Science.gov

Sample records for alveolar macrophages isolated

  1. Assessing Anti-fungal Activity of Isolated Alveolar Macrophages by Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Melissa J.; D'Auria, Anthony C.; Segal, Brahm H.

    2014-01-01

    The lung is an interface where host cells are routinely exposed to microbes and microbial products. Alveolar macrophages are the first-line phagocytic cells that encounter inhaled fungi and other microbes. Macrophages and other immune cells recognize Aspergillus motifs by pathogen recognition receptors and initiate downstream inflammatory responses. The phagocyte NADPH oxidase generates reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) and is critical for host defense. Although NADPH oxidase is critical for neutrophil-mediated host defense1-3, the importance of NADPH oxidase in macrophages is not well defined. The goal of this study was to delineate the specific role of NADPH oxidase in macrophages in mediating host defense against A. fumigatus. We found that NADPH oxidase in alveolar macrophages controls the growth of phagocytosed A. fumigatus spores4. Here, we describe a method for assessing the ability of mouse alveolar macrophages (AMs) to control the growth of phagocytosed Aspergillus spores (conidia). Alveolar macrophages are stained in vivo and ten days later isolated from mice by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Macrophages are plated onto glass coverslips, then seeded with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing A. fumigatus spores. At specified times, cells are fixed and the number of intact macrophages with phagocytosed spores is assessed by confocal microscopy. PMID:25045941

  2. Toxicity of lunar and martian dust simulants to alveolar macrophages isolated from human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Latch, Judith N; Hamilton, Raymond F; Holian, Andrij; James, John T; Lam, Chiu-wing

    2008-01-01

    NASA is planning to build a habitat on the Moon and use the Moon as a stepping stone to Mars. JSC-1, an Arizona volcanic ash that has mineral properties similar to those of lunar soil, is used to produce lunar environments for instrument and equipment testing. NASA is concerned about potential health risks to workers exposed to these fine dusts in test facilities. The potential toxicity of JSC-1 lunar soil simulant and a Martian soil simulant (JSC-Mars-1, a Hawaiian volcanic ash) was evaluated using human alveolar macrophages (HAM) isolated from volunteers; titanium dioxide and quartz were used as reference dusts. This investigation is a prerequisite to studies of actual lunar dust. HAM were treated in vitro with these test dusts for 24 h; assays of cell viability and apoptosis showed that JSC-1 and TiO2 were comparable, and more toxic than saline control but less toxic than quartz. HAM treated with JSC-1 or JSC-Mars 1 showed a dose-dependent increase in cytotoxicity. To elucidate the mechanism by which these dusts induce apoptosis, we investigated the involvement of scavenger receptors (SR). Pretreatment of cells with polyinosinic acid, an SR blocker, significantly inhibited both apoptosis and necrosis. These results suggest HAM cytotoxicity may be initiated by interaction of the dust particles with SR. Besides being cytotoxic, silica is known to induce shifting of HAM phenotypes to an immune active status. The immunomodulatory effect of the dust simulants was investigated. Treatment of HAM with either simulant caused preferential damage to the suppressor macrophage subpopulation, leading to a net increase in the ratio of activator (RFD1+) to suppressor (RFD1+7+) macrophages, an effect similar to that of treatment with silica. It is recommended that appropriate precautions be used to minimize exposure to these fine dusts in large-scale engineering applications.

  3. Toxicity of Lunar and Martian Dust Simulants to Alveolar Macrophages Isolated from Human Volunteers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latch, Judith N.; Hamilton, Raymond F., Jr.; Holian, Andrij; James, John T.

    2007-01-01

    NASA is planning to build a habitat on the Moon and use the Moon as a stepping stone to Mars. JSC-1, an Arizona volcanic ash that has mineral properties similar to lunar soil, is used to produce lunar environments for instrument and equipment testing. NASA is concerned about potential health risks to workers exposed to these fine dusts in test facilities. The potential toxicity of JSC-1 and a Martian soil simulant (JSC-Mars-1, a Hawaiian volcanic ash) was evaluated using human alveolar macrophages (HAM) isolated from volunteers; titanium dioxide and quartz were used as reference dusts. This investigation is a prerequisite to studies of actual lunar dust. HAM were treated in vitro with these test dusts for 24 h; assays of cell viability and apoptosis showed that JSC-1 and TiO2 were comparable, and more toxic than saline control, but less toxic than quartz. HAM treated with JSC-1 or JSC-Mars 1 showed a dose-dependent increase in cytotoxicity. To elucidate the mechanism by which these dusts induce apoptosis, we investigated the involvement of the scavenger receptor (SR). Pretreatment of cells with polyinosinic acid, an SR blocker, significantly inhibited both apoptosis and necrosis. These results suggest HAM cytotoxicity may be initiated by interaction of the dust particles with SR. Besides being cytotoxic, silica is known to induce shifting of HAM phenotypes to an immune active status. The immunomodulatory effect of the simulants was investigated. Treatment of HAM with either simulant caused preferential damage to the suppressor macrophage subpopulation, leading to a net increase in the ratio of activator (RFD1+) to suppressor (RFD1+7+) macrophages, a result similar to treatment with silica. It is recommended that appropriate precautions be used to minimize exposure to these fine dusts in large-scale engineering applications.

  4. Down modulation of IFN-{gamma} signaling in alveolar macrophages isolated from smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Dhillon, Navneet K.; Murphy, William J.; Filla, Michael B.; Crespo, Ana J.; Latham, Heath A.; O'Brien-Ladner, Amy

    2009-05-15

    The master cytokine, IFN-{gamma} possesses a wide spectrum of biological effects and is crucial for development of the highly activated macrophage phenotype characteristically found during inflammation. However, no data exists regarding the potential influence of cigarette smoke on the status of the expression of the cell surface receptor for IFN-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}R) on alveolar macrophages (AM) of smokers. Here in, we report reduction in the expression of the IFN-{gamma}R {alpha}-chain on AM of cigarette smokers, when compared with non-smokers. Ensuing from the loss of receptor expression on the AM of smokers there was a decrease in IFN-{gamma}-mediated cell signaling. This included a decrease in the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1 and induction of interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-1. Further, diminished activation/induction of transcription factors did not appear to result from induction of known members of the 'suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS)' family. Decreased IFN-{gamma} signal transduction in AM from smokers may have an important implication regarding the use of therapeutic IFN-{gamma} in the lungs of patients that develop respiratory disorders as a result of tobacco use.

  5. The relationship of detergent-solubilization plasma-membrane components of rabbit alveolar macrophages to an isolated inhibitor of phagocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, R S; Cook, G M

    1979-01-01

    1. A plasma-membrane fraction prepared from rabbit alveolar macrophages by hyposmotic borate lysis is described. 2. Rabbit lung lavages, containing a glycoprotein inhibitor of phagocytosis, may be fractionated by preparative isoelectric focusing in the presence of Triton X-100. 3. Chemical analysis indicates that the glycoproteins of the lung lavage contain sialic acid, fucose, mannose, galactose, hexosamine and appreciable quantities of glucose. 4. The relationship of macrophage membrane glycoproteins, solubilized with Triton X-100 in the presence of borate, to the lung lavage glycoproteins is demonstrated immunoelectrophoretically. Images PLATE 1 Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:486083

  6. Mycoplasma bovis isolates recovered from cattle and bison (Bison bison) show differential in vitro effects on PBMC proliferation, alveolar macrophage apoptosis and invasion of epithelial and immune cells.

    PubMed

    Suleman, Muhammad; Prysliak, Tracy; Clarke, Kyle; Burrage, Pat; Windeyer, Claire; Perez-Casal, Jose

    2016-04-15

    In the last few years, several outbreaks of pneumonia, systemically disseminated infection, and high mortality associated with Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) in North American bison (Bison bison) have been reported in Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Nebraska, New Mexico, Montana, North Dakota, and Kansas. M. bovis causes Chronic Pneumonia and Polyarthritis Syndrome (CPPS) in young, stressed calves in intensively-managed feedlots. M. bovis is not classified as a primary pathogen in cattle, but in bison it appears to be a primary causative agent with rapid progression of disease with fatal outcomes and an average 20% mature herd mortality. Thus, there is a possibility that M. bovis isolates from cattle and bison differ in their pathogenicity. Hence, we decided to compare selected cattle isolates to several bison isolates obtained from clinical cases. We show differences in modulation of PBMC proliferation, invasion of trachea and lung epithelial cells, along with modulation of apoptosis and survival in alveolar macrophages. We concluded that some bison isolates showed less inhibition of cattle and bison PBMC proliferation, were not able to suppress alveolar macrophage apoptosis as efficiently as cattle isolates, and were more or less invasive than the cattle isolate in various cells. These findings provide evidence about the differential properties of M. bovis isolated from the two species and has helped in the selection of bison isolates for genomic sequencing. PMID:27016754

  7. Mycoplasma bovis isolates recovered from cattle and bison (Bison bison) show differential in vitro effects on PBMC proliferation, alveolar macrophage apoptosis and invasion of epithelial and immune cells.

    PubMed

    Suleman, Muhammad; Prysliak, Tracy; Clarke, Kyle; Burrage, Pat; Windeyer, Claire; Perez-Casal, Jose

    2016-04-15

    In the last few years, several outbreaks of pneumonia, systemically disseminated infection, and high mortality associated with Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) in North American bison (Bison bison) have been reported in Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Nebraska, New Mexico, Montana, North Dakota, and Kansas. M. bovis causes Chronic Pneumonia and Polyarthritis Syndrome (CPPS) in young, stressed calves in intensively-managed feedlots. M. bovis is not classified as a primary pathogen in cattle, but in bison it appears to be a primary causative agent with rapid progression of disease with fatal outcomes and an average 20% mature herd mortality. Thus, there is a possibility that M. bovis isolates from cattle and bison differ in their pathogenicity. Hence, we decided to compare selected cattle isolates to several bison isolates obtained from clinical cases. We show differences in modulation of PBMC proliferation, invasion of trachea and lung epithelial cells, along with modulation of apoptosis and survival in alveolar macrophages. We concluded that some bison isolates showed less inhibition of cattle and bison PBMC proliferation, were not able to suppress alveolar macrophage apoptosis as efficiently as cattle isolates, and were more or less invasive than the cattle isolate in various cells. These findings provide evidence about the differential properties of M. bovis isolated from the two species and has helped in the selection of bison isolates for genomic sequencing.

  8. Effect of alveolar macrophages on Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Ryning, F W; Remington, J S

    1977-01-01

    As pulmonary involvement can occur in disseminated toxoplasmosis in immunosuppressed patients, studies were initiated to define local mechanisms of resistance of the lung to Toxoplasma gondii. Alveolar macrophages were obtained from normal mice and mice chronically infected with T. gondii by bronchopulmonary lavage and cultured in vitro. Although normal alveolar macrophages were difficult to infect with Toxoplasma, they supported intracellular multiplication of this organism. When exposed to Toxoplasma that had been pretreated with heat-inactivated serum containing specific antibody, the number of intracellular organisms increased remarkably, and the macrophages destroyed the coated parasites. After development of chronic infections with Toxoplasma, there was a transient period during which a striking increase in numbers of alveolar macrophages was observed in lavage specimens. These macrophages differed from those of normal alveolar macrophages. There was a greater percentage of large cells, a greater tendency to spread on glass, and an increased number of intracellular Toxoplasma, and the cells were activated to kill or inhibit multiplication of the parasite. During the period when activated macrophages were demonstrable in bronchopulmonary washings, histological changes in the lungs revealed a marked mononuclear cell infiltrate. These studies support a role for the activated alveolar macrophage as an effector in resistance of the lung to infection with Toxoplasma. PMID:591065

  9. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  10. Depletion of alveolar macrophages prolongs survival in response to acute pneumovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Rigaux, Peter; Killoran, Kristin E.; Qiu, Zhijun; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages are immunoregulatory effector cells that interact directly with respiratory virus pathogens in vivo. We examined the role of alveolar macrophages in acute infection with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a rodent pneumovirus that replicates the clinical sequelae of severe human respiratory syncytial virus disease. We show that PVM replicates in primary mouse macrophage culture, releasing infectious virions and proinflammatory cytokines. Alveolar macrophages isolated from PVM-infected mice express activation markers Clec43 and CD86, cytokines TNFα, IL-1, IL-6, and numerous CC and CXC chemokines. Alveolar macrophage depletion prior to PVM infection results in small but statistically significant increases in virus recovery but paradoxically prolonged survival. In parallel, macrophage depleted PVM-infected mice exhibit enhanced NK cell recruitment and increased production of IFNγ by NK, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results suggest a protective, immunomodulatory role for IFNγ, as overproduction secondary to macrophage depletion may promote survival despite increased virus recovery. PMID:22129848

  11. Glucocorticoid receptors, in human alveolar macrophages and peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, T; Yasuoka, S; Nakayama, T; Tsubura, E

    1982-01-01

    The numbers of glucocorticoid receptors in human alveolar macrophages and peripheral blood cells were measured with 3H-prednisolone. Alveolar macrophages, which constituted 89.0 +/- 5.9% of broncho-alveolar cells, obtained by broncho-alveolar lavage from normal volunteers had much larger numbers of specific glucocorticoid receptors than peripheral blood cells. The numbers of glucocorticoid receptors in peripheral polymorphonuclear leucocytes, lymphocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations (B cells, T cells, TG cells and TnonG cells) were nearly equal. In patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, in whom alveolar macrophages amounted to over 85% of the broncho-alveolar cells, the number of glucocorticoid receptors in alveolar macrophages was significantly decreased, but the numbers in their peripheral blood cells were normal. This finding suggests that the number of glucocorticoid receptors in alveolar macrophages may change specifically during disorders of the lung. PMID:7075033

  12. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-11-15

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-..gamma.., tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin l..cap alpha.. or 1..beta... The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes.

  13. Impairment of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Bree, L.; van Iwaarden, J.F.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J. )

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibited phagocytosis and superoxide anion production by rat alveolar macrophages. The inhibition was irreversible and concentration and exposure time dependent. The potential relationship between H2O2-induced biochemical perturbations and impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytic functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophage viability and Fc receptor binding capacity were not affected by H2O2. There was probably no correlation between a H2O2-induced rise in cytosolic (Ca2+) ((Ca2+)i) and the impairment of phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, as was suggested by the following findings. First, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i could be inhibited by chelation of extracellular Ca2+, whereas the H2O2-induced impairment of phagocytosis could not. Second, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was reversible, whereas the impairment of phagocytosis was not. And finally, a rise in (Ca2+)i by incubation of alveolar macrophages with the calcium ionophore A23187 did not affect phagocytosis. Various experiments suggested that ATP depletion may play an important role in the H2O2 toxicity for alveolar macrophages. Comparable concentrations of H2O2 caused an irreversible decrease both in cellular ATP and in phagocytosis and superoxide production by alveolar macrophages. In addition, time course of ATP depletion and induction of impaired alveolar macrophage function were similar. In view of the fact that the strong oxidant H2O2 may react with a large variety of biological substances, possible other toxic lesions may not be excluded as underlying mechanism for H2O2-induced inhibition of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages.

  14. Virulent Coxiella burnetii pathotypes productively infect primary human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Graham, Joseph G; MacDonald, Laura J; Hussain, S Kauser; Sharma, Uma M; Kurten, Richard C; Voth, Daniel E

    2013-06-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Coxiella burnetii is a category B select agent that causes human Q fever. In vivo, C. burnetii targets alveolar macrophages wherein the pathogen replicates in a lysosome-like parasitophorous vacuole (PV). In vitro, C. burnetii infects a variety of cultured cell lines that have collectively been used to model the pathogen's infectious cycle. However, differences in the cellular response to infection have been observed, and virulent C. burnetii isolate infection of host cells has not been well defined. Because alveolar macrophages are routinely implicated in disease, we established primary human alveolar macrophages (hAMs) as an in vitro model of C. burnetii-host cell interactions. C. burnetii pathotypes, including acute disease and endocarditis isolates, replicated in hAMs, albeit with unique PV properties. Each isolate replicated in large, typical PV and small, non-fused vacuoles, and lipid droplets were present in avirulent C. burnetii PV. Interestingly, a subset of small vacuoles harboured single organisms undergoing degradation. Prototypical PV formation and bacterial growth in hAMs required a functional type IV secretion system, indicating C. burnetii secretes effector proteins that control macrophage functions. Avirulent C. burnetii promoted sustained activation of Akt and Erk1/2 pro-survival kinases and short-termphosphorylation of stress-related p38. Avirulent organisms also triggered a robust, early pro-inflammatory response characterized by increased secretion of TNF-α and IL-6, while virulent isolates elicited substantially reduced secretion of these cytokines. A corresponding increase in pro- and mature IL-1β occurred in hAMs infected with avirulent C. burnetii, while little accumulation was observed following infection with virulent isolates. Finally, treatment of hAMs with IFN-γ controlled intracellular replication, supporting a role for this antibacterial insult in the host response to C

  15. *Ambient Particluate Matter Supresses Alveolar Macrophage Cytokine Response to Lipopolysaccharide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports link ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including the exacerbation of inflammatory disease and increased hospitalization for lung infections. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play an important defense role against infections v...

  16. The effects of bleomycin on alveolar macrophage growth factor secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Denholm, E. M.; Phan, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous work in this laboratory has demonstrated increased secretion of fibroblast growth factor (MDGF) activity by alveolar macrophages obtained from mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The mechanism by which bleomycin promotes this increase in MDGF secretion is not clear, however. The purpose of this study was to determine the direct effects of bleomycin on alveolar macrophages. Normal rat alveolar macrophages obtained by lavage were cultured in the presence or absence of bleomycin; conditioned media from these cultures were dialyzed to remove bleomycin and then assayed in vitro for MDGF activity. Alveolar macrophages incubated with 0.01 microgram to 1 microgram/ml bleomycin for 18 hours secreted significantly more MDGF than macrophages incubated without bleomycin. Viability of macrophages as determined by exclusion of trypan blue and release of LDH was unaffected by any dose tested. Maximal MDGF production was seen with bleomycin doses of greater than or equal to 0.1 microgram/ml. When alveolar macrophages were incubated with 0.1 microgram/ml bleomycin for 0.5-18 hours, MDGF activity was detected as early as 1 hour, with peak responses found at 4-8 hours. Macrophages stimulated with bleomycin continued to produce significant amounts of MDGF even after bleomycin was removed and replaced with fresh (bleomycin-free) media. MDGF secretion by bleomycin-stimulated alveolar macrophages was inhibited by cycloheximide, and the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors NDGA (nordihydroguairetic acid) and BW755c, indicating not only a requirement for protein synthesis but also for metabolites of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism for full expression of activity(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2464942

  17. Comparison of alveolar and interstitial macrophages in fibroblast stimulation after silica and long or short asbestos

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, I.Y.R.; Bowden, D.H. )

    1991-03-15

    Pulmonary fibrosis in response to particles has been attributed to secretion of fibroblast growth factors (FGF) by alveolar macrophages (AM). However, since fibrosis is interstitial and is associated with particle retention by interstitial macrophages (IM), the authors have now compared the secretory activity of FGF by rat alveolar (AM) and interstitial macrophages (IM) in response to silica and to long or short asbestos fibers. AM were obtained by broncho-alveolar lavage, and IM by collecting macrophages that migrate from explants of a previously lavaged and perfused lung. Isolated Am and IM from fibrotic lungs, 6 weeks after instilling silica, secreted equal amounts of FGF. Six weeks after giving short asbestos fibers in vivo, lavaged AM secreted FGF in vitro, but there was no change in fibroblast growth and no fibrosis in vivo. After giving long fibers, which reach the interstitium, isolated IM secreted FGF and collagen levels were increased in whole lung. When macrophages were isolated from normal rats and exposed to particles in vitro, Am and IM supernatants contained equal amounts of FGF. The results show that these macrophage populations respond equally to particles with respect to FGF secretion. The fibrotic reaction seen in vivo is likely due to the close proximity to fibroblasts to particle-laden macrophages within the interstitium allowing more efficient transfer of growth factors.

  18. Alveolar Macrophage Dysregulation in Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Farshid N.; Brantly, Mark L.; Markello, Thomas C.; Helip-Wooley, Amanda; O'Brien, Kevin; Hess, Richard; Huizing, Marjan; Gahl, William A.; Gochuico, Bernadette R.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Individuals with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 1 (HPS-1), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by defective biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles, develop an accelerated form of progressive fibrotic lung disease. The etiology of pulmonary fibrosis associated with HPS-1 is unknown. Objectives: To investigate the potential pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis in HPS-1, lung cells and proteins from individuals with HPS-1 were studied. Methods: Forty-one subjects with HPS-1 with and without pulmonary fibrosis were evaluated with pulmonary function tests, high-resolution computed tomography scan, and bronchoscopy. Bronchoalveolar lavage cells and analytes were analyzed. Measurements and Main Results: Concentrations of total bronchoalveolar lavage cells and alveolar macrophages were significantly higher in epithelial lining fluid from subjects with HPS-1 with and without pulmonary fibrosis compared with healthy research volunteers. Concentrations of cytokines and chemokines (i.e., monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) in alveolar epithelial lining fluid were significantly higher in subjects with HPS-1 with and without pulmonary fibrosis compared with healthy research volunteers (P < 0.001). In vitro, HPS-1 pulmonary fibrosis alveolar macrophages, which did not express HPS1 mRNA, secreted significantly higher concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) protein compared with normal cells (P = 0.001, P = 0.014, and P = 0.011, respectively). Pirfenidone suppressed HPS-1 alveolar macrophage cytokine and chemokine secretion in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions: In HPS-1, alveolar inflammation predominantly involves macrophages and is associated with high lung concentrations of cytokines and chemokines. HPS-1 alveolar macrophages

  19. Alveolar macrophage interaction with air pollution particulates.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, C A; Frevert, C; Imrich, A; Sioutas, C; Kobzik, L

    1997-09-01

    We applied flow cytometric analysis to characterize the in vitro response of alveolar macrophages (AM) to air pollution particulates. Normal hamster AM were incubated with varying concentrations of residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or concentrated ambient air particulates (CAP). We found a dose-dependent increase in AM-associated right angle light scatter (RAS) after uptake of ROFA (e.g., mean channel number 149.4 +/- 6.5, 102.5 +/- 4.1, 75.8 +/- 3.5, and 61.0 +/- 4.6 at 200, 100, 50, and 25 mg/ml, respectively) or CAP. A role for scavenger-type receptors (SR) in AM uptake of components of ROFA and CAP was identified by marked inhibition of RAS increases in AM pretreated with the specific SR inhibitor polyinosinic acid. We combined measurement of particle uptake (RAS) with flow cytometric analysis of intracellular oxidation of dichlorofluorescin. Both ROFA and CAP caused a dose-related intracellular oxidant stress within AM, comparable to that seen with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) (e.g., fold increase over control, 6.6 +/- 0.4, 3.6 +/- 0.4, 4.6 +/- 0.5, 200 mg/ml ROFA, 100 mg/ml ROFA, and 10(-7) M PMA, respectively). We conclude that flow cytometry of RAS increases provides a useful relative measurement of AM uptake of complex particulates within ROFA and CAP. Both ROFA and CAP cause substantial intracellular oxidant stress within AM, which may contribute to subsequent cell activation and production of proinflammatory mediators.

  20. Isolation and Quantitative Estimation of Diesel Exhaust and Carbon Black Particles Ingested by Lung Epithelial Cells and Alveolar Macrophages In Vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new procedure for isolating and estimating ingested carbonaceous diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or carbon black (CB) particles by lung epithelial cells and macrophages is described. Cells were incubated with DEP or CB to examine cell-particle interaction and ingestion. After va...

  1. Alveolar macrophage kinetics and function after interruption of canine marrow function

    SciTech Connect

    Springmeyer, S.C.; Altman, L.C.; Kopecky, K.J.; Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.

    1982-03-01

    To study the kinetics and function of alveolar macrophages after interruption of marrow function, we performed serial bronchoalveolar lavages in dogs. The studies were performed before and after 9.0 to 9.5 Grey total body irradiation and marrow infusion. Monocytes had disappeared from the bloodstream by Day 7 after the irradiation. Alveolar macrophages were significantly decreased at Day 21. At Days 14 and 21 myeloperoxidase-positive alveolar macrophages were also significantly decreased. Beyond Day 30 the number of circulating monocytes, myeloperoxidase-positive and total alveolar macrophages had returned. Sex chromatin stains of alveolar macrophages obtained from a male dog that received female marrow indicated that the repopulating macrophages were of marrow origin. In vitro studies of alveolar macrophage migration and phagocytosis demonstrated increased activities beyond Day 30. These studies suggest that in this model the alveolar macrophage is dependent on the bone marrow for support and that the alveolar macrophage depletion may impair lung defense mechanisms.

  2. Degradation of pulmonary surfactant disaturated phosphatidylcholines by alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, P.R.; Ma, J.Y.; Bowman, L.

    1988-06-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether rat pulmonary surfactant disaturated phosphatidylcholines (DSPC) are degraded by alveolar macrophages in vitro. When (3H)choline-labeled surfactant materials are incubated with unlabeled alveolar macrophages, approximately 40% of the labeled DSPC is broken down in 6 h. There is just a slight decrease in the specific activity of DSPC, which suggests that most products of degradation are not reincorporated into DSPC, at least during the 6-h incubation period. There is a time- and temperature-dependent association of surfactant DSPC with alveolar macrophages, and some of the cell-associated materials are released from the cell fragments after sonication. Association of surfactant with the cells precedes degradation. The breakdown of surfactant DSPC by intact alveolar macrophages lags behind that produced by sonicated cell preparations with disrupted cell membranes. These data and other information suggest that the surfactant materials are internalized by the cells, before the breakdown. The products of degradation probably include free choline and fatty acids, most of which appear in the extracellular fluid. The breakdown processes do not seem to depend on the physical form of the surfactant or on the presence of surfactant apoproteins. Incubation of the cells alone also results in disappearance of intracellular DSPC, some of which may be surfactant phospholipid taken up by the cells in vivo. These results indicate that alveolar macrophages can degrade surfactant DSPC and suggest that these cells may be involved in catabolism of pulmonary surfactant materials.

  3. Studying the Role of Alveolar Macrophages in Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Vadrevu, Surya Kumari; Sharma, Sharad; Chintala, Navin; Patel, Jalpa; Karbowniczek, Magdalena; Markiewski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the syngeneic model of breast cancer (4T1) to the studies on a role of pulmonary alveolar macrophages in cancer metastasis. The 4T1 cells expressing GFP in combination with imaging and confocal microscopy are used to monitor tumor growth, track metastasizing tumor cells, and quantify the metastatic burden. These approaches are supplemented by digital histopathology that allows the automated and unbiased quantification of metastases. In this method the routinely prepared histological lung sections, which are stained with hematoxylin and eosin, are scanned and converted to the digital slides that are then analyzed by the self-trained pattern recognition software. In addition, we describe the flow cytometry approaches with the use of multiple cell surface markers to identify alveolar macrophages in the lungs. To determine impact of alveolar macrophages on metastases and antitumor immunity these cells are depleted with the clodronate-containing liposomes administrated intranasally to tumor-bearing mice. This approach leads to the specific and efficient depletion of this cell population as confirmed by flow cytometry. Tumor volumes and lung metastases are evaluated in mice depleted of alveolar macrophages, to determine the role of these cells in the metastatic progression of breast cancer. PMID:27403530

  4. Tissue factor activity. A marker of alveolar macrophage maturation in rabbits. Effects of granulomatous pneumonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rothberger, H; McGee, M P; Lee, T K

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to examine relationships between alveolar macrophage maturity and amounts of tissue factor (Clotting Factor III) in these cells under physiologic conditions and during immunologically induced pneumonitis. Using discontinuous density gradient centrifugation, alveolar macrophages from healthy rabbits were rapidly isolated into five subpopulations at different stages of maturation, as demonstrated by morphologic and morphometric evaluation. Very large amounts of tissue factor activity were found in fully mature cells that were purified in the lowest density subpopulation and assayed without preliminary in vitro stimulation or culture. In the remaining four subpopulations of increasing density, amounts of tissue factor were found to progressively diminish in direct correlation with declines of cell maturity. These differences at mean levels were as great as 35-fold. In addition, blood monocytes had less than 1/219 and less than 1/6 of the activity of the fully mature and the least mature subpopulations, respectively. After 16 h culture of the five isolated subpopulations in the absence of lymphokines or of significant numbers of lymphocytes, tissue factor activity increased in inverse correlation with the preincubation stage of cell maturity (2,387 and 109% in the least mature and most mature subpopulations, respectively). These increases required protein synthesis and were accompanied by morphologic and morphometric changes which indicated cellular maturation during the period of tissue factor activity generation in vitro, thus further demonstrating relationships between macrophage maturity and tissue factor content. In additional experiments, direct correlations between cell maturity and tissue factor activity content were also found in activated alveolar macrophage populations from rabbits with Bacillus Calmette Guering (BCG)-induced granulomatous pneumonitis. However, as compared with controls, the BCG populations had increased total

  5. Magnetometric evaluation for the effect of chrysotile on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Keira, T; Okada, M; Katagiri, H; Aizawa, Y; Okayasu, I; Kotani, M

    1998-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages are thought to play an important role in fibrogenesis due to asbestos exposure. In this experiment, we evaluated the effect mainly by unique magnetometry and also by conventional methods such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity measurement and morphological observations. Alveolar macrophages obtained from Syrian golden hamsters by bronchoalveolar lavages were exposed 18 hours in vitro to Fe3O4 as an indicator for magnetometry and chrysotile for experiments. A rapid decrease of the remanent magnetic field, so called "relaxation", was observed after the cessation of an external magnetic field in macrophages phagocytizing Fe3O4 alone, while relaxation was delayed in those concurrently exposed to chrysotile. Since relaxation is thought due to the cytoskeleton-driven random rotation of phagosomes containing iron oxide particles, chrysotile is considered to interfere with the cytoskeletal function of macrophages. Release of LDH from chrysotile-exposed macrophages into the medium was recognized, but it was not significantly higher than the controls. Apoptosis was negligible in macrophages exposed to chrysotile by the DNA ladder detection, the terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling method and morphological observations. Electron microscopical examinations revealed early necrotic changes in macrophages exposed to chrysotile. These findings indicate that cell magnetometry detects impaired cytoskeletal function due to in vitro exposure to chrysotile. PMID:10223613

  6. Entry and Elimination of Marine Mammal Brucella spp. by Hooded Seal (Cystophora cristata) Alveolar Macrophages In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Anett K.; Nymo, Ingebjørg H.; Boysen, Preben; Tryland, Morten; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    A high prevalence of Brucellapinnipedialis serology and bacteriology positive animals has been found in the Northeast Atlantic stock of hooded seal (Cystophoracristata); however no associated gross pathological changes have been identified. Marine mammal brucellae have previously displayed different infection patterns in human and murine macrophages. To investigate if marine mammal Brucella spp. are able to invade and multiply in cells originating from a presumed host species, we infected alveolar macrophages from hooded seal with a B. pinnipedialis hooded seal isolate. Hooded seal alveolar macrophages were also challenged with B. pinnipedialis reference strain (NCTC 12890) from harbor seal (Phocavitulina), B. ceti reference strain (NCTC 12891) from harbor porpoise (Phocoenaphocoena) and a B. ceti Atlantic white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchusacutus) isolate (M83/07/1), to evaluate possible species-specific differences. Brucella suis 1330 was included as a positive control. Alveolar macrophages were obtained by post mortem bronchoalveolar lavage of euthanized hooded seals. Phenotyping of cells in the lavage fluid was executed by flow cytometry using the surface markers CD14 and CD18. Cultured lavage cells were identified as alveolar macrophages based on morphology, expression of surface markers and phagocytic ability. Alveolar macrophages were challenged with Brucella spp. in a gentamicin protection assay. Following infection, cell lysates from different time points were plated and evaluated quantitatively for colony forming units. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal isolate was verified by immunocytochemistry. Our results show that the marine mammal brucellae were able to enter hooded seal alveolar macrophages; however, they did not multiply intracellularly and were eliminated within 48 hours, to the contrary of B. suis that showed the classical pattern of a pathogenic strain. In conclusion, none of the four marine mammal strains tested were able

  7. Entry and elimination of marine mammal Brucella spp. by hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Anett K; Nymo, Ingebjørg H; Boysen, Preben; Tryland, Morten; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    A high prevalence of Brucellapinnipedialis serology and bacteriology positive animals has been found in the Northeast Atlantic stock of hooded seal (Cystophoracristata); however no associated gross pathological changes have been identified. Marine mammal brucellae have previously displayed different infection patterns in human and murine macrophages. To investigate if marine mammal Brucella spp. are able to invade and multiply in cells originating from a presumed host species, we infected alveolar macrophages from hooded seal with a B. pinnipedialis hooded seal isolate. Hooded seal alveolar macrophages were also challenged with B. pinnipedialis reference strain (NCTC 12890) from harbor seal (Phocavitulina), B. ceti reference strain (NCTC 12891) from harbor porpoise (Phocoenaphocoena) and a B. ceti Atlantic white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchusacutus) isolate (M83/07/1), to evaluate possible species-specific differences. Brucella suis 1330 was included as a positive control. Alveolar macrophages were obtained by post mortem bronchoalveolar lavage of euthanized hooded seals. Phenotyping of cells in the lavage fluid was executed by flow cytometry using the surface markers CD14 and CD18. Cultured lavage cells were identified as alveolar macrophages based on morphology, expression of surface markers and phagocytic ability. Alveolar macrophages were challenged with Brucella spp. in a gentamicin protection assay. Following infection, cell lysates from different time points were plated and evaluated quantitatively for colony forming units. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal isolate was verified by immunocytochemistry. Our results show that the marine mammal brucellae were able to enter hooded seal alveolar macrophages; however, they did not multiply intracellularly and were eliminated within 48 hours, to the contrary of B. suis that showed the classical pattern of a pathogenic strain. In conclusion, none of the four marine mammal strains tested were able

  8. Entry and elimination of marine mammal Brucella spp. by hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Anett K; Nymo, Ingebjørg H; Boysen, Preben; Tryland, Morten; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    A high prevalence of Brucellapinnipedialis serology and bacteriology positive animals has been found in the Northeast Atlantic stock of hooded seal (Cystophoracristata); however no associated gross pathological changes have been identified. Marine mammal brucellae have previously displayed different infection patterns in human and murine macrophages. To investigate if marine mammal Brucella spp. are able to invade and multiply in cells originating from a presumed host species, we infected alveolar macrophages from hooded seal with a B. pinnipedialis hooded seal isolate. Hooded seal alveolar macrophages were also challenged with B. pinnipedialis reference strain (NCTC 12890) from harbor seal (Phocavitulina), B. ceti reference strain (NCTC 12891) from harbor porpoise (Phocoenaphocoena) and a B. ceti Atlantic white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchusacutus) isolate (M83/07/1), to evaluate possible species-specific differences. Brucella suis 1330 was included as a positive control. Alveolar macrophages were obtained by post mortem bronchoalveolar lavage of euthanized hooded seals. Phenotyping of cells in the lavage fluid was executed by flow cytometry using the surface markers CD14 and CD18. Cultured lavage cells were identified as alveolar macrophages based on morphology, expression of surface markers and phagocytic ability. Alveolar macrophages were challenged with Brucella spp. in a gentamicin protection assay. Following infection, cell lysates from different time points were plated and evaluated quantitatively for colony forming units. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal isolate was verified by immunocytochemistry. Our results show that the marine mammal brucellae were able to enter hooded seal alveolar macrophages; however, they did not multiply intracellularly and were eliminated within 48 hours, to the contrary of B. suis that showed the classical pattern of a pathogenic strain. In conclusion, none of the four marine mammal strains tested were able

  9. Changes in cytokine and nitric oxide secretion by rat alveolar macrophages after oral administration of bacterial extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Broug-Holub, E; Persoons, J H; Schornagel, K; Kraal, G

    1995-01-01

    Oral administration of the bacterial immunomodulator Broncho-Vaxom (OM-85), a lysate of eight bacteria strains commonly causing respiratory disease, has been shown to enhance the host defence of the respiratory tract. In this study we examined the effect of orally administered (in vivo) OM-85 on stimulus-induced cytokine and nitric oxide secretion by rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The results show that alveolar macrophages isolated from OM-85-treated rats secreted significantly more nitric oxide, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-1 beta upon in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), whereas, in contrast, LPS-induced IL-6 secretion was significantly lower. The observed effects of in vivo OM-85 treatment on stimulus-induced cytokine secretion in vitro are not due to a direct effect of OM-85 on the cells, because in vitro incubation of alveolar macrophages with OM-85 did not result in altered activity, nor did direct intratracheal instillation of OM-85 in the lungs of rats result in altered alveolar macrophage activity in vitro. It is hypothesized that oral administration of OM-85 leads to priming of alveolar macrophages in such a way that immune responses are non-specifically enhanced upon stimulation. The therapeutic action of OM-85 may therefore result from an enhanced clearance of infectious bacteria from the respiratory tract due to increased alveolar macrophage activity. PMID:7648713

  10. Age-dependent changes in porcine alveolar macrophage function during the postnatal period of alveolarization

    PubMed Central

    Dickie, R.; Tasat, D.R.; Fernandez Alanis, E.; Delfosse, V.; Tsuda, A.

