, 2003). Given the documented role of cathepsin D (CatD) in apoptosis of other cell types, we hypothesized that CatD might be the AEC enzyme responsible for the conversion of angiotensinogen into ANG I, the substrate for ACE. Primary cultures of rat type II AECs challenged with bleomycin in vitro showed upregulation and secretion of CatD enzymatic activity and immunoreactive protein but no increases in CatD mRNA. The aspartyl protease inhibitor pepstatin A, which completely blocked CatD enzymatic activity, inhibited bleomycin-induced nuclear fragmentation by 76% and reduced bleomycin-induced caspase-3 activation by 47%. Antisense oligonucleotides against CatD mRNA reduced CatD-immunoreactive protein and inhibited bleomycin-induced nuclear fragmentation by 48%. A purified fragment of angiotensinogen (F1-14) containing the CatD and ACE cleavage sites, when applied to unchallenged AEC in vitro, yielded mature ANG II peptide and induced apoptosis. The apoptosis induced by F1-14 was inhibited 96% by pepstatin A and 77% by neutralizing antibodies specific for CatD (both P < 0.001). These data indicate a critical role for CatD in bleomycin-induced apoptosis of cultured AEC and suggest that the role(s) of CatD in AEC apoptosis include the conversion of newly synthesized angiotensinogen to ANG II.

  1. Penetration of Ciprofloxacin and Amikacin into the Alveolar Epithelial Lining Fluid of Rats with Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ni, Wentao; Yang, Deqing; Mei, Hekun; Zhao, Jin; Liang, Beibei; Bai, Nan; Chai, Dong; Cui, Junchang; Wang, Rui; Liu, Youning

    2017-04-01

    We determined the concentration-time profiles of ciprofloxacin and amikacin in serum and alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of rats with or without pulmonary fibrosis and investigated the effect of pulmonary fibrosis on the capacity for penetration of antimicrobials into the ELF of rats. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced in rats with a single intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. After intravenous injection of ciprofloxacin or amikacin, blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were collected. Urea concentrations in serum and lavage fluid were determined using an enzymatic assay. Ciprofloxacin and amikacin concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. The mean ratio of ELF to plasma concentrations of ciprofloxacin at each time point in the normal group did not significantly differ from that in the pulmonary fibrosis group. However, the ratio of the ciprofloxacin area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0-24) in ELF to the AUC0-24 in plasma was 1.02 in the normal group and 0.76 in the pulmonary fibrosis group. The mean ELF-to-plasma concentration ratios of amikacin at each time point in the normal group were higher than those in the pulmonary fibrosis group, reaching a statistically significant difference at 1, 2, and 4 h. The ratio of the AUC0-24 in ELF to the AUC0-24 in plasma was 0.49 in the normal group and 0.27 in the pulmonary fibrosis group. In conclusion, pulmonary fibrosis can influence the penetration of antimicrobials into the ELF of rats and may have a marked effect on the penetration of amikacin than that of ciprofloxacin. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Mitochondrial-derived free radicals mediate asbestos-induced alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Panduri, Vijayalakshmi; Weitzman, Sigmund A; Chandel, Navdeep S; Kamp, David W

    2004-06-01

    Asbestos causes pulmonary toxicity by mechanisms that in part involve reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the precise source of ROS is unclear. We showed that asbestos induces alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis by a mitochondrial-regulated death pathway. To determine whether mitochondrial-derived ROS are necessary for causing asbestos-induced AEC apoptosis, we utilized A549-rho(omicron) cells that lack mitochondrial DNA and a functional electron transport. As expected, antimycin, which induces an oxidative stress by blocking mitochondrial electron transport at complex III, increased dichlorofluoroscein (DCF) fluorescence in A549 cells but not in A549-rho(omicron) cells. Compared with A549 cells, rho(omicron) cells have less asbestos-induced ROS production, as assessed by DCF fluorescence, and reductions in total glutathione levels as well as less caspase-9 activation and apoptosis, as assessed by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling staining and DNA fragmentation. A mitochondrial anion channel inhibitor that prevents ROS release from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm also blocked asbestos-induced A549 cell caspase-9 activation and apoptosis. Finally, a role for nonmitochondrial-derived ROS with exposure to high levels of asbestos (50 microg/cm(2)) was suggested by our findings that an iron chelator (phytic acid or deferoxamine) or a free radical scavenger (sodium benzoate) provided additional protection against asbestos-induced caspase-9 activation and DNA fragmentation in rho(omicron) cells. We conclude that asbestos fibers affect mitochondrial DNA and functional electron transport, resulting in mitochondrial-derived ROS production that in turn mediates AEC apoptosis. Nonmitochondrial-associated ROS may also contribute to AEC apoptosis, particularly with high levels of asbestos exposure.

  3. Lactate as substrate for mitochondrial respiration in alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Lottes, Robyn G; Newton, Danforth A; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; Baatz, John E

    2015-05-01

    Because of the many energy-demanding functions they perform and their physical location in the lung, alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells have a rapid cellular metabolism and the potential to influence substrate availability and bioenergetics both locally in the lung and throughout the body. A thorough understanding of ATII cell metabolic function in the healthy lung is necessary for determining how metabolic changes may contribute to pulmonary disease pathogenesis; however, lung metabolism is poorly understood at the cellular level. Here, we examine lactate utilization by primary ATII cells and the ATII model cell line, MLE-15, and link lactate consumption directly to mitochondrial ATP generation. ATII cells cultured in lactate undergo mitochondrial respiration at near-maximal levels, two times the rates of those grown in glucose, and oxygen consumption under these conditions is directly linked to mitochondrial ATP generation. When both lactate and glucose are available as metabolic substrate, the presence of lactate alters glucose metabolism in ATII to favor reduced glycolytic function in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that lactate is used in addition to glucose when both substrates are available. Lactate use by ATII mitochondria is dependent on monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)-mediated import, and ATII cells express MCT1, the isoform that mediates lactate import by cells in other lactate-consuming tissues. The balance of lactate production and consumption may play an important role in the maintenance of healthy lung homeostasis, whereas disruption of lactate consumption by factors that impair mitochondrial metabolism, such as hypoxia, may contribute to lactic acid build-up in disease. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Altered surfactant homeostasis and alveolar epithelial cell stress in amiodarone-induced lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Poornima; Henneke, Ingrid; Ruppert, Clemens; Knudsen, Lars; Venkatesan, Shalini; Liebisch, Gerhard; Chambers, Rachel C; Ochs, Matthias; Schmitz, Gerd; Vancheri, Carlo; Seeger, Werner; Korfei, Martina; Guenther, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Amiodarone (AD) is a highly efficient antiarrhythmic drug with potentially serious side effects. Severe pulmonary toxicity is reported in patients receiving AD even at low doses and may cause interstitial pneumonia as well as lung fibrosis. Apoptosis of alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECII) has been suggested to play an important role in this disease. In the current study, we aimed to establish a murine model of AD-induced lung fibrosis and analyze surfactant homeostasis, lysosomal, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in this model. AD/vehicle was instilled intratracheally into C57BL/6 mice, which were sacrificed on days 7, 14, 21, and 28. Extent of lung fibrosis development was assessed by trichrome staining and hydroxyproline measurement. Cytotoxicity was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Phospholipids (PLs) were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Surfactant proteins (SP) and markers for apoptosis, lysosomal, and ER stress were studied by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. AECII morphology was evaluated by electron microscopy. Extensive lung fibrosis and AECII hyperplasia were observed in AD-treated mice already at day 7. Surfactant PL and SP accumulated in AECII over time. In parallel, induction of apoptosis, lysosomal, and ER stress was encountered in AECII of mice lungs and in MLE12 cells treated with AD. In vitro, siRNA-mediated knockdown of cathepsin D did not alter the AD-induced apoptotic response. Our data suggest that mice exposed to intratracheal AD develop severe pulmonary fibrosis, exhibit extensive surfactant alterations and cellular stress, but AD-induced AECII apoptosis is not mediated primarily via cathepsin D.

  5. Epigenetic Regulation of Tolerance to Toll-Like Receptor Ligands in Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Neagos, Jacqueline; Standiford, Theodore J; Newstead, Michael W; Zeng, Xianying; Huang, Steven K; Ballinger, Megan N

    2015-12-01

    To protect the host against exuberant inflammation and injury responses, cells have the ability to become hyporesponsive or "tolerized" to repeated stimulation by microbial and nonmicrobial insults. The lung airspace is constantly exposed to a variety of exogenous and endogenous Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, yet the ability of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) to be tolerized has yet to be examined. We hypothesize that type II AECs will develop a tolerance phenotype upon repeated TLR agonist exposure. To test this hypothesis, primary AECs isolated from the lungs of mice and a murine AEC cell line (MLE-12) were stimulated with either a vehicle control or a TLR ligand for 18 hours, washed, then restimulated with either vehicle or TLR ligand for an additional 6 hours. Tolerance was assessed by measurement of TLR ligand-stimulated chemokine production (monocyte chemoattractant protein [MCP]-1/CCL2, keratinocyte chemoattractant [KC]/CXCL1, and macrophage inflammatory protein [MIP]-2/CXCL2). Sequential treatment of primary AECs or MLE-12 cells with TLR agonists resulted in induction of either tolerance or cross-tolerance. The induction of tolerance was not due to expression of specific negative regulators of TLR signaling (interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase [IRAK]-M, Toll-interacting protein [Tollip], single Ig IL-1-related receptor [SIGIRR], or suppressor of cytokine signaling [SOCS]), inhibitory microRNAs (miRs; specifically, miR-155 and miR146a), or secretion of inhibitory or regulatory soluble mediators (prostaglandin E2, IL-10, transforming growth factor-β, or IFN-α/β). Moreover, inhibition of histone demethylation or DNA methylation did not prevent the development of tolerance. However, treatment of AECs with the histone deacetylase inhibitors trichostatin A or suberoylanilide hyrozamine resulted in reversal of the tolerance phenotype. These findings indicate a novel mechanism by which epigenetic modification regulates the induction of tolerance in AECs.

  6. Epigenetic Regulation of Tolerance to Toll-Like Receptor Ligands in Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Neagos, Jacqueline; Standiford, Theodore J.; Newstead, Michael W.; Zeng, Xianying; Huang, Steven K.

    2015-01-01

    To protect the host against exuberant inflammation and injury responses, cells have the ability to become hyporesponsive or “tolerized” to repeated stimulation by microbial and nonmicrobial insults. The lung airspace is constantly exposed to a variety of exogenous and endogenous Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, yet the ability of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) to be tolerized has yet to be examined. We hypothesize that type II AECs will develop a tolerance phenotype upon repeated TLR agonist exposure. To test this hypothesis, primary AECs isolated from the lungs of mice and a murine AEC cell line (MLE-12) were stimulated with either a vehicle control or a TLR ligand for 18 hours, washed, then restimulated with either vehicle or TLR ligand for an additional 6 hours. Tolerance was assessed by measurement of TLR ligand–stimulated chemokine production (monocyte chemoattractant protein [MCP]-1/CCL2, keratinocyte chemoattractant [KC]/CXCL1, and macrophage inflammatory protein [MIP]-2/CXCL2). Sequential treatment of primary AECs or MLE-12 cells with TLR agonists resulted in induction of either tolerance or cross-tolerance. The induction of tolerance was not due to expression of specific negative regulators of TLR signaling (interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase [IRAK]-M, Toll-interacting protein [Tollip], single Ig IL-1–related receptor [SIGIRR], or suppressor of cytokine signaling [SOCS]), inhibitory microRNAs (miRs; specifically, miR-155 and miR146a), or secretion of inhibitory or regulatory soluble mediators (prostaglandin E2, IL-10, transforming growth factor-β, or IFN-α/β). Moreover, inhibition of histone demethylation or DNA methylation did not prevent the development of tolerance. However, treatment of AECs with the histone deacetylase inhibitors trichostatin A or suberoylanilide hyrozamine resulted in reversal of the tolerance phenotype. These findings indicate a novel mechanism by which epigenetic modification regulates the induction of tolerance

  7. [Dexmedetomidine preconditioning protects against lipopolysaccharides-induced injury in the human alveolar epithelial cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Xian-Jin; Zhan, Li-Ying; Wu, Xiao-Jing; Li, Wen-Lan; Zhao, Bo; Meng, Qing-Tao; Xia, Zhong-Yuan

    2017-08-14

    Dexmedetomidine (DEX) has demonstrated the preconditioning effect and shown protective effects against organize injury. In this study, using A549 (human alveolar epithelial cell) cell lines, we investigated whether DEX preconditioning protected against acute lung injury (ALI) in vitro. A549 were randomly divided into four groups (n=5): control group, DEX group, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) group, and D-LPS (DEX+LPS) group. Phosphate buffer saline (PBS) or DEX were administered. After 2h preconditioning, the medium was refreshed and the cells were challenged with LPS for 24h on the LPS and D-LPS group. Then the malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3 and the cytochrome c in the A549 were tested. The apoptosis was also evaluated in the cells. Compare with LPS group, DEX preconditioning reduced the apoptosis (26.43%±1.05% vs. 33.58%±1.16%, p<0.05) in the A549, which is correlated with decreased MDA (12.84±1.05 vs. 19.16±1.89 protein, p<0.05) and increased SOD activity (30.28±2.38 vs. 20.86±2.19 protein, p<0.05). DEX preconditioning also increased the Bcl-2 level (0.53±0.03 vs. 0.32±0.04, p<0.05) and decreased the level of Bax (0.49±0.04 vs. 0.65±0.04, p<0.05), caspase-3 (0.54±0.04 vs. 0.76±0.04, p<0.05) and cytochrome c. DEX preconditioning has a protective effect against ALI in vitro. The potential mechanisms involved are the inhibition of cell death and improvement of antioxidation. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Variable stretch reduces the pro-inflammatory response of alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rentzsch, Ines; Santos, Cíntia L; Huhle, Robert; Ferreira, Jorge M C; Koch, Thea; Schnabel, Christian; Koch, Edmund; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia R M; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation has the potential to increase inflammation in both healthy and injured lungs. Several animal studies have shown that variable ventilation recruits the lungs and reduces inflammation. However, it is unclear which cellular mechanisms are involved in those findings. We hypothesized that variable stretch of LPS-stimulated alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) reduces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to non-variable stretch. AECs were subjected to non-variable or variable cyclic stretch (sinusoidal pattern), with and without LPS stimulation. The expression and release of interleukin-6, CXCL-2 and CCL-2 mRNA were analyzed after 4 hours. The phosphorylation of the MAPKs ERK1/2 and SAPK/JNK was determined by Western Blot analysis at 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min of cyclic stretch. In LPS-stimulated AECs, variable cyclic cell stretching led to reduced cytokine expression and release compared to non-variable cell stretching. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of the MAPK ERK1/2 was increased after 30 minutes in non-variable stretched AECs, whereas variable stretched cells demonstrated only the non-stretched level of phosphorylation. After the 4h period of cyclic cell stretch and inhibition of the ERK1/2, but not the SAPK/JNK, signaling pathway, the gene expression of investigated cytokines increased in variable stretched, and decreased in non-variable stretched AECs. We conclude that in LPS-stimulated AECs, variable stretch reduced the pro-inflammatory response compared to non-variable stretch. This effect was mediated by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, and might partly explain the findings of reduced lung inflammation during mechanical ventilation modes that enhance breath-by-breath variability of the respiratory pattern.

  9. Variable stretch reduces the pro-inflammatory response of alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Jorge M. C.; Koch, Thea; Schnabel, Christian; Koch, Edmund; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation has the potential to increase inflammation in both healthy and injured lungs. Several animal studies have shown that variable ventilation recruits the lungs and reduces inflammation. However, it is unclear which cellular mechanisms are involved in those findings. We hypothesized that variable stretch of LPS-stimulated alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) reduces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to non-variable stretch. AECs were subjected to non-variable or variable cyclic stretch (sinusoidal pattern), with and without LPS stimulation. The expression and release of interleukin-6, CXCL-2 and CCL-2 mRNA were analyzed after 4 hours. The phosphorylation of the MAPKs ERK1/2 and SAPK/JNK was determined by Western Blot analysis at 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min of cyclic stretch. In LPS-stimulated AECs, variable cyclic cell stretching led to reduced cytokine expression and release compared to non-variable cell stretching. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of the MAPK ERK1/2 was increased after 30 minutes in non-variable stretched AECs, whereas variable stretched cells demonstrated only the non-stretched level of phosphorylation. After the 4h period of cyclic cell stretch and inhibition of the ERK1/2, but not the SAPK/JNK, signaling pathway, the gene expression of investigated cytokines increased in variable stretched, and decreased in non-variable stretched AECs. We conclude that in LPS-stimulated AECs, variable stretch reduced the pro-inflammatory response compared to non-variable stretch. This effect was mediated by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, and might partly explain the findings of reduced lung inflammation during mechanical ventilation modes that enhance breath-by-breath variability of the respiratory pattern. PMID:28813446

  10. Isolation and cultivation of metabolically competent alveolar epithelial cells from A/J mice.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Tanja; Chougule, Anil; Borlak, Jürgen

    2014-08-01

    The A/J mouse strain is used in lung cancer studies. To enable mechanistic investigations the isolation and cultivation of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) is desirable. Based on four different protocols dispase digestion of lung tissue was best and yielded 9.3 ± 1.5 × 10(6) AECs. Of these 61 ± 13% and 43 ± 5% were positive for AP and NBT staining, respectively. Purification by discontinuous Percoll gradient centrifugation did not change this ratio; however, reduced the total cell yield to 4.4 ± 1.1 × 10(6) AECs. Flow cytometry of lectin bound AECs determined 91 ± 7% and 87 ± 5% as positive for Helix pomatia and Maclura pomifera to evidence type II pneumocytes. On day 3 in culture the ethoxyresorufin-O-demethylase activity was 251 ± 80 pmol/4 h × 1.5 × 10(6) and the production of androstenedione proceed at 243.5 ± 344.4 pmol/24 h × 1.5 × 10(6) AECs. However, 6-α, 6-β and 16-β-hydroxytestosterone were produced about 20-fold less as compared to androstenedione and the production of metabolites depended on the culture media supplemented with 2% mouse serum or 10% FCS. Finally, by RT-PCR expression of CYP genes was confirmed in lung tissue and AECs; a link between testosterone metabolism and CYP2A12, 3A16 and 2B9/10 expression was established. Taken collectively, AECs can be successfully isolated and cultured for six days while retaining metabolic competence.

  11. Involvement of Igf1r in Bronchiolar Epithelial Regeneration: Role during Repair Kinetics after Selective Club Cell Ablation

    PubMed Central

    López, Icíar P.; Piñeiro-Hermida, Sergio; Pais, Rosete S.; Torrens, Raquel; Hoeflich, Andreas; Pichel, José G.

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of lung epithelium is vital for maintaining airway function and integrity. An imbalance between epithelial damage and repair is at the basis of numerous chronic lung diseases such as asthma, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer. IGF (Insulin-like Growth Factors) signaling has been associated with most of these respiratory pathologies, although their mechanisms of action in this tissue remain poorly understood. Expression profiles analyses of IGF system genes performed in mouse lung support their functional implication in pulmonary ontogeny. Immuno-localization revealed high expression levels of Igf1r (Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor) in lung epithelial cells, alveolar macrophages and smooth muscle. To further understand the role of Igf1r in pulmonary homeostasis, two distinct lung epithelial-specific Igf1r mutant mice were generated and studied. The lack of Igf1r disturbed airway epithelial differentiation in adult mice, and revealed enhanced proliferation and altered morphology in distal airway club cells. During recovery after naphthalene-induced club cell injury, the kinetics of terminal bronchiolar epithelium regeneration was hindered in Igf1r mutants, revealing increased proliferation and delayed differentiation of club and ciliated cells. Amid airway restoration, lungs of Igf1r deficient mice showed increased levels of Igf1, Insr, Igfbp3 and epithelial precursor markers, reduced amounts of Scgb1a1 protein, and alterations in IGF signaling mediators. These results support the role of Igf1r in controlling the kinetics of cell proliferation and differentiation during pulmonary airway epithelial regeneration after injury. PMID:27861515

  12. Diffusible signal to murine alveolar macrophages from lipopolysaccharide- and Escherichia coli-stimulated lung Type II epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Farberman, M M; Hoffmann, J W; Ryerse, J S; Demello, D E

    2004-09-01

    To demonstrate a diffusible intercellular macrophage activation factor secreted by Type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) in transwell co-cultures. T(7), our Type II conditionally immortalized AEC line; MH-S, an alveolar macrophage cell line; Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or uv-killed Escherichia coli (UVEC) for antigen presentation. LPS or UVEC stimulation of T(7) cells in the lower chamber was investigated for ability to activate MH-S cells in the upper chamber, as assayed by nitric oxide production and western blots for inducible nitric oxide synthase-2. Both transwell and UVEC-conditioned medium experiments showed secretion of an MH-S activation factor by T(7) cells. Many common inflammatory cytokines were ruled out as this immunoactivator. Demonstration of a diffusible activation factor produced by Type II AECs supports their potential role as first responders of innate immunity in the lung.

  13. Cigarette Smoke Modulates Repair and Innate Immunity following Injury to Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Nadia M.; van der Vlugt, Luciën E. P. M.; van Schadewijk, Annemarie; Taube, Christian; Hiemstra, Pieter S.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and contributes to COPD development and progression by causing epithelial injury and inflammation. Whereas it is known that cigarette smoke (CS) may affect the innate immune function of airway epithelial cells and epithelial repair, this has so far not been explored in an integrated design using mucociliary differentiated airway epithelial cells. In this study, we examined the effect of whole CS exposure on wound repair and the innate immune activity of mucociliary differentiated primary bronchial epithelial cells, upon injury induced by disruption of epithelial barrier integrity or by mechanical wounding. Upon mechanical injury CS caused a delayed recovery in the epithelial barrier integrity and wound closure. Furthermore CS enhanced innate immune responses, as demonstrated by increased expression of the antimicrobial protein RNase 7. These differential effects on epithelial repair and innate immunity were both mediated by CS-induced oxidative stress. Overall, our findings demonstrate modulation of wound repair and innate immune responses of injured airway epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD development and progression. PMID:27829065

  14. The last resort for reconstruction of nasal floor in difficult-to-repair alveolar cleft cases: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2014-09-01

    This article describes four new methods as the last resort for reconstruction of the nasal floor in difficult-to-repair alveolar cleft patients, including bone suture technique, vascularized interpositional periosteal-connective tissue flap from the palate (VIP-CT flap), anteriorly based inferior turbinate flap, and skinless subcutaneous nasolabial flap, with emphasis on indications and limitations. In a retrospective study, data were obtained from 214 patients referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Mashhad Dental School, Iran, for alveolar cleft bone grafting in 2004-2013. Eighteen patients had been treated using special techniques other than direct suturing for reconstruction of the nasal floor during alveolar cleft bone grafting. Eighteen patients had been treated using these techniques as the last resort for nasal floor reconstruction; including bone suture technique (50%), inferior turbinate flap (33.3%), VIP-CT flap (11.2%) and nasolabial flap (5.5%). All the patients had a unilateral alveolar cleft, 72.2% of which were located on the left side and 44.5% of the patients were female. Nasal floor reconstruction in 8.4% of alveolar cleft patients needed special techniques and flaps. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hyperoxia Inhibits Nitric Oxide Treatment Effects in Alveolar Epithelial Cells via Effects on L-Type Amino Acid Transporter-1

    PubMed Central

    Brahmajothi, Mulugu V.; Tinch, Brian T.; Wempe, Michael F.; Endou, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The aims of this study were to determine hyperoxia effects on S-nitrosothiol (SNO) accumulation and L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) expression/function in alveolar epithelium and to determine whether hyperoxia impairs exogenous nitric oxide (NO) treatment effects in alveolar epithelium through effects on LAT1 expression and/or function. Results: SNO accumulation in vitro and in vivo after NO treatment was dependent on the LAT1 system transport. Hyperoxia (60% or 90%) impaired NO effects on SNO accumulation and soluble guanylyl cyclase activation in proportion to the magnitude of hyperoxia and the duration of exposure, up to 12 h, in type I-like (R3/1) and type II-like (L2) rat and human (A549) alveolar epithelial cells. LAT function, determined by sodium-independent 3H-leucine uptake, was impaired in a parallel manner. Hyperoxia impaired LAT1 expression in alveolar epithelial cells, determined by immunoblots and immunofluorescence, and in newborn rats exposed to 60% O2 for 4 days, determined by immunohistochemistry. Innovation: Despite significant preclinical evidence, inhaled NO has shown disappointing limitations in clinical applications. Our studies suggest an important explanation: oxidative stress, a common feature of diseases in which therapeutic NO would be considered, impairs LAT1 expression and function, blocking a major route for inhaled NO (iNO) action, that is, the uptake of S-nitrosocysteine via LAT1. Conclusions: SNO uptake after NO treatment is dependent on LAT1. Hyperoxia impairs SNO uptake and NO effects during NO exposure and impairs LAT system function and LAT1 expression. Effects on SNO formation and transport must be considered for rational optimization of NO-based therapeutics. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1823–1836. PMID:25089378

  16. ERK/GSK3ß/Snail signaling mediates radiation-induced alveolar epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Devipriya; Melo, Tahira; Deng, Zhiyong; Almeida, Celine; Zhao, Weiling

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the major treatment regimes for thoracic malignancies, but can lead to severe lung complications including pneumonitis and fibrosis. Recent studies suggest that epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in tissue injury leading to organ fibrosis. To investigate whether radiation can induce EMT in lung epithelial cells and also understand the potential mechanism(s) associated with this change, rat alveolar type II lung epithelial RLE-6TN cells were irradiated with 8 Gy of 137Cs γ-rays. Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed a time-dependent decrease in E-cadherin with a concomitant increase in α-SMA and vimentin after radiation, suggesting that the epithelial cells acquired mesenchymal-like morphology. Protein levels and nuclear translocation of Snail, the key inducer of EMT, were significantly elevated in the irradiated cells. Radiation also induced a time-dependent inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3ß), an endogenous inhibitor of Snail. A marked increase in phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but not JNKs or p38, was observed in irradiated RLE-6TN cells. Silencing ERK1/2 using siRNAs and the MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126 attenuated the radiation-induced phosphorylation of GSK3ß and altered the protein levels of Snail, α-SMA and E-cadherin in RLE-6TN cells. Pre-incubating RLE-6TN cells with N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant, abolished the radiation-induced phosphorylation of ERK and altered protein levels of Snail, E-cadherin and α-SMA. These findings reveal, for the first time, that radiation-induced EMT in alveolar type II epithelial cells is mediated by the ERK/GSK3ß/Snail pathway. PMID:22198183

  17. Effect of laser phototherapy on human alveolar bone repair: micro tomographic and histomorphometrical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romão, Marcia M. A.; Marques, Márcia M.; Cortes, Arthur R. G.; Horliana, Anna C. R. T.; Moreira, Maria S.; Lascala, Cesar A.

    2015-06-01

    The immediate dental implant placement in the molars region is critical, because of the high amount of bone loss and the discrepancy between the alveolar crest thickness and the dental implant platform. Laser phototherapy (LPT) improves bone repair thus could accelerate the implant placement. Twenty patients were selected for the study. Ten patients were submitted to LPT with GaAlAs diode laser (808nm) during molar extraction, immediately after, 24h, 48h, 72h, 96h and 7 days. The irradiations were applied in contact and punctual mode (100mW, 0.04cm2, 0.75J/cm2, 30s per point, 3J per point). The control group (n=10) received the same treatment; however with the power of the laser off. Forty days later samples of the tissue formed inside the sockets were obtained for further microtomography (microCTs) and histomorphometry analyses. Data were compared by the Student t test, whereas those from the different microCT parameters were compared by the Pearson correlation test (p<0.05). The relative bone volume, as well as area was significantly higher (p<0.001) in the lased than the control group. In the control group there were negative correlations between number and thickness, and between number and separation of trabecula (p<0.01). Between thickness and separation of trabecula the correlation was positive (p<0.01). The laser group showed significant negative correlation between the number and the thickness of trabecula (p<0.01). LPT accelerated bone repair. By the Pearson correlation test it was possible to infer that the lased group presented a more homogeneous trabecular configuration, which would allow earlier dental implant placement.

  18. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis of FITC-albumin in alveolar type II epithelial cell line RLE-6TN.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Ryoko; Nishikawa, Hiromi; Okamoto, Miho; Katayama, Hirokazu; Nagai, Junya; Takano, Mikihisa

    2006-05-01

    We examined mechanisms of FITC-albumin uptake by alveolar type II epithelial cells using cultured RLE-6TN cells. Alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of cytokeratin 19 mRNA, which are characteristic features of alveolar type II epithelial cells, were detected in RLE-6TN cells. The uptake of FITC-albumin by the cells was time and temperature dependent and showed the saturation kinetics of high- and low-affinity transport systems. FITC-albumin uptake was inhibited by native albumin, by chemically modified albumin, and by metabolic inhibitors and bafilomycin A(1), an inhibitor of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. Confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis after FITC-albumin uptake showed punctate localization of fluorescence in the cells, which was partly localized in lysosomes. FITC-albumin taken up by the cells gradually degraded over time, as shown by fluoroimage analyzer after SDS-PAGE. The uptake of FITC-albumin by RLE-6TN cells was not inhibited by nystatin, indomethacin, or methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (inhibitors of caveolae-mediated endocytosis) but was inhibited by phenylarsine oxide and chlorpromazine (inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis) in a concentration-dependent manner. Uptake was also inhibited by potassium depletion and hypertonicity, conditions known to inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These results indicate that the uptake of FITC-albumin in cultured alveolar type II epithelial cells, RLE-6TN, is mediated by clathrin-mediated but not by caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and intracellular FITC-albumin is gradually degraded in lysosomes. Possible receptors involved in this endocytic system are discussed.

  19. Effect of cigarette smoke extract on P-glycoprotein function in primary cultured and newly developed alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takano, Mikihisa; Naka, Ryosuke; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Nishimoto, Saori; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2016-12-01

    The effect of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function in the distal lung is unclear. In this study, we first examined the expression and function of P-gp and the effect of CSE in rat primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells. The expression of P-gp protein was observed in type I-like cells, but not in type II cells. In type I-like cells, rhodamine 123 (Rho123) accumulation was enhanced by various P-gp inhibitors such as verapamil and cyclosporine A. In addition, the expression of P-gp mRNAs, mdr1a and mdr1b, as well as P-gp activity increased along with the transdifferentiation. When type I-like cells were co-incubated with CSE, P-gp activity was suppressed. Next, we attempted to clarify the effect of CSE on P-gp function in human-derived cultured alveolar epithelial cells. For this purpose, we isolated an A549 clone (A549/P-gp) expressing P-gp, because P-gp expression in native A549 cells was negligible. In A549/P-gp cells, P-gp was functionally expressed, and the inhibitory effect of CSE on P-gp was observed. These results suggested that smoking would directly suppress P-gp activity, and that A549/P-gp cell line should be a useful model to further study the effect of xenobiotics on P-gp function in the alveolar epithelial cells.

  20. Construction of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors and its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chan; Dong, Wen-Bin; Zhao, Shuai; Li, Qing-Ping; Kang, Lan; Lei, Xiao-Ping; Guo, Lin; Zhai, Xue-Song

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to observe the inhibitive effects of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors on the expression of p66Shc, and to explore its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia. Methods The gene sequences were cloned into the pLenR-GPH-shRNA lentiviral vector, which was selected by Genebank searches. The pLenR-GPH-shRNA and lentiviral vector packaging plasmid mix were cotransfected into 293T cells to package lentiviral particles. Culture virus supernatant was harvested, and then the virus titer was determined by serial dilution assay. A549 cells were transduced with the constructed lentiviral vectors, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to evaluate p66Shc expression. This study is divided into a control group, a hyperoxia group, an A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, and a negative lentivirus group. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry after 24 hours; the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and caspase-9 were detected by immunohistochemistry assay. The production of reactive oxygen species and cellular mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined by fluorescence microscopy. Results We successfully established the p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors, A549-p66ShcshRNA. The A549-p66ShcshRNA was transfected into alveolar epithelial cells, and the inhibitive effects on the expression of p66Shc were observed. Both RT-PCR and Western blot demonstrated downregulation of p66Shc expression in A549 cells. In the A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, we found dampened oxidative stress. A549-p66ShcshRNA can cause p66Shc gene silencing, reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, reduce membrane potential decrease, reduce the apoptosis of A549 cells, and reduce alveolar epithelial cell injury, while the lentiviral empty vector group had no such changes. Conclusion p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vector can affect the

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species/Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α/Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB Autocrine Loop Contributes to Cocaine-Mediated Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Damage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Chen, Xufeng; Simet, Samantha M; Hu, Guoku; Cai, Yu; Niu, Fang; Kook, Yeonhee; Buch, Shilpa J

    2016-11-01

    Abuse of psychostimulants, such as cocaine, has been shown to be closely associated with complications of the lung, such as pulmonary hypertension, edema, increased inflammation, and infection. However, the mechanism by which cocaine mediates impairment of alveolar epithelial barrier integrity that underlies various pulmonary complications has not been well determined. Herein, we investigate the role of cocaine in disrupting the alveolar epithelial barrier function and the associated signaling cascade. Using the combinatorial electric cell-substrate impedance sensing and FITC-dextran permeability assays, we demonstrated cocaine-mediated disruption of the alveolar epithelial barrier, as evidenced by increased epithelial monolayer permeability with a concomitant loss of the tight junction protein zonula occludens-1 (Zo-1) in both mouse primary alveolar epithelial cells and the alveolar epithelial cell line, L2 cells. To dissect the signaling pathways involved in this process, we demonstrated that cocaine-mediated induction of permeability factors, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) and vascular endothelial growth factor, involved reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent induction of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. Interestingly, we demonstrated that ROS-dependent induction of another transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2, that did not play a role in cocaine-mediated barrier dysfunction. Importantly, this study identifies, for the first time, that ROS/HIF-1α/PDGF-BB autocrine loop contributes to cocaine-mediated barrier disruption via amplification of oxidative stress and downstream signaling. Corroboration of these cell culture findings in vivo demonstrated increased permeability of the alveolar epithelial barrier, loss of expression of Zo-1, and a concomitantly increased expression of both HIF-1α and PDGF-BB. Pharmacological blocking of HIF-1α significantly abrogated cocaine-mediated loss of Zo-1. Understanding the mechanism

  2. Macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung alveolar epithelial cells via PGE2, PGD2, and HGF

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Young-So; Lee, Ye-Ji; Choi, Youn-Hee; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2016-01-01

    Apoptotic cell clearance results in the release of growth factors and the action of signaling molecules involved in tissue homeostasis maintenance. Here, we investigated whether and how macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit the TGF-β1-induced Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process in lung alveolar epithelial cells. Treatment with conditioned medium derived from macrophages exposed to apoptotic cells, but not viable or necrotic cells, inhibited TGF-β1-induced EMT, including loss of E-cadherin, synthesis of N-cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin, and induction of EMT-activating transcription factors, such as Snail1/2, Zeb1/2, and Twist1. Exposure of macrophages to cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors (NS-398 and COX-2 siRNA) or RhoA/Rho kinase inhibitors (Y-27632 and RhoA siRNA) and LA-4 cells to antagonists of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor (EP4 [AH-23848]), PGD2 receptors (DP1 [BW-A868C] and DP2 [BAY-u3405]), or the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor c-Met (PHA-665752), reversed EMT inhibition by the conditioned medium. Additionally, we found that apoptotic cell instillation inhibited bleomycin-mediated EMT in primary mouse alveolar type II epithelial cells in vivo. Our data suggest a new model for epithelial cell homeostasis, by which the anti-EMT programming of macrophages by apoptotic cells may control the progressive fibrotic reaction via the production of potent paracrine EMT inhibitors. PMID:26875548

  3. TREK-1 Regulates Cytokine Secretion from Cultured Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells Independently of Cytoskeletal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Schwingshackl, Andreas; Roan, Esra; Teng, Bin; Waters, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Background TREK-1 deficient alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) secrete less IL-6, more MCP-1, and contain less F-actin. Whether these alterations in cytokine secretion and F-actin content are related remains unknown. We now hypothesized that cytokine secretion from TREK-1-deficient AECs was regulated by cytoskeletal rearrangements. Methods We determined F-actin and α-tubulin contents of control, TREK-1-deficient and TREK-1-overexpressing human A549 cells by confocal microscopy and western blotting, and measured IL-6 and MCP-1 levels using real-time PCR and ELISA. Results Cytochalasin D decreased the F-actin content of control cells. Jasplakinolide increased the F-actin content of TREK-1 deficient cells, similar to the effect of TREK-1 overexpression in control cells. Treatment of control and TREK-1 deficient cells with TNF-α, a strong stimulus for IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion, had no effect on F-actin structures. The combination of TNF-α+cytochalasin D or TNF-α+jasplakinolide had no additional effect on the F-actin content or architecture when compared to cytochalasin D or jasplakinolide alone. Although TREK-1 deficient AECs contained less F-actin at baseline, quantified biochemically, they contained more α-tubulin. Exposure to nocodazole disrupted α-tubulin filaments in control and TREK-1 deficient cells, but left the overall amount of α-tubulin unchanged. Although TNF-α had no effect on the F-actin or α-tubulin contents, it increased IL-6 and MCP-1 production and secretion from control and TREK-1 deficient cells. IL-6 and MCP-1 secretions from control and TREK-1 deficient cells after TNF-α+jasplakinolide or TNF-α+nocodazole treatment was similar to the effect of TNF-α alone. Interestingly, cytochalasin D decreased TNF-α-induced IL-6 but not MCP-1 secretion from control but not TREK-1 deficient cells. Conclusion Although cytochalasin D, jasplakinolide and nocodazole altered the F-actin and α-tubulin structures of control and TREK-1 deficient AEC, the

  4. Susceptibility of inflamed alveolar and airway epithelial cells to injury induced by diesel exhaust particles of varying organic carbon content.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Nicholas D; Slade, Ralph; Richards, Judy H; McGee, John K; Martin, Linda D; Dye, Janice A

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to traffic-related ambient air pollution, such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP), is associated with adverse health outcomes, especially in individuals with preexisting inflammatory respiratory diseases. Using an analogous novel in vitro system to model both the healthy and inflamed lung, the susceptibility of epithelial cells exposed to DEP of varying organic carbon content was studied. Murine LA-4 alveolar type II-like epithelial cells, as well as primary murine tracheal epithelial cells (MTE), were treated with exogenous cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF] alpha + interleukin [IL]-1 beta + interferon [IFN] gamma) to model a mild inflammatory state. Epithelial cells were subsequently exposed to DEP of varying organic carbon content, and the resultant cytotoxic, cytoprotective, or antioxidant cell responses were inferred by changes in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, or glutathione levels, respectively. Data showed that exposure of healthy LA-4 cells to organic carbon-rich DEP (25 microg/cm(2); 24 h) induced adaptive cytoprotective/antioxidant responses with no apparent cell injury. In contrast, exposure of inflamed LA-4 cells resulted in oxidative stress culminating in significant cytotoxicity. Exposure of healthy MTE cells to organic carbon-rich DEP (20 microg/cm(2); 24 h) was seemingly without effect, whereas exposure of inflamed MTE cells resulted in increased epithelial solute permeability. Thus, surface lung epithelial cells stressed by a state of inflammation and then exposed to organic carbon-rich DEP appear unable to respond to the additional oxidative stress, resulting in epithelial barrier dysfunction and injury. Adverse health outcomes associated with exposure to traffic-related air pollutants, like DEP, in patients with preexisting inflammatory respiratory diseases may be due, in part, to similar mechanisms.