    2008-01-01

    During early postnatal ontogeny in most mammals, the lung is structurally and functionally immature. In some species with relatively altricial lung morphology, there is evidence of a coupling between functional maturity of the pulmonary cellular immune system and alveolar maturation. Herein, we examine changes in alveolar macrophage (AM) number and function occurring during alveolarization in a more precocial species, the pig, to determine if heightened oxidative metabolism and phagocytic ability is similarly delayed until completion of lung morphogenesis. We assessed cell differential in lavage fluid and evaluated two main functional parameters of AM phagocytic response, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and particle internalization. AM functional maturation occurred mainly during the first postnatal week: the proportion of AMs, ROS generation, and phagocytosis all increased significantly. These results suggest maturational improvement of the impaired AM-based pulmonary immune system of the neonate piglet occurs during the postnatal period of rapid alveolarization. PMID:18775449

  11. Antioxidant properties of taurine in rat alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Castranova, V.; Banks, M.A.; Porter, D.W.; Martin, W.G. West Virginia Univ., Morgantown )

    1990-02-26

    Isolated rat alveolar macrophages (RAM) which had taken-up and accumulated extracellular (0-500 {mu}M) taurine (TAU) were exposed to 0.45 {plus minus} 0.05 ppm ozone for 30 minutes in a modified tissue culture flask containing TAU-supplemented medium. Recovered cells were assayed for oxidant damage and media analyzed for leakage of intracellular components. Cell viability significantly increased, while recovery of cells decreased (possibly due to increased adherence) with increasing TAU. At 100 {mu}M (rat plasma TAU level), TAU protected against the ozone-induced increase in zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence, diminished leakages of lipid peroxidation products and protein into the medium, and partially restored the ozone-inactivated Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase activity of RAM. Efflux of oxidized glutathione was maximized and K{sup +} leakage was minimized by the addition of 250 {mu}M TAU. At 250-500 {mu}M TAU, leakages of lipid peroxidation products and protein were enhanced, while the intracellular TAU content dramatically increased. These results indicate that TAU has both direct and indirect antioxidant properties at low levels and pro-oxidant properties at high levels in RAM.

  12. Interaction of iron oxide Fe3O4 nanoparticles and alveolar macrophages in vivo.

    PubMed

    Katsnelson, B A; Privalova, L I; Sutunkova, M P; Tulakina, L G; Pichugova, S V; Beykin, J B; Khodos, M J

    2012-03-01

    Aqueous suspension of magnetite nanoparticles with primary diameter of 10 nm were intratracheally administered into rat lungs. In 24 h, cells were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage and examined under a transmission electron microscope. Alveolar macrophages demonstrated ability to actively uptake single nanoparticles and small aggregates composed of such particles, which then formed larger conglomerates inside fused phagosomes. Some of these mature phagosomes shed the membrane and free nanoparticles closely interacted with nuclear membrane and with cristae and mitochondrial membranes thereby inflicting pronounced damage to these intracellular structures. The loss of primary lysosomes can be viewed as indirect evidence attesting to the role played by diffusion of lysosomal hydrolytic enzymes in the final destruction of the alveolar macrophages provoked by nanoparticles.

  13. Antigen-Mediated Fusion of Specifically Sensitized Rabbit Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, B.

    1972-01-01

    Rabbits sensitized intravenously with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (strain H37Ra) suspended in mineral oil developed a strong pulmonary granulomatous response which reached its peak about 3 to 4 weeks after injection. Alveolar cells (4 × 106 cells/ml of tissue culture medium 199) procured 6 weeks after sensitization showed extensive development of multinucleated giant cells after 12 hr of incubation in tissue culture flasks containing heat-killed H37Ra (5 μg/ml). Giant cells measured 80 μm to 2.5 mm in length and contained between 30 and 700 nuclei. In contrast, no giant cells were observed when similar samples of the same cell populations were incubated in flasks containing: (i) no mycobacteria; (ii) heat-killed Escherichia coli; (iii) heat-killed Bacillus subtilis; (iv) latex particles; (v) ovalbumin; or (vi) phytohemagglutinin. The addition of immune (anti-H37Ra) sera potentiated the phenomenon of giant cell formation. In addition, supernatant fluids obtained from sensitive alveolar cells incubated with H37Ra were capable of inducing giant cell formation when incubated with nonsensitized alveolar cells. The results suggest that fusion of alveolar macrophages is mediated by an immunological mechanism. Images PMID:4629127

  14. In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Poncy, J L; Metivier, H; Dhilly, M; Verry, M; Masse, R

    1992-01-01

    In vitro cellular dissolution tests for insoluble forms of uranium oxide are technically difficult with conventional methodology using adherent alveolar macrophages. The limited number of cells per flask and the slow dissolution rate in a large volume of nutritive medium are obvious restricting factors. Macrophages in suspension cannot be substituted because they represent different and poorly reproducible functional subtypes with regard to activation and enzyme secretion. Preliminary results on the dissolution of uranium oxide using immobilized alveolar macrophages are promising because large numbers of highly functional macrophages can be cultured in a limited volume. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavages performed on baboons (Papio papio) and then immobilized after the phagocytosis of uranium octoxide (U3O8) particles in alginate beads linked with Ca2+. The dissolution rate expressed as percentage of initial uranium content in cells was 0.039 +/- 0.016%/day for particles with a count median geometric diameter of 3.84 microns(sigma g = 1.84). A 2-fold increase in the dissolution rate was observed when the same number of particles was immobilized without macrophages. These results, obtained in vitro, suggest that the U3O8 preparation investigated should be assigned to inhalation class Y as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Future experiments are intended to clarify this preliminary work and to examine the dissolution characteristics of other particles such as uranium dioxide. It is recommended that the dissolution rate should be measured over an interval of 3 weeks, which is compatible with the survival time of immobilized cells in culture and may reveal transformation states occurring with aging of the particles. PMID:1396447

  15. In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Poncy, J.L.; Dhilly, M.; Verry, M. ); Metivier, H. ); Masse, R. )

    1992-07-01

    In vitro cellular dissolution tests for insoluble forms of uranium oxide are technically difficult with conventional methodology using adherent alveolar macrophages. The limited number of cells per flask and the slow dissolution rate in a large volume of nutritive medium are obvious restricting factors. macrophages in suspension cannot be substituted because they represent different and poorly reproducible functional subtypes with regard to activation and enzyme secretion. Preliminary results on the dissolution of uranium oxide using immobilized alveolar macrophages are promising because large numbers of highly function macrophages can be cultured in a limited volume. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavages performed on baboons (Papio papio) and then immobilized after the phagocytosis of uranium octoxide (U[sub 3]O[sub 8]) particles in alginate beads linked with Ca[sup 2+]. The dissolution rate expressed as percentage of initial uranium content in cells was 0.039 [+-] 0.016%/day for particles with a count median geometric diameter of 3.84 [mu]m([sigma][sub g] = 1.84). A 2-fold increase in the dissolution rate was observed when the same number of particles was immobilized without macrophages. These results, obtained in vitro, suggest that the U[sub 3]O[sub g] preparation investigated should be assigned to inhalation class Y as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Future experiments are intended to clarify this preliminary work and to examine the dissolution characteristics of other particles such as uranium dioxide. It is recommended that the dissolution rate should be measured over an interval of 3 weeks, which is compatible with the survival time of immobilized cells in culture and may reveal transformation states occurring with aging of the particles. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Trace elements in human alveolar macrophages studied by PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, G.; Roelandts, I.; Corhay, J. L.; Radermecker, M.; Delavignette, J. P.

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the metal content of alveolar macrophages by PIXE from 94 subjects divided into two groups as follows: group (1) — subjects with non-occupational exposure to industrial dust: 30 healthy volunteers (controls), 16 patients suffering from lung cancer; group (2) — 48 healthy steel workers from the Liège area (blast-furnace [ n=29] and coke oven [ n=19]). We hope to define more precisely the influence of carcinoma, smoking habit, pathology and occupational exposure in the steel industry on the macrophage metal content. This study has shown: (a) an Fe and Sr increase and a Br decrease in the macrophages of smokers (especially in heavy smokers): (b) a significant Fe, Ti, Br and Cu increase and a trend to Pb, Cr, As and Sr increase in macrophages of healthy steel workers (especially blast-furnace workers) in comparison with non-exposed controls; (c) a significant Fe, Br, Cu and Zn increase and a trend to Pb, As and Ni increase in macrophages of non-exposed patients with lung cancer by comparison with non-exposed controls. The mechanism of metal change could be explained by professional exposure and endogenous changes (protein synthesis, inflammation, bronchial bleeding, …)

  17. Specific Neuropilins Expression in Alveolar Macrophages among Tissue-Specific Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Naing Ye; Ohe, Rintaro; Meng, Hongxue; Kabasawa, Takanobu; Yang, Suran; Kato, Tomoya; Yamakawa, Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    In the immune system, neuropilins (NRPs), including NRP-1 and NRP-2, are expressed in thymocytes, dendritic cells, regulatory T cells and macrophages. Their functions on immune cells around the neoplastic cells vary into pro-angiogenesis, tumor progression and anti-angiogenesis according to their ligands. Even though NRPs expression on malignant tumors and immune system has studied, a PubMed-based literature query did not yield any articles describing NRPs expression on tissue-specific macrophages. The aims of this study were (i) to detect NRPs expression on tissue-specific macrophages in the brain, liver, spleen, lymph node and lung; (ii) to observe NRPs expression in classes of macrophages, including alveolar macrophages (AMs), bronchial macrophages (BMs), interstitial macrophages (IMs), intravascular macrophages (IVMs) and macrophage subsets (M1, M2 and Mox) in lung; and (iii) to detect the co-expression of NRPs and dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in AMs. Both NRPs were specifically detected in AMs among tissue-specific macrophages by immunohistochemistry (IHC). NRPs mRNA expression levels were characterized in normal lung by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ-polymerase chain reaction (in situ-PCR). The expression of both NRPs was detected in AMs, BMs and IVMs by IHC. The frequency of NRPs+ AMs in lung tissue adjacent to the cancer margin was significantly higher than the frequencies in inflamed and normal lung tissue. Double and triple IHC demonstrated that NRPs are expressed on all macrophage subsets in lung. Double IHC showed co-expression of DC-SIGN and NRPs in AMs. This study demonstrated for the first time the specific expression of both NRPs in AMs among tissue-specific macrophages and their expression on M1, M2 and Mox macrophages. Furthermore, the possible origin of AMs from blood monocytes could be suggested from a co-expression of NRPs and DC-SIGN. PMID:26900851

  18. Interactions between calf alveolar macrophages and parainfluenza-3 virus.

    PubMed

    Probert, M; Stott, E J; Thomas, L H

    1977-02-01

    Cells washed from the lungs of freshly killed calves (lung wash cells; LWC) were cytotoxic for calf kidney (CK) target cells infected with parainfluenzavirus type 3 (Pi-3) when assayed by chromium release. LWC collected from 25 calves, including two gnotobiotic animals that had not previously been infected with Pi-3, were all cytotoxic, giving a specific chromium release between 11 and 50%. Cytotoxicity was detected at ratios of LWC to target cell as low as 5:1. The cytotoxic reaction required viable LWC, was inhibited by Pi-3 antiserum, and was not the result of virus-induced damage to the target cells. The cytotoxic cells in the LWC population were identified as alveolar macrophages from observations on glass adherence, phagocytic activity, killing by silica and fine-structural appearance. When LWC were added to CK cells or organ cultures of bovine trachea infected with Pi-3, the yield of virus was reduced for the first 2 to 3 days. However, subsequently, Pi-3 virus replicated in the LWC. Infection of LWC with Pi-3 virus reduced their cytotoxic activity. The significance of these interactions between alveolar macrophages and Pi-3 virus is discussed.

  19. Deficiency of vitamin E in the alveolar fluid of cigarette smokers. Influence on alveolar macrophage cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Pacht, E R; Kaseki, H; Mohammed, J R; Cornwell, D G; Davis, W B

    1986-01-01

    Cigarette smoking produces oxidant-mediated changes in the lung important to the pathogenesis of emphysema. Since vitamin E can neutralize reactive oxygen species and prevent peroxidation of unsaturated lipids, it may constitute an important component of the lung's defense against oxidant injury. To better characterize the antioxidant protective role of vitamin E, young asymptomatic smokers and nonsmokers were evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage before and immediately after a 3-wk course of oral vitamin E (2,400 IU/d). Smoker alveolar fluid at baseline was relatively deficient in vitamin E compared with nonsmoker fluid (3.1 +/- 0.7 ng/ml vs. 20.7 +/- 2.4 ng/ml, P less than 0.005). Although smoker alveolar fluid vitamin E levels increased to 9.3 +/- 2.3 ng/ml after supplementation, the levels remained significantly lower than nonsmoker baseline levels (P less than 0.01). This deficiency was explained, in part, by the increased oxidative metabolism of vitamin E to the quinone form in the lungs of smokers compared with nonsmokers. Although the significance of a lower concentration of alveolar fluid vitamin E is unclear, it may compromise the antioxidant protection afforded by the alveolar fluid as it coats the lung's epithelial surface. The protective role of vitamin E was assessed by cytotoxicity experiments, which demonstrated that the killing of normal rat lung parenchymal cells by smoker alveolar macrophages was inversely related to the vitamin E content of the parenchymal cells. These findings suggest that vitamin E may be an important lower respiratory tract antioxidant, and that the deficiency seen in young smokers may predispose them to an enhanced oxidant attack on their lung parenchymal cells. PMID:3949977

  20. Particle-macrophage relationships during the clearance of particles from the alveolar macrophage compartment

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Toevs, K.E.; Valdez, Y.E.; Sebring, R.J.

    1988-11-01

    In this study, we quantitatively characterized the distributions of particles among lavageable AM over a 30 day period after the acute intratracheal instillation of /approximately/3 mg of 1.9 ..mu..m dia. polystyrene microspheres into the lungs of rats. Information obtained for particles retained in the lavageable AM compartment and particle-AM distribution data were collectively examined using a simple, first order kinetic model for AM removal from the lung. The results of our analyses suggest that a volume load of particles in a macrophage up to at least /approximately/450 ..mu..m/sup 3/ does not inhibit the mobilization of macrophages from the alveolar compartment. Additionally, the kinetic analyses of the particle-macrophage distributions suggest that macrophages that replenish those AM that are translocated from the lung on a continual basis during alveolar clearance are not and/or do not remain particle-free in the alveoli. This latter observation can be explained by: (1) the influx of particle-bearing macrophages into the alveoli, or (2) the in situ proliferation of particle bearing AM, or (3) the release of particles by AM and the subsequent phagocytosis of the particles by newly arrived cells, or (4) a combination of these possibilities. 32 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Expression of functions by normal sheep alveolar macrophages and their alteration by interaction with Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Niang, M; Rosenbusch, R F; Lopez-Virella, J; Kaeberle, M L

    1997-10-31

    Normal sheep alveolar macrophages collected by bronchial lavage were exposed to live or heat-killed Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae organisms, and their capability to ingest Staphylococcus aureus and to elicit antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against sensitized chicken red blood cells was tested. Controls consisted of non-infected macrophages in M199 medium. In addition, the effect of M. ovipneumoniae on expression of surface molecules on these sheep alveolar macrophages was determined. The percentage of S. aureus ingested by nontreated sheep alveolar macrophages was significantly higher than that of infected macrophages. Live mycoplasmas were more effective in suppressing the ingestion of S. aureus by these macrophages than killed mycoplasmas. Both live and killed mycoplasmas suppressed the cytolytic effect of the sheep alveolar macrophages to a similar degree. About 78% and 45% of the normal sheep alveolar macrophages had IgG and complement receptors, respectively. Infection of these macrophages with M. ovipneumoniae decreased significantly the expression of IgG receptors but had no effects on complement receptors. There were substantial increases in the expression of both MHC class I and class II by the mycoplasma-induced macrophages as compared with unstimulated macrophages. Live mycoplasmas were more effective in inducing expression of both classes than killed mycoplasmas. The results, taken together, suggest that M. ovipneumoniae induced alterations in macrophage activities and this may be a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of respiratory disease induced by the organism.

  2. Replication of parainfluenza (Sendai) virus in isolated rat pulmonary type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Castleman, W. L.; Northrop, P. J.; McAllister, P. K.

    1989-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were to determine whether alveolar type II epithelial cells isolated from rat lung and maintained in tissue culture would support productive replication of parainfluenza type 1 (Sendai) virus and to determine whether isolated type II cells from neonatal (5-day-old) rats that are more susceptible to viral-induced alveolar dysplasia supported viral replication to a greater extent than those from weanling (25-day-old) rats. Isolated and cultured type II cells from neonatal and weanling rats that were inoculated with Sendai virus supported productive replication as indicated by ultrastructural identification of budding virions and viral nucleocapsids in type II cells and by demonstration of rising titers of infectious virus from inoculated type II cell cultures. Alveolar macrophages from neonatal and weanling rats also supported viral replication, although infectious viral titers in macrophage cultures were lower than those from type II cell cultures. Only minor differences were detected between viral titers from neonatal and weanling type II epithelial cell cultures. Higher densities of viral nucleocapsids were observed in neonatal type II cells than in those from weanling rats. The results indicate that isolated type II alveolar epithelial cells support productive replication of parainfluenza virus and that type II cells are probably more efficient in supporting productive viral replication than are alveolar macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2541612

  3. Mechanisms underlying the redistribution of particles among the lung's alveolar macrophages during alveolar phase clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Oritz, J.B.; Steinkamp, J.A.; Tietjen, G.L.; Sebring, R.J. ); Oberdorster, G. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the particle redistribution phenomenon following the deposition of inhaled particles, as well as to obtain information about some of the mechanisms that may be operable in the redistribution of particles, lavaged lung free cell analyses and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses of lung tissue and were performed using lungs from rats after they were subchronically exposed to aerosolized dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). TEM analyses indicated that the in situ autolysis of particle-containing Alveolar Macropages (AM) is one important mechanism involved in the redistribution of particles. Evidence was also obtained that indicated that the engulfment of one particle-containing phagocyte by another phagocyte also occurs. Another prominent mechanism of the particle redistribution phenomenon may be the in situ proliferation of particle-laden AM. We used the macrophage cell line J774A.1 as a surrogate for AM to investigate how different particulate loads in macrophages may affect their abilities to proliferate. These in vitro investigations indicated that the normal rate of proliferation of macrophages is essentially unaffected by the containment of relatively high particulate burdens. Overall, the results of our investigations suggest that in situ autolysis of particle-containing AM and the rephagocytosis of freed particles by other phagocytes, the phagocytosis of effete and disintegrating particle-containing phagocytes by other AM, and the in situ division of particle-containing AM are likely mechanisms that underlie the post-depositional redistribution of particles among the lung's AM during alveolar phase clearance. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Coordinated DNA methylation and gene expression changes in smoker alveolar macrophages: specific effects on VEGF receptor 1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Philibert, Robert A.; Sears, Rory A.; Powers, Linda S.; Nash, Emma; Bair, Thomas; Gerke, Alicia K.; Hassan, Ihab; Thomas, Christie P.; Gross, Thomas J.; Monick, Martha M.

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is implicated in numerous diseases, including emphysema and lung cancer. The clinical expression of lung disease in smokers is not well explained by currently defined variations in gene expression or simple differences in smoking exposure. Alveolar macrophages play a critical role in the inflammation and remodeling of the lung parenchyma in smoking-related lung disease. Significant gene expression changes in alveolar macrophages from smokers have been identified. However, the mechanism for these changes remains unknown. One potential mechanism for smoking-altered gene expression is via changes in cytosine methylation in DNA regions proximal to gene-coding sequences. In this study, alveolar macrophage DNA from heavy smokers and never smokers was isolated and methylation status at 25,000 loci determined. We found differential methylation in genes from immune-system and inflammatory pathways. Analysis of matching gene expression data demonstrated a parallel enrichment for changes in immune-system and inflammatory pathways. A significant number of genes with smoking-altered mRNA expression had inverse changes in methylation status. One gene highlighted by this data was the FLT1, and further studies found particular up-regulation of a splice variant encoding a soluble inhibitory form of the receptor. In conclusion, chronic cigarette smoke exposure altered DNA methylation in specific gene promoter regions in human alveolar macrophages. PMID:22427682

  5. Interaction of Mycoplasma dispar with bovine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, R A; Wannemuehler, M J; Rosenbusch, R F

    1992-01-01

    The capacity to avoid phagocytosis and the activation of bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) by encapsulated Mycoplasma dispar or purified M. dispar capsule was investigated. Encapsulated and unencapsulated M. dispar were cocultured with BAM in the presence or absence of antisera prepared against unencapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule antiserum. Unopsonized mycoplasmas resisted phagocytosis, while only anti-capsule antibodies enhanced the phagocytosis of encapsulated mycoplasmas. BAM were cultured in the presence of purified M. dispar capsule or either live or heat-killed encapsulated or unencapsulated M. dispar. These BAM were then activated with Escherichia coli endotoxin or left without further activation. The supernatants of these cultures were assayed for tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1, and glucose consumption as indicators of macrophage activation. Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 were produced by BAM stimulated with unencapsulated M. dispar but not when encapsulated M. dispar or its purified capsule was used. Similarly, glucose consumption was increased in the presence of unencapsulated M. dispar, but not when BAM were cocultured with encapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule. When BAM were treated with purified capsule or encapsulated mycoplasmas, they could not be subsequently activated by endotoxin. These results indicate that encapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule exerts an inhibitory effect on the activity of BAM and prevents the activation of these cells. PMID:1612758

  6. Phagocytosis of latex beads by alveolar macrophages from mice exposed to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Ortega, E; Hueso, F; Collazos, M E; Pedrera, M I; Barriga, C; Rodríguez, A B

    1992-04-01

    Cigarette smoking is known to alter the numerical presence and function of alveolar macrophages. It has been speculated that these cigarette-smoke-induced alterations contribute to the depressed pulmonary defence mechanism commonly demonstrated in smokers. Studies of the phagocytic and bactericidal activities of alveolar macrophages from smokers and non-smokers have yielded conflicting results. The purpose of this study was to investigate the phagocytic capacity of alveolar macrophages from mice exposed to cigarette smoke in relation to the ability to ingest inert particles (latex beads). Measurements were made before (basal values), immediately after, and 1, 12 or 24 h after exposure. Significant decreases were observed in the number of latex beads ingested by 100 macrophages (phagocytic index) and in the phagocytic efficiency for ingesting latex (mean number of latex beads ingested per activated macrophages) immediately after and 1 h after exposure, and in the number of activated macrophages (those with phagocytic activity) immediately after exposure. PMID:1563261

  7. Surface morphology and function of human pulmonary alveolar macrophages from smokers and non-smokers.

    PubMed Central

    Ando, M; Sugimoto, M; Nishi, R; Suga, M; Horio, S; Kohrogi, H; Shimazu, K; Araki, S

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar macrophages were obtained by saline lavage from 23 healthy male volunteers--10 non-smokers and 13 cigarette smokers. Lavage produced three times as many alveolar macrophages in smokers than in non-smokers. When macrophages from smokers and from non-smokers were incubated in vitro, more cells from smokers adhered to glass, spread out, and showed enhanced nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction. The surface morphology of alveolar macrophages from smokers showed more with a plate like appearance and ridge like membrane surface, while the macrophages from non-smokers were predominantly spherical with ruffles. The proportions of cells which stained highly for beta galactosidase were 55% in smokers and 11% in non-smokers. Thus, in a resting state in vitro, alveolar macrophages from smokers were more active than those from non-smokers. When, however, macrophages from smokers and non-smokers were incubated with immunobeads and with opsonised or non-opsonised BCG, the phagocytic activity and stimulated NBT reduction of alveolar macrophages from smokers were similar to or somewhat less than those of non-smokers. Images PMID:6438822

  8. Alveolar macrophage cytokine response to air pollution particles: Oxidant mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, Amy; Ning Yaoyu; Lawrence, Joy; Coull, Brent; Gitin, Elena; Knutson, Mitchell; Kobzik, Lester . E-mail: lkobzik@hsph.harvard.edu

    2007-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) primed with LPS and treated with concentrated ambient air particles (CAPs) showed enhanced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and provide an in vitro model for the amplified effects of air pollution particles seen in people with preexisting lung disease. To investigate the mechanism(s) by which CAPs mediate TNF release in primed rat AMs, we first tested the effect of a panel of antioxidants. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (20 mM), dimethyl thiourea (20 mM) and catalase (5 {mu}M) significantly inhibited TNF release by primed AMs incubated with CAPs. Conversely, when LPS-primed AMs were treated with CAPs in the presence of exogenous oxidants (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by glucose oxidase, 10 {mu}M/h), TNF release and cell toxicity was significantly increased. The soluble fraction of CAPs suspensions caused most of the increased bioactivity in the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) strongly inhibited the interaction of the soluble fraction with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} but had no effect on the bioactivity of the insoluble CAPs fraction. We conclude that CAPs can mediate their effects in primed AMs by acting on oxidant-sensitive cytokine release in at least two distinct ways. In the primed cell, insoluble components of PM mediate enhanced TNF production that is H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-dependent (catalase-sensitive) yet independent of iron (DFO-insensitive). In the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released by AMs, PMNs, or other lung cells within an inflamed alveolar milieu, soluble iron released from air particles can also mediate cytokine release and cell toxicity.

  9. Nitrated fatty acids reverse pulmonary fibrosis by dedifferentiating myofibroblasts and promoting collagen uptake by alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Aravind T.; Lakshmi, Sowmya P.; Zhang, Yingze; Reddy, Raju C.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, fatal disease, thought to be largely transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) driven, for which there is no effective therapy. We assessed the potential benefits in IPF of nitrated fatty acids (NFAs), which are unique endogenous agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a nuclear hormone receptor that exhibits wound-healing and antifibrotic properties potentially useful for IPF therapy. We found that pulmonary PPARγ is down-regulated in patients with IPF. In vitro, knockdown or knockout of PPARγ expression in isolated human and mouse lung fibroblasts induced a profibrotic phenotype, whereas treating human fibroblasts with NFAs up-regulated PPARγ and blocked TGFβ signaling and actions. NFAs also converted TGFβ to inactive monomers in cell-free solution, suggesting an additional mechanism through which they may inhibit TGFβ. In vivo, treating mice bearing experimental pulmonary fibrosis with NFAs reduced disease severity. Also, NFAs up-regulated the collagen-targeting factor milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8), stimulated collagen uptake and degradation by alveolar macrophages, and promoted myofibroblast dedifferentiation. Moreover, treating mice with established pulmonary fibrosis using NFAs reversed their existing myofibroblast differentiation and collagen deposition. These findings raise the prospect of treating IPF with NFAs to halt and perhaps even reverse the progress of IPF.—Reddy, A. T., Lakshmi, S. P., Zhang, Y., Reddy, R. C. Nitrated fatty acids reverse pulmonary fibrosis by dedifferentiating myofibroblasts and promoting collagen uptake by alveolar macrophages. PMID:25252739

  10. Effects of acute radon progeny exposure on rat alveolar macrophage number and function

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.F.; Newton, G.J.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    Alveolar macrophages play a key role in removal and translocation of inhaled particles and have been shown to influence proliferation of Alveolar Type II cells and fibroblasts. The effect of radon progeny on alveolar macrophage number and function is not documented. Functional impairment of alveolar macrophages may be an ancillary event in the induction of pulmonary lesions and may also indicate dose to the peripheral lung. In our study, rats were exposed to 1000 working level months (WLM) of radon progeny over a 3- to 5-h period, with a vector aerosol of environmental tobacco smoke. Groups of animals were sacrificed, and the lungs were lavaged immediately after exposure and on days 2, 18, 16, 21 and 29 after exposure. The numbers and viabilities of the lavaged macrophages were determined. Cytological preparations were made to determine the number of binucleated/multinucleated macrophages and macrophages containing micronuclei. The DNA content was measured flow-cytometrically using Hoechst 33342, and phagocytosis was assayed by determining the uptake of fluorescent microspheres. The numbers and viabilities of macrophages recovered from exposed animals were similar to the values measured for control animals. There was no evidence of an inflammatory reaction during any period after radon progeny exposure. Nuclear atypia, evidenced by increases in the number of binucleated cells and cells with micronuclei, occurred in animals 8 days after exposure, and this response peaked at 21 days after exposure. The phagocytic capability of the alveolar macrophages was not significantly affected at any time point after exposure. These results show that there was little functional impairment of alveolar macrophages in rats after acute radon-progeny exposure; however, there was long-standing interference with cell division, resulting in binucleated and micronucleated macrophages.

  11. The equine alveolar macrophage: Functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages☆

    PubMed Central

    Karagianni, Anna E.; Kapetanovic, Ronan; McGorum, Bruce C.; Hume, David A.; Pirie, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) constitute the first line of defence in the lung of all species, playing a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses to inhaled pathogens. A detailed understanding of the function and phenotype of AMs is a necessary pre-requisite to both elucidating their role in preventing opportunistic bacterial colonisation of the lower respiratory tract and developing appropriate preventative strategies. The purpose of the study was to characterise this important innate immune cell at the tissue level by making functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages (PMs). We hypothesised that the tissue of origin determines a unique phenotype of AMs, which may constitute an appropriate therapeutic target for certain equine respiratory diseases. Macrophages isolated from the lung and the peritoneal cavity of 9 horses were stimulated with various toll like receptor (TLR) ligands and the production of nitrite, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL) 10 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) were measured by the Griess reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and/or quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Cells were also compared on the basis of phagocytic-capacity and the expression of several cell surface markers. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated increased TNFα release following stimulation with LPS, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (Poly IC) and heat-killed Salmonella typhinurium and increased TNFα and IDO mRNA expression when stimulated with LPS. AMs showed high expression of the specific macrophage markers cluster of differentiation (CD) 14, CD163 and TLR4, whereas PMs showed high expression of TLR4 only. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated efficient phagocytic activity. Our results demonstrate that AMs are more active than PMs when stimulated with various pro-inflammatory ligands, thus supporting the importance of the local microenvironment in the activation status of the macrophage. This

  12. Quantitative assessment of rabbit alveolar macrophage function by chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, P.C.; Kirchner, F.R.

    1985-08-01

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages (RAM) were cultured for 24 hr with concentrations ranging from 3 to 12 ..mu..g/ml of vanadium oxide (V/sub 2/O/sub 5/), a known cytotoxic agent, or with high-molecular-weight organic by-products from coal gasification processes. After culture the cells were harvested and tested for functional capacity using three types of indicators: (1) luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (CL), which quantitatively detects photon emission due to respiratory burst activity measured in a newly designed instrument with standardized reagents; (2) the reduction of nitro blue tetrazolium-saturated polyacrylamide beads, a semiquantitative measure of respiratory burst activity; and (3) phagocytic efficiency, defined as percentage of cells incorporating immunoglobulin-coated polyacrylamide beads. Chemiluminescence declined linearly with increasing concentrations of V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ over the dose range tested. Dye reduction and phagocytic efficiency similarly decreased with increasing V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ concentration, but were less sensitive indicators of functional impairment than CL as measured by the amount required to reduce the response to 50% of untreated cells. The effect of coal gasification condensates on RAM function varied, but in general these test also indicated that the CL response was the most sensitive indicator.

  13. Toxicity of metallic ions and oxides to rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Labedzka, M.; Gulyas, H.; Schmidt, N.; Gercken, G. )

    1989-04-01

    The effects of soluble compounds and oxides of As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, V, and Zn on oxidative metabolism and membrane integrity of rabbit alveolar macrophages were studied by 24-hr in vitro exposure. Oxidative metabolism induced by phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan was measured by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} release and by chemiluminescence in the presence of luminol. Membrane integrity was estimated by extracellular LDH activity. Metallic ions and oxides inhibited the release of active oxygen species. Cd(II), As(III), and V(V) were the most toxic elements as measured by all investigated parameters. Cu(II) decreased O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} release and chemiluminescence effectively but H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release and membrane integrity less. Chemiluminescence was decreased strongly by Hg(II) while O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release were depressed moderately. Zn(II) and Sb(III) compounds caused medium toxicity and the tested Sn, Ni, and Pb compounds showed only faint toxic effects.

  14. Dissolution of beryllium in artificial lung alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Virji, M Abbas; Day, Gregory A

    2011-05-01

    Dissolution of a lung burden of poorly soluble beryllium particles is hypothesized to be necessary for development of chronic beryllium lung disease (CBD) in humans. As such, particle dissolution rate must be sufficient to activate the lung immune response and dissolution lifetime sufficient to maintain chronic inflammation for months to years to support development of disease. The purpose of this research was to investigate the hypothesis that poorly soluble beryllium compounds release ions via dissolution in lung fluid. Dissolution kinetics of 17 poorly soluble particulate beryllium materials that span extraction through ceramics machining (ores, hydroxide, metal, copper-beryllium [CuBe] fume, oxides) and three CuBe alloy reference materials (chips, solid block) were measured over 31 d using artificial lung alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid (pH 4.5). Differences in beryllium-containing particle physicochemical properties translated into differences in dissolution rates and lifetimes in artificial phagolysosomal fluid. Among all materials, dissolution rate constant values ranged from 10(-5) to 10(-10)gcm(-2)d(-1) and half-times ranged from tens to thousands of days. The presence of magnesium trisilicate in some beryllium oxide materials may have slowed dissolution rates. Materials associated with elevated prevalence of CBD had faster beryllium dissolution rates [10(-7)-10(-8)gcm(-2)d(-1)] than materials not associated with elevated prevalence (p<0.05).

  15. Evidence for particle transport between alveolar macrophages in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Nikula, K.J.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Recent studies at this Institute have focused on determining the role of alveolar macrophages (AMs) in the transport of particles within and form the lung. For those studies, AMs previously labeled using the nuclear stain Hoechst 33342 and polychromatic Fluoresbrite microspheres (1 {mu}m diameter, Polysciences, Inc., Warrington, PA) were instilled into lungs of recipient F344 rats. The fate of the donor particles and the doubly labeled AMs within recipient lungs was followed for 32 d. Within 2-4 d after instillation, the polychromatic microspheres were found in both donor and resident AMs, suggesting that particle transfer occurred between the donor and resident AMs. However, this may also have been an artifact resulting from phagocytosis of the microspheres form dead donor cells or from the fading or degradation of Hoechst 33342 within the donor cells leading to their misidentification as resident AMs. The results support the earlier findings that microspheres in donor AMs can be transferred to resident AMs within 2 d after instillation.

  16. Glutathione-dependent peroxidative metabolism in the alveolar macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Molly T.; Thomas, Catherine; Vassallo, Charles L.; Basford, R. E.; Gee, J. Bernard L.

    1971-01-01

    Phagocytosis by rabbit alveolar macrophages (AM) is accompanied by increases in O2 consumption, glucose oxidation, and H2O2 formation. Two aspects of the interrelations between these metabolic features of phagocytosis have been studied. First, the following evidence indicates that glutathione, glutathione reductase, and peroxidase serve as a cytoplasmic shuttle between H2O2 and NADPH-dependent glucose oxidation: (a) AM contain 5.9 mμmoles of reduced glutathione per 106 cells and exhibit glutathione peroxidase and NADPH-specific glutathione reductase activity; (b) oxidized glutathione potentiates NADP stimulation of glucose oxidation; (c) an artificial H2O2-generating system stimulates glucose oxidation; (d) the cell penetrating thiol inhibitor, N-ethylmaleimide diminishes glucose oxidation. This effect largely depends on inhibition of the glutathione system rather than on inhibition of either H2O2 formation or enzymes directly subserving glucose oxidation. Second, three potential H2O2-generating oxidases have been sought. No cyanide-insensitive NADH or NADPH oxidase activity could be detected. D-amino acid oxidase activity was 0.48 ±0.07 U/106 cells with D-alanine as substrate. PMID:4395562

  17. Characterization of alveolar macrophage receptors involved in opsonin independent phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Godleski, J.J.; Parod, R.J.; Katler, M.; Brain, J.D.

    1986-03-05

    Hamster alveolar macrophages (AM) avidly ingest particles in the absence of serum. This process is calcium dependent and can be blocked by HAMM, a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for hamster AM's. The purpose of this study was to identify the membrane receptors involved. AM membranes were labeled with /sup 125/I, lysed with RIPA-PMSF, and then reacted with uncoated latex beads or with beads coated with BSA, gelatin, or poly-L-lysine. Lysed membranes were also reacted with zymosan particles. All of these reactions were done in the presence and absence of calcium and magnesium ions. After reaction, the particles were boiled in SDS to remove attached membrane constituents which were then separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Only one AM membrane protein (37 kilodaltons (kd)) bound to BSA and gelatin coated latex, uncoated latex, and zymosan particles in the presence of Ca/sup + +/ and Mg/sup + +/. Proteins of 45 and 19 kd attached to all particles even in the absence of divalent cations. In contrast, HAMM reacted with a membrane constituent of 102 kd. The authors conclude that the Ca/sup + +/ dependent receptor for opsonin independent phagocytosis has a molecular weight of 37 kd and is different from the antigen identified by HAMM.

  18. Pterins inhibit nitric oxide synthase activity in rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Jorens, P. G.; van Overveld, F. J.; Bult, H.; Vermeire, P. A.; Herman, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    1. The synthesis of nitrite and citrulline from L-arginine by immune-stimulated rat alveolar macrophages and the modulation of this synthesis were studied. 2,4-Diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine (DAHP), 6R-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH4) and L-sepiapterin were potent inhibitors of the recombinant interferon-gamma induced production of nitrogen oxides in intact cultured cells with I50 values for BH4 and L-sepiapterin of approximately 10 microM. They were equally effective in inhibiting the induced production of citrulline. This inhibitory effect was concentration-dependent for all three modulators investigated. 2. The inhibitory effects were not dependent on incubation times of either 24 or 48 h, on the immune-stimulus used (lipopolysaccharide, interferon-gamma), or whether these stimuli were added during or after the induction period. 3. Pterin-6-carboxylic acid (PCA), which cannot be converted into BH4, and methotrexate (MTX), which inhibits dihydrofolatereductase but not de novo biosynthesis of BH4, did not change the production of nitrite. 4. The data indicate that DAHP, an inhibitor of the de novo biosynthesis of the co-factor BH4, blocks the nitric oxide synthase activity in intact cells. Since the pterins BH4 and L-sepiapterin blocked the L-arginine dependent production of nitrite and citrulline, the activity of nitric oxide synthase in phagocytic cells may be regulated by metabolic endproducts of the de novo biosynthesis of BH4. PMID:1281717

  19. Species differences in impairment and recovery of alveolar macrophage functions following single and repeated ozone exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J.; Van Bree, L. )

    1991-08-01

    Effects of single (0.4 ppm for 3, 6, or 12 hr) and repeated (0.4 ppm, 12 hr/day for 3 or 7 days) in vivo ozone exposures on rat and mouse alveolar macrophage functions and cell number were investigated. Single ozone exposure of rats resulted in a small (approximately 15%) decrease in Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis and phorbol ester-induced superoxide production by the alveolar macrophages and was followed by recovery above control levels within 12 hr of exposure. Repeated exposures of rats for up to 7 days did not alter alveolar macrophage functions, with the exception of the effects of 3 days of exposure on superoxide production (71 {plus minus} 9% as compared with the controls). In mice, significant changes in alveolar macrophage functions were not observed until 12 hr of exposure (at that timepoint phagocytosis was 74 {plus minus} 2%). Repeated ozone exposures of mice did not cause a further decrease in phagocytosis (at Day 7, 74 {plus minus} 14%). Both after 3 and 7 days of repeated ozone exposure of mice, superoxide production by the alveolar macrophages was inhibited approximately 50%. In rats and mice, repeated ozone exposures led to an increase in the number of alveolar macrophages. In mice, this increase appeared at a later time point (at Day 7 vs Day 3) and was less pronounced (at Day 7, 139 {plus minus} 9% vs 179 {plus minus} 17%) as compared with rats. In summary, our data show that rat and mouse alveolar macrophages have different susceptibilities to both single and repeated in vivo ozone exposures.