  5. Quorum-sensing inhibition abrogates the deleterious impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on airway epithelial repair.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, Manon; Bilodeau, Claudia; Maillé, Émilie; LaFayette, Shantelle L; McKay, Geoffrey A; Trinh, Nguyen Thu Ngan; Beaudoin, Trevor; Desrosiers, Martin-Yvon; Rousseau, Simon; Nguyen, Dao; Brochiero, Emmanuelle

    2016-09-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections are associated with progressive epithelial damage and lung function decline. In addition to its role in tissue injury, the persistent presence of P. aeruginosa-secreted products may also affect epithelial repair ability, raising the need for new antivirulence therapies. The purpose of our study was to better understand the outcomes of P. aeruginosa exoproducts exposure on airway epithelial repair processes to identify a strategy to counteract their deleterious effect. We found that P. aeruginosa exoproducts significantly decreased wound healing, migration, and proliferation rates, and impaired the ability of directional migration of primary non-cystic fibrosis (CF) human airway epithelial cells. Impact of exoproducts was inhibited after mutations in P. aeruginosa genes that encoded for the quorum-sensing (QS) transcriptional regulator, LasR, and the elastase, LasB, whereas impact was restored by LasB induction in ΔlasR mutants. P. aeruginosa purified elastase also induced a significant decrease in non-CF epithelial repair, whereas protease inhibition with phosphoramidon prevented the effect of P. aeruginosa exoproducts. Furthermore, treatment of P. aeruginosa cultures with 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, a QS inhibitor, abrogated the negative impact of P. aeruginosa exoproducts on airway epithelial repair. Finally, we confirmed our findings in human airway epithelial cells from patients with CF, a disease featuring P. aeruginosa chronic respiratory infection. These data demonstrate that secreted proteases under the control of the LasR QS system impair airway epithelial repair and that QS inhibitors could be of benefit to counteract the deleterious effect of P. aeruginosa in infected patients.-Ruffin, M., Bilodeau, C., Maillé, É., LaFayette, S. L., McKay, G. A., Trinh, N. T. N., Beaudoin, T., Desrosiers, M.-Y., Rousseau, S., Nguyen, D., Brochiero, E. Quorum-sensing inhibition abrogates the deleterious impact

  6. M2 polarized macrophages induced by CSE promote proliferation, migration, and invasion of alveolar basal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao; Shi, Hengfei; Qi, Yue; Zhang, Weiyun; Dong, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Cigarette smoking plays an important role in the genesis of lung cancer, and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are believed to accelerate the process. We therefore sought to clarify the relationship between cigarette smoking, TAMs and tumorigenesis. We treated macrophages (THP-1) with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and found that the mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α decreased, while TGF-β mRNA levels increased. CSE significantly inhibited the phagocytic ability of macrophages, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of FITC-dextran internalization. JAK2/STAT3 was significantly activated by CSE, as determined by Western blot analysis. When the scavenger receptor CD163, a specific marker of M2 macrophages, was analyzed by flow cytometry, its expression was significantly increased. After inducing M2 polarization of THP-1 cells, we co-cultured macrophages and alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549). The proliferation of A549 cells was detected by the MTT assay and cell cycle analysis, while their migration and invasion were detected by scratch wound assay and transwell assay. The results showed that the proliferation, migration and invasion of A549 cells were significantly promoted by M2 macrophages but were slightly inhibited by CSE. In conclusion, we demonstrated that macrophage M2 polarization induced by CSE promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of alveolar basal epithelial cells.

  7. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived alveolar epithelial type II cells abrogates acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dachun; Morales, John E; Calame, Daniel G; Alcorn, Joseph L; Wetsel, Rick A

    2010-03-01

    Respiratory diseases are a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Current treatments offer no prospect of cure or disease reversal. Transplantation of pulmonary progenitor cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) may provide a novel approach to regenerate endogenous lung cells destroyed by injury and disease. Here, we examine the therapeutic potential of alveolar type II epithelial cells derived from hESCs (hES-ATIICs) in a mouse model of acute lung injury. When transplanted into lungs of mice subjected to bleomycin (BLM)-induced acute lung injury, hES-ATIICs behaved as normal primary ATIICs, differentiating into cells expressing phenotypic markers of alveolar type I epithelial cells. Without experiencing tumorigenic side effects, lung injury was abrogated in mice transplanted with hES-ATIICs, demonstrated by recovery of body weight and arterial blood oxygen saturation, decreased collagen deposition, and increased survival. Therefore, transplantation of hES-ATIICs shows promise as an effective therapeutic to treat acute lung injury.

  8. Transplantation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell–Derived Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cells Abrogates Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dachun; Morales, John E; Calame, Daniel G; Alcorn, Joseph L; Wetsel, Rick A

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Current treatments offer no prospect of cure or disease reversal. Transplantation of pulmonary progenitor cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) may provide a novel approach to regenerate endogenous lung cells destroyed by injury and disease. Here, we examine the therapeutic potential of alveolar type II epithelial cells derived from hESCs (hES-ATIICs) in a mouse model of acute lung injury. When transplanted into lungs of mice subjected to bleomycin (BLM)-induced acute lung injury, hES-ATIICs behaved as normal primary ATIICs, differentiating into cells expressing phenotypic markers of alveolar type I epithelial cells. Without experiencing tumorigenic side effects, lung injury was abrogated in mice transplanted with hES-ATIICs, demonstrated by recovery of body weight and arterial blood oxygen saturation, decreased collagen deposition, and increased survival. Therefore, transplantation of hES-ATIICs shows promise as an effective therapeutic to treat acute lung injury. PMID:20087316

  9. Green tea polyphenol blocks h(2)o(2)-induced interleukin-8 production from human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Katsunari; Isowa, Noritaka; Yoshimura, Takashi; Liu, Mingyao; Wada, Hiromi

    2002-06-07

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play crucial roles in ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury of lung transplants. Reactive oxygen species may stimulate the production of neutrophil chemotactic factors such as interleukin-8 (IL-8), from alveolar epithelial cells, causing recruitment and activation of neutrophils in the reperfused tissue. Green tea polyphenol has potent anti-oxidative activities and anti-inflammatory effects by decreasing cytokine production. In the present study, we found that green tea polyphenol significantly inhibited IL-8 production induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in human lung alveolar epithelial cells (A549 line). It has been shown that mitogen activated protein kinases, such as Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 and p44/42, could mediate IL-8 production from a variety of cell types. We further investigated the effect of green tea polyphenol on these protein kinases, and demonstrated that H(2)O(2)-induced phosphorylation of JNK and p38 but not p44/42 was inhibited by green tea polyphenol in A549 cells. We speculate that green tea polyphenol may inhibit H(2)O(2)-induced IL-8 production from A549 cells through inactivation of JNK and p38.

  10. Propofol Protects Rats and Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury via Inhibiting HMGB1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Chengxiao; Wang, Gongming

    2016-06-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) plays a key role in the development of acute lung injury (ALI). Propofol, a general anesthetic with anti-inflammatory properties, has been suggested to be able to modulate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. In this study, we investigated the effects of propofol on the expression of HMGB1 in a rat model of LPS-induced ALI. Rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of LPS to mimic sepsis-induced ALI. Propofol bolus (1, 5, or 10 mg/kg) was infused continuously 30 min after LPS administration, followed by infusion at 5 mg/(kg · h) through the left femoral vein cannula. LPS increased wet to dry weight ratio and myeloperoxidase activity in lung tissues and caused the elevation of total protein and cells, neutrophils, macrophages, and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Moreover, HMGB1 and other cytokine levels were increased in BALF and lung tissues and pathological changes of lung tissues were excessively aggravated in rats after LPS administration. Propofol inhibited all the above effects. It also inhibited LPS-induced toll-like receptor (TLR)2/4 protein upexpression and NF-κB activation in lung tissues and human alveolar epithelial cells. Propofol protects rats and human alveolar epithelial cells against HMGB1 expression in a rat model of LPS-induced ALI. These effects may partially result from reductions in TLR2/4 and NF-κB activation.

  11. Effects of rewarming on nuclear factor-kappaB and interleukin 8 expression in cold-preserved alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kunihiko; Suzuki, Satoshi; Kubo, Hiroshi; Ishida, Itaru; Ueda, Shinsaku; Kondo, Takashi

    2003-07-27

    Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and interleukin (IL)-8 play important roles in the pathophysiology of acute lung injury after lung transplantation. Because alveolar epithelium is one of the most important sites at which IL-8 production takes place after reperfusion of donor lungs, we examined the effects of cold/rewarming on NF-kappaB and IL-8 expression in alveolar epithelial cells. A549 cells were preserved at 4 degrees C for 5 hr and then rewarmed for up to 20 hr. NF-kappaB was analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. IL-8 mRNA expression was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. IL-8 concentration in the cell culture medium after rewarming was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-kappaB was increased in the nuclear extracts as early as 30 min after rewarming. There was a marked increase in the IL-8 mRNA expression at 1 and 3 hr after rewarming. IL-8 concentration in the cell culture medium was progressively increased during 20 hr following rewarming. The cell culture medium inhibited apoptosis of neutrophils significantly. The cold/rewarming-induced IL-8 production was reduced to approximately 50% by introducing an antisense oligonucleotide for the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB and by treatment with N-acetyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-norleucinal and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. The effect of dexamethasone treatment was dose dependent (reduced to approximately 30% at 10-5 M dexamethasone). Our results indicate that rewarming of cold-preserved alveolar epithelial cells itself may be an important initiator of the inflammatory cascades, including NF-kappaB activation and IL-8 release. Inhibition of NF-kappaB would be worth trying to control unnecessary IL-8 production and the inflammatory response in the donor lungs.

  12. Epithelial Gpr116 regulates pulmonary alveolar homeostasis via Gq/11 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kari; Filuta, Alyssa; Ludwig, Marie-Gabrielle; Seuwen, Klaus; Jaros, Julian; Vidal, Solange; Arora, Kavisha; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Kandasamy, Kathirvel; Offermanns, Stefan; Mason, Robert J.; Miller, William E.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Bridges, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary function is dependent upon the precise regulation of alveolar surfactant. Alterations in pulmonary surfactant concentrations or function impair ventilation and cause tissue injury. Identification of the molecular pathways that sense and regulate endogenous alveolar surfactant concentrations, coupled with the ability to pharmacologically modulate them both positively and negatively, would be a major therapeutic advance for patients with acute and chronic lung diseases caused by disruption of surfactant homeostasis. The orphan adhesion GPCR GPR116 (also known as Adgrf5) is a critical regulator of alveolar surfactant concentrations. Here, we show that human and mouse GPR116 control surfactant secretion and reuptake in alveolar type II (AT2) cells by regulating guanine nucleotide–binding domain α q and 11 (Gq/11) signaling. Synthetic peptides derived from the ectodomain of GPR116 activated Gq/11-dependent inositol phosphate conversion, calcium mobilization, and cortical F-actin stabilization to inhibit surfactant secretion. AT2 cell–specific deletion of Gnaq and Gna11 phenocopied the accumulation of surfactant observed in Gpr116–/– mice. These data provide proof of concept that GPR116 is a plausible therapeutic target to modulate endogenous alveolar surfactant pools to treat pulmonary diseases associated with surfactant dysfunction. PMID:28570277

  13. β-Liddle mutation of the epithelial sodium channel increases alveolar fluid clearance and reduces the severity of hydrostatic pulmonary oedema in mice

    PubMed Central

    Randrianarison, Nadia; Escoubet, Brigitte; Ferreira, Chrystophe; Fontayne, Alexandre; Fowler-Jaeger, Nicole; Clerici, Christine; Hummler, Edith; Rossier, Bernard C; Planès, Carole

    2007-01-01

    Transepithelial sodium transport via alveolar epithelial Na+ channels and Na+,K+-ATPase constitutes the driving force for removal of alveolar oedema fluid. Decreased activity of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) in the apical membrane of alveolar epithelial cells impairs sodium-driven alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) and predisposes to pulmonary oedema. We hypothesized that hyperactivity of ENaC in the distal lung could improve AFC and facilitate the resolution of pulmonary oedema. AFC and lung fluid balance were studied at baseline and under conditions of hydrostatic pulmonary oedema in the β-Liddle (L) mouse strain harbouring a gain-of-function mutation (R566stop) within the Scnn1b gene. As compared with wild-type (+/+), baseline AFC was increased by 2- and 3-fold in heterozygous (+/L) and homozygous mutated (L/L) mice, respectively, mainly due to increased amiloride-sensitive AFC. The β2-agonist terbutaline stimulated AFC in +/+ and +/L mice, but not in L/L mice. Acute volume overload induced by saline infusion (40% of body weight over 2 h) significantly increased extravascular (i.e. interstitial and alveolar) lung water as assessed by the bloodless wet-to-dry lung weight ratio in +/+ and L/L mice, as compared with baseline. However, the increase was significantly larger in +/+ than in L/L groups (P= 0.01). Volume overload also increased the volume of the alveolar epithelial lining fluid in +/+ mice, indicating the presence of alveolar oedema, but not in L/L mice. Cardiac function as evaluated by echocardiography was comparable in both groups. These data show that constitutive ENaC activation improved sodium-driven AFC in the mouse lung, and attenuated the severity of hydrostatic pulmonary oedema. PMID:17430990

  14. Hypotonic shock modulates Na(+) current via a Cl(-) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin dependent mechanism in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dagenais, André; Tessier, Marie-Claude; Tatur, Sabina; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Grygorczyk, Ryszard; Berthiaume, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial cells are involved in Na(+) absorption via the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), an important process for maintaining an appropriate volume of liquid lining the respiratory epithelium and for lung oedema clearance. Here, we investigated how a 20% hypotonic shock modulates the ionic current in these cells. Polarized alveolar epithelial cells isolated from rat lungs were cultured on permeant filters and their electrophysiological properties recorded. A 20% bilateral hypotonic shock induced an immediate, but transient 52% rise in total transepithelial current and a 67% increase in the amiloride-sensitive current mediated by ENaC. Amiloride pre-treatment decreased the current rise after hypotonic shock, showing that ENaC current is involved in this response. Since Cl(-) transport is modulated by hypotonic shock, its contribution to the basal and hypotonic-induced transepithelial current was also assessed. Apical NPPB, a broad Cl(-) channel inhibitor and basolateral DIOA a potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC) inhibitor reduced the total and ENaC currents, showing that transcellular Cl(-) transport plays a major role in that process. During hypotonic shock, a basolateral Cl(-) influx, partly inhibited by NPPB is essential for the hypotonic-induced current rise. Hypotonic shock promoted apical ATP secretion and increased intracellular Ca(2+). While apyrase, an ATP scavenger, did not inhibit the hypotonic shock current response, W7 a calmodulin antagonist completely prevented the hypotonic current rise. These results indicate that a basolateral Cl(-) influx as well as Ca(2+)/calmodulin, but not ATP, are involved in the acute transepithelial current rise elicited by hypotonic shock.

  15. Elastolytic activity and alveolar epithelial type-1 cell damage after chronic LPS inhalation: Effects of dexamethasone and rolipram

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Frederick J. . E-mail: JohnsonFJ@Cardiff.ac.uk; Reynolds, Lucy J.; Toward, Toby J.

    2005-09-15

    This study investigated whether a correlation between leukocyte-derived elastolytic activity, alveolar epithelial type-1 cell damage, and leukocyte infiltration of the airways existed in guinea-pigs chronically exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The airway pathology of this model, notably the neutrophilia, resembles chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The effect of the corticosteroid, dexamethasone, or the phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4)-inhibitor, rolipram, on these features was studied. Conscious guinea-pigs were exposed for 1 h to single or repeated (nine) doses of LPS (30 {mu}g ml{sup -1}). Dexamethasone (20 mg kg{sup -1}, ip) or rolipram (1 mg kg{sup -1}, ip) was administered 24 and 0.5 h before the first exposure and daily thereafter. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was removed and elastolytic activity determined as the elastase-like release of Congo Red from impregnated elastin. The presence of the specific epithelial cell type-1 protein (40-42 kDa) RT1{sub 40} in BALF was identified by Western blotting using a rat monoclonal antibody and semi-quantified by dot-blot analysis. The antibody was found to identify guinea-pig RT1{sub 40}. BALF inflammatory cells, particularly neutrophils and macrophages, and elastolytic activity were increased in chronic LPS-exposed guinea-pigs, the latter by 90%. Chronic LPS exposure also increased (10.5-fold) RT1{sub 40} levels, indicating significant alveolar epithelial type-1 cell damage. Dexamethasone or rolipram treatment reduced the influx of inflammatory cells, the elastolytic activity (by 40% and 38%, respectively), and RT1{sub 40} levels (by 50% and 57%, respectively). In conclusion, chronic LPS-exposed guinea-pigs, like COPD, exhibit elastolytic lung damage. This was prevented by a PDE4 inhibitor and supports their development for suppressing this leukocyte-mediated pathology.

  16. A site-specific genetic modification for induction of pluripotency and subsequent isolation of derived lung alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing; Quan, Yuan; Sun, Huanhuan; Peng, Xinmiao; Zou, Zhengyun; Alcorn, Joseph L; Wetsel, Rick A; Wang, Dachun

    2014-02-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have great therapeutic potential in repairing defective lung alveoli. However, genetic abnormalities caused by vector integrations and low efficiency in generating hiPSCs, as well as difficulty in obtaining transplantable hiPSC-derived cell types are still major obstacles. Here we report a novel strategy using a single nonviral site-specific targeting vector with a combination of Tet-On inducible gene expression system, Cre/lox P switching gene expression system, and alveolar epithelial type II cell (ATIIC)-specific Neomycin(R) transgene expression system. With this strategy, a single copy of all of the required transgenes can be specifically knocked into a site immediately downstream of β-2-microglobulin (B2M) gene locus at a high frequency, without causing B2M dysfunction. Thus, the expression of reprogramming factors, Oct4, Sox2, cMyc, and Klf4, can be precisely regulated for efficient reprogramming of somatic cells into random integration-free or genetic mutation-free hiPSCs. The exogenous reprogramming factor transgenes can be subsequently removed after reprogramming by transient expression of Cre recombinase, and the resulting random integration-free and exogenous reprogramming factor-free hiPSCs can be selectively differentiated into a homogenous population of ATIICs. In addition, we show that these hiPSC-derived ATIICs exhibit ultrastructural characteristics and biological functions of normal ATIICs. When transplanted into bleomycin-challenged mice lungs, hiPSC-derived ATIICs efficiently remain and re-epithelialize injured alveoli to restore pulmonary function, preventing lung fibrosis and increasing survival without tumorigenic side effect. This strategy allows for the first time efficient generation of patient-specific ATIICs for possible future clinical applications. © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  17. Increased survival and proliferation of the epidemic strain Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense CRM0019 in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Giovanni Monteiro; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Real, Fernando; Teixeira, Daniela; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane

    2017-09-13

    Outbreaks of infections caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria have been reported worldwide generally associated with medical procedures. Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense CRM0019 was obtained during an epidemic of postsurgical infections and was characterized by increased persistence in vivo. To better understand the successful survival strategies of this microorganism, we evaluated its infectivity and proliferation in macrophages (RAW and BMDM) and alveolar epithelial cells (A549). For that, we assessed the following parameters, for both M. abscessus CRM0019 as well as the reference strain M. abscessus ATCC 19977: internalization, intracellular survival for up 3 days, competence to subvert lysosome fusion and the intracellular survival after cell reinfection. CRM0019 and ATCC 19977 strains showed the same internalization rate (approximately 30% after 6 h infection), in both A549 and RAW cells. However, colony forming units data showed that CRM0019 survived better in A549 cells than the ATCC 19977 strain. Phagosomal characteristics of CRM0019 showed the bacteria inside tight phagosomes in A549 cells, contrasting to the loosely phagosomal membrane in macrophages. This observation holds for the ATCC 19977 strain in both cell types. The competence to subvert lysosome fusion was assessed by acidification and acquisition of lysosomal protein. For M. abscessus strains the phagosomes were acidified in all cell lines; nevertheless, the acquisition of lysosomal protein was reduced by CRM0019 compared to the ATCC 19977 strain, in A549 cells. Conversely, in macrophages, both M. abscessus strains were located in mature phagosomes, however without bacterial death. Once recovered from macrophages M. abscessus could establish a new intracellular infection. Nevertheless, only CRM0019 showed a higher growth rate in A549, increasing nearly 10-fold after 48 and 72 h. M. abscessus CRM0019 creates a protective and replicative niche in alveolar epithelial cells mainly by

  18. REGULATION OF CYTOKINE PRODUCTION IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGES AND AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS IN RESPONSE TO AMBIENT AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES: FURTHER MECHANISTIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to better understand how ambient air particulate matter (PM) affect lung health, the two main airway cell types likely to interact with inhaled particles, alveolar macrophages (AM) and airway epithelial cells have been exposed to particles in vitro and followed for endp...

  19. REGULATION OF CYTOKINE PRODUCTION IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGES AND AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS IN RESPONSE TO AMBIENT AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES: FURTHER MECHANISTIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to better understand how ambient air particulate matter (PM) affect lung health, the two main airway cell types likely to interact with inhaled particles, alveolar macrophages (AM) and airway epithelial cells have been exposed to particles in vitro and followed for endp...

  20. Inflammation and the Intestinal Barrier: Leukocyte-Epithelial Cell Interactions, Cell Junction Remodeling, and Mucosal Repair.

    PubMed

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Parkos, Charles A; Nusrat, Asma

    2016-10-01

    The intestinal tract is lined by a single layer of columnar epithelial cells that forms a dynamic, permeable barrier allowing for selective absorption of nutrients, while restricting access to pathogens and food-borne antigens. Precise regulation of epithelial barrier function is therefore required for maintaining mucosal homeostasis and depends, in part, on barrier-forming elements within the epithelium and a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory factors in the mucosa. Pathologic states, such as inflammatory bowel disease, are associated with a leaky epithelial barrier, resulting in excessive exposure to microbial antigens, recruitment of leukocytes, release of soluble mediators, and ultimately mucosal damage. An inflammatory microenvironment affects epithelial barrier properties and mucosal homeostasis by altering the structure and function of epithelial intercellular junctions through direct and indirect mechanisms. We review our current understanding of complex interactions between the intestinal epithelium and immune cells, with a focus on pathologic mucosal inflammation and mechanisms of epithelial repair. We discuss leukocyte-epithelial interactions, as well as inflammatory mediators that affect the epithelial barrier and mucosal repair. Increased knowledge of communication networks between the epithelium and immune system will lead to tissue-specific strategies for treating pathologic intestinal inflammation. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Inflammation and the Intestinal Barrier: Leukocyte–Epithelial Cell Interactions, Cell Junction Remodeling, and Mucosal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal tract is lined by a single layer of columnar epithelial cells that forms a dynamic, permeable barrier allowing for selective absorption of nutrients, while restricting access to pathogens and food-borne antigens. Precise regulation of epithelial barrier function is therefore required for maintaining mucosal homeostasis and depends, in part, on barrier-forming elements within the epithelium and a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory factors in the mucosa. Pathologic states, such as inflammatory bowel disease, are associated with a leaky epithelial barrier, resulting in excessive exposure to microbial antigens, recruitment of leukocytes, release of soluble mediators, and ultimately mucosal damage. An inflammatory microenvironment affects epithelial barrier properties and mucosal homeostasis by altering the structure and function of epithelial intercellular junctions through direct and indirect mechanisms. We review our current understanding of complex interactions between the intestinal epithelium and immune cells, with a focus on pathologic mucosal inflammation and mechanisms of epithelial repair. We discuss leukocyte–epithelial interactions, as well as inflammatory mediators that affect the epithelial barrier and mucosal repair. Increased knowledge of communication networks between the epithelium and immune system will lead to tissue-specific strategies for treating pathologic intestinal inflammation. PMID:27436072

  2. Cytotoxicity and inflammation in human alveolar epithelial cells following exposure to occupational levels of gold and silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachand, George D.; Allen, Amy; Bachand, Marlene; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Seagrave, Jean Clare; Brozik, Susan M.

    2012-10-01

    While inhalation represents one of the most likely routes of exposure, the toxicity and response of nanoparticles at concentrations expected from such an exposure are not well understood. Here we characterized the in vitro response of human A549 adenocarcinomic alveolar epithelial cells following exposure to gold (AuNP) and silver (AgNP) nanoparticles at levels approximating an occupational exposure. Changes in neither oxidative stress nor cytotoxicity were significantly affected by exposure to AgNPs and AuNPs, regardless of NP type (Ag vs. Au), concentration, surface ligand (citrate or tannic acid), or size. An inflammatory response was, however, observed in response to 20 nm AgNPs and 20 nm AuNPs, where significant differences in the release of interleukin (IL)-8 but not IL-6 were observed. Additional data demonstrated that increased IL-8 secretion was strongly dependent on both nanoparticle size and concentration. Overall these data suggest that, while not acutely toxic, occupational exposure to AuNPs and AgNPs may trigger a significant inflammatory response in alveolar epithelium. Moreover, the differential responses in IL-8 and IL-6 secretion suggest that NPs may induce a response pathway that is distinct from those commonly elicited by allergens and pathogens.

  3. Staining histological lung sections with Sudan Black B or Sudan III for automated identification of alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jan Philipp; Pedersen, Lars; Mühlfeld, Christian; Ochs, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cells produce, store and secrete pulmonary surfactant and serve as progenitor cells for the alveolar epithelium. They are thus an interesting target in wide fields of pulmonary research. Stereological methods allow their quantification based on measurements on histological sections. A proper AE2 cell quantification, however, requires a method of tissue processing that results in little tissue shrinkage during processing. It was recently shown that a primary fixation with a mixture of glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde, postfixation with osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate and embedding in glycol methacrylate fulfills this requirement. However, a proper quantification, furthermore, requires a secure identification of the cells under the microscope. Classical approaches using routine stainings, high magnifications and systematic uniform random sampling can result in a tedious counting procedure. In this article we show that Sudan Black B and Sudan III staining in combination with the previously described "low shrinkage method" of tissue processing result in good staining of lamellar bodies of AE2 cells (their storing organelles of surfactant) and thus provide a good signal of AE2 cells, which allows their easy and secure identification even at rather low magnifications. We further show that this signal enables automated detection of AE2 cells by image analysis, which should make this method a suitable staining method for the recently developed and more efficient proportionator sampling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. IDH3 mediates apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells type 2 due to mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake during hypocapnia.

    PubMed

    Kiefmann, Martina; Tank, Sascha; Keller, Paula; Börnchen, Christian; Rinnenthal, Jan L; Tritt, Marc-Oliver; Schulte-Uentrop, Leonie; Olotu, Cynthia; Goetz, Alwin E; Kiefmann, Rainer

    2017-08-24

    In adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) pulmonary perfusion failure increases physiologic dead-space (VD/VT) correlating with mortality. High VD/VT results in alveolar hypocapnia, which has been demonstrated to cause edema formation, atelectasis, and surfactant depletion, evoked, at least in part, by apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). However, the mechanism underlying the hypocapnia-induced AEC apoptosis is unknown. Here, using fluorescent live-cell imaging of cultured AEC type 2 we could show that in terms of CO2 sensing the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 3 seems to be an important player because hypocapnia resulted independently from pH in an elevation of IDH3 activity and subsequently in an increase of NADH, the substrate of the respiratory chain. As a consequence, the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨ) rose causing a Ca(2+) shift from cytosol into mitochondria, whereas the IDH3 knockdown inhibited these responses. Furthermore, the hypocapnia-induced mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake resulted in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and both the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and ROS production induced apoptosis. Accordingly, we provide evidence that in AEC type 2 hypocapnia induces elevation of IDH3 activity leading to apoptosis. This finding might give new insight into the pathogenesis of ARDS and may help to develop novel strategies to reduce tissue injury in ARDS.

  5. Arsenic upregulates MMP-9 and inhibits wound repair in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Colin E; Liguori, Andrew E; Zong, Yue; Lantz, R Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L; Boitano, Scott

    2008-08-01

    As part of the innate immune defense, the polarized conducting lung epithelium acts as a barrier to keep particulates carried in respiration from underlying tissue. Arsenic is a metalloid toxicant that can affect the lung via inhalation or ingestion. We have recently shown that chronic exposure of mice or humans to arsenic (10-50 ppb) in drinking water alters bronchiolar lavage or sputum proteins consistent with reduced epithelial cell migration and wound repair in the airway. In this report, we used an in vitro model to examine effects of acute exposure of arsenic (15-290 ppb) on conducting airway lung epithelium. We found that arsenic at concentrations as low as 30 ppb inhibits reformation of the epithelial monolayer following scrape wounds of monolayer cultures. In an effort to understand functional contributions to epithelial wound repair altered by arsenic, we showed that acute arsenic exposure increases activity and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, an important protease in lung function. Furthermore, inhibition of MMP-9 in arsenic-treated cells improved wound repair. We propose that arsenic in the airway can alter the airway epithelial barrier by restricting proper wound repair in part through the upregulation of MMP-9 by lung epithelial cells.

  6. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway mediates chrysotile asbestos-induced alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    LI, PENG; LIU, TIE; KAMP, DAVID W.; LIN, ZIYING; WANG, YAHONG; LI, DONGHONG; YANG, LAWEI; HE, HUIJUAN; LIU, GANG

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chrysotile asbestos exposure is associated with an increased risk of mortality in combination with pulmonary diseases including lung cancer, mesothelioma and asbestosis. Multiple mechanisms by which chrysotile asbestos fibers induce pulmonary disease have been identified, however the role of apoptosis in human lung alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) has not yet been fully explored. Accumulating evidence implicates AEC apoptosis as a crucial event in the development of both idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and asbestosis. The aim of the present study was to determine whether chrysotile asbestos induces mitochondria-regulated (intrinsic) AEC apoptosis and, if so, whether this induction occurs via the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Human A549 bronchoalveolar carcinoma-derived cells with alveolar epithelial type II-like features were used. The present study showed that chrysotile asbestos induced a dose- and time-dependent decrease in A549 cell viability, which was accompanied by the activation of the MAPK c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), but not the MAPKs extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38. Chrysotile asbestos was also shown to induce intrinsic AEC apoptosis, as evidenced by the upregulation of the pro-apoptotic genes Bax and Bak, alongside the activation of caspase-9, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and the release of cytochrome c. Furthermore, the specific JNK inhibitor SP600125 blocked chrysotile asbestos-induced JNK activation and subsequent apoptosis, as assessed by both caspase-9 cleavage and PARP activation. The results of the present study demonstrated that chrysotile asbestos induces intrinsic AEC apoptosis by a JNK-dependent mechanism, and suggests a potential novel target for the modulation of chrysotile asbestos-associated lung diseases. PMID:25530474

  7. Ulinastatin post-treatment attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats and human alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yunpeng; Che, Wen; Zhao, Mingyan

    2017-01-01

    Ulinastatin (UTI), a serine protease inhibitor, possesses anti-inflammatory properties and has been suggested to modulate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear DNA-binding protein, plays a key role in the development of ALI. The aim of this study was to investigate whether UTI attenuates ALI through the inhibition of HMGB1 expression and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. ALI was induced in male rats by the intratracheal instillation of LPS (5 mg/kg). UTI was administered intraperitoneally 30 min following exposure to LPS. A549 alveolar epithelial cells were incubated with LPS in the presence or absence of UTI. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the levels of inflammatory cytokines. Western blot analysis was performed to detect the changes in the expression levels of Toll-like receptor 2/4 (TLR2/4) and the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). The results revealed that UTI significantly protected the animals from LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the decrease in the lung wet to dry weight ratio, total cells, neutrophils, macrophages and myeloperoxidase activity, associated with reduced lung histological damage. We also found that UTI post-treatment markedly inhibited the release of HMGB1 and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, UTI significantly inhibited the LPS-induced increase in TLR2/4 protein expression and NF-κB activation in lung tissues. In vitro, UTI markedly inhibited the expression of TLR2/4 and the activation of NF-κB in LPS-stimulated A549 alveolar epithelial cells. The findings of our study indicate that UTI attenuates LPS-induced ALI through the inhibition of HMGB1 expression in rats. These benefits are associated with the inhibition of the activation of the TLR2/4-NF-κB pathway by UTI. PMID:27959396

  8. Mechanisms of suppression of alveolar epithelial cell GM-CSF expression in the setting of hyperoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Anne; Vollbrecht, Timothy; Mir-Kasimov, Mustafa; McManus, Michael; Wilcoxen, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary expression of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is critically important for normal functional maturation of alveolar macrophages. We found previously that lung GM-CSF is dramatically suppressed in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) are a major source of GM-CSF in the peripheral lung, and in vivo hyperoxia resulted in greatly reduced expression of GM-CSF protein by AEC ex vivo. We now explore the mechanisms responsible for this effect, using primary cultures of murine AEC exposed to hyperoxia in vitro. Exposure of AEC to 80% oxygen/5% CO2 for 48 h did not induce overt toxicity, but resulted in significantly decreased GM-CSF protein and mRNA expression compared with cells in normoxia. Similar effects were seen when AEC were stressed with serum deprivation, an alternative inducer of oxidative stress. The effects in AEC were opposite those in a murine lung epithelial cell line (MLE-12 cells), in which hyperoxia induced GM-CSF expression. Both hyperoxia and serum deprivation resulted in increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in AEC. Hyperoxia and serum deprivation induced significantly accelerated turnover of GM-CSF mRNA. Treatment of AEC with catalase during oxidative stress preserved GM-CSF protein and mRNA and was associated with stabilization of GM-CSF mRNA. We conclude that hyperoxia-induced suppression of AEC GM-CSF expression is a function of ROS-induced destabilization of GM-CSF mRNA. We speculate that AEC oxidative stress results in significantly impaired pulmonary innate immune defense due to effects on local GM-CSF expression in the lung. PMID:20034963

  9. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway mediates chrysotile asbestos-induced alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Liu, Tie; Kamp, David W; Lin, Ziying; Wang, Yahong; Li, Donghong; Yang, Lawei; He, Huijuan; Liu, Gang

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to chrysotile asbestos exposure is associated with an increased risk of mortality in combination with pulmonary diseases including lung cancer, mesothelioma and asbestosis. Multiple mechanisms by which chrysotile asbestos fibers induce pulmonary disease have been identified, however the role of apoptosis in human lung alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) has not yet been fully explored. Accumulating evidence implicates AEC apoptosis as a crucial event in the development of both idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and asbestosis. The aim of the present study was to determine whether chrysotile asbestos induces mitochondria‑regulated (intrinsic) AEC apoptosis and, if so, whether this induction occurs via the activation of mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPK). Human A549 bronchoalveolar carcinoma‑derived cells with alveolar epithelial type II‑like features were used. The present study showed that chrysotile asbestos induced a dose‑ and time‑dependent decrease in A549 cell viability, which was accompanied by the activation of the MAPK c‑Jun N‑terminal kinases (JNK), but not the MAPKs extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 and p38. Chrysotile asbestos was also shown to induce intrinsic AEC apoptosis, as evidenced by the upregulation of the pro‑apoptotic genes Bax and Bak, alongside the activation of caspase‑9, poly (ADP‑ribose) polymerase (PARP), and the release of cytochrome c. Furthermore, the specific JNK inhibitor SP600125 blocked chrysotile asbestos‑induced JNK activation and subsequent apoptosis, as assessed by both caspase‑9 cleavage and PARP activation. The results of the present study demonstrated that chrysotile asbestos induces intrinsic AEC apoptosis by a JNK‑dependent mechanism, and suggests a potential novel target for the modulation of chrysotile asbestos‑associated lung diseases.

  10. Pirfenidone inhibits p38-mediated generation of procoagulant microparticles by human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Neri, Tommaso; Lombardi, Stefania; Faìta, Francesca; Petrini, Silvia; Balìa, Cristina; Scalise, Valentina; Pedrinelli, Roberto; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Celi, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Pirfenidone is a drug recently approved for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis but its mechanisms of action are partially unknown. We have previously demonstrated that the airways of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis contain procoagulant microparticles that activate coagulation factor X to its active form, Xa, a proteinase that signals fibroblast growth and differentiation, thus potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease. We also reported that in vitro exposure of human alveolar cells to H2O2 causes microparticle generation. Since p38 activation is involved in microparticle generation in some cell models and p38 inhibition is one of the mechanisms of action of pirfenidone, we investigated the hypothesis that H2O2-induced generation of microparticles by alveolar cells is dependent on p38 phosphorylation and is inhibited by pirfenidone. H2O2 stimulation of alveolar cells caused p38 phosphorylation that was inhibited by pirfenidone. The drug also inhibited H2O2 induced microparticle generation as assessed by two independent methods (solid phase thrombin generation and flow cytometry). The shedding of microparticle-bound tissue factor activity was also inhibited by pirfenidone. Inhibition of p38-mediated generation of procoagulant microparticle is a previously unrecognized mechanism of action of the antifibrotic drug, pirfenidone.

  11. XB130 promotes bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation in airway epithelial repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Hiroaki; Wang, Yingchun; Bai, Xiaohui; Zamel, Ricardo; Cho, Hae-Ra; Liu, Hongmei; Lira, Alonso; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liu, Mingyao

    2015-01-01

    Proliferation of bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) is essential for epithelial repair. XB130 is a novel adaptor protein involved in the regulation of epithelial cell survival, proliferation and migration through the PI3K/Akt pathway. To determine the role of XB130 in airway epithelial injury repair and regeneration, a naphthalene-induced airway epithelial injury model was used with XB130 knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates. In XB130 KO mice, at days 7 and 14, small airway epithelium repair was significantly delayed with fewer number of Club cells (previously called Clara cells). CCSP (Club cell secreted protein) mRNA expression was also significantly lower in KO mice at day 7. At day 5, there were significantly fewer proliferative epithelial cells in the KO group, and the number of BASCs significantly increased in WT mice but not in KO mice. At day 7, phosphorylation of Akt, GSK-3β, and the p85α subunit of PI3K was observed in airway epithelial cells in WT mice, but to a much lesser extent in KO mice. Microarray data also suggest that PI3K/Akt-related signals were regulated differently in KO and WT mice. An inhibitory mechanism for cell proliferation and cell cycle progression was suggested in KO mice. XB130 is involved in bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation, likely through the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway. PMID:26360608

  12. Human amniotic epithelial cells combined with silk fibroin scaffold in the repair of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting-gang; Xu, Jie; Zhu, Ai-hua; Lu, Hua; Miao, Zong-ning; Zhao, Peng; Hui, Guo-zhen; Wu, Wei-jiang

    2016-01-01

    Treatment and functional reconstruction after central nervous system injury is a major medical and social challenge. An increasing number of researchers are attempting to use neural stem cells combined with artificial scaffold materials, such as fibroin, for nerve repair. However, such approaches are challenged by ethical and practical issues. Amniotic tissue, a clinical waste product, is abundant, and amniotic epithelial cells are pluripotent, have low immunogenicity, and are not the subject of ethical debate. We hypothesized that amniotic epithelial cells combined with silk fibroin scaffolds would be conducive to the repair of spinal cord injury. To test this, we isolated and cultured amniotic epithelial cells, and constructed complexes of these cells and silk fibroin scaffolds. Implantation of the cell-scaffold complex into a rat model of spinal cord injury resulted in a smaller glial scar in the damaged cord tissue than in model rats that received a blank scaffold, or amniotic epithelial cells alone. In addition to a milder local immunological reaction, the rats showed less inflammatory cell infiltration at the transplant site, milder host-versus-graft reaction, and a marked improvement in motor function. These findings confirm that the transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells combined with silk fibroin scaffold can promote the repair of spinal cord injury. Silk fibroin scaffold can provide a good nerve regeneration microenvironment for amniotic epithelial cells. PMID:27904501

  13. Cytoskeletal re-arrangement in TGF-β1-induced alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition studied by atomic force microscopy and high-content analysis.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Stephen T; Medina, Carlos; Davies, Anthony M; Ehrhardt, Carsten

    2012-04-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is closely implicated in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Associated with this phenotypic transition is the acquisition of an elongated cell morphology and establishment of stress fibers. The extent to which these EMT-associated changes influence cellular mechanics is unclear. We assessed the biomechanical properties of alveolar epithelial cells (A549) following exposure to TGF-β1. Using atomic force microscopy, changes in cell stiffness and surface membrane features were determined. Stimulation with TGF-β1 gave rise to a significant increase in stiffness, which was augmented by a collagen I matrix. Additionally, TGF-β1-treated cells exhibited a rougher surface profile with notable protrusions. Simultaneous quantitative examination of the morphological attributes of stimulated cells using an image-based high-content analysis system revealed dramatic alterations in cell shape, F-actin content and distribution. Together, these investigations point to a strong correlation between the cytoskeletal-associated cellular architecture and the mechanical dynamics of alveolar epithelial cells undergoing EMT. From the Clinical Editor: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Using atomic force microscopy, the authors demonstrate a strong correlation between the cytoskeletal-associated cellular architecture and the mechanical dynamics of alveolar epithelial cells undergoing mesenchymal transition.

  14. uPAR regulates bronchial epithelial repair in vitro and is elevated in asthmatic epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Nijmeh, Hala S; Brightling, Christopher E; Sayers, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Background The asthma-associated gene urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) may be involved in epithelial repair and airway remodelling. These processes are not adequately targeted by existing asthma therapies. A fuller understanding of the pathways involved in remodelling may lead to development of new therapeutic opportunities. uPAR expression in the lung epithelium of normal subjects and patients with asthma was investigated and the contribution of uPAR to epithelial wound repair in vitro was studied using primary bronchial epithelial cells (NHBECs). Methods Bronchial biopsy sections from normal subjects and patients with asthma were immunostained for uPAR. NHBECs were used in a scratch wound model to investigate the contribution of the plasminogen pathway to repair. The pathway was targeted via blocking of the interaction between urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and uPAR and overexpression of uPAR. The rate of wound closure and activation of intracellular signalling pathways and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured. Results uPAR expression was significantly increased in the bronchial epithelium of patients with asthma compared with controls. uPAR expression was increased during wound repair in monolayer and air-liquid interface-differentiated NHBEC models. Blocking the uPA–uPAR interaction led to attenuated wound repair via changes in Erk1/2, Akt and p38MAPK signalling. Cells engineered to have raised levels of uPAR showed attenuated repair via sequestration of uPA by soluble uPAR. Conclusions The uPAR pathway is required for efficient epithelial wound repair. Increased uPAR expression, as seen in the bronchial epithelium of patients with asthma, leads to attenuated wound repair which may contribute to the development and progression of airway remodelling in asthma. This pathway may therefore represent a potential novel therapeutic target for the treatment of asthma. PMID:22139533

  15. Baicalin alleviates radiation-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of primary type II alveolar epithelial cells via TGF-β and ERK/GSK3β signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinhua; Zhong, Yazhen; Lin, Zechen; Lin, Xianlei; Chen, Zhaohui; Wu, Xuping; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Haiqiao; Huang, Siyu; Zhu, Yuan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Lin, Shengyou

    2017-09-16

    Radiation therapy is commonly used to treat thoracic malignancies. However, it may lead to severe lung pneumonitis and ultimately fibrosis. Irradiation has been reported to increase epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC), which play an important role in pulmonary fibrosis. The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and ERK/glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) pathways are critically involved in radiation-induced EMT. In the present study, we investigated whether baicalin was a novel therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced EMT in type II AEC. Primary type II AEC were isolated and treated with (60)Co γ-rays and a series doses of baicalin (2μM, 10μM and 50μM). The ultrastructure and morphology changes were observed by transmission electron microscopy and optical microscopy, respectively. Protein expression was determined by western blotting analysis. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to detect the nuclear translocation of Snail. After irradiation, type II AEC displayed a mesenchymal-like morphology accompanied by a decrease in E-cadherin expression, an increase in the expression of Vimentin and α-SMA. Nuclear translocation of Snail, the activation of TGF-β/Smad pathway, and the inactivation of GSK3β were prominent in radiation-treated cells. Baicalin significantly attenuated the effects of radiation on type II AEC. Baicalin may a useful radioprotective agent through suppressing the EMT of type II AEC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES INDUCE ABERRANT ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL DIRECTED CELL MOVEMENT BY DISRUPTION OF POLARITY MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption of the respiratory epithelium contributes to the progression of a variety of respiratory diseases that are aggravated by exposure to air pollutants, specifically traffic-based pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Recognizing that lung repair following inj...

  17. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES INDUCE ABERRANT ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL DIRECTED CELL MOVEMENT BY DISRUPTION OF POLARITY MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption of the respiratory epithelium contributes to the progression of a variety of respiratory diseases that are aggravated by exposure to air pollutants, specifically traffic-based pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Recognizing that lung repair following inj...

  18. Asbestos fibre length-dependent detachment injury to alveolar epithelial cells in vitro: role of a fibronectin-binding receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, K.; Miller, B. G.; Sara, E.; Slight, J.; Brown, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    A short and a long fibre sample of amosite asbestos were tested for their effects on cells of the human Type 2 alveolar epithelial cell-line A549 in vitro. The long amosite sample was found to cause a rapid detachment of the epithelial cells live from their substratum. At the highest dose, on average 28% of the cells present were detached in this way. Studies on the mechanism of the detachment injury showed that it did not involve oxidants since it was not ameliorated by scavengers of active oxygen species. Neither was the effect reduced by treatment of the fibres with the iron chelator Desferal. Treatments reported to increase the interaction between fibres and cells, serum and poly-L-lysine, did not influence the detachment injury, nor did lung lining fluid. Conversely, the fibronectin tripeptide RGD alone could cause detachment which suggested that a fibronectin-binding integrin was involved. This receptor could be reduced in activity by long fibre exposure, leading to detachment. The detaching effect of fibre could be mimicked by the protein kinase C activator PMA, and so the second messenger system of the cell could also be involved. This type of injury could be important in the pathology associated with exposure to long fibres. PMID:8392859

  19. The verapamil transporter expressed in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) does not interact with β2-receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Johanna J; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2014-01-01

      Affinity of different organs for verapamil is highly variable and organ-specific. For example, the drug exhibits high levels of accumulation in lung tissues. A transporter recognising verapamil as a substrate has previously been identified in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and in rat retinal capillary endothelial (TR-iBRB2) cells. This transporter is distinct from any of the cloned organic cation transporters. Therefore, we hypothesised that the verapamil transporter is also functionally expressed in the human respiratory mucosa. Moreover, we tested the hypothesis that this transporter interacts with pulmonary administered cationic drugs such as β2-agonists. The uptake of [(3)H]verapamil was studied in A549 human alveolar epithelial cell monolayers at different times and concentrations. The influence of extracellular proton concentration and various organic cations on verapamil uptake was determined. Verapamil uptake into A549 cells was time- and concentration-dependent, sensitive to pH and had a Km value of 39.8 ± 8.2 µM. Verapamil uptake was also sensitive to inhibition by amantadine, quinidine and pyrilamine, but insensitive to other typical modulators of organic cation and choline transporters. Whilst we demonstrated functional activity of the elusive verapamil transporter at the lung epithelium, our data suggest that this transporter does not interact with β2-agonists at therapeutic concentrations.

  20. IL-8 inhibits cAMP-stimulated alveolar epithelial fluid transport via a GRK2/PI3K-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Jérémie; McNicholas, Carmel M.; Carles, Michel; Goolaerts, Arnaud; Houseman, Benjamin T.; Dickinson, Dale A.; Iles, Karen E.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Matthay, Michael A.; Pittet, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Patients with acute lung injury (ALI) who retain maximal alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) have better clinical outcomes. Experimental and small clinical studies have shown that β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists enhance AFC via a cAMP-dependent mechanism. However, two multicenter phase 3 clinical trials failed to show that β2AR agonists provide a survival advantage in patients with ALI. We hypothesized that IL-8, an important mediator of ALI, directly antagonizes the alveolar epithelial response to β2AR agonists. Short-circuit current and whole-cell patch-clamping experiments revealed that IL-8 or its rat analog CINC-1 decreases by 50% β2AR agonist-stimulated vectorial Cl− and net fluid transport across rat and human alveolar epithelial type II cells via a reduction in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator activity and biosynthesis. This reduction was mediated by heterologous β2AR desensitization and down-regulation (50%) via the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2)/PI3K signaling pathway. Inhibition of CINC-1 restored β2AR agonist-stimulated AFC in an experimental model of ALI in rats. Finally, consistent with the experimental results, high pulmonary edema fluid levels of IL-8 (>4000 pg/ml) were associated with impaired AFC in patients with ALI. These results demonstrate a novel role for IL-8 in inhibiting β2AR agonist-stimulated alveolar epithelial fluid transport via GRK2/PI3K-dependent mechanisms.—Roux, J., McNicholas, C. M., Carles, M., Goolaerts, A., Houseman, B. T., Dickinson, D. A., Iles, K. E., Ware, L. B., Matthay, M. A., Pittet, J.-F. IL-8 inhibits cAMP-stimulated alveolar epithelial fluid transport via a GRK2/PI3K-dependent mechanism. PMID:23221335

  1. Epithelial Stem Cells and Implications for Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Plikus, Maksim V.; Gay, Denise L.; Treffeisen, Elsa; Wang, Anne; Supapannachart, Rarinthip June; Cotsarelis, George

    2012-01-01

    Activation of epithelial stem cells and efficient recruitment of their proliferating progeny plays a critical role in cutaneous wound healing. The reepithelialized wound epidermis hasa mosaic composition consisting of progeny that can be traced back both to epidermal and several types of hair follicle stem cells. The contribution of hair follicle stem cells to wound epidermis is particularly intriguing as it involves lineage identity change from follicular to epidermal. Studies from our laboratory show that hair follicle-fated bulge stem cells commit only transient amplifying epidermal progeny that participate in the initial wound re-epithelialization, but eventually are outcompeted by other epidermal clones and largely disappear after a few months. Conversely, recently described stem cell populations residing in the isthmus portion of hair follicle contribute long-lasting progeny toward wound epidermis and, arguably, give rise to new inter-follicular epidermal stem cells. The role of epithelial stem cells during wound healing is not limited to regenerating stratified epidermis. By studying regenerative response in large cutaneous wounds, our laboratory uncovered that epithelial cells in the center of the wound can acquire greater morphogenetic plasticity and, together with the underlying wound dermis, can engage in an embryonic-like process of hair follicle neogenesis. Future studies should uncover cellular and signaling basis of this remarkable adult wound regeneration phenomenon. PMID:23085626

  2. Deleterious impact of hyperglycemia on cystic fibrosis airway ion transport and epithelial repair.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Claudia; Bardou, Olivier; Maillé, Émilie; Berthiaume, Yves; Brochiero, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF)-related diabetes (CFRD) is associated with faster pulmonary function decline. Thus, we evaluated the impact of hyperglycemia on airway epithelial repair and transepithelial ion transport, which are critical in maintaining lung integrity and function. Non-CF and CF airway epithelial cells were exposed to low (LG) or high (HG) glucose before ion current and wound repair rate measurements. CFTR and K+ currents decreased after HG treatments. HG also reduced the wound healing rates of non-CF and CF cell monolayers. Although CFTR correction with VRT-325 accelerated the healing rates of CF cells monolayers under LG conditions, this improvement was significantly abrogated under HG conditions. Our data highlights a deleterious impact of hyperglycemia on ion transport and epithelial repair functions, which could contribute to the deterioration in lung function in CFRD patients. HG may also interfere with the beneficial effects of CFTR rescue on airway epithelial repair. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nasal epithelial repair and remodeling in physical injury, infection, and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Gordon, William M; Wang, De-Yun

    2013-06-01

    To summarize the current knowledge of cellular and molecular mechanisms of nasal epithelial repair and remodeling during physical and pathophysiological conditions. Nasal epithelial repair and remodeling is a highly organized and well coordinated process, involving inflammation, proliferation, differentiation, matrix deposition, and remodeling, and is regulated by a wide variety of growth factors and cytokines. From the in-vivo and in-vitro studies conducted in both human and animal models, undifferentiated basal cells (progenitors) are able to migrate from adjacent epithelium, spread over the denuded basement membrane, and proliferate in injured regions (self-renewal) in necessary (homeostasis) or excessive (hyperplasia) degree. Progenitor cells reorient to an apical-basal polarity, and progressively differentiate into ciliated and nonciliated columnar cells and goblet cells, reconstituting a functional respiratory epithelium after several weeks. This recovery process can be observed during various types and severity of injury, and also in common nasal diseases, including acute viral, allergic, and nonallergic rhinitis, as well as chronic rhinosinusitis with and without nasal polyps. Although nearly 10 000 articles about nasal epithelium have been published in the last decade, the mechanisms underlying the nasal epithelial repair are still understood at only a superficial descriptive level. In order to advance rhinology to the next level of a comprehensive knowledge of the orchestrated genetic and molecular processes acting during epithelial repair, combined clinical and experimental studies using sophisticated investigational plans to elucidate the functions of both the protein-coding and regulatory portions of the human genome are required.

  4. Role of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide induced by intermittent hypoxia in airway epithelial wound repair in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Satoshi; Sato, Atsuyasu; Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Satooka, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Koichi; Tanimura, Kazuya; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Inouchi, Morito; Handa, Tomohiro; Oga, Toru; Muro, Shigeo; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2016-05-15

    The airway epithelium acts as a frontline barrier against various environmental insults and its repair process after airway injury is critical for the lung homeostasis restoration. Recently, the role of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as transcription-independent damage signaling has been highlighted in the wound repair process. Both conditions of continuous hypoxia and intermittent hypoxia (IH) induce ROS. Although IH is important in clinical settings, the roles of IH-induced ROS in the airway repair process have not been investigated. In this study, we firstly showed that IH induced mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and significantly decreased bronchial epithelial cell migration, prevented by catalase treatment in a wound scratch assay. RhoA activity was higher during repair process in the IH condition compared to in the normoxic condition, resulting in the cellular morphological changes shown by immunofluorescence staining: round cells, reduced central stress fiber numbers, pronounced cortical actin filament distributions, and punctate focal adhesions. These phenotypes were replicated by exogenous H2O2 treatment under the normoxic condition. Our findings confirmed the transcription-independent role of IH-induced intracellular ROS in the bronchial epithelial cell repair process and might have significant implications for impaired bronchial epithelial cell regeneration.

  5. Brief mechanical ventilation causes differential epithelial repair along the airways of fetal, preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Deptula, Nicole; Royse, Emily; Kemp, Matthew W; Miura, Yuichiro; Kallapur, Suhas G; Jobe, Alan H; Hillman, Noah H

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical ventilation of preterm lambs causes lung inflammation and injury to the airway epithelium, which is repaired by 15 days after ventilation. In mice, activated basal cells (p63+, KRT14+, KRT8+) initiate injury repair to the trachea, whereas club cells coordinate distal airway repair. In both human and sheep, basal cells line the pseudostratified airways to the distal bronchioles with club cells only present in terminal bronchioles. Mechanical ventilation causes airway epithelial injury that is repaired through basal cell activation in the fetal lung. Ewes at 123 ± 1 day gestational age had the head and chest of the fetus exteriorized and tracheostomy placed. With placental circulation intact, fetal lambs were mechanically ventilated with up to 15 ml/kg for 15 min with 95% N2/5% CO2 Fetal lambs were returned to the uterus for up to 24 h. The trachea, left mainstem bronchi, and peripheral lung were evaluated for epithelial injury and cellular response consistent with repair. Peripheral lung tissue had inflammation, pro-inflammatory cytokine production, epithelial growth factor receptor ligand upregulation, increased p63 expression, and proliferation of pro-SPB, TTF-1 positive club cells. In bronchi, KRT14 and KRT8 mRNA increased without increases in Notch pathway mRNA or proliferation. In trachea, mRNA increased for Notch ligands, SAM pointed domain-containing Ets transcription factor and mucin 5B, but not for basal cell markers. A brief period of mechanical ventilation causes differential epithelial activation between trachea, bronchi, and peripheral lung. The repair mechanisms identified in adult mice occur at different levels of airway branching in fetal sheep with basal and club cell activation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Nadph oxidase regulates alveolar epithelial sodium channel activity and lung fluid balance in vivo via O2− signaling

    PubMed Central

    Goodson, Preston; Kumar, Amrita; Jain, Lucky; Kundu, Kousik; Murthy, Niren; Koval, Michael

    2012-01-01

    To define roles for reactive oxygen species (ROS) and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in maintaining lung fluid balance in vivo, we used two novel whole animal imaging approaches. Live X-ray fluoroscopy enabled quantification of air space fluid content of C57BL/6J mouse lungs challenged by intratracheal (IT) instillation of saline; results were confirmed by using conventional lung wet-to-dry weight ratios and Evans blue as measures of pulmonary edema. Visualization and quantification of ROS produced in lungs was performed in mice that had been administered a redox-sensitive dye, hydro-Cy7, by IT instillation. We found that inhibition of NADPH oxidase with a Rac-1 inhibitor, NSC23766, resulted in alveolar flooding, which correlated with a decrease in lung ROS production in vivo. Consistent with a role for Nox2 in alveolar fluid balance, Nox2−/− mice showed increased retention of air space fluid compared with wild-type controls. Interestingly, fluoroscopic analysis of C57BL/6J lungs IT instilled with LPS showed an acute stimulation of lung fluid clearance and ROS production in vivo that was abrogated by the ROS scavenger tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPO). Acute application of LPS increased the activity of 20 pS nonselective ENaC channels in rat type 1 cells; the average number of channel and single-channel open probability (NPo) increased from 0.14 ± 0.04 to 0.62 ± 0.23. Application of TEMPO to the same cell-attached recording caused an immediate significant decrease in ENaC NPo to 0.04 ± 0.03. These data demonstrate that, in vivo, ROS has the capacity to stimulate lung fluid clearance by increasing ENaC activity. PMID:22160304

  7. Incorporation of quercetin in respirable lipid microparticles: effect on stability and cellular uptake on A549 pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Scalia, Santo; Trotta, Valentina; Traini, Daniela; Young, Paul M; Sticozzi, Claudia; Cervellati, Franco; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop controlled release inhalable lipid microparticles (LMs) loaded with the antioxidant flavonoid, quercetin and to investigate the interaction of these microparticles with A549 pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells. The LMs were produced using different lipidic materials and surfactants, by melt emulsification followed by a sonication step. The most efficient modulation of the in vitro release of quercetin was achieved by the LMs prepared with tristearin and hydrogenated phosphatidylcholine, which were used for subsequent studies. These LMs exhibited a quercetin loading of 11.8±0.3%, and a volume median diameter, determined by laser diffraction, of 4.1±0.2μm. Moreover, their mass median aerodynamic diameter (4.82±0.15μm) and fine particle fraction (27.2±3.9%), as measured by multi-stage liquid impinger, were suitable for pulmonary delivery. Quercetin was found to be highly unstable (complete decomposition within 6-h incubation) in Ham's F-12 medium used for A549 cell culture. Degradation was markedly reduced (16.4% of the initial quercetin content still present after 24-h incubation) after encapsulation in the lipid particle system. Viability studies performed by lactate dehydrogenase assay, demonstrated that quercetin LMs showed no significant cytotoxicity on the A549 cells, over the concentration 0.1-5μM. The uptake of quercetin by the A549 lung alveolar cells was also investigated. After 4-h incubation, the accumulation of quercetin in the A549 cells was significantly higher (2.3-fold increase) for the microparticle entrapped flavonoid when compare to non-encapsulated quercetin. The enhanced intracellular delivery of quercetin achieved by the LMs is likely due to the flavonoid stabilization after encapsulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by glass fibers on human alveolar epithelial cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla; Ledda, Caterina; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Bracci, Massimo; Santarelli, Lory; Renis, Marcella; Ferrante, Margherita; Cardile, Venera

    2015-04-01

    Man-made vitreous fibers have been widely used as insulation material as asbestos substitutes; however their morphology and composition raises concerns. In 1988 the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified fiberglass, rock wool, slag wool, and ceramic fibers as Group 2B, i.e. possibly carcinogenic to humans. In 2002 it reassigned fiberglass, rock and slag wool, and continuous glass filaments to Group 3, not classifiable as carcinogenic to humans. The aim of this study was to verify the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects and oxidative stress production induced by in vitro exposure of human alveolar epithelial cells A549 to glass fibers with a predominant diameter <3 μm (97%) and length >5 μm (93%). A549 cells were incubated with 5, 50, or 100 μg/ml (2.1, 21, and 42 μg/cm(2), respectively) of glass fibers for 72 h. Cytotoxicity and DNA damage were tested by the MTT and the Comet assay, respectively. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by Western blotting, production of nitric oxide (NO) with Griess reagent, and concentration of reactive oxygen species by fluorescent quantitative analysis with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). The results showed that glass fiber exposure significantly reduced cell viability and increased DNA damage and oxidative stress production in a concentration-dependent manner, demonstrating that glass fibers exert cytotoxic and genotoxic effects related to increased oxidative stress on the human alveolar cell line A549. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Wound repair and anti-oxidative capacity is regulated by ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chi; Liu, Hui-jun; Xiang, Yang; Tan, Yu-rong; Zhu, Xiao-lin; Qin, Xiao-qun

    2010-08-01

    Integrin beta 4 (ITGB4) is a structural adhesion molecule which engages in maintaining the integrity of airway epithelial cells. Its specific cytomembrane structural feature strongly indicates that ITGB4 may engage in many signaling pathways and physiologic processes. However, in addition to adhesion, the specific biologic significance of ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells is almost unknown. In this article, we investigated the expression and functional properties of ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro. Human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14O-cells) and primary rat tracheal epithelial cells (RTE cells) were used to determine ITGB4 expression under ozone tress or mechanical damage, respectively. An ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged asthma model was used to investigate ITGB4 expression after antigen exposure in vivo. In addition, an ITGB4 overexpression vector and ITGB4 silence virus vector were constructed and transfected into RTE cells. Then, wound repair ability and anti-oxidation capacity was evaluated. Our results demonstrated that, on the edge of mechanically wounded cell areas, ITGB4 expression was increased after mechanical injury. After ozone stress, upregulation expression of ITGB4 was also detected. In the OVA-challenged asthma model, ITGB4 expression was decreased on airway epithelial cells accompanying with structural disruption and damage of anti-oxidation capacity. Besides, our study revealed that upregulation of ITGB4 promotes wound repair ability and anti-oxidative ability, while such abilities were blocked when ITGB4 was silenced. Taken together, these results showed that ITGB4 was a new interesting molecule involved in the regulation of wound repair and anti-oxidation processes for airway epithelial cells.

  10. Effect of timing of palatal repair on the transverse development of maxillary alveolar arch in complete-cleft cases.

    PubMed

    Shamsudheen, M; Utreja, A; Tewari, A; Chari, P S

    1991-03-01

    Forty cleft cases in the age range of 5-12 years where the palatal repair had been performed at 16-24 months (17 cases), 24-36 months (15 cases) and 36-72 months (8 cases) were assessed retrospectively, for the status of maxillary arch and were segregated as acceptable and unacceptable. Plaster casts were prepared from alginate impressions and their graphical reproduction using Huddart's technique, were used to measure the alveolar arch. Anterior palatal measurement (C-C') and posterior palatal measurement (P-P') of the cleft subjects were compared with that in the non-cleft matched controls. The 16-24 month group showed 41.2% acceptable and 58.8% unacceptable arch cases. The 24-36 month group showed that 73.4% had acceptable arches and 26.6% had unacceptable arches. In the 36-72 months group the arch was acceptable in 62.5% cases and unacceptable in 37.5% cases. It was concluded that palatal repair performed before 24 months of age adversely affected the maxillary growth, whereas most favourable growth of maxillary arch occurred when the repair was done between 24-36 months.

  11. Rat respiratory coronavirus infection: replication in airway and alveolar epithelial cells and the innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Funk, C. Joel; Manzer, Rizwan; Miura, Tanya A.; Groshong, Steve D.; Ito, Yoko; Travanty, Emily A.; Leete, Jennifer; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Mason, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    The rat coronavirus sialodacryoadenitis virus (SDAV) causes respiratory infection and provides a system for investigating respiratory coronaviruses in a natural host. A viral suspension in the form of a microspray aerosol was delivered by intratracheal instillation into the distal lung of 6–8-week-old Fischer 344 rats. SDAV inoculation produced a 7 % body weight loss over a 5 day period that was followed by recovery over the next 7 days. SDAV caused focal lesions in the lung, which were most severe on day 4 post-inoculation (p.i.). Immunofluorescent staining showed that four cell types supported SDAV virus replication in the lower respiratory tract, namely Clara cells, ciliated cells in the bronchial airway and alveolar type I and type II cells in the lung parenchyma. In bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) a neutrophil influx increased the population of neutrophils to 45 % compared with 6 % of the cells in control samples on day 2 after mock inoculation. Virus infection induced an increase in surfactant protein SP-D levels in BALF of infected rats on days 4 and 8 p.i. that subsided by day 12. The concentrations of chemokines MCP-1, LIX and CINC-1 in BALF increased on day 4 p.i., but returned to control levels by day 8. Intratracheal instillation of rats with SDAV coronavirus caused an acute, self-limited infection that is a useful model for studying the early events of the innate immune response to respiratory coronavirus infections in lungs of the natural virus host. PMID:19741068

  12. Tracking translocation of industrially relevant engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) across alveolar epithelial monolayers in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Joel M.; Derk, Raymond; Wang, Liying; Godleski, John; Kobzik, Lester; Brain, Joseph; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the fate of industrially relevant engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in the lungs. Inhalation exposure and subsequent translocation of ENMs across the epithelial lining layer of the lung might contribute to clearance, toxic effects or both. To allow precise quantitation of translocation across lung epithelial cells, we developed a method for tracking industrially-relevant metal oxide ENMs in vitro using neutron activation. The versatility and sensitivity of the proposed In Vitro Epithelial Translocation (INVET) system was demonstrated using a variety of industry relevant ENMs including CeO2 of various primary particle diameter, ZnO, and SiO2-coated-CeO2 and ZnO particles. ENMs were neutron activated, forming gamma emitting isotopes 141Ce and 65Zn respectively. Calu-3 lung epithelial cells cultured to confluency on transwell inserts were exposed to neutron-activated ENM dispersions at sub-lethal doses to investigate the link between ENM properties and translocation potential. The effects of ENM exposure on monolayer integrity was monitored by various methods. ENM translocation across the cellular monolayer was assessed by gamma spectrometry following 2, 4 and 24 hours of exposure. Our results demonstrate that ENMs translocated in small amounts (e.g. <0.01% of the delivered dose at 24 h), predominantly via transcellular pathways without compromising monolayer integrity or disrupting tight junctions. It was also demonstrated that the delivery of particles in suspension to cells in culture is proportional to translocation, emphasizing the importance of accurate dosimetry when comparing ENM-cellular interactions for large panels of materials. The reported INVET system for tracking industrially relevant ENMs while accounting for dosimetry can be a valuable tool for investigating nano-bio interactions in the future. PMID:24479615

  13. Tracking translocation of industrially relevant engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) across alveolar epithelial monolayers in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel M; Derk, Raymond; Wang, Liying; Godleski, John; Kobzik, Lester; Brain, Joseph; Demokritou, Philip

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Relatively little is known about the fate of industrially relevant engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in the lungs that can be used to convert administered doses to delivered doses. Inhalation exposure and subsequent translocation of ENMs across the epithelial lining layer of the lung might contribute to clearance, toxic effects or both. To allow precise quantitation of translocation across lung epithelial cells, we developed a method for tracking industrially relevant metal oxide ENMs in vitro using neutron activation. The versatility and sensitivity of the proposed in vitro epithelial translocation (INVET) system was demonstrated using a variety of industry relevant ENMs including CeO2 of various primary particle diameter, ZnO, and SiO2-coated CeO2 and ZnO particles. ENMs were neutron activated, forming gamma emitting isotopes (141)Ce and (65)Zn, respectively. Calu-3 lung epithelial cells cultured to confluency on transwell inserts were exposed to neutron-activated ENM dispersions at sub-lethal doses to investigate the link between ENM properties and translocation potential. The effects of ENM exposure on monolayer integrity was monitored by various methods. ENM translocation across the cellular monolayer was assessed by gamma spectrometry following 2, 4 and 24 h of exposure. Our results demonstrate that ENMs translocated in small amounts (e.g. <0.01% of the delivered dose at 24 h), predominantly via transcellular pathways without compromising monolayer integrity or disrupting tight junctions. It was also demonstrated that the delivery of particles in suspension to cells in culture is proportional to translocation, emphasizing the importance of accurate dosimetry when comparing ENM-cellular interactions for large panels of materials. The reported INVET system for tracking industrially relevant ENMs while accounting for dosimetry can be a valuable tool for investigating nano-bio interactions in the future.

  14. Macrophage-derived IL-10 mediates mucosal repair by epithelial WISP-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Quiros, Miguel; Nishio, Hikaru; Neumann, Philipp A; Siuda, Dorothee; Brazil, Jennifer C; Azcutia, Veronica; Hilgarth, Roland; O'Leary, Monique N; Garcia-Hernandez, Vicky; Leoni, Giovanna; Feng, Mingli; Bernal, Gabriela; Williams, Holly; Dedhia, Priya H; Gerner-Smidt, Christian; Spence, Jason; Parkos, Charles A; Denning, Timothy L; Nusrat, Asma

    2017-09-01

    In response to injury, epithelial cells migrate and proliferate to cover denuded mucosal surfaces and repair the barrier defect. This process is orchestrated by dynamic crosstalk between immune cells and the epithelium; however, the mechanisms involved remain incompletely understood. Here, we report that IL-10 was rapidly induced following intestinal mucosal injury and was required for optimal intestinal mucosal wound closure. Conditional deletion of IL-10 specifically in CD11c-expressing cells in vivo implicated macrophages as a critical innate immune contributor to IL-10-induced wound closure. Consistent with these findings, wound closure in T cell- and B cell-deficient Rag1-/- mice was unimpaired, demonstrating that adaptive immune cells are not absolutely required for this process. Further, following mucosal injury, macrophage-derived IL-10 resulted in epithelial cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) activation and subsequent synthesis and secretion of the pro-repair WNT1-inducible signaling protein 1 (WISP-1). WISP-1 induced epithelial cell proliferation and wound closure by activating epithelial pro-proliferative pathways. These findings define the involvement of macrophages in regulating an IL-10/CREB/WISP-1 signaling axis, with broad implications in linking innate immune activation to mucosal wound repair.

  15. Conditioned media from mesenchymal stromal cells restore sodium transport and preserve epithelial permeability in an in vitro model of acute alveolar injury.

    PubMed

    Goolaerts, Arnaud; Pellan-Randrianarison, Nadia; Larghero, Jérôme; Vanneaux, Valérie; Uzunhan, Yurdagül; Gille, Thomas; Dard, Nicolas; Planès, Carole; Matthay, Michael A; Clerici, Christine

    2014-06-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) or their media (MSC-M) were reported to reverse acute lung injury (ALI)-induced decrease of alveolar fluid clearance. To determine the mechanisms by which MSC-M exert their beneficial effects, an in vitro model of alveolar epithelial injury was created by exposing primary rat alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) to hypoxia (3% O2) plus cytomix, a combination of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ. MSC-M were collected from human MSCs exposed for 12 h to either normoxia (MSC-M) or to hypoxia plus cytomix (HCYT-MSC-M). This latter condition was used to model the effect of alveolar inflammation and hypoxia on paracrine secretion of MSCs in the injured lung. Comparison of paracrine soluble factors in MSC media showed that the IL-1 receptor antagonist and prostaglandin E2 were markedly increased while keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) was twofold lower in HCYT-MSC-M compared with MSC-M. In AECs, hypoxia plus cytomix increased protein permeability, reduced amiloride-sensitive short-circuit current (AS-Isc), and also decreased the number of α-epithelial sodium channel (α-ENaC) subunits in the apical membrane. To test the effects of MSC media, MSC-M and HCYT-MSC-M were added for an additional 12 h to AECs exposed to hypoxia plus cytomix. MSC-M and HCYT-MSC-M completely restored epithelial permeability to normal. MSC-M, but not HCYT-MSC-M, significantly prevented the hypoxia plus cytomix-induced decrease of ENaC activity and restored apical α-ENaC channels. Interestingly, KGF-deprived MSC-M were unable to restore amiloride-sensitive sodium transport, indicating a possible role for KGF in the beneficial effect of MSC-M. These results indicate that MSC-M may be a preferable therapeutic option for ALI.

  16. Analysis of airway epithelial regeneration and repair following endobronchial brush biopsy in sheep.

    PubMed

    Yahaya, B; Baker, A; Tennant, P; Smith, S H; Shaw, D J; McLachlan, G; Collie, D D S

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the fundamental processes involved in repairing the airway wall following injury is fundamental to understanding the way in which these processes are perturbed during disease pathology. Indeed complex diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have at their core evidence of airway wall remodeling processes that play a crucial functional role in these diseases. The authors sought to understand the dynamic cellular events that occur during bronchial airway epithelial repair in sheep. The injury was induced by endobronchial brush biopsy (BBr), a process that causes epithelial débridement and induces a consequential repair process. In addition, the current experimental protocol allowed for the time-dependent changes in airway wall morphology to be studied both within and between animals. The initial débridement was followed by evidence of dedifferentiation in the intact epithelium at the wound margins, followed by proliferation of cells both within the epithelium and in the deeper wall structures, notably in association with the submucosal glands and smooth muscle bundles. Seven days after injury, although the airway wall was thickened at the site of damage, the epithelial layer was intact, with evidence of redifferentiation. These studies, in demonstrating broad agreement with previous studies in small animals, indicate the wider relevance of this system as a comparative model and should provide a solid basis upon which to further characterize the critical cellular and molecular interactions that underlie both effective restitution and pathological repair.

  17. Water-pipe smoke condensate increases the internalization of Mycobacterium Bovis of type II alveolar epithelial cells (A549).

    PubMed

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Alipoor, Shamila D; Movassaghi, Masoud; Varahram, Mohammad; Ghorbani, Jahangir; Folkerts, Gert; Garssen, Johan; Adcock, Ian M

    2017-04-21

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem, and there is an association between tobacco smoke and TB. Water pipe smoking has become an increasing problem not only in Middle Eastern countries but also globally because users consider it as safer than cigarettes. The presence of high levels of toxic substances in water-pipe smoke may be a predisposing factor that enhances the incidence of pulmonary disorders. For example, uncontrolled macropinocytosis in alveolar epithelial cells following exposure to water-pipe smoke may predispose subjects to pulmonary infection. Here, we studied the effects of water-pipe condense (WPC) on the internalization of Mycobacterium Bovis BCG by macropinocytosis in the alveolar epithelial cell line A549. A549 cells were exposed to WPC (4 mg/ml) for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. Cell viability was studied using the methyl thiazolyldipenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay and proliferation by bromodeoxyUridine (BrdU) incorporation. Cells were exposed to FITC-Dextran (1 mg/ml) (as a control) and FITC-BCG (MOI = 10) for 20 min at 37 °C before cells were collected and the uptake of BCG-FITC determined by flow cytometry. Similar experiments were performed at 4 °C as a control. The Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 (1 μM) was used to assess the mechanism by which WPC enhanced BCG uptake. WPC (4 mg/ml) increased the uptake of BCG-FITC after 72 (1.3 ± 0.1 fold, p < 0.05) and 96 (1.4 ± 0.05 fold, p < 0.05) hours. No effect on BCG-FITC uptake was observed at 24 or 48 h. WPC also significantly increased the uptake of FITC-Dextran (2.9 ± 0.3 fold, p < 0.05) after 24 h. WPC significantly decreased cell viability after 24 (84 ± 2%, p < 0.05), 48 (78±, 3%, p < 0.05), 72 (64 ± 2%, p < 0.05) and 96 h (45 ± 2%, p < 0.05). Y-27632 completely attenuated the increased uptake of BCG by WPC. Cell proliferation showed a decreasing trend in a time

  18. 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone, a component of tobacco smoke, modulates mediator release from human bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Proulx, L I; Gaudreault, M; Turmel, V; Augusto, L A; Castonguay, A; Bissonnette, E Y

    2005-04-01

    Respiratory epithelial cells are known to contribute to immune responses through the release of mediators. The aim of this study was to characterize the immunomodulatory effects of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), a tobacco carcinogen, on respiratory epithelial cells and to compare two metabolic pathways, alpha-methylhydroxylation and alpha-methylenehydroxylation, involved in these effects using selective precursors, 4-(acetoxy-methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridil)-1-butanone (NNKOAc) and N-nitroso (acetoxymethyl) methylamine (NDMAOAc), respectively. Human bronchial and alveolar epithelial cell lines, BEAS-2B and A549, respectively, were treated with NNK, NNKOAc and NDMAOAc for 24 h with and without tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and mediators released in cell-free supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). NNK significantly inhibited interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) production in both cell types. Similar results were observed with primary bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells. Although NNK increased prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production by A549 cells, its immunomodulatory effects were not mediated by PGE(2) according to the results with cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors. NNKOAc mimicked NNK effects, whereas NDMAOAc significantly inhibited IL-8 production in BEAS-2B cells and MCP-1 in both cell types. These results demonstrate that NNK and its reactive metabolites have immunosuppressive effects on respiratory epithelial cells, which could contribute to the increased respiratory infections observed in smokers and the development and/or the progression of lung cancer.

  19. Phagosomal pH and glass fiber dissolution in cultured nasal epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages: a preliminary study.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, N F

    1994-01-01

    The dissolution rate of glass fibers has been shown to be pH sensitive using in vitro lung fluid simulant models. The current study investigated whether there is a difference in phagosomal pH (ppH) between rat alveolar macrophages (AM) and rat nasal epithelial cells (RNEC) and whether such a difference would influence the dissolution of glass fibers. The ppH was measured in cultured AM and RNEC using flow cytometric, fluorescence-emission rationing techniques with fluorescein-labeled, amorphous silica particles. Glass fiber dissolution was determined in AM and RNEC cultured for 3 weeks with fast dissolving glass fibers (GF-A) or slow dissolving ones (GF-B). The mean diameters of GF-A were 2.7 microns and of GF-B, 2.6 microns, the average length of both fibers was approximately 22 to 25 microns. Dissolution was monitored by measuring the length and diameter of intracellular fibers and estimating the volume, assuming a cylindrical morphology. The ppH of AM was 5.2 to 5.8, and the ppH of RNEC was 7.0 to 7.5. The GF-A dissolved more slowly in RNEC than in AM, and no dissolution was evident in either cell type with GF-B. The volume loss with GF-A after a 3-week culture with AM was 66% compared to 45% for cultured RNEC. These results are different from those obtained using in vitro lung fluid-simulant models where dissolution is faster at higher pH. This difference suggests that dissolution rates of glass fibers in AM should not be applied to the dissolution of fibers in epithelial cells. Images Figure 1. a Figure 1. b Figure 2. a Figure 2. b Figure 3. a Figure 3. b PMID:7882965

  20. Annexin A1, formyl peptide receptor, and NOX1 orchestrate epithelial repair

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Giovanna; Alam, Ashfaqul; Neumann, Philipp-Alexander; Lambeth, J. David; Cheng, Guangjie; McCoy, James; Hilgarth, Roland S.; Kundu, Kousik; Murthy, Niren; Kusters, Dennis; Reutelingsperger, Chris; Perretti, Mauro; Parkos, Charles A.; Neish, Andrew S.; Nusrat, Asma

    2012-01-01

    N-formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are critical regulators of host defense in phagocytes and are also expressed in epithelia. FPR signaling and function have been extensively studied in phagocytes, yet their functional biology in epithelia is poorly understood. We describe a novel intestinal epithelial FPR signaling pathway that is activated by an endogenous FPR ligand, annexin A1 (ANXA1), and its cleavage product Ac2-26, which mediate activation of ROS by an epithelial NADPH oxidase, NOX1. We show that epithelial cell migration was regulated by this signaling cascade through oxidative inactivation of the regulatory phosphatases PTEN and PTP-PEST, with consequent activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin. In vivo studies using intestinal epithelial specific Nox1–/–IEC and AnxA1–/– mice demonstrated defects in intestinal mucosal wound repair, while systemic administration of ANXA1 promoted wound recovery in a NOX1-dependent fashion. Additionally, increased ANXA1 expression was observed in the intestinal epithelium and infiltrating leukocytes in the mucosa of ulcerative colitis patients compared with normal intestinal mucosa. Our findings delineate a novel epithelial FPR1/NOX1-dependent redox signaling pathway that promotes mucosal wound repair. PMID:23241962

  1. Important factors mediates the adhesion of aspergillus fumigatus to alveolar epithelial cells with E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Yong; Chen, Fei; Sun, He; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Bei-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus is widely distributed in the Earth's biosphere. It has strong adaptive capacity, and lives as saprophytic or parasitic life. This study aims to investigate the role of E-cadherin for adhesion of Aspergillus fumigatus blastospores in a human epithelial cell line (A549) and search the correlated molecule in aspergillus. A. fumigatus blastospores were incubated with the total protein of A549 to investigate the binding of E-cadherin and blastospores followed by an affinity purification procedure. After establishing the adhesion model, the adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores by A549 cells was evaluated by down-regulating E-cadherin of A549 cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA). FVB mice constructed with E-cadherin down-regulation were infected with aspergillus fumigatus. Preliminary exploration of E-cadherin interacting protein on the surface of aspergillus fumigates by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis. E-cadherin was adhered to the surface of A. fumigatus blastospore. Adhesion of the blastospores was reduced by blocking or down-regulating E-cadherin in A549 cells. E-cadherin showed limited significance in the process of mice against aspergillus fumigates. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis indicated the following proteins AFUA_8G07080, AfA24A6.130c, XP_747789 can bind to E-cadherin. In conclusion, E-cadherin is a receptor for adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores in epithelial cells. This may open a new approach to treat this fungal infection.

  2. Procyanidin A2 Modulates IL-4-Induced CCL26 Production in Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Sara L.; Kruger, Marlena C.; Sawyer, Gregory M.; Hurst, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Allergic asthma is an inflammatory lung disease that is partly sustained by the chemokine eotaxin-3 (CCL26), which extends eosinophil migration into tissues long after allergen exposure. Modulation of CCL26 could represent a means to mitigate airway inflammation. Here we evaluated procyanidin A2 as a means of modulating CCL26 production and investigated interactions with the known inflammation modulator, Interferon γ (IFNγ). We used the human lung epithelial cell line A549 and optimized the conditions for inducing CCL26. Cells were exposed to a range of procyanidin A2 or IFNγ concentrations for varied lengths of time prior to an inflammatory insult of interleukin-4 (IL-4) for 24 h. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure CCL26 production. Exposing cells to 5 μM procyanidin A2 (prior to IL-4) reduced CCL26 production by 35% compared with control. Greatest inhibition by procyanidin A2 was seen with a 2 h exposure prior to IL-4, whereas IFNγ inhibition was greatest at 24 h. Concomitant incubation of procyanidin A2 and IFNγ did not extend the inhibitory efficacy of procyanidin A2. These data provide evidence that procyanidin A2 can modulate IL-4-induced CCL26 production by A549 lung epithelial cells and that it does so in a manner that is different from IFNγ. PMID:27845745

  3. Isolation and characterization of lung resident mesenchymal stem cells capable of differentiating into alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xuemin; Sun, Zhaorui; Cui, Di; Xu, Xiaomeng; Zhu, Huiming; Wang, Lihui; Qian, Weiping; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-04-01

    Controversies and risks continue to be reported about exogenous mesenchymal stem cell-based therapies. In contrast with employing exogenous stem cells, making use of lung resident mesenchymal stem cells (LR-MSCs) could be advantageous. Our study sought to isolate the LR-MSCs and explore their potential to differentiate into alveolar epithelial type II cells (ATII cells). Total lung cells were first precultured, from which the Sca-1(+) CD45(-) CD31(-) population was purified using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). By these methods, it would seem that the Sca-1(+) CD45(-) CD31(-) cells were LR-MSCs. Similar to bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), these cells express Sca-1, CD29, CD90, CD44 and CD106, but not CD31 or CD45. They share the same gene expression file with the BM-MSCs and have a similar DNA content during long-term culturing. Furthermore, they could be serially passaged with all these properties being sustained. Above all, LR-MSCs could differentiate into ATII cells when co-cultured with ATII cells in a trans-well system. These findings demonstrated that the Sca-1(+) CD45(-) CD31(-) cells appear to be LR-MSCs that can differentiate into ATII cells. This approach may hold promise for their use in the treatment of lung disease.