  20. Comparative cytotoxicity of four nickel compounds to canine and rodent alveolar macrophages in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Henderson, R.F.; McClellan, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    Nickel subsulfide (Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/), nickel sulfate (NiSO/sub 4/), nickel chloride (NiCl/sub 2/), and nickel oxide (NiO), are four compounds encountered by workers in the nickel-refining and electroplating industries. These compounds were tested for their relative toxicity to beagle dog and F344/Crl rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. Dog alveolar macrophages were at least 10 times more sensitive to the effects of each of the 4 nickel compounds than were rat alveolar macrophages. Toxicity ranking of the four nickel compounds to macrophages from both species was Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/ > NiCl/sub 2/ approx. = NiSO/sub 4/ > NiO.

  1. Comparative cytotoxicity of four nickel compounds to canine and rodent alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Benson, J M; Henderson, R F; McClellan, R O

    1986-01-01

    Nickel subsulfide (Ni3S2), nickel sulfate (NiSO4), nickel chloride (NiCl2), and nickel oxide (NiO), are four compounds encountered by workers in the nickel-refining and electroplating industries. These compounds were tested for their relative toxicity to beagle dog and F344/Crl rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. Dog alveolar macrophages were at least 10 times more sensitive to the effects of each of the 4 nickel compounds than were rat alveolar macrophages. Toxicity ranking of the four nickel compounds to macrophages from both species was Ni3S2 greater than NiCl2 approximately NiSO4 greater than NiO. PMID:3746937

  2. PPAR{gamma} regulates the expression of cholesterol metabolism genes in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Anna D.; Malur, Anagha; Barna, Barbara P.; Kavuru, Mani S.; Malur, Achut G.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2010-03-19

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) is a nuclear transcription factor involved in lipid metabolism that is constitutively expressed in the alveolar macrophages of healthy individuals. PPAR{gamma} has recently been implicated in the catabolism of surfactant by alveolar macrophages, specifically the cholesterol component of surfactant while the mechanism remains unclear. Studies from other tissue macrophages have shown that PPAR{gamma} regulates cholesterol influx, efflux, and metabolism. PPAR{gamma} promotes cholesterol efflux through the liver X receptor-alpha (LXR{alpha}) and ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1). We have recently shown that macrophage-specific PPAR{gamma} knockout (PPAR{gamma} KO) mice accumulate cholesterol-laden alveolar macrophages that exhibit decreased expression of LXR{alpha} and ABCG1 and reduced cholesterol efflux. We hypothesized that in addition to the dysregulation of these cholesterol efflux genes, the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and influx was also dysregulated and that replacement of PPAR{gamma} would restore regulation of these genes. To investigate this hypothesis, we have utilized a Lentivirus expression system (Lenti-PPAR{gamma}) to restore PPAR{gamma} expression in the alveolar macrophages of PPAR{gamma} KO mice. Our results show that the alveolar macrophages of PPAR{gamma} KO mice have decreased expression of key cholesterol synthesis genes and increased expression of cholesterol receptors CD36 and scavenger receptor A-I (SRA-I). The replacement of PPAR{gamma} (1) induced transcription of LXR{alpha} and ABCG1; (2) corrected suppressed expression of cholesterol synthesis genes; and (3) enhanced the expression of scavenger receptors CD36. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} regulates cholesterol metabolism in alveolar macrophages.

  3. Influence of Rhodococcus equi on the respiratory burst of resident alveolar macrophages from horses

    SciTech Connect

    Brumbaugh, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is the etiologic agent of a devastating pneumonia of sporadic incidence in foals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of R. equi on the superoxide anion production, measured spectrophotometrically as the reduction of cytochrome C, and hexose monophosphate shunt activity, measured by /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ liberation from /sup 14/C-1-D-glucose, of alveolar macrophages from horses. Alveolar macrophages were harvested from 6 anesthetized, healthy, light-breed, adult horses by bronchoalveolar lavage. Following a randomized complete block design, the suspension of cells was divided into aliquots of 10/sup 6/ viable alveolar macrophages which were exposed to 1, 10 or 100 g. of opsonized R. equi or opsonized zymosan A at 37 C for 2 hours. In this study the respiratory burst of equine alveolar macrophages was only evidenced by the hexose monophosphate shunt activity and superoxide anion was not coincidentally produced. Rhodococcus equi did not adversely affect that response. The insignificant superoxide anion production by the alveolar macrophages suggests that this may not be a significant oxygen metabolite in those cells.

  4. Chronic ethanol ingestion in rats decreases granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor expression and downstream signaling in the alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pratibha C; Applewhite, Lisa; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse; Fernandez, Alberto L; Eaton, Douglas C; Brown, Lou Ann S; Guidot, David M

    2005-11-15

    Although it is well recognized that alcohol abuse impairs alveolar macrophage immune function and renders patients susceptible to pneumonia, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. Alveolar macrophage maturation and function requires priming by GM-CSF, which is produced and secreted into the alveolar space by the alveolar epithelium. In this study, we determined that although chronic ethanol ingestion (6 wk) in rats had no effect on GM-CSF expression within the alveolar space, it significantly decreased membrane expression of the GM-CSF receptor in alveolar macrophages. In parallel, ethanol ingestion decreased cellular expression and nuclear binding of PU.1, the master transcription factor that activates GM-CSF-dependent macrophage functions. Furthermore, treatment of ethanol-fed rats in vivo with rGM-CSF via the upper airway restored GM-CSF receptor membrane expression as well as PU.1 protein expression and nuclear binding in alveolar macrophages. Importantly, GM-CSF treatment also restored alveolar macrophage function in ethanol-fed rats, as reflected by endotoxin-stimulated release of TNF-alpha and bacterial phagocytosis. We conclude that ethanol ingestion dampens alveolar macrophage immune function by decreasing GM-CSF receptor expression and downstream PU.1 nuclear binding and that these chronic defects can be reversed relatively quickly with rGM-CSF treatment in vivo.

  5. Bioavailability of 1-nitropyrene from model coal fly ash and its uptake by alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, J.L.; Tedjad, S.B.; Jackson, M.; Lewtas, J.

    1986-08-01

    Alveolar macrophage cultures exposed to coal fly ash vapor-coated with 1-nitropyrene were used as a model system to study the bioavailability and the uptake of a nitroaromatic hydrocarbon from coal combustion emissions. Initially, 1-nitropyrene-coated fly ash and uncoated fly ash were examined for cytotoxicity using rabbit alveolar macrophages and for mutagenicity in the Salmonella typhimurium plate incorporation assay. The distribution and recovery of 1-nitropyrene from macrophage cultures treated with coated fly ash were determined by using a reverse-hase high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence method. 1-Nitropyrene alone was not very toxic, nor did vapor deposition of 1-nitropyrene onto coal fly ash significantly affect the toxicity of the fly ash. Most toxicity resulted from the original, uncoated fly ash particles. 1-Nitropyren after being coated onto the particles was bioavailable in agar and aqueous culture medium. The coated fly ash showed mutagenic activity when the particles were tested directly; the uncoated fly ash did not show mutagenic activity. 1-Nitropyrene recovery from alveolar macrophage cultures exposed to the coated fly ash diminished as cell number increased. The rate of 1-nitropyrene loss was 2.7 ng/10/sup 6/ macrophages for medium and 4.1 ng/10/sup 6/ macrophages for the whole culture. The mutagenic activity recovered from these macrophage cultures also decreased with increasing cell number.

  6. Bioavailability of 1-nitropyrene from model coal fly ash and its uptake by alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, J.L.; Tejada, S.B.; Jackson, M.; Lewtas, J.

    1986-01-01

    Alveolar macrophage cultures exposed to coal fly ash vapor-coated with 1-nitropyrene were used as a model system to study the bioavailability and the uptake of a nitroaromatic hydrocarbon from coal-combustion emissions. Initially, 1-nitropyrene-coated fly ash and uncoated fly ash were examined for cytotoxicity using rabbit alveolar macrophages and for mutagenicity in the Salmonella typhimurium plate incorporation assay. The results were compared to determine the effects of vapor deposition. The distribution and recovery of 1-nitropyrene from macrophage cultures treated with coated fly ash were determined by using a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence method. 1-Nitropyrene alone was not very toxic, nor did vapor deposition of 1-nitropyrene onto coal fly ash significantly affect the toxicity of the fly ash. Most toxicity resulted from the original, uncoated, fly ash particles, 1-Nitropyrene after being coated onto the particles was bioavailable in agar and aqueous culture medium. The coated fly ash showed mutagenic activity when the particles were tested directly; the uncoated fly ash did not show mutagenic activity. 1-Nitropyrene recovery from alveolar macrophage cultures exposed to the coated fly ash diminished as cell number increased. The rate of 1-nitropyrene loss was 2.7 ng/.000001 macrophages for medium and 4.1 ng/.000001 macrophages for the whole culture. The mutagenic activity recovered from these macrophage cultures also decreased with increasing cell number.

  7. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Clearance by Alveolar Macrophages Is Impaired by Exposure to Cigarette Smoke ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Martí-Lliteras, Pau; Regueiro, Verónica; Morey, Pau; Hood, Derek W.; Saus, Carles; Sauleda, Jaume; Agustí, Alvar G. N.; Bengoechea, José Antonio; Garmendia, Junkal

    2009-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) is an opportunistic gram-negative pathogen that causes respiratory infections and is associated with progression of respiratory diseases. Cigarette smoke is a main risk factor for development of respiratory infections and chronic respiratory diseases. Glucocorticoids, which are anti-inflammatory drugs, are still the most common therapy for these diseases. Alveolar macrophages are professional phagocytes that reside in the lung and are responsible for clearing infections by the action of their phagolysosomal machinery and promotion of local inflammation. In this study, we dissected the interaction between NTHI and alveolar macrophages and the effect of cigarette smoke on this interaction. We showed that alveolar macrophages clear NTHI infections by adhesion, phagocytosis, and phagolysosomal processing of the pathogen. Bacterial uptake requires host actin polymerization, the integrity of plasma membrane lipid rafts, and activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling cascade. Parallel to bacterial clearance, macrophages secrete tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) upon NTHI infection. In contrast, exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytosis, although NTHI-induced TNF-α secretion was not abrogated. Mechanistically, our data showed that CSE reduced PI3K signaling activation triggered by NTHI. Treatment of CSE-exposed cells with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone reduced the amount of TNF-α secreted upon NTHI infection but did not compensate for CSE-dependent phagocytic impairment. The deleterious effect of cigarette smoke was observed in macrophage cell lines and in human alveolar macrophages obtained from smokers and from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:19620348

  8. Autophagic Killing Effects against Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Alveolar Macrophages from Young and Aged Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Sophia A.; Powers, Katelyn M.; Engelmann, Flora; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Purdy, Georgiana E.

    2013-01-01

    Non-human primates, notably rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta, RM), provide a robust experimental model to investigate the immune response to and effective control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections. Changes in the function of immune cells and immunosenescence may contribute to the increased susceptibility of the elderly to tuberculosis. The goal of this study was to examine the impact of age on M. tuberculosis host-pathogen interactions following infection of primary alveolar macrophages derived from young and aged rhesus macaques. Of specific interest to us was whether the mycobactericidal capacity of autophagic macrophages was reduced in older animals since decreased autophagosome formation and autophagolysosomal fusion has been observed in other cells types of aged animals. Our data demonstrate that alveolar macrophages from old RM are as competent as those from young animals for autophagic clearance of M. tuberculosis infection and controlling mycobacterial replication. While our data do not reveal significant differences between alveolar macrophage responses to M. tuberculosis by young and old animals, these studies are the first to functionally characterize autophagic clearance of M. tuberculosis by alveolar macrophages from RM. PMID:23825603

  9. Alveolar macrophages in pulmonary host defence – the unrecognized role of apoptosis as a mechanism of intracellular bacterial killing

    PubMed Central

    Aberdein, J D; Cole, J; Bewley, M A; Marriott, H M; Dockrell, D H

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages play an essential role in clearing bacteria from the lower airway, as the resident phagocyte alveolar macrophages must both phagocytose and kill bacteria, and if unable to do this completely must co-ordinate an inflammatory response. The decision to escalate the inflammatory response represents the transition between subclinical infection and the development of pneumonia. Alveolar macrophages are well equipped to phagocytose bacteria and have a large phagolysosomal capacity in which ingested bacteria are killed. The rate-limiting step in control of extracellular bacteria, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, is the capacity of alveolar macrophages to kill ingested bacteria. Therefore, alveolar macrophages complement canonical microbicidal strategies with an additional level of apoptosis-associated killing to help kill ingested bacteria. PMID:23841514

  10. Elemental analysis of lung tissue particles and intracellular iron content of alveolar macrophages in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease occurred by idiopathic (autoimmune) or secondary to particle inhalation. The in-air microparticle induced X-ray emission (in-air micro-PIXE) system performs elemental analysis of materials by irradiation with a proton microbeam, and allows visualization of the spatial distribution and quantitation of various elements with very low background noise. The aim of this study was to assess the secondary PAP due to inhalation of harmful particles by employing in-air micro-PIXE analysis for particles and intracellular iron in parafin-embedded lung tissue specimens obtained from a PAP patient comparing with normal lung tissue from a non-PAP patient. The iron inside alveolar macrophages was stained with Berlin blue, and its distribution was compared with that on micro-PIXE images. Results The elements composing particles and their locations in the PAP specimens could be identified by in-air micro-PIXE analysis, with magnesium (Mg), aluminum (Al), silicon (Si), phosphorus (P), sulfur (S), scandium (Sc), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), titanium (Ti), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), manganase (Mn), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn) being detected. Si was the major component of the particles. Serial sections stained by Berlin blue revealed accumulation of sideromacrophages that had phagocytosed the particles. The intracellular iron content of alveolar macrophage from the surfactant-rich area in PAP was higher than normal lung tissue in control lung by both in-air micro-PIXE analysis and Berlin blue staining. Conclusion The present study demonstrated the efficacy of in-air micro-PIXE for analyzing the distribution and composition of lung particles. The intracellular iron content of single cells was determined by simultaneous two-dimensional and elemental analysis of paraffin-embedded lung tissue sections. The results suggest that secondary PAP is associated with exposure to inhaled particles and accumulation of iron in alveolar

  11. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  12. Effects of air pollutants on the oxidative metabolism and phagocytic capacity of pulmonary alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Romert, L; Bernson, V; Pettersson, B

    1983-01-01

    Isolated rabbit pulmonary alveolar macrophages were found to be a convenient biological model system, relevant for studies of the toxicity of air pollutants. The phagocytic capacity and the oxygen consumption were used as test parameters and studied simultaneously on the same cells. The toxicity of extracts of airborne particles (phi less than 15 microns) collected in urban and rural areas was investigated and compared to a cigarette-smoke condensate. An extract of particles from a car tunnel was found to be the most toxic air sample, inhibiting phagocytosis as well as respiration of the macrophages at a concentration representing 5 m3 air/ml cell suspension. A corresponding sample collected on a roof of a five-storied building in the central area of a city (population 600,000) was found to inhibit phagocytosis but did not affect respiration. Further investigations revealed that one effect of the "tunnel" extract could be explained as an uncoupling of the mitochondrial respiratory control. Compared to the cigarette-smoke condensate, the toxicity of the air samples was infinitesimal.

  13. EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ON HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE RESPONSIVENESS TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of diesel exhaust particles on human alveolar macrophage responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide
    S. Mundandhara1 , S. Becker2 and M. Madden2, 1UNC Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, 2US EPA, NHEERL, HSD, Chapel Hill, NC, US

    Epidemiological...

  14. Enhanced alveolar monocytic phagocyte (macrophage) proliferation in tobacco and marijuana smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Barbers, R.G.; Evans, M.J.; Gong, H. Jr.; Tashkin, D.P. )

    1991-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that enhanced cell division accounted for the augmented numbers of monocytic phagocytes with characteristics attributed to alveolar macrophages (AM) found in the lungs of habitual tobacco (T) and marijuana (M) smokers. The monocytic phagocytes, that is, alveolar macrophages, were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from 12 nonsmoking subjects; 10 subjects who smoked T only (TS); 13 subjects who smoked M only (MS); and 6 smokers of both T and M (MTS). The replication of these cells was determined by measuring the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine into the DNA of dividing cells and visually counting 2,000 cells on autoradiographically prepared cytocentrifuge cell preparations. This study demonstrated that the number of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled monocytic phagocytes with characteristics of alveolar macrophages from either TS or MS have a higher proliferative index compared to cells (macrophages) from nonsmokers, p less than 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. The total number of BAL macrophages that are in mitosis in TS (17.90 +/- 4.50 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) or MTS (10.50 +/- 4.20 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are 18- and 10-fold greater, respectively, than the number obtained from nonsmokers (1.01 +/- 0.18 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml). Interestingly, the number of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled macrophages from MS (2.90 +/- 0.66 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are also greater than the number obtained from nonsmokers, although this is not statistically significant. The stimulus augmenting alveolar macrophage replication is as yet unknown but may likely be found in the T or M smoke.

  15. Depletion of Alveolar Macrophages Does Not Prevent Hantavirus Disease Pathogenesis in Golden Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Brocato, Rebecca L.; Bell, Todd M.; Schellhase, Christopher W.; Mraz, Steven R.; Queen, Laurie A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Andes virus (ANDV) is associated with a lethal vascular leak syndrome in humans termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). The mechanism for the massive vascular leakage associated with HPS is poorly understood; however, dysregulation of components of the immune response is often suggested as a possible cause. Alveolar macrophages are found in the alveoli of the lung and represent the first line of defense to many airborne pathogens. To determine whether alveolar macrophages play a role in HPS pathogenesis, alveolar macrophages were depleted in an adult rodent model of HPS that closely resembles human HPS. Syrian hamsters were treated, intratracheally, with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes or control liposomes and were then challenged with ANDV. Treatment with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes resulted in significant reduction in alveolar macrophages, but depletion did not prevent pathogenesis or prolong disease. Depletion also did not significantly reduce the amount of virus in the lung of ANDV-infected hamsters but altered neutrophil recruitment, MIP-1α and MIP-2 chemokine expression, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in hamster bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid early after intranasal challenge. These data demonstrate that alveolar macrophages may play a limited protective role early after exposure to aerosolized ANDV but do not directly contribute to hantavirus disease pathogenesis in the hamster model of HPS. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses continue to cause disease worldwide for which there are no FDA-licensed vaccines, effective postexposure prophylactics, or therapeutics. Much of this can be attributed to a poor understanding of the mechanism of hantavirus disease pathogenesis. Hantavirus disease has long been considered an immune-mediated disease; however, by directly manipulating the Syrian hamster model, we continue to eliminate individual immune cell types. As the most numerous immune cells present in the respiratory tract

  16. The effect of ozone exposure on rat alveolar macrophage arachidonic acid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, M.C.; Eling, T.E.; Dailey, L.A.; Friedman, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Rat alveolar macrophages were prelabeled with {sup 3}H-arachidonic acid ({sup 3}H-AA) and exposed to air or O3 (0.1-1.0 ppm) in vitro for 2 h. Alveolar macrophages released 3.6-fold more tritium at the 1.0 ppm exposure concentration compared with air-exposed macrophages. A significantly increased production of several {sup 3}H-AA metabolites, including 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, thromboxane B2, 12-hydroxy-5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid, prostaglandins E2 and D2, leukotrienes B4 and D4, and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid was formed by macrophages exposed to 1.0 ppm O3 compared with air-exposed macrophages as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. O3 exposure did not alter macrophage {sup 3}H-AA metabolism in response to calcium ionophore A23187. The largest tritiated peak observed in the HPLC chromatograms of O{sub 3}-exposed cells was a polar complex of products that contained various phospholipids and neutral lipids (including diacylglycerol) and possibly degradation products of {sup 3}H-AA and some of its metabolites. These changes in macrophage arachidonic acid metabolism may play an important role in the lung response to O{sub 3} exposure in vivo.

  17. Enzyme release and superoxide anion production by human alveolar macrophages stimulated with immunoglobulin E.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, M; Tonnel, A B; Capron, A; Voisin, C

    1980-01-01

    Human alveolar macrophages specifically released lysosomal beta-glucuronidase and neutral proteases when successively incubated with IgE, and then, for 30 min, with anti-IgE. Superoxide anion O2- generation was obtained when anti-IgE-opsonized zymosan was added to IgE-incubated cells. Macrophages from smokers excreted twice as much enzymes and superoxide as cells from non-smokers. It was possible to induce the specific release of beta-glucuronidase with normal alveolar macrophages successively incubated with the serum of patients allergic to house dust or to grass pollen and then with the specific allergen. This characteristic opens the field to a direct test for allergic sera by analogy with the allergen-induced degranulation test of sensitized basophils. PMID:6254706

  18. Importance of bacterial replication and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Camberlein, Emilie; Cohen, Jonathan M; José, Ricardo; Hyams, Catherine J; Callard, Robin; Chimalapati, Suneeta; Yuste, Jose; Edwards, Lindsey A; Marshall, Helina; van Rooijen, Nico; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Brown, Jeremy S

    2015-03-01

    Although the importance of alveolar macrophages for host immunity during early Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection is well established, the contribution and relative importance of other innate immunity mechanisms and of bacterial factors are less clear. We have used a murine model of S. pneumoniae early lung infection with wild-type, unencapsulated, and para-amino benzoic acid auxotroph mutant TIGR4 strains to assess the effects of inoculum size, bacterial replication, capsule, and alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent clearance mechanisms on bacterial persistence within the lungs. Alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent (calculated indirectly) clearance half-lives and bacterial replication doubling times were estimated using a mathematical model. In this model, after infection with a high-dose inoculum of encapsulated S. pneumoniae, alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms were dominant, with a clearance half-life of 24 min compared to 135 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance. In addition, after a high-dose inoculum, successful lung infection required rapid bacterial replication, with an estimated S. pneumoniae doubling time of 16 min. The capsule had wide effects on early lung clearance mechanisms, with reduced half-lives of 14 min for alveolar macrophage-independent and 31 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance of unencapsulated bacteria. In contrast, with a lower-dose inoculum, the bacterial doubling time increased to 56 min and the S. pneumoniae alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance half-life improved to 42 min and was largely unaffected by the capsule. These data demonstrate the large effects of bacterial factors (inoculum size, the capsule, and rapid replication) and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with S. pneumoniae. PMID:25583525

  19. Importance of bacterial replication and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Camberlein, Emilie; Cohen, Jonathan M; José, Ricardo; Hyams, Catherine J; Callard, Robin; Chimalapati, Suneeta; Yuste, Jose; Edwards, Lindsey A; Marshall, Helina; van Rooijen, Nico; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Brown, Jeremy S

    2015-03-01

    Although the importance of alveolar macrophages for host immunity during early Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection is well established, the contribution and relative importance of other innate immunity mechanisms and of bacterial factors are less clear. We have used a murine model of S. pneumoniae early lung infection with wild-type, unencapsulated, and para-amino benzoic acid auxotroph mutant TIGR4 strains to assess the effects of inoculum size, bacterial replication, capsule, and alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent clearance mechanisms on bacterial persistence within the lungs. Alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent (calculated indirectly) clearance half-lives and bacterial replication doubling times were estimated using a mathematical model. In this model, after infection with a high-dose inoculum of encapsulated S. pneumoniae, alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms were dominant, with a clearance half-life of 24 min compared to 135 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance. In addition, after a high-dose inoculum, successful lung infection required rapid bacterial replication, with an estimated S. pneumoniae doubling time of 16 min. The capsule had wide effects on early lung clearance mechanisms, with reduced half-lives of 14 min for alveolar macrophage-independent and 31 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance of unencapsulated bacteria. In contrast, with a lower-dose inoculum, the bacterial doubling time increased to 56 min and the S. pneumoniae alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance half-life improved to 42 min and was largely unaffected by the capsule. These data demonstrate the large effects of bacterial factors (inoculum size, the capsule, and rapid replication) and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with S. pneumoniae.

  20. Effects of asbestos on the random migration of rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Myrvik, Q.N.; Knox, E.A.; Gordon, M.; Shirley, P.S.

    1985-05-01

    The toxicity of sized and characterized chrysotile, crocidolite, and amosite preparations have been evaluated using alveolar macrophage (AM) migration inhibition assays and viability tests. These results have been compared with asbestos samples obtained from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). These latter samples are designated chrysotile A (RT), crocidolite (RT), and amosite (RT). In addition, filter-isolated preparations of chrysotile A (RT) that consisted mainly of large nonphagocytosable fibers were also tested. Chrysotile (Spurny) and sonicated chrysotile A (RT) produced 50% migration inhibition at about 115 g/mL. Spurny crocidolite produced 50% migration inhibition at about 340 g/mL, where RT crocidolite produced 50% migration inhibition at about 230 g/mL. RT amosite caused 50% migration inhibition at about 180 g/mL, where Spurny amosite was inactive up to 500 g/mL. The large nonphagocytosable chrysotile A (RT) fibers produced 50% migration inhibition at about 66 g/mL. This indicates that fibers can be toxic for AM through extracellular membrane contact. In general the results from the viability studies paralleled the migration inhibition observations. None of the asbestos preparations induced a burst in the hexose monophosphate shunt of BCG-immune AM at 1 mg/mL. BCG-immune AM were more susceptible to cell death than normal AM when incubated with chrysotile A (RT), amosite (RT) and zymosan. Migration inhibition induced by asbestos fibers probably reflects toxicity of the asbestos preparations and could play an important role in blocking normal alveolar clearance of inhaled particles.

  1. Distinct signal transduction pathways for activation of rabbit alveolar macrophages in vitro by cotton bract tannin.

    PubMed

    Prévost, M C; Soulat, J M; Comminges, C; Maury, E; Aslane, R; Cohen-Jonathan, E; Cariven, C; Lauque, D; Chap, H

    1996-05-01

    These experiments were designed to study signal transduction pathways in alveolar macrophages stimulated by condensed tannin or zymosan. Condensed tannins, present in cotton mill dust, alter the host-defense function of alveolar macrophages and may contribute to the pathogenesis of byssinosis. We tried to determine the early steps in signal transduction mechanisms of cell activation by tannin. With the quantification of 51Cr release, we determined that tannin was cytotoxic for the cells after 30 min activation with 130 micrograms for 2 x 10(6) cells. 51Cr release was similar for control cells and zymosan- or 30 micrograms tannin-activated cells. Using the luciferine luciferase reaction, we showed that tannin markedly depleted ATP cell content. In inositol-labeled cells, tannin increased inositolphosphate release in a dose-dependent manner. In lysoPAF-labeled cells, tannin induced synthesis of phosphatidic acid and diglycerides. In the presence of ethanol, the level of tannin-induced phosphatidic acid was slightly reduced, and phosphatidylethanol was synthesized. No phosphatidylethanol was found in alveolar macrophages stimulated by zymosan in the presence of ethanol. GF 109203X, a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C decreased only tannin-induced phosphatidylethanol synthesis. In conclusion, tannin (at 30 or 130 micrograms/ml) activated an inositol phospholipase C in alveolar membranes. Phosphatidylcholine phospholipases C and D were found only at the higher concentration of tannin.

  2. Full Spectrum of LPS Activation in Alveolar Macrophages of Healthy Volunteers by Whole Transcriptomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yutong; Zhao, Jing; Donahoe, Michael P.; Barge, Suchitra; Horne, William T.; Kolls, Jay K.; McVerry, Bryan J.; Birukova, Anastasiya; Tighe, Robert M.; Foster, W. Michael; Hollingsworth, John; Ray, Anuradha; Mallampalli, Rama; Ray, Prabir; Lee, Janet S.

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding macrophage activation, little is known regarding how human alveolar macrophages in health calibrate its transcriptional response to canonical TLR4 activation. In this study, we examined the full spectrum of LPS activation and determined whether the transcriptomic profile of human alveolar macrophages is distinguished by a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF)-dominant type I interferon signature. Bronchoalveolar lavage macrophages were obtained from healthy volunteers, stimulated in the presence or absence of ultrapure LPS in vitro, and whole transcriptomic profiling was performed by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). LPS induced a robust type I interferon transcriptional response and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis predicted interferon regulatory factor (IRF)7 as the top upstream regulator of 89 known gene targets. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase (USP)-18, a negative regulator of interferon α/β responses, was among the top up-regulated genes in addition to IL10 and USP41, a novel gene with no known biological function but with high sequence homology to USP18. We determined whether IRF-7 and USP-18 can influence downstream macrophage effector cytokine production such as IL-10. We show that IRF-7 siRNA knockdown enhanced LPS-induced IL-10 production in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and USP-18 overexpression attenuated LPS-induced production of IL-10 in RAW264.7 cells. Quantitative PCR confirmed upregulation of USP18, USP41, IL10, and IRF7. An independent cohort confirmed LPS induction of USP41 and IL10 genes. These results suggest that IRF-7 and predicted downstream target USP18, both elements of a type I interferon gene signature identified by RNA-Seq, may serve to fine-tune early cytokine response by calibrating IL-10 production in human alveolar macrophages. PMID:27434537

  3. In vitro toxicity of gallium arsenide in alveolar macrophages evaluated by magnetometry, cytochemistry and morphology.

    PubMed

    Okada, M; Karube, H; Niitsuya, M; Aizawa, Y; Okayasu, I; Kotani, M

    1999-12-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), a chemical compound of gallium and arsenic, causes various toxic effects including pulmonary diseases in animals. Since the toxicity is not completely investigated, GaAs has been used in workplaces as the material of various semiconductor products. The present study was conducted to clarify the toxicity of GaAs particles in the alveolar macrophages of hamsters using magnetometry, enzyme release assays and morphological examinations. Alveolar macrophages obtained from hamsters by tracheobronchial lavage and adhered to the disks in the bottom of wells were exposed to ferrosoferric oxide and GaAs particles. Ferrosoferric oxide particles were magnetized externally and the remanent magnetic field was measured. Relaxation, a fast decline of the remanent magnetic fields radiated from the alveolar macrophages, was delayed and decay constants were decreased dose-dependently due to exposure to GaAs. Because the relaxation is thought to be associated with cytoskeleton, the exposure of GaAs may have impaired the motor function of them. Enzyme release assay and morphological findings indicated the damage to the macrophages. Thus the cytotoxicity causes cytostructural changes and cell death. According to DNA electrophoresis and the TUNEL method, necrotic changes occur more frequently than apoptotic changes.

  4. In vitro toxicity of gallium arsenide in alveolar macrophages evaluated by magnetometry, cytochemistry and morphology.

    PubMed

    Okada, M; Karube, H; Niitsuya, M; Aizawa, Y; Okayasu, I; Kotani, M

    1999-12-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), a chemical compound of gallium and arsenic, causes various toxic effects including pulmonary diseases in animals. Since the toxicity is not completely investigated, GaAs has been used in workplaces as the material of various semiconductor products. The present study was conducted to clarify the toxicity of GaAs particles in the alveolar macrophages of hamsters using magnetometry, enzyme release assays and morphological examinations. Alveolar macrophages obtained from hamsters by tracheobronchial lavage and adhered to the disks in the bottom of wells were exposed to ferrosoferric oxide and GaAs particles. Ferrosoferric oxide particles were magnetized externally and the remanent magnetic field was measured. Relaxation, a fast decline of the remanent magnetic fields radiated from the alveolar macrophages, was delayed and decay constants were decreased dose-dependently due to exposure to GaAs. Because the relaxation is thought to be associated with cytoskeleton, the exposure of GaAs may have impaired the motor function of them. Enzyme release assay and morphological findings indicated the damage to the macrophages. Thus the cytotoxicity causes cytostructural changes and cell death. According to DNA electrophoresis and the TUNEL method, necrotic changes occur more frequently than apoptotic changes. PMID:10739163

  5. Aerosol-based efficient delivery of azithromycin to alveolar macrophages for treatment of respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of aerosol-based delivery of azithromycin (AZM) for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by pathogenic microorganisms infected in alveolar macrophages (AMs) was evaluated by comparison with oral administration. The aerosol formulation of AZM (0.2 mg/kg) was administered to rat lungs using a Liquid MicroSprayer(®). The oral formulation of AZM (50 mg/kg) was used for comparison. Time-courses of concentrations of AZM in AMs following administration were obtained, and then the therapeutic availability (TA) was calculated. In addition, the area under the concentrations of AZM in AMs - time curve/minimum inhibitory concentration at which 90% of isolates ratio (AUC/MIC90) were calculated to estimate the antibacterial effects in AMs. The TA of AZM in AMs following administration of aerosol formulation was markedly greater than that following administration of oral formulation. In addition, the AUC/MIC90 of AZM in AMs was markedly higher than the effective values. This indicates that the aerosol formulation could be useful for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by pathogenic microorganisms infected in AMs. This study suggests that aerosolized AZM is an effective pulmonary drug delivery system for the treatment of respiratory infections.

  6. Tilmicosin reduces lipopolysaccharide-stimulated bovine alveolar macrophage prostaglandin E(2) production via a mechanism involving phospholipases.

    PubMed

    Lakritz, Jeffrey; Tyler, Jeff W; Marsh, Antoinette E; Romesburg-Cockrell, Mary; Smith, Kathy; Holle, Julie M

    2002-01-01

    Tilmicosin is a potent antimicrobial with broad-spectrum activity against the bacterial agents involved in the bovine respiratory disease complex. Recent studies indicate that in addition to being bactericidal, tilmicosin is capable of modulating inflammation in the lung. A series of experiments were designed to determine whether tilmicosin alters alveolar macrophage-prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production induced by Escherichia coli (O55:B5) lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Twenty-two healthy Holstein bull calves were used to study the effects of LPS-induced PGE(2) production of alveolar macrophages after in vivo or in vitro treatment with tilmicosin. In Experiment 1, tilmicosin was given by subcutaneous injection (15 mg/kg) twice, 48 hours apart, to four calves; four control calves received no treatment. Twenty-four hours after the second treatment, alveolar macrophages were stimulated with LPS in vitro. In Experiment 2, alveolar macrophages from five untreated calves were harvested and treated in vitro with tilmicosin, followed by LPS stimulation. In Experiment 3, the ability of in vitro tilmicosin treatment to alter the expression of LPS-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA was evaluated. In Experiments 4 and 5, secretory phospholipase A(2) activity was examined in untreated calves. Treatment of calves with tilmicosin resulted in reduced LPS-induced alveolar macrophage PGE(2) production. Similar reductions in PGE(2) by LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages after in vitro tilmicosin treatment were noted. This in vitro tilmicosin treatment was not associated with reduction of the expression of LPS-induced COX-2. Alveolar macrophage phospholipase A(2) activity induced by LPS was significantly reduced by prior tilmicosin treatment in vitro. Tilmicosin (in vivo and in vitro) appears to reduce the PGE(2) eicosanoid response of LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages by reducing the in vitro substrate availability without altering in vitro COX-2 mRNA expression.

  7. Neutrophil chemotaxis caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease alveolar macrophages: the role of CXCL8 and the receptors CXCR1/CXCR2.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manminder; Singh, Dave

    2013-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages produce neutrophil chemoattractants; this cellular cross-talk contributes to neutrophilic airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We have investigated the chemotaxis cross-talk mechanisms between these cells using COPD alveolar macrophages. Using conditioned media from stimulated COPD alveolar macrophages, we investigated the relative contributions of growth-related oncogene (CXCL1), interleukin-8 (CXCL8), and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (CCL5) to neutrophil chemotaxis and evaluated the effect of blocking the chemokine receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 on chemotaxis caused by macrophage-conditioned media. Furthermore, we evaluated whether corticosteroid treatment of stimulated alveolar macrophages inhibited the chemotaxis ability of conditioned media. Alveolar macrophages isolated from COPD (n = 8) and smoker (S) (n = 8) lungs were treated with ultra-pure lipopolysaccharide in the presence and absence of dexamethasone (1 μM). Supernatants were used for neutrophil chemotaxis assays. SB656933 (2-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyl-3-{2-[[(R)-1-(5-methyl-furan-2-yl)-propyl]amino]-3,4-dioxo-cyclobut-1-enylamino}-benzamide) (CXCR2 antagonist) and Sch527123 [1-(2-chloro-3-fluorophenyl)-3-(4-chloro-2-hydroxy-3-piperazin-1-ylsulfonylphenyl)urea, 3-(2-chloro-3-fluoro-phenyl)-1-(4-chloro-2-hydroxy-3-piperazin-1-ylsulfonyl-phenyl)urea] (dual CXCR1 and CXCR2 antagonist) and blocking antibodies for CXCL8, CXCL1, and CCL5 were assessed. Conditioned media caused neutrophil chemotaxis in COPD and smokers (60.5 and 79.9% of total cells, respectively). Dexamethasone did not significantly reduce neutrophil chemotaxis in COPD or S. SB656933 and Sch527123 inhibited chemotaxis in a concentration-dependent manner, with the dual antagonist Sch527123 causing greater inhibition of chemotaxis. CXCL8 antibody inhibited neutrophil chemotaxis to basal levels, although there was no significant effect of blocking either CXCL1 or CCL5 (P

  8. Effects of X irradiation on the cytoskeleton of rat alveolar macrophages in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ladyman, S.J.; Townsend, K.M.S.; Edwards, C.

    1984-07-01

    The three-dimensional visualization of Triton X-100 resistant cytoskeletons has been used to demonstrate that an absorbed dose of 120 Gy from X rays causes a distinctive and reproducible alteration of the cytoskeleton of intact rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The alteration has also been shown to be rapidly and completely ''repaired'' and to be apparently similar to alterations caused by colchicine but dissimilar to those caused by cytochalasin B. From these observations and those of other workers who have studied the irradiation of extracted microtubular proteins in vitro, the authors think it likely that microtubules rather than microfilaments are the radiosensitive component of the macrophage cytoskeleton.

  9. Role of alveolar macrophages in the dissolution of two different industrial uranium oxides.

    PubMed

    Hengé-Napoli, M H; Ansoborlo, E; Claraz, M; Berry, J P; Cheynet, M C

    1996-05-01

    This study was aimed at assessing and understanding some mechanisms involved in the intracellular particle transformation of two uranium oxides (U3O8 and UO2 + Umetal) produced by a new isotopic enrichment plant using laser technology. Instillations were conducted on rats with both uranium compounds and alveolar macrophages were harvested at different dates and prepared in order to be studied using transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS). The presence of particles in the cells was observed from the first day after instillation, and crystalline needles of uranyl phosphate appeared in the cytoplasm of the cells. These needles were more numerous after instillation with the mixture UO2 + Umetal than after administration of U3O8 and may be correlated with the higher solubility of UO2 + Umetal observed in vitro. The formation of insoluble needles in lysosomes is consistent with the insolubilisation of uranium observed after phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. PMID:8793194

  10. Different pathways of degradation of SP-A and saturated phosphatidylcholine by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Baritussio, A; Alberti, A; Armanini, D; Meloni, F; Bruttomesso, D

    2000-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages degrade surfactant protein (SP) A and saturated phosphatidycholine [dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)]. To clarify this process, using rabbit alveolar macrophages, we analyzed the effect of drugs known to affect phagocytosis, pinocytosis, clathrin-mediated uptake, caveolae, the cytoskeleton, lysosomal pH, protein kinase C, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) on the degradation of SP-A and DPPC. We found the following: 1) SP-A binds to the plasma membrane, is rapidly internalized, and then moves toward degradative compartments. Uptake could be clathrin mediated, whereas phagocytosis, pinocytosis, or the use of caveolae are less likely. An intact cytoskeleton and an acidic milieu are necessary for the degradation of SP-A. 2) Stimulation of protein kinase C increases the degradation of SP-A. 3) PI3K influences the degradation of SP-A by regulating both the speed of internalization and subsequent intracellular steps, but its inhibition does not prevent SP-A from reaching the lysosomal compartment. 4) The degradation of DPPC is unaffected by most of the treatments able to influence the degradation of SP-A. Thus it appears that DPPC is degraded by alveolar macrophages through mechanisms very different from those utilized for the degradation of SP-A. PMID:10893207

  11. RNA sequencing provides exquisite insight into the manipulation of the alveolar macrophage by tubercle bacilli.

    PubMed

    Nalpas, Nicolas C; Magee, David A; Conlon, Kevin M; Browne, John A; Healy, Claire; McLoughlin, Kirsten E; Rue-Albrecht, Kévin; McGettigan, Paul A; Killick, Kate E; Gormley, Eamonn; Gordon, Stephen V; MacHugh, David E

    2015-09-08

    Mycobacterium bovis, the agent of bovine tuberculosis, causes an estimated $3 billion annual losses to global agriculture due, in part, to the limitations of current diagnostics. Development of next-generation diagnostics requires a greater understanding of the interaction between the pathogen and the bovine host. Therefore, to explore the early response of the alveolar macrophage to infection, we report the first application of RNA-sequencing to define, in exquisite detail, the transcriptomes of M. bovis-infected and non-infected alveolar macrophages from ten calves at 2, 6, 24 and 48 hours post-infection. Differentially expressed sense genes were detected at these time points that revealed enrichment of innate immune signalling functions, and transcriptional suppression of host defence mechanisms (e.g., lysosome maturation). We also detected differentially expressed natural antisense transcripts, which may play a role in subverting innate immune mechanisms following infection. Furthermore, we report differential expression of novel bovine genes, some of which have immune-related functions based on orthology with human proteins. This is the first in-depth transcriptomics investigation of the alveolar macrophage response to the early stages of M. bovis infection and reveals complex patterns of gene expression and regulation that underlie the immunomodulatory mechanisms used by M. bovis to evade host defence mechanisms.

  12. Chitosan microspheres as an alveolar macrophage delivery system of ofloxacin via pulmonary inhalation.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju-Hwan; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Kim, Dae-Duk; Chung, Suk-Jae; Shim, Won-Sik; Shim, Chang-Koo

    2013-01-30

    Because Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes tuberculosis, survives mainly in the alveolar macrophages, the remedial efficiency of anti-tuberculosis drugs such as ofloxacin may be improved by their direct delivery to the lungs via pulmonary inhalation. For this purpose, ofloxacin-loaded, glutaraldehyde-crosslinked chitosan microspheres (OCMs) were prepared using a water-in-oil emulsification method. The particle size of the OCMs was around 1-6 μm, and the content of ofloxacin was 27% (w/w). A twin-stage impinger (TSI) study revealed that the device-removal efficiency of the drug from the capsule and the arrival rate of the drug to stage II of the apparatus were substantially improved for OCMs compared to ofloxacin itself (i.e., 81 vs. 98% and 13 vs. 45%, respectively). Also, the in vitro uptake of ofloxacin from the OCMs to alveolar macrophages (NR8383) was substantially accelerated: the cellular ofloxacin concentrations at 4 and 24 h after the application were >3.5-fold greater than those for free ofloxacin. The above results indicate that pulmonary inhalation of OCMs might improve the delivery efficiency of ofloxacin to the alveolar macrophages, thereby shortening the length of time that is required to cure tuberculosis with the drug-usually at least 6 months when administered orally.

  13. RNA sequencing provides exquisite insight into the manipulation of the alveolar macrophage by tubercle bacilli

    PubMed Central

    Nalpas, Nicolas C.; Magee, David A.; Conlon, Kevin M.; Browne, John A.; Healy, Claire; McLoughlin, Kirsten E.; Rue-Albrecht, Kévin; McGettigan, Paul A.; Killick, Kate E.; Gormley, Eamonn; Gordon, Stephen V.; MacHugh, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis, the agent of bovine tuberculosis, causes an estimated $3 billion annual losses to global agriculture due, in part, to the limitations of current diagnostics. Development of next-generation diagnostics requires a greater understanding of the interaction between the pathogen and the bovine host. Therefore, to explore the early response of the alveolar macrophage to infection, we report the first application of RNA-sequencing to define, in exquisite detail, the transcriptomes of M. bovis-infected and non-infected alveolar macrophages from ten calves at 2, 6, 24 and 48 hours post-infection. Differentially expressed sense genes were detected at these time points that revealed enrichment of innate immune signalling functions, and transcriptional suppression of host defence mechanisms (e.g., lysosome maturation). We also detected differentially expressed natural antisense transcripts, which may play a role in subverting innate immune mechanisms following infection. Furthermore, we report differential expression of novel bovine genes, some of which have immune-related functions based on orthology with human proteins. This is the first in-depth transcriptomics investigation of the alveolar macrophage response to the early stages of M. bovis infection and reveals complex patterns of gene expression and regulation that underlie the immunomodulatory mechanisms used by M. bovis to evade host defence mechanisms. PMID:26346536

  14. Effects of an inhaled corticosteroid, budesonide, on alveolar macrophage function in smokers.

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrand, H; Björnson, A; Blaschke, E; Brattsand, R; Eklund, A; Larsson, K; Linden, M

    1990-01-01

    Selected functions of alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage of 12 healthy smokers were examined before and after eight weeks' treatment with an inhaled glucocorticosteroid, budesonide (400 micrograms twice daily). After budesonide treatment spontaneous as well as opsonised zymosan triggered prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretion from harvested cells was reduced; no such reduction in opsonised zymosan triggered leukotriene B4 (LTB4) production was observed. Neither the capacity to phagocytose opsonised yeast particles nor the superoxide radical generation triggered by the calcium ionophore A23187, 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), or opsonised zymosan ex vivo were more than marginally affected by the glucocorticosteroid treatment in vivo. Lavage fluid concentrations of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), however, after treatment were twice those before treatment and concentrations of fibronectin were reduced to half. Albumin concentrations in lavage fluid were not affected by the glucocorticosteroid treatment. In separate experiments treatment of alveolar macrophages with 10(-7) or 10(-6) M budesonide overnight in vitro did not affect their superoxide radical or PGE2 generation but significantly blocked LTB4 release. These data indicate that inhaled gluco-corticosteroid treatment may affect synthesis or release (or both) of ACE and fibronectin by alveolar macrophages from healthy smokers whereas other functions of these cells, such as the generation of reactive oxygen derived products ex vivo, are only marginally affected. PMID:2166359

  15. Differential polarization of alveolar macrophages and bone marrow-derived monocytes following chemically and pathogen-induced chronic lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Redente, Elizabeth F.; Higgins, David M.; Dwyer-Nield, Lori D.; Orme, Ian M.; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Malkinson, Alvin M.

    2010-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages and BDMCs undergo sequential biochemical changes during the chronic inflammatory response to chemically induced lung carcinogenesis in mice. Herein, we examine two chronic lung inflammation models—repeated exposure to BHT and infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis—to establish whether similar macrophage phenotype changes occur in non-neoplastic pulmonary disease. Exposure to BHT or M. tuberculosis results in pulmonary inflammation characterized by an influx of macrophages, followed by systemic effects on the BM and other organs. In both models, pulmonary IFN-γ and IL-4 production coincided with altered polarization of alveolar macrophages. Soon after BHT administration or M. tuberculosis infection, IFN-γ content in BALF increased, and BAL macrophages became classically (M1) polarized, as characterized by increased expression of iNOS. As inflammation progressed in both models, the amount of BALF IFN-γ content and BAL macrophage iNOS expression decreased, and BALF IL-4 content and macrophage arginase I expression rose, indicating alternative/M2 polarization. Macrophages present in M. tuberculosis-induced granulomas remained M1-polarized, implying that these two pulmonary macrophage populations, alveolar and granuloma-associated, are exposed to different activating cytokines. BDMCs from BHT-treated mice displayed polarization profiles similar to alveolar macrophages, but BDMCs in M. tuberculosis-infected mice did not become polarized. Thus, only alveolar macrophages in these two models of chronic lung disease exhibit a similar progression of polarization changes; polarization of BDMCs was specific to BHT-induced pulmonary inflammation, and polarization of granuloma macrophages was specific to the M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:20360403

  16. In vivo Targeting of Alveolar Macrophages via RAFT-Based Glycopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun-Ho; Manganiello, Matthew J.; Chow, Yu-Hua; Ghosn, Bilal; Convertine, Anthony J.; Stayton, Partick S.; Schnapp, Lynn M.; Ratner, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Targeting cell populations via endogenous carbohydrate receptors is an appealing approach for drug delivery. However, to be effective, this strategy requires the production of high affinity carbohydrate ligands capable of engaging with specific cell-surface lectins. To develop materials that exhibit high affinity towards these receptors, we synthesized glycopolymers displaying pendant carbohydrate moieties from carbohydrate-functionalized monomer precursors via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. These glycopolymers were fluorescently labeled and used to determine macrophage-specific targeting both in vitro and in vivo. Mannose- and N-acetylglucosamine-containing glycopolymers were shown to specifically target mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in vitro in a dose-dependent manner as compared to a galactose-containing glycopolymer (30- and 19-fold higher uptake, respectively). In addition, upon macrophage differentiation, the mannose glycopolymer exhibited enhanced uptake in M2-polarized macrophages, an anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype prevalent in injured tissue. This carbohydrate-specific uptake was retained in vivo, as alveolar macrophages demonstrated 6-fold higher internalization of mannose glycopolymer, as compared to galactose, following intratracheal administration in mice. We have shown the successful synthesis of a class of functional RAFT glycopolymers capable of macrophage-type specific uptake both in vitro and in vivo, with significant implications for the design of future targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:22770567

  17. Urban particle-induced apoptosis and phenotype shifts in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Holian, A; Hamilton, R F; Morandi, M T; Brown, S D; Li, L

    1998-01-01

    Epidemiological studies report a small but positive association between short-term increases in airborne particulate matter and small increases in morbidity and mortality from respiratory and cardiovascular disease in urban areas. However, the lack of a mechanistic explanation to link particle exposure and human health effects makes it difficult to validate the human health effects. The present study tested the hypothesis that urban particles could cause apoptosis of human alveolar macrophages(AM) and a shift of their phenotypes to a higher immune active state, which would provide a mechanism to explain an inflammatory response. Freshly isolated human AM were incubated for 24 hr with urban particles (#1648 and #1649), Mount Saint Helen's ash (MSH), and residual oil fly ash (ROFA).Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion and apoptosis was demonstrated by morphology, cell death ELISA, and DNA ladder formation. Additionally, AM were characterized according to RFD1(+) (immune stimulatory macrophages) and RFD1(+)7(+) (suppressor macrophages) phenotypes by flow cytometry. ROFA particles caused AM necrosis at concentrations as low as 10 microg/ml, urban particles had no effect except at 200 microg/ml, and MSH had no effect at 200 microg/ml. ROFA (25 microg/ml) and particles #1648 or #1649 (100 microg/ml) caused apoptosis of AM by all three criteria, but 200 microg/ml MSH had no effect. Finally, 25 microg/ml ROFA and 100 microg/ml particles #1648 or #1649 up regulated the expression of the RFD1(+) AM phenotype, while only ROFA decreased the RFD1(+)7(+) phenotype. Consequently, ROFA and urban particles can induce apoptosis of human AM and increase the ratio of AM phenotypes toward a higher immune active state (i.e., increased RFD1(+):RFD1(+)7(+) ratio). Ifurban particles cause similar changes in vivo, this could result in lung inflammation and possible increased pulmonary and cardiovascular disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID

  18. Alveolar Macrophage Recruitment and Activation by Chronic Second Hand Smoke Exposure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ellwanger, Almut; Solon, Margaret; Cambier, Christopher J.; Pinkerton, Kent E.; Koth, Laura L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Approximately 15% of cases of COPD occur in non-smokers. Among the potential risk factors for COPD in non-smokers is second hand smoke (SHS) exposure. However, the Surgeon General reported in 2006 that the evidence linking second hand smoke and COPD is insufficient to infer a causal relationship, largely because current evidence does not establish a biological link. Objectives The goal of this study was to determine whether SHS exposure can induce alveolar macrophage recruitment and expression of activation markers that we have previously demonstrated in human smokers and in mouse models of emphysema. To achieve these goals, we studied mice exposed to an ambient mixture of predominantly [89%] sidestream smoke at increasing doses over 3 months. Results We found that second hand smoke exposure induced a dose-dependent increase in alveolar macrophage recruitment (mean ± sd; 224,511 ± 52,330 vs 166,152 ± 47,989 macrophages/ml of bronchoalveolar lavage in smoke-exposed vs air-exposed controls at 3 months, p=0.003). We also found increased expression of several markers of alveolar macrophage activation (PLA2g7, dkfzp434l142, Trem-2, and pirin, all p<0.01 at 3 months) and increased lavage levels of two inflammatory mediators associated with COPD (CCL2 [MCP-1], 58 ± 12 vs. 43 ± 22 pg/ml, p=0.03; and TNFα, 138 ± 43 vs 88 ± 78 pg/ml, p=0.04 at 3 months). Conclusions These findings indicate that second smoke exposure can cause macrophage recruitment and activation, providing a biological link between second hand smoke exposure and the development of inflammatory processes linked to COPD. PMID:19378221

  19. Plutonium behavior after pulmonary administration according to solubility properties, and consequences on alveolar macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Van der Meeren, Anne; Gremy, Olivier; Renault, Daniel; Miroux, Amandine; Bruel, Sylvie; Griffiths, Nina; Tourdes, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    The physico-chemical form in which plutonium enters the body influences the lung distribution and the transfer rate from lungs to blood. In the present study, we evaluated the early lung damage and macrophage activation after pulmonary contamination of plutonium of various preparation modes which produce different solubility and distribution patterns. Whatever the solubility properties of the contaminant, macrophages represent a major retention compartment in lungs, with 42 to 67% of the activity from broncho-alveolar lavages being associated with macrophages 14 days post-contamination. Lung changes were observed 2 and 6 weeks post-contamination, showing inflammatory lesions and accumulation of activated macrophages (CD68 positive) in plutonium-contaminated rats, although no increased proliferation of pneumocytes II (TTF-1 positive cells) was found. In addition, acid phosphatase activity in macrophages from contaminated rats was enhanced 2 weeks post-contamination as compared to sham groups, as well as inflammatory mediator levels (TNF-α, MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1) in macrophage culture supernatants. Correlating with the decrease in activity remaining in macrophages after plutonium contamination, inflammatory mediator production returned to basal levels 6 weeks post-exposure. The production of chemokines by macrophages was evaluated after contamination with Pu of increasing solubility. No correlation was found between the solubility properties of Pu and the activation level of macrophages. In summary, our data indicate that, despite the higher solubility of plutonium citrate or nitrate as compared to preformed colloids or oxides, macrophages remain the main lung target after plutonium contamination and may participate in the early pulmonary damage.

  20. YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Tang, Ming-Chi; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Chang, Wen-De; Chung, Pei-Jen; Chang, Ya-Wen; Fang, Yao-Ching

    2012-04-15

    Alveolar macrophages play significant roles in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory lung diseases. Increases in exhaled nitric oxide (NO) are well documented to reflect disease severity in the airway. In this study, we investigated the effect of 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1), a known activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, on prostaglandin (PG)E{sub 1} (a stable PGE{sub 2} analogue) and forskolin (a adenylate cyclase activator) induced NO production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383). YC-1 did not directly cause NO production or iNOS expression, but drastically potentiated PGE{sub 1}- or forskolin-induced NO production and iNOS expression in NR8383 alveolar macrophages. Combination treatment with YC-1 and PGE{sub 1} significantly increased phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), but not nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The combined effect on NO production, iNOS expression, and CREB phosphorylation was reversed by a protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor (H89), suggesting that the potentiating functions were mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Consistent with this, cAMP analogues, but not the cGMP analogue, caused NO release, iNOS expression, and CREB activation. YC-1 treatment induced an increase in PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP formation, which occurred through the inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Furthermore, the combination of rolipram (an inhibitor of PDE4), but not milronone (an inhibitor of PDE3), and PGE{sub 1} also triggered NO production and iNOS expression. In summary, YC-1 potentiates PGE{sub 1}-induced NO production and iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and activation of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. Highlights: ► YC-1 potentiated PGE1-induced iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages. ► The combination of YC-1 and PGE1 increased CREB but not NFκB activation.

  1. Role of alveolar macrophages in dissemination of Marek’s disease virus from lungs to lymphoid organs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand the specific role of macrophages in the control or exacerbation of Marek’s disease (MD), alveolar macrophages of chickens were depleted by intra-tracheal (IT) instillation of Cl2MBP. Forty-eight hours post treatment chicks were inoculated with 100 micro liter of cell-free MD virus (MD...

  2. Role of alveolar macrophages in innate immunity in neonates: evidence for selective lipopolysaccharide binding protein production by rat neonatal alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lee, P T; Holt, P G; McWilliam, A S

    2000-11-01

    As the first line of defense against inhaled substances, alveolar macrophages (AM) play a crucial role in maintaining lung homeostasis. This is achieved via phagocytosis of foreign material and the secretion of a wide range of mediator molecules, including those involved in neutrophil recruitment. Neonates are known to manifest increased susceptibility to lung infections, and we hypothesize that this may be due in part to a deficiency in the function of AM. We report here that although recruitment of neutrophils into the respiratory tract of newborn animals in response to Moraxalla catarrhalis exposure is greatly delayed and diminished, AM from newborn animals have greater phagocytic capacity when compared with those from adult animals. Additionally, newborn AM respond normally to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) via production of a variety of chemokines, including macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-1beta, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, gro/ cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, MIP-2, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. We have also demonstrated an LPS inducible expression of messenger RNA for LPS binding protein (LBP) in neonatal AM that was not observed in AM from adult animals or in peritoneal macrophages. We speculate that local production of LBP by AM may be a significant factor in the neonatal immunologic response to infections, providing a compensatory mechanism for the deficiency in specific neonatal immunity during this period of development when the newborn is being exposed to a range of potentially pathogenic materials for the first time.

  3. Nicotinic receptors on rat alveolar macrophages dampen ATP-induced increase in cytosolic calcium concentration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) have been identified on a variety of cells of the immune system and are generally considered to trigger anti-inflammatory events. In the present study, we determine the nAChR inventory of rat alveolar macrophages (AM), and investigate the cellular events evoked by stimulation with nicotine. Methods Rat AM were isolated freshly by bronchoalveolar lavage. The expression of nAChR subunits was analyzed by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. To evaluate function of nAChR subunits, electrophysiological recordings and measurements of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were conducted. Results Positive RT-PCR results were obtained for nAChR subunits α3, α5, α9, α10, β1, and β2, with most stable expression being noted for subunits α9, α10, β1, and β2. Notably, mRNA coding for subunit α7 which is proposed to convey the nicotinic anti-inflammatory response of macrophages from other sources than the lung was not detected. RT-PCR data were supported by immunohistochemistry on AM isolated by lavage, as well as in lung tissue sections and by Western blotting. Neither whole-cell patch clamp recordings nor measurements of [Ca2+]i revealed changes in membrane current in response to ACh and in [Ca2+]i in response to nicotine, respectively. However, nicotine (100 μM), given 2 min prior to ATP, significantly reduced the ATP-induced rise in [Ca2+]i by 30%. This effect was blocked by α-bungarotoxin and did not depend on the presence of extracellular calcium. Conclusions Rat AM are equipped with modulatory nAChR with properties distinct from ionotropic nAChR mediating synaptic transmission in the nervous system. Their stimulation with nicotine dampens ATP-induced Ca2+-release from intracellular stores. Thus, the present study identifies the first acute receptor-mediated nicotinic effect on AM with anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:20920278

  4. Role of activation in alveolar macrophage-mediated suppression of the plaque-forming cell response.

    PubMed Central

    Mbawuike, I N; Herscowitz, H B

    1988-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are highly suppressive of the in vitro plaque-forming cell (PFC) response of spleen cells obtained from mice primed with sheep erythrocytes. Comparison of macrophage populations obtained from disparate anatomical sites revealed that although in both cases there was a cell-concentration-dependent suppression of the PFC response, resident AM or AM activated as a result of intravenous injection of Mycobacterium bovis BCG were equally suppressive at the doses examined. Although there was a similar dose-dependent suppression with peritoneal macrophages, BCG-activated cells were more suppressive of the PFC response than were resident cells. In contrast, splenic macrophages at comparable concentrations were not at all suppressive. Resident AM exhibited significantly lower levels of 5'-nucleotidase activity than did resident peritoneal macrophages. Macrophage-mediated suppression of the in vitro PFC response could not be attributed to the release of toxic oxygen metabolites (H2O2, O2- ,and .OH) or prostaglandins, since the addition of catalase, superoxide dismutase, 2-mercaptoethanol, or indomethacin did not completely reverse suppression. These results suggest that the lung microenvironment may maintain AM in an activated state which contributes to their potential immunoregulatory functions. PMID:2830191

  5. Formulation and Characterization of Pyrazinamide Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Efficiency for Alveolar Macrophage Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Varma, J. N. Ravi; Kumar, T. Santosh; Prasanthi, B.; Ratna, J. Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Pyrazinamide, a highly specific agent against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is used as first-line drug to treat tuberculosis. The current work aims to formulate polymeric nanoparticles based drug delivery system to sustain the release profile and reduce the dosing frequency of pyrazinamide. Further aim was to target the macrophages within body fluid. These polymeric nanoparticles were prepared by simultaneous double-emulsion (W/O/W) solvent evaporation/diffusion technique. The prepared dispersions were characterized for various biopharmaceutical parameters such as particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, drug loading capacity, entrapment efficiency and targeting to alveolar macrophages. The formulated polymeric nanoparticles were in the particle size range of 45.51 to 300.4 nm with a maximum drug entrapment efficiency of 80.9%. The stability study of optimized batch conducted at 40±2°/75±5% relative humidity showed no significant changes up to 90 days. X-Ray Diffraction spectrum exhibits the transformation of crystalline form of drug to amorphous in the formulation. Scanning Electron Microscope image showed nanoparticles spherical in shape with smooth surface. In vitro release profiles were biphasic in nature with burst release followed by controlled release over a period of 24 h obeying diffusion mechanism. In vivo and ex vivo studies results of the study show significant uptake of the nanoparticles by alveolar macrophages through fluorescent micrograph. Polymeric nanoparticles formulation of pyrazinamide could encompass significant uptake by alveolar macrophages, the high first-pass metabolism, sustain the release of drug leading to reduction in dose, toxicity and improvement of patient compliance. PMID:26180270

  6. Acute toxicity of lead particulates on pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Ultrastructural and microanalytical studies

    SciTech Connect

    deVries, C.R.; Ingram, P.; Walker, S.R.; Linton, R.W.; Gutknecht, W.F.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Although it is well established that respiratory uptake of lead-containing particles plays a substantial role in the epidemiology of plumbism, relatively little is known about the role of the pulmonary alveolar macrophage in lead poisoning. An in vitro system was designed to investigate the effects of lead oxide particles of respirable size on the rabbit alveolar macrophage. The studies were concerned with the intracellular solubility of PbO and Pb/sub 3/O/sub 4/ and changes in fine structure attributable to lead toxicity. The distribution of phagocytosed lead and its intracellular reprecipitation complexes was established by electron microprobe analysis and secondary ion mass spectroscopy in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and backscatter imaging. It was found that Pb/sub 3/O/sub 4/, PbO and PbO-coated particles were ingested by the rabbit alveolar macrophages and that each of these lead oxide compounds produced similar damage to the fine structure of the cell. Swelling of the mitochondria, nuclear membrane, and endoplasmic reticulum was common, as well as were characteristic reprecipitation complexes of lead, phosphorous, and calcium within the nuclear heterochromatin and cytoplasm of the cell. The precipitation complexes were not seen in cells incubated with the particles if phagocytosis was blocked by 0.22-microns, membrane filters. It was concluded that phagocytosis of these lead oxide particles was necessary to produce the cytopathic changes. It is suggested that solubilization of lead from the ingested particles in phagosomes of macrophages results in the liberation of intracellular lead with the resultant formation of reprecipitation complexes.

  7. Phagostimulatory effect of uptake of PLGA microspheres loaded with rifampicin on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Keiji; Hasegawa, Taizo; Nakajima, Takehisa; Makino, Kimiko; Terada, Hiroshi

    2011-10-15

    Our previous results on the phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages (Mϕs) toward poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid microspheres (PLGA MS) loaded with the anti-tuberculosis agent rifampicin (R-PLGA MS) suggest that the phagocytosis of R-PLGA MS enhances the phagocytic activity of Mϕ cells. To confirm this possibility, we examined the effect of phagocytosis of R-PLGA MS and polystyrene latex (PSL) MS on the phagocytic uptake of fluorescent PSL (F-PSL) MS by cells of the rat alveolar macrophage cell line NR8383 at 37°C. Phagocytic activity was examined in terms of the population of Mϕ cells that had phagocytosed MS (N(total)) and the total number of MS phagocytosed (n(total)) by counting the phagocytic Mϕ cells and the MS ingested in optical microscopic fields. Phagocytosis of R-PLGA MS enhanced about 1.5 times the values of N(total) and n(total) of the phagocytosis of F-PSL MS under the conditions where the phagocytosis of F-PSL MS did not attain the saturated level. In contrast, the phagocytosis of PSL MS did not enhance the phagocytic activity of Mϕ cells toward F-PSL MS. In conclusion, R-PLGA MS are favorable for drug delivery of anti-tuberculosis agents into alveolar Mϕs due to their ability to up-regulate the phagocytosis of MS. PMID:21700434

  8. Alendronate inhalation ameliorates elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice by induction of apoptosis of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Manabu; Maeno, Toshitaka; Nishimura, Satoshi; Ogata, Fusa; Masubuchi, Hiroaki; Hara, Kenichiro; Yamaguchi, Kouichi; Aoki, Fumiaki; Suga, Tatsuo; Nagai, Ryozo; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-03-10

    Alveolar macrophages play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of emphysema, for which there is currently no effective treatment. Bisphosphonates are widely used to treat osteoclast-mediated bone diseases. Here we show that delivery of the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate alendronate via aerosol inhalation ameliorates elastase-induced emphysema in mice. Inhaled, but not orally ingested, alendronate inhibits airspace enlargement after elastase instillation, and induces apoptosis of macrophages in bronchoalveolar fluid via caspase-3- and mevalonate-dependent pathways. Cytometric analysis indicates that the F4/80(+)CD11b(high)CD11c(mild) population characterizing inflammatory macrophages, and the F4/80(+)CD11b(mild)CD11c(high) population defining resident alveolar macrophages take up substantial amounts of the bisphosphonate imaging agent OsteoSense680 after aerosol inhalation. We further show that alendronate inhibits macrophage migratory and phagocytotic activities and blunts the inflammatory response of alveolar macrophages by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB signalling. Given that the alendronate inhalation effectively induces apoptosis in both recruited and resident alveolar macrophages, we suggest this strategy may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of emphysema.

  9. Alendronate inhalation ameliorates elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice by induction of apoptosis of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Manabu; Maeno, Toshitaka; Nishimura, Satoshi; Ogata, Fusa; Masubuchi, Hiroaki; Hara, Kenichiro; Yamaguchi, Kouichi; Aoki, Fumiaki; Suga, Tatsuo; Nagai, Ryozo; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of emphysema, for which there is currently no effective treatment. Bisphosphonates are widely used to treat osteoclast-mediated bone diseases. Here we show that delivery of the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate alendronate via aerosol inhalation ameliorates elastase-induced emphysema in mice. Inhaled, but not orally ingested, alendronate inhibits airspace enlargement after elastase instillation, and induces apoptosis of macrophages in bronchoalveolar fluid via caspase-3- and mevalonate-dependent pathways. Cytometric analysis indicates that the F4/80(+)CD11b(high)CD11c(mild) population characterizing inflammatory macrophages, and the F4/80(+)CD11b(mild)CD11c(high) population defining resident alveolar macrophages take up substantial amounts of the bisphosphonate imaging agent OsteoSense680 after aerosol inhalation. We further show that alendronate inhibits macrophage migratory and phagocytotic activities and blunts the inflammatory response of alveolar macrophages by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB signalling. Given that the alendronate inhalation effectively induces apoptosis in both recruited and resident alveolar macrophages, we suggest this strategy may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of emphysema. PMID:25757189

  10. Inhibition of bleomycin-induced cell death in rat alveolar macrophages and human lung epithelial cells by ambroxol.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jun Sik; Ko, Hyun Hee; Han, Eun Sook; Lee, Chung Soo

    2003-10-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition is recognized to be involved in toxic and oxidative forms of cell injury. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ambroxol against the cytotoxicity of bleomycin (BLM) by looking at the effect on the mitochondrial membrane permeability in alveolar macrophages and lung epithelial cells. Alveolar macrophages or lung epithelial cells exposed to BLM revealed the loss of cell viability and increase in caspase-3 activity. Ambroxol (10-100 microM) reduced the 75 mU/mL BLM-induced cell death and activation of caspase-3 in macrophages or epithelial cells. It reduced the condensation and fragmentation of nuclei caused by BLM in macrophages. Ambroxol alone did not significantly cause cell death. Treatment of alveolar macrophages with BLM resulted in the decrease in transmembrane potential in mitochondria, cytosolic accumulation of cytochrome c, increase in formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of GSH. Ambroxol (10-100 microM) inhibited the increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability, ROS formation and decrease in GSH contents due to BLM in macrophages. Ambroxol exerted a scavenging effect on hydroxyl radicals and nitric oxide and reduced the iron-mediated formation of malondialdehyde and carbonyls in liver mitochondria. It prevented cell death due to SIN-1 in lung epithelial cells. The results demonstrate that ambroxol attenuates the BLM-induced viability loss in alveolar macrophages or lung epithelial cells. This effect may be due to inhibition of mitochondrial damage and due to the scavenging action on free radicals.

  11. Human Alveolar Macrophage Gene Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains H37Ra and H37Rv

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Richard F.; Walrath, Jessica; Lee, Hung; Jacobson, Bruce A.; Horton, Heidi; Bowman, Michael R.; Nocka, Karl; Sypek, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    H37Rv and H37Ra have been widely used as models of virulent and avirulent strains, respectively, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Since the sequencing of H37Rv, microarrays have been used to investigate gene expression of M. tuberculosis strains under various conditions, and to compare gene expression of specific isolates of the organism. Because differences in the virulence of these organisms could also be manifest via their differential induction of host genes, we used Affymetrix Human Genome Arrays U133A and U133B to evaluate human alveolar macrophage (AM) responses to infection with H37Rv and H37Ra. H37Rv altered expression of far more genes than did H37Ra. Moreover, the genes induced by H37Rv to a greater extent than by H37Ra were predominantly associated with the development of effective immunity. H37Rv markedly increased expression of IL-23 p19, whereas neither organism significantly induced IL-12 p35 expression. Quantitative PCR confirmed that H37Rv induced significantly more AM p19 expression than did H37Ra. After low-level infection of both AM and peripheral blood monocytes (MN) with H37Rv, neither cell type produced IL-12 (by ELISA). In contrast, AM displayed significant IL-23 production in response to H37Rv, whereas MN did not. Our findings thus suggest an important role for IL-23 in human host responses to pulmonary infection with M. tuberculosis, and are consistent with epidemiologic and genetic studies that imply that H37Rv may not have unusual capacity to cause human disease. PMID:18787177

  12. Synthesis of lyso(bis)phosphatidic acid in rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Thornburg, T.; Roddick, V.; Wykle, R.L.; Waite, M.

    1987-05-01

    Reported here are studies on the biosynthetic pathway used by normal and BCG elicited alveolar macrophages for the synthesis of lyso(bis)phosphatidic acid (L(bis)PA). Earlier observations by this laboratory have shown that although L(bis)PA is abundant in these cells, there is little de novo synthesis of this lipid. Diaceyl phosphatidylglycerol (PG) labeled with either (1,2,3-/sup 3/H) glycerol or /sup 32/P demonstrated that PG is used as an exogenous substrate for L(bis)PA formation; both glycerol moieties are incorporated. Other phospholipids do not have this capacity. BCG-elicited macrophages are capable of only one-quarter the synthesis of L(bis)PA seen with normal cells, and also show a decreased amount of cell associated substrate. In addition, (/sup 3/H) 1-0-alkyl PG was used as a substrate to test the importance of the sn-1 acyl linkage in the synthetic pathway. This substrate produced less L(bis)PA while dramatically increasing the amounts of labelled phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine within the cell. The alkyl substrate also showed increased uptake by the cell. They conclude that the hydrolysis of the acyl group at the sn-1 position of PG is essential in the synthetic pathway leading to the production of L(bis)PA. They further suggest that the PG used by these cells as an exogenous substrate in vitro is obtained from the PG-rich surfactant surrounding the alveolar macrophage.

  13. Effects of asbestos and silica on superoxide anion production in the guinea pig alveolar macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Roney, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    This study examined the effect of asbestos and silica on the activation pathway of the guinea pig alveolar macrophage. Activation of macrophages by physiological agents results in stimulation of phospholipase C causing phosphatidyl inositol turnover and intracellular calcium mobilization. Phosphatidyl inositol turnover produces diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C causing superoxide anion production. Chrysotile stimulated alveolar macrophages to produce superoxide anion. This stimulation proceeded via phospholipase C, since chrysotile stimulated phosphatidyl inositol turnover and intracellular calcium mobilization. The possible involvement of a coupling protein was evaluated by pretreating cells with pertussis toxin. Potential binding sites for chrysotile stimulation were examined using a series of nine lectins. Chrysotile-stimulated superoxide anion production was blocked by pretreatment with lectins which bound to mannose, fucose, or N-acetylgalactosamine. In addition, incubation with the N-acetylglucosamine, but not by lectins which bound to mannose, fucose, or N-acetylgalactosamine. In addition, incubation with the N-acetylglucosamine polymer, chitin, inhibited chrysotile-stimulated superoxide anion production, suggesting that chrysotile stimulated superoxide anion production by binding to N-acetylglucosamine residues. On the other hand, silica did not stimulate superoxide anion production. The effect of silica on agonist stimulation of this pathway was examined using two stimulants of superoxide anion production, N-formyl-nle-leu-phe (FNLP, which stimulates through phospholipase C) and phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (which directly activates protein kinase C).

  14. Acute toxicity of lead particulates on pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Ultrastructural and microanalytical studies

    SciTech Connect

    deVries, C.R.; Ingram, P.; Walker, S.R.; Linton, R.W.; Gutknecht, W.F.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    An in vitro system was designed to investigate the effects of lead oxide particles of respirable size on the rabbit alveolar macrophage. The studies were concerned with the intracellular solubility of PbO and Pb/sub 3/O/sub 4/ and changes in fine structure attributable to lead toxicity. The distribution of phagocytosed lead and its intracellular reprecipitation complexes was established by electron microprobe analysis and secondary ion mass spectroscopy in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and backscatter imaging. It was found that Pb/sub 3/O/sub 4/, PbO and PbO-coated particles were ingested by the rabbit alveolar macrophages and that each of these lead oxide compounds produced similar damage to the fine structure of the cell. Swelling of the mitochondria, nuclear membrane, and endoplasmic reticulum was common, as well as were characteristic reprecipitation complexes of lead, phosphorous, and calcium within the nuclear heterochromatin and cytoplasm of the cell. The precipitation complexes were not seen in cells incubated with the particles if phagocytosis was blocked by 0.22-microns, membrane filters. It was concluded that phagocytosis of these lead oxide particles was necessary to produce the cytopathic changes. It is suggested that solubilization of lead from the ingested particles in phagosomes of macrophages results in the liberation of intracellular lead with the resultant formation of reprecipitation complexes.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide modulation of a CD14-like molecule on porcine alveolar macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielian, T. L.; Ross, C. R.; McVey, D. S.; Chapes, S. K.; Blecha, F.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation antigen 14 (CD14) functions as a receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) LPS-binding protein (LBP) complexes. Because LPS has varying effects on CD14 expression in vitro, we evaluated CD14 expression in response to LPS with a fully differentiated macrophage phenotype, the alveolar macrophage. By using flow microfluorometric analysis and a radioimmunoassay with an anti-human CD14 monoclonal antibody (My4) that cross-reacts with porcine CD14, we found that macrophages stimulated with LPS for 24 h exhibited a two- to fivefold increase in CD14-like antigen compared with unstimulated cells. At low concentrations of LPS, up-regulation of the CD14-like antigen was dependent on serum; at higher concentrations of LPS, serum was not required. In the absence of serum a 10-fold higher dose of LPS (10 ng/ml) was required to increase CD14-like expression. In addition, LPS-induced CD14-like up-regulation correlated with secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, regardless of serum concentration. Blockade with My4 antibody significantly inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion at 1 ng/ml of LPS. However, inhibition decreased as we increased the LPS concentration, suggesting the existence of CD14-independent pathways of macrophage activation in response to LPS. Alternatively, My4 may have a lower affinity for the porcine CD14 antigen than LPS, which may have only partially blocked the LPS-LBP binding site at high concentrations of LPS. Therefore, these data suggest that LPS activation of porcine alveolar macrophages for 24 h increased CD14-like receptor expression. The degree of CD14-like up-regulation was related to LPS concentration, however, activation did not require the presence of serum at high concentrations of LPS.