  4. Neopterin-induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in type II-like alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, G; Rieder, J; Smolny, M; Seibel, M; Wirleitner, B; Fuchs, D; Schobersberger, W

    1999-01-01

    Production and release of proinflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha and neopterin are common events following the activation of the cellular immune system. Concerning inflammatory disorders of the lung, e.g. sepsis or sarcoidosis, high serum neopterin levels have been reported to correlate well with the severity of the disease. These situations are often associated with an increased expression of ICAM-1 reported to be induced in type II alveolar epithelial cells. In our study we investigated the potential effects of neopterin on ICAM-1 synthesis in the type II-like pneumocyte cell line L2. Detection of ICAM-1 gene expression by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed a dose-dependent effect of neopterin, with maximum impact following 12-h incubations. Comparable results were obtained when ICAM-1 protein synthesis was measured via a cell-based ELISA. In a second set of experiments we were able to show that coincubation of L2 cells with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) significantly suppressed neopterin-induced ICAM-1 synthesis. Since PDTC is known to be a potent inhibitor of NF-κB, the stimulating effects of neopterin on ICAM-1 gene expression and protein generation may be mediated by activation of this transcription factor. From these data we conclude that neopterin stimulates ICAM-1 production in L2 cells. In vivo, these effects may contribute to the prolongation of the inflammatory response, including cytotoxic cell host defence mechanisms that impair the functions of the airway epithelium. PMID:10594564

  5. Effect of amygdalin on the proliferation of hyperoxia-exposed type II alveolar epithelial cells isolated from premature rat.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huaping; Chang, Liwen; Li, Wenbin; Liu, Hanchu

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hyperoxia lung injury and the mechanism of amygdalin on type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2) isolated from premature rat lungs in vitro were investigated. AEC2 were obtained by primary culture from 20-days fetal rat lung and hyperoxia-exposed cell model was established. Cell proliferating viability was examined by MTT assay after treatment of amygdalin at various concentrations. DNA content and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein expression of AEC2 were measured by using flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry respectively after 24 h of hyperoxia exposure or amygdalin treatment. The results showed that hyperoxia inhibited the proliferation and decreased PCNA protein expression in A-EC2 of premature rat in vitro. Amygdalin at the concentration range of 50-200 micromol/L stimulated the proliferation of AEC2 in a dose-dependent manner, however, 400 micromol/L amygdalin inhibited the proliferation of AEC2. Amygdalin at the concentration of 200 micromol/L played its best role in facilitating proliferation of AEC2s in vitro and could partially ameliorated the changes of proliferation in hyperoxia exposed AEC2 of premature rat. It has been suggested that hyperoxia inhibited the proliferation of AEC2s of premature rat, which may contribute to hyperoxia lung injury. Amygdalin may play partial protective role in hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

  6. Histological studies on the effects of tooth brushing on repair of alveolar bone after periodontal osseous surgery in the rat incisor.

    PubMed

    Agematsu, H; Watanabe, H; Fukayama, M; Yamamoto, H; Kanazawa, T; Kishiro, H; Miake, K

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of tooth brushing on repair of alveolar bone after periodontal osseous surgery in the labial alveolar bone of rat incisor. The surgery was performed on 24 Wistar rats divided into 2 groups: the experimental group, which was subjected to tooth brushing, and the control group, which was not. In the experimental group, daily tooth brushing was initiated at 4 weeks after surgery. The rats were sacrificed after 1 or 2 weeks of tooth brushing. Microradiographic, light and fluorescence microscopic examinations were made of sections of the alveolar bone and its surrounding tissue. After 1 week of tooth brushing, callus with a low degree of mineralization and with large, irregularly arranged, young osteocytes appeared in the superficial layer and crest portion of alveolar bone in the brushing region. Numerous blood vessels had invaded the callus. In this region, the height of osteoblasts on the callus surface increased. At the alveolar crest region, the callus was approximately 3 times thicker than in the superficial region. After 2 weeks of tooth brushing, modification had occurred in the callus; this region had evolved into developed bone with a compact matrix. These findings suggest that the intermittent mechanical stress of tooth brushing is useful in activating the cells of the alveolar periosteum and in stimulating bone formation.

  7. Expression and Biological Activity of ABCA1 in Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Sandra R.; Tao, Jian-Qin; Yu, Kevin J.; Borok, Zea; Crandall, Edward D.; Collins, Heidi L.; Rothblat, George H.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms used by alveolar type I pneumocytes for maintenance of the lipid homeostasis necessary to sustain these large squamous cells are unknown. The processes may involve the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), a transport protein shown to be crucial in apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I)–mediated mobilization of cellular cholesterol and phospholipid. Immunohistochemical data demonstrated the presence of ABCA1 in lung type I and type II cells and in cultured pneumocytes. Type II cells isolated from rat lungs and cultured for 5 days in 10% serum trans-differentiated toward cells with a type I–like phenotype which reacted with the type I cell–specific monoclonal antibody VIIIB2. Upon incubation of the type I–like pneumocytes with agents that up-regulate the ABCA1 gene (9-cis-retinoic acid [9cRA] and 22-hydroxycholesterol [22-OH, 9cRA/22-OH]), ABCA1 protein levels were enhanced to maximum levels after 8 to 16 hours and remained elevated for 24 hours. In the presence of apoA-I and 9cRA/22-OH, efflux of radioactive phospholipid and cholesterol from pneumocytes was stimulated 3- to 20-fold, respectively, over controls. Lipid efflux was inhibited by Probucol. Sucrose density gradient analysis of the media from stimulated cells incubated with apoA-I identified heterogeneous lipid particles that isolated at a density between 1.063 and 1.210 g/ml, with low or high apoA-I content. Thus, pneumocytes with markers for the type I phenotype contained functional ABCA1 protein, released lipid to apoA-I protein, and were capable of producing particles resembling nascent high-density lipoprotein, indicating an important role for ABCA1 in the maintenance of lung lipid homeostasis. PMID:17884990

  8. A new method for alveolar bone repair using extracted teeth for the graft material.

    PubMed

    Nampo, Tomoki; Watahiki, Junichi; Enomoto, Akiko; Taguchi, Tomohiro; Ono, Miki; Nakano, Haruhisa; Yamamoto, Gou; Irie, Tarou; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Maki, Koutaro

    2010-09-01

    In the clinical field of jawbone formation, the use of autogenous bone as the graft material is the gold standard. However, there are some problems with this technique, such as risk of infection on the donor side, the limited amount of available bone mass, and marked resorption of the grafted bone. We investigated the potential for using teeth as a bone graft material for jawbone formation because the dental pulp contains stem cells, including undifferentiated neural crest-derived cells. Alveolar bone defects were created in Wistar rats, and the defects were filled with either tooth or iliac bone graft material, or left as controls. The potential for using teeth as a bone graft material for jawbone formation was measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction, microcomputed tomography, and histologic analysis. Polymerase chain reaction revealed that the expressions of P75, P0, nestin, and musashi-1 were significantly higher in teeth than in mandibular bone and iliac bone grafts. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and microcomputed tomography showed that at 8 weeks, tooth graft material produced a similar amount of new bone compared to iliac bone graft material. Osteopontin was expressed in both the tooth and iliac bone graft material at 6 and 8 weeks after surgery. Dentin sialoprotein was expressed in the tooth graft material in the new bone at 6 weeks only. These results indicate that teeth may be an alternative material to autogenous bone for treating alveolar bone defects by grafting.

  9. IL-22 is essential for lung epithelial repair following influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Pociask, Derek A; Scheller, Erich V; Mandalapu, Sivanarayana; McHugh, Kevin J; Enelow, Richard I; Fattman, Cheryl L; Kolls, Jay K; Alcorn, John F

    2013-04-01

    Influenza infection is widespread in the United States and the world. Despite low mortality rates due to infection, morbidity is common and little is known about the molecular events involved in recovery. Influenza infection results in persistent distal lung remodeling, and the mechanism(s) involved are poorly understood. Recently IL-22 has been found to mediate epithelial repair. We propose that IL-22 is critical for recovery of normal lung function and architecture after influenza infection. Wild-type and IL-22(-/-) mice were infected with influenza A PR8/34 H1N1 and were followed up for up to 21 days post infection. IL-22 receptor was localized to the airway epithelium in naive mice but was expressed at the sites of parenchymal lung remodeling induced by influenza infection. IL-22(-/-) mice displayed exacerbated lung injury compared with wild-type mice, which correlated with decreased lung function 21 days post infection. Epithelial metaplasia was observed in wild-type mice but was not evident in IL-22(-/-) animals that were characterized with an increased fibrotic phenotype. Gene expression analysis revealed aberrant expression of epithelial genes involved in repair processes, among changes in several other biological processes. These data indicate that IL-22 is required for normal lung repair after influenza infection. IL-22 represents a novel pathway involved in interstitial lung disease.

  10. Annexin A1–containing extracellular vesicles and polymeric nanoparticles promote epithelial wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Giovanna; Neumann, Philipp-Alexander; Kamaly, Nazila; Quiros, Miguel; Nishio, Hikaru; Jones, Hefin R.; Sumagin, Ronen; Hilgarth, Roland S.; Alam, Ashfaqul; Fredman, Gabrielle; Argyris, Ioannis; Rijcken, Emile; Kusters, Dennis; Reutelingsperger, Chris; Perretti, Mauro; Parkos, Charles A.; Farokhzad, Omid C.; Neish, Andrew S.; Nusrat, Asma

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial restitution is an essential process that is required to repair barrier function at mucosal surfaces following injury. Prolonged breaches in epithelial barrier function result in inflammation and further damage; therefore, a better understanding of the epithelial restitution process has potential for improving the development of therapeutics. In this work, we demonstrate that endogenous annexin A1 (ANXA1) is released as a component of extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from intestinal epithelial cells, and these ANXA1-containing EVs activate wound repair circuits. Compared with healthy controls, patients with active inflammatory bowel disease had elevated levels of secreted ANXA1-containing EVs in sera, indicating that ANXA1-containing EVs are systemically distributed in response to the inflammatory process and could potentially serve as a biomarker of intestinal mucosal inflammation. Local intestinal delivery of an exogenous ANXA1 mimetic peptide (Ac2-26) encapsulated within targeted polymeric nanoparticles (Ac2-26 Col IV NPs) accelerated healing of murine colonic wounds after biopsy-induced injury. Moreover, one-time systemic administration of Ac2-26 Col IV NPs accelerated recovery following experimentally induced colitis. Together, our results suggest that local delivery of proresolving peptides encapsulated within nanoparticles may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for clinical situations characterized by chronic mucosal injury, such as is seen in patients with IBD. PMID:25664854

  11. Paracrine influence of human perivascular cells on the proliferation of adenocarcinoma alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunbi; Na, Sunghun; An, Borim; Yang, Se-Ran; Kim, Woo Jin; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Han, Eun-Taek; Park, Won Sun; Lee, Chang-Min; Lee, Ji Yoon

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the crosstalk mechanisms between perivascular cells (PVCs) and cancer cells might be beneficial in preventing cancer development and metastasis. In this study, we investigated the paracrine influence of PVCs derived from human umbilical cords on the proliferation of lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549) and erythroleukemia cells (TF-1α and K562) in vitro using Transwell® co-culture systems. PVCs promoted the proliferation of A549 cells without inducing morphological changes, but had no effect on the proliferation of TF-1α and K562 cells. To identify the factors secreted from PVCs, conditioned media harvested from PVC cultures were analyzed by antibody arrays. We identified a set of cytokines, including persephin (PSPN), a neurotrophic factor, and a key regulator of oral squamous cell carcinoma progression. Supplementation with PSPN significantly increased the proliferation of A549 cells. These results suggested that PVCs produced a differential effect on the proliferation of cancer cells in a cell-type dependent manner. Further, secretome analyses of PVCs and the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms could facilitate the discovery of therapeutic target(s) for lung cancer. PMID:28280409

  12. Toxicity of surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles toward lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Nadège; Hillaireau, Hervé; Vergnaud, Juliette; Santiago, Letícia Aragão; Kerdine-Romer, Saadia; Pallardy, Marc; Tsapis, Nicolas; Fattal, Elias

    2013-10-01

    In vitro cytotoxicity and inflammatory response following exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) made of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) have been investigated on A549 human lung epithelial cells. Three different PLGA NPs (230 nm) were obtained using different stabilizers (polyvinyl alcohol, chitosan, or Pluronic(®) F68) to form respectively neutral, positively or negatively charged NPs. Polystyrene NPs were used as polymeric but non-biodegradable NPs, and titanium dioxide (anatase and rutile) as inorganic NPs, for comparison. Cytotoxicity was evaluated through mitochondrial activity as well as membrane integrity (lactate dehydrogenase release, trypan blue exclusion, propidium iodide staining). The cytotoxicity of PLGA-based and polystyrene NPs was lower or equivalent to the one observed after exposure to titanium dioxide NPs. The inflammatory response, evaluated through the release of the IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TNF-α cytokines, was low for all NPs. However, some differences were observed, especially for negative PLGA NPs that led to a higher inflammatory response, which can be correlated to a higher uptake of these NPs. Taken together, these results show that both coating of PLGA NPs and the nature of the core play a key role in cell response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Overexpression of sICAM-1 in the alveolar epithelial space results in an exaggerated inflammatory response and early death in Gram negative pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Michael P; Monroy, Yeni K; Du, Ming; Preston, Angela M; Tolle, Leslie; Lin, Yujing; VanDussen, Kelli L; Samuelson, Linda C; Standiford, Theodore J; Curtis, Jeffery L; Beck, James M; Christensen, Paul J; Paine, Robert

    2011-01-19

    A sizeable body of data demonstrates that membrane ICAM-1 (mICAM-1) plays a significant role in host defense in a site-specific fashion. On the pulmonary vascular endothelium, mICAM-1 is necessary for normal leukocyte recruitment during acute inflammation. On alveolar epithelial cells (AECs), we have shown previously that the presence of normal mICAM-1 is essential for optimal alveolar macrophage (AM) function. We have also shown that ICAM-1 is present in the alveolar space as a soluble protein that is likely produced through cleavage of mICAM-1. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) is abundantly present in the alveolar lining fluid of the normal lung and could be generated by proteolytic cleavage of mICAM-1, which is highly expressed on type I AECs. Although a growing body of data suggesting that intravascular sICAM-1 has functional effects, little is known about sICAM-1 in the alveolus. We hypothesized that sICAM-1 in the alveolar space modulates the innate immune response and alters the response to pulmonary infection. Using the surfactant protein C (SPC) promoter, we developed a transgenic mouse (SPC-sICAM-1) that constitutively overexpresses sICAM-1 in the distal lung, and compared the responses of wild-type and SPC-sICAM-1 mice following intranasal inoculation with K. pneumoniae. SPC-sICAM-1 mice demonstrated increased mortality and increased systemic dissemination of organisms compared with wild-type mice. We also found that inflammatory responses were significantly increased in SPC-sICAM-1 mice compared with wild-type mice but there were no difference in lung CFU between groups. We conclude that alveolar sICAM-1 modulates pulmonary inflammation. Manipulating ICAM-1 interactions therapeutically may modulate the host response to Gram negative pulmonary infections.

  14. Overexpression of sICAM-1 in the Alveolar Epithelial Space Results in an Exaggerated Inflammatory Response and Early Death in Gram Negative Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A sizeable body of data demonstrates that membrane ICAM-1 (mICAM-1) plays a significant role in host defense in a site-specific fashion. On the pulmonary vascular endothelium, mICAM-1 is necessary for normal leukocyte recruitment during acute inflammation. On alveolar epithelial cells (AECs), we have shown previously that the presence of normal mICAM-1 is essential for optimal alveolar macrophage (AM) function. We have also shown that ICAM-1 is present in the alveolar space as a soluble protein that is likely produced through cleavage of mICAM-1. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) is abundantly present in the alveolar lining fluid of the normal lung and could be generated by proteolytic cleavage of mICAM-1, which is highly expressed on type I AECs. Although a growing body of data suggesting that intravascular sICAM-1 has functional effects, little is known about sICAM-1 in the alveolus. We hypothesized that sICAM-1 in the alveolar space modulates the innate immune response and alters the response to pulmonary infection. Methods Using the surfactant protein C (SPC) promoter, we developed a transgenic mouse (SPC-sICAM-1) that constitutively overexpresses sICAM-1 in the distal lung, and compared the responses of wild-type and SPC-sICAM-1 mice following intranasal inoculation with K. pneumoniae. Results SPC-sICAM-1 mice demonstrated increased mortality and increased systemic dissemination of organisms compared with wild-type mice. We also found that inflammatory responses were significantly increased in SPC-sICAM-1 mice compared with wild-type mice but there were no difference in lung CFU between groups. Conclusions We conclude that alveolar sICAM-1 modulates pulmonary inflammation. Manipulating ICAM-1 interactions therapeutically may modulate the host response to Gram negative pulmonary infections. PMID:21247482

  15. Platelet-rich plasma, plasma rich in growth factors and simvastatin in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone

    PubMed Central

    RIVERA, CÉSAR; MONSALVE, FRANCISCO; SALAS, JUAN; MORÁN, ANDREA; SUAZO, IVÁN

    2013-01-01

    Platelet preparations promote bone regeneration by inducing cell migration, proliferation and differentiation in the area of the injury, which are essential processes for regeneration. In addition, several studies have indicated that simvastatin (SIMV), widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, stimulates osteogenesis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of treatment with either platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) in combination with SIMV in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone. The jaws of Sprague Dawley rats (n=18) were subjected to rotary instrument-induced bone damage (BD). Animals were divided into six groups: BD/H2O (n=3), distilled water without the drug and alveolar bone damage; BD/H2O/PRP (n=3), BD and PRP; BD/H2O/PRGF (n=3), BD and PRGF; BD/SIMV (n=3), BD and water with SIMV; BD/SIMV/PRP (n=3), BD, PRP and SIMV; and BD/SIMV/PRGF (n=3), BD, PRGF and SIMV. Conventional histological analysis (hematoxylin and eosin staining) revealed that the BD/SIMV group showed indicators for mature bone tissue, while the BD/SIMV/PRP and BD/SIMV/PRGF groups showed the coexistence of indicators for mature and immature bone tissue, with no statistical differences between the platelet preparations. Simvastatin did not improve the effect of platelet-rich plasma and plasma rich in growth factors. It was not possible to determine which platelet preparation produced superior effects. PMID:24250728

  16. Understanding Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Airway Epithelial Repair: Selecting the Most Appropriate Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Yahaya, B.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying the process of regeneration and repair of airway epithelial structures demands close characterization of the associated cellular and molecular events. The choice of an animal model system to study these processes and the role of lung stem cells is debatable since ideally the chosen animal model should offer a valid comparison with the human lung. Species differences may include the complex three-dimensional lung structures, cellular composition of the lung airway as well as transcriptional control of the molecular events in response to airway epithelium regeneration, and repair following injury. In this paper, we discuss issues related to the study of the lung repair and regeneration including the role of putative stem cells in small- and large-animal models. At the end of this paper, the author discuss the potential for using sheep as a model which can help bridge the gap between small-animal model systems and humans. PMID:23049478

  17. Enhancement of the repair of dog alveolar cleft by an autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell, and platelet-rich fibrin mixture.

    PubMed

    Yuanzheng, Chen; Yan, Gao; Ting, Li; Yanjie, Fu; Peng, Wu; Nan, Bai

    2015-05-01

    Autologous bone graft has been regarded as the criterion standard for the repair of alveolar cleft. However, the most prominent issue in alveolar cleft treatment is the high absorption rate of the bone graft. The authors' objective was to investigate the effects of an autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell, and platelet-rich fibrin mixture on the repair of dog alveolar cleft. Twenty beagle dogs with unilateral alveolar clefts created by surgery were divided randomly into four groups: group A underwent repair with an autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell, and platelet-rich fibrin mixture; group B underwent repair with autologous iliac bone and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells; group C underwent repair with autologous iliac bone and platelet-rich fibrin; and group D underwent repair with autologous iliac bone as the control. One day and 6 months after transplantation, the transplant volumes and bone mineral density were assessed by quantitative computed tomography. All of the transplants were harvested for hematoxylin and eosin staining 6 months later. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich fibrin transplants formed the greatest amounts of new bone among the four groups. The new bone formed an extensive union with the underlying maxilla in groups A, B, and C. Transplants with the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, platelet-rich fibrin, and their mixture retained the majority of their initial volume, whereas the transplants in the control group showed the highest absorption rate. Bone mineral density of transplants with the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, platelet-rich fibrin, and their mixture 6 months later was significantly higher than in the control group (p < 0.05), and was the highest in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich fibrin mixed transplants. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that the structure of new bones formed the best

  18. Insulin regulates alveolar epithelial function by inducing Na+/K+-ATPase translocation to the plasma membrane in a process mediated by the action of Akt.

    PubMed

    Comellas, Alejandro P; Kelly, Aileen M; Trejo, Humberto E; Briva, Arturo; Lee, Joyce; Sznajder, Jacob I; Dada, Laura A

    2010-04-15

    Stimulation of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase translocation to the cell surface increases active Na(+) transport, which is the driving force of alveolar fluid reabsorption, a process necessary to keep the lungs free of edema and to allow normal gas exchange. Here, we provide evidence that insulin increases alveolar fluid reabsorption and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity by increasing its translocation to the plasma membrane in alveolar epithelial cells. Insulin-induced Akt activation is necessary and sufficient to promote Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase translocation to the plasma membrane. Phosphorylation of AS160 by Akt is also required in this process, whereas inactivation of the Rab GTPase-activating protein domain of AS160 promotes partial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase translocation in the absence of insulin. We found that Rab10 functions as a downstream target of AS160 in insulin-induced Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase translocation. Collectively, these results suggest that Akt plays a major role in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase intracellular translocation and thus in alveolar fluid reabsorption.

  19. Hypoxia Inducible Factor 3α Plays a Critical Role in Alveolarization and Distal Epithelial Cell Differentiation during Mouse Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yadi; Kapere Ochieng, Joshua; Kempen, Marjon Buscop-van; Munck, Anne Boerema-de; Swagemakers, Sigrid; van IJcken, Wilfred; Grosveld, Frank; Tibboel, Dick; Rottier, Robbert J.

    2013-01-01

    Lung development occurs under relative hypoxia and the most important oxygen-sensitive response pathway is driven by Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIF). HIFs are heterodimeric transcription factors of an oxygen-sensitive subunit, HIFα, and a constitutively expressed subunit, HIF1β. HIF1α and HIF2α, encoded by two separate genes, contribute to the activation of hypoxia inducible genes. A third HIFα gene, HIF3α, is subject to alternative promoter usage and splicing, leading to three major isoforms, HIF3α, NEPAS and IPAS. HIF3α gene products add to the complexity of the hypoxia response as they function as dominant negative inhibitors (IPAS) or weak transcriptional activators (HIF3α/NEPAS). Previously, we and others have shown the importance of the Hif1α and Hif2α factors in lung development, and here we investigated the role of Hif3α during pulmonary development. Therefore, HIF3α was conditionally expressed in airway epithelial cells during gestation and although HIF3α transgenic mice were born alive and appeared normal, their lungs showed clear abnormalities, including a post-pseudoglandular branching defect and a decreased number of alveoli. The HIF3α expressing lungs displayed reduced numbers of Clara cells, alveolar epithelial type I and type II cells. As a result of HIF3α expression, the level of Hif2α was reduced, but that of Hif1α was not affected. Two regulatory genes, Rarβ, involved in alveologenesis, and Foxp2, a transcriptional repressor of the Clara cell specific Ccsp gene, were significantly upregulated in the HIF3α expressing lungs. In addition, aberrant basal cells were observed distally as determined by the expression of Sox2 and p63. We show that Hif3α binds a conserved HRE site in the Sox2 promoter and weakly transactivated a reporter construct containing the Sox2 promoter region. Moreover, Hif3α affected the expression of genes not typically involved in the hypoxia response, providing evidence for a novel function of Hif3

  20. Molecular Characterization of Hypoxic Alveolar Epithelial Cells After Lung Contusion Indicates an Important Role for HIF-1α.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Matthew A; Suresh, Madathilparambil V; Dolgachev, Vladislav A; McCandless, Lane K; Xue, Xiang; Ziru, Li; Machado-Aranda, David; Shah, Yatrik M; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2016-11-01

    To understand the fate and regulation of hypoxic type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) after lung contusion (LC). LC due to thoracic trauma is a major risk factor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome. AECs have recently been implicated as a primary driver of inflammation in LC. The main pathological consequence of LC is hypoxia, and a key mediator of adaptation to hypoxia is hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1. We have recently published that HIF-1α is a major driver of acute inflammation after LC through type II AEC. LC was induced in wild-type mice (C57BL/6), luciferase-based hypoxia reporter mice (ODD-Luc), and HIF-1α conditional knockout mice. The degree of hypoxia was assessed using hypoxyprobe and in vivo imaging system. The fate of hypoxic AEC was evaluated by luciferase dual staining with caspases-3 and Ki-67, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, and flow cytometry with ApoStat. NLRP-3 expression was determined by western blot. Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate AECs in vivo, and collected RNA was analyzed by Q-PCR for HIF-related pathways. Global hypoxia was present after LC, but hypoxic foci were not uniform. Hypoxic AECs preferentially undergo apoptosis. There were significant reductions in NLRP-3 in HIF-1α conditional knockout mice. The expression of proteins involved in HIF-related pathways and inflammasome activation were significantly increased in hypoxic AECs. These are the first in vivo data to identify, isolate, and characterize hypoxic AECs. HIF-1α regulation through hypoxic AECs is critical to the initiation of acute inflammation after LC.

  1. Nano-biointeractions of PEGylated and bare reduced graphene oxide on lung alveolar epithelial cells: A comparative in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Reshma, S C; Syama, S; Mohanan, P V

    2016-04-01

    Graphene and its derivatives have garnered significant scientific interest and have potential use in nano-electronics as well as biomedicine. However the undesirable biological consequence, especially upon inhalation of the particle, requires further investigations. This study aimed to elucidate the nano-biointeractions of PEGylated reduced graphene oxide (PrGO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with that of lung alveolar epithelial cells (A549). Both nanomaterials showed dose dependent decrease in cell viability and alteration of cell morphology after 24h. Upon intracellular uptake of PrGO, it elicited oxidative stress mediated apoptosis in the cells by inducing ROS, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and inflammatory response by NF-κB activation. Conversely, rGO was found to scavenge ROS efficiently except at high dose after 24h. It was found that ROS at high dose of rGO prompted loss of MMP. rGO was found to adhere to the cell membrane, where it is assumed to bind to cell surface Toll like receptors (TLRs) thereby activating NF-κB mediated inflammatory response. All these events culminated in an increase in apoptosis of A549 cells after 24h of rGO exposure. It was also noticed that both the nanomaterials did not initiate lysosomal pathway but instead activated mitochondria mediated apoptosis. This study highlights the possible adverse toxic effect of PrGO and rGO upon inhalation and persistence of these particles in the lungs. Further research is required to comprehend the biological response of PrGO and rGO so as to advance its biomedical application and safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Asbestos-induced alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis: role of mitochondrial dysfunction caused by iron-derived free radicals.

    PubMed

    Kamp, David W; Panduri, Vij ayalakshmi; Weitzman, Sigmund A; Chandel, Navdeep

    2002-01-01

    Asbestos causes asbestosis and malignancies by mechanisms that are not fully understood. Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) injury by iron-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one important mechanism implicated. We previously showed that iron-catalyzed ROS in part mediate asbestos-inducedAEC DNA damage and apoptosis. Mitochondria have a critical role in regulating apoptosis after exposure to agents causing DNA damage but their role in regulating asbestos-induced apoptosis is unknown. To determine whether asbestos causes AEC mitochondrial dysfunction, we exposed A549 cells to amosite asbestos and assessed mitochondrial membrane potential changes (delta(psi)m) using a fluorometric technique involving tetremethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) and mitotracker green. We show that amosite asbestos, but not an inert particulate, titanium dioxide, reduces delta(psi)m after a 4 h exposure period. Further, the delta(psi)m after 4 h was inversely proportional to the levels of apoptosis noted at 24 h as assessed by nuclear morphology as well as by DNA nucleosome formation. A role for iron-derived ROS was suggested by the finding that phytic acid, an iron chelator, blocked asbestos-induced reductions in A549 cell delta(psi)m and attenuated apoptosis. Finally, overexpression of Bcl-xl, an anti-apoptotic protein that localizes to the mitochondria, prevented asbestos-induced decreases in A549 cell delta(psi)m after 4 h and diminished apoptosis. We conclude that asbestos alters AEC mitochondrial function in part by generating iron-derived ROS, which in turn can result in apoptosis. This suggests that the mitochondrial death pathway is important in regulating pulmonary toxicity from asbestos.

  3. Mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis pathway in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to the metals in combustion-generated particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Visalli, Giuseppa; Baluce, Barbara; Bertuccio, Maria; Picerno, Isa; Di Pietro, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Previously a significant mitochondrial impairment was identified in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to metals adsorbed to combustion-generated particulate matter (PM). Due to the critical role of mitochondria in apoptosis, the aim of this study was to investigate the pro-apoptotic potential of metals present in oil fly ash (OFA). A549 cells were exposed to water-soluble components of an OFA sample, containing vanadium [V(IV)], iron [Fe(III)], and nickel [Ni(II)] (68.8, 110.4, and 18 μM, respectively). Experiments were also performed using individual metal solutions. Apoptosis was detected and the mitochondrial role was assessed by a caspase-9 inhibitor (Z-LEHD-FMK). To determine whether the presence of impaired mitochondria in unexposed daughter cells increased apoptosis, an in vitro model was developed that allowed determination of effects until the third cell generation. To specifically examine the toxicity of vanadium (V), that characterize the airborne pollutant examined in this study, p53involvement and metabolic impairment through changes in HIF-1α and Glut-1 expression were determined. OFA and individual metal solutions produced significant apoptosis in the progeny of exposed cells, triggering the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. In apoptosis induced by poorly genotoxic metal V, p53 did not play a significant role. However, V exposure increased nuclear translocation of HIF-1α and expression of the Glut-1 receptor, indicating metabolic impairment due to metal-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Overall, these results improve our knowledge of the pathogenic role that airborne metals and in particular V exerted in respiratory epithelium.

  4. The Role of Alveolar Epithelial Cells in Initiating and Shaping Pulmonary Immune Responses: Communication between Innate and Adaptive Immune Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chuquimia, Olga D.; Petursdottir, Dagbjort H.; Rahman, Muhammad J.; Hartl, Katharina; Singh, Mahavir; Fernández, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells have been recognized as key players in the defense against mycobacterial infection. However, more recently, other cells in the lungs such as alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) have been found to play important roles in the defense and pathogenesis of infection. In the present study we first compared AEC with pulmonary macrophages (PuM) isolated from mice in their ability to internalize and control Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) growth and their capacity as APCs. AEC were able to internalize and control bacterial growth as well as present antigen to primed T cells. Secondly, we compared both cell types in their capacity to secrete cytokines and chemokines upon stimulation with various molecules including mycobacterial products. Activated PuM and AEC displayed different patterns of secretion. Finally, we analyzed the profile of response of AEC to diverse stimuli. AEC responded to both microbial and internal stimuli exemplified by TLR ligands and IFNs, respectively. The response included synthesis by AEC of several factors, known to have various effects in other cells. Interestingly, TNF could stimulate the production of CCL2/MCP-1. Since MCP-1 plays a role in the recruitment of monocytes and macrophages to sites of infection and macrophages are the main producers of TNF, we speculate that both cell types can stimulate each other. Also, another cell-cell interaction was suggested when IFNs (produced mainly by lymphocytes) were able to induce expression of chemokines (IP-10 and RANTES) by AEC involved in the recruitment of circulating lymphocytes to areas of injury, inflammation, or viral infection. In the current paper we confirm previous data on the capacity of AEC regarding internalization of mycobacteria and their role as APC, and extend the knowledge of AEC as a multifunctional cell type by assessing the secretion of a broad array of factors in response to several different types of stimuli. PMID:22393384

  5. The role of alveolar epithelial cells in initiating and shaping pulmonary immune responses: communication between innate and adaptive immune systems.

    PubMed

    Chuquimia, Olga D; Petursdottir, Dagbjort H; Rahman, Muhammad J; Hartl, Katharina; Singh, Mahavir; Fernández, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells have been recognized as key players in the defense against mycobacterial infection. However, more recently, other cells in the lungs such as alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) have been found to play important roles in the defense and pathogenesis of infection. In the present study we first compared AEC with pulmonary macrophages (PuM) isolated from mice in their ability to internalize and control Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) growth and their capacity as APCs. AEC were able to internalize and control bacterial growth as well as present antigen to primed T cells. Secondly, we compared both cell types in their capacity to secrete cytokines and chemokines upon stimulation with various molecules including mycobacterial products. Activated PuM and AEC displayed different patterns of secretion. Finally, we analyzed the profile of response of AEC to diverse stimuli. AEC responded to both microbial and internal stimuli exemplified by TLR ligands and IFNs, respectively. The response included synthesis by AEC of several factors, known to have various effects in other cells. Interestingly, TNF could stimulate the production of CCL2/MCP-1. Since MCP-1 plays a role in the recruitment of monocytes and macrophages to sites of infection and macrophages are the main producers of TNF, we speculate that both cell types can stimulate each other. Also, another cell-cell interaction was suggested when IFNs (produced mainly by lymphocytes) were able to induce expression of chemokines (IP-10 and RANTES) by AEC involved in the recruitment of circulating lymphocytes to areas of injury, inflammation, or viral infection. In the current paper we confirm previous data on the capacity of AEC regarding internalization of mycobacteria and their role as APC, and extend the knowledge of AEC as a multifunctional cell type by assessing the secretion of a broad array of factors in response to several different types of stimuli.

  6. Rab38 targets to lamellar bodies and normalizes their sizes in lung alveolar type II epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linghui; Yu, Kevin; Robert, Kyle W.; DeBolt, Kristine M.; Hong, Nankang; Tao, Jian-Qin; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Fisher, Aron B.

    2011-01-01

    Rab38 is a rat Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome gene that plays an important role in surfactant homeostasis in alveolar type II (ATII) pneumocytes. We examined Rab38 function in regulating lamellar body (LB) morphology in ATII cells. Quantitative electron microscopy revealed that LBs in ATII cells were ∼77% larger in Rab38-null fawn-hooded hypertension (FHH) than control Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Rab38 protein expression was restricted in lung epithelial cells but was not found in primary endothelial cells. In SD ATII cells, Rab38 protein level gradually declined during 5 days in culture. Importantly, endogenous Rab38 was present in LB fractions purified from SD rat lungs, and transiently expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged Rab38 labeled only the limiting membranes of a subpopulation (∼30%) of LBs in cultured ATII cells. This selective targeting was abolished by point mutations to EGFP-Rab38 and was not shared by Rab7 and Rab4b, which also function in the ATII cells. Using confocal microscopy, we established a method for quantitative evaluation of the enlarged LB phenotype temporally preserved in cultured FHH ATII cells. A direct causal relationship was established when the enlarged LB phenotype was reserved and then rescued by transiently reexpressed EGFP-Rab38 in cultured FHH ATII cells. This rescuing effect was associated with dynamic EGFP-Rab38 targeting to and on LB limiting membranes. We conclude that Rab38 plays an indispensible role in maintaining LB morphology and surfactant homeostasis in ATII pneumocytes. PMID:21764986

  7. Involvement of lysosomal dysfunction in silver nanoparticle-induced cellular damage in A549 human lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Miyayama, Takamitsu; Matsuoka, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in consumer and medical products, the mechanism by which AgNPs cause pulmonary cytotoxicity is not clear. AgNP agglomerates are found in endo-lysosomal structures within the cytoplasm of treated cells. In this study, the functional role of lysosomes in AgNP-induced cellular damage was examined in A549 human lung alveolar epithelial cells. We evaluated the intracellular distribution of AgNPs, lysosomal pH, cellular viability, Ag dissolution, and metallothionein (MT) mRNA levels in AgNP-exposed A549 cells that were treated with bafilomycin A1, the lysosomal acidification inhibitor. Exposure of A549 cells to citrate-coated AgNPs (20 nm diameter) for 24 h induced cellular damage and cell death at 100 and 200 μg Ag/ml, respectively. Confocal laser microscopic examination of LysoTracker-stained cells showed that AgNPs colocalized with lysosomes and their agglomeration increased in a dose-dependent manner (50-200 μg Ag/ml). In addition, the fluorescence signals of LysoTracker were reduced following exposure to AgNPs, suggesting the elevation of lysosomal pH. Treatment of A549 cells with 200 nM bafilomycin A1 and AgNPs (50 μg Ag/ml) further reduced the fluorescence signals of LysoTracker. AgNP-induced cell death was also increased by bafilomycin A1 treatment. Finally, treatment with bafilomycin A1 suppressed the dissolution of Ag and decreased the mRNA expression levels of MT-I and MT-II following exposure to AgNPs. The perturbation of lysosomal pH by AgNP exposure may play a role in AgNP agglomeration and subsequent cellular damage in A549 cells.

  8. Microarray identifies ADAM family members as key responders to TGF-beta1 in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Keating, Dominic T; Sadlier, Denise M; Patricelli, Andrea; Smith, Sinead M; Walls, Dermot; Egan, Jim J; Doran, Peter P

    2006-09-01

    The molecular mechanisms of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) remain elusive. Transforming Growth Factor beta 1(TGF-beta1) is a key effector cytokine in the development of lung fibrosis. We used microarray and computational biology strategies to identify genes whose expression is significantly altered in alveolar epithelial cells (A549) in response to TGF-beta1, IL-4 and IL-13 and Epstein Barr virus. A549 cells were exposed to 10 ng/ml TGF-beta1, IL-4 and IL-13 at serial time points. Total RNA was used for hybridisation to Affymetrix Human Genome U133A microarrays. Each in vitro time-point was studied in duplicate and an average RMA value computed. Expression data for each time point was compared to control and a signal log ratio of 0.6 or greater taken to identify significant differential regulation. Using normalised RMA values and unsupervised Average Linkage Hierarchical Cluster Analysis, a list of 312 extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins or modulators of matrix turnover was curated via Onto-Compare and Gene-Ontology (GO) databases for baited cluster analysis of ECM associated genes. Interrogation of the dataset using ontological classification focused cluster analysis revealed coordinate differential expression of a large cohort of extracellular matrix associated genes. Of this grouping members of the ADAM (A disintegrin and Metalloproteinase domain containing) family of genes were differentially expressed. ADAM gene expression was also identified in EBV infected A549 cells as well as IL-13 and IL-4 stimulated cells. We probed pathologenomic activities (activation and functional activity) of ADAM19 and ADAMTS9 using siRNA and collagen assays. Knockdown of these genes resulted in diminished production of collagen in A549 cells exposed to TGF-beta1, suggesting a potential role for these molecules in ECM accumulation in IPF.

  9. Differential regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor by hydrogen peroxide and flagellin in cultured lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Noriko; Izumi, Shunsuke; Higa-Nakamine, Sayomi; Toku, Seikichi; Kakinohana, Manabu; Sugahara, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Hideyuki

    2015-02-05

    In previous studies, we found that stimulation of Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) by flagellin induced the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase-2 (MAPKAPK-2) through activation of the p38 MAPK pathway in cultured alveolar epithelial A549 cells. Our studies strongly suggested that MAPKAPK-2 phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at Ser1047. It has been reported that phosphorylation of Ser1047 after treatment with tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) induced the internalization of EGFR. In the present study, we first found that treatment of A549 cells with hydrogen peroxide induced the activation of MAPKAPK-2 and phosphorylation of EGFR at Ser1047 within 30 min. This was different from flagellin treatment because hydrogen peroxide treatment induced the phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1173 as well as Ser1047, indicating the activation of EGFR. We also found that KN93, an inhibitor of CaM kinase II, inhibited the hydrogen peroxide-induced phosphorylation of EGFR at Ser1047 through inhibition of the activation of the p38 MAPK pathway. Furthermore, we examined the internalization of EGFR by three different methods. Flow cytometry with an antibody against the extracellular domain of EGFR and biotinylation of cell surface proteins revealed that flagellin, but not hydrogen peroxide, decreased the amount of cell-surface EGFR. In addition, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase by EGF treatment was reduced by flagellin pre-treatment. These results strongly suggested that hydrogen peroxide activated the p38 MAPK pathway via activation of CaM kinase II and that flagellin and hydrogen peroxide regulate the functions of EGFR by different mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Aerosolized ZnO nanoparticles induce toxicity in alveolar type II epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yumei; Williams, Nolann G.; Tolic, Ana; Chrisler, William B.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Maddux, Bettye L.; Pounds, Joel G.; Laskin, Alexander; Orr, Galya

    2012-01-20

    The majority of in vitro studies characterizing the impact of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) on cells that line the respiratory tract were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in suspension. This approach introduces processes that are unlikely to occur during inhaled NP exposures in vivo, such as the shedding of toxic doses of dissolved ions. ZnO NPs are used extensively and pose significant sources for human exposure. Exposures to airborne ZnO NPs can induce adverse effects, but the relevance of the dissolved Zn2+ to the observed effects in vivo is still unclear. Our goal was to mimic in vivo exposures to airborne NPs and decipher the contribution of the intact NP from the contribution of the dissolved ions to airborne ZnO NP toxicity. We established the exposure of alveolar type II epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI), and compared the impact of aerosolized ZnO NPs and NPs in suspension at the same cellular doses, measured as the number of particles per cell. By evaluating membrane integrity and cell viability 6 and 24 hours post exposure we found that aerosolized NPs induced toxicity at the ALI at doses that were in the same order of magnitude as doses required to induce toxicity in submersed cultures. In addition, distinct patterns of oxidative stress were observed in the two exposure systems. These observations unravel the ability of airborne ZnO NPs to induce toxicity without the contribution of dissolved Zn2+ and suggest distinct mechanisms at the ALI and in submersed cultures.