  16. Binding of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids to phosphatidylcholine vesicles and alveolar macrophages: relationship between binding affinity and antifibrogenic potential of these drugs.

    PubMed

    Ma, J K; Mo, C G; Malanga, C J; Ma, J Y; Castranova, V

    1991-01-01

    A group of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids has been shown to exhibit various degrees of effectiveness in preventing silica-induced fibrosis in animal models. The objective of the present study was to characterize the binding of several of these alkaloids to phosphatidylcholine vesicles and rat alveolar macrophages using fluorometric and equilibrium dialysis methods, respectively. The lipid binding affinity of these alkaloids was found to depend upon several structural factors including hydrophobic substitutions, chiral configurations, and double oxygen bridge-restricted confirmation of the benzylisoquinoline moieties. Tetrandrine, which is a highly effective agent in preventing fibrosis, showed strong binding to both lipid vesicles and alveolar macrophages. In contrast, certain analogues of tetrandrine such as curine and tubocurine, which have little or no effect on silicosis, exhibited only weak binding to lipid vesicles and almost no binding to cells. The moderate binding affinity of fangchinoline to vesicles and cells corresponded to a moderate effectiveness of the compound as an antifibrogenic agent. Methoxyadiantifoline, an alkaloid of unknown antifibrogenic potential, also exhibited high binding affinities for lipid and cells. In conclusion, the results of these studies indicate that alveolar macrophages exhibit large binding capacities for certain members of this class of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids. A positive correlation was observed between binding affinity to alveolar macrophages and the reported antifibrotic potency of these compounds. These data also suggest that the ability of these drugs to interact with alveolar macrophages may be a key step in inhibition of the progression of silica-induced pulmonary disease. PMID:1663032

  17. Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1) Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David N.; Li, Yonghua; Kumar, Rajnish; Burke, Sean A.; Dawson, Rodney; Hioe, Catarina E.; Borkowsky, William; Rom, William N.; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    While exploring the effects of aerosol IFN-γ treatment in HIV-1/tuberculosis co-infected patients, we observed A to G mutations in HIV-1 envelope sequences derived from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of aerosol IFN-γ-treated patients and induction of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) in the BAL cells. IFN-γ induced ADAR1 expression in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) but not T cells. ADAR1 siRNA knockdown induced HIV-1 expression in BAL cells of four HIV-1 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. Similar results were obtained in MDM that were HIV-1 infected in vitro. Over-expression of ADAR1 in transformed macrophages inhibited HIV-1 viral replication but not viral transcription measured by nuclear run-on, suggesting that ADAR1 acts post-transcriptionally. The A to G hyper-mutation pattern observed in ADAR1 over-expressing cells in vitro was similar to that found in the lungs of HIV-1 infected patients treated with aerosol IFN-γ suggesting the model accurately represented alveolar macrophages. Together, these results indicate that ADAR1 restricts HIV-1 replication post-transcriptionally in macrophages harboring HIV-1 provirus. ADAR1 may therefore contribute to viral latency in macrophages. PMID:25272020

  18. Isolation and phenotypic characterization of colonic macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rogler, G; Hausmann, M; Vogl, D; Aschenbrenner, E; Andus, T; Falk, W; Andreesen, R; SchÖlmerich, J; Gross, V

    1998-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in the intestinal mucosal immune system. However, they are a poorly defined cell population. We therefore determined their phenotype in normal colonic mucosa. Macrophages were isolated from colonic biopsies and surgical specimens by collagenase digestion. Colonic macrophages were positively sorted by anti-CD33 magnetic beads. Flow cytometric triple fluorescence analysis was applied to study CD14, CD16, CD33, CD44, CD11b, CD11c, CD64, HLA-DR, CD80, CD86 and CD3/CD19 expression. CD33 was evaluated as a positive marker for intestinal macrophages. CD33+ cells isolated from normal colonic mucosa showed co-expression of the established intracellular macrophage marker CD68 in FACS analysis. CD33+ cells were capable of phagocytosis. Isolation of this cell population by magnetic anti-CD33 beads and culture resulted in a 4.2–40-fold increase in IL-1β and 4.5–44-fold increase in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) secretion compared with unsorted lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC). Of the CD33+ cells, 90.9 ± 6.9% (mean ± s.d.) were CD44+. However, macrophages from colonic mucosa showed only a low expression of CD14 (10.5 ± 3.8%), CD16 (10.1 ± 3.9%), HLA-DR (27.3 ± 9.2%), CD11b (17.4 ± 6.8%), CD11c (17.8 ± 10.4%). Furthermore, expression of CD80 (9.2 ± 4.2%) and CD86 (15.1 ± 7.3%) was low, suggesting a low ability of normal intestinal macrophages to activate T cells and T cell-mediated immune responses. We conclude that CD33 is useful for the isolation and flow cytometric characterization of colonic macrophages. These cells exhibit a single phenotype in normal mucosa (CD33++, CD44++, CD14−, CD16−, CD11b−, CD11c−, HLA-DRlow, CD80−, CD86−) lacking lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor and costimulatory molecules. PMID:9649182

  19. [Toxicity of chongqing acid fogwater on rabbit alveolar macrophages in vitro].

    PubMed

    Shu, W Q; Zhuo, J B

    1992-07-01

    We collected acid fogwater on a fogday and observed its toxic effects on rabbits' pulmonary alveolar macrophages (AM) in vitro. The fogwater was diluted into 4 concentrations: 1, 1/10, 1/100, and 1/1000 of the original fogwater and the exposure time was 12 hours. The results showed that both the AM's viability and the phagocytic capacity were depressed significantly, but the AM's lysosomal enzyme--acid phosphatase activity was found to be stimulated to increase. All these changes were directly correlated with the degree of pollution of the fogwater. Of these three toxicity indices, the most sensitive one was the change of AM's phagocytic capacity.

  20. Immunoactivating peptide p4 augments alveolar macrophage phagocytosis in two diverse human populations.

    PubMed

    Bangert, Mathieu; Wright, Adam K; Rylance, Jamie; Kelly, Matthew J; Wright, Angela D; Carlone, George M; Sampson, Jacquelyn S; Rajam, Gowrisankar; Ades, Edwin W; Kadioglu, Aras; Gordon, Stephen B

    2013-09-01

    New treatment strategies are urgently needed to overcome early mortality in acute bacterial infections. Previous studies have shown that administration of a novel immunoactivating peptide (P4) alongside passive immunotherapy prevents the onset of septicemia and rescues mice from lethal invasive disease models of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. In this study, using two diverse populations of adult volunteers, we determined whether P4 treatment of human alveolar macrophages would upregulate phagocytic killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae ex vivo. We also measured macrophage intracellular oxidation, cytokine secretion, and surface marker expression following stimulation. Peptide treatment showed enhanced bacterial killing in the absence of nonspecific inflammation, consistent with therapeutic potential. This is the first demonstration of P4 efficacy on ex vivo-derived human lung cells.

  1. Alveolar Macrophages Are a Prominent but Nonessential Target for Murine Cytomegalovirus Infecting the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Helen E.; Lawler, Clara; Oliveira, Martha T.; Davis-Poynter, Nick

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) infect the lungs and cause pathological damage there in immunocompromised hosts. How lung infection starts is unknown. Inhaled murine CMV (MCMV) directly infected alveolar macrophages (AMs) and type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s) but not type 1 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC1s). In contrast, herpes simplex virus 1 infected AEC1s and murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) infected AEC1s via AMs. MCMV-infected AMs prominently expressed viral reporter genes from a human CMV IE1 promoter; but most IE1-positive cells were AEC2s, and CD11c-cre mice, which express cre in AMs, switched the fluorochrome expression of <5% of floxed MCMV in the lungs. In contrast, CD11C-cre mice exhibited fluorochrome switching in >90% of floxed MuHV-4 in the lungs and 50% of floxed MCMV in the blood. AM depletion increased MCMV titers in the lung during the acute phase of infection. Thus, the influence of AMs was more restrictive than permissive. Circulating monocytes entered infected lungs in large numbers and became infected, but not directly; infection occurred mainly via AEC2s. Mice infected with an MCMV mutant lacking its m131/m129 chemokine homolog, which promotes macrophage infection, showed levels of lung infection equivalent to those of wild-type MCMV-infected mice. The level of lung infiltration by Gr-1-positive cells infected with the MCMV m131/m129-null mutant was modestly different from that for wild-type MCMV-infected lungs. These results are consistent with myeloid cells mainly disseminating MCMV from the lungs, whereas AEC2s provide local amplification. IMPORTANCE Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) chronically and systemically infect most mammals. Human CMV infection is usually asymptomatic but causes lung disease in people with poor immune function. As human infection is hard to analyze, studies with related animal viruses provide important insights. We show that murine CMV has two targets in the lungs: macrophages and surfactant-secreting epithelial cells

  2. Murine Alveolar Macrophages Are Highly Susceptible to Replication of Coxiella burnetii Phase II In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Talita D; Cunha, Larissa D; Ribeiro, Juliana M; Massis, Liliana M; Lima-Junior, Djalma S; Newton, Hayley J; Zamboni, Dario S

    2016-09-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes Q fever in humans. Q fever is an atypical pneumonia transmitted through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In mammalian lungs, C. burnetii infects and replicates in several cell types, including alveolar macrophages (AMs). The innate immunity and signaling pathways operating during infection are still poorly understood, in part because of the lack of relevant host cell models for infection in vitro In the study described here, we investigated and characterized the infection of primary murine AMs by C. burnetii phase II in vitro Our data reveal that AMs show a pronounced M2 polarization and are highly permissive to C. burnetii multiplication in vitro Murine AMs present an increased susceptibility to infection in comparison to primary bone marrow-derived macrophages. AMs support more than 2 logs of bacterial replication during 12 days of infection in culture, similar to highly susceptible host cells, such as Vero and THP-1 cells. As a proof of principle that AMs are useful for investigation of C. burnetii replication, we performed experiments with AMs from Nos2(-/-) or Ifng(-/-) mice. In the absence of gamma interferon and nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2), AMs were significantly more permissive than wild-type cells. In contrast, AMs from Il4(-/-) mice were more restrictive to C. burnetii replication, supporting the importance of M2 polarization for the permissiveness of AMs to C. burnetii replication. Collectively, our data account for understanding the high susceptibility of alveolar macrophages to bacterial replication and support the use of AMs as a relevant model of C. burnetii growth in primary macrophages. PMID:27297388

  3. Chronic Household Air Pollution Exposure Is Associated with Impaired Alveolar Macrophage Function in Malawian Non-Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Rylance, Jamie; Chimpini, Chikondi; Semple, Sean; Russell, David G.; Jackson, Malcolm J.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Household air pollution in low income countries is an important cause of mortality from respiratory infection. We hypothesised that chronic smoke exposure is detrimental to alveolar macrophage function, causing failure of innate immunity. We report the relationship between macrophage function and prior smoke exposure in healthy Malawians. Methods Healthy subjects exposed daily to cooking smoke at home volunteered for bronchoalveolar lavage. Alveolar macrophage particulate content was measured as a known correlate of smoke exposure. Phagocytosis and intraphagosomal function (oxidative burst and proteolysis) were measured by a flow cytometric assay. Cytokine responses in macrophages were compared following re-exposure in vitro to wood smoke, before and after glutathione depletion. Results Volunteers had a range of alveolar macrophage particulate loading. The macrophage capacity for phagosomal oxidative burst was negatively associated with alveolar macrophage particulate content (n = 29, r2 = 0.16, p = 0.033), but phagocytosis per se and proteolytic function were unaffected. High particulate content was associated with lower baseline CXCL8 release (ratio 0.51, CI 0.29–0.89) and lower final concentrations on re-exposure to smoke in vitro (ratio 0.58, CI 0.34–0.97). Glutathione depletion augmented CXCL8 responses by 1.49x (CI 1.02–2.17) compared with wood smoke alone. This response was specific to smoke as macrophages response to LPS were not modulated by glutathione. Conclusion Chronic smoke exposure is associated with reduced human macrophage oxidative burst, and dampened inflammatory cytokine responses. These are critical processes in lung defence against infection and likely to underpin the relationship between air pollution and pneumonia. PMID:26406307

  4. An adherent cell perifusion technique to study the overall and sequential response of rat alveolar macrophages to toxic substances.

    PubMed Central

    Forget, G; Lacroix, M J; Cadieux, A; Calvert, R; Grose, J H; Sirois, P

    1983-01-01

    Essentially pure (97%) alveolar macrophages were isolated by bronchoalveolar lavage of rats with warm (37 degrees C) PBS solution. These cells were allowed to adhere to the inside walls of open-ended glass cylinders which were closed off at each end by three-way stopcocks. The adhering cells were perifused with RPMI-1640 medium supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum for 18 hr at the rate of 1 mL/hr, and the effluent medium was collected automatically in 2-mL aliquots. Cell recoveries and viabilities did not differ from those found for Petri cultures treated similarly, indicating that the perifusion method under study offered an adequate milieu for short-term primary cultures. The alveolar macrophages in culture were subjected to the presence of particulate (chrysotile asbestos) and soluble (phorbol myristate) toxicants, and their response was monitored in the effluent medium by measuring the release of prostaglandins (PGE) by radioimmunoassay. A significant increase in the sequential release of PGE was observed in the presence of asbestos (100 micrograms/mL) or phorbol myristate (200 ng/mL). Treatment of the cells with indomethacin (20 microM) completely abolished the release of PGE stimulated with phorbol myristate. A cumulative response to the toxicants was also observed when cells were harvested manually from the chambers: asbestos caused a 2-fold increase in cell mortality relative to control, while phorbol myristate brought about a 3-fold increase in the number of dead cells. This effect was not prevented by the presence of indomethacin. Cell aggregation was also observed when cells were perifused in the presence of phorbol myristate, whether indomethacin was present or absent. Our results indicate that the cell perifusion system combines the advantages of conventional adherent cell cultures (viability, aggregation) with those of perifusion techniques (sequential metabolism studies). Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 6. PMID:6641651

  5. STP position paper: interpreting the significance of increased alveolar macrophages in rodents following inhalation of pharmaceutical materials.

    PubMed

    Nikula, Kristen J; McCartney, Jeffrey E; McGovern, Timothy; Miller, Glen K; Odin, Marielle; Pino, Michael V; Reed, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    The Scientific and Regulatory Policy Committee of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) appointed a working group to address risk assessment for increases in alveolar macrophages following inhalation of pharmaceutical materials. This position paper provides recommendations for inhalation study-specific terminology and interpretation based on literature and information from marketed inhaled drugs. Based on a weight-of-the-evidence approach, and with appropriate consideration of the physical and pharmacological characteristics of the compound, uncomplicated increases in the size or number of alveolar macrophages in nonclinical species are interpreted as nonadverse. PMID:24178583

  6. Identification of beta 2-adrenoceptors on guinea pig alveolar macrophages using (-)-3-( sup 125 I)iodocyanopindolol

    SciTech Connect

    Leurs, R.; Beusenberg, F.D.; Bast, A.; Van Amsterdam, J.G.; Timmerman, H. )

    1990-08-01

    The beta-adrenoceptor antagonist (-)-3-({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol (({sup 125}I)ICYP) binds with high affinity and in saturable way to membranes of guinea pig alveolar macrophages. The equilibrium dissociation constant for ({sup 125}I)ICYP is 24.3 +/- 1.2 pM, and the number of binding sites is 166.3 +/- 13.7 fmol/mg protein (N = 4, +/- SEM). Displacement studies with selective antagonists showed that ({sup 125}I)ICYP labels beta 2-adrenoceptors on guinea pig alveolar macrophages.

  7. Transcriptome analysis highlights the conserved difference between embryonic and postnatal-derived alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gibbings, Sophie L; Goyal, Rajni; Desch, A Nicole; Leach, Sonia M; Prabagar, Miglena; Atif, Shaikh M; Bratton, Donna L; Janssen, William; Jakubzick, Claudia V

    2015-09-10

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) reside on the luminal surfaces of the airways and alveoli where they maintain host defense and promote alveolar homeostasis by ingesting inhaled particulates and regulating inflammatory responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that AMs populate the lungs during embryogenesis and self-renew throughout life with minimal replacement by circulating monocytes, except under extreme conditions of depletion or radiation injury. Here we demonstrate that on a global scale, environment appears to dictate AM development and function. Indeed, transcriptome analysis of embryonic host-derived and postnatal donor-derived AMs coexisting within the same mouse demonstrated >98% correlation and overall functional analyses were similar. However, we also identified several genes whose expression was dictated by origin rather than environment. The most differentially expressed gene not altered by environment was Marco, a gene recently demonstrated to have enhancer activity in embryonic-derived but not postnatal-derived tissue macrophages. Overall, we show that under homeostatic conditions, the environment largely dictates the programming and function of AMs, whereas the expression of a small number of genes remains linked to the origin of the cell. PMID:26232173

  8. WIN 57273 is bactericidal for Legionella pneumophila grown in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, P H; Edelstein, M A

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro antimicrobial activity of WIN 57273, a new quinolone antimicrobial agent, was determined for 21 Legionella strains, using broth macrodilution and agar dilution testing methods; ciprofloxacin and erythromycin were tested as well. Three different buffered yeast extract media were used for the agar dilution studies, two of which were made with starch rather than charcoal. Broth macrodilution susceptibility testing was performed with buffered yeast extract broth and two Legionella pneumophila strains. Antimicrobial inhibition of L. pneumophila growth in guinea pig alveolar macrophages was also studied, using a method able to detect bacterial killing. The MICs for 90% of the 21 strains of Legionella spp. grown on buffered charcoal yeast extract medium were 0.125 microgram/ml for WIN 57273, 0.25 microgram/ml for ciprofloxacin, and 1.0 micrograms/ml for erythromycin. These MICs were falsely high, because of inhibition of drug activity by the medium used. Use of less drug-antagonistic, starch-containing media did not support good growth of the test strains. The broth macrodilution MICs for two strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 were less than or equal to 0.03 microgram/ml for WIN 57273 and ciprofloxacin and 0.125 microgram/ml for erythromycin. WIN 57273, ciprofloxacin, and erythromycin all inhibited growth of L. pneumophila in guinea pig alveolar macrophages at concentrations of 1 microgram/ml, but only WIN 57273 prevented regrowth or killed L. pneumophila after removal of extracellular antimicrobial agent. PMID:2619277

  9. Transcriptome analysis highlights the conserved difference between embryonic and postnatal-derived alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gibbings, Sophie L.; Goyal, Rajni; Desch, A. Nicole; Leach, Sonia M.; Prabagar, Miglena; Atif, Shaikh M.; Bratton, Donna L.; Janssen, William

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) reside on the luminal surfaces of the airways and alveoli where they maintain host defense and promote alveolar homeostasis by ingesting inhaled particulates and regulating inflammatory responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that AMs populate the lungs during embryogenesis and self-renew throughout life with minimal replacement by circulating monocytes, except under extreme conditions of depletion or radiation injury. Here we demonstrate that on a global scale, environment appears to dictate AM development and function. Indeed, transcriptome analysis of embryonic host-derived and postnatal donor-derived AMs coexisting within the same mouse demonstrated >98% correlation and overall functional analyses were similar. However, we also identified several genes whose expression was dictated by origin rather than environment. The most differentially expressed gene not altered by environment was Marco, a gene recently demonstrated to have enhancer activity in embryonic-derived but not postnatal-derived tissue macrophages. Overall, we show that under homeostatic conditions, the environment largely dictates the programming and function of AMs, whereas the expression of a small number of genes remains linked to the origin of the cell. PMID:26232173

  10. Transcriptome analysis highlights the conserved difference between embryonic and postnatal-derived alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gibbings, Sophie L; Goyal, Rajni; Desch, A Nicole; Leach, Sonia M; Prabagar, Miglena; Atif, Shaikh M; Bratton, Donna L; Janssen, William; Jakubzick, Claudia V

    2015-09-10

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) reside on the luminal surfaces of the airways and alveoli where they maintain host defense and promote alveolar homeostasis by ingesting inhaled particulates and regulating inflammatory responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that AMs populate the lungs during embryogenesis and self-renew throughout life with minimal replacement by circulating monocytes, except under extreme conditions of depletion or radiation injury. Here we demonstrate that on a global scale, environment appears to dictate AM development and function. Indeed, transcriptome analysis of embryonic host-derived and postnatal donor-derived AMs coexisting within the same mouse demonstrated >98% correlation and overall functional analyses were similar. However, we also identified several genes whose expression was dictated by origin rather than environment. The most differentially expressed gene not altered by environment was Marco, a gene recently demonstrated to have enhancer activity in embryonic-derived but not postnatal-derived tissue macrophages. Overall, we show that under homeostatic conditions, the environment largely dictates the programming and function of AMs, whereas the expression of a small number of genes remains linked to the origin of the cell.

  11. Restoring cigarette smoke-induced impairment of efferocytosis in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, R; Mukherjee, S; Chen, H; Keshava, S; Neuenschwander, P; Shams, H

    2016-07-01

    Cigarette smoke has been associated with susceptibility to different pulmonary and airway diseases. Impaired alveolar macrophages (AMs) that are major phagocytes in the lung have been associated with patients with airway diseases and active smokers. In the current report, we show that exposure to second-hand cigarette smoke (SHS) significantly reduced efferocytosis in vivo. More importantly, delivery of recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to the alveolar space restored and refurbished the efferocytosis capability of AMs. Exposure to SHS significantly reduced expression of CD16/32 on AMs, and treatment with GM-CSF not only restored but also significantly increased the expression of CD16/32 on AMs. GM-CSF treatment increased uptake and digestion/removal of apoptotic cells by AMs. The latter was attributed to increased expression of Rab5 and Rab7. Increased efferocytosis of AMs was also tested in a disease condition. AMs from GM-CSF-treated, influenza-infected, SHS-exposed mice showed significantly better efferocytosis activity, and mice had significantly less morbidity compared with phosphate-buffered saline-treated group. GM-CSF-treated mice had increased amphiregulin levels in the lungs, which in addition to efferocytosis of AMs may have attributed to their protection against influenza. These results will have great implications for developing therapeutic approaches by harnessing mucosal innate immunity to treat lung and airway diseases and protect against pneumonia. PMID:26577570

  12. The response of guinea pig airway epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages to environmental stress

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, D.S.; Palmer, E.; Welch, W.J.; Sheppard, D. )

    1991-08-01

    Cells lining the respiratory tract form an interface between the organism and the external environment and are repeatedly exposed to physical, chemical, and metabolic stresses. The authors examined the response of cultured guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages to various forms of stress, including clinically and environmentally relevant metabolic stresses such as ozone and acid exposure. Classic stress treatments such as heat shock and sodium arsenite treatment induced the synthesis of 28, 32, 72, 73, 90, and 110 kD stress proteins similar to those observed in other cell types. In contrast, no significant changes in the pattern of protein synthesis were detected after exposure to ambient concentrations of ozone, although ozone exposure caused significant cytotoxicity to both cell types. Another potent oxidant, hydrogen peroxide, similarly did not induce appreciable stress protein synthesis. However, surface acidification of tracheal epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages caused the induction of 72 and 78 kD stress proteins. While stress proteins may play a role in the response of respiratory cells to certain injuries such as hyperthermia and surface acidification, they may not be important in the defense against ozone or other forms of oxidative injury.

  13. Mechanical and structural assessment of cortical and deep cytoskeleton reveals substrate-dependent alveolar macrophage remodeling.

    PubMed

    Féréol, S; Fodil, R; Laurent, V M; Planus, E; Louis, B; Pelle, G; Isabey, D

    2008-01-01

    The sensitivity of alveolar macrophages to substrate properties has been described in a recent paper (Féréol et al., Cell Motil. Cytoskel. 63 (2006), 321-340). It is presently re-analyzed in terms of F-actin structure (assessed from 3D-reconstructions in fixed cells) and mechanical properties (assessed by Magnetic Twisting Cytometry experiments in living cells) of cortical and deep cytoskeleton structures for rigid plastic (Young Modulus: 3 MPa) or glass (70 MPa) substrates and a soft (approximately 0.1 kPa) confluent monolayer of alveolar epithelial cells. The cortical cytoskeleton component (lowest F-actin density) is represented by the rapid and softer viscoelastic compartment while the deep cytoskeleton component (intermediate F-actin density) is represented by the slow and stiffer compartment. Stiffness of both cortical and deep cytoskeleton is significantly decreased when soft confluent monolayer of alveolar epithelial cells replace the rigid plastic substrate while F-actin reconstructions reveal a consistent actin cytoskeleton remodeling observable on both cytoskeleton components.

  14. Immortalized MH-S cells lack defining features of primary alveolar macrophages and do not support mouse pneumovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Todd A; Rice, Tyler A; Anderson, Erik D; Percopo, Caroline M; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2016-04-01

    The SV-40-transformed MH-S cell line maintains some, but not all, features of primary alveolar macrophages (AMs) from BALB/c mice. We show here that MH-S cells produce inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and CXCL10 in response to challenge with Gram-positive Lactobacillus reuteri, and to TLR2 and NOD2 ligands Pam3CSK4 and MDP, respectively. In contrast, although wild-type AMs are infected in vivo by pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), no virus replication was detected in MH-S cells. Interestingly, the surface immunophenotype of MH-S cells (CD11c(+)Siglec F(-)) differs from that of wild-type AMs (CD11c(+) Siglec F(+)) and is similar to that of immature AMs isolated from granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene-deleted mice; AMs from GM-CSF(-/-) mice also support PVM replication. However, MH-S cells do not express the GM-CSF receptor alpha chain (CD116) and do not respond to GM-CSF. Due to these unusual features, MH-S cells should be used with caution as experimental models of AMs. PMID:26916143

  15. DM-CSF stimulated proliferation of rat alveolar macrophages and the effects of differing particulate burden levels in alveolar macrophages on the proliferative response

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, D.; Valdez, Y.E.; Lehnert, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    Particles are gradually redistributed among the lung's population of alveolar macrophages (AM) at times well after they were originally deposited in the lung. One mechanism that may underlie this particle redistribution phenomenon'' is the in situ replication of particle-containing AM and the allocation of particles from dividing AM to daughter cells. Little is known about how the abilities of AM to proliferate may be affected by the containment of particles; conceivably, AM proliferation may be a particle burden-dependent process. In this study, we assessed the proliferative abilities of AM that contain differing burdens of phagocytized particles. Rats were intratracheally instilled with 2 [times] 10[sup 8] fluorescent, polystyrene microspheres ([approximately]2 [mu]M diam.), and several days thereafter their lungs were lavaged. The lavaged AM were analyzed using a multiparameter flow cytometer, and the AM were sorted according to their relative burdens of microspheres, i.e., low burdens, medium burdens, high burdens, based on their levels of fluorescence intensities. Control cells consisted of AM that were lavaged from the lungs of untreated animals and also passed through the flow cytometer. The sorted AM were then cultured in the presence of 0.3 ng/ml Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor and cultured for up to 15 days. Control cells and the sorted AM all replicated similarly; no evidence was found to indicate that AM proliferation is either stimulated or decreased. Evidence was also obtained that indicated that when particle-containing AM divide, the particles they originally contained are distributed to their offspring.

  16. Surface morphology and morphometry of rat alveolar macrophages after ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Dormans, J.A.; Rombout, P.J.; van Loveren, H. )

    1990-09-01

    As the ultrastructural data on the effects of ozone on pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) are lacking, transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron microscopy were performed on rat PAM present in alveolar lavages following exposure to ozone. Rats were continuously exposed for 7 d to ozone concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 1.50 mg/m3 for 7 d followed by a 5-d recovery period. Additionally, morphometry on lung sections was performed to quantitate PAM. In a second experiment rats were continuously exposed to 1.50 mg O3/m3 for 1, 3, 5, or 7 d. To study the influence of concurrent ozone exposure and lung infection, due to Listeria monocytogenes, rats were exposed for 7 d to 1.50 mg O3/m3 after a Listeria infection. The surface area of lavaged control PAM was uniformly covered with ruffles as shown by SEM and TEM. Exposure to 0.5 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d resulted in cells partly covered with microvilli and blebs in addition to normal ruffles. The number of large size PAM increased with an increase in ozone concentration. After 1 d of exposure, normal-appearing as well as many small macrophages with ruffles and scattered lymphocytes were seen. Lavage samples taken after 5 or 7 d of exposure showed an identical cell composition to that taken after 3 d of exposure. After Listeria infection alone, lavage samples consisted of mainly lymphocytes and some macrophages. Small quantitative changes, such as an increase in the number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and large-size PAM, occurred in lavages after ozone exposure and infection with L. monocytogenes. Morphometric examination of lung sections revealed a concentration-related increase in the number of PAM, even in animals exposed to 0.25 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d. Centriacinar regions were more severely affected than other regions of lung tissue.

  17. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ward, D M; Pevsner, J; Scullion, M A; Vaughn, M; Kaplan, J

    2000-07-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome-lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome-lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome-lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages.

  18. Alveolar macrophage-stimulated neutrophil and monocyte migration: effects of in vitro ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, K.E.; Schlesinger, R.B.

    1988-04-01

    The ability of rabbit alveolar macrophages (AM) to release factors which stimulate the migration of peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes was examined, and the influence of in vitro ozone exposure on this secretory activity was investigated. To evaluate the ability of AM to release leukocyte chemotactic activity, AM obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage were established in monolayer or suspension culture, with and without added zymosan, for 2 and 6 hr. The resulting macrophage-conditioned medium was tested for chemotactic activity using modified Boyden-type chambers and rabbit peripheral blood neutrophils or monocytes as the responding cells. The results demonstrate that substrate attachment (monolayer culture) and/or zymosan phagocytosis can stimulate AM to release chemoattractants for monocytes and neutrophils. Additionally, the results suggest that AM are constitutively producing low levels of monocyte chemotactic factors. The effects of in vitro ozone exposure on the secretion of chemotactic activity was investigated by exposing monolayer cultures of AM to air, 0.1, 0.3, or 1.2 ppm ozone for 2 hr. Macrophage-conditioned medium was harvested immediately, 2 and 6 hr postexposure, and tested for chemotactic activity. Exposure to 0.3 and 1.2 ppm ozone significantly increased the AM secretion of factors which stimulated neutrophil migration; additionally, the results strongly suggest that ozone can augment the ability of AM to stimulate monocyte migration. These results imply a role for the AM in the recruitment of inflammatory cells after ozone inhalation.

  19. HUMAL ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE RESPONSES TO AIR POLLUTION PARTICULATES ARE ASSOCIATED WITH INSOLUBLE OCMPONENTS OF COARSE MATERIAL, INCLUDING PARTICULATE ENDOTOXIN

    EPA Science Inventory


    Inhalation of particulate matter in the ambient air has been shown to cause pulmonary morbidity and exacerbate asthma. Alveolar macrophage (AM) are essential for effective removal of inhaled particles and microbes in the lower airways. While some particles minimally effect AM...

  20. Different particle determinants induce apoptosis and cytokine release in primary alveolar macrophage cultures

    PubMed Central

    Refsnes, Magne; Hetland, Ragna B; Øvrevik, Johan; Sundfør, Idunn; Schwarze, Per E; Låg, Marit

    2006-01-01

    Background Particles are known to induce both cytokine release (MIP-2, TNF-α), a reduction in cell viability and an increased apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. To examine whether these responses are triggered by the same particle determinants, alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to mineral particles of different physical-chemical properties. Results The crystalline particles of the different stone types mylonite, gabbro, basalt, feldspar, quartz, hornfels and fine grain syenite porphyr (porphyr), with a relatively equal size distribution (≤ 10 μm), but different chemical/mineral composition, all induced low and relatively similar levels of apoptosis. In contrast, mylonite and gabbro induced a marked MIP-2 response compared to the other particles. For particles of smaller size, quartz (≤ 2 μm) seemed to induce a somewhat stronger apoptotic response than even smaller quartz (≤ 0.5 μm) and larger quartz (≤ 10 μm) in relation to surface area, and was more potent than hornfels and porphyr (≤ 2 μm). The reduction in cell viability induced by quartz of the different sizes was roughly similar when adjusted to surface area. With respect to cytokines, the release was more marked after exposure to quartz ≤ 0.5 μm than to quartz ≤ 2 μm and ≤ 10 μm. Furthermore, hornfels (≤ 2 μm) was more potent than the corresponding hornfels (≤ 10 μm) and quartz (≤ 2 μm) to induce cytokine responses. Pre-treatment of hornfels and quartz particles ≤ 2 μm with aluminium lactate, to diminish the surface reactivity, did significantly reduce the MIP-2 response to hornfels. In contrast, the apoptotic responses to the particles were not affected. Conclusion These results indicate that different determinants of mineral/stone particles are critical for inducing cytokine responses, reduction in cell viability and apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. The data suggest that the particle surface reactivity was critical for cytokine responses, but contributed less

  1. An Intracellular Arrangement of Histoplasma capsulatum Yeast-Aggregates Generates Nuclear Damage to the Cultured Murine Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pitangui, Nayla de Souza; Sardi, Janaina de Cássia Orlandi; Voltan, Aline R.; dos Santos, Claudia T.; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; da Silva, Rosangela A. M.; Souza, Felipe O.; Soares, Christiane P.; Rodríguez-Arellanes, Gabriela; Taylor, Maria Lucia; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is responsible for a human systemic mycosis that primarily affects lung tissue. Macrophages are the major effector cells in humans that respond to the fungus, and the development of respiratory disease depends on the ability of Histoplasma yeast cells to survive and replicate within alveolar macrophages. Therefore, the interaction between macrophages and H. capsulatum is a decisive step in the yeast dissemination into host tissues. Although the role played by components of cell-mediated immunity in the host's defense system and the mechanisms used by the pathogen to evade the host immune response are well understood, knowledge regarding the effects induced by H. capsulatum in host cells at the nuclear level is limited. According to the present findings, H. capsulatum yeast cells display a unique architectural arrangement during the intracellular infection of cultured murine alveolar macrophages, characterized as a formation of aggregates that seem to surround the host cell nucleus, resembling a “crown.” This extranuclear organization of yeast-aggregates generates damage on the nucleus of the host cell, producing DNA fragmentation and inducing apoptosis, even though the yeast cells are not located inside the nucleus and do not trigger changes in nuclear proteins. The current study highlights a singular intracellular arrangement of H. capsulatum yeast near to the nucleus of infected murine alveolar macrophages that may contribute to the yeast's persistence under intracellular conditions, since this fungal pathogen may display different strategies to prevent elimination by the host's phagocytic mechanisms. PMID:26793172

  2. Stimulation of alveolar macrophages by mineral dusts in vitro: luminol-dependent chemiluminescence study

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, V.; Wilhelm, J.; Brzak, P.; Hurych, J.

    1987-02-01

    Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) of normal (nonactivated) rabbit alveolar macrophages (AMs) was measured in suspension upon stimulation by various size fractions of one quartz dust sample or by various mineral dusts (quartz, corundum, anatas, and chrysotile asbestos as an example of fibrous dust). The CL-triggering capacity of the tested dusts was inhibited by their preincubation with autologous serum. The intensity of luminol-dependent CL induced by particulate dusts upon their action on AMs depended on the kind of dust, on the dust particle sizes, and on the ratio of the number of particles to the number of cells in a given suspension. The cytotoxicity and/or fibrogenicity of the dust and its capacity to trigger the luminol-dependent CL of nonadherent AMs were not directly correlated.

  3. Enhanced phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages induced by short-term ozone insult

    SciTech Connect

    Christman, C.A.; Schwartz, L.W.

    1982-08-01

    In vitro phagocytosis of inert microspheres by the alveolar macrophage (AM) was evaluated after in vivo exposure to 0.8 ppm ozone for 3, 7, or 20 days. AM were collected by bronchoalveolar lavage from rats, allowed to adhere to glass, and incubated with carbon-coated latex microspheres. The percentages of phagocytic cells were determined by light microscopy after 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hr of incubation. Morphological features of AM were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an index of cell spreading was determined by image analysis of SEM photomicrographs. An enhanced phagocytic activity was observed after ozone exposure, with the greatest increase on Day 3. This enhanced phagocytic activity correlated with an increase in cell spreading. The results, which suggest that prolonged ozone insult produces an altered AM population, support previous morphological observations.

  4. [Effects of jute, ramee, flax dusts on rabbit alveolar macrophages in vitro].

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Ke, F; Zhang, J

    1994-03-01

    The effects of jute, ramee, flax dusts on alveolar macrophage (AM) were observed by cell culture. The results indicated that AM could be damaged by all of the three kinds of dusts. The viability was decreased. The activity of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) and acid phosphatase (AcP) in the culture supernatant was increased. The morphology of AM was damaged. But the toxicity effect of the three dusts was less than that of SiO2 and chrysotile asbestos (CH) in the same dosage. Meanwhile, the functions of AM were changed. The levels of IgG, immunocomplex (IC) and histamine (HIS) were increased. As to the degree of toxicity and ability of stimulating AM to secrete biomedium by the three dusts, the effect of flax was weakest.

  5. Enhancement of CD4+ T-cell-dependent interleukin-2 production in vitro by murine alveolar macrophages: the role of leukotriene B4.