  11. Protective effect of autophagy on endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells in rat models of COPD.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao; Cai, Qi-Hang; Wang, Yong-Jian; Fan, Shao-Hua; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Xiao, Meng-Qi; Zhu, Jin-Yu; Wu, Dong-Mei; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Yuan-Lin

    2017-09-29

    During this study, we explored the protective effects of autophagy on endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS)-induced apoptosis belonging to alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) in rat models with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Fifty-six 12-week-old male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly assigned into the COPD group (rats exposed to cigarette smoke), the 3-methyladenine (3-MA) intervention group (COPD rats were administrated with 10 mg/kg autophagy inhibitors), the chloroquine (CQ)-intervention group (COPD rats were administrated with 40 mg/kg CQ) and the control group (rats breathed in normal saline). The forced expiratory volume in 0.3 sec/forced vital capacity (FEV0.3/FVC%), inspiratory resistance (RI) and dynamic lung compliance (Cdyn) were measured and recorded. The expressions of PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (CHOP) were detected by immunohistochemistry. The cell apoptotic rates of AECs were analyzed by TUNEL staining. The expression levels of LC3-II, p62, Beclin-1, ATG5, ATG7, Caspase-12 and Caspase-3 were detected by western blotting. Results showed that The COPD group exhibited a lower FEV0.3/FVC% and Cdyn, and a higher RI than the control group. Compared with the control group, the integrated optical density (IOD) values of PERK and CHOP, the apoptotic rate of AECs, and expressions of LC3-II, Beclin-1, ATG5, ATG7, Caspase-3 and Caspase-12 expressions were significantly higher, whereas p62 expression was  significantly lower in the COPD group. Based on the results obtained during this study, it became clear that the inhibition of autophagy could attenuate the ERS-induced apoptosis of AECs in rats with COPD. ©2017 The Author(s).

  12. Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in fibrosis and repair. Transforming growth factor-β activation by epithelial cells and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Dean

    2015-03-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays a central role in driving tissue fibrosis. TGF-β is secreted in a latent form, held latent by noncovalent association of the active cytokine with a peptide derived from cleavage of the N-terminal domain of the same gene product, and needs to be activated extracellularly to exert any of its diverse biological effects. We have shown that two of the three mammalian isoforms of TGF-β, TGF-β1 and TGF-β3, depend on interactions with cell surface integrins for activation. We found that the integrin αvβ6 is highly induced on injured alveolar epithelial cells, potently induces TGF-β activation, and is critical for the development of pulmonary fibrosis and acute lung injury. However, although TGF-β drives fibrosis in virtually every anatomic site, αvβ6-mediated TGF-β activation is much more restricted. For example, αvβ6 is not induced on injured hepatocytes and plays little or no role in cirrhosis induced by repetitive hepatocyte injury. Fibroblasts are highly contractile cells that express multiple integrins closely related to αvβ6, which share the promiscuous αv subunit, so we reasoned that perhaps one or more of these αv integrins on fibroblasts might substitute for αvβ6 and activate the TGF-β required to drive liver fibrosis. Indeed, deletion of the αv subunit from activated fibroblasts protected mice from carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Importantly, these same mice were protected from bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis and renal fibrosis caused by unilateral ureteral obstruction, despite the presence of epithelial αvβ6 in these mice. These results suggest that the generation and maintenance of sufficient quantities of active TGF-β to cause tissue fibrosis in multiple organs probably depends on at least two sources-TGF-β activation by injured epithelial cells that drives fibroblast expansion and activation and an amplification step that involves TGF-β activation by an αv integrin on

  13. Gap Junctional Coupling is Essential for Epithelial Repair in the Avian Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, Regina; Forge, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The loss of auditory hair cells triggers repair responses within the population of nonsensory supporting cells. When hair cells are irreversibly lost from the mammalian cochlea, supporting cells expand to fill the resulting lesions in the sensory epithelium, an initial repair process that is dependent on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). In the chicken cochlea (the basilar papilla or BP), dying hair cells are extruded from the epithelium and supporting cells expand to fill the lesions and then replace hair cells via mitotic and/or conversion mechanisms. Here, we investigated the involvement of GJIC in the initial epithelial repair process in the aminoglycoside-damaged BP. Gentamicin-induced hair cell loss was associated with a decrease of chicken connexin43 (cCx43) immunofluorescence, yet cCx30-labeled gap junction plaques remained. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments confirmed that the GJIC remained robust in gentamicin-damaged explants, but regionally asymmetric coupling was no longer evident. Dye injections in slice preparations from undamaged BP explants identified cell types with characteristic morphologies along the neural-abneural axis, but these were electrophysiologically indistinct. In gentamicin-damaged BP, supporting cells expanded to fill space formerly occupied by hair cells and displayed more variable electrophysiological phenotypes. When GJIC was inhibited during the aminoglycoside damage paradigm, the epithelial repair response halted. Dying hair cells were retained within the sensory epithelium and supporting cells remained unexpanded. These observations suggest that repair of the auditory epithelium shares common mechanisms across vertebrate species and emphasize the importance of functional gap junctions in maintaining a homeostatic environment permissive for subsequent hair cell regeneration. PMID:25429127

  14. Neutrophil-derived JAML Inhibits Repair of Intestinal Epithelial Injury During Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Dominique A.; Sumagin, Ronen; McCall, Ingrid C.; Leoni, Giovanna; Neumann, Philipp A.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Brazil, Jennifer C.; Medina-Contreras, Oscar; Denning, Timothy L.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil transepithelial migration (TEM) during acute inflammation is associated with mucosal injury. Using models of acute mucosal injury in-vitro and in-vivo, we describe a new mechanism by which neutrophils infiltrating the intestinal mucosa disrupt epithelial homeostasis. We report that junctional adhesion molecule-like protein (JAML) is cleaved from neutrophil surface by zinc-metalloproteases during TEM. Neutrophil-derived soluble JAML bound to the epithelial tight junction protein coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) resulting in compromised barrier and inhibition of wound repair, through decreased epithelial proliferation. The deleterious effects of JAML on barrier and wound repair were reversed with an anti-JAML mAb that inhibits JAML-CAR binding. Thus, JAML released from transmigrating neutrophils across inflamed epithelia can promote recruitment of leukocytes and aid in clearance of invading microorganisms. However, sustained release of JAML under pathologic conditions associated with persistence of large numbers of infiltrated neutrophil would compromise intestinal barrier and inhibit mucosal healing. Targeting JAML-CAR interactions may thus improve mucosal healing responses under conditions of dysregulated neutrophil recruitment. PMID:24621992

  15. Airway epithelial repair, regeneration, and remodeling after injury in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Puchelle, Edith; Zahm, Jean-Marie; Tournier, Jean-Marie; Coraux, Christelle

    2006-11-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), exacerbations are generally associated with several causes, including pollutants, viruses, bacteria that are responsible for an excess of inflammatory mediators, and proinflammatory cytokines released by activated epithelial and inflammatory cells. The normal response of the airway surface epithelium to injury includes a succession of cellular events, varying from the loss of the surface epithelium integrity to partial shedding of the epithelium or even complete denudation of the basement membrane. The epithelium then has to repair and regenerate to restore its functions, through several mechanisms, including basal cell spreading and migration, followed by proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells. In COPD, the remodeling of the airway epithelium, such as squamous metaplasia and mucous hyperplasia that occur during injury, may considerably disturb the innate immune functions of the airway epithelium. In vitro and in vivo models of airway epithelial wound repair and regeneration allow the study of the spatiotemporal modulation of cellular and molecular interaction factors-namely, the proinflammatory cytokines, the matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors, and the intercellular adhesion molecules. These factors may be markedly altered during exacerbation periods of COPD and their dysregulation may induce remodeling of the airway mucosa and a leakiness of the airway surface epithelium. More knowledge of the mechanisms involved in airway epithelium regeneration may pave the way to cytoprotective and regenerative therapeutics, allowing the reconstitution of a functional, well-differentiated airway epithelium in COPD.

  16. Effect on the contour of bone and soft tissue one year after harvesting chin bone for alveolar cleft repair.

    PubMed

    Dik, E A; de Ruiter, A P; van der Bilt, A; Koole, R

    2010-10-01

    In this study the authors evaluate and quantify the residual bony defect in the mandibular symphysis and its effect on the soft tissue contour a minimum of 1 year after harvesting chin bone. 59 ASA I cleft lip and palate patients, aged 8-19 years were included. In all patients an autologous bone graft from the mandibular symphysis was harvested for transplantation to the alveolar cleft. Lateral cephalograms were used to measure the donor site defects, and the effects on the soft tissue contour. An evident residual defect was measured at the donor site 1 year after harvesting chin bone. A significant relation was seen between age at time of surgery and size of the defect 1 year postoperatively. In older patients a larger defect remained. Using the current surgical technique of harvesting chin bone, complete bony repair of the defect was not achieved. This study shows postoperatively persisting defects that comprise on average 14% of the original peroperative defects. A significant increase in soft tissue thickness was seen at the mandibular symphysis at a minimum of 1 year postoperatively. These changes in the soft tissue chin contour 1 year after harvesting bone are similar to normal growth changes. Copyright © 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Alveolar epithelial cells are critical in protection of the respiratory tract by secretion of factors able to modulate the activity of pulmonary macrophages and directly control bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Chuquimia, Olga D; Petursdottir, Dagbjort H; Periolo, Natalia; Fernández, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The respiratory epithelium is a physical and functional barrier actively involved in the clearance of environmental agents. The alveolar compartment is lined with membranous pneumocytes, known as type I alveolar epithelial cells (AEC I), and granular pneumocytes, type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II). AEC II are responsible for epithelial reparation upon injury and ion transport and are very active immunologically, contributing to lung defense by secreting antimicrobial factors. AEC II also secrete a broad variety of factors, such as cytokines and chemokines, involved in activation and differentiation of immune cells and are able to present antigen to specific T cells. Another cell type important in lung defense is the pulmonary macrophage (PuM). Considering the architecture of the alveoli, a good communication between the external and the internal compartments is crucial to mount effective responses. Our hypothesis is that being in the interface, AEC may play an important role in transmitting signals from the external to the internal compartment and in modulating the activity of PuM. For this, we collected supernatants from AEC unstimulated or stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These AEC-conditioned media were used in various setups to test for the effects on a number of macrophage functions: (i) migration, (ii) phagocytosis and intracellular control of bacterial growth, and (iii) phenotypic changes and morphology. Finally, we tested the direct effect of AEC-conditioned media on bacterial growth. We found that AEC-secreted factors had a dual effect, on one hand controlling bacterial growth and on the other hand increasing macrophage activity.

  18. Induction and repair of DNA strand breaks in bovine lens epithelial cells after high LET irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, C.; Heilmann, J.; Rink, H.

    The lens epithelium is the initiation site for the development of radiation induced cataracts. While in the cortex and nucleus radiation interacts with proteins, experimental results from cultured lenses and lens epithelial cells demonstrate mutagenic and cytotoxic effects in the epithelium. It is suggested that incorrectly repaired DNA damage may be lethal in terms of cellular reproduction and also may initiate the development of mutations or transformations in surviving cells. The occurrence of such genetically modified cells may lead to lens opacification. For a quantitative risk estimation for astronauts and space travelers it is necessary to know the radiation's relative biological effectiveness (RBE), because cosmic rays differ significantly from X-rays. RBEs for the induction of DNA strand breaks and the efficiency of repair of these breaks were measured in cultured diploid bovine lens epithelial cells exposed to different LET irradiations. Irradiations were performed either with 300 kV X-rays or at the UNILAC accelerator at GSI. Accelerated ions from Z=8 (O) to Z=92 (U) were used. For strand break measurements hydroxyapatite chromatography of alka-line unwound DNA (overall strand breaks) and non-denaturing filter elution technique (double strand breaks) were applied. Experiments showed that DNA damage occurs as a function of dose, of kinetic energy and of LET. For particles having the same LET the severity of the DNA damage increases with dose. For a given particle dose, as the LET rises, the numbers of DNA strand breaks increase to a maximum and then reach a plateau or decrease. Repair kinetics depend on the fluence (irradiation dose). At any LET value, repair is much slower after heavy ion exposure than after X-irradiation. For ions with an LET of less than 10,000 keV/μm more than 90 percent of the strand breaks induced are repaired within 24 hours. At higher particle fluences, especially for low energetic particles with a very high local density of

  19. Transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells repairs brachial plexus injury: pathological and biomechanical analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; Luo, Min; Li, Peng; Jin, Hai

    2014-01-01

    A brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits by stretching the C6 nerve root. Immediately after the stretching, a suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was injected into the injured brachial plexus. The results of tensile mechanical testing of the brachial plexus showed that the tensile elastic limit strain, elastic limit stress, maximum stress, and maximum strain of the injured brachial plexuses were significantly increased at 24 weeks after the injection. The treatment clearly improved the pathological morphology of the injured brachial plexus nerve, as seen by hematoxylin eosin staining, and the functions of the rabbit forepaw were restored. These data indicate that the injection of human amniotic epithelial cells contributed to the repair of brachial plexus injury, and that this technique may transform into current clinical treatment strategies. PMID:25657737

  20. Determination of alveolar epithelial cell phenotypes in fetal sheep: evidence for the involvement of basal lung expansion

    PubMed Central

    Flecknoe, Sharon J; Wallace, Megan J; Harding, Richard; Hooper, Stuart B

    2002-01-01

    The factors that control the differentiation of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) into type-I and type-II cells in vivo are largely unknown. As sustained increases in fetal lung expansion induce type-II AECs to differentiate into type-I cells, our aim was to determine whether reduced fetal lung expansion can induce type-I AECs to trans-differentiate into type-II AECs. Chronically catheterised fetal sheep were divided into two age-matched control groups and three experimental groups (n = 5 for each). The experimental groups were exposed to either: (1) 10 days of increased lung expansion induced by tracheal obstruction (TO), (2) 10 days of TO followed by 5 days of reduced lung expansion induced by lung liquid drainage (LLD), or (3) 10 days of TO followed by 10 days of LLD. Following 10 days of TO, 5 days of LLD reduced the proportion of type-I AECs from 89.4 ± 0.9 % to 68.4 ± 2.8 %, which was similar to control values (64.8 ± 0.5 %), and increased the proportion of type-II AECs from 1.9 ± 0.3 % to 21.9 ± 2.8 %, which remained below control values (33.4 ± 1.7 %). The same treatment increased surfactant protein (SP)-A, SP-B and SP-C mRNA levels (expressed as a percentage of control values) from 26.7 ± 6.0 %, 40.0 ± 7.3 % and 10.3 ± 1.8 % to 78.1 ± 10.3 %, 105.8 ± 12.7 % and 121.0 ± 14.1 %, respectively. Similar results were obtained after 10 days of LLD, which followed 10 days of TO. These results indicate that the phenotypes of type-I and type-II AECs are strongly influenced by the basal degree of lung expansion in fetal sheep. Furthermore, the coincident increase in type-II AEC proportions and SP mRNA levels in response to LLD suggests that type-I AECs can trans-differentiate into functional type-II cells, and hence are not terminally differentiated. PMID:12096066

  1. [In vitro differentiation of rat amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells into type II alveolar epithelial cells].

    PubMed

    Gu, Chao; Yan, Jianping; Xu, Wulin; Li, Yaqing; Xia, Yingjie; Chen, Chun

    2014-07-08

    To explore the in vitro differentiation of rat amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AF-MSCs) into type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECII). Flow cytometry was used to analyze the phenotypes of AF-MSCs from 10 pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats. And the Oct-4 mRNA expression level was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Rat embryonic stem cell was used as a positive control. According to different culturing methods, AF-MSCs were randomly divided into 5 groups of A (control group), B, C, D and E. After in vitro differentiation, SPA, SPB, SPC, SPD and TTF1 mRNA expressions were detected by qRT-PCR, SPA and SPC protein expressions measured by immunofluorescence and lamellar bodies observed by transmission electron microscopy. AF-MSCs could grow spirally in L-DMEM medium containing 20% fetal bovine serum and 4 µg/L basic fibroblast growth factor. The expressions of such surface antigens of AF-MSCs (third passage) as CD29 (99.1 ± 7.9)%, CD44 (99.2 ± 7.4)%, CD73 (75.6 ± 5.2)%, CD90 (98.9 ± 8.1)%, CD105 (92.9 ± 7.3)% and CD166 (89.3 ± 6.7)% were positive while CD34 and CD45 were negative. And the expression of Oct-4 mRNA (relative quantity: 0.690 ± 0.059) was significantly lower than rat embryonic stem cells (relative quantity: 1.000 ± 0.002) positive control group (P < 0.01). After in vitro differentiation, the expressions of SPA, SPB, SPC, SPD and TTF1 mRNA and SPA and SPC protein were negative in group A and positive in group B. The expressions of SPA, SPB, SPC, SPD and TTF1 mRNA (relative quantity: 0.426 ± 0.043, 0.368 ± 0.028, 0.492 ± 0.058, 0.327 ± 0.024 and 0.183 ± 0.018) and SPA and SPC protein in group B were significantly higher than other groups (all P < 0.01). Lamellar bodies could be found in the differentiated cells of group B. Rat AF-MSCs from amniotic fluid may differentiated into AECII like cells in vitro.

  2. The voltage-activated hydrogen ion conductance in rat alveolar epithelial cells is determined by the pH gradient

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Voltage-activated H+ currents were studied in rat alveolar epithelial cells using tight-seal whole-cell voltage clamp recording and highly buffered, EGTA-containing solutions. Under these conditions, the tail current reversal potential, Vrev, was close to the Nernst potential, EH, varying 52 mV/U pH over four delta pH units (delta pH = pHo - pHi). This result indicates that H+ channels are extremely selective, PH/PTMA > 10(7), and that both internal and external pH, pHi, and pHo, were well controlled. The H+ current amplitude was practically constant at any fixed delta pH, in spite of up to 100-fold symmetrical changes in H+ concentration. Thus, the rate-limiting step in H+ permeation is pH independent, must be localized to the channel (entry, permeation, or exit), and is not bulk diffusion limitation. The instantaneous current- voltage relationship exhibited distinct outward rectification at symmetrical pH, suggesting asymmetry in the permeation pathway. Sigmoid activation kinetics and biexponential decay of tail currents near threshold potentials indicate that H+ channels pass through at least two closed states before opening. The steady state H+ conductance, gH, as well as activation and deactivation kinetic parameters were all shifted along the voltage axis by approximately 40 mV/U pH by changes in pHi or pHo, with the exception of the fast component of tail currents which was shifted less if at all. The threshold potential at which H+ currents were detectably activated can be described empirically as approximately 20-40(pHo-pHi) mV. If internal and external protons regulate the voltage dependence of gH gating at separate sites, then they must be equally effective. A simpler interpretation is that gating is controlled by the pH gradient, delta pH. We propose a simple general model to account for the observed delta pH dependence. Protonation at an externally accessible site stabilizes the closed channel conformation. Deprotonation of this site permits a

  3. Effects of Bisphenol A Metabolite 4-Methyl-2,4-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)pent-1-ene on Lung Function and Type 2 Pulmonary Alveolar Epithelial Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Su, Chin-Chuan; Lee, Kuan-I; Chen, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is recognized as a major pollutant worldwide. 4-Methyl-2,4-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)pent-1-ene (MBP) is a major active metabolite of BPA. The epidemiological and animal studies have reported that BPA is harmful to lung function. The role of MBP in lung dysfunction after BPA exposure still remains unclear. This study investigated whether MBP would induce lung alveolar cell damage and evaluated the role of MBP in the BPA exposure-induced lung dysfunction. An in vitro type 2 alveolar epithelial cell (L2) model and an ex vivo isolated reperfused rat lung model were used to determine the effects of BPA or MBP on cell growth and lung function. MBP, but not BPA, dose-dependently increased the mean artery pressure (Pa), pulmonary capillary pressure (Pc), pulmonary capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), and wet/dry weight ratio in isolated reperfused rat lungs. MBP significantly reduced cell viability and induced caspases-3/7 cleavage and apoptosis and increased AMP-activated protein kinas (AMPK) phosphorylation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related molecules expression in L2 cells, which could be reversed by AMPK-siRNA transfection. These findings demonstrated for the first time that MBP exposure induced type 2 alveolar cell apoptosis and lung dysfunction through an AMPK-regulated ER stress signaling pathway. PMID:27982077

  4. Effects of Bisphenol A Metabolite 4-Methyl-2,4-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)pent-1-ene on Lung Function and Type 2 Pulmonary Alveolar Epithelial Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Su, Chin-Chuan; Lee, Kuan-I; Chen, Ya-Wen

    2016-12-16

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is recognized as a major pollutant worldwide. 4-Methyl-2,4-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)pent-1-ene (MBP) is a major active metabolite of BPA. The epidemiological and animal studies have reported that BPA is harmful to lung function. The role of MBP in lung dysfunction after BPA exposure still remains unclear. This study investigated whether MBP would induce lung alveolar cell damage and evaluated the role of MBP in the BPA exposure-induced lung dysfunction. An in vitro type 2 alveolar epithelial cell (L2) model and an ex vivo isolated reperfused rat lung model were used to determine the effects of BPA or MBP on cell growth and lung function. MBP, but not BPA, dose-dependently increased the mean artery pressure (Pa), pulmonary capillary pressure (Pc), pulmonary capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), and wet/dry weight ratio in isolated reperfused rat lungs. MBP significantly reduced cell viability and induced caspases-3/7 cleavage and apoptosis and increased AMP-activated protein kinas (AMPK) phosphorylation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related molecules expression in L2 cells, which could be reversed by AMPK-siRNA transfection. These findings demonstrated for the first time that MBP exposure induced type 2 alveolar cell apoptosis and lung dysfunction through an AMPK-regulated ER stress signaling pathway.

  5. Induction and repair of DNA strand breaks in bovine lens epithelial cells after high LET irradiation.

    PubMed

    Baumstark-Khan, C; Heilmann, J; Rink, H

    2003-01-01

    The lens epithelium is the initiation site for the development of radiation induced cataracts. Radiation in the cortex and nucleus interacts with proteins, while in the epithelium, experimental results reveal mutagenic and cytotoxic effects. It is suggested that incorrectly repaired DNA damage may be lethal in terms of cellular reproduction and also may initiate the development of mutations or transformations in surviving cells. The occurrence of such genetically modified cells may lead to lens opacification. For a quantitative risk estimation for astronauts and space travelers it is necessary to know the relative biological effectiveness (RBE), because the spacial and temporal distribution of initial physical damage induced by cosmic radiation differ significantly from that of X-rays. RBEs for the induction of DNA strand breaks and the efficiency of repair of these breaks were measured in cultured diploid bovine lens epithelial cells exposed to different LET irradiation to either 300 kV X-rays or to heavy ions at the UNILAC accelerator at GSI. Accelerated ions from Z=8 (O) to Z=92 (U) were used. Strand breaks were measured by hydroxyapatite chromatography of alkaline unwound DNA (overall strand breaks). Results showed that DNA damage occurs as a function of dose, of kinetic energy and of LET. For particles having the same LET the severity of the DNA damage increases with dose. For a given particle dose, as the LET rises, the numbers of DNA strand breaks increase to a maximum and then reach a plateau or decrease. Repair kinetics depend on the fluence (irradiation dose). At any LET value, repair is much slower after heavy ion exposure than after X-irradiation. For ions with an LET of less than 10,000 keV micrometers-1 more than 90 percent of the strand breaks induced are repaired within 24 hours. At higher particle fluences, especially for low energetic particles with a very high local density of energy deposition within the particle track, a higher proportion of

  6. Induction and repair of DNA strand breaks in bovine lens epithelial cells after high LET irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, C.; Heilmann, J.; Rink, H.

    The lens epithelium is the initiation site for the development of radiation induced cataracts. Radiation in the cortex and nucleus interacts with proteins, while in the epithelium, experimental results reveal mutagenic and cytotoxic effects. It is suggested that incorrectly repaired DNA damage may be lethal in terms of cellular reproduction and also may initiate the development of mutations or transformations in surviving cells. The occurrence of such genetically modified cells may lead to lens opacification. For a quantitative risk estimation for astronauts and space travelers it is necessary to know the relative biological effectiveness (RBE), because the spacial and temporal distribution of initial physical damage induced by cosmic radiation differ significantly from that of X-rays. RBEs for the induction of DNA strand breaks and the efficiency of repair of these breaks were measured in cultured diploid bovine lens epithelial cells exposed to different LET irradiation to either 300 kV X-rays or to heavy ions at the UNILAC accelerator at GSI. Accelerated ions from Z=8 (O) to Z=92 (U) were used. Strand breaks were measured by hydroxyapatite chromatography of alkaline unwound DNA (overall strand breaks). Results showed that DNA damage occurs as a function of dose, of kinetic energy and of LET. For particles having the same LET the severity of the DNA damage increases with dose. For a given particle dose, as the LET rises, the numbers of DNA strand breaks increase to a maximum and then reach a plateau or decrease. Repair kinetics depend on the fluence (irradiation dose). At any LET value, repair is much slower after heavy ion exposure than after X-irradiation. For ions with an LET of less than 10,000 keV μ -1 more than 90 percent of the strand breaks induced are repaired within 24 hours. At higher particle fluences, especially for low energetic particles with a very high local density of energy deposition within the particle track, a higher proportion of non

  7. Alteration in Intrapulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Aerosolized Model Compounds Due to Disruption of the Alveolar Epithelial Barriers Following Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Tada, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a lethal lung disease that is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix and a change in lung structure. In this study, intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of aerosolized model compounds were evaluated using rats with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Aerosol formulations of indocyanine green, 6-carboxyfluorescein (6-CF), and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextrans (FD; 4.4, 10, 70, and 250 kDa) were administered to rat lungs using a MicroSprayer. Indocyanine green fluorescence signals were significantly weaker in fibrotic lungs than in control lungs and 6-CF and FD concentrations in the plasma of pulmonary fibrotic animals were markedly higher than in the plasma of control animals. Moreover, disrupted epithelial tight junctions, including claudins-1, -3, and -5, were observed in pulmonary fibrotic lesions using immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, destruction of tight junctions on model alveolar epithelial cells (NCI-H441) by transforming growth factor-β1 treatment enhanced the permeability of 6-CF and FDs through NCI-H441 cell monolayers. These results indicate that aerosolized drugs are easily distributed into the plasma after leakage through damaged tight junctions of alveolar epithelium. Therefore, the development of delivery systems for anti-fibrotic agents to improve intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics may be necessary for effective idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis therapy.

  8. Blockage of glycolysis by targeting PFKFB3 alleviates sepsis-related acute lung injury via suppressing inflammation and apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yuanqi; Lan, Haibing; Yu, Zhihong; Wang, Meng; Wang, Shu; Chen, Yu; Rao, Haiwei; Li, Jingying; Sheng, Zhiyong; Shao, Jianghua

    2017-09-16

    Sepsis-related acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by excessive lung inflammation and apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells resulting in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Recent studies indicated that anaerobic glycolysis play an important role in sepsis. However, whether inhibition of aerobic glycolysis exhibits beneficial effect on sepsis-induced ALI is not known. In vivo, a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced ALI mouse model was set up and mice treated with glycolytic inhibitor 3PO after CLP. The mice treated with the 3PO ameliorated the survival rate, histopathological changes, lung inflammation, lactate increased and lung apoptosis of mice with CLP-induced sepsis. In vitro, the exposure of human alveolar epithelial A549 cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in cell apoptosis, inflammatory cytokine production, enhanced glycolytic flux and reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased. While these changes were attenuated by 3PO treatment. Sequentially, treatment of A549 cells with lactate caused cell apoptosis and enhancement of ROS. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) significantly lowered LPS and lactate-induced the generation of ROS and cell apoptosis in A549 cells. Therefore, these results indicate that anaerobic glycolysis may be an important contributor in cell apoptosis of sepsis-related ALI. Moreover, LPS specifically induces apoptotic insults to A549 cell through lactate-mediated enhancement of ROS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Adrenergic regulation of ion transport across adult alveolar epithelial cells: effects on Cl- channel activation and transport function in cultures with an apical air interface.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X; Ingbar, D H; O'Grady, S M

    2001-06-01

    The effect of beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation on Cl- channel activation was investigated in alveolar epithelial cells grown in monolayer culture and in freshly isolated cells. Monolayers cultured under apical air interface conditions exhibited enhanced amiloride-sensitive Na+ transport compared to apical liquid interface monolayers. Amiloride or benzamil inhibited most (66%) of the basal short circuit current (Isc) with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.62 microm and 0.09 microm respectively. Basolateral addition of terbutaline (2 microm) produced a rapid decrease in Isc followed by a slow recovery that exceeded the basal Isc. When Cl- was replaced with methanesulfonate in either intact monolayers or basolateral membrane permeabilized monolayers, the response to terbutaline (2 microm) was completely inhibited. No effect of terbutaline on amiloride-sensitive Na+ current was detected. beta-Adrenergic agonists and 8-chlorothiophenyl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (8-ctp cAMP) directly stimulated a Cl- channel in freshly isolated alveolar epithelial cells. The current was blocked by glibenclamide (100 microm) and had a reversal potential of -22 mV. No increase in amiloride-sensitve current was detected in response to terbutaline or 8-cpt cAMP stimulation. These data support the conclusion that beta-adrenergic agonists produce acute activation of apical Cl- channels and that monolayers maintained under apical air interface conditions exhibit increased Na+ absorption.

  10. Shp-2 contributes to anti-RSV activity in human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells by interfering with the IFN-α-induced Jak/Stat1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Saisai; Zheng, Gang; Zhao, Lifang; Xu, Feng; Qian, Jing

    2015-10-01

    Src homology phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2 (Shp-2) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that is involved in a variety of cellular processes, including antiviral interferon signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated the role of Shp-2 in the host cell interactions of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We report significant changes in the expression of Shp-2 in human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (A549) upon RSV infection. We also report that blocking Shp-2 does not affect viral replication or virus-induced interferon-alpha (IFN-α) production. Interestingly, whereas A549 cells were activated by IFN-α, the blocking of Shp-2 resulted in increased viral replication that was associated with the reduced expression of the IFN-stimulated genes of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetases and Mx1, and the concomitant inhibition of Stat1 tyrosine phosphorylation. Our findings suggest that Shp-2 contributes to the control of RSV replication and progeny production in pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells by interfering with IFN-α-induced Jak/Stat1 pathway activation rather than by affecting the production of IFN-α itself. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  11. Modeling pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis by epithelial deletion of the Npt2b sodium phosphate cotransporter reveals putative biomarkers and strategies for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Atsushi; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos M.; Amlal, Hassane; Uehara, Yasuaki; Gardner, Jason C.; LaSance, Kathleen; Pitstick, Lori B.; Bridges, James P.; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; McGraw, Dennis W.; Woods, Jason C.; Sabbagh, Yves; Schiavi, Susan C.; Altinişik, Göksel; Jakopović, Marko; Inoue, Yoshikazu; McCormack, Francis X.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare, autosomal recessive lung disorder associated with progressive accumulation of calcium phosphate microliths. Inactivating mutations in SLC34A2, which encodes the NPT2b sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter, has been proposed as a cause of PAM. We show that epithelial deletion of Npt2b in mice results in a progressive pulmonary process characterized by diffuse alveolar microlith accumulation, radio-graphic opacification, restrictive physiology, inflammation, fibrosis, and an unexpected alveolar phospholipidosis. Cytokine and surfactant protein elevations in the alveolar lavage and serum of PAM mice and confirmed in serum from PAM patients identify serum MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein 1) and SP-D (surfactant protein D) as potential biomarkers. Microliths introduced by adoptive transfer into the lungs of wild-type mice produce marked macrophagerich inflammation and elevation of serum MCP-1 that peaks at 1 week and resolves at 1 month, concomitant with clearance of stones. Microliths isolated by bronchoalveolar lavage readily dissolve in EDTA, and therapeutic whole-lung EDTA lavage reduces the burden of stones in the lungs. A low-phosphate diet prevents microlith formation in young animals and reduces lung injury on the basis of reduction in serum SP-D. The burden of pulmonary calcium deposits in established PAM is also diminished within 4 weeks by a low-phosphate diet challenge. These data support a causative role for Npt2b in the pathogenesis of PAM and the use of the PAM mouse model as a preclinical platform for the development of biomarkers and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26560359

  12. Modeling pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis by epithelial deletion of the Npt2b sodium phosphate cotransporter reveals putative biomarkers and strategies for treatment.

    PubMed

    Saito, Atsushi; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos M; Amlal, Hassane; Uehara, Yasuaki; Gardner, Jason C; LaSance, Kathleen; Pitstick, Lori B; Bridges, James P; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; McGraw, Dennis W; Woods, Jason C; Sabbagh, Yves; Schiavi, Susan C; Altinişik, Göksel; Jakopović, Marko; Inoue, Yoshikazu; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-11-11

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare, autosomal recessive lung disorder associated with progressive accumulation of calcium phosphate microliths. Inactivating mutations in SLC34A2, which encodes the NPT2b sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter, has been proposed as a cause of PAM. We show that epithelial deletion of Npt2b in mice results in a progressive pulmonary process characterized by diffuse alveolar microlith accumulation, radiographic opacification, restrictive physiology, inflammation, fibrosis, and an unexpected alveolar phospholipidosis. Cytokine and surfactant protein elevations in the alveolar lavage and serum of PAM mice and confirmed in serum from PAM patients identify serum MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein 1) and SP-D (surfactant protein D) as potential biomarkers. Microliths introduced by adoptive transfer into the lungs of wild-type mice produce marked macrophage-rich inflammation and elevation of serum MCP-1 that peaks at 1 week and resolves at 1 month, concomitant with clearance of stones. Microliths isolated by bronchoalveolar lavage readily dissolve in EDTA, and therapeutic whole-lung EDTA lavage reduces the burden of stones in the lungs. A low-phosphate diet prevents microlith formation in young animals and reduces lung injury on the basis of reduction in serum SP-D. The burden of pulmonary calcium deposits in established PAM is also diminished within 4 weeks by a low-phosphate diet challenge. These data support a causative role for Npt2b in the pathogenesis of PAM and the use of the PAM mouse model as a preclinical platform for the development of biomarkers and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Establishment of a Clinically Relevant Ex Vivo Mock Cataract Surgery Model for Investigating Epithelial Wound Repair in a Native Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Walker, Janice L; Bleaken, Brigid M; Wolff, Iris M; Menko, A Sue

    2015-06-05

    The major impediment to understanding how an epithelial tissue executes wound repair is the limited availability of models in which it is possible to follow and manipulate the wound response ex vivo in an environment that closely mimics that of epithelial tissue injury in vivo. This issue was addressed by creating a clinically relevant epithelial ex vivo injury-repair model based on cataract surgery. In this culture model, the response of the lens epithelium to wounding can be followed live in the cells' native microenvironment, and the molecular mediators of wound repair easily manipulated during the repair process. To prepare the cultures, lenses are removed from the eye and a small incision is made in the anterior of the lens from which the inner mass of lens fiber cells is removed. This procedure creates a circular wound on the posterior lens capsule, the thick basement membrane that surrounds the lens. This wound area where the fiber cells were attached is located just adjacent to a continuous monolayer of lens epithelial cells that remains linked to the lens capsule during the surgical procedure. The wounded epithelium, the cell type from which fiber cells are derived during development, responds to the injury of fiber cell removal by moving collectively across the wound area, led by a population of vimentin-rich repair cells whose mesenchymal progenitors are endogenous to the lens. These properties are typical of a normal epithelial wound healing response. In this model, as in vivo, wound repair is dependent on signals supplied by the endogenous environment that is uniquely maintained in this ex vivo culture system, providing an ideal opportunity for discovery of the mechanisms that regulate repair of an epithelium following wounding.

  14. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) IVA as a potential signature molecule in cigarette smoke condensate induced pathologies in alveolar epithelial lineages.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Subodh K; Sharma, Sanjeev K; Farooque, Abdullah; Kaushik, Gaurav; Kaur, Balwinder; Pathak, Chander M; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S; Khanduja, Krishan L

    2016-08-15

    Smoking is one of the leading causes of millions of deaths worldwide. During cigarette smoking, most affected and highly exposed cells are the alveolar epithelium and generated oxidative stress in these cells leads to death and damage. Several studies suggested that oxidative stress causes membrane remodeling via Phospholipase A2s but in the case of cigarette smokers, mechanistically study is not yet fully defined. In view of present perspective, we evaluated the involvement of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) IVA as therapeutic target in cigarette smoke induced pathologies in transformed type I and type II alveolar epithelial cells. Transformed type I (WI26) and type II (A549) alveolar epithelial cells were used for the present study. Cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) was prepared from most commonly used cigarette (Gold Flake with filter) by the Indian population. CSC-induced molecular changes were evaluated through cell viability using MTT assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement using 2,7 dichlorodihydrofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA), cell membrane integrity using fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and ethidium bromide (EtBr) staining, super oxide dismutase (SOD) levels, cPLA2 activity and molecular involvement of specific cPLA2s at selected 24 h time period. CSC-induced response on both type of epithelial cells shown significantly reduction in cell viability, declined membrane integrity, with differential escalation of ROS levels in the range of 1.5-15 folds and pointedly increased cPLA2 activity (p < 0.05). Likewise, we observed distinction antioxidant potential in these two types of lineages as type I cells had considerably higher SOD levels when compared to type II cells (p < 0.05). Further molecular expression of all cPLA2s increased significantly in a dose dependent manner, specifically cytosolic phospholipase A2 IVA with maximum manifestation of 3.8 folds. Interestingly, CSC-induced ROS levels and cPLA2s expression were relatively higher in A

  15. Colorectal cancer intrinsic subtypes predict chemotherapy benefit, deficient mismatch repair and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Roepman, Paul; Schlicker, Andreas; Tabernero, Josep; Majewski, Ian; Tian, Sun; Moreno, Victor; Snel, Mireille H; Chresta, Christine M; Rosenberg, Robert; Nitsche, Ulrich; Macarulla, Teresa; Capella, Gabriel; Salazar, Ramon; Orphanides, George; Wessels, Lodewyk FA; Bernards, Rene; Simon, Iris M

    2014-01-01

    In most colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, outcome cannot be predicted because tumors with similar clinicopathological features can have differences in disease progression and treatment response. Therefore, a better understanding of the CRC biology is required to identify those patients who will benefit from chemotherapy and to find a more tailored therapy plan for other patients. Based on unsupervised classification of whole genome data from 188 stages I–IV CRC patients, a molecular classification was developed that consist of at least three major intrinsic subtypes (A-, B- and C-type). The subtypes were validated in 543 stages II and III patients and were associated with prognosis and benefit from chemotherapy. The heterogeneity of the intrinsic subtypes is largely based on three biological hallmarks of the tumor: epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, deficiency in mismatch repair genes that result in high mutation frequency associated with microsatellite instability and cellular proliferation. A-type tumors, observed in 22% of the patients, have the best prognosis, have frequent BRAF mutations and a deficient DNA mismatch repair system. C-type patients (16%) have the worst outcome, a mesenchymal gene expression phenotype and show no benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. Both A-type and B-type tumors have a more proliferative and epithelial phenotype and B-types benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. B-type tumors (62%) show a low overall mutation frequency consistent with the absence of DNA mismatch repair deficiency. Classification based on molecular subtypes made it possible to expand and improve CRC classification beyond standard molecular and immunohistochemical assessment and might help in the future to guide treatment in CRC patients. PMID:23852808

  16. Classic IL-6R signalling is dispensable for intestinal epithelial proliferation and repair

    PubMed Central

    Aden, K; Breuer, A; Rehman, A; Geese, H; Tran, F; Sommer, J; Waetzig, G H; Reinheimer, T M; Schreiber, S; Rose-John, S; Scheller, J; Rosenstiel, P

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by disturbed cytokine signalling in the mucosa. Inhibition of the proinflammatory interleukin (IL)-6 pathway is a promising new therapeutic strategy, but safety concerns arise as IL-6 signalling also contributes to epithelial repair of the intestinal mucosa. To which extent IL-6 classic or trans-signalling contributes to intestinal repair remains elusive. We tested the influence of IL-6 classic signalling on intestinal repair and proliferation. Whereas IL-6 induced STAT3 phosphorylation in the colonic cancer cell lines, primary non-malignant intestinal organoids did not respond to IL-6 classic signalling. Mice deficient in intestinal IL-6R (IL-6RΔIEC mice) did not display increased susceptibility to acute dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. In the azoxymethane DSS model IL-6RΔIEC mice were not protected from inflammation-induced carcinogenesis but showed comparable tumor load to wild-type mice. These data indicate that classic signalling is not the major pathway to transduce IL-6 stimuli into the intestinal epithelium. PMID:27869785

  17. Lost after translation: insights from pulmonary surfactant for understanding the role of alveolar epithelial dysfunction and cellular quality control in fibrotic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Mulugeta, Surafel; Nureki, Shin-Ichi; Beers, Michael F

    2015-09-15

    Dating back nearly 35 years ago to the Witschi hypothesis, epithelial cell dysfunction and abnormal wound healing have reemerged as central concepts in the pathophysiology of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in adults and in interstitial lung disease in children. Alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells represent a metabolically active compartment in the distal air spaces responsible for pulmonary surfactant biosynthesis and function as a progenitor population required for maintenance of alveolar integrity. Rare mutations in surfactant system components have provided new clues to understanding broader questions regarding the role of AT2 cell dysfunction in the pathophysiology of fibrotic lung diseases. Drawing on data generated from a variety of model systems expressing disease-related surfactant component mutations [surfactant proteins A and C (SP-A and SP-C); the lipid transporter ABCA3], this review will examine the concept of epithelial dysfunction in fibrotic lung disease, provide an update on AT2 cell and surfactant biology, summarize cellular responses to mutant surfactant components [including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and intrinsic apoptosis], and examine quality control pathways (unfolded protein response, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, macroautophagy) that can be utilized to restore AT2 homeostasis. This integrated response and its derangement will be placed in the context of cell stress and quality control signatures found in patients with familial or sporadic IPF as well as non-surfactant-related AT2 cell dysfunction syndromes associated with a fibrotic lung phenotype. Finally, the need for targeted therapeutic strategies for pulmonary fibrosis that address epithelial ER stress, its downstream signaling, and cell quality control are discussed.

  18. Lost after translation: insights from pulmonary surfactant for understanding the role of alveolar epithelial dysfunction and cellular quality control in fibrotic lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Nureki, Shin-Ichi; Beers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Dating back nearly 35 years ago to the Witschi hypothesis, epithelial cell dysfunction and abnormal wound healing have reemerged as central concepts in the pathophysiology of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in adults and in interstitial lung disease in children. Alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells represent a metabolically active compartment in the distal air spaces responsible for pulmonary surfactant biosynthesis and function as a progenitor population required for maintenance of alveolar integrity. Rare mutations in surfactant system components have provided new clues to understanding broader questions regarding the role of AT2 cell dysfunction in the pathophysiology of fibrotic lung diseases. Drawing on data generated from a variety of model systems expressing disease-related surfactant component mutations [surfactant proteins A and C (SP-A and SP-C); the lipid transporter ABCA3], this review will examine the concept of epithelial dysfunction in fibrotic lung disease, provide an update on AT2 cell and surfactant biology, summarize cellular responses to mutant surfactant components [including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and intrinsic apoptosis], and examine quality control pathways (unfolded protein response, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, macroautophagy) that can be utilized to restore AT2 homeostasis. This integrated response and its derangement will be placed in the context of cell stress and quality control signatures found in patients with familial or sporadic IPF as well as non-surfactant-related AT2 cell dysfunction syndromes associated with a fibrotic lung phenotype. Finally, the need for targeted therapeutic strategies for pulmonary fibrosis that address epithelial ER stress, its downstream signaling, and cell quality control are discussed. PMID:26186947

  19. Abnormal epithelial structure and chronic lung inflammation after repair of chlorine-induced airway injury.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yiqun; Chen, Jing; Humphrey, David M; Fodah, Ramy A; Warawa, Jonathan M; Hoyle, Gary W

    2015-01-15

    Chlorine is a toxic gas used in a variety of industrial processes and is considered a chemical threat agent. High-level chlorine exposure causes acute lung injury, but the long-term effects of acute chlorine exposure are unclear. Here we characterized chronic pulmonary changes following acute chlorine exposure in mice. A/J mice were exposed to 240 parts per million-hour chlorine or sham-exposed to air. Chlorine inhalation caused sloughing of bronchial epithelium 1 day after chlorine exposure, which was repaired with restoration of a pseudostratified epithelium by day 7. The repaired epithelium contained an abnormal distribution of epithelial cells containing clusters of club or ciliated cells rather than the uniformly interspersed pattern of these cells in unexposed mice. Although the damaged epithelium in A/J mice was repaired rapidly, and minimal airway fibrosis was observed, chlorine-exposed mice developed pneumonitis characterized by infiltration of alveoli with neutrophils and prominent, large, foamy macrophages. Levels of CXCL1/KC, CXCL5/LPS-induced CXC chemokine, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and VEGF in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluid from chlorine-exposed mice showed steadily increasing trends over time. BAL protein levels were increased on day 4 and remained elevated out to day 28. The number of bacteria cultured from lungs of chlorine-exposed mice 4 wk after exposure was not increased compared with sham-exposed mice, indicating that the observed pneumonitis was not driven by bacterial infection of the lung. The results indicate that acute chlorine exposure may cause chronic abnormalities in the lungs despite rapid repair of injured epithelium.

  20. Abnormal epithelial structure and chronic lung inflammation after repair of chlorine-induced airway injury

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yiqun; Chen, Jing; Humphrey, David M.; Fodah, Ramy A.; Warawa, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Chlorine is a toxic gas used in a variety of industrial processes and is considered a chemical threat agent. High-level chlorine exposure causes acute lung injury, but the long-term effects of acute chlorine exposure are unclear. Here we characterized chronic pulmonary changes following acute chlorine exposure in mice. A/J mice were exposed to 240 parts per million-hour chlorine or sham-exposed to air. Chlorine inhalation caused sloughing of bronchial epithelium 1 day after chlorine exposure, which was repaired with restoration of a pseudostratified epithelium by day 7. The repaired epithelium contained an abnormal distribution of epithelial cells containing clusters of club or ciliated cells rather than the uniformly interspersed pattern of these cells in unexposed mice. Although the damaged epithelium in A/J mice was repaired rapidly, and minimal airway fibrosis was observed, chlorine-exposed mice developed pneumonitis characterized by infiltration of alveoli with neutrophils and prominent, large, foamy macrophages. Levels of CXCL1/KC, CXCL5/LPS-induced CXC chemokine, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and VEGF in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluid from chlorine-exposed mice showed steadily increasing trends over time. BAL protein levels were increased on day 4 and remained elevated out to day 28. The number of bacteria cultured from lungs of chlorine-exposed mice 4 wk after exposure was not increased compared with sham-exposed mice, indicating that the observed pneumonitis was not driven by bacterial infection of the lung. The results indicate that acute chlorine exposure may cause chronic abnormalities in the lungs despite rapid repair of injured epithelium. PMID:25398987

  1. Highly water-permeable type I alveolar epithelial cells confer high water permeability between the airspace and vasculature in rat lung

    PubMed Central

    Dobbs, Leland G.; Gonzalez, Robert; Matthay, Michael A.; Carter, Ethan P.; Allen, Lennell; Verkman, A. S.

    1998-01-01

    Water permeability measured between the airspace and vasculature in intact sheep and mouse lungs is high. More than 95% of the internal surface area of the lung is lined by alveolar epithelial type I cells. The purpose of this study was to test whether osmotic water permeability (Pf) in type I alveolar epithelial cells is high enough to account for the high Pf of the intact lung. Pf measured between the airspace and vasculature in the perfused fluid-filled rat lung by the pleural surface fluorescence method was high (0.019 ± 0.004 cm/s at 12°C) and weakly temperature-dependent (activation energy 3.7 kcal/mol). To resolve the contributions of type I and type II alveolar epithelial cells to lung water permeability, Pf was measured by stopped-flow light scattering in suspensions of purified type I or type II cells obtained by immunoaffinity procedures. In response to a sudden change in external solution osmolality from 300 to 600 mOsm, the volume of type I cells decreased rapidly with a half-time (t1/2) of 60–80 ms at 10°C, giving a plasma membrane Pf of 0.06–0.08 cm/s. Pf in type I cells was independent of osmotic gradient size and was weakly temperature-dependent (activation energy 3.4 kcal/mol). In contrast, t1/2 for type II cells in suspension was much slower, ≈1 s; Pf for type II cells was 0.013 cm/s. Vesicles derived from type I cells also had a very high Pf of 0.06–0.08 cm/s at 10°C that was inhibited 95% by HgCl2. The Pf in type I cells is the highest measured for any mammalian cell membrane and would account for the high water permeability of the lung. PMID:9501203

  2. Bone defect repair on the alveolar wall of the maxillary sinus using collagen membranes and temporal fascia: an experimental study in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Silva, Adalberto Novaes; Oliveira, José Américo de; Jamur, Maria Célia; Junqueira, José Ari Gualberto; Correa, Vani Maria; Lima, Wilma Terezinha Anselmo

    2011-01-01

    Few studies has been done using guided bone regeneration in maxillary sinus defects. To assess the bone repair process in surgical defects on the alveolar wall of the monkey maxillary sinus, which communicates with the sinus cavity, by using collagen membranes: Gen-derm--Genius Baumer, Pro-tape--Proline and autologous temporal fascia. In this prospective and experimental study, orosinusal communications were performed in four tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and histologic analysis was carried out 180 days after. In the defects without a cover (control), bone proliferation predominated in two animals and fibrous connective tissue predominated in the other two. In defects repaired with a temporal fascia flap, fibrous connective tissue predominated in three animals and bone proliferation predominated in one. In the defects repaired with Gen-derm or Pro-tape collagen membranes there was complete bone proliferation in three animals and fibrous connective tissue in one. Surgical defect can be repaired with both bone tissue and fibrous connective tissue in all study groups; collagen membranes was more beneficial in the bone repair process than temporal fascia or absence of a barrier.

  3. IN VITRO LUNG ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELL INJURY AND INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO PARTICULATE MATTER-ASSOCIATED METALS - MODULATION BY EXPOSURE TO TNF-ALPHA, IL-BETA, OR IFN-GAMMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO LUNG ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELL INJURY AND INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO PARTICULATE MATTER-ASSOCIATED METALS - MODULATION BY EXPOSURE TO TNF , IL-1 , OR IFN .

    JA Dye, KE Peoples*, CL Hayes?. US EPA, ORD, Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, RTP, NC, *HHMI-SRI, NCSU, Raleigh, NC...

  4. IN VITRO LUNG ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELL INJURY AND INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO PARTICULATE MATTER-ASSOCIATED METALS - MODULATION BY EXPOSURE TO TNF-ALPHA, IL-BETA, OR IFN-GAMMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO LUNG ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELL INJURY AND INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO PARTICULATE MATTER-ASSOCIATED METALS - MODULATION BY EXPOSURE TO TNF , IL-1 , OR IFN .

    JA Dye, KE Peoples*, CL Hayes?. US EPA, ORD, Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, RTP, NC, *HHMI-SRI, NCSU, Raleigh, NC...

  5. A Human Espophageal Epithelial Cell Model for Study of Radiation Induced Cancer and DNA Damage Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Janice L.; Patel, Zarana S.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For cancer risk assessment in astronauts and for countermeasure development, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and how these mechanisms are influenced by exposure to the types of radiation found in space. We are developing an in vitro model system for the study of radiation-induced initiation and progression of esophageal carcinoma, a type of cancer found to have a significant enhancement in incidence in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Here we present the results of our preliminary characterization of both normal and hTERT immortalized esophageal epithelial cells grown in 2-dimensional culture. We analyzed DNA repair capacity by measuring the kinetics of formation and loss of - H2AX foci following radiation exposure. Additionally, we analyzed induction of chromosomal aberrations using 3-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Data were generated using both low LET (gamma rays) and high LET ions (1000 MeV/nucleon iron).

  6. A Human Espophageal Epithelial Cell Model for Study of Radiation Induced Cancer and DNA Damage Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Janice L.; Patel, Zarana S.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For cancer risk assessment in astronauts and for countermeasure development, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and how these mechanisms are influenced by exposure to the types of radiation found in space. We are developing an in vitro model system for the study of radiation-induced initiation and progression of esophageal carcinoma, a type of cancer found to have a significant enhancement in incidence in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Here we present the results of our preliminary characterization of both normal and hTERT immortalized esophageal epithelial cells grown in 2-dimensional culture. We analyzed DNA repair capacity by measuring the kinetics of formation and loss of - H2AX foci following radiation exposure. Additionally, we analyzed induction of chromosomal aberrations using 3-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Data were generated using both low LET (gamma rays) and high LET ions (1000 MeV/nucleon iron).

  7. Morphologic Damage of Rat Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cells Induced by Bile Acids Could Be Ameliorated by Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibitor Z-Guggulsterone In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yaowei; Hou, Xusheng; Wu, Wenyu; Nie, Lei; Tian, Yinghong; Lu, Yanmeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether bile acids (BAs) affect respiratory functions through the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) expressed in the lungs and to explore the possible mechanisms of BAs-induced respiratory disorder. Methods. Primary cultured alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECIIs) of rat were treated with different concentrations of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) in the presence or absence of FXR inhibitor Z-guggulsterone (GS). Then, expression of FXR in nuclei of AECIIs was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy. And ultrastructural changes of the cells were observed under transmission electron microscope and analyzed by Image-Pro Plus software. Results. Morphologic damage of AECIIs was exhibited in high BAs group in vitro, with high-level expression of FXR, while FXR inhibitor GS could attenuate the cytotoxicity of BAs to AECIIs. Conclusions. FXR expression was related to the morphologic damage of AECIIs induced by BAs, thus influencing respiratory functions. PMID:27340672

  8. Hypoxia promotes the skewed differentiation of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells toward type II alveolar epithelial cells by regulating microRNA-145.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Shi, Xu; Yang, Liming; Mou, Yan; Li, Yingbo; Dang, Rongjing; Li, Changyuan

    2017-09-30

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well recognized for their ability to differentiate into type II alveolar epithelial (ATII) cells in damaged lungs, which is critical for reepithelization and recovery in acute lung injury (ALI). However, the high level of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) commonly seen in injured lung tissues is also able to induce MSCs to differentiate into fibroblast-like cells. In this study, we found that hypoxia could promote umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs) differentiation into ATII cells rather than into fibroblast-like cells, and this effect was mainly mediated by microRNA-145 (miR-145), which could induce the inhibition of TGF-β signaling by targeting TGF-β receptor II (TGFβRII). Clarifying the function of hypoxia in the fate determination of MSCs is important for improving stem cell-based therapies for ALI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Salvianolic acid B improves bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into alveolar epithelial cells type I via Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yang, Jingxian; Gao, Xi; Xu, Dan; Niu, Dongge; Li, Jinglin; Wen, Qingping

    2015-08-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is among the most common causes of mortality in intensive care units. Previous studies have suggested that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) may attenuate pulmonary edema. In addition, alveolar epithelial cells type I (ATI) are involved in reducing the alveolar edema in response to ALI. However, the mechanism involved in improving the efficiency of differentiation of MSCs into ATI remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the effect of salvianolic acid B (Sal B) on the differentiation of BMSCs into ATI and the activities of the Wnt signaling pathways were investigated. The BMSCs were supplemented with conditioned medium (CM). The groups were as follows: i) CM group: BMSCs were supplemented with CM; ii) lithium chloride (LiCl) group: BMSCs were supplemented with CM and 5 mM LiCl; iii) Sal B group: BMSCs were supplemented with CM and 10 mM Sal B. The samples were collected and assessed on days 7 and 14. It was revealed that aquaporin (AQP)-5 and T1α were expressed in BMSCs, and induction with LiCl or Sal B increased the expression of AQP-5 and T1α. Furthermore, the Wnt-1 and Wnt-3a signaling pathways were activated during the differentiation of BMSCs into ATI. In conclusion, it was suggested that the promotive effects of Sal B on the differentiation of BMSCs into ATI occurred through the activation of Wnt signaling pathways.

  10. Mycoplasma bovis isolates recovered from cattle and bison (Bison bison) show differential in vitro effects on PBMC proliferation, alveolar macrophage apoptosis and invasion of epithelial and immune cells.

    PubMed

    Suleman, Muhammad; Prysliak, Tracy; Clarke, Kyle; Burrage, Pat; Windeyer, Claire; Perez-Casal, Jose

    2016-04-15

    In the last few years, several outbreaks of pneumonia, systemically disseminated infection, and high mortality associated with Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) in North American bison (Bison bison) have been reported in Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Nebraska, New Mexico, Montana, North Dakota, and Kansas. M. bovis causes Chronic Pneumonia and Polyarthritis Syndrome (CPPS) in young, stressed calves in intensively-managed feedlots. M. bovis is not classified as a primary pathogen in cattle, but in bison it appears to be a primary causative agent with rapid progression of disease with fatal outcomes and an average 20% mature herd mortality. Thus, there is a possibility that M. bovis isolates from cattle and bison differ in their pathogenicity. Hence, we decided to compare selected cattle isolates to several bison isolates obtained from clinical cases. We show differences in modulation of PBMC proliferation, invasion of trachea and lung epithelial cells, along with modulation of apoptosis and survival in alveolar macrophages. We concluded that some bison isolates showed less inhibition of cattle and bison PBMC proliferation, were not able to suppress alveolar macrophage apoptosis as efficiently as cattle isolates, and were more or less invasive than the cattle isolate in various cells. These findings provide evidence about the differential properties of M. bovis isolated from the two species and has helped in the selection of bison isolates for genomic sequencing.

  11. In vitro effects of water-pipe smoke condensate on the endocytic activity of Type II alveolar epithelial cells (A549) with bacillus Calmette-Guérin.

    PubMed

    Adcock, Ian M; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Alipoor, Shamila D; Garssen, Johan; Akbar Velayati, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem and poses immense threats to many populations. The association between tobacco smoke and TB has already been studied. Water-pipe smoking has become an increasing problem not only in Middle Eastern countries but also globally as it is considered by users as being safer than cigarettes. The presence of high levels of toxic substances in water-pipe smoke may be predisposing factors that enhance the incidence of pulmonary disorders in water-pipe smokers. For example, uncontrolled macropinocytosis occurs in alveolar epithelial cells following exposure to water-pipe smoke, which may predispose individuals to pulmonary infection. In this work, we studied the effects of water-pipe condense (WPC) on the internalization of Mycobacterium bovis (bacillus Calmette-Guérin [BCG]) by macropinocytosis in Type II alveolar epithelial cells (A549). A549 cells were treated by WPC (4mg/mL) for 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, and 96 h, respectively. The effect on cell proliferation was studied using a methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay. Cells were exposed to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran (1mg/mL; control) and FITC-BCG (multiplicity of infection, 10) for 20min at 37°C before their collection and the uptake of BCG-FITC was determined by flow cytometry. Similar experiments were performed at 4°C as a control. WPC (4mg/mL) after 72h (1.4±0.2-fold, p<0.05) and 96h (1.6±0.2-fold, p<0.05) hours increased the uptake of BCG-FITC. No effect on BCG-FITC uptake was observed at 24h or 48h. WPC also significantly increased the uptake of FITC-dextran (2.9±0.3-fold, p<0.05) after 96h. WPC also significantly decreased cell proliferation after 24h (84±2%), 48h (78±3%), 72h (64±2%, p<0.05), and 96h (45±2%, p<0.05). WPC exposure increased epithelial cells' permeability and death and enhanced their capacity for macropinocytosis. Our in vitro data suggest possible harmful effects of WPC on the ability of lung epithelial

  12. Mannose-capped Lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces IL-37 production via upregulating ERK1/2 and p38 in human type II alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhen; Zhao, Gao Wei; Gao, Chun Hai; Chi, Xiu Wen; Zeng, Tao; Hu, Yan Wei; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    The major surface lipoglycan of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM), is an immunosuppressive epitope of M. tb. Interleukin (IL)-37, is a newly identified anti-inflammatory cytokine, which reduces systemic and local inflammation. However, the correlation between ManLAM and IL-37 remains unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigate the possible role and relative molecular mechanism of ManLAM in IL-37 production of human type II alveolar epithelial cells by using A549 cell line. Here, we report that M. tb induced IL-37 mRNA and protein expression in a time-dependent manner. We next fractionated components of M. tb using chloroform: methanol (C:M) and water. In sharp contrast to the C:M phase, water phase was mainly responsible for the production of IL-37. Since ManLAM is the major component of water phase, we found that ManLAM induced IL-37 mRNA and protein expression in a time and dose-dependent manner, while this activity was almost totally abolished by the ERK1/2 (U0126) and p38 (SB203580) inhibitor. ManLAM stimulation significantly induced ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation in A549 cells, as well as cell surface TLR2 expression. After interfering TLR2 expression, ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation levels were markedly decreased, and also IL-37 production. Though ManLAM also promoted TLR4 expression on A549 cells, TLR4 interference showed no influence on ManLAM-induced IL-37 production. Our results indicate that ManLAM induces IL-37 production in human type II alveolar epithelial cells via up-regulating TLR2/p38 or ERK1/2 pathway, and this provide an important evidence to explain the pathological role of ManLAM that contribute to the persistence of M. tb. PMID:26221267

  13. Mannose-capped Lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces IL-37 production via upregulating ERK1/2 and p38 in human type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; Zhao, Gao Wei; Gao, Chun Hai; Chi, Xiu Wen; Zeng, Tao; Hu, Yan Wei; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    The major surface lipoglycan of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM), is an immunosuppressive epitope of M. tb. Interleukin (IL)-37, is a newly identified anti-inflammatory cytokine, which reduces systemic and local inflammation. However, the correlation between ManLAM and IL-37 remains unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigate the possible role and relative molecular mechanism of ManLAM in IL-37 production of human type II alveolar epithelial cells by using A549 cell line. Here, we report that M. tb induced IL-37 mRNA and protein expression in a time-dependent manner. We next fractionated components of M. tb using chloroform: methanol (C:M) and water. In sharp contrast to the C:M phase, water phase was mainly responsible for the production of IL-37. Since ManLAM is the major component of water phase, we found that ManLAM induced IL-37 mRNA and protein expression in a time and dose-dependent manner, while this activity was almost totally abolished by the ERK1/2 (U0126) and p38 (SB203580) inhibitor. ManLAM stimulation significantly induced ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation in A549 cells, as well as cell surface TLR2 expression. After interfering TLR2 expression, ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation levels were markedly decreased, and also IL-37 production. Though ManLAM also promoted TLR4 expression on A549 cells, TLR4 interference showed no influence on ManLAM-induced IL-37 production. Our results indicate that ManLAM induces IL-37 production in human type II alveolar epithelial cells via up-regulating TLR2/p38 or ERK1/2 pathway, and this provide an important evidence to explain the pathological role of ManLAM that contribute to the persistence of M. tb.

  14. Mapping differential cellular protein response of mouse alveolar epithelial cells to multi-walled carbon nanotubes as a function of atomic layer deposition coating.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Gina M; Taylor, Alexia J; Hussain, Salik; Dandley, Erinn C; Griffith, Emily H; Garantziotis, Stavros; Parsons, Gregory N; Bonner, James C; Bereman, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a prototypical engineered nanomaterial, have been increasingly manufactured for a variety of novel applications over the past two decades. However, since CNTs possess fiber-like shape and cause pulmonary fibrosis in rodents, there is concern that mass production of CNTs will lead to occupational exposure and associated pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to use contemporary proteomics to investigate the mechanisms of cellular response in E10 mouse alveolar epithelial cells in vitro after exposure to multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) that were functionalized by atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is a method used to generate highly uniform and conformal nanoscale thin-film coatings of metals to enhance novel conductive properties of CNTs. We hypothesized that specific types of metal oxide coatings applied to the surface of MWCNTs by ALD would determine distinct proteomic profiles in mouse alveolar epithelial cells in vitro that could be used to predict oxidative stress and pulmonary inflammation. Uncoated (U)-MWCNTs were functionalized by ALD with zinc oxide (ZnO) to yield Z-MWCNTs or aluminum oxide (Al2O3) to yield A-MWCNTs. Significant differential protein expression was found in the following critical pathways: mTOR/eIF4/p70S6K signaling and Nrf-2 mediated oxidative stress response increased following exposure to Z-MWCNTs, interleukin-1 signaling increased following U-MWCNT exposure, and inhibition of angiogenesis by thrombospondin-1, oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial dysfunction increased following A-MWCNT exposure. This study demonstrates that specific types of metal oxide thin film coatings applied by ALD produce distinct cellular and biochemical responses related to lung inflammation and fibrosis compared to uncoated MWCNT exposure in vitro.

  15. In vivo autoradiographic demonstration of. beta. -adrenergic binding sites in adult rat type II alveolar epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Sidhu, M.K.

    1984-02-06

    Adult male rats were injected intravenously with the muscarinic binding probe /sup 3/H-Quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) or the ..beta..-adrenergic probe /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol (DHA). Other rats were pre-treated with an intraperitoneal injection of a 500-fold excess of L-isoproterenol prior to the DHA. Light microscopic autoradiography of 0.5 ..mu..m sections of lung from the QNB group demonstrated very little labelling even after 6 months of exposure. In constrast, trachealis smooth muscle from these animals contained substantial labelling. Autoradiographs of lung from rats injected with DHA demonstrated labelling which was well localized over alveolar septa and concentrated over the cytoplasm of type II cells. Quantitative analysis of labelling in the DHA groups indicated a significant reduction of labelling in animals treated with L-isoproterenol prior to DHA, in both the alveolar parenchyma in general and over type II cells. The results of this study provide morphologic evidence for the uptake and specific binding of ..beta..-adrenergic antagonists by the adult lung in vivo, while failing to demonstrate similar binding of a muscarinic probe. In addition, the results demonstrate specific ..beta..-adrenergic receptors on type II cells in vivo and substantiate the view of a direct effect of ..beta..-adrenergic agonists on alveolar type II cells.

  16. Three-Dimensional Micro-Computed Tomographic Imaging of Alveolar Bone in Experimental Bone Loss or Repair

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Ho; Abramson, Zachary R.; Taba, Mario; Jin, Qiming; Chang, Jia; Kreider, Jaclynn M.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Giannobile, William V.

    2008-01-01

    Background Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) offers significant potential for identifying mineralized structures. However, three-dimensional (3-D) micro-CT of alveolar bone has not been adapted readily for quantification. Moreover, conventional methods are not highly sensitive for analyzing bone loss or bone gain following periodontal disease or reconstructive therapy. The objective of this investigation was to develop a micro-CT methodology for quantifying tooth-supporting alveolar bone in 3-D following experimental preclinical situations of periodontitis or reconstructive therapy. Methods Experimental in vivo bone loss or regeneration situations were developed to validate the micro-CT imaging techniques. Twenty mature Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: bone loss (Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-mediated bone resorption) and regenerative therapy. Micro-CT and software digitized specimens were reconstructed three-dimensionally for linear and volumetric parameter assessment of alveolar bone (linear bone height, bone volume, bone volume fraction, bone mineral content, and bone mineral density). Intra- and interexaminer reproducibility and reliability were compared for methodology validation. Results The results demonstrated high examiner reproducibility for linear and volumetric parameters with high intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CV). The ICC showed that the methodology was highly reliable and reproducible (ICC >0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.937 to 1.000; CV <1.5%), suggesting that 3-D measurements may provide better alveolar bone analysis than conventional 2-D methods. Conclusions The developed methods allow for highly accurate and reproducible static measurements of tooth-supporting alveolar bone following preclinical situations of bone destruction or regeneration. Future investigations should focus on using in vivo micro-CT imaging for real-time assessments of alveolar bone changes. PMID

  17. BRCA1/FANCD2/BRG1-Driven DNA Repair Stabilizes the Differentiation State of Human Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Bierie, Brian; Li, Andrew G; Pathania, Shailja; Toomire, Kimberly; Dimitrov, Stoil D; Liu, Ben; Gelman, Rebecca; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Feunteun, Jean; Polyak, Kornelia; Livingston, David M

    2016-07-21

    An abnormal differentiation state is common in BRCA1-deficient mammary epithelial cells, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we report a convergence between DNA repair and normal, cultured human mammary epithelial (HME) cell differentiation. Surprisingly, depleting BRCA1 or FANCD2 (Fanconi anemia [FA] proteins) or BRG1, a mSWI/SNF subunit, caused HME cells to undergo spontaneous epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and aberrant differentiation. This also occurred when wild-type HMEs were exposed to chemicals that generate DNA interstrand crosslinks (repaired by FA proteins), but not in response to double-strand breaks. Suppressed expression of ΔNP63 also occurred in each of these settings, an effect that links DNA damage to the aberrant differentiation outcome. Taken together with somatic breast cancer genome data, these results point to a breakdown in a BRCA/FA-mSWI/SNF-ΔNP63-mediated DNA repair and differentiation maintenance process in mammary epithelial cells that may contribute to sporadic breast cancer development.

  18. N-Acetylcysteine counteracts oxidative stress and protects alveolar epithelial cells from lung contusion-induced apoptosis in rats with blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Topcu-Tarladacalisir, Yeter; Tarladacalisir, Taner; Sapmaz-Metin, Melike; Karamustafaoglu, Altemur; Uz, Yesim Hulya; Akpolat, Meryem; Cerkezkayabekir, Aysegul; Turan, Fatma Nesrin

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on peroxidative and apoptotic changes in the contused lungs of rats following blunt chest trauma. The rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, contusion, and contusion + NAC. All the rats, apart from those in the control group, performed moderate lung contusion. A daily intramuscular NAC injection (150 mg/kg) was given immediately following the blunt chest trauma and was continued for two additional days following cessation of the trauma. Samples of lung tissue were taken in order to evaluate the tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) level, histopathology, and epithelial cell apoptosis using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and active caspase-3 immunostaining. In addition, we immunohistochemically evaluated the expression of surfactant protein D (SP-D) in the lung tissue. The blunt chest trauma-induced lung contusion resulted in severe histopathological injury, as well as an increase in the MDA level and in the number of cells identified on TUNEL assay together with active caspase-3 positive epithelial cells, but a decrease in the number of SP-D positive alveolar type 2 (AT-2) cells. NAC treatment effectively attenuated histopathologic, peroxidative, and apoptotic changes, as well as reducing alterations in SP-D expression in the lung tissue. These findings indicate that the beneficial effects of NAC administrated following blunt chest trauma is related to the regulation of oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  19. Characterization of protein factor(s) in rat bronchoalveolar lavage fluid that enhance insulin transport via transcytosis across primary rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Bahhady, Rana; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Borok, Zea; Crandall, Edward D.; Shen, Wei-Chiang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize factor(s) in rat bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) that enhance(s) insulin transport across primary rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers (RAECM) in primary culture. BALF was concentrated 7.5-fold using the Centricon device and the retentate was used to characterize the factor(s) involved in enhancing apical-to-basolateral transport of intact 125I-insulin across various epithelial cell monolayers. These factor(s) enhanced transport of intact insulin across type II cell-like RAECM (3-fold increase) and type I cell-like RAECM (2-fold increase), but not across Caco-2 or MDCK cell monolayers. The insulin transport-enhancing factor(s) were temperature- and trypsin-sensitive. The mechanism of enhancement did not seem to involve paracellular transport or fluid-phase endocytosis, since fluxes of sodium fluorescein and FITC-dextran (70 kDa) were not affected by the factor(s) in the apical bathing fluid. BALF enhancement of intact 125I-insulin transport was abolished at 4°C and in the presence of monensin, suggesting involvement of transcellular pathways. Sephacryl S-200 purification of BALF retentate, followed by LC-MS/MS, indicated that the high molecular weight (>100 kDa) fractions (which show some homology to alpha-1-inhibitor III, murinoglobulin gamma 2, and pregnancy-zone protein) appear to facilitate transcellular transport of insulin across RAECM. PMID:18406118

  20. Pulmonary toxicity of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl: nonciliated bronchiolar epithelial (Clara) cell necrosis and alveolar damage in the mouse, rat, and hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkinen, P.J.; Haschek, W.M.

    1982-01-01

    Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) was administered ip to young female BALB/c mice (120 mg MMT/kg), S/A albino rats (5 mg MMT/kg), or LV/sub 6//LAK Syrian hamsters (180 mg MMT/kg). This administration resulted in lung cell damage followed by cellular proliferation, which was quantified by measuring increases in thymidine incorporation into DNA (mouse, rat, and hamster) and by labeling indices (LI) determined from cell kinetic studies (mouse and rat). Thymidine incorporation into pulmonary DNA was significantly elevated within 1 to 2 days following MMT treatment in all three species, with peak incorporation occurring on Day 2 in the rat and hamster, and Day 4 in the mouse. Both bronchiolar and parenchymal LI were elevated at this time. Alveolar damage and nonciliated bronchiolar epithelial (Clara) cell necrosis were evident within 1 day of injection. This finding was followed by type II epithelial and Clara cell proliferation. Ultrastructurally, in the mouse, mitochondrial swelling and degeneration preceded Clara cell necrosis. Bronchiolar damage was most severe in the mouse, whereas parenchymal damage was most severe in the rat. These results suggest that the mouse, rat, and hamster have different susceptibilities to MMT-induced injury.

  1. Internalization of SiO₂ nanoparticles by alveolar macrophages and lung epithelial cells and its modulation by the lung surfactant substitute Curosurf.

    PubMed

    Vranic, Sandra; Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio; Darnis, Cécile; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Boggetto, Nicole; Marano, Francelyne; Boland, Sonja; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle

    2013-05-01

    Because of an increasing exposure to environmental and occupational nanoparticles (NPs), the potential risk of these materials for human health should be better assessed. Since one of the main routes of entry of NPs is via the lungs, it is of paramount importance to further characterize their impact on the respiratory system. Here, we have studied the uptake of fluorescently labeled SiO₂ NPs (50 and 100 nm) by epithelial cells (NCI-H292) and alveolar macrophages (MHS) in the presence or absence of pulmonary surfactant. The quantification of NP uptake was performed by measuring cell-associated fluorescence using flow cytometry and spectrometric techniques in order to identify the most suitable methodology. Internalization was shown to be time and dose dependent, and differences in terms of uptake were noted between epithelial cells and macrophages. In the light of our observations, we conclude that flow cytometry is a more reliable technique for the study of NP internalization, and importantly, that the hydrophobic fraction of lung surfactant is critical for downregulating NP uptake in both cell types.

  2. Evaluation of the effects of the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on alveolar bone repair following extraction of impacted third molars: prospective study.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Guilherme de Marco; Torres do Couto, Ricardo; Giongo, Caroline Comis; Corrêa, Marcos Britto; Chagas Júnior, Otacílio Luiz; Lemes, Carmen Helena Jacques

    2013-06-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is rich in growth factors, target-specific polypeptides that play a role in cell proliferation and differentiation and can thus encourage wound repair. This study sought to assess the effects of PRP on new bone formation in a sample of 25 patients with clinical indications for extraction of all four impacted third molars with similar orientation, depth, and root morphology. Immediately after extraction, sockets on one side received PRP, whereas those on the other side (control) did not. Patients underwent 6 months of clinical and radiographic follow-up. Periapical radiographs were scanned and bone repair was assessed by image histogram analysis. The radiographic densities of the extraction sockets were compared to the densities of the distal surfaces of the adjacent teeth, with the difference between both serving to distinguish the PRP and control sides. Results showed that healing of PRP-treated sockets was significantly different from that of control sockets at 1-, 3-, and 6-month follow-up, in mandibular and maxillary sockets alike. The results of this sample suggest that PRP provides a safe and effective means of speeding alveolar bone repair. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Key role of microRNA in the regulation of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor expression in murine alveolar epithelial cells during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, Anne; Mir-Kasimov, Mustafa; Baker, Jessica; Rowley, Jesse; Paine, Robert

    2014-02-14

    GM-CSF is an endogenous pulmonary cytokine produced by normal alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) that is a key defender of the alveolar space. AEC GM-CSF expression is suppressed by oxidative stress through alternations in mRNA turnover, an effect that is reversed by treatment with recombinant GM-CSF. We hypothesized that specific microRNA (miRNA) would play a key role in AEC GM-CSF regulation. A genome-wide miRNA microarray identified 19 candidate miRNA altered in primary AEC during oxidative stress with reversal by treatment with GM-CSF. Three of these miRNA (miR 133a, miR 133a*, and miR 133b) are also predicted to bind the GM-CSF 3'-untranslated region (UTR). PCR for the mature miRNA confirmed induction during oxidative stress that was reversed by treatment with GM-CSF. Experiments using a GM-CSF 3'-UTR reporter construct demonstrated that miR133a and miR133b effects on GM-CSF expression are through interactions with the GM-CSF 3'-UTR. Using lentiviral transduction of specific mimics and inhibitors in primary murine AEC, we determined that miR133a and miR133b suppress GM-CSF expression and that their inhibition both reverses oxidant-induced suppression of GM-CSF expression and increases basal expression of GM-CSF in cells in normoxia. In contrast, these miRNAs are not active in regulation of GM-CSF expression in murine EL4 T cells. Thus, members of the miR133 family play key roles in regulation of GM-CSF expression through effects on mRNA turnover in AEC during oxidative stress. Increased understanding of GM-CSF gene regulation may provide novel miRNA-based interventions to augment pulmonary innate immune defense in lung injury.

  4. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A.; Smith, Jordan N.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Orr, Galya

    2015-01-01

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in-vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air–liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submerged cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly three-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submerged cultures, and eight-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. Together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs. PMID:24289294

  5. Rapid maxillary expansion in alveolar cleft repaired with a tissue-engineered bone in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jialiang; Tian, Bo; Chu, Fengting; Yang, Chenjie; Zhao, Jun; Jiang, Xinquan; Qian, Yufen

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of orthodontic expansion on graft area of a tissue-engineered bone (TEB) BMSCs/β-TCP, and to find an alternative strategy for the therapy of alveolar cleft. A unilateral alveolar cleft canine model was established and then treated with BMSCs/β-TCP under rapid maxillary expansion (RME). Sequential fluorescent labeling, radiography and helical computed tomography were used to evaluate new bone formation and mineralization in the graft area. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and Van Gieson׳s picro fuchsin staining were performed for histological and histomorphometric observation. ALP activity, mineralization and the expression of osteogenic differentiation related genes of BMSCs that grew on the β-TCP scaffold were promoted by their cultivation in osteogenic medium. Based on fact, TEB was constructed. After 8 weeks of treatment with BMSCs/β-TCP followed by RME, new bone formation and mineralization of the dogs were markedly accelerated, and bone resorption was significantly reduced, compared with the untreated dogs, or those only treated with autogenous iliac bone. The treatment with both TEB and RME evidently made the bone trabecula more abundant and the area of bone formation larger. What is more, there were no significant differences between BMSCs/β-TCP group and the group treated with autogenous bone and RME. This study further revealed that TEB was not only a feasible clinical approach for patients with alveolar cleft, but also a potential substituent of autogenous bone, and its combination with RME might be an alternative strategy for the therapy of alveolar cleft. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A human esophageal epithelial cell model for study of radiation induced cancer and DNA repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Janice; Patel, Zarana; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    For cancer risk assessment in astronauts and for countermeasure development, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and how these mechanisms are influenced by exposure to the types of radiation found in space. We are developing an in vitro model system for the study of radiation-induced initiation and progression of esophageal carcinoma. Development of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is associated with radiation exposure, as revealed by the significant enhanced in incidence rates for this type of cancer in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. It is also associated with poor nutritional status and micronutrient deficiencies, which are also important issues for long duration spaceflight. The possible synergies between nutritional issues and radiation exposure are unknown. Here we present the results of preliminary characterization of both normal and hTERT-immortalized esophageal epithelial cells grown in 2-dimensional culture. We analyzed DNA repair capacity by measuring the kinetics of formation and loss of gamma-H2AX foci following radiation exposure. Additionally, we analyzed induction of chromosomal aberrations using 3-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Data were generated using both low LET (gamma rays) and high LET ions (1000 MeV/nucleon iron.

  7. Genetic Screen in Drosophila melanogaster Uncovers a Novel Set of Genes Required for Embryonic Epithelial Repair

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Isabel; Geiger, Jennifer A.; Santos, Ana Catarina; Carlos, Vanessa; Jacinto, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The wound healing response is an essential mechanism to maintain the integrity of epithelia and protect all organisms from the surrounding milieu. In the “purse-string” mechanism of wound closure, an injured epithelial sheet cinches its hole closed via an intercellular contractile actomyosin cable. This process is conserved across species and utilized by both embryonic as well as adult tissues, but remains poorly understood at the cellular level. In an effort to identify new players involved in purse-string wound closure we developed a wounding strategy suitable for screening large numbers of Drosophila embryos. Using this methodology, we observe wound healing defects in Jun-related antigen (encoding DJUN) and scab (encoding Drosophila αPS3 integrin) mutants and performed a forward genetics screen on the basis of insertional mutagenesis by transposons that led to the identification of 30 lethal insertional mutants with defects in embryonic epithelia repair. One of the mutants identified is an insertion in the karst locus, which encodes Drosophila βHeavy-spectrin. We show βHeavy-spectrin (βH) localization to the wound edges where it presumably exerts an essential function to bring the wound to normal closure. PMID:19884309

  8. A novel bioabsorbable composite membrane of Polyactive 70/30 and bioactive glass number 13--93 in repair of experimental maxillary alveolar cleft defects.