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, J; Grabowska, A; Bryniarski, K; Chain, B M

    1997-01-01

    Local tissue macrophages are known to play a key role in regulation of adaptive immune responses, often by inhibition of T-cell activation and proliferation. In this study, we compare the influence of alveolar and peritoneal macrophages on T-cell-dependent interleukin-2 (IL-2) release. Alveolar macrophages, in contrast to peritoneal macrophages, enhance IL-2 release. Assay of a panel of potential macrophage-derived mediators indicated that activated alveolar macrophages stimulated greater release of IL-1 beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and, especially, leukotriene B4 (> 100 times) than activated peritoneal macrophages. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis by alveolar macrophages further enhanced the production of IL-2, while inhibition of leukotriene synthesis abolished the enhancement. The addition of exogenous prostaglandin E2 inhibited IL-2 release, while exogenous leukotriene B4 enhanced IL-2 release. When added simultaneously, the two compounds antagonized each other's activity. In conclusion, this study confirms that alveolar macrophages enhance IL-2 secretion, and suggests that this enhancement may be due at least in part to the very high rates of production of leukotriene B4. The overall influence of macrophage populations on T cells in vivo will reflect the complex balance between the multiple mediators produced within the local tissue microenvironment. PMID:9301525

  6. The influence of suspension nebulization or instillation on particle uptake by guinea pig alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Suarez, S; Kazantseva, M; Bhat, M; Costa, D; Hickey, A J

    2001-09-01

    Phagocytosis represents a crucial event in the host defense against pathogens. Experimental methods are required that allow a range of particle doses to be delivered. However, it is not clear that these methods result in the same sites of deposition or mechanisms of clearance. The effect of particle administration by nebulization or instillation on the uptake by guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AMs) has been studied. Suspensions of escalating quantities of 1-microm fluorescent polystyrene latex microspheres were delivered by 15 min of nebulization (1.4 x 10(7)-11.1 x 10(7) particles) or instillation (19 x 10(7)-152 x 10(7) particles) into the lungs of guinea pigs. These doses were selected to maximize delivery using each of these methods. Macrophages were collected by alveolar lavage 6 h postadministration. The total number of cells recovered was 3 x 10(6) and the cell viability was >97%, which was measured by trypan blue exclusion. Differential cell counts of lavaged cell suspensions were conducted and results showed no difference for the two methods of administration with various concentrations of latex particles and control samples. The uptake of particles was measured using epifluorescence, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry. AMs showed a dose-dependent increase in associated particles measured by microscopy and flow cytometry. There was a direct correlation (R(2) =.99) in the phagocytic indices (PIs) measured by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. The PI was 15 times higher after instillation than that obtained after particle nebulization. The percentage of AMs involved in phagocytosis observed after instillation was 55% and after nebulization 23%. The uptake of aerosolized particles by AMs and the number of cells involved in phagocytosis were dependent on the particle dose and the efficiency of aerosol delivery to the lungs.

  7. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  8. Activated alveolar macrophage and lymphocyte alveolitis in extrathoracic sarcoidosis without radiological mediastinopulmonary involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Wallaert, B.; Ramon, P.; Fournier, E.C.; Prin, L.; Tonnel, A.B.; Voisin, C.

    1986-01-01

    Cellular characteristics of BAL were investigated in 18 patients with proved extrathoracic sarcoidosis (that is, sarcoidosis that affected the skin, eyes, parotid glands, stomach, nose, kidneys, or meninges) without clinical or radiological mediastinopulmonary involvement. Computed tomography of the thorax was performed on five patients: four patients were normal, and one had enlarged lymph nodes (these enlargements were not detectable on the patient's chest roentgenogram). The results of pulmonary function tests were normal in all patients. The total BAL cell count did not differ significantly between controls and patients. Abnormal percentages of alveolar lymphocytes (from 18 to 87%) were noted in 15 out of 18 patients. SACE levels were normal in 15 patients. No pulmonary gallium uptake was detected. The chemiluminescence of AM's, whether spontaneous or PMA induced, was increased in five out of seven patients. The percentages of T3+ lymphocytes in sarcoidosis patients did not significantly differ from those in controls. The T4+:T8+ ratio was normal in four patients and slightly increased in one. Follow-up of patients showed that alveolar lymphocytosis is as lasting as extrathoracic involvement. Our data demonstrate increased percentages of lymphocytes and activated AM's in the BAL of patients with extrathoracic sarcoidosis. This may be due to the initial involvement of the respiratory tract in extrathoracic sarcoidosis or to the diffusion of activated macrophages and lymphocytes from an extrathoracic site into the lung.

  9. Alveolar macrophages are the main target cells in feline calicivirus-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Monné Rodriguez, J M; Soare, T; Malbon, A; Blundell, R; Papoula-Pereira, R; Leeming, G; Köhler, K; Kipar, A

    2014-08-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a pathogen of felids and one of the most common causative agents of feline upper respiratory disease (URD). Reports of natural FCV pneumonia in the course of respiratory tract infections are sparse. Therefore, knowledge on the pathogenesis of FCV-induced lung lesions comes only from experimental studies. The aim of the present study was to assess the type and extent of pulmonary involvement in natural respiratory FCV infections of domestic cats and to identify the viral target cells in the lung. For this purpose, histology, immunohistochemistry and RNA-in situ hybridisation for FCV and relevant cell markers were performed on diagnostic post-mortem specimens collected after fatal URD, virulent systemic FCV or other conditions. All groups of cats exhibited similar acute pathological changes, dominated by multifocal desquamation of activated alveolar macrophages (AM) and occasional type II pneumocytes with fibrin exudation, consistent with diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). In fatal cases, this was generally seen without evidence of epithelial regeneration. In cats without clinical respiratory signs, type II pneumocyte hyperplasia was present alongside the other changes, consistent with the post-damage proliferative phase of DAD. FCV infected and replicated in AM and, to a lesser extent, type II pneumocytes. This study shows that lung involvement is an infrequent but important feature of FCV-induced URD. AM are the main viral target cell and pulmonary replication site, and their infection is associated with desquamation and activation, as well as death via apoptosis. PMID:24857252

  10. Acid-active neuraminidases in the growth media from cultures of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri and in sonicates of rabbit alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Eisen, D; Franson, R C

    1987-05-19

    Using bovine mucin and isolated human myelin as sources of sialic acid, we demonstrate the presence of neuraminidase activities in the growth media of pathogenic, but not nonpathogenic, Naegleria sp. and in sonicates of rabbit alveolar macrophages. Neuraminidase activity was maximal at pH 4.5 and 5.0, and the specific activity for sialic acid release was up to 13-fold greater with mucin than with human myelin. Activity in the growth media from cultures of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri was ion-independent, while that of macrophage sonicates required divalent cation; optimal activity was noted with 2.5 mM Zn2+, while Mg2+ and Mn2+ supported activity to a lesser extent. Such acid-active neuraminidases may contribute to the reported glycolipid alterations associated with demyelinating diseases.

  11. Exposure to cigarette smoke downregulates β2-adrenergic receptor expression and upregulates inflammation in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Xiaoguang; Xu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke-triggered inflammation is important in the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). β2-Adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) is abundantly expressed on inflammatory cells, which is associated with inflammation regulation. To observe alterations in inflammation, pathological changes in lung tissues, and detect changes in β2-AR expression, rats were exposed for 4 months to cigarette smoke. Pathological changes were observed in lung tissue sections. The levels of inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung tissues were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Exposure to this regimen of cigarette smoke induced peribronchial and perivascular lymphocytic aggregates and parenchymal accumulation of macrophages in rats. EMSA demonstrated that smoke exposure enhanced NF-κB activation in rats' alveolar macrophages (AMs). Compared with the control group, smoke exposure induced a notable increase in TNF-α and IL-1β in BALF, lung tissues, and a decrease of β2-AR expression of AMs. The expression of β2-AR from AMs was inversely correlated with TNF-α and IL-1β levels of BALF. These data demonstrated that chronic smoke-triggered lung inflammation was accompanied by down-regulation of β2-AR in rat lungs' AMs.

  12. Role of alveolar macrophage chemotaxis and phagocytosis in pulmonary clearance responses to inhaled particles: Comparisons among rodent species

    SciTech Connect

    Warheit, D.B.; Hartsky, M.A. . Du Pont Haskell Lab.)

    1993-12-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) play an important role in clearing inhaled particles from the lung. The mechanisms through which macrophages identify particles that have been deposited in the alveolar regions is not well understood, although macrophage motility and phagocytic functions appear to be prerequisites for efficient clearance of inhaled materials. The current studies were undertaken to compare pulmonary clearance responses in several rodent species exposed to carbonyl iron (CI) particles. In vitro and in vivo pulmonary clearance responses were evaluated using one strain each of mouse, hamster, rat, and guinea pig. In vitro studies showed that hamster AM had the greatest phagocytic activity and that rat AM migrated best to complement-dependent chemotactic factors. Subsequently, groups of animals from each species were exposed to CI particles for 1 or 6 hr at aerosol concentrations of 100 mg/m[sup 3]. Particle deposition patterns in the distal lung were nearly identical for all species, although enhanced numbers of CI particles were deposited on alveolar duct bifurcations of either rats or mice compared to hamsters, and particle deposition in guinea pigs was substantially lower. Time course studies showed that enhanced numbers of rat AM migrated to deposition sites and phagocytized particles, and this correlated with increased numbers and percentages of phagocytic macrophages recovered by lavage (P < 0.01). In vivo phagocytic rates were the lowest in the mouse, and this correlated with reduced phagocytic rates in vitro.

  13. Inhibition of respiratory burst activity in alveolar macrophages by bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids: characterization of drug-cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Ma, J Y; Barger, M W; Ma, J K; Castranova, V

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of various bisbenzylisoquinoline (BBIQ) alkaloids on respiratory burst activity of alveolar macrophages and to characterize the interaction of these drugs with alveolar phagocytes. BBIQ alkaloids were chosen for study because they exhibit a wide range of antifibrotic potencies in a rat model, with tetrandrine being very effective and tubocurarine being ineffective. These drugs inhibited zymosan-stimulated oxygen consumption with a potency sequence of tetrandrine (TT) approximately fangchinoline (FA) > berbamine (BE) approximately cepharanthine (CE) approximately cycleanine (CY) > tubocurarine (TU). This inhibition of respiratory burst activity could not be attributed to a drug-induced decline in the ATP content of these pneumocytes. Drug binding to alveolar macrophages was directly dependent on temperature and drug concentration. The sequence for binding capacity was FA > TT approximately BE approximately CY > CE > TU. Therefore, there was no simple relationship between binding capacity and inhibitory potency. Binding capacity was not related to lipophilicity of these alkaloids. In addition, tetrandrine failed to bind to metabolically dead cells or sonicated macrophage preparations. These data suggest that the interaction of BBIQ alkaloids with phagocytes is not simply nonspecific binding to membrane lipids. Alteration of the cytoskeletal system with vinblastine, taxol, or cytochalasin B decreased tetrandrine binding by approximately 33% when added separately and by 93% when added jointly. Pre-exposure of alveolar macrophages to stimulants increased the ability of BBIQ alkaloids to inhibit both oxygen consumption and superoxide release. These data suggest that the mechanism by which BBIQ alkaloids inhibit activation of phagocytes involves microtubules and bules and microfilaments. Pre-exposure of macrophages to stimulants would change the conformation of cytoskeletal components and may make these structures

  14. Age-related changes in phagocytic activity and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by lipopolysaccharide stimulated porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim; Tholen, Ernst; Tesfaye, Dawit; Looft, Christian; Schellander, Karl; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the age-related changes of phagocytic capacity and the kinetic production of cytokines in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated porcine alveolar macrophages. For this purpose, AMs were isolated from 5 (newborn), 40 (post-weaned) and 120 (young) day old pigs. Results of phagocytosis assay showed that AMs from newborn piglets had less phagocytic capacity than those of young pigs (P<0.05). For the kinetics study, cells and supernatant were collected at 1, 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h after LPS stimulation for quantification of cytokine mRNA and protein by quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. The kinetics results showed that AMs from newborn piglets were significantly less capable of producing IL1β, IL6, IL12β, TNFα and IL8 than post-weaned piglets or young pigs. IL18 mRNA did not show significant differences between ages. MIP2 and MCP1 mRNA was higher in young pigs. Hence, higher production of cytokines by AMs may be the surfactant factors in the pulmonary host defense system. These results indicate that AMs from newborn piglets might be functionally immature, which may lead to increased susceptibility to lung infections. Future studies of cytokine kinetics in more animals are clearly needed to confirm these results across a wider age range.

  15. Effects of in vitro ozone exposure on peroxidative damage, membrane leakage, and taurine content of rat alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, M.A.; Porter, D.W.; Martin, W.G.; Castranova, V. )

    1990-08-01

    Rat alveolar macrophages (AM) were isolated by pulmonary lavage, allowed to adhere to a tissue culture flask, and then exposed to 0.45 +/- 0.05 ppm ozone. After exposures ranging from 0 to 60 min, the medium was decanted and cells were harvested. Cells were assayed for oxidant damage and media analyzed for leakage of intracellular components. Increasing length of exposure to ozone resulted in a decreased number of adherent AM and decreased cell viability. Resting and zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence increased immediately after ozone exposure and reached a maximum at 15-30 min, then declined to initial levels after 60 min of ozone exposure. Lipid peroxidation and leakage of protein and K+ ions increased with increasing length of exposure to ozone, while leakage of reduced and oxidized glutathione increased through 30 min, then declined (reduced) or leveled off (oxidized). Activity of the Na+/K+ ATPase decreased with time while intracellular taurine concentration exhibited an initial rise, peaked at 30 min, and then returned to the untreated level. Leakage of taurine into the medium increased with time of exposure, suggesting that exposure of AM to ozone results in a shift from bound to free intracellular taurine. These data indicate that in vitro exposure of AM to ozone results in a time-dependent alteration of cell function, membrane integrity, and viability.

  16. Prevention of asbestos-induced cell death in rat lung fibroblasts and alveolar macrophages by scavengers of active oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Shatos, M.A.; Doherty, J.M.; Marsh, J.P.; Mossman, B.T.

    1987-10-01

    The possible modulation of asbestos-related cell death using antioxidants in both target and effector cells of asbestosis was investigated. After exposure to crocidolite asbestos at a range of concentrations (2.5-25 ..mu..gcm/sup 2/ dish), the viability of a normal rat lung fibroblast line and freshly isolated alveolar macrophages (AM) was determined. In comparison to fibroblasts, AM were more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of asbestos. Cytotoxic concentrations of asbestos then were added to both cell types in combination with the antioxidants, superoxide dismutase (SOD), a scavenger of superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -./), and catalase, an enzyme scavenging H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. Dimethylthiourea (DMTU), a scavenger of the hydroxyl radical (OH/sup ./) and deferoxamine, an iron chelator, also were evaluated in similar studies. Results showed significant dosage-dependent reduction of asbestos-associated cell death with all agents. In contrast, asbestos-induced toxicity was not ameliorated after addition of chemically inactivated SOD and catalase or bovine serum albumin. Results above suggest asbestos-induced cell damage is mediated by active oxygen species. In this regard, the iron associated with the fiber andor its interaction with cell membranes might be critical in deriving a modified Haber-Weiss (Fenton-type) reaction resulting in production of OH/sup ./.

  17. Production of Fibronectin by the Human Alveolar Macrophage: Mechanism for the Recruitment of Fibroblasts to Sites of Tissue Injury in Interstitial Lung Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennard, Stephen I.; Hunninghake, Gary W.; Bitterman, Peter B.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    1981-11-01

    Because cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system are known to produce fibronectin and because alveolar macrophages are activated in many interstitial lung diseases, the present study was designed to evaluate a role for the alveolar macrophage as a source of the increased levels of fibronectin found in the lower respiratory tract in interstitial lung diseases and to determine if such fibronectin might contribute to the development of the fibrosis found in these disorders by being a chemoattractant for human lung fibroblasts. Production of fibronectin by human alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage and maintained in short-term culture in serum-free conditions was demonstrated; de novo synthesis was confirmed by the incorporation of [14C]proline. This fibronectin had a monomer molecular weight of 220,000 and was antigenically similar to plasma fibronectin. Macrophages from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis produced fibronectin at a rate 20 times higher than did normal macrophages; macrophages from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis produced fibronectin at 10 times the normal rate. Macrophages from 6 of 10 patients with various other interstitial disorders produced fibronectin at rates greater than the rate of highest normal control. Human alveolar macrophage fibronectin was chemotactic for human lung fibroblasts, suggesting a functional role for this fibronectin in the derangement of the alveolar structures that is characteristic of these disorders.

  18. CD14 and tissue factor expression by bacterial lipopolysaccharide-stimulated bovine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z; Carter, C D; Miller, M S; Bochsler, P N

    1995-01-01

    The membrane-associated CD14 receptor (mCD14) is a monocyte/macrophage differentiation antigen, and it has been demonstrated to serve as a receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; endotoxin). Binding of LPS to mCD14 has been shown to be associated with LPS-induced macrophage, monocyte, and neutrophil activation in humans. In this report, we describe the presence and function of an mCD14-like receptor on bovine alveolar macrophages (bAM). An immunofluorescence technique and flow cytometric analysis indicated binding of anti-human CD14 monoclonal antibodies (MAb) My4, 3C10, and 60bd to bAM. Binding of anti-CD14 MAb (3C10 and MY4) was reduced over 20% by pretreatment of bAM with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (0.5 to 1.0 U/ml), indicating that bovine mCD14 is a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored protein. In addition, pretreatment of bAM with anti-CD14 MAb decreased binding of 125I-labeled LPS to macrophages, suggesting that bovine mCD14 serves as a receptor for LPS. A cDNA probe based on the human sequence for CD14 was used in Northern (RNA) blot analysis, and hybridization to human monocyte CD14 yielded the expected 1.5-kb band. Hybridization to bovine mRNA yielded a 1.5-kb band plus an unexpected 3.1-kb band. Constitutive expression of bovine CD14 mRNA was observed, and the expression level was modestly elevated in bAM stimulated for 24 h with LPS (1 ng/ml) in the presence of bovine serum. The function and activation of bAM were assessed by quantitation of tissue factor (TF) expression on the cells using an activated factor X-related chromogenic assay and S-2222 substrate. LPS (1 ng/ml)-mediated upregulation of TF expression on bAM was dependent on the presence of bovine serum components, and TF expression was inhibited by anti-CD14 MAb. In addition, TF mRNA levels in LPS-stimulated bAM were decreased by pretreatment of cells with anti-CD14 MAb (MAb 60bd, 10 micrograms/ml). PMID:7528735

  19. Ozone-enhanced pulmonary infection with Streptococcus zooepidemicus in mice. The role of alveolar macrophage function and capsular virulence factors

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, M.I.; Park, P.; Selgrade, M.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Ozone exposure has been shown to increase the susceptibility of mice to pulmonary bacterial infection. We report here the differences in susceptibility of two strains of mice (C3H/HeJ and C57Bl/6) to pulmonary challenge with Streptococcus zooepidemicus, and demonstrate an association between O3 exposure, reduced alveolar macrophage (AM) function, and increased mortality to infection. After a 3-h exposure to air or to 0.4 or 0.8 ppm O3, mice received an infection of bacteria by aerosol. Subsequent mortality observed over a 20-day period for any given exposure concentration was greater in the C3H/HeJ mice than in the C57Bl/6 mice. Phagocytosis assays identified the AM from O3-exposed lungs as having an impaired ability to engulf the bacteria. Baseline phagocytic activity in C3H/HeJ mice was lower than that in C57Bl/6 mice. Microbiologic assessment of the lungs at various times after infection revealed that the streptococci proliferated rapidly in the lungs of O3-exposed mice, grew more quickly upon isolation, and displayed a mucoid colony appearance indicative of increased encapsulation. In vitro assays confirmed that the encapsulated isolates prevented binding of the bacteria to AM, and reinfection of nonexposed mice with the encapsulated isolate resulted in increased mortality compared with infection with similar numbers of the original unencapsulated bacteria. We have demonstrated that O3 inhalation impairs AM activity in the lung. The streptococci are then able to proliferate and more fully express virulence factors, in particular, the antiphagocytic capsule, which prohibits the ingestion of bacteria by pulmonary phagocytes and leads to increased severity of infection.

  20. Salmonella Typhimurium induces SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulated and strain dependent downregulation of MHC II expression on porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Van Parys, Alexander; Boyen, Filip; Verbrugghe, Elin; Leyman, Bregje; Bram, Flahou; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2012-06-13

    Foodborne salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases worldwide. Salmonella Typhimurium is the serovar most frequently isolated from persistently infected slaughter pigs in Europe. Circumvention of the host's immune system by Salmonella might contribute to persistent infection of pigs. In the present study, we found that Salmonella Typhimurium strain 112910a specifically downregulated MHC II, but not MHC I, expression on porcine alveolar macrophages in a Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-1 and SPI-2 dependent way. Salmonella induced downregulation of MHC II expression and intracellular proliferation of Salmonella in macrophages were significantly impaired after opsonization with Salmonella specific antibodies prior to inoculation. Furthermore, the capacity to downregulate MHC II expression on macrophages differed significantly among Salmonella strains, independently of strain specific differences in invasion capacity, Salmonella induced cytotoxicity and altered macrophage activation status. The fact that strain specific differences in MHC II downregulation did not correlate with the extent of in vitro SPI-1 or SPI-2 gene expression indicates that other factors are involved in MHC II downregulation as well. Since Salmonella strain dependent interference with the pig's immune response through downregulation of MHC II expression might indicate that certain Salmonella strains are more likely to escape serological detection, our findings are of major interest for Salmonella monitoring programs primarily based on serology.

  1. [A study on the activity of nitric oxide in alveolar macrophages from patients with lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Hu, C; Li, G; Wu, E

    1998-01-01

    Nitrite and nitrate (NO2-/NO2-) in the bronchus alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the supernatants of incubated alveolar macrophages (AMs) from patients with primary lung cancer were measured by copper-coated cadmium reduction and Griess method. Mrna expression of AM induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were analyzed by RT-PCR. There was NO2-/NO2- in BALF either from lung cancer patients or from control subjects. When compared with control group and the nontumor-bearing lung, the level of NO2-/NO2-was lower in BALF from the tumor-bearing lung [5.18+/-1.1 vs 2.47+/-0.67nmol x mg protein-1 (P< 0.01); 4.65+/- 2.46 vs 2.47+/- 0.67nmol x mg protein-1(P< 0.01)]. We also found a lower level of NO2-/NO2- in the supernatants of incubated AMs from the lung of cancer patients than from control and nontumor-bearing lung [95.03+/- 21.76 vs 63.37+/- 17.58nmol (P< 0.01); 85.61+/- 16.70 vs 63.37+/- 17.58nmol (P< 0.05)]. No significant difference existed between the MRNA expression of AM iNOS in lung cancer patients (69%) and that of control subjects (91%). After the AMs were stimulated with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), the level of NO2-/NO2- in the supernatants was significantly increased (P< 0.01); while the mRNA expression of AM iNOS from patients with lung cancer resulted in an increase of 16.85+/- 7.58% vs 33.38+/- 8.21% of control group (P< 0.05). These observation suggest that some defects of antitumor function occur in the AMs at the tumor region. GM-CSF can stimulate AMs and thus potentiate their NO activity.

  2. Respiratory burst in alveolar macrophages exposed to urban particles is not a predictor of cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Breznan, Dalibor; Goegan, Patrick; Chauhan, Vinita; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Kumarathasan, Prem; Cakmak, Sabit; Nadeau, Denis; Brook, Jeffrey R; Vincent, Renaud

    2013-06-01

    We examined the utility of respiratory burst measurements in alveolar macrophages to assess adverse cellular changes following exposure to urban particles. Cells were obtained by bronchioalveolar lavage of Fisher 344 rats and exposed (0-100 μg/well) to urban particles (EHC-93, SRM-1648, SRM-1649, PM2.5), the soluble (EHC-93sol) and insoluble (EHC-93insol) fractions of EHC-93 (EHC-93tot), mineral particles (TiO(2), SiO(2)) and metal oxides (iron III oxide, iron II/III oxide, copper II oxide, nickel II oxide). The particle-induced respiratory burst was measured by chemiluminescence for 2h after the addition of particles. The cells were then stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), yeast Zymosan fragments (Zymosan), or lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma (LPS/IFN-γ) and the stimulant-induced respiratory burst was measured. Independently of the potential of particles to induce directly a respiratory burst, exposure to most particles attenuated the subsequent stimulant-induced burst. The notable exception was SiO(2), which produced a strong respiratory burst upon contact with the macrophages and enhanced the subsequent response to PMA or LPS/IFN-γ. Based on the degree of inhibition of the stimulant-dependent respiratory burst, particles were clustered into groups of high (SRM-1649, iron III oxide), intermediate (EHC-93tot, EHC-93insol, SRM-1648, VERP, iron II/III oxide, copper II oxide), and low (EHC-93sol, SiO(2), TiO2 and nickel II oxide) potency. Across these clusters, the potency of the particles to inhibit the stimulant-dependent respiratory burst showed poor correlation with cytotoxicity determined by XTT reduction assay.

  3. Nrf2 regulates PU.1 expression and activity in the alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Staitieh, Bashar S; Fan, Xian; Neveu, Wendy; Guidot, David M

    2015-05-15

    Alveolar macrophage (AM) immune function depends on the activation of the transcription factor PU.1 by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. We have determined that chronic alcohol ingestion dampens PU.1 signaling via an unknown zinc-dependent mechanism; specifically, although PU.1 is not known to be a zinc-dependent transcription factor, zinc treatment reversed alcohol-mediated dampening of PU.1 signaling. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), a zinc-dependent basic leucine zipper protein essential for antioxidant defenses, is also impaired by chronic alcohol ingestion and enhanced by zinc treatment. We hypothesized that the response of PU.1 to zinc treatment may result from the action of Nrf2 on PU.1. We first performed Nrf2/PU.1 protein coimmunoprecipitation on a rat AM cell line (NR8383) and found no evidence of protein-protein interactions. We then found evidence of increased Nrf2 binding to the PU.1 promoter region by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We next activated Nrf2 using either sulforaphane or an overexpression vector and inhibited Nrf2 with silencing RNA to determine whether Nrf2 could actively regulate PU.1. Nrf2 activation increased protein expression of both factors as well as gene expression of their respective downstream effectors, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase[quinone] 1 (NQO1) and cluster of differentiation antigen-14 (CD14). In contrast, Nrf2 silencing decreased the expression of both proteins, as well as gene expression of their effectors. Activating and inhibiting Nrf2 in primary rat AMs resulted in similar effects. Taken together, these findings suggest that Nrf2 regulates the expression and activity of PU.1 and that antioxidant response and immune activation are coordinately regulated within the AM.

  4. Diesel and biodiesel exhaust particle effects on rat alveolar macrophages with in vitro exposure.

    PubMed

    Bhavaraju, Laya; Shannahan, Jonathan; William, Aaron; McCormick, Robert; McGee, John; Kodavanti, Urmila; Madden, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Combustion emissions from diesel engines emit particulate matter which deposits within the lungs. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) encounter the particles and attempt to engulf the particles. Emissions particles from diesel combustion engines have been found to contain diverse biologically active components including metals and polyaromatic hydrocarbons which cause adverse health effects. However little is known about AM response to particles from the incorporation of biodiesel. The objective of this study was to examine the toxicity in Wistar Kyoto rat AM of biodiesel blend (B20) and low sulfur petroleum diesel (PDEP) exhaust particles. Particles were independently suspended in media at a range of 1-500μgmL(-1). Results indicated B20 and PDEP initiated a dose dependent increase of inflammatory signals from AM after exposure. After 24h exposure to B20 and PDEP gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) increased. B20 exposure resulted in elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release at lower particle concentrations compared to PDEP. B20 and PDEP demonstrated similar affinity for sequestration of PGE2 at high concentrations, suggesting detection is not impaired. Our data suggests PGE2 release from AM is dependent on the chemical composition of the particles. Particle analysis including measurements of metals and ions indicate B20 contains more of select metals than PDEP. Other particle components generally reduced by 20% with 20% incorporation of biodiesel into original diesel. This study shows AM exposure to B20 results in increased production of PGE2in vitro relative to diesel.

  5. Cytogenetic effects of cigarette smoke on pulmonary alveolar macrophages of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Rithidech, K.; Chen, B.T.; Mauderly, J.L.; Whorton, E.B. Jr.; Brooks, A.L. )

    1989-01-01

    To determine accurately the potential genetic damage induced by toxic inhaled agents, the cells that receive a high concentration of such agents should be analyzed. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) represent such cells. The authors compared the cytogenetic effects of cigarette smoke on PAMs of rats exposed repeatedly by different methods. This study was part of a larger investigation of the health effects resulting from different methods of exposing rats to cigarette smoke. Fischer 344/N male rats were randomly selected from five different exposure groups. The rats were exposed 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 22-24 days. All smoke-exposed rats received the same daily concentrations {times} time product of cigarette smoke. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with colchicine at the end of exposure. PAMs were obtained by lung lavage and chromosomal damage was measured. Highly significant smoke-induced differences in both structural and numerical aberrations were observed in continuously exposed rats vs. sham controls, regardless route of exposure. The structural aberrations observed were chromatid-type deletions. Both hypoploid and hyperploid cells were detected. The data suggest that cigarette smoke is clastogenic and may disrupt spindle-fiber formation. These activities may play a role in the induction of human carcinogenesis caused by cigarette smoke exposure.

  6. Fas/FasL pathway-mediated alveolar macrophage apoptosis involved in human silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, San-qiao; Rojanasakul, Liying Wang; Chen, Zhi-yuan; Xu, Ying-jun; Bai, Yu-ping; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Xi-ying; Zhang, Chun-min; Yu, Yan-qin; Shen, Fu-hai; Yuan, Ju-xiang; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that lung cell apoptosis is associated with lung fibrosis; however the relationship between apoptosis of alveolar macrophages (AMs) and human silicosis has not been addressed. In the present study, AM apoptosis was determined in whole-lung lavage fluid from 48 male silicosis patients, 13 male observers, and 13 male healthy volunteers. The relationships between apoptosis index (AI) and silica exposure history, soluble Fas (sFas)/membrane-bound Fas (mFas), and caspase-3/caspase-8 were analyzed. AI, mFas, and caspase-3 were significantly higher in lung lavage fluids from silicosis patients than those of observers or healthy volunteers, but the level of sFas demonstrated a decreasing trend. AI was related to silica exposure, upregulation of mFas, and activation of caspase-3 and -8, as well as influenced by smoking status after adjusting for confounding factors. These results indicate that AM apoptosis could be used as a potential biomarker for human silicosis, and the Fas/FasL pathway may regulate this process. The present data from human lung lavage samples may help to understand the mechanism of silicosis and in turn lead to strategies for preventing or treating this disease. PMID:21910009

  7. Viral respiratory infection increases alveolar macrophage cytoplasmic motility in rats: role of NO.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, T; Sekizawa, K; Yamaya, M; Okinaga, S; Satoh, M; Sasaki, H

    1995-03-01

    Ingested ferrimagnetic (Fe3O4) particles were used to estimate noninvasively the motion of organelles in alveolar macrophages (AM) in intact rats during viral respiratory infection by parainfluenza type 1 (Sendai) virus. Four days after instillation of Fe3O4 particles (3 mg/kg) into the lung, remnant field strength (RFS) was measured at the body surface immediately after magnetization of Fe3O4 particles by an externally applied magnetic field. RFS decreases with time, due to particle rotation (relaxation) which is related to cytoplasmic motility of AM. Viral infection increased the relaxation rate (lambda o per min), and increases in lambda o reached a maximum 3 days after nasal inoculation (day 3). Viral infection (day 3)-induced increases in lambda o were dose dependently inhibited by either the L-arginine analogue N-nitro-L-arginine or by methylene blue, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase activity. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained from infected rats contained significantly higher levels of nitrite than that from control rats (P < 0.01). In in vitro experiments, AM from infected rats showed significantly higher lambda o, nitrite production, and intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels than those from control rats (P < 0.01). Sodium nitroprusside, known to release nitric oxide concentration dependently, increased lambda o of AM from noninfected rats in vitro. These results suggest that nitric oxide plays an important role in AM cytoplasmic motility during viral respiratory infection. PMID:7900821

  8. [Functional activity of alveolar macrophages in patients with bronchial asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Liamina, S V; Kalish, S V; Malysheva, E V; Iurenev, G L; Malyshev, I Iu

    2013-01-01

    Combination of bronchial asthma (BA) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a widespread clinical situation. The two pathologies are known to influence each other leading to disturbances in immune responsiveness. We studied phenotypes and phenotypic plasticity of immune cells (alveolar macrophages) in patients with BA and GERD. It was shown that BA and GERD are largely associated with AM of proinflammatory M2 and anti-inflammatory M1 phenotypes respectively. Population of AM with MI phenotype increases in patients having both BA and GERD compared with that in BA alone. In vitro experiments showed that acidic milieu promotes shifting the phenotype toward the predominance of M1, i.e. simulates the situation characteristic of GERD. Combination of BA and GERD narrows the interval within which AM can change MI phenotype (i.e. makes them more "rigid") but broadens the range in which they can change M2 phenotype. Also, GERD promotes the development of morphological rigidity of AM. Patients with BA given steroid therapy undergo inversion of phenotypic plasticity of AM. These data characterize the immunological component of BA and/or GERD pathogenesis. They help to better understand mechanisms of development of broncho-pulmonary pathology in GERD patients and can be used to work out new methods for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:24417067

  9. Investigation of fine chalk dust particles' chemical compositions and toxicities on alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuexia; Yang, Zhenhua; Li, Ruijin; Geng, Hong; Dong, Chuan

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate chemical compositions of fine chalk dust particles (chalk PM2.5) and examine their adverse effects on alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. Morphologies and element concentrations of individual chalk particles were analyzed by using the quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA). The oxidative response of AMs and the potential to generate nitric oxide (NO) by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) and nitrate reductase method were assessed 4h following the treatment of AMs with differing dosages of fine chalk particles, respectively. Oxidative stress and cytotoxicity elicited by chalk PM2.5 were also examined. The results showed that fine chalk particles were mainly composed of gypsum, calcite, dolomite and a little amount of organic adhesives. Exposure to chalk PM2.5 at 100 μg mL(-1) or 300 μg mL(-1) significantly increased intracellular catalase, malondialdehyde, and NO levels and decreased superoxide dismutase level in AMs, leading to leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and reduction of the cell viability. Furthermore, luminol-dependent CL from respiratory burst in AMs was enhanced. It was suggested that chalk PM2.5 could make oxidative damages on AMs and result in cytotoxicity, being likely attributed to excessive reactive oxygen species or reactive nitrogen species induced by mixture of fine gypsum and calcite/dolomite particles. PMID:25278178

  10. The effect of phorbol myristate acetate on the metabolism and ultrastructure of human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hoidal, J. R.; Repine, J. E.; Beall, G. D.; Rasp, F. L.; White, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    In the present investigation we examined the influence of the surface-active agent phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonized heat-killed bacteria (HKB) on oxygen consumption, superoxide release, and glucose oxidation of human alveolar macrophages (AM). Both PMA and HKB produced a surge in oxygen consumption, superoxide release, and oxidation of 1-14C-glucose and 6-14C-glucose by human AM. Examination of AM by electron microscopy following stimulation by these two agents demonstrated membrane ruffling, loss of microvilli, and increased vacuolization in PMA-treated cells and phagocytic vacuoles containing bacteria in HKB-treated cells. The vacuolization produced by PMA-treated AM was much less striking than the vacuolization produced in PMA-treated leukocytes. The similarity in the metabolic and some of the physical responses of AM stimulated by PMA and HKB suggest that PMA may be a useful agent for evaluating cell-membrane-related events of phagocytosis in AM. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figures 9 and 10 Figures 11 and 12 PMID:207188

  11. Early apoptosis of porcine alveolar macrophages limits avian influenza virus replication and pro-inflammatory dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pengxiang; Kuchipudi, Suresh V; Mellits, Kenneth H; Sebastian, Sujith; James, Joe; Liu, Jinhua; Shelton, Holly; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2015-01-01

    Pigs are evidently more resistant to avian than swine influenza A viruses, mediated in part through frontline epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages (AM). Although porcine AM (PAM) are crucial in influenza virus control, their mode of control is unclear. To gain insight into the possible role of PAM in the mediation of avian influenza virus resistance, we compared the host effects and replication of two avian (H2N3 and H6N1) and three mammalian (swine H1N1, human H1N1 and pandemic H1N1) influenza viruses in PAM. We found that PAM were readily susceptible to initial infection with all five avian and mammalian influenza viruses but only avian viruses caused early and extensive apoptosis (by 6 h of infection) resulting in reduced virus progeny and moderated pro-inflammation. Full length viral PB1-F2 present only in avian influenza viruses is a virulence factor that targets AM for mitochondrial-associated apoptotic cell death. With the use of reverse genetics on an avian H5N1 virus, we found that full length PB1-F2 contributed to increased apoptosis and pro-inflammation but not to reduced virus replication. Taken together, we propose that early apoptosis of PAM limits the spread of avian influenza viruses and that PB1-F2 could play a contributory role in the process. PMID:26642934

  12. Differential responses of rat alveolar macrophages to carpet dust in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Mohamed; Ahmad, Iqbal; Musthapa, Syed; Baig, Masroor Alam; Mishra, Rinky; Rahman, Qamar

    2003-05-01

    Epidemiological studies of workers in carpet weaving units in carpet industries have shown a direct relation between the concentration of carpet dust in the air and respiratory symptoms. To predict the health risk of carpet weavers, this preliminary study was conducted to evaluate the toxic potential of different types of workplace dust by using alveolar macrophages (AMs). Several parameters were observed for cytotoxicity such as cell viability, the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in rat AMs treated with different concentration of carpet dust and haemolytic potential of erythrocytes. In addition, reactive oxygen/nitrogen species-inducing effects of carpet dust were assessed by nitric oxide (NO), reduced glutathione (GSH) release and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation in AMs. Results of cell viability and hemolytic assay showed a direct correlation between increasing the dust concentration with enhancing the toxic effect. Knotted and tufted carpet dust increases the release of LDH, NO, GSH and H2O2 production with increasing dust concentration. Present observations have revealed that dusts collected from tufted carpet weaving units exhibited more toxicity to AMs than knotted carpet dust. These data further suggest that injurious effects of carpet dust to AMs could pave a way to evaluate the toxic potential of the different types of workplace dusts and component(s) involved in it.

  13. Uptake characteristics of liposomes by rat alveolar macrophages: influence of particle size and surface mannose modification.

    PubMed

    Chono, Sumio; Tanino, Tomoharu; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2007-01-01

    The influence of particle size and surface mannose modification on the uptake of liposomes by alveolar macrophages (AMs) was investigated in-vitro and in-vivo. Non-modified liposomes of five different particle sizes (100, 200, 400, 1000 and 2000 nm) and mannosylated liposomes with 4-aminophenyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside (particle size 1000 nm) were prepared, and the uptake characteristics by rat AMs in-vitro and in-vivo were examined. The uptake of non-modified liposomes by rat AMs in-vitro increased with an increase in particle size over the range of 100-1000 nm, and became constant at over 1000 nm. The uptake of non-modified liposomes by AMs after pulmonary administration to rats in-vivo increased with an increase in particle size in the range 100-2000 nm. The uptake of mannosylated liposomes (particle size 1000 nm) by rat AMs both in-vitro and in-vivo was significantly greater than that of non-modified liposomes (particle size 1000 nm). The results indicate that the uptake of liposomes by rat AMs is dependent on particle size and is increased by surface mannose modification.

  14. Subcellular distribution of azithromycin and clarithromycin in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Azithromycin (AZM), a 15-membered ring macrolide antimicrobial agent, has an antibacterial spectrum that includes intracellular parasitic pathogens that survive or intracellularly multiply in alveolar macrophages (AMs). The subcellular distribution of AZM in AMs was evaluated in vitro in comparison with clarithromycin (CAM). AZM and CAM (50 µM) were applied to the NR8383 cells, used as an in vitro model of AMs, followed by incubation at 37°C or 4°C. The total amount of AZM in cells and subcellular distribution (cell fractionation) was determined after incubation. High level of AZM accumulation was observed in the NR8383 cells at 37°C, and the equilibrium intracellular to extracellular concentration ratio (I/E ratio) was approximately 680, which was remarkably higher than that of CAM (equilibrium I/E ratio=28). The intracellular accumulation of AZM and CAM was temperature dependent. In addition, AZM distributed to the granules fraction including organelles and soluble fraction including cytosol in the NR8383 cells, whereas CAM mainly distributed in soluble fraction. The amount of AZM in the granules fraction was markedly reduced in the presence of ammonium chloride for increase in intracellular pH. These results indicate that AZM is distributed in acidic compartment in AMs. This study suggests that high AZM accumulation in the NR8383 cells is due to the trapping and/or binding in acidic organelles, such as lysosomes.

  15. Alveolar Macrophages Can Control Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in the Absence of Type I Interferons.

    PubMed

    Makris, Spyridon; Bajorek, Monika; Culley, Fiona J; Goritzka, Michelle; Johansson, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of lower respiratory tract infections. Immunity to RSV is initiated upon detection of the virus by pattern recognition receptors, such as RIG-I-like receptors. RIG-I-like receptors signal via MAVS to induce the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators, including type I interferons (IFNs), which trigger and shape antiviral responses and protect cells from infection. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) are amongst the first cells to encounter invading viruses and the ones producing type I IFNs. However, it is unclear whether IFNs act to prevent AMs from serving as vehicles for viral replication. In this study, primary AMs from MAVS (Mavs-/-)- or type I IFN receptor (Ifnar1-/-)-deficient mice were exposed to RSV ex vivo. Wild-type (wt) AMs but not Mavs-/- and Ifnar1-/- AMs produced inflammatory mediators in response to RSV. Furthermore, Mavs-/- and Ifnar1-/- AMs accumulated more RSV proteins than wt AMs, but the infection was abortive. Thus, RIG-I-like receptor-MAVS and IFNAR signalling are important for the induction of proinflammatory mediators from AMs upon RSV infection, but this signalling is not central for controlling viral replication. The ability to restrict viral replication makes AMs ideal sensors of RSV infection and important initiators of immune responses in the lung. PMID:27423203

  16. Modulation of human alveolar macrophage properties by ozone exposure in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, S.; Madden, M.C.; Newman, S.L.; Devlin, R.B.; Koren, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    The study investigated changes in human alveolar macrophage (HAM) function after exposure in vitro to ozone (O3)(0.1-1.0 ppm for 2-4 hr). The functions studied reflect concern that O3 is detrimental to host defense mechanisms in the bronchoalveolar spaces. Exposure of HAM to O3 caused a concentration-dependent increase in release of prostaglandin E2(PGE2), an important modulator of inflammation, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst. Although phagocytosis of particulate immune complexes was decreased by O3, the authors found no change in the quantity of Fc receptors and complement receptors on the HAM surface. Superoxide (O2) production in response to phorbol ester was reduced after exposure of HAM to O3 while the basal O2 release in response to plastic adherence was not affected. Growth inhibition of the opportunistic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans by HAM was not affected by O3 exposure. The production of inflammatory mediators and immune modulators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6 were not induced by exposure to O3. However, compared to controls, O3-exposed HAM produced significantly lower levels of these cytokines when simulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

  17. Early apoptosis of porcine alveolar macrophages limits avian influenza virus replication and pro-inflammatory dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pengxiang; Kuchipudi, Suresh V.; Mellits, Kenneth H.; Sebastian, Sujith; James, Joe; Liu, Jinhua; Shelton, Holly; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2015-01-01

    Pigs are evidently more resistant to avian than swine influenza A viruses, mediated in part through frontline epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages (AM). Although porcine AM (PAM) are crucial in influenza virus control, their mode of control is unclear. To gain insight into the possible role of PAM in the mediation of avian influenza virus resistance, we compared the host effects and replication of two avian (H2N3 and H6N1) and three mammalian (swine H1N1, human H1N1 and pandemic H1N1) influenza viruses in PAM. We found that PAM were readily susceptible to initial infection with all five avian and mammalian influenza viruses but only avian viruses caused early and extensive apoptosis (by 6 h of infection) resulting in reduced virus progeny and moderated pro-inflammation. Full length viral PB1-F2 present only in avian influenza viruses is a virulence factor that targets AM for mitochondrial-associated apoptotic cell death. With the use of reverse genetics on an avian H5N1 virus, we found that full length PB1-F2 contributed to increased apoptosis and pro-inflammation but not to reduced virus replication. Taken together, we propose that early apoptosis of PAM limits the spread of avian influenza viruses and that PB1-F2 could play a contributory role in the process. PMID:26642934

  18. Composition of coal dusts and their cytotoxicity on alveolar macrophages. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.Y.; Lee, S.L.; Sheehan, C.E.; Wang, Y.

    1996-09-01

    Coal mine dust is produced from complex materials consisting of organic sedimentary strata, inorganic minerals, and trace elements. The dust varies in its chemical compositions and is capable of causing lung injury and damage when inhaled. The purpose of this study was to perform scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive spectrometry, wavelength-dispersive spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction analyses of three coal dusts, and examine their effects on rat lung alveolar macrophages (AMs) in cell culture. The coal dusts were obtained from coal surfaces of anthracite, meager, and fat coal mines. The AMs were harvested in bronchoalveolar lavage from adult male Wistar rats and were cultured in Eagle`s medium at 37 deg C. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and lactate dehydrogenase (LD) released by cultured AMs were measured by radioimmunoassay and enzymatic methods, respectively, 24 hours after addition of coal dust. Cytotoxicity was evident in AM culture of all three coal dusts, which caused the release of LD and PGE2. The release was dose-dependent. In summary, our study shows that all three coal dusts exhibit cytotoxicity to AMs and suggests that the pathogenesis of coal associated with pulmonary disease may be linked to the elemental compositions and mineralogic components.

  19. Investigation of fine chalk dust particles' chemical compositions and toxicities on alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuexia; Yang, Zhenhua; Li, Ruijin; Geng, Hong; Dong, Chuan

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate chemical compositions of fine chalk dust particles (chalk PM2.5) and examine their adverse effects on alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. Morphologies and element concentrations of individual chalk particles were analyzed by using the quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA). The oxidative response of AMs and the potential to generate nitric oxide (NO) by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) and nitrate reductase method were assessed 4h following the treatment of AMs with differing dosages of fine chalk particles, respectively. Oxidative stress and cytotoxicity elicited by chalk PM2.5 were also examined. The results showed that fine chalk particles were mainly composed of gypsum, calcite, dolomite and a little amount of organic adhesives. Exposure to chalk PM2.5 at 100 μg mL(-1) or 300 μg mL(-1) significantly increased intracellular catalase, malondialdehyde, and NO levels and decreased superoxide dismutase level in AMs, leading to leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and reduction of the cell viability. Furthermore, luminol-dependent CL from respiratory burst in AMs was enhanced. It was suggested that chalk PM2.5 could make oxidative damages on AMs and result in cytotoxicity, being likely attributed to excessive reactive oxygen species or reactive nitrogen species induced by mixture of fine gypsum and calcite/dolomite particles.

  20. Three-dimensional characteristics of alveolar macrophages in vitro observed by dark field microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarat, Dominic; Wiemann, Martin; Lipinski, Hans-Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are cells from immune defense inside the lung. They engulf particles in vacuoles from the outer membrane. Volume and surface are important parameters to characterize the particle uptake. AM change their shape within a few seconds, therefore it is hard to obtain by confocal laser scanning microscopy, which is commonly used to generate 3D-images. So we used an intensified dark field microscopy (DFM) as an alternative method to generate contrast rich AM gray tone image slices used for 3D-reconstructions of AM cells by VTK software applications. From these 3D-reconstructions approximate volume and surface data of the AM were obtained and compared to values found in the literature. Finally, simple geometrical 3D-models of the AM were created and compared to real data. Averaged volume and surface data from the DFM images are close to values found in the literature. Furthermore, calculation of volume and surface data from DFM images could be done faster if simplified geometrical 3D-models of the cells were used.

  1. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide–sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptors Required for Late Endosome–Lysosome and Homotypic Lysosome Fusion in Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Diane McVey; Pevsner, Jonathan; Scullion, Matthew A.; Vaughn, Michael; Kaplan, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome–lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome–lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome–lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome–lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages. PMID:10888671

  2. Nitric oxide-mediated cytotoxic effects of alveolar macrophages on transformed lung epithelial cells are independent of the beta 2 integrin-mediated intercellular adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, S

    1998-01-01

    It is known that murine macrophages produce nitric oxide (NO) when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and NO mediates the tumoricidal activity of activated macrophages. The present study was designed to investigate whether the intercellular adhesion is necessary for activated rat alveolar macrophages to exert the full cytotoxic effects. Rat alveolar macrophages produced NO dose dependently in response to either LPS or IFN-gamma, and caused DNA fragmentation in rat type II pneumocytes transformed with SV40 (SV40T2). Chemically produced NO also caused the DNA fragmentation and viability loss in SV40T2, and both of them were inhibited by a NO radical scavenger. The cytotoxicity of activated macrophages was reduced by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, a competitive nitric synthase inhibitor, and neither superoxide dismutase nor catalase modulated the cytotoxicity. Although alveolar macrophages stimulated with either LPS or IFN-gamma caused DNA fragmentation of SV40T2, only LPS increased the intercellular adherence between macrophages and SV40T2. The intercellular adhesion was reduced by both anti-CD18 and anti-CD11a. However, those antibodies did not affect the cytotoxicity of LPS-stimulated macrophages. These results clearly indicate that NO-mediated cytotoxicity is caused predominantly by diffusion of NO, and the beta 2 integrin-mediated intercellular adhesion does not play an important role, if any, in activated macrophage-mediated cytotoxic effects on SV40T2. Images Figure 5 PMID:9536125

  3. Intraphagolysosomal pH in canine and rat alveolar macrophages: flow cytometric measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Heilmann, P; Beisker, W; Miaskowski, U; Camner, P; Kreyling, W G

    1992-01-01

    Intracellular dissolution of inhaled inorganic particles is an important clearance mechanism of the lung and occurs in phagolysosomal vacuoles of phagocytes. Flow cytometric measurements of intraphagolysosomal pH in alveolar macrophages (AM) obtained from beagle dogs, Wistar rats, and from a baboon were made using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled amorphous silica particles (FSP). AM were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. FSP were phagocytized by AM in cell suspensions incubated in full media for 24 hr up to 6 days. Dual laser flow cytometry was performed and six-parameter list mode data were recorded from forward scatter, side scatter, and fluorescence intensities at 530 nm excited at 457 nm and 488 nm as well as logarithmic fluorescence intensity at wavelengths 630 nm excited at 488 nm. In this way it was possible to discriminate viable AM with phagocytized FSP from lysing AM with phagocytized FSP and from cells without FSP and from free FSP. Viable cells were distinguished from lysing cells by staining with propidium iodide immediately before the flow cytometric measurement. A calibration curve for the pH value was determined from FSP suspended in buffered media at pH values ranging from 3.5 to 7.5. First flow cytometrical results indicated that after an incubation time of 24 hr, the mean intraphagolysosomal pH of viable AM was 4.7 +/- 0.3 for dogs and 5.1 +/- 0.5 for rats. The intraphagolysosomal pH of the baboon AM was 4.5. PMID:1396445

  4. Secretion of TNF-alpha by alveolar macrophages in response to Candida albicans mannan.

    PubMed

    Garner, R E; Rubanowice, K; Sawyer, R T; Hudson, J A

    1994-02-01

    Resident alveolar macrophages (AM phi) were tested for their ability to respond to Candida albicans mannan. AM phi were found to produce tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in vitro in response to mannan stimulation. TNF-alpha secretion was measured using ELISA and L929B cellular cytotoxicity assays. Cytotoxicity was neutralized in parallel L929B cell cultures by the addition of rabbit anti-TNF-alpha antibody. Mannan preparations were found to be free of contaminating LPS by Limulus assay. When AM phi were cultivated for 18 h at 37 degrees C, 67 micrograms of mannan stimulated the secretion of approximately 207 U/ml of TNF-alpha. By comparison, AM phi treated with 6.7 micrograms of LPS secreted approximately 257 U/ml of TNF-alpha. Optimal TNF-alpha production occurred between 9 and 18 h after mannan stimulation. Disparate mechanisms for stimulation of TNF-alpha secretion were suggested by differential sugar blockade of LPS- and mannan-induced TNF-alpha secretion. The addition of 2% D-mannose or 2% alpha-methyl-D-mannoside to AM phi cultures blocked mannan- but not LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha secretion. Furthermore, the addition of rabbit anti-mannan antibody to mannan-coated plastic culture dishes prevented TNF-alpha secretion by the mannan-sensitive RAW 264.7 cell line. Moreover, the data suggest that C. albicans mannan stimulated AM phi to secrete TNF-alpha by an LPS-independent receptor mechanism which may also function as a mannose receptor.

  5. Effects of extracellular slime produced by Staphylococcus epidermidis on oxidative responses of rabbit alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Myrvik, Q N; Wagner, W; Barth, E; Wood, P; Gristina, A G

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial slime produced in mass cultures of the RP 12 strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis was extracted with 4 M guanidine-HCl plus 0.05 M sodium acetate and 0.5% CHAPS, concentrated, dialyzed, and subjected to separation on DEAE sephacel columns. Three fractions, I-2A, I-2B, and I-4, were eluted with linear gradients of NaCl. Fractions I-2A and I-2B were alcian blue positive, whereas I-4 was alcian blue negative but the most electronegative fraction. The crude polysaccharide fraction and the three purified fractions were incubated individually for 2.5 or 20 h with normal rabbit alveolar macrophages (AM) to determine their effect on a subsequent PMA-induced oxidative burst. The crude fraction (50-200 micrograms/mL) and I-2B (50-200 micrograms/mL) primed the AM to give approximately a threefold increase in the PMA-induced burst after 2.5 h incubation. In contrast, a 20-h incubation resulted in a 30-40% inhibition of the PMA-induced burst with AM incubated with the same concentrations of the crude, I-2A, or I-2B fractions. Fraction I-4 had no detectable effect. The fractions also were tested to determine if they could elicit an oxidative burst in BCG-immune AM. None of the fractions (up to 500 micrograms/mL) elicited a significant oxidative burst even though BCG-immune AM yielded a PMA-induced burst 100 times that observed with normal resident AM. These data suggest that slime from S. epidermidis can impair the PMA-induced oxidative burst of normal AM during a 20-h incubation period and could explain in part why host defenses are compromised by slime-producing S. epidermidis.

  6. Ivermectin inhibits porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in cultured porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Lee, Changhee

    2016-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a devastating viral pathogen of swine that causes huge financial losses in the pig industry worldwide. Ivermectin is known to be a potent inhibitor of importin α/β-mediated nuclear transport and exhibits antiviral activity towards several RNA viruses by blocking the nuclear trafficking of viral proteins. Although PRRSV replication occurs exclusively in the cytoplasm of infected cells, the nucleocapsid (N) protein has been shown to distinctly localize in the nucleus and nucleolus throughout infection. Here, we sought to assess whether ivermectin suppresses PRRSV replication in cultured porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM) cells and to investigate the effect of ivermectin on the subcellular localization of the PRRSV N protein. Our data demonstrate that ivermectin treatment inhibits PRRSV infection in PAM-pCD163 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The antiviral activity of ivermectin on PRRSV replication was most effective when cells were treated during the early stage of infection. Treatment of PRRSV-infected cells with ivermectin significantly suppressed viral RNA synthesis, viral protein expression, and progeny virus production. However, immunofluorescence and cell fractionation assays revealed that ivermectin was incapable of disrupting the nuclear localization of the N protein, both in PRRSV-infected PAM-pCD163 cells and in PAM cells stably expressing the PRRSV N protein. This finding suggests that an alternative mechanism of action accounts for the ability of ivermectin to diminish PRRSV replication. Taken together, our results suggest that ivermectin is an invaluable therapeutic or preventative agent against PRRSV infection. PMID:26518309

  7. Inhalation of ozone produces a decrease in superoxide anion radical production in mouse alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Ryer-Powder, J.E.; Amoruso, M.A.; Czerniecki, B.; Witz, G.; Goldstein, B.D.

    1988-11-01

    The potentiation of fatal bacterial pneumonia in mice by prior inhalation of ozone occurs at levels of this oxidant pollutant that are frequently present in ambient air. A likely mechanism for this effect is an ozone-induced inhibition in the ability of pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) to produce superoxide anion radical (O2-) demonstrated in the present study. A 25% decrease in PAM O2- production, as measured by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction, occurred after exposure of Swiss-Webster mice to 0.11 ppm ozone for 3 h (p less than 0.05). After 1 ppm there was almost complete inhibition of O2- release. In contrast, the rat, which is highly resistant to the potentiation of bacterial infections by ozone, was less sensitive to inhibition of PAM O2- production, as measured by cytochrome c reduction (mouse IC50, 0.41 ppm; rat IC50, 3.0 ppm ozone for 3 h). The observed decrement in mouse PAM O2- production was not associated with any change in phagocytic ability, as measured by both latex bead ingestion and 51Cr-labeled sheep red blood cell ingestion. This decrease in O2- production in the presence of normal phagocytic activity is analogous to certain of the findings in the neutrophils of children with chronic granulomatous disease. A decrease in rat PAM membrane cytochrome b558 levels was observed after ozone exposure of 3 ppm for 3 h, preliminarily suggesting that the mechanism by which ozone interferes with PAM O2- production may be through interaction with this heme-containing electron carrier.

  8. Acute and subchronic ozone inhalation in the rabbit: response of alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, K.E.; Vollmuth, T.A.; Schlesinger, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Ozone is a potent oxidant gas and a common constituent of photochemical smog. This investigation evaluated the numbers and functional capabilities of alveolar macrophages (AM) recovered from rabbits undergoing acute and subchronic ozone exposure. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed immediately, 24 h, and 7 d after acute (2-h) exposure to 0.1 or 1.2 ppm ozone, and on d 3, 7, and 14 during subchronic (2 h/d X 13 d) exposure to 0.1 ppm ozone. After acute exposure to 1.2 ppm, a marked increase in lavaged neutrophils was observed at 24 h. A single exposure to 0.1 ppm resulted in increased AM at 7 d, while repeated exposures resulted in an increase in AM and neutrophils on d 7 and 14. AM phagocytosis was depressed immediately and 24 h after acute exposure to 0.1 ppm, and at all time points after exposure to 1.2 ppm. Repeated exposures to 0.1 ppm produced reductions in the numbers of phagocytically active AM on d 3 and 7, with a return to control levels by d 14. Substrate attachment by AM was impaired immediately after exposure to 1.2 ppm; AM mobility was not altered by any of the ozone exposures. The results of these studies demonstrated significant alterations in the numbers and functional properties of AM as a result of single or repeated exposure to 0.1 ppm ozone, a level below the current National Ambient Air Quality Standard. These findings indicate that levels of ozone frequently encountered in areas of high photochemical air pollution can elicit a pulmonary inflammatory response and can impair pulmonary defense capabilities.

  9. Alveolar Macrophages Infected with Ames or Sterne Strain of Bacillus anthracis Elicit Differential Molecular Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Douglas; Kenny, Tara; Ojeda, Jenifer F.; Zhong, Yang; Che, Jianwei; Zhou, Yingyao; Ribot, Wilson; Kota, Krishna P.; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) phagocytose Bacillus anthracis following inhalation and induce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines to mediate the activation of innate immunity. Ames, the virulent strain of B. anthracis, contains two plasmids that encode the antiphagocytic poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule and the lethal toxin. The attenuated Sterne strain of B. anthracis, which lacks the plasmid encoding capsule, is widely adapted as a vaccine strain. Although differences in the outcome of infection with the two strains may have originated from the presence or absence of an anti-phagocytic capsule, the disease pathogenesis following infection will be manifested via the host responses, which is not well understood. To gain understanding of the host responses at cellular level, a microarray analysis was performed using primary rhesus macaque AMs infected with either Ames or Sterne spores. Notably, 528 human orthologs were identified to be differentially expressed in AMs infected with either strain of the B. anthracis. Meta-analyses revealed genes differentially expressed in response to B. anthracis infection were also induced upon infections with multiple pathogens such as Francisella Novicida or Staphylococcus aureus. This suggests the existence of a common molecular signature in response to pathogen infections. Importantly, the microarray and protein expression data for certain cytokines, chemokines and host factors provide further insights on how cellular processes such as innate immune sensing pathways, anti-apoptosis versus apoptosis may be differentially modulated in response to the virulent or vaccine strain of B. anthracis. The reported differences may account for the marked difference in pathogenicity between these two strains. PMID:24516547

  10. The innate and adaptive immune response induced by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient particulate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Ryohei; Eeden, Stephan F. van

    2011-12-15

    Emerging epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular events but the exact mechanism by which PM has adverse effects is still unclear. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play a major role in clearing and processing inhaled PM. This comprehensive review of research findings on immunological interactions between AM and PM provides potential pathophysiological pathways that interconnect PM exposure with adverse cardiovascular effects. Coarse particles (10 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 10}) induce innate immune responses via endotoxin-toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway while fine (2.5 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 2.5}) and ultrafine particles (0.1 {mu}m or less, UFP) induce via reactive oxygen species generation by transition metals and/or polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The innate immune responses are characterized by activation of transcription factors [nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B and activator protein-1] and the downstream proinflammatory cytokine [interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}] production. In addition to the conventional opsonin-dependent phagocytosis by AM, PM can also be endocytosed by an opsonin-independent pathway via scavenger receptors. Activation of scavenger receptors negatively regulates the TLR4-NF-{kappa}B pathway. Internalized particles are subsequently subjected to adaptive immunity involving major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression, recruitment of costimulatory molecules, and the modulation of the T helper (Th) responses. AM show atypical antigen presenting cell maturation in which phagocytic activity decreases while both MHC II and costimulatory molecules remain unaltered. PM drives AM towards a Th1 profile but secondary responses in a Th1- or Th-2 up-regulated milieu drive the response in favor of a Th2 profile.

  11. Ozone effect on respiratory syncytial virus infectivity and cytokine production by human alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Soukup, J.; Koren, H.S.; Becker, S.

    1993-01-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the effect of ozone (O3) exposure at 1 ppm for 2 hr on the susceptibility/resistance of adult human alveolar macrophages (AM) to infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in vitro and on RSV-induced cytokine production by the AM. AM were first exposed to O3 or to filtered air and then infected with RSV at multiplicities of infection (m.o.i.) of 0.1 1.0 and 10. The percentage RSV-infected AM and the amount of infectious virus released by the cells were determined at Days 2 and 4 after infection. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels in the supernatants were determined on Day 2. No difference in the percentage infected AM or in the amount of infectious RSV produced was found between control and O3-exposed cultures. However, O3-exposed AM infected with RSV at m.o.i. 1 produced less IL-1 in response to RSV infection than control AM:63.6 pg/ml compared with 98.5 pg/ml. No difference in IL-1 was seen with m.o.i. 10. IL-6 levels were also decreased, but only after infection with m.o.i. 0.1. At this level of infection 830 pg/ml was produced by control AM as compared to 468.2 pg/ml by O3-exposed AM. TNF production was unaffected by O3 at all multiplicities of infection. (Copyright (c) 1993 by Academic Press, Inc.)

  12. Effects of extracellular slime produced by Staphylococcus epidermidis on oxidative responses of rabbit alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Myrvik, Q N; Wagner, W; Barth, E; Wood, P; Gristina, A G

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial slime produced in mass cultures of the RP 12 strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis was extracted with 4 M guanidine-HCl plus 0.05 M sodium acetate and 0.5% CHAPS, concentrated, dialyzed, and subjected to separation on DEAE sephacel columns. Three fractions, I-2A, I-2B, and I-4, were eluted with linear gradients of NaCl. Fractions I-2A and I-2B were alcian blue positive, whereas I-4 was alcian blue negative but the most electronegative fraction. The crude polysaccharide fraction and the three purified fractions were incubated individually for 2.5 or 20 h with normal rabbit alveolar macrophages (AM) to determine their effect on a subsequent PMA-induced oxidative burst. The crude fraction (50-200 micrograms/mL) and I-2B (50-200 micrograms/mL) primed the AM to give approximately a threefold increase in the PMA-induced burst after 2.5 h incubation. In contrast, a 20-h incubation resulted in a 30-40% inhibition of the PMA-induced burst with AM incubated with the same concentrations of the crude, I-2A, or I-2B fractions. Fraction I-4 had no detectable effect. The fractions also were tested to determine if they could elicit an oxidative burst in BCG-immune AM. None of the fractions (up to 500 micrograms/mL) elicited a significant oxidative burst even though BCG-immune AM yielded a PMA-induced burst 100 times that observed with normal resident AM. These data suggest that slime from S. epidermidis can impair the PMA-induced oxidative burst of normal AM during a 20-h incubation period and could explain in part why host defenses are compromised by slime-producing S. epidermidis. PMID:2488002

  13. Surface iron inhibits quartz-induced cytotoxic and inflammatory responses in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ghiazza, Mara; Scherbart, Agnes M; Fenoglio, Ivana; Grendene, Francesca; Turci, Francesco; Martra, Gianmario; Albrecht, Catrin; Schins, Roel P F; Fubini, Bice

    2011-01-14

    The mechanism of enhancement/inhibition of quartz toxicity induced by iron is still unclear. Here the amount of iron on a fibrogenic quartz (Qz) was increased by wet impregnation (Fe(NO(3))(3) 0.67 and 6.7 wt %). X-ray diffraction (XRD), XRF diffuse reflectance, UV-vis, and infrared (IR) spectroscopies revealed dispersed ferric ions, and hematite aggregates at the higher loading. Surface features relevant to pathogenicity and cell responses were compared not only to the original quartz but also to reference quartz DQ12. Surface charge (ζ-potential) was more negative on the original and low-loaded specimen than on the high-loaded one. DQ12 had a less negative ζ-potential than Qz, ascribed to the absence of aluminium present in Qz (1.7 wt %). All quartz specimens were able to generate HO(•) radicals, iron-loaded samples being more reactive than original quartz. Iron deposition inhibited the rupture of a C-H bond. All quartzes were phagocytized by alveolar macrophages (AMΦ cell line NR8383) to the same extent, irrespective of their surface state. Conversely, iron loading increased AMΦ viability (evaluated by cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis). Qz was found to be much less cytotoxic than DQ12. The induction of oxidative stress and inflammatory responses (evaluated by HO-1 mRNA expression and TNF-α mRNA and protein expression) revealed a reduction in inflammogenicity upon iron loading and a more inflammogenic potency of DQ12 ascribed to undissociated SiOH interacting via H-bonding with cell membrane components. The results suggest that besides aluminium also iron at the quartz surface may have an inhibitory effect on adverse health responses.

  14. Effect of erythrocytes on alveolar macrophage cytostatic activity induced by bleomycin lung damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Huot, A E; Gundel, R M; Hacker, M P

    1990-04-15

    Bleomycin (BLM) has been successfully used to treat a number of human neoplasms. The main toxicity associated with BLM therapy is an acute pulmonary inflammation that can culminate in diffuse chronic fibrosis. The effect of BLM-induced pulmonary inflammation on the cytostatic activity of alveolar macrophages (AM) was investigated using AM obtained from rats that had been previously treated with BLM. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected at selected time intervals following a single fibrogenic dose of intratracheally administered BLM (3.6 mg/kg). AM obtained 12 to 72 h following intratracheal BLM (BLM-AM) caused cytostasis of murine leukemia L1210 cells in co-culture, whereas AM obtained from saline-treated controls were not cytostatic. These results indicate that the growth-inhibitory activity of the AM was related to the pulmonary inflammation. Cytostatic activity in control AM could be induced by in vitro exposure to lipopolysaccharide (5 micrograms). When RBC were added to the AM-L1210 co-culture, the cytostatic activity of the BLM-AM was abrogated. The fact that chemical treatment of the RBC with sodium nitrite and potassium cyanide or N-ethylmaleimide did not alter the ability of the RBC to abrogate AM cytostatic activity suggests that the RBC is not acting as a scavenger of oxygen radicals. In contrast, the addition of FeSO4 to the AM-L1210 co-culture mimicked the effect of RBC addition. Aconitase, an iron-sulfur-containing enzyme necessary for mitochondrial respiration, is decreased in L1210 cells that have been co-cultured with BLM-AM but not when the co-cultures also contain RBC. These results suggest that (a) pulmonary inflammation induces cytostatic activity in AM, (b) the alteration of iron homeostasis plays an important role in this cytostatic process, and (c) RBC can prevent this cytostatic activity. PMID:1690596

  15. The FGL2/fibroleukin prothrombinase is involved in alveolar macrophage activation in COPD through the MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanling; Xu, Sanpeng; Xiao, Fei; Xiong, Yan; Wang, Xiaojin; Gao, Sui; Yan, Weiming; Ning, Qin

    2010-05-28

    Fibrinogen-like protein 2 (FGL2)/fibroleukin has been reported to play a vital role in the pathogenesis of some critical inflammatory diseases by possessing immunomodulatory activity through the mediation of 'immune coagulation' and the regulation of maturation and proliferation of immune cells. We observed upregulated FGL2 expression in alveolar macrophages from peripheral lungs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and found a correlation between FGL2 expression and increased macrophage activation markers (CD11b and CD14). The role of FGL2 in the activation of macrophages was confirmed by the detection of significantly decreased macrophage activation marker (CD11b, CD11c, and CD71) expression as well as the inhibition of cell migration and inflammatory cytokine (IL-8 and MMP-9) production in an LPS-induced FGL2 knockdown human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1). Increased FGL2 expression co-localized with upregulated phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) in the lung tissues from COPD patients. Moreover, FGL2 knockdown in THP-1 cells significantly downregulated LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38-MAPK while upregulating phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Thus, we demonstrate that FGL2 plays an important role in macrophage activation in the lungs of COPD patients through MAPK pathway modulation.

  16. Fibrinogen enhances the inflammatory response of alveolar macrophages to TiO2, SiO2 and carbon nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Marucco, Arianna; Gazzano, Elena; Ghigo, Dario; Enrico, Emanuele; Fenoglio, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that the composition of the protein corona dramatically affects the response of cells to nanomaterials (NMs). However, the role of each single protein is still largely unknown. Fibrinogen (FG), one of the most abundant plasma proteins, is believed to mediate foreign-body reactions. Since this protein is absent in cell media used in in vitro toxicological tests the possible FG-mediated effects have not yet been assessed. Here, the effect of FG on the toxicity of three different kinds of inorganic NMs (carbon, SiO2 and TiO2) on alveolar macrophages has been investigated. A set of integrated techniques (UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) have been used to study the strength and the kinetics of interaction of FG with the NMs. The inflammatory response of alveolar macrophages (MH-S) exposed to the three NMs associated with FG has also been investigated. We found that FG significantly enhances the cytotoxicity (lactate dehydrogenase leakage) and the inflammatory response (increase in nitric oxide (NO) concentration and NO synthase activation) induced by SiO2, carbon and TiO2 NMs on alveolar macrophages. This effect appears related to the amount of FG interacting with the NMs. In the case of carbon NMs, the activation of fibrinolysis, likely related to the exposure of cryptic sites of FG, was also observed after 24 h. These findings underline the critical role played by FG in the toxic response to NMs.

  17. Activation of l-arginine transport by protein kinase C in rabbit, rat and mouse alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Racké, Kurt; Hey, Claudia; Mössner, Jutta; Hammermann, Rainer; Stichnote, Christina; Wessler, Ignaz

    1998-01-01

    The role of protein kinase C in controlling L-arginine transport in alveolar macrophages was investigated. L-[3H]Arginine uptake in rabbit alveolar macrophages declined by 80 % after 20 h in culture. 4β-Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), but not 4α-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (α-PMA), present during 20 h culture, enhanced L-[3H]arginine uptake more than 10-fold. Staurosporine and chelerythrine opposed this effect. L-[3H]Arginine uptake was saturable and blockable by L-lysine. After PMA treatment Vmax was increased more than 5-fold and Km was reduced from 0.65 to 0.32 mM. Time course experiments showed that PMA increased L-[3H]arginine uptake almost maximally within 2 h. This short-term effect was not affected by cycloheximide or actinomycin D. L-[3H]Arginine uptake and its stimulation by PMA was also observed in sodium-free medium. L-Leucine (0.1 mM) inhibited L-[3H]arginine uptake by 50 % in sodium-containing medium, but not in sodium-free medium. At 1 mM, L-leucine caused significant inhibition in sodium-free medium also. L-Leucine showed similar effects on PMA-treated cells. N-Ethylmaleimide (200 μm, 10 min) reduced L-[3H]arginine uptake by 70 % in control cells, but had no effect on PMA-treated (20 or 2 h) cells. In alveolar macrophages, multiple transport systems are involved in L-arginine uptake, which is markedly stimulated by protein kinase C, probably by modulation of the activity of already expressed cationic amino acid transporters. PMID:9714862

  18. Rat pulmonary alveolar macrophages in-vitro cytotoxicity to six metal dusts. Technical report, May-August 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.S.; Gutshall, L.L.; Thomson, S.A.

    1987-12-01

    Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) were harvested from rats by bronchopulmonary lavage and exposed in vitro to aqueous suspensions of six metal dusts: aluminum, silicated aluminum, carbon, graphite, titanium dioxide, and silica. The LC50 value for each dust was calculated by logarithmic linear regression analysis of the toxicity data from the experimental exposure concentrations. Cytotoxicity was determined by metal concentration-dependent inability of PAMs to exclude the trypan blue dye from their cytroplasm. After exposure, PAMs usually bore numerous bound metal particles; but phagocytosis was rare, probably because the cells were not activated in situ prior to removal from the lungs.

  19. Role of ICAM-1 in the aggregation and adhesion of human alveolar macrophages in response to TNF-alpha and INF-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, M; Namioka, Y; Ito, T; Izumiyama, N; Fukui, S; Watanabe, A; Kashima, M; Sano, M; Shioya, T; Miura, M

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)-mediated cell-cell adhesion is thought to play an important role at sites of inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that ICAM-1 surface expression on alveolar macrophages is increased in pulmonary sarcoidosis and that inflammatory granuloma formation is characterized by the aggregation of macrophages. The present study shows that ICAM-1 expression is significantly elevated on alveolar macrophages from patients with sarcoidosis in response to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) compared with healthy controls. Aggregation and adhesion were significantly increased in alveolar macrophages treated with TNF-alpha and INF-gamma, and significantly inhibited in those pretreated with a monoclonal antibody to ICAM-1. Similarly, aggregation and adhesion were inhibited in macrophages treated with heparin, which then exhibited a wide range of biological activities relevant to inflammation. These results suggested that the surface expression of ICAM-1 on alveolar macrophages in response to TNF-alpha and INF-gamma is important in mediating aggregation and adhesion. Additionally, heparin may be useful for developing novel therapeutic agents for fibrotic lung disease. PMID:11817671

  20. Effects of prostaglandin E{sub 2} on the subcellular localization of Epac-1 and Rap1 proteins during Fc{gamma}-receptor-mediated phagocytosis in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Thomas G.; Serezani, Carlos H.; Carstens, Jennifer K.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Aronoff, David M.

    2008-01-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated a central role for the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) in the inhibition of Fc{gamma}-receptor-mediated phagocytosis and bacterial killing by prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) in macrophages. However, the subcellular localization of Epac, and its primary target Rap1, has yet to be determined in primary macrophages. Therefore, we used immunofluorescent techniques and phagosome isolation to localize Epac-1 and Rap1 in alveolar macrophages. Epac-1 was predominantly expressed on punctate and tubular membranes throughout the cell body; on the plasma membrane; and co-localized with microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). Rap1 was abundant on punctate membranes, less abundant on plasma membrane, and also found on MTOCs. Following PGE{sub 2} treatment, Epac-1, but not Rap1, accumulated on the nuclear envelope and disappeared from MTOCs. By immunofluorescent microscopy, both Epac-1 and Rap1 were seen to associate with phagosomes containing IgG-opsonized beads, but this association appeared weak, as we failed to observe such interactions in phagosomes isolated from cells at various time points after bead ingestion. Strikingly, however, Epac-1, but not Rap1, appeared to accumulate on maturing phagosomes, but only after PGE{sub 2} treatment (or treatment with a selective Epac-1 agonist). This association was confirmed in isolated phagosome preparations. The changes in Epac-1 localization were too slow to account for the inhibitory effects of PGE{sub 2} on phagocytosis. However, the appearance of Epac-1 on late phagosomes following PGE{sub 2} treatment might be important for suppressing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production and inhibiting the killing of intraphagosomal pathogens. The absence of Rap1 on late phagosomes suggests that the effect of Epac-1 might not require Rap1.