    PubMed

    Puumanen, K; Kellomäki, M; Ritsilä, V; Böhling, T; Törmälä, P; Waris, T; Ashammakhi, N

    2005-10-01

    A novel bioabsorbable composite membrane of polyethylene oxide terephthalate and polybutylene terephthalate copolymer (Polyactive 70/30) combined with bioactive glass No. 13--93 was tested in the repair of experimental maxillary alveolar cleft defects. In this pilot study, the possible ability of the membrane to promote bone formation by guided tissue regeneration was investigated. Standard alveolar defects were made bilaterally in the maxilla of 12 growing rabbits and were filled with autogenous bone grafts. The test defect was covered with the composite membrane and the other defect was left uncovered to serve as a control. The follow-up time was 10 weeks. Radiological, histological, and histomorphometric evaluations were performed. Radiologically, no statistically significant differences between test and control defects at 10 weeks were found. Histologically, the membrane enhanced osteogenic activity locally at the membrane-bone interface. Swelling of the membrane was observed. Histomorphometrically, no significant promotion of bone formation by the membrane was observed. The composite membrane was found to be biocompatible and surgically easy to use, but its osteopromotive effect was limited in this experimental cleft model. Further studies are necessary to assess its suitability for reconstructive surgical applications.

  9. Erratum: Mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces IL-37 production via upregulating ERK1/2 and p38 in human type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; Zhao, Gao Wei; Gao, Chun Hai; Chi, Xiu Wen; Zeng, Tao; Hu, Yan Wei; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    The major surface lipoglycan of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM), is an immunosuppressive epitope of M. tb. Interleukin (IL)-37, is a newly identified anti-inflammatory cytokine, which reduces systemic and local inflammation. However, the correlation between ManLAM and IL-37 remains unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigate the possible role and relative molecular mechanism of ManLAM in IL-37 production of human type II alveolar epithelial cells by using A549 cell line. Here, we report that M. tb induced IL-37 mRNA and protein expression in a time-dependent manner. We next fractionated components of M. tb using chloroform: methanol (C:M) and water. In sharp contrast to the C:M phase, water phase was mainly responsible for the production of IL-37. Since ManLAM is the major component of water phase, we found that ManLAM induced IL-37 mRNA and protein expression in a time and dose-dependent manner, while this activity was almost totally abolished by the ERK1/2 (U0126) and p38 (SB203580) inhibitor. ManLAM stimulation significantly induced ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation in A549 cells, as well as cell surface TLR2 expression. After interfering TLR2 expression, ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation levels were markedly decreased, and also IL-37 production. Though ManLAM also promoted TLR4 expression on A549 cells, TLR4 interference showed no influence on ManLAM-induced IL-37 production. Our results indicate that ManLAM induces IL-37 production in human type II alveolar epithelial cells via up-regulating TLR2/p38 or ERK1/2 pathway, and this provide an important evidence to explain the pathological role of ManLAM that contribute to the persistence of M. tb.[This corrects the article on p. 7279 in vol. 8, PMID: 26221267.].

  10. DA-Raf-Mediated Suppression of the Ras--ERK Pathway Is Essential for TGF-β1-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Alveolar Epithelial Type 2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Takano, Haruko; Takano, Kazunori; Hatano, Masahiko; Tokuhisa, Takeshi; Endo, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Myofibroblasts play critical roles in the development of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis by depositing components of extracellular matrix. One source of lung myofibroblasts is thought to be alveolar epithelial type 2 cells that undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Rat RLE-6TN alveolar epithelial type 2 cells treated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) are converted into myofibroblasts through EMT. TGF-β induces both canonical Smad signaling and non-canonical signaling, including the Ras-induced ERK pathway (Raf-MEK-ERK). However, the signaling mechanisms regulating TGF-β1-induced EMT are not fully understood. Here, we show that the Ras-ERK pathway negatively regulates TGF-β1-induced EMT in RLE-6TN cells and that DA-Raf1 (DA-Raf), a splicing isoform of A-Raf and a dominant-negative antagonist of the Ras-ERK pathway, plays an essential role in EMT. Stimulation of the cells with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), which activated the ERK pathway, prominently suppressed TGF-β1-induced EMT. An inhibitor of MEK, but not an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, rescued the TGF-β1-treated cells from the suppression of EMT by FGF2. Overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of a component of the Ras-ERK pathway, i.e., H-Ras, B-Raf, or MEK1, interfered with EMT. Knockdown of DA-Raf expression with siRNAs facilitated the activity of MEK and ERK, which were only weakly and transiently activated by TGF-β1. Although DA-Raf knockdown abrogated TGF-β1-induced EMT, the abrogation of EMT was reversed by the addition of the MEK inhibitor. Furthermore, DA-Raf knockdown impaired the TGF-β1-induced nuclear translocation of Smad2, which mediates the transcription required for EMT. These results imply that intrinsic DA-Raf exerts essential functions for EMT by antagonizing the TGF-β1-induced Ras-ERK pathway in RLE-6TN cells.

  11. A tissue-specific role for Nlrp3 in tubular epithelial repair after renal ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Pieter J; Butter, Loes M; Claessen, Nike; Teske, Gwendoline J D; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C

    2014-07-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion injury is a major cause of acute kidney injury. Improving renal repair would represent a therapeutic strategy to prevent renal dysfunction. The innate immune receptor Nlrp3 is involved in tissue injury, inflammation, and fibrosis; however, its role in repair after ischemia/reperfusion is unknown. We address the role of Nlrp3 in the repair phase of renal ischemia/reperfusion and investigate the relative contribution of leukocyte- versus renal-associated Nlrp3 by studying bone marrow chimeric mice. We found that Nlrp3 expression was most profound during the repair phase. Although Nlrp3 expression was primarily expressed by leukocytes, both leukocyte- and renal-associated Nlrp3 was detrimental to renal function after ischemia/reperfusion. The Nlrp3-dependent cytokine IL-1β remained unchanged in kidneys of all mice. Leukocyte-associated Nlrp3 negatively affected tubular apoptosis in mice that lacked Nlrp3 expression on leukocytes, which correlated with reduced macrophage influx. Nlrp3-deficient (Nlrp3KO) mice with wild-type bone marrow showed an improved repair response, as seen by a profound increase in proliferating tubular epithelium, which coincided with increased hepatocyte growth factor expression. In addition, Nlrp3KO tubular epithelial cells had an increased repair response in vitro, as seen by an increased ability of an epithelial monolayer to restore its structural integrity. In conclusion, Nlrp3 shows a tissue-specific role in which leukocyte-associated Nlrp3 is associated with tubular apoptosis, whereas renal-associated Nlrp3 impaired wound healing. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Wnt3a mitigates acute lung injury by reducing P2X7 receptor-mediated alveolar epithelial type I cell death

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Y; Mishra, A; Weng, T; Chintagari, N R; Wang, Y; Zhao, C; Huang, C; Liu, L

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by pulmonary endothelial and epithelial cell damage, and loss of the alveolar–capillary barrier. We have previously shown that P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), a cell death receptor, is specifically expressed in alveolar epithelial type I cells (AEC I). In this study, we hypothesized that P2X7R-mediated purinergic signaling and its interaction with Wnt/β-catenin signaling contributes to AEC I death. We examined the effect of P2X7R agonist 2′-3′-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-ATP (BzATP) and Wnt agonist Wnt3a on AEC I death in vitro and in vivo. We also assessed the therapeutic potential of Wnt3a in a clinically relevant ALI model of intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in ventilated mice. We found that the activation of P2X7R by BzATP caused the death of AEC I by suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling through stimulating glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and proteasome. On the other hand, the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by Wnt3a, GSK-3β inhibitor, or proteasome inhibitor blocked the P2X7R-mediated cell death. More importantly, Wnt3a attenuated the AEC I damage caused by intratracheal instillation of BzATP in rats or LPS in ventilated mice. Our results suggest that Wnt3a overrides the effect of P2X7R on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling to prevent the AEC I death and restrict the severity of ALI. PMID:24922070

  13. miR-34 miRNAs Regulate Cellular Senescence in Type II Alveolar Epithelial Cells of Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Disayabutr, Supparerk; Kim, Eun Kyung; Cha, Seung-Ick; Green, Gary; Naikawadi, Ram P.; Jones, Kirk D.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Schroeder, Aaron; Matthay, Michael A.; Kukreja, Jasleen; Erle, David J.; Collard, Harold R.; Wolters, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic features of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) include genetic predisposition, activation of the unfolded protein response, telomere attrition, and cellular senescence. The mechanisms leading to alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) senescence are poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported as regulators of cellular senescence. Senescence markers including p16, p21, p53, and senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-βgal) activity were measured in type II AECs from IPF lungs and unused donor lungs. miRNAs were quantified in type II AECs using gene expression arrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Molecular markers of senescence (p16, p21, and p53) were elevated in IPF type II AECs. SA-βgal activity was detected in a greater percentage in type II AECs isolated from IPF patients (23.1%) compared to patients with other interstitial lung diseases (1.2%) or normal controls (0.8%). The relative levels of senescence-associated miRNAs miR-34a, miR-34b, and miR-34c, but not miR-20a, miR-29c, or miR-let-7f were significantly higher in type II AECs from IPF patients. Overexpression of miR-34a, miR-34b, or miR-34c in lung epithelial cells was associated with higher SA-βgal activity (27.8%, 35.1%, and 38.2%, respectively) relative to control treated cells (8.8%). Targets of miR-34 miRNAs, including E2F1, c-Myc, and cyclin E2, were lower in IPF type II AECs. These results show that markers of senescence are uniquely elevated in IPF type II AECs and suggest that the miR-34 family of miRNAs regulate senescence in IPF type II AECs. PMID:27362652

  14. miR-34 miRNAs Regulate Cellular Senescence in Type II Alveolar Epithelial Cells of Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Disayabutr, Supparerk; Kim, Eun Kyung; Cha, Seung-Ick; Green, Gary; Naikawadi, Ram P; Jones, Kirk D; Golden, Jeffrey A; Schroeder, Aaron; Matthay, Michael A; Kukreja, Jasleen; Erle, David J; Collard, Harold R; Wolters, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic features of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) include genetic predisposition, activation of the unfolded protein response, telomere attrition, and cellular senescence. The mechanisms leading to alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) senescence are poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported as regulators of cellular senescence. Senescence markers including p16, p21, p53, and senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-βgal) activity were measured in type II AECs from IPF lungs and unused donor lungs. miRNAs were quantified in type II AECs using gene expression arrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Molecular markers of senescence (p16, p21, and p53) were elevated in IPF type II AECs. SA-βgal activity was detected in a greater percentage in type II AECs isolated from IPF patients (23.1%) compared to patients with other interstitial lung diseases (1.2%) or normal controls (0.8%). The relative levels of senescence-associated miRNAs miR-34a, miR-34b, and miR-34c, but not miR-20a, miR-29c, or miR-let-7f were significantly higher in type II AECs from IPF patients. Overexpression of miR-34a, miR-34b, or miR-34c in lung epithelial cells was associated with higher SA-βgal activity (27.8%, 35.1%, and 38.2%, respectively) relative to control treated cells (8.8%). Targets of miR-34 miRNAs, including E2F1, c-Myc, and cyclin E2, were lower in IPF type II AECs. These results show that markers of senescence are uniquely elevated in IPF type II AECs and suggest that the miR-34 family of miRNAs regulate senescence in IPF type II AECs.

  15. N-acetylcysteine amide, a thiol antioxidant, prevents bleomycin-induced toxicity in human alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549).

    PubMed

    Tobwala, S; Fan, W; Stoeger, T; Ercal, N

    2013-09-01

    Bleomycin (BLM), a glycopeptide antibiotic from Streptomyces verticillus, is an effective antineoplastic drug. However, its clinical use is restricted due to the wide range of associated toxicities, especially pulmonary toxicity. Oxidative stress has been implicated as an important factor in the development of BLM-induced pulmonary toxicity. Previous studies have indicated disruption of thiol-redox status in lungs (lung epithelial cells) upon BLM treatment. Therefore, this study focused on (1) investigating the oxidative effects of BLM on lung epithelial cells (A549) and (2) elucidating whether a well-known thiol antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), provides any protection against BLM-induced toxicity. Oxidative stress parameters, such as glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and antioxidant enzyme activities were altered upon BLM treatment. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), as assessed by fluorescence microscopy, indicated that cytotoxicity is possibly mediated through mitochondrial dysfunction. Pretreatment with NACA reversed the oxidative effects of BLM. NACA decreased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and MDA levels and restored the intracellular GSH levels. Our data showed that BLM induced A549 cell death by a mechanism involving oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. NACA had a protective role against BLM-induced toxicity by inhibiting lipid peroxidation, scavenging ROS, and preserving intracellular GSH and ΔΨm. NACA can potentially be developed into a promising adjunctive therapeutic option for patients undergoing chemotherapy with BLM.

  16. RAGE/NF-κB pathway mediates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in alveolar type I epithelial cells isolated from neonate rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhong; Wu, Rong; Zhao, Sai; Cheng, Huaipin; Ji, Ping; Yu, Min; Tian, Zhaofang

    2014-10-01

    Alveolar type I epithelial cells (AECIs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGEs) is expressed at a high basal level in AECIs, and its soluble isoform is suggested as a marker of AECI injury. However, the molecular mechanism by which RAGE mediates inflammatory injury in AECIs remains elusive. In this study, we established lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in AECIs isolated from neonate rats as the experimental model and investigated the role of RAGE/NF-κB signaling in mediating inflammatory response in AECIs. We found that LPS increased RAGE expression and the secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in AECIs in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of RAGE significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-1β levels in conditioned medium of AECIs. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that NF-κB activation was increased in AECIs treated by LPS. However, knockdown of RAGE inhibited both basic and LPS-induced NF-κB activity in AECIs. Finally, NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) significantly reduced LPS-induced upregulation of RAGE expression at both protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in AECIs. Our results suggest that RAGE mediates inflammatory response in AECIs via activating NF-κB, and RAGE/NF-κB pathway presents potential target for the prevention and therapy of acute lung injury.

  17. RIG-I and TLR3 are both required for maximum interferon induction by influenza virus in human lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenxin; Zhang, Wei; Duggan, Elizabeth S; Booth, J Leland; Zou, Ming-Hui; Metcalf, Jordan P

    2015-08-01

    Pattern recognition receptors, such as retinoic acid-inducible protein I (RIG-I), Toll-like receptors 3 and 7 (TLR3 and 7), and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing protein 2 (NOD2), play important roles in the recognition of influenza A virus (IAV), but their role in interferon (IFN) induction is still unclear, particularly in human lung. We investigated IFN induction by IAV in the A549 cell line as well as in primary human alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). TLR3/7, NOD2, RIG-I, and IFN expression levels were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA in cells infected with IAV PR8. We found that TLR7 and NOD2 were not involved in IFN induction by IAV in these cells. Neither RIG-I nor TLR3 siRNA alone completely blocked IFN induction. However, double knockdown of RIG-I and TLR3 completely inhibited IFN induction by influenza. Thus, signaling through both RIG-I and TLR3 is important for IFN induction by IAV in human lung AEC.

  18. Understanding the developmental pathways pulmonary fibroblasts may follow during alveolar regeneration.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Stephen

    2017-03-01

    Although pulmonary alveolar interstitial fibroblasts are less specialized than their epithelial and endothelial neighbors, they play essential roles during development and in response to lung injury. At birth, they must adapt to the sudden mechanical changes imposed by the onset of respiration and to a higher ambient oxygen concentration. In diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and interstitial fibrosis, their adaptive responses are overwhelmed leading to compromised gas-exchange function. Thus, although fibroblasts do not directly participate in gas-exchange, they are essential for creating and maintaining an optimal environment at the alveolar epithelial-endothelial interface. This review summarizes new information and concepts about the ontogeny differentiation, and function of alveolar fibroblasts. Alveolar development will be emphasized, because the development of strategies to evoke alveolar repair and regeneration hinges on thoroughly understanding the way that resident fibroblasts populate specific locations in which extracellular matrix must be produced and remodeled. Other recent reviews have described the disruption that diseases cause to the fibroblast niche and so my objective is to illustrate how the unique developmental origins and differentiation pathways could be harnessed favorably to augment certain fibroblast subpopulations and to optimize the conditions for alveolar regeneration.

  19. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    DOE PAGES

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; ...

    2013-12-02

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specificmore » fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. In conclusion, together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs.« less

  20. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A; Smith, Jordan N; Tarasevich, Barbara J; Orr, Galya

    2015-02-01

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in-vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn(2+)) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn(2+), together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn(2+) in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn(2+) values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submerged cultures, intracellular Zn(2+) values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn(2+) values that were nearly three-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submerged cultures, and eight-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn(2+). At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn(2+) was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn(2+) following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. Together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn(2+) have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs.

  1. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A.; Smith, Jordan N.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Orr, Galya

    2013-12-02

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. In conclusion, together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes

  2. Key Role of MicroRNA in the Regulation of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor Expression in Murine Alveolar Epithelial Cells during Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Anne; Mir-Kasimov, Mustafa; Baker, Jessica; Rowley, Jesse; Paine, Robert

    2014-01-01

    GM-CSF is an endogenous pulmonary cytokine produced by normal alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) that is a key defender of the alveolar space. AEC GM-CSF expression is suppressed by oxidative stress through alternations in mRNA turnover, an effect that is reversed by treatment with recombinant GM-CSF. We hypothesized that specific microRNA (miRNA) would play a key role in AEC GM-CSF regulation. A genome-wide miRNA microarray identified 19 candidate miRNA altered in primary AEC during oxidative stress with reversal by treatment with GM-CSF. Three of these miRNA (miR 133a, miR 133a*, and miR 133b) are also predicted to bind the GM-CSF 3′-untranslated region (UTR). PCR for the mature miRNA confirmed induction during oxidative stress that was reversed by treatment with GM-CSF. Experiments using a GM-CSF 3′-UTR reporter construct demonstrated that miR133a and miR133b effects on GM-CSF expression are through interactions with the GM-CSF 3′-UTR. Using lentiviral transduction of specific mimics and inhibitors in primary murine AEC, we determined that miR133a and miR133b suppress GM-CSF expression and that their inhibition both reverses oxidant-induced suppression of GM-CSF expression and increases basal expression of GM-CSF in cells in normoxia. In contrast, these miRNAs are not active in regulation of GM-CSF expression in murine EL4 T cells. Thus, members of the miR133 family play key roles in regulation of GM-CSF expression through effects on mRNA turnover in AEC during oxidative stress. Increased understanding of GM-CSF gene regulation may provide novel miRNA-based interventions to augment pulmonary innate immune defense in lung injury. PMID:24371146

  3. The role of Scgb1a1+ Clara cells in the long-term maintenance and repair of lung airway, but not alveolar, epithelium.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, Emma L; Okubo, Tadashi; Xue, Yan; Brass, David M; Auten, Richard L; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Wang, Fan; Hogan, Brigid L M

    2009-06-05

    To directly test the contribution of Scgb1a1(+) Clara cells to postnatal growth, homeostasis, and repair of lung epithelium, we generated a Scgb1a1-CreER "knockin" mouse for lineage-tracing these cells. Under all conditions tested, the majority of Clara cells in the bronchioles both self-renews and generates ciliated cells. In the trachea, Clara cells give rise to ciliated cells but do not self-renew extensively. Nevertheless, they can contribute to tracheal repair. In the postnatal mouse lung, it has been proposed that bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) which coexpress Scgb1a1 (Secretoglobin1a1) and SftpC (Surfactant Protein C), contribute descendants to both bronchioles and alveoli. The putative BASCs were lineage labeled in our studies. However, we find no evidence for the function of a special BASC population during postnatal growth, adult homeostasis, or repair. Rather, our results support a model in which the trachea, bronchioles, and alveoli are maintained by distinct populations of epithelial progenitor cells.

  4. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hua; Yang, Qi; Ji, Feng; Zhang, Ya-jie; Zhao, Yan; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 106 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections) immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals. PMID:25883625

  5. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hua; Yang, Qi; Ji, Feng; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Zhao, Yan; Luo, Min

    2015-02-01

    The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 10(6) cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections) immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  6. The effect of activated alveolar macrophages on experimental lung emphysema development. III. Morphological analysis of the lung tissue and alveolar macrophages in situ.

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, S; Nowak, H F; Sulkowska, M; Sobaniec-Lotowska, M; Andrzejewska, A; Sulik, M; Dziecioł, J; Famulski, W; Poczopko, B

    1995-01-01

    Morphological (in light and transmission electron microscope) as well as morphometrical analysis of the lungs was performed on experimental, papain-induced lung emphysema. Development of emphysematous changes was studied seven days after a single intratracheal instillation of papain solution. The effect of alveolar macrophages (AM) activation by BCG-vaccine on changes in pulmonary tissue was analyzed. In the rats given BCG the number of AM increased and demonstrated enhanced activity. Increase in reticulin fibre density in places of AM cumulation, particularly in BCG+papain-treated rats was observed. The lungs of animals treated with BCG+papain showed enhancing of emphysema comparing with the papain-treated rats. Development of emphysematous changes, especially in BCG+papain-treated rats coexisted with cumulation of activated alveolar macrophages and collagen fibres as well as type II alveolar epithelial cells proliferation. Our data support the inflammatory-repair hypothesis of emphysema pathogenesis and indicate that AM regulate collagen production in the lung. Type II alveolar epithelial cells seem be important in lung injury and repair.

  7. Host DNA Repair Proteins in Response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Lung Epithelial Cells and in Mice ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Huang, Huang; Zhang, Weidong; Kannan, Shibichakravarthy; Weaver, Andrew; Mckibben, Molynda; Herington, Danielle; Zeng, Huawei; Gao, Hongwei

    2011-01-01

    Although DNA repair proteins in bacteria are critical for pathogens' genome stability and for subverting the host defense, the role of host DNA repair proteins in response to bacterial infection is poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, that infection with the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa significantly altered the expression and enzymatic activity of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) in lung epithelial cells. Downregulation of OGG1 by a small interfering RNA strategy resulted in severe DNA damage and cell death. In addition, acetylation of OGG1 is required for host responses to bacterial genotoxicity, as mutations of OGG1 acetylation sites increased Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB) protein expression. These results also indicate that CSB may be involved in DNA repair activity during infection. Furthermore, OGG1 knockout mice exhibited increased lung injury after infection with P. aeruginosa, as demonstrated by higher myeloperoxidase activity and lipid peroxidation. Together, our studies indicate that P. aeruginosa infection induces significant DNA damage in host cells and that DNA repair proteins play a critical role in the host response to P. aeruginosa infection, serving as promising targets for the treatment of this condition and perhaps more broadly Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:20956573

  8. Regulation of cytokine production in human alveolar macrophages and airway epithelial cells in response to ambient air pollution particles: Further mechanistic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Susanne; Mundandhara, Sailaja; Devlin, Robert B.; Madden, Michael . E-mail: madden.michael@epa.gov

    2005-09-01

    In order to better understand how ambient air particulate matter (PM) affect lung health, the two main airway cell types likely to interact with inhaled particles, alveolar macrophages (AM) and airway epithelial cells have been exposed to particles in vitro and followed for endpoints of inflammation, and oxidant stress. Separation of Chapel Hill PM 10 into fine and coarse size particles revealed that the main proinflammatory response (TNF, IL-6, COX-2) in AM was driven by material present in the coarse PM, containing 90-95% of the stimulatory material in PM10. The particles did not affect expression of hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1), a sensitive marker of oxidant stress. Primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) also responded to the coarse fraction with higher levels of IL-8 and COX-2, than induced by fine or ultrafine PM. All size PM induced oxidant stress in NHBE, while fine PM induced the highest levels of HO-1 expression. The production of cytokines in AM by both coarse and fine particles was blocked by the toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist E5531 involved in the recognition of LPS and Gram negative bacteria. The NHBE were found to recognize coarse and fine PM through TLR2, a receptor with preference for recognition of Gram positive bacteria. Compared to ambient PM, diesel PM induced only a minimal cytokine response in both AM and NHBE. Instead, diesel suppressed LPS-induced TNF and IL-8 release in AM. Both coarse and fine ambient air PM were also found to inhibit LPS-induced TNF release while silica, volcanic ash or carbon black had no inhibitory effect. Diesel particles did not affect cytokine mRNA induction nor protein accumulation but interfered with the release of cytokine from the cells. Ambient coarse and fine PM, on the other hand, inhibited both mRNA induction and protein production. Exposure to coarse and fine PM decreased the expression of TLR4 in the macrophages. Particle-induced decrease in TLR4 and hyporesponsiveness to LPS

  9. Curcumin induces glutathione biosynthesis and inhibits NF-kappaB activation and interleukin-8 release in alveolar epithelial cells: mechanism of free radical scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saibal K; McClure, Danny; Jimenez, Luis A; Megson, Ian L; Rahman, Irfan

    2005-01-01

    Oxidants and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) activate transcription factors such as nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), which is involved in the transcription of proinflammatory mediators, including interleukin-8 (IL-8). Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a naturally occurring flavonoid present in the spice turmeric, which has a long traditional use as a chemotherapeutic agent for many diseases. We hypothesize that curcumin may possess both antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties by increasing the glutathione levels and inhibiting oxidant- and cytokine-induced NF-kappaB activation and IL-8 release from cultured alveolar epithelial cells (A549). Treatment of A549 cells with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 100 microM) and TNF-alpha (10 ng/ml) significantly increased NF-kappaB and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation, as well as IL-8 release. Curcumin inhibited both H2O2- and TNF-alpha-mediated activation of NF-kappaB and AP-1, and IL-8 release. Furthermore, an increased level of GSH and glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit mRNA expression was observed in curcumin-treated cells as compared with untreated cells. Curcumin interacted directly with superoxide anion (O2*-) and hydroxyl radical (*OH) as shown by electron paramagnetic resonance, quenching the interaction of the radicals with the spin trap, Tempone-H. This suggests that curcumin has multiple properties: as an oxygen radical scavenger, antioxidant through modulation of glutathione levels, and antiinflammatory agent through inhibition of IL-8 release in lung cells.

  10. A Novel Approach for Ovine Primary Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Isolation and Culture from Fresh and Cryopreserved Tissue Obtained from Premature and Juvenile Animals

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Mariola M.; Baker, Sandy T.; Wu, Jichuan; Hubert, Terrence L.; Wolfson, Marla R.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo ovine model provides a clinically relevant platform to study cardiopulmonary mechanisms and treatments of disease; however, a robust ovine primary alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell culture model is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop and optimize ovine lung tissue cryopreservation and primary ATII cell culture methodologies for the purposes of dissecting mechanisms at the cellular level to elucidate responses observed in vivo. To address this, we established in vitro submerged and air-liquid interface cultures of primary ovine ATII cells isolated from fresh or cryopreserved lung tissues obtained from mechanically ventilated sheep (128 days gestation—6 months of age). Presence, abundance, and mRNA expression of surfactant proteins was assessed by immunocytochemistry, Western Blot, and quantitative PCR respectively on the day of isolation, and throughout the 7 day cell culture study period. All biomarkers were significantly greater from cells isolated from fresh than cryopreserved tissue, and those cultured in air-liquid interface as compared to submerged culture conditions at all time points. Surfactant protein expression remained in the air-liquid interface culture system while that of cells cultured in the submerged system dissipated over time. Despite differences in biomarker magnitude between cells isolated from fresh and cryopreserved tissue, cells isolated from cryopreserved tissue remained metabolically active and demonstrated a similar response as cells from fresh tissue through 72 hr period of hyperoxia. These data demonstrate a cell culture methodology using fresh or cryopreserved tissue to support study of ovine primary ATII cell function and responses, to support expanded use of biobanked tissues, and to further understanding of mechanisms that contribute to in vivo function of the lung. PMID:26999050

  11. Carbocisteine attenuates TNF-α-induced inflammation in human alveolar epithelial cells in vitro through suppressing NF-κB and ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Guan, Wei-jie; Huang, Rong-quan; Xie, Yan-qing; Zheng, Jin-ping; Zhu, Shao-xuan; Chen, Mao; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We previously proven that carbocisteine, a conventional mucolytic drug, remarkably reduced the rate of acute exacerbations and improved the quality of life in the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this study we investigated the mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of carbocisteine in human alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. Methods: Human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 was treated with TNF-α (10 ng/mL). Carbocisteine was administered either 24 h prior to or after TNF-α exposure. The cytokine release and expression were measured using ELISA and qRT-PCR. Activation of NF-κB was analyzed with Western blotting, immunofluorescence assay and luciferase reporter gene assay. The expression of ERK1/2 MAPK signaling proteins was assessed with Western blotting. Results: Carbocisteine (10, 100, 1000 μmol/L), administered either before or after TNF-α exposure, dose-dependently suppressed TNF-α-induced inflammation in A549 cells, as evidenced by diminished release of IL-6 and IL-8, and diminished mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1 and MIP-1β. Furthermore, pretreatment with carbocisteine significantly decreased TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and ERK1/2 MAPK, and inhibited the nuclear translocation of p65 subunit in A549 cells. In an NF-κB luciferase reporter system, pretreatment with carbocisteine dose-dependently inhibited TNF-α-induced transcriptional activity of NF-κB. Conclusion: Carbocisteine effectively suppresses TNF-α-induced inflammation in A549 cells via suppressing NF-κB and ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:26997568

  12. Effect of irradiation/bone marrow transplantation on alveolar epithelial type II cells is aggravated in surfactant protein D deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Mühlfeld, Christian; Madsen, Jens; Mackay, Rose-Marie; Schneider, Jan Philipp; Schipke, Julia; Lutz, Dennis; Birkelbach, Bastian; Knudsen, Lars; Botto, Marina; Ochs, Matthias; Clark, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation (BM-Tx) is a frequent therapeutic intervention causing pathology to the lung. Although alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cells are essential for lung function and are damaged by irradiation, the long-term consequences of irradiation and BM-Tx are not well characterized. In addition, it is unknown whether surfactant protein D (SP-D) influences the response of AE2 cells to the injurious events. Therefore, wildtype (WT) and SP-D(-/-) mice were subjected to a myeloablative whole body irradiation dose of 8 Gy and subsequent BM-Tx and compared with age- and sex-matched untreated controls. AE2 cell changes were investigated quantitatively by design-based stereology. Compared with WT, untreated SP-D(-/-) mice showed a higher number of larger sized AE2 cells and a greater amount of surfactant-storing lamellar bodies. Irradiation and BM-Tx induced hyperplasia and hypertrophy in WT and SP-D(-/-) mice as well as the formation of giant lamellar bodies. The experimentally induced alterations were more severe in the SP-D(-/-) than in the WT mice, particularly with respect to the surfactant-storing lamellar bodies which were sometimes extremely enlarged in SP-D(-/-) mice. In conclusion, irradiation and BM-Tx have profound long-term effects on AE2 cells and their lamellar bodies. These data may explain some of the clinical pulmonary consequences of this procedure. The data should also be taken into account when BM-Tx is used as an experimental procedure to investigate the impact of bone marrow-derived cells for the phenotype of a specific genotype in the mouse.

  13. A Novel Approach for Ovine Primary Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Isolation and Culture from Fresh and Cryopreserved Tissue Obtained from Premature and Juvenile Animals.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Mariola M; Baker, Sandy T; Wu, Jichuan; Hubert, Terrence L; Wolfson, Marla R

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo ovine model provides a clinically relevant platform to study cardiopulmonary mechanisms and treatments of disease; however, a robust ovine primary alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell culture model is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop and optimize ovine lung tissue cryopreservation and primary ATII cell culture methodologies for the purposes of dissecting mechanisms at the cellular level to elucidate responses observed in vivo. To address this, we established in vitro submerged and air-liquid interface cultures of primary ovine ATII cells isolated from fresh or cryopreserved lung tissues obtained from mechanically ventilated sheep (128 days gestation-6 months of age). Presence, abundance, and mRNA expression of surfactant proteins was assessed by immunocytochemistry, Western Blot, and quantitative PCR respectively on the day of isolation, and throughout the 7 day cell culture study period. All biomarkers were significantly greater from cells isolated from fresh than cryopreserved tissue, and those cultured in air-liquid interface as compared to submerged culture conditions at all time points. Surfactant protein expression remained in the air-liquid interface culture system while that of cells cultured in the submerged system dissipated over time. Despite differences in biomarker magnitude between cells isolated from fresh and cryopreserved tissue, cells isolated from cryopreserved tissue remained metabolically active and demonstrated a similar response as cells from fresh tissue through 72 hr period of hyperoxia. These data demonstrate a cell culture methodology using fresh or cryopreserved tissue to support study of ovine primary ATII cell function and responses, to support expanded use of biobanked tissues, and to further understanding of mechanisms that contribute to in vivo function of the lung.

  14. Carbocisteine attenuates TNF-α-induced inflammation in human alveolar epithelial cells in vitro through suppressing NF-κB and ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Guan, Wei-Jie; Huang, Rong-Quan; Xie, Yan-Qing; Zheng, Jin-Ping; Zhu, Shao-Xuan; Chen, Mao; Zhong, Nan-Shan

    2016-05-01

    We previously proven that carbocisteine, a conventional mucolytic drug, remarkably reduced the rate of acute exacerbations and improved the quality of life in the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this study we investigated the mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of carbocisteine in human alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. Human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 was treated with TNF-α (10 ng/mL). Carbocisteine was administered either 24 h prior to or after TNF-α exposure. The cytokine release and expression were measured using ELISA and qRT-PCR. Activation of NF-κB was analyzed with Western blotting, immunofluorescence assay and luciferase reporter gene assay. The expression of ERK1/2 MAPK signaling proteins was assessed with Western blotting. Carbocisteine (10, 100, 1000 μmol/L), administered either before or after TNF-α exposure, dose-dependently suppressed TNF-α-induced inflammation in A549 cells, as evidenced by diminished release of IL-6 and IL-8, and diminished mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1 and MIP-1β. Furthermore, pretreatment with carbocisteine significantly decreased TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and ERK1/2 MAPK, and inhibited the nuclear translocation of p65 subunit in A549 cells. In an NF-κB luciferase reporter system, pretreatment with carbocisteine dose-dependently inhibited TNF-α-induced transcriptional activity of NF-κB. Carbocisteine effectively suppresses TNF-α-induced inflammation in A549 cells via suppressing NF-κB and ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathways.

  15. The Role of Alveolar Epithelial Type II-Like Cells in Uptake of Structurally Different Antigens and in Polarisation of Local Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Akgün, Johnnie; Schabussova, Irma; Schwarzer, Martin; Kozakova, Hana; Kundi, Michael; Wiedermann, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Background Our previous studies on intranasal tolerance induction demonstrated reduction of allergic responses with different allergen constructs. The underlying mechanisms varied depending on their conformation or size. Objective The aim of the present study was to compare the uptake of two structurally different allergen molecules within the respiratory tract following intranasal application. Methods The three-dimensional Bet v 1 (Bv1-Protein) and the T cell epitope peptide of Bet v 1 (Bv1-Peptide) were labelled with 5,6-Carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and their uptake was investigated in lung cells and cells of the nasal associated lymphoid tissue from naive and sensitised BALB/c mice. Phenotypic characterisation of FAM+ lung cells after antigen incubation in vitro and after intranasal application was performed by flow cytometry. Impact of Bv1-Protein and Bv1-Peptide on cytokine profiles and gene expression in vivo or in an alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell line were assessed in mono- and co-cultures with monocytes using ELISA and quantitative real-time PCR. Results Both antigens were taken up preferably by ATII-like cells (ATII-LCs) in naive mice, and by macrophages in sensitised mice. After intranasal application, Bv1-Peptide was taken up faster and more efficiently than Bv1-Protein. In vivo and in vitro experiments revealed that Bv1-Protein induced the transcription of thymic stromal lymphopoietin mRNA while Bv1-Peptide induced the transcription of IL-10 and MCP1 mRNA in ATII-LCs. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Both tested antigens were taken up by ATII-LCs under steady state conditions and induced different polarisation of the immune responses. These data may have an important impact for the generation of novel and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic tools targeting the respiratory mucosa. PMID:25894334

  16. Oxidative stress, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest are induced in primary fetal alveolar type II epithelial cells exposed to fine particulate matter from cooking oil fumes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Yan-Yan; Cao, Ji-Yu; Tao, Fang-Biao; Zhu, Xiao-Xia; Yao, Ci-Jiang; Chen, Dao-Jun; Che, Zhen; Zhao, Qi-Hong; Wen, Long-Ping

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a linkage between morbidity and mortality and particulate matter (PM), particularly fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that can readily penetrate into the lungs and are therefore more likely to increase the incidence of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the compositions of cooking oil fume (COF)-derived PM2.5, which is the major source of indoor pollution in China. Furthermore, oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest induced by COF-derived PM2.5 in primary fetal alveolar type II epithelial cells (AEC II cells) were also detected. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a radical scavenger, was used to identify the role of oxidative stress in the abovementioned processes. Our results suggested that compositions of COF-derived PM2.5 are obviously different to PM2.5 derived from other sources, and COF-derived PM2.5 led to cell death, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and G0/G1 cell arrest in primary fetal AEC II cells. Furthermore, the results also showed that COF-derived PM2.5 induced apoptosis through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway, which is indicated by the increased expression of ER stress-related apoptotic markers, namely GRP78 and caspase-12. Besides, the induction of oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest was reversed by pretreatment with NAC. These findings strongly suggested that COF-derived PM2.5-induced toxicity in primary fetal AEC II cells is mediated by increased oxidative stress, accompanied by ER stress which results in apoptosis.

  17. C22-bronchial and T7-alveolar epithelial cell lines of the immortomouse are excellent murine cell culture model systems to study pulmonary peroxisome biology and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karnati, Srikanth; Palaniswamy, Saranya; Alam, Mohammad Rashedul; Oruqaj, Gani; Stamme, Cordula; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2016-03-01

    In pulmonary research, temperature-sensitive immortalized cell lines derived from the lung of the "immortomouse" (H-2k(b)-tsA58 transgenic mouse), such as C22 club cells and T7 alveolar epithelial cells type II (AECII), are frequently used cell culture models to study CC10 metabolism and surfactant synthesis. Even though peroxisomes are highly abundant in club cells and AECII and might fulfill important metabolic functions therein, these organelles have never been investigated in C22 and T7 cells. Therefore, we have characterized the peroxisomal compartment and its associated gene transcription in these cell lines. Our results show that peroxisomes are highly abundant in C22 and T7 cells, harboring a common set of enzymes, however, exhibiting specific differences in protein composition and gene expression patterns, similar to the ones observed in club cells and AECII in situ in the lung. C22 cells contain a lower number of larger peroxisomes, whereas T7 cells possess more numerous tubular peroxisomes, reflected also by higher levels of PEX11 proteins. Moreover, C22 cells harbor relatively higher amounts of catalase and antioxidative enzymes in distinct subcellular compartments, whereas T7 cells exhibit higher levels of ABCD3 and plasmalogen synthesizing enzymes as well as nuclear receptors of the PPAR family. This study suggest that the C22 and T7 cell lines of the immortomouse lung are useful models to study the regulation and metabolic function of the peroxisomal compartment and its alterations by paracrine factors in club cells and AECII.

  18. Repair of alveolar cleft defect with mesenchymal stem cells and platelet derived growth factors: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Behnia, Hossein; Khojasteh, Arash; Soleimani, Masoud; Tehranchi, Azita; Atashi, Amir

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the enhancing effect of recombinant platelet derived growth factor on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in secondary alveoloplasty. Three patients with 4 alveolar defects were selected for this study. Mesenchymal stem cells were cultured from a posterior iliac bone aspirate. MSCs were mounted on biphasic scaffolds and combined with platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) in the operating room to make a triad of the scaffold, growth factor, and cells. The triads were placed in anterior maxillary cleft defects and closed with lateral advancement gingival flaps. The postoperative cleft bone volume was measured with cone beam computed tomography scans. A mean of 51.3% fill of the bone defect was calculated 3 months post-operation. Our data suggests the use of recombinant platelet derived growth factor with hMSCs may enhance the regeneration capacity of the cells. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Global comparison of chromosome X genes of pulmonary telocytes with mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts, alveolar type II cells, airway epithelial cells, and lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yichun; Zheng, Minghuan; Song, Dongli; Ye, Ling; Wang, Xiangdong

    2015-09-28

    Telocytes (TCs) are suggested as a new type of interstitial cells with specific telopodes. Our previous study evidenced that TCs differed from fibroblasts and stem cells at the aspect of gene expression profiles. The present study aims to search the characters and patterns of chromosome X genes of TC-specific or TC-dominated gene profiles and fingerprints, investigate the network of principle genes, and explore potential functional association. We compared gene expression profiles in chromosome X of pulmonary TCs with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), fibroblasts (Fb), alveolar type II cells (ATII), airway basal cells (ABC), proximal airway cells (PAC), CD8(+) T cells come from bronchial lymph nodes (T-BL), or CD8(+) T cells from lungs (T-L) by global analyses, and selected the genes which were consistently up or down regulated (>1 fold) in TCs compared to other cells as TC-specific genes. The functional and characteristic networks were identified and compared by bioinformatics tools. We selected 31 chromosome X genes as the TC-specific or dominated genes, among which 8 up-regulated (Flna, Msn, Cfp, Col4a5, Mum1l1, Rnf128, Syn1, and Srpx2) and 23 down-regulated (Abcb7, Atf1, Ddx26b, Drp2, Fam122b, Gyk, Irak1, Lamp2, Mecp2, Ndufb11, Ogt, Pdha1, Pola1, Rab9, Rbmx2, Rhox9, Thoc2, Vbp1, Dkc1, Nkrf, Piga, Tmlhe and Tsr2), as compared with other cells. Our data suggested that gene expressions of chromosome X in TCs are different with those in other cells in the lung tissue. According to the selected TC-specific genes, we infer that pulmonary TCs function as modulators which may enhance cellular growth and migration, resist senescence, protect cells from external stress, regulate immune responses, participate in tissue remodeling and repair, regulate neural function, and promote vessel formation.

  20. [Research on effects of vitamin A palmitate on repair of mechanical corneal epithelial defects and conjunctival goblet cells in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiao-di; Gong, Lan; Chen, Min-jie

    2010-02-01

    Randomized controlled experimental study to investigate the influence of vitamin A palmitate and bovine recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on repair of mechanical corneal epithelial defects, conjunctival epithelial cells and goblet cells in rabbits. One hundred and twenty New Zealand rabbits (all males) were selected to establish the mechanical corneal epithelial defects models (scratching out a round area with the diameter of 8 mm in the centre of cornea). Forty eight New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: group A used lincomycin hydrochloride eye drops (LED) after the model had been established; group B used vitamin A palmitate eye gel and LED; group C used recombinant bFGF eye gel and LED; group D used vitamin A palmitate eye gel, bFGF eye gel and LED. Photo slit lamp examination and measurement of repaired area were performed on day 0, day 1, day 4 and day 7; transmission electron microscopy, histological microscope examination and impression cytology were performed on day 0, day 1, day 4 and day 7 to analysis the morphology and repairment of corneal epithelium, conjunctival epithelial cells and the goblet cells. The variants were tested using analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Statistic analysis showed that on day 1, the size of areas of repaired corneal epithelium was: group A(53.512 +/- 18.850) mm(2), group B (92.194 +/- 14.367) mm(2), group C (89.779 +/- 20.535) mm(2), group D (127.816 +/- 16.379) mm(2). The difference in size of repaired areas between different groups was statistically significant (F = 17.663, P = 0.000), with exception of the difference between groups B and C (P = 0.995). Conjunctival impression cytology showed that, the average number of conjunctival goblet cells per 740 microm x 550 microm at day 1 was decreased, group A (10.083 +/- 4.441), group B (10.667 +/- 3.551), group C (9.583 +/- 4.502), group D (9.167 +/- 5.606). The difference between these four groups was not significant (F = 0.239, P = 0

  1. Low-level laser irradiation promotes the proliferation and maturation of keratinocytes during epithelial wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Felipe F.; Simões, Alyne; Corrêa, Luciana; Aranha, Ana Cecília C.; Giudice, Fernanda S.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Sousa, Suzana C.O.M.

    2015-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been extensively employed to improve epithelial wound healing, though the exact response of epithelium maturation and stratification after LLLT is unknown. Thus, this study aimed to assess the in vitro growth and differentiation of keratinocytes (KCs) and in vivo wound healing response when treated with LLLT. Human KCs (HaCaT cells) showed an enhanced proliferation with all the employed laser energy densities (3, 6 and 12 J/cm2, 660nm, 100mW), together with an increased expression of Cyclin D1. Moreover, the immunoexpression of proteins related to epithelial proliferation and maturation (p63, CK10, CK14) all indicated a faster maturation of the migrating KCs in the LLLT-treated wounds. In that way, an improved epithelial healing was promoted by LLLT with the employed parameters; this improvement was confirmed by changes in the expression of several proteins related to epithelial proliferation and maturation. PMID:25411997

  2. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate-Induced ICAM-1 Expression via NADPH Oxidase/ROS-Dependent NF-κB Cascade on Human Pulmonary Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Yang, Chien-Chung; Cho, Rou-Ling; Wang, Chen-Yu; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2016-01-01

    The intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression is frequently correlated with the lung inflammation. In lung injury, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, bioactive sphingolipid metabolite), participate gene regulation of adhesion molecule in inflammation progression and aggravate tissue damage. To investigate the transduction mechanisms of the S1P in pulmonary epithelium, we demonstrated that exposure of HPAEpiCs (human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells) to S1P significantly induces ICAM-1 expression leading to increase monocyte adhesion on the surface of HPAEpiCs. These phenomena were effectively attenuated by pretreatments with series of inhibitors such as Rottlerin (PKCδ), PF431396 (PYK2), diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI), apocynin (NADPH oxidase), Edaravone (ROS), and Bay11-7082 (NF-κB). Consistently, knockdown with siRNA transfection of PKCδ, PYK2, p47phox, and p65 exhibited the same results. Pretreatment with both Gq-coupled receptor antagonist (GPA2A) and Gi/o-coupled receptor antagonist (GPA2) also blocked the upregulation of ICAM-1 protein and mRNA induced by S1P. We observed that S1P induced PYK2 activation via a Gq-coupled receptor/PKCδ-dependent pathway. In addition, S1P induced NADPH oxidase activation and intracellular ROS generation, which were also reduced by Rottlerin or PF431396. We demonstrated that S1P induced NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation in HPAEpiCs. Activated NF-κB was blocked by Rottlerin, PF431396, APO, DPI, or Edaravone. Besides, the results of monocyte adhesion assay indicated that S1P-induced ICAM-1 expression on HPAEpiCs can enhance the monocyte attachments. In the S1P-treated mice, we found that the levels of ICAM-1 protein and mRNA in the lung fractions, the pulmonary hematoma and leukocyte count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were enhanced through a PKCδ/PYK2/NADPH oxidase/ROS/NF-κB signaling pathway. We concluded that S1P-accelerated lung damage is due to the ICAM-1 induction associated with

  3. Curcumin modulates the effect of histone modification on the expression of chemokines by type II alveolar epithelial cells in a rat COPD model

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lixing; Li, Chengye; Wang, Jian; Guo, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies have suggested that histone modification has a positive impact on various aspects associated with the progression of COPD. Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) suppresses proinflammatory gene expression through deacetylation of core histones. Objective To investigate the effect of histone modification on the expression of chemokines in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II) in a rat COPD model and regulation of HDAC2 expression by curcumin in comparison with corticosteroid. Materials and methods The rat COPD model was established by cigarette smoke exposure and confirmed by histology and pathophysioloy. AEC II were isolated and cultured in vitro from the COPD models and control animals. The cells were treated with curcumin, corticosteroid, or trichostatin A, and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2α (MIP-2α) was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of HDAC2 was measured by Western blot. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to detect H3/H4 acetylation and H3K9 methylation in the promoter region of three kinds of chemokine genes (IL-8, MCP-1, and MIP-2α). Results Compared to the control group, the mRNAs of MCP-1, IL-8, and MIP-2α were upregulated 4.48-fold, 3.14-fold, and 2.83-fold, respectively, in the AEC II from COPD model. The protein expression of HDAC2 in the AEC II from COPD model was significantly lower than from the control group (P<0.05). The decreased expression of HDAC2 was negatively correlated with the increased expression of IL-8, MCP-1, and MIP-2α mRNAs (all P<0.05). The level of H3/H4 acetylation was higher but H3K9 methylation in the promoter region of chemokine genes was lower in the cells from COPD model than from the control group (all P<0.05). Curcumin downregulated the expression of MCP-1, IL-8, and MIP-2α, and the expression was further enhanced in the presence of

  4. Expression of asthma susceptibility genes in bronchial epithelial cells and bronchial alveolar lavage in the Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) cohort.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingnan; Hawkins, Gregory A; Moore, Wendy C; Hastie, Annette T; Ampleford, Elizabeth J; Milosevic, Jadranka; Li, Huashi; Busse, William W; Erzurum, Serpil C; Kaminski, Naftali; Wenzel, Sally E; Bleecker, Eugene R; Meyers, Deborah A

    2016-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified genes associated with asthma, however expression of these genes in asthma-relevant tissues has not been studied. This study tested expression and correlation between GWAS-identified asthma genes and asthma or asthma severity. Correlation analyses of expression levels of GWAS-identified asthma genes and asthma-related biomarkers were performed in cells from human bronchial epithelial biopsy (BEC, n = 107) and bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL, n = 94). Expression levels of asthma genes between BEC and BAL and with asthma or asthma severity were weakly correlated. The expression levels of IL18R1 were consistently higher in asthma than controls or in severe asthma than mild/moderate asthma in BEC and BAL (p < 0.05). In RAD50-IL13 region, the expression levels of RAD50, not IL4, IL5, or IL13, were positively correlated between BEC and BAL (ρ = 0.53, P = 4.5 × 10(-6)). The expression levels of IL13 were positively correlated with IL5 in BEC (ρ = 0.35, P = 1.9 × 10(-4)) and IL4 in BAL (ρ = 0.42, P = 2.5 × 10(-5)), respectively. rs3798134 in RAD50, a GWAS-identified SNP, was correlated with IL13 expression and the expression levels of IL13 were correlated with asthma (P = 0.03). rs17772583 in RAD50 was significantly correlated with RAD50 expression in BAL and BEC (P = 7.4 × 10(-7) and 0.04) but was not associated with asthma. This is the first report studying the expression of GWAS-identified asthma genes in BEC and BAL. IL13, rather than RAD50, IL4, or IL5, is more likely to be the asthma susceptibility gene. Our study illustrates tissue-specific expression of asthma-related genes. Therefore, whenever possible, disease-relevant tissues should be used for transcription analysis.

  5. Ph-Dependent Inhibition of Voltage-Gated H+ Currents in Rat Alveolar Epithelial Cells by Zn2+ and Other Divalent Cations

    PubMed Central

    Cherny, Vladimir V.; DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    Inhibition by polyvalent cations is a defining characteristic of voltage-gated proton channels. The mechanism of this inhibition was studied in rat alveolar epithelial cells using tight-seal voltage clamp techniques. Metal concentrations were corrected for measured binding to buffers. Externally applied ZnCl2 reduced the H+ current, shifted the voltage-activation curve toward positive potentials, and slowed the turn-on of H+ current upon depolarization more than could be accounted for by a simple voltage shift, with minimal effects on the closing rate. The effects of Zn2+ were inconsistent with classical voltage-dependent block in which Zn2+ binds within the membrane voltage field. Instead, Zn2+ binds to superficial sites on the channel and modulates gating. The effects of extracellular Zn2+ were strongly pHo dependent but were insensitive to pHi, suggesting that protons and Zn2+ compete for external sites on H+ channels. The apparent potency of Zn2+ in slowing activation was ∼10× greater at pHo 7 than at pHo 6, and ∼100× greater at pHo 6 than at pHo 5. The pHo dependence suggests that Zn2+, not ZnOH+, is the active species. Evidently, the Zn2+ receptor is formed by multiple groups, protonation of any of which inhibits Zn2+ binding. The external receptor bound H+ and Zn2+ with pKa 6.2–6.6 and pKM 6.5, as described by several models. Zn2+ effects on the proton chord conductance–voltage (gH–V) relationship indicated higher affinities, pKa 7 and pKM 8. CdCl2 had similar effects as ZnCl2 and competed with H+, but had lower affinity. Zn2+ applied internally via the pipette solution or to inside-out patches had comparatively small effects, but at high concentrations reduced H+ currents and slowed channel closing. Thus, external and internal zinc-binding sites are different. The external Zn2+ receptor may be the same modulatory protonation site(s) at which pHo regulates H+ channel gating. PMID:10578017

  6. Alveolar type II cell-fibroblast interactions, synthesis and secretion of surfactant and type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M; Bhandari, R; Hamilton, G; Chan, Y C; Powell, J T

    1993-06-01

    During alveolar development and alveolar repair close contacts are established between fibroblasts and lung epithelial cells through gaps in the basement membrane. Using co-culture systems we have investigated whether these close contacts influence synthesis and secretion of the principal surfactant apoprotein (SP-A) by cultured rat lung alveolar type II cells and the synthesis and secretion of type I collagen by fibroblasts. The alveolar type II cells remained cuboidal and grew in colonies on fibroblast feeder layers and on Matrigel-coated cell culture inserts but were progressively more flattened on fixed fibroblast monolayers and plastic. Alveolar type II cells cultured on plastic released almost all their SP-A into the medium by 4 days. Alveolar type II cells cultured on viable fibroblasts or Matrigel-coated inserts above fibroblasts accumulated SP-A in the medium at a constant rate for the first 4 days, and probably recycle SP-A by endocytosis. The amount of mRNA for SP-A was very low after 4 days of culture of alveolar type II cells on plastic, Matrigel-coated inserts or fixed fibroblast monolayers: relatively, the amount of mRNA for SP-A was increased 4-fold after culture of alveolar type II cells on viable fibroblasts. Co-culture of alveolar type II cells with confluent human dermal fibroblasts stimulated by 2- to 3-fold the secretion of collagen type I into the culture medium, even after the fibroblasts' growth had been arrested with mitomycin C. Collagen secretion, by fibroblasts, also was stimulated 2-fold by conditioned medium from alveolar type II cells cultured on Matrigel. The amount of mRNA for type I collagen increased only modestly when fibroblasts were cultured in this conditioned medium. This stimulation of type I collagen secretion diminished as the conditioned medium was diluted out, but at high dilutions further stimulation occurred, indicating that a factor that inhibited collagen secretion also was being diluted out. The conditioned medium

  7. Brief report: Dclk1 deletion in tuft cells results in impaired epithelial repair after radiation injury.

    PubMed

    May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Weygant, Nathaniel; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stanley A; Li, Linheng; Sureban, Sripathi M; Houchen, Courtney W

    2014-03-01

    The role of Dclk1(+) tuft cells in the replacement of intestinal epithelia and reestablishing the epithelial barrier after severe genotoxic insult is completely unknown. Successful restoration requires precise coordination between the cells within each crypt subunit. While the mechanisms that control this response remain largely uncertain, the radiation model remains an exceptional surrogate for stem cell-associated crypt loss. Following the creation of Dclk1-intestinal-epithelial-deficient Villin-Cre;Dclk1(flox/flox) mice, widespread gene expression changes were detected in isolated intestinal epithelia during homeostasis. While the number of surviving crypts was unaffected, Villin-Cre;Dclk1(flox/flox) mice failed to maintain tight junctions and died at approximately 5 days, where Dclk1(flox/flox) mice lived until day 10 following radiation injury. These findings suggest that Dclk1 plays a functional role critical in the epithelial restorative response. © AlphaMed Press.

  8. Dclk1 Deletion in Tuft Cells Results in Impaired Epithelial Repair After Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Weygant, Nathaniel; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stanley A.; Li, Linheng; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2013-01-01

    The role of Dclk1+ tuft cells in the replacement of intestinal epithelia and reestablishing the epithelial barrier after severe genotoxic insult is completely unknown. Successful restoration requires precise coordination between the cells within each crypt subunit. While the mechanisms that control this response remain largely uncertain, the radiation model remains an exceptional surrogate for stem cell-associated crypt loss. Following the creation of Dclk1-intestinal-epithelial-deficient Villin-Cre;Dclk1flox/flox mice, widespread gene expression changes were detected in isolated intestinal epithelia during homeostasis. While the number of surviving crypts were unaffected, Villin-Cre;Dclk1flox/flox mice failed to maintain tight junctions and died at ~5d, where Dclk1flox/flox mice lived until day 10 following radiation injury. These findings suggest that Dclk1 plays a functional role critical in the epithelial restorative response. PMID:24123696

  9. An uptake of cationized ferritin by alveolar type I cells in airway-instilled goat lung: distribution of anionic sites on the epithelial surface.

    PubMed

    Atwal, O S; Viel, L; Minhas, K J

    1990-07-01

    The present study has investigated ultrastructural localization of anionic sites on the luminal surface of the alveolar epithelium of goat lung by direct airway instillation of cationized ferritin (CF) in the cranial lobe of the right lung through a bronchoscope. The cationic probe decorated preferentially the luminal plasmalemmal vesicles and plasmalemma proper of alveolar type I cell. This indicated the presence of highly charged anionic microdomains at these binding sites. The ligand was internalized in the free plasmalemmal vesicles of alveolar type I cell within 2 min. Heavy decoration of vesicles at 5 min of perfusion indicated that the amount of CF internalization increased with its concentration in the alveoli. It is suggested that exposure of alveolar surface to several gases of ruminal-origin induces changes in the surface charge of luminal plasmalemma of alveolar type I cells. The significance of these anionic plasmalemmal sites is discussed in relation to the adjustment of osmotic pressure gradient across the alveolar-capillary membrane of the ruminant lung.

  10. Lung alveolar epithelium and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Corvol, Harriet; Flamein, Florence; Epaud, Ralph; Clement, Annick; Guillot, Loic

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) comprise a group of lung disorders characterized by various levels of inflammation and fibrosis. The current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of ILD strongly suggests a central role of the alveolar epithelium. Following injury, alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) may actively participate in the restoration of a normal alveolar architecture through a coordinated process of re-epithelialization, or in the development of fibrosis through a process known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Complex networks orchestrate EMT leading to changes in cell architecture and behaviour, loss of epithelial characteristics and gain of mesenchymal properties. In the lung, AECs themselves may serve as a source of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts by acquiring a mesenchymal phenotype. This review covers recent knowledge on the role of alveolar epithelium in the pathogenesis of ILD. The mechanisms underlying disease progression are discussed, with a main focus on the apoptotic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and the developmental pathway.

  11. Defective DNA single-strand break repair is responsible for senescence and neoplastic escape of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nassour, Joe; Martien, Sébastien; Martin, Nathalie; Deruy, Emeric; Tomellini, Elisa; Malaquin, Nicolas; Bouali, Fatima; Sabatier, Laure; Wernert, Nicolas; Pinte, Sébastien; Gilson, Eric; Pourtier, Albin; Pluquet, Olivier; Abbadie, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    The main characteristic of senescence is its stability which relies on the persistence of DNA damage. We show that unlike fibroblasts, senescent epithelial cells do not activate an ATM-or ATR-dependent DNA damage response (DDR), but accumulate oxidative-stress-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs). These breaks remain unrepaired because of a decrease in PARP1 expression and activity. This leads to the formation of abnormally large and persistent XRCC1 foci that engage a signalling cascade involving the p38MAPK and leading to p16 upregulation and cell cycle arrest. Importantly, the default in SSB repair also leads to the emergence of post-senescent transformed and mutated precancerous cells. In human-aged skin, XRCC1 foci accumulate in the epidermal cells in correlation with a decline of PARP1, whereas DDR foci accumulate mainly in dermal fibroblasts. These findings point SSBs as a DNA damage encountered by epithelial cells with aging which could fuel the very first steps of carcinogenesis. PMID:26822533

  12. Faster DNA Repair of Ultraviolet-Induced Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers and Lower Sensitivity to Apoptosis in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells than in Epidermal Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Justin D.; Bastien, Nathalie; Gendron, Sébastien P.; Rochette, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Absorption of UV rays by DNA generates the formation of mutagenic cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and pyrimidine (6–4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PP). These damages are the major cause of skin cancer because in turn, they can lead to signature UV mutations. The eye is exposed to UV light, but the cornea is orders of magnitude less prone to UV-induced cancer. In an attempt to shed light on this paradox, we compared cells of the corneal epithelium and the epidermis for UVB-induced DNA damage frequency, repair and cell death sensitivity. We found similar CPD levels but a 4-time faster UVB-induced CPD, but not 6-4PP, repair and lower UV-induced apoptosis sensitivity in corneal epithelial cells than epidermal. We then investigated levels of DDB2, a UV-induced DNA damage recognition protein mostly impacting CPD repair, XPC, essential for the repair of both CPD and 6-4PP and p53 a protein upstream of the genotoxic stress response. We found more DDB2, XPC and p53 in corneal epithelial cells than in epidermal cells. According to our results analyzing the protein stability of DDB2 and XPC, the higher level of DDB2 and XPC in corneal epithelial cells is most likely due to an increased stability of the protein. Taken together, our results show that corneal epithelial cells have a better efficiency to repair UV-induced mutagenic CPD. On the other hand, they are less prone to UV-induced apoptosis, which could be related to the fact that since the repair is more efficient in the HCEC, the need to eliminate highly damaged cells by apoptosis is reduced. PMID:27611318

  13. Drosophila Imaginal Discs as a Model of Epithelial Wound Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Bolton, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The Drosophila larval imaginal discs, which form the adult fly during metamorphosis, are an established model system for the study of epithelial tissue damage. The disc proper is a simple columnar epithelium, but it contains complex patterning and cell-fate specification, and is genetically tractable. These features enable unbiased genetic screens to identify genes involved in all aspects of the wound response, from sensing damage to wound closure, initiation of regeneration, and re-establishment of proper cell fates. Identification of the genes that facilitate epithelial wound closure and regeneration will enable development of more sophisticated wound treatments for clinical use. Recent Advances: Imaginal disc epithelia can be damaged in many different ways, including fragmentation, induction of cell death, and irradiation. Recent work has demonstrated that the tissue's response to damage varies depending on how the wound was induced. Here, we summarize the different responses activated in these epithelial tissues after the different types of damage. Critical Issues: These studies highlight that not all wounds elicit the same response from the surrounding tissue. A complete understanding of the various wound-healing mechanisms in Drosophila will be a first step in understanding how to manage damaged human tissues and optimize healing in different clinical contexts. Future Directions: Further work is necessary to understand the similarities and differences among an epithelial tissue's responses to different insults. Ongoing studies will identify the genes and pathways employed by injured imaginal discs. Thus, work in this genetically tractable system complements work in more conventional wound-healing models. PMID:27274435

  14. Nucleotide excision repair is reduced in oral epithelial tissues compared with skin.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David; Paniker, Lakshmi; Godar, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure to internal tissues for diagnostic, therapeutic and cosmetic procedures has increased dramatically over the past decade. The greatest increase in UVR exposure of internal tissues occurs in the cosmetic industry where it is combined with oxidizing agents for teeth whitening, often in conjunction with indoor tanning. To address potential carcinogenic risks of these procedures, we analyzed the formation and repair of the DNA photoproducts associated with the signature mutations of UVR. Radioimmunoassay was used to quantify the induction and repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproducts in DNA purified from three reconstructed tissues, EpiDerm(TM) , EpiGingival(TM) and EpiOral(TM) . We observed comparable levels of DNA damage in all tissues immediately after UVR exposure. In contrast, repair was significantly reduced in both oral tissues compared with EpiDerm(TM) . Our data suggest that UVR exposure of oral tissues can result in accumulation of DNA damage and increase the risk for carcinoma and melanoma of the mouth. Because NER is a broad-spectrum defense against DNA damage caused by a variety of agents in addition to UVR, our data suggest that the relatively low NER efficiency observed in oral tissues may have wide-ranging consequences in this highly exposed environment.

  15. Neutrophil transmigration triggers repair of the lung epithelium via beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Zemans, Rachel L; Briones, Natalie; Campbell, Megan; McClendon, Jazalle; Young, Scott K; Suzuki, Tomoko; Yang, Ivana V; De Langhe, Stijn; Reynolds, Susan D; Mason, Robert J; Kahn, Michael; Henson, Peter M; Colgan, Sean P; Downey, Gregory P

    2011-09-20

    Injury to the epithelium is integral to the pathogenesis of many inflammatory lung diseases, and epithelial repair is a critical determinant of clinical outcome. However, the signaling pathways regulating such repair are incompletely understood. We used in vitro and in vivo models to define these pathways. Human neutrophils were induced to transmigrate across monolayers of human lung epithelial cells in the physiological basolateral-to-apical direction. This allowed study of the neutrophil contribution not only to the initial epithelial injury, but also to its repair, as manifested by restoration of transepithelial resistance and reepithelialization of the denuded epithelium. Microarray analysis of epithelial gene expression revealed that neutrophil transmigration activated β-catenin signaling, and this was verified by real-time PCR, nuclear translocation of β-catenin, and TOPFlash reporter activity. Leukocyte elastase, likely via cleavage of E-cadherin, was required for activation of β-catenin signaling in response to neutrophil transmigration. Knockdown of β-catenin using shRNA delayed epithelial repair. In mice treated with intratracheal LPS or keratinocyte chemokine, neutrophil emigration resulted in activation of β-catenin signaling in alveolar type II epithelial cells, as demonstrated by cyclin D1 expression and/or reporter activity in TOPGAL mice. Attenuation of β-catenin signaling by IQ-1 inhibited alveolar type II epithelial cell proliferation in response to neutrophil migration induced by intratracheal keratinocyte chemokine. We conclude that β-catenin signaling is activated in lung epithelial cells during neutrophil transmigration, likely via elastase-mediated cleavage of E-cadherin, and regulates epithelial repair. This pathway represents a potential therapeutic target to accelerate physiological recovery in inflammatory lung diseases.

  16. Bax-induced apoptosis shortens the life span of DNA repair defect Ku70-knockout mice by inducing emphysema.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Shigemi; Palmer, James; Bates, Adam; Poventud-Fuentes, Izmarie; Wong, Kelvin; Ngo, Justine; Matsuyama, Mieko

    2016-06-01

    Cells with DNA damage undergo apoptosis or cellular senescence if the damage cannot be repaired. Recent studies highlight that cellular senescence plays a major role in aging. However, age-associated diseases, including emphysema and neurodegenerative disorders, are caused by apoptosis of lung alveolar epithelial cells and neurons, respectively. Therefore, enhanced apoptosis also promotes aging and shortens the life span depending on the cell type. Recently, we reported that ku70(-) (/) (-)bax(-) (/) (-) and ku70(-) (/) (-)bax(+/) (-) mice showed significantly extended life span in comparison with ku70(-) (/) (-)bax(+/+) mice. Ku70 is essential for non-homologous end joining pathway for DNA double strand break repair, and Bax plays an important role in apoptosis. Our study suggests that Bax-induced apoptosis has a significant impact on shortening the life span of ku70(-) (/) (-) mice, which are defective in one of DNA repair pathways. The lung alveolar space gradually enlarges during aging, both in mouse and human, and this age-dependent change results in the decrease of respiration capacity during aging that can lead to emphysema in more severe cases. We found that emphysema occurred in ku70(-) (/) (-) mice at the age of three-months old, and that Bax deficiency was able to suppress it. These results suggest that Bax-mediated apoptosis induces emphysema in ku70(-) (/) (-) mice. We also found that the number of cells, including bronchiolar epithelial cells and type 2 alveolar epithelial cells, shows a higher DNA double strand break damage response in ku70 KO mouse lung than in wild type. Recent studies suggest that non-homologous end joining activity decreases with increased age in mouse and rat model. Together, we hypothesize that the decline of Ku70-dependent DNA repair activity in lung alveolar epithelial cells is one of the causes of age-dependent decline of lung function resulting from excess Bax-mediated apoptosis of lung alveolar epithelial cells (and their

  17. Reduction of DNA mismatch repair protein expression in airway epithelial cells of premenopausal women chronically exposed to biomass smoke.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bidisha; Dutta, Anindita; Chowdhury, Saswati; Roychoudhury, Sanghita; Ray, Manas Ranjan

    2014-02-01

    Biomass burning is a major source of indoor air pollution in rural India. This study examined whether chronic inhalation of biomass smoke causes change in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway in the airway cells. For this, airway cells exfoliated in sputum were collected from 72 premenopausal nonsmoking rural women (median age 34 years) who cooked with biomass (wood, dung, crop residues) and 68 control women who cooked with cleaner fuel liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) for the past 5 years or more. The levels of particulate matters with diameters less than 10 and 2.5 μm (PM10 and PM2.5) in indoor air were measured by real-time aerosol monitor. Benzene exposure was monitored by measuring trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) in urine by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detector. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in airway cells were measured by flow cytometry and spectrophotometry, respectively. Immunocytochemical assay revealed lower percentage of airway epithelial cells expressing MMR proteins mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and mutS homolog 2 (MSH2) in biomass-using women compared to LPG-using controls. Women who cooked with biomass had 6.7 times higher level of urinary t,t-MA, twofold increase in ROS generation, and 31 % depletion of SOD. Indoor air of biomass-using households had three times more particulate matters than that of controls. ROS, urinary t,t-MA, and particulate pollution in biomass-using kitchen had negative correlation, while SOD showed positive correlation with MSH2 and MLH1 expression. It appears that chronic exposure to biomass smoke reduces MMR response in airway epithelial cells, and oxidative stress plays an important role in the process.

  18. Function and repair of dental enamel - Potential role of epithelial transport processes of ameloblasts.

    PubMed

    Varga, Gábor; Kerémi, Beáta; Bori, Erzsébet; Földes, Anna

    2015-07-01

    The hardest mammalian tissue, dental enamel is produced by ameloblasts, which are electrolyte-transporting epithelial cells. Although the end product is very different, they show many similarities to transporting epithelia of the pancreas, salivary glands and kidney. Enamel is produced in a multi-step epithelial secretory process that features biomineralization which is an interplay of secreted ameloblast specific proteins and the time-specific transport of minerals, protons and bicarbonate. First, "secretory" ameloblasts form the entire thickness of the enamel layer, but with low mineral content. Then they differentiate into "maturation" ameloblasts, which remove organic matrix from the enamel and in turn further build up hydroxyapatite crystals. The protons generated by hydroxyapatite formation need to be buffered, otherwise enamel will not attain full mineralization. Buffering requires a tight pH regulation and secretion of bicarbonate by ameloblasts. The whole process has been the focus of many immunohistochemical and gene knock-out studies, but, perhaps surprisingly, no functional data existed for mineral ion transport by ameloblasts. However, recent studies including ours provided a better insight for molecular mechanism of mineral formation. The secretory regulation is not completely known as yet, but its significance is crucial. Impairing regulation retards or prevents completion of enamel mineralization and results in the development of hypomineralized enamel that easily erodes after dental eruption. Factors that impair this function are fluoride and disruption of pH regulators. Revealing these factors may eventually lead to the treatment of enamel hypomineralization related to genetic or environmentally induced malformation. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Alveolar hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Parrot, A; Fartoukh, M; Cadranel, J

    2015-04-01

    Alveolar hemorrhage occurs relatively rarely and is a therapeutic emergency because it can quickly lead to acute respiratory failure, which can be fatal. Hemoptysis associated with anemia and pulmonary infiltrates suggest the diagnosis of alveolar hemorrhage, but may be absent in one third of cases including patients in respiratory distress. The diagnosis of alveolar hemorrhage is based on the findings of a bronchoalveolar lavage. The causes are numerous. It is important to identify alveolar hemorrhage due to sepsis, then separate an autoimmune cause (vasculitis associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, connective tissue disease and Goodpasture's syndrome) with the search for autoantibodies and biopsies from readily accessible organs, from a non-immune cause, performing echocardiography. Lung biopsy should be necessary only in exceptional cases. If the hemorrhage has an immune cause, treatment with steroids and cyclophosphamide may be started. The indications for treatment with rituximab are beginning to be established (forms that are not severe and refractory forms). The benefit of plasma exchange is unquestionable in Goodpasture's syndrome. In patients with an immune disease that can lead to an alveolar hemorrhage, removing any source of infection is the first priority.

  20. Retinal pigment epithelial cell multinucleation in the aging eye - a mechanism to repair damage and maintain homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Rajapakse, Dinusha; Fraczek, Monika; Luo, Chang; Forrester, John V; Xu, Heping

    2016-06-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are central to retinal health and homoeostasis. Dysfunction or death of RPE cells underlies many age-related retinal degenerative disorders particularly age-related macular degeneration. During aging RPE cells decline in number, suggesting an age-dependent cell loss. RPE cells are considered to be postmitotic, and how they repair damage during aging remains poorly defined. We show that RPE cells increase in size and become multinucleate during aging in C57BL/6J mice. Multinucleation appeared not to be due to cell fusion, but to incomplete cell division, that is failure of cytokinesis. Interestingly, the phagocytic activity of multinucleate RPE cells was not different from that of mononuclear RPE cells. Furthermore, exposure of RPE cells in vitro to photoreceptor outer segment (POS), particularly oxidized POS, dose-dependently promoted multinucleation and suppressed cell proliferation. Both failure of cytokinesis and suppression of proliferation required contact with POS. Exposure to POS also induced reactive oxygen species and DNA oxidation in RPE cells. We propose that RPE cells have the potential to proliferate in vivo and to repair defects in the monolayer. We further propose that the conventionally accepted 'postmitotic' status of RPE cells is due to a modified form of contact inhibition mediated by POS and that RPE cells are released from this state when contact with POS is lost. This is seen in long-standing rhegmatogenous retinal detachment as overtly proliferating RPE cells (proliferative vitreoretinopathy) and more subtly as multinucleation during normal aging. Age-related oxidative stress may promote failure of cytokinesis and multinucleation in RPE cells. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Macrophage recruitment and epithelial repair following hair cell injury in the mouse utricle.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Tejbeer; Hirose, Keiko; Rubel, Edwin W; Warchol, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    The sensory organs of the inner ear possess resident populations of macrophages, but the function of those cells is poorly understood. In many tissues, macrophages participate in the removal of cellular debris after injury and can also promote tissue repair. The present study examined injury-evoked macrophage activity in the mouse utricle. Experiments used transgenic mice in which the gene for the human diphtheria toxin receptor (huDTR) was inserted under regulation of the Pou4f3 promoter. Hair cells in such mice can be selectively lesioned by systemic treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT). In order to visualize macrophages, Pou4f3-huDTR mice were crossed with a second transgenic line, in which one or both copies of the gene for the fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 were replaced with a gene for GFP. Such mice expressed GFP in all macrophages, and mice that were CX3CR1(GFP/GFP) lacked the necessary receptor for fractalkine signaling. Treatment with DT resulted in the death of ∼70% of utricular hair cells within 7 days, which was accompanied by increased numbers of macrophages within the utricular sensory epithelium. Many of these macrophages appeared to be actively engulfing hair cell debris, indicating that macrophages participate in the process of 'corpse removal' in the mammalian vestibular organs. However, we observed no apparent differences in injury-evoked macrophage numbers in the utricles of CX3CR1(+/GFP) mice vs. CX3CR1(GFP/GFP) mice, suggesting that fractalkine signaling is not necessary for macrophage recruitment in these sensory organs. Finally, we found that repair of sensory epithelia at short times after DT-induced hair cell lesions was mediated by relatively thin cables of F-actin. After 56 days recovery, however, all cell-cell junctions were characterized by very thick actin cables.

  2. Pulmonary administration of phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor is a curative treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by alveolar regeneration.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Michiko; Oiso, Yuki; Sakai, Hitomi; Motomura, Tomoki; Yamashita, Chikamasa

    2015-09-10

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an intractable pulmonary disease, causing widespread and irreversible alveoli collapse. The discovery of a low-molecular-weight compound that induces regeneration of pulmonary alveoli is of utmost urgency to cure intractable pulmonary diseases such as COPD. However, a practically useful compound for regenerating pulmonary alveoli is yet to be reported. Previously, we have elucidated that Akt phosphorylation is involved in a differentiation-inducing molecular mechanism of human alveolar epithelial stem cells, which play a role in regenerating pulmonary alveoli. In the present study, we directed our attention to phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling and examined whether PI3K inhibitors display the pulmonary alveolus regeneration. Three PI3K inhibitors with different PI3K subtype specificities (Wortmannin, AS605240, PIK-75 hydrochloride) were tested for the differentiation-inducing effect on human alveolar epithelial stem cells, and Wortmannin demonstrated the most potent differentiation-inducing activity. We evaluated Akt phosphorylation in pulmonary tissues of an elastase-induced murine COPD model and found that Akt phosphorylation in the pulmonary tissue was enhanced in the murine COPD model compared with normal mice. Then, the alveolus-repairing effect of pulmonary administration of Wortmannin to murine COPD model was evaluated using X-ray CT analysis and hematoxylin-eosin staining. As a result, alveolar damages were repaired in the Wortmannin-administered group to a similar level of normal mice. Furthermore, pulmonary administration of Wortmannin induced a significant recovery of the respiratory function, compared to the control group. These results indicate that Wortmannin is capable of inducing differentiation of human alveolar epithelial stem cells and represents a promising drug candidate for curative treatment of pulmonary alveolar destruction in COPD.

  3. Comparative studies of induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks in X-irradiated alveolar macrophages and resting peripheral blood lymphocytes using constant-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Chukhlovin, A; Dahm-Daphi, J; Gercken, G; Zander, A R; Dikomey, E

    1995-08-01

    Induction and repair of X-ray-induced DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) was compared for normal broncho-alveolar macrophages and human peripheral blood lymphocytes, using CHO cells as a reference cell model. The cells, upon their separation, were processed in a similar manner. After X-irradiation, cell lysis and proteinase K treatment, the DNA samples were subjected to constant-field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) followed by fluorimetric densitometry for quantification of released DNA. Induction of dsbs after X-ray doses of 5-100 Gy was found to show no gross differences for all cell systems used. Repair of dsbs was studied after X-ray dose of 60 Gy for up to 24 h after irradiation. The repair curves obtained proved to be similar for bronchoalveolar macrophages and CHO cells (97% of all dsbs rejoined after 24 h). However, in blood lymphocytes from normal subjects and from bone marrow recipients, dsb repair proceeded rapidly only for 0.5-1 h post-irradiation, being followed by the gradual degradation of DNA at longer intervals. The kinetics of DNA degradation correlated with cytological features of pyknosis and necrosis.

  4. Functions of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha and beta in skin homeostasis, epithelial repair, and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Icre, Guillaume; Wahli, Walter; Michalik, Liliane

    2006-09-01

    The three peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR alpha, PPAR beta, and PPAR gamma) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. They are regarded as being sensors of physiological levels of fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives. In the adult mouse skin, they are found in hair follicle keratinocytes but not in interfollicular epidermis keratinocytes. Skin injury stimulates the expression of PPAR alpha and PPAR beta at the site of the wound. Here, we review the spatiotemporal program that triggers PPAR beta expression immediately after an injury, and then gradually represses it during epithelial repair. The opposing effects of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha and transforming growth factor-beta-1 signalling pathways on the activity of the PPAR beta promoter are the key elements of this regulation. We then compare the involvement of PPAR beta in the skin in response to an injury and during hair morphogenesis, and underscore the similarity of its action on cell survival in both situations.

  5. The increase of microRNA-21 during lung fibrosis and its contribution to epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pulmonary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The excess and persistent accumulation of fibroblasts due to aberrant tissue repair results in fibrotic diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Recent reports have revealed significant changes in microRNAs during idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and evidence in support of a role for microRNAs in myofibroblast differentiation and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the context of fibrosis. It has been reported that microRNA-21 is up-regulated in myofibroblasts during fibrosis and promotes transforming growth factor-beta signaling by inhibiting Smad7. However, expression changes in microRNA-21 and the role of microRNA-21 in epithelial-mesenchymal transition during lung fibrosis have not yet been defined. Methods Lungs from saline- or bleomycin-treated C57BL/6 J mice and lung specimens from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis were analyzed. Enzymatic digestions were performed to isolate single lung cells. Lung epithelial cells were isolated by flow cytometric cell sorting. The expression of microRNA-21 was analyzed using both quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization. To induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition in culture, isolated mouse lung alveolar type II cells were cultured on fibronectin-coated chamber slides in the presence of transforming growth factor-β, thus generating conditions that enhance epithelial-mesenchymal transition. To investigate the role of microRNA-21 in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, we transfected cells with a microRNA-21 inhibitor. Total RNA was isolated from the freshly isolated and cultured cells. MicroRNA-21, as well as mRNAs of genes that are markers of alveolar epithelial or mesenchymal cell differentiation, were quantified using quantitative PCR. Results The lung epithelial cells isolated from the bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis model system had decreased expression of epithelial marker genes, whereas the expression of mesenchymal marker genes was increased. MicroRNA-21 was significantly upregulated

  6. Role of epithelial cells in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: from innocent targets to serial killers.

    PubMed

    Selman, Moisés; Pardo, Annie

    2006-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a progressive and relentless lung scarring of unknown etiology, has been recognized as the most lethal interstitial lung disease. Despite the growing interest in IPF, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the development of fibrosis and leading to the irreversible destruction of the lung are still unknown. Recently, it has been proposed that IPF, instead of being a chronic inflammatory disorder, results from multiple cycles of epithelial cell injury and activation. In turn, active alveolar epithelial cells provoke the migration, proliferation, and activation of mesenchymal cells with the formation of fibroblastic/myofibroblastic foci and the exaggerated accumulation of extracellular matrix, mirroring abnormal wound repair. In this article, some characteristics of the alveolar epithelium are briefly outlined, and the fibrogenic mechanisms specifically operated by active abnormal epithelial cells are examined.

  7. The role of C/EBPβ phosphorylation in modulating membrane phospholipids repairing in LPS-induced human lung/bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shu, Shiyu; Xu, Yan; Xie, Ling; Ouyang, Yufang

    2017-09-20

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a common critical emergency with high mortality in clinical practice. The key mechanism of ALI/ARDS is that the excessive inflammatory response damages the integrity of alveolar and bronchial cell membrane and thus affects their basic function. Phospholipids are the main component of cell membranes. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2), which catalyzes the cleavage of membrane phospholipids, is the most important inflammatory mediator of ALI. However, clara cell secretory protein 1 (CCSP1), a