  1. Scavenging of hydrogen peroxide by alveolar type II pneumocytes (ATII) and macrophages (MAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, L.; Slater, M.; Baker, R.; Matalon, S. )

    1990-02-26

    The pulmonary epithelium is often a target of increased concentrations of extracellularly generated reactive oxygen species (PROS). In this study the authors quantified whether freshly isolated ATII and unstimulated MAC may scavenge extracellularly generated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and to determine the mechanisms involved. Cells were suspended in Eagles minimum essential medium and incubated with 500 {mu}M xanthine and 10 mU/ml xanthine oxidase for 60 min at 37C. In a separate series of experiments cells were preincubated with 10 {mu}M aminotriazole (ATZ) which decreased their catalase activity 60% of their initial values. Both ATII and MAC scavenged significant amounts of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. After exposure to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} cell viabilities for the control (-ATZ) and ATZ treated cells were {ge}50%. The ability of ATII and MAC to scavenge extracellular H{sub 2}O{sub 2} may protect the alveolar epithelium from reactive oxygen species injury.

  2. Ozone effect on respiratory syncytial virus infectivity and cytokine production by human alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Soukup, J.; Koren, H.S.; Becker, S. )

    1993-02-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of ozone (O3) exposure at 1 ppm for 2 hr on the susceptibility/resistance of adult human alveolar macrophages (AM) to infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in vitro and on RSV-induced cytokine production by the AM. AM were first exposed to O3 or to filtered air and then infected with RSV at multiplicities of infection (m.o.i.) of 0.1, 1.0, and 10. The percentage RSV-infected AM and the amount of infectious virus released by the cells were determined at Days 2 and 4 after infection. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels in the supernatants were determined on Day 2. No difference in the percentage infected AM or in the amount of infectious RSV produced was found between control and O3-exposed cultures. However, O3-exposed AM infected with RSV at m.o.i. 1 produced less IL-1 in response to RSV infection than control AM: 63.6 pg/ml compared with 98.5 pg/ml. No difference in IL-1 was seen with m.o.i. 10. IL-6 levels were also decreased, but only after infection with m.o.i. 0.1. At this level of infection 830 pg/ml was produced by control AM as compared to 468.2 pg/ml by O3-exposed AM. TNF production was unaffected by O3 at all multiplicities of infection. Statistical analysis of the O3 effect on AM cytokine production induced by the different multiplicities, however, revealed no significant effect of O3. Based on these observations it appears unlikely that O3 alters susceptibility of AM to infection with RSV, nor does O3 dramatically alter cytokine production in response to RSV since effects on IL-1 and IL-6 secretion were only found with the lowest levels of infection which induced cytokine release.

  3. The effects of ambient particulate matter on human alveolar macrophage oxidative and inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, K; Mundandhara, S; Ghio, A J; Madden, M C

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiologic and occupational studies demonstrated that ambient particulate matter (PM) and diesel exhaust particles (DEP) exert deleterious effects on human cardiopulmonary health, including exacerbation of pre-existing lung disease and development of respiratory infections. The effects of ambient PM on lung cell responsiveness are poorly defined. Human alveolar macrophages (AM) were exposed to SRM 1649 (Washington, DC, urban dust; UD), SRM 2975 (forklift diesel exhaust particles; DEP), and fine or coarse ambient PM collected in Chapel Hill, NC, during the late fall (November) and early summer (June) of 2001-2002. AM were subsequently incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), or calcium ionophore A23817 for 6 or 24 h after PM exposure. UD and DEP markedly suppressed O2- release 24 h post-PM exposure. UD exposure significantly inhibited tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8 release after exposure to 10 nanog/ml LPS. DEP significantly suppressed only TNF-alpha and IL-6 release. Suppressed cytokine release may also be produced by reduced cellular cytokine production. Data suggested that decreased cytokine release is not produced by the presence of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. Comparison of TNF-alpha release after LPS, PMA, or A23817 revealed that suppressive effects of UD are LPS dependent, whereas inhibitory effects of DEP may work across multiple mechanistic pathways. November and June Chapel Hill PM exposure stimulated TNF-alpha and IL-8 release before LPS exposure. Fine and coarse November PM exposure markedly suppressed TNF-alpha release 6 h after LPS stimulation, but appeared to exert a stimulatory effect on IL-8 release 24 h after LPS exposure. June fine and coarse PM suppressed IL-8 release after LPS exposure. Data suggest that seasonal influences on PM composition affect AM inflammatory response before and after bacterial exposure. Overall, delayed or inhibited AM immune

  4. ISOZYMES OF ACID PHOSPHATASE IN NORMAL AND CALMETTE-GUÉRIN BACILLUS-INDUCED RABBIT ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Axline, S. G.

    1968-01-01

    The acid phosphatase activity of normal alveolar and BCG-induced alveolar macrophages has been examined. Five electrophoretically distinct forms of acid phosphatase have been identified in both normal and BCG-induced macrophages. The acid phosphatases can be divided into two major categories. One category, containing four distinct forms, is readily solubilized after repeated freezing and thawing or mechanical disruption The second category, containing one form, is firmly bound to the lysosomal membrane and can be solubilized by treatment of the lysosomal fraction with Triton X-100. The Triton-extractable acid phosphatase and the predominant aqueous soluble acid phosphatase have been shown to differ in the degree of membrane binding, in solubility, in net charge, and in molecular weight. The two pre-dominant phosphatases possess identical pH optimum and do not differ in response to enzyme inhibitors. BCG stimulation has been shown to result in a nearly twofold increase in acid phosphatase activity. A nearly proportionate increase in the major acid phosphatase forms has been observed. PMID:4878908

  5. Neutrophil and Alveolar Macrophage-Mediated Innate Immune Control of Legionella pneumophila Lung Infection via TNF and ROS.

    PubMed

    Ziltener, Pascal; Reinheckel, Thomas; Oxenius, Annette

    2016-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium that lives in aquatic environments where it parasitizes amoeba. However, upon inhalation of contaminated aerosols it can infect and replicate in human alveolar macrophages, which can result in Legionnaires' disease, a severe form of pneumonia. Upon experimental airway infection of mice, L. pneumophila is rapidly controlled by innate immune mechanisms. Here we identified, on a cell-type specific level, the key innate effector functions responsible for rapid control of infection. In addition to the well-characterized NLRC4-NAIP5 flagellin recognition pathway, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also essential for effective innate immune control of L. pneumophila. While ROS are essential for the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, alveolar macrophages (AM) rely on neutrophil and monocyte-derived TNF signaling via TNFR1 to restrict bacterial replication. This TNF-mediated antibacterial mechanism depends on the acidification of lysosomes and their fusion with L. pneumophila containing vacuoles (LCVs), as well as caspases with a minor contribution from cysteine-type cathepsins or calpains, and is independent of NLRC4, caspase-1, caspase-11 and NOX2. This study highlights the differential utilization of innate effector pathways to curtail intracellular bacterial replication in specific host cells upon L. pneumophila airway infection. PMID:27105352

  6. Neutrophil and Alveolar Macrophage-Mediated Innate Immune Control of Legionella pneumophila Lung Infection via TNF and ROS

    PubMed Central

    Ziltener, Pascal; Reinheckel, Thomas; Oxenius, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium that lives in aquatic environments where it parasitizes amoeba. However, upon inhalation of contaminated aerosols it can infect and replicate in human alveolar macrophages, which can result in Legionnaires’ disease, a severe form of pneumonia. Upon experimental airway infection of mice, L. pneumophila is rapidly controlled by innate immune mechanisms. Here we identified, on a cell-type specific level, the key innate effector functions responsible for rapid control of infection. In addition to the well-characterized NLRC4-NAIP5 flagellin recognition pathway, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also essential for effective innate immune control of L. pneumophila. While ROS are essential for the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, alveolar macrophages (AM) rely on neutrophil and monocyte-derived TNF signaling via TNFR1 to restrict bacterial replication. This TNF-mediated antibacterial mechanism depends on the acidification of lysosomes and their fusion with L. pneumophila containing vacuoles (LCVs), as well as caspases with a minor contribution from cysteine-type cathepsins or calpains, and is independent of NLRC4, caspase-1, caspase-11 and NOX2. This study highlights the differential utilization of innate effector pathways to curtail intracellular bacterial replication in specific host cells upon L. pneumophila airway infection. PMID:27105352

  7. Klotho Reduction in Alveolar Macrophages Contributes to Cigarette Smoke Extract-induced Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingling; Wang, Yujie; Gao, Wei; Yuan, Cheng; Zhang, Sini; Zhou, Hong; Huang, Mao; Yao, Xin

    2015-11-13

    Abnormal inflammation and accelerated decline in lung function occur in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Klotho, an anti-aging protein, has an anti-inflammatory function. However, the role of Klotho has never been investigated in COPD. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible role of Klotho by alveolar macrophages in airway inflammation in COPD. Klotho levels were assessed in the lung samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of non-smokers, smokers, and patients with COPD. The regulation of Klotho expression by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) was studied in vitro, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) and recombinant Klotho were employed to investigate the role of Klotho on CSE-induced inflammation. Klotho expression was reduced in alveolar macrophages in the lungs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of COPD patients. CSE decreased Klotho expression and release from MH-S cells. Knockdown of endogenous Klotho augmented the expression of the inflammatory mediators, such as MMP-9, IL-6, and TNF-α, by MH-S cells. Exogenous Klotho inhibited the expression of CSE-induced inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, we showed that Klotho interacts with IκBα of the NF-κB pathway. Dexamethasone treatment increased the expression and release level of Klotho in MH-S cells. Our findings suggest that Klotho plays a role in sustained inflammation of the lungs, which in turn may have therapeutic implications in COPD.

  8. Superoxide potentiates NF-kappaB activation and modulates endotoxin-induced cytokine production in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ndengele, Michael M; Muscoli, Carolina; Wang, Zhi Qiang; Doyle, Timothy M; Matuschak, George M; Salvemini, Daniela

    2005-02-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infection predisposes to the development of shock and acute lung injury with multiple organ dysfunction in the critically ill. Although overexpression of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, and other mediators is causally implicated in the pathogenesis of shock and lung injury, the underlying mechanisms following cellular exposure to gram-negative endotoxin remain unclear. De novo generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by monocytes/macrophages in particular has been proposed as a pivotal regulatory mechanism by which enhanced transactivation of redox-sensitive genes culminates in augmented cytokine expression within the lower respiratory tract. Here we sought to characterize the mechanism of action of a synthetic, nonpeptide, low-molecular-weight, Mn-containing superoxide dismutase mimetic (SODm), M40403, in modulating E. coli lipopolysaccharide serotype 0111:B4 (LPS)-induced cytokine production by cultured rat alveolar macrophages. Intracellular superoxide (O2) ion generation was measured using hydroethidine (HE) dye, and the dose-dependent effects of M40403 on TNF-alpha and IL-6 biosynthesis by ELISAs. Upstream redox-sensitive signaling events involving the pleiotropic transcription factor NF-kappaB were determined in nuclear extracts by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) and p65 subunit Western blot. The levels of the cytosolic inhibitory protein IkappaB-alpha were also assessed by Western analysis. We found that M40403 potently suppressed the production of superoxide, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 in LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages, suggesting a key role for superoxide in endotoxin-induced cytokine production in the distal air spaces. In addition, M40403 decreased E. coli LPS-induced activation of NF-kappaB, and this effect was associated with modest suppression of cytoplasmic IkappaB-alpha degradation. Together, these results suggest that removal of

  9. Surfactant Protein A Prevents IFN-γ/IFN-γ Receptor Interaction and Attenuates Classical Activation of Human Alveolar Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Minutti, Carlos M; García-Fojeda, Belén; Sáenz, Alejandra; de Las Casas-Engel, Mateo; Guillamat-Prats, Raquel; de Lorenzo, Alba; Serrano-Mollar, Anna; Corbí, Ángel L; Casals, Cristina

    2016-07-15

    Lung surfactant protein A (SP-A) plays an important function in modulating inflammation in the lung. However, the exact role of SP-A and the mechanism by which SP-A affects IFN-γ-induced activation of alveolar macrophages (aMϕs) remains unknown. To address these questions, we studied the effect of human SP-A on rat and human aMϕs stimulated with IFN-γ, LPS, and combinations thereof and measured the induction of proinflammatory mediators as well as SP-A's ability to bind to IFN-γ or IFN-γR1. We found that SP-A inhibited (IFN-γ + LPS)-induced TNF-α, iNOS, and CXCL10 production by rat aMϕs. When rat macrophages were stimulated with LPS and IFN-γ separately, SP-A inhibited both LPS-induced signaling and IFN-γ-elicited STAT1 phosphorylation. SP-A also decreased TNF-α and CXCL10 secretion by ex vivo-cultured human aMϕs and M-CSF-derived macrophages stimulated by either LPS or IFN-γ or both. Hence, SP-A inhibited upregulation of IFN-γ-inducible genes (CXCL10, RARRES3, and ETV7) as well as STAT1 phosphorylation in human M-CSF-derived macrophages. In addition, we found that SP-A bound to human IFN-γ (KD = 11 ± 0.5 nM) in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and prevented IFN-γ interaction with IFN-γR1 on human aMϕs. We conclude that SP-A inhibition of (IFN-γ + LPS) stimulation is due to SP-A attenuation of both inflammatory agents and that the binding of SP-A to IFN-γ abrogates IFN-γ effects on human macrophages, suppressing their classical activation and subsequent inflammatory response.

  10. Isolation of Mouse and Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Swierczak, Agnieszka; Sugano, Gaël; Smith, Harriet; Wiechmann, Lisa; Pollard, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex network of cells that support tumor progression and malignancy. It has been demonstrated that tumor cells can educate the immune system to promote a tumor-friendly environment. Among all these immune cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are well represented and their presence in mouse models has been shown to promote tumor progression and metastasis. These effects are through the stimulation of angiogenesis, enhancement of tumor cell invasion and intravasation, immunosuppression, and at the metastatic site tumor cell extravasation and growth. However, the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Furthermore there is limited information on TAMs derived from human cancers. For this reason it is important to be able to extract TAMs from tumors in order to compare their phenotypes, functions, and transcriptomes with normal resident tissue macrophages. Isolation of these cells is challenging due to the lack of markers and standardized protocols. Here we show an optimized protocol for the efficient isolation and extraction of resident macrophages and TAMs from human and mouse tissues by using multicolor flow cytometry. These protocols allow for the extraction of thousands of macrophages in less than 5 h from tissues as small as half a gram. The isolated macrophages can then be used for both "omics" and in vitro studies. PMID:27325269

  11. Isolation of Mouse and Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Swierczak, Agnieszka; Sugano, Gaël; Smith, Harriet; Wiechmann, Lisa; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex network of cells that support tumor progression and malignancy. It has been demonstrated that tumor cells can educate the immune system to promote a tumor-friendly environment. Among all these immune cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are well represented and their presence in mouse models has been shown to promote tumor progression and metastasis. These effects are through the stimulation of angiogenesis, enhancement of tumor cell invasion and intravasation, immunosuppression, and at the metastatic site tumor cell extravasation and growth. However, the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Furthermore there is limited information on TAMs derived from human cancers. For this reason it is important to be able to extract TAMs from tumors in order to compare their phenotypes, functions, and transcriptomes with normal resident tissue macrophages. Isolation of these cells is challenging due to the lack of markers and standardized protocols. Here we show an optimized protocol for the efficient isolation and extraction of resident macrophages and TAMs from human and mouse tissues by using multicolor flow cytometry. These protocols allow for the extraction of thousands of macrophages in less than 5 h from tissues as small as half a gram. The isolated macrophages can then be used for both “omics” and in vitro studies. PMID:27325269

  12. Niacin attenuates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in LPS-induced mouse alveolar macrophages by HCA2 dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ershun; Li, Yimeng; Yao, Minjun; Wei, Zhengkai; Fu, Yunhe; Yang, Zhengtao

    2014-11-01

    Niacin has been reported to have potent anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-induced acute lung injury. However, the molecular mechanism of niacin has not been fully understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of niacin on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β in LPS-induced mouse alveolar macrophages and explore its underlying mechanism. Mouse alveolar macrophages were incubated in the presence or absence of various concentrations of niacin (1, 10, 100 μmol/l) 1h before LPS (1 μg/ml) challenge. The results showed that niacin reduced the levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β in LPS-challenged alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, NF-κB activation was inhibited by niacin through blocking the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and IκBα. In addition, silencing HCA2 abrogated the effect of niacin on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggested that niacin attenuated the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines possibly mediated by HCA2 in LPS-challenged alveolar macrophages.

  13. Augmentation of human neutrophil and alveolar macrophage LTB4 production by N-acetylcysteine: role of hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Dent, Gordon; Rabe, Klaus F; Magnussen, Helgo

    1997-01-01

    The actions of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) production by human resting and stimulated peripheral blood neutrophils and alveolar macrophages were investigated. At a concentration of 100 μM, NAC significantly (P<0.01) suppressed the accumulation of H2O2 in the incubation medium of resting and opsonized zymosan (OZ; 0.5 mg ml−1)- or N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP; 1 μM)-stimulated neutrophils and of resting and OZ-stimulated macrophages. At concentrations of 10 μM and above, NAC augmented significantly the level of LTB4 in the supernatants of OZ- and fMLP-stimulated neutrophils (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively) and OZ-stimulated macrophages (P<0.05 at 10 μM, P<0.01 at 100 μM NAC). NAC (100 μM) caused a significant (P<0.01) reduction in the quantity of measurable H2O2 when incubated with exogenous H2O2 concentrations equivalent to those released from OZ-stimulated neutrophils and macrophages. At no concentration did NAC affect quantitites of measurable LTB4 when incubated with exogenous LTB4. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), which catalyzes the conversion of superoxide anion to H2O2 had no significant effect on LTB4 production by human neutrophils. In contrast, catalase, which catalyzes the conversion of H2O2 to H2O and O2, caused a pronounced, statistically significant (P<0.01) increase in the levels of LTB4 measured in the supernatants of OZ- and fMLP-stimulated neutrophils. H2O2 (12.5 μM and 25 μM, concentrations equivalent to those measured in the supernatants of activated neutrophils and alveolar macrophages, respectively) caused a small (13%) decrease in the quantity of measurable LTB4 (P=0.051 and P<0.05 at 12.5 μM and 25 μM, respectively) that was inhibited by NAC (100 μM) but not by catalase (400 u ml−1). In conclusion, the anti-oxidant drug, NAC, increases LTB4 production by human neutrophils and alveolar macrophages, probably through the elimination of cell

  14. Nitric oxide alters metabolism in isolated alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Miles, P R; Bowman, L; Huffman, L

    1996-07-01

    Alveolar type II cells may be exposed to nitric oxide (.NO) from external sources, and these cells can also generate .NO. Therefore we studied the effects of altering .NO levels on various type II cell metabolic processes. Incubation of cells with the .NO generator, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP; 1 mM), leads to reductions of 60-70% in the synthesis of disaturated phosphatidylcholines (DSPC) and cell ATP levels. Cellular oxygen consumption, an indirect measure of cell ATP synthesis, is also reduced by SNAP. There is no direct effect of SNAP on lung mitochondrial ATP synthesis, suggesting that .NO does not directly inhibit this process. On the other hand, incubation of cells with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the enzyme responsible for .NO synthesis, results in increases in DSPC synthesis, cell ATP content, and cellular oxygen consumption. The L-NAME effects are reversed by addition of L-arginine, the substrate for NOS. Production of .NO by type II cells is inhibited by L-NAME, a better inhibitor of constitutive NOS (cNOS) than inducible NOS (iNOS), and is reduced in the absence of external calcium. Aminoguanidine, a specific inhibitor of iNOS, has no effect on cell ATP content or on .NO production. These results indicate that alveolar type II cell lipid and energy metabolism can be affected by .NO and suggest that there may be cNOS activity in these cells. PMID:8760128

  15. Role of lysosomal enzymes released by alveolar macrophages in the pathogenesis of the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, M. N.; Martín, T.; Sánchez, M. L.; Buitrago, J. M. González; Jiménez, A.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrolytic enzymes are the major constituents of alveolar macrophages (AM) and have been shown to be involved in many aspects of the inflammatory pulmonary response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of lysosomal enzymes in the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HPs). An experimental study on AM lysosomal enzymes of an HP-guinea-pig model was performed. The results obtained both in vivo and in vitro suggest that intracellular enzymatic activity decrease is, at least partly, due to release of lysosomal enzymes into the medium. A positive but slight correlation was found between extracellular lysosomal activity and four parameters of lung lesion (lung index, bronchoalveolar fluid total (BALF) protein concentration, BALF LDH and BALF alkaline phosphatase activities). All the above findings suggest that the AM release of lysosomal enzymes during HP is a factor involved, although possibly not the only one, in the pulmonary lesions appearing in this disease. PMID:18475615

  16. FERRITIN EXPRESSION AFTER IN VITRO EXPOSURES OF HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES TO SILICA IS IRON-DEPENDENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increased availability of catalytically active iron after silica exposure can present an oxidative injury to a living system. Sequestration of reactive iron would, therefore, confer a protective effect. The intracellular storage of iron by ferritin within macrophages can limi...

  17. Toxicity of ozone and nitrogen dioxide to alveolar macrophages: comparative study revealing differences in their mechanism of toxic action

    SciTech Connect

    Rietjens, I.M.; Poelen, M.C.; Hempenius, R.A.; Gijbels, M.J.; Alink, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    In this study the toxic mechanisms of action of ozone and nitrogen dioxide were compared using an intact cell model. Rat alveolar macrophages were exposed by means of gas diffusion through a Teflon film. In this in vitro system, ozone appeared to be 10 times more toxic than nitrogen dioxide. alpha-Tocopherol protected equally well against ozone and nitrogen dioxide. It was demonstrated that alpha-tocopherol provided its protection by its action as a radical scavenger and not by its stabilizing structural membrane effect, as (1) concentrations of alpha-tocopherol that already provided optimal protection against ozone and nitrogen dioxide did not influence the membrane fluidity of alveolar macrophages and (2) neither one of the structural alpha-tocopherol analogs tested (phytol and the methyl ether of alpha-tocopherol) could provide a protection against ozone or nitrogen dioxide comparable to the one provided by alpha-tocopherol. It was concluded that reactive intermediates scavenged by alpha-tocopherol are important in the toxic mechanism of both ozone and nitrogen dioxide induced cell damage. However, further results presented strongly confirmed that the kind of radicals and/or reactive intermediates, and thus the toxic reaction mechanism involved, must be different in ozone- and nitrogen dioxide-induced cell damage. This was concluded from the observations that showed that (1) vitamin C provided significantly better protection against nitrogen dioxide than against an equally toxic dose of ozone, (2) glutathione depletion affected the cellular sensitivity toward ozone to a significantly greater extent than the sensitivity towards nitrogen dioxide, and (3) the scavenging action of alpha-tocopherol was accompanied by a significantly greater reduction in its cellular level during nitrogen dioxide exposure than during exposure to ozone.

  18. Protective phenotypes of club cells and alveolar macrophages are favored as part of endotoxin-mediated prevention of asthma.

    PubMed

    García, Luciana N; Leimgruber, Carolina; Uribe Echevarría, Elisa M; Acosta, Patricio L; Brahamian, Jorge M; Polack, Fernando P; Miró, María S; Quintar, Amado A; Sotomayor, Claudia E; Maldonado, Cristina A

    2015-07-01

    Atopic asthma is a chronic allergic disease that involves T-helper type 2 (Th2)-inflammation and airway remodeling. Bronchiolar club cells (CC) and alveolar macrophages (AM) are sentinel cells of airway barrier against inhaled injuries, where allergy induces mucous metaplasia of CC and the alternative activation of AM, which compromise host defense mechanisms and amplify Th2-inflammation. As there is evidence that high levels of environmental endotoxin modulates asthma, the goal of this study was to evaluate if the activation of local host defenses by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) previous to allergy development can contribute to preserving CC and AM protective phenotypes. Endotoxin stimulus before allergen exposition reduced hallmarks of allergic inflammation including eosinophil influx, Interleukin-4 and airway hyperreactivity, while the T-helper type 1 related cytokines IL-12 and Interferon-γ were enhanced. This response was accompanied by the preservation of the normal CC phenotype and the anti-allergic proteins Club Cell Secretory Protein (CCSP) and Surfactant-D, thereby leading to lower levels of CC metaplasia and preventing the increase of the pro-Th2 cytokine Thymic stromal lymphopoietin. In addition, classically activated alveolar macrophages expressing nitric oxide were promoted over the alternatively activated ones that expressed arginase-1. We verified that LPS induced a long-term overexpression of CCSP and the innate immune markers Toll-like receptor 4, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, changes that were preserved in spite of the allergen challenge. These results demonstrate that LPS pre-exposition modifies the local bronchioalveolar microenvironment by inducing natural anti-allergic mechanisms while reducing local factors that drive Th2 type responses, thus modulating allergic inflammation.

  19. Innate imprinting of murine resident alveolar macrophages by allergic bronchial inflammation causes a switch from hypoinflammatory to hyperinflammatory reactivity.

    PubMed

    Naessens, Thomas; Vander Beken, Seppe; Bogaert, Pieter; Van Rooijen, Nico; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried; De Koker, Stefaan; Grooten, Johan

    2012-07-01

    Resident alveolar macrophages (rAMs) residing in the bronchoalveolar lumen of the airways play an important role in limiting excessive inflammatory responses in the respiratory tract. High phagocytic activity along with hyporesponsiveness to inflammatory insults and lack of autonomous IFN-β production are crucial assets in this regulatory function. Using a mouse model of asthma, we analyzed the fate of rAMs both during and after allergic bronchial inflammation. Although nearly indistinguishable phenotypically from naïve rAMs, postinflammation rAMs exhibited a strongly reduced basal phagocytic capacity, accompanied by a markedly increased inflammatory reactivity to Toll-like receptors TLR-3 (poly I:C), TLR-4 [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)], and TLR-7 (imiquimod). Importantly, after inflammation, rAMs exhibited a switch from an IFN-β-defective to an IFN-β-competent phenotype, thus indicating the occurrence of a new, inflammatory-released rAM population in the postallergic lung. Analysis of rAM turnover revealed a rapid disappearance of naïve rAMs after the onset of inflammation. This inflammation-induced rAM turnover is critical for the development of the hyperinflammatory rAM phenotype observed after clearance of bronchial inflammation. These data document a novel mechanism of innate imprinting in which noninfectious bronchial inflammation causes alveolar macrophages to acquire a highly modified innate reactivity. The resulting increase in secretion of inflammatory mediators on TLR stimulation implies a role for this phenomenon of innate imprinting in the increased sensitivity of postallergic lungs to inflammatory insults. PMID:22613023

  20. Protective phenotypes of club cells and alveolar macrophages are favored as part of endotoxin-mediated prevention of asthma

    PubMed Central

    García, Luciana N; Leimgruber, Carolina; Uribe Echevarría, Elisa M; Acosta, Patricio L; Brahamian, Jorge M; Polack, Fernando P; Miró, María S; Quintar, Amado A; Sotomayor, Claudia E

    2014-01-01

    Atopic asthma is a chronic allergic disease that involves T-helper type 2 (Th2)-inflammation and airway remodeling. Bronchiolar club cells (CC) and alveolar macrophages (AM) are sentinel cells of airway barrier against inhaled injuries, where allergy induces mucous metaplasia of CC and the alternative activation of AM, which compromise host defense mechanisms and amplify Th2-inflammation. As there is evidence that high levels of environmental endotoxin modulates asthma, the goal of this study was to evaluate if the activation of local host defenses by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) previous to allergy development can contribute to preserving CC and AM protective phenotypes. Endotoxin stimulus before allergen exposition reduced hallmarks of allergic inflammation including eosinophil influx, Interleukin-4 and airway hyperreactivity, while the T-helper type 1 related cytokines IL-12 and Interferon-γ were enhanced. This response was accompanied by the preservation of the normal CC phenotype and the anti-allergic proteins Club Cell Secretory Protein (CCSP) and Surfactant-D, thereby leading to lower levels of CC metaplasia and preventing the increase of the pro-Th2 cytokine Thymic stromal lymphopoietin. In addition, classically activated alveolar macrophages expressing nitric oxide were promoted over the alternatively activated ones that expressed arginase-1. We verified that LPS induced a long-term overexpression of CCSP and the innate immune markers Toll-like receptor 4, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, changes that were preserved in spite of the allergen challenge. These results demonstrate that LPS pre-exposition modifies the local bronchioalveolar microenvironment by inducing natural anti-allergic mechanisms while reducing local factors that drive Th2 type responses, thus modulating allergic inflammation. PMID:25504013

  1. Stimulation of alveolar macrophages by BCG vaccine enhances the process of lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Chyczewska, E; Chyczewski, L; Bańkowski, E; Sułkowski, S; Nikliński, J

    1993-01-01

    It was found that the BCG vaccine injected subcutaneously to the rats enhances the process of lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin. Pretreatment of rats with this vaccine results in accumulation of activated macrophages in lung interstitium and in the bronchoalveolar spaces. It may be suggested that the activated macrophages release various cytokines which may stimulate the proliferation of fibroblasts and biosynthesis of extracellular matrix components.

  2. Endothelin receptor-antagonists suppress lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine release from alveolar macrophages of non-smokers, smokers and COPD subjects.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Kathrin; Köhler-Bachmann, Stefanie; Jungck, David; Körber, Sandra; Yanik, Sarah; Knoop, Heiko; Wehde, Deborah; Rheinländer, Sonja; Walther, Jörg W; Kronsbein, Juliane; Knobloch, Jürgen; Koch, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Smoking-induced COPD is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, which becomes enhanced by bacterial infections resulting in accelerated disease progression called exacerbation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) release endothelin-1 (ET-1), IL-6, CCL-2 and MMP-9, all of which are linked to COPD pathogenesis and exacerbation. ET-1 signals via ETA- and ETB-receptors (ETAR, ETBR). This is blocked by endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs), like bosentan, which targets both receptors, ETAR-selective ambrisentan and ETBR-specific BQ788. Therefore, ERAs could have anti-inflammatory potential, which might be useful in COPD and other inflammatory lung diseases. We hypothesized that ERAs suppress cytokine release from AM of smokers and COPD subjects induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the most important immunogen of gram-negative bacteria. AM were isolated from the broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) of n=29 subjects (11 non-smokers, 10 current smokers without COPD, 8 smokers with COPD), cultivated and stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of ERAs. Cytokines were measured by ELISA. Endothelin receptor expression was investigated by RT-PCR and western blot. AM expressed ETAR and ETBR mRNA, but only ETBR protein was detected. LPS and ET-1 both induced IL-6, CCL-2 and MMP-9. LPS-induced IL-6 release was increased in COPD versus non-smokers and smokers. Bosentan, ambrisentan and BQ788 all partially reduced all cytokines without differences between cohorts. Specific ETBR inhibition was most effective. LPS induced ET-1, which was exclusively blocked by BQ788. In conclusion, LPS induces ET-1 release in AM, which in turn leads to CCL-2, IL-6 and MMP-9 expression rendering AM sensitive for ERAs. ERAs could have anti-inflammatory potential in smoking-induced COPD.

  3. Stimulation of the alveolar macrophage respiratory burst by ADP causes selective glutathionylation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Rinna, Alessandra; Torres, Martine; Forman, Henry Jay

    2006-07-01

    H(2)O(2) produced by stimulation of the macrophage NADPH oxidase is involved both in bacterial killing and as a second messenger in these cells. Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are targets for H(2)O(2) signaling through oxidation of their catalytic cysteine, resulting in inhibition of their activity. Here, we show that, in the rat alveolar macrophage NR8383 cell line, H(2)O(2) produced through the ADP-stimulated respiratory burst induces the formation of a disulfide bond between PTP1B and GSH that was detectable with an antibody to glutathione-protein complexes and was reversed by DTT addition. PTP1B glutathionylation was dependent on H(2)O(2) as the presence of catalase at the time of ADP stimulation inhibited the formation of the conjugate. Interestingly, other PTPs, i.e., SHP-1 and SHP-2, did not undergo glutathionylation in response to ADP stimulation of the respiratory burst, although glutathionylation of these proteins could be shown by reaction with 25 mM glutathione disulfide in vitro. While previous studies have suggested the reversible oxidation of PTP1B during signaling or showed PTP1B glutathionylation in vitro, the present study directly demonstrates that physiological stimulation of H(2)O(2) production results in PTP1B glutathionylation in intact cells, which may affect downstream signaling.

  4. Single-Cell Mechanics Provides an Effective Means To Probe in Vivo Interactions between Alveolar Macrophages and Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying X; Karsai, Arpad; Anderson, Donald S; Silva, Rona M; Uyeminami, Dale L; Van Winkle, Laura S; Pinkerton, Kent E; Liu, Gang-yu

    2015-12-10

    Single-cell mechanics, derived from atomic force microscopy-based technology, provides a new and effective means to investigate nanomaterial-cell interactions upon in vivo exposure. Lung macrophages represent initial and important responses upon introducing nanoparticles into the respiratory tract, as well as particle clearance with time. Cellular mechanics has previously proven effective to probe in vitro nanomaterial-cell interactions. This study extends technology further to probe the interactions between primary alveolar macrophages (AM) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) upon in vivo exposure. Two types of AgNPs, 20 and 110 nm, were instilled to rat lung at 0.5 mg AgNPs/kg body weight, and allowed 24 h interaction. The consequences of these interactions were investigated by harvesting the primary AMs while maintaining their biological status. Cellular mechanics measurements revealed the diverse responses among AM cells, due to variations in AgNP uptake and oxidative dissolving into Ag(+). Three major responses are evident: zero to low uptake that does not alter cellular mechanics, intracellular accumulation of AgNPs trigger cytoskeleton rearrangement resulting in the stiffening of mechanics, and damage of cytoskeleton that softens the mechanical profile. These effects were confirmed using confocal imaging of F-actin and measurements of reactive oxygen species production. More detailed intracellular interactions will also be discussed on the basis of this study in conjunction with prior knowledge of AgNP toxicity.

  5. Effects of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESAT6-CFP10 Protein on Cell Viability and Production of Nitric Oxide in Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaoli; Han, Meng; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Laixing; Gu, Zuye; Yang, Mei; Yang, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the major pathogen of tuberculosis, which affects approximately one-third of the world’s population. The 6 kDa early secreted antigenic target (ESAT6) and the 10 kDa culture filtrate protein (CFP10), which are secreted by the ESX-1 system in M. tuberculosis, can contribute to mycobacterial virulence. Objectives The aim of this study was to research the effects of M. tuberculosis ESAT6-CFP10 protein on macrophages during a host’s was first and second exposures to M. tuberculosis. Materials and Methods In this study, the ESAT6 and CFP10 genes were amplified to create a fusion gene (ESAT6-CFP10) and cloned into the pET-32a(+) and pEGFP-N1 expression vectors, respectively. The recombinant pET-32a(+)-ESAT6-CFP10 plasmid was transformed into the Escherichia coli Origami strain, and the fusion protein was expressed and confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. The recombinant pEGFP-N1-ESAT6-CFP10 plasmid was transfected into rat alveolar macrophage cells (NR8383). The cell line expressing the ESAT6-CFP10 protein was selected with RT-PCR and designated as NR8383-EC. Finally, the effects of the ESAT6-CFP10 fusion protein on the NR8383 cell line, as well as on the newly constructed NR8383-EC cells, were further assessed. Results The recombinant ESAT6-CFP10 protein was expressed in E. coli and in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages. This protein affected the proliferation and nitric oxide (NO) generation of the NR8383 and NR8383-EC cells. Although NO generation was inhibited in both cell lines, proliferation was inhibited in NR8383 while it was increased NR8383-EC. Conclusions The data indicate that ESAT6-CFP10 could support the survival of M. tuberculosis in the host through altering the host immune response. It also indicates that the host may gain some level of protection from a second exposure to M. tuberculosis, as evidenced by increased proliferation of NR8383-EC. PMID:27635210

  6. Phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from lung, isolated alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived adenomas.

    PubMed Central

    Pool, G L; Bubacz, D G; Lumb, R H; Mason, R J

    1983-01-01

    We have examined phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from rat and mouse whole lung, isolated rat alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived mouse pulmonary adenomas. We report an enrichment in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol (but not phosphatidylinositol) protein-catalysed transfer in the type II cell and adenoma cytosols compared with the whole-lung cytosols. The activities from these cytosols were resolved using column chromatofocusing, which clearly demonstrated the presence of a phosphatidylcholine-specific transfer protein in each of the four tissues. In addition, two proteins (rat) or three proteins (mouse) catalysing both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol transfer were resolved from whole lung, whereas in both the rat isolated alveolar type II cells and the mouse type II cell-derived adenomas one of these less specific proteins is not present. PMID:6661189

  7. Potential Link between the Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) System and Defective Alveolar Macrophage Phagocytic Function in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Barnawi, Jameel; Tran, Hai; Jersmann, Hubertus; Pitson, Stuart; Roscioli, Eugene; Hodge, Greg; Meech, Robyn; Haberberger, Rainer; Hodge, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We previously reported that alveolar macrophages from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are defective in their ability to phagocytose apoptotic cells, with a similar defect in response to cigarette smoke. The exact mechanisms for this defect are unknown. Sphingolipids including ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are involved in diverse cellular processes and we hypothesised that a comprehensive analysis of this system in alveolar macrophages in COPD may help to delineate the reasons for defective phagocytic function. Methods We compared mRNA expression of sphingosine kinases (SPHK1/2), S1P receptors (S1PR1-5) and S1P-degrading enzymes (SGPP1, SGPP2, SGPL1) in bronchoalveolar lavage-derived alveolar macrophages from 10 healthy controls, 7 healthy smokers and 20 COPD patients (10 current- and 10 ex-smokers) using Real-Time PCR. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells was investigated using flow cytometry. Functional associations were assessed between sphingosine signalling system components and alveolar macrophage phagocytic ability in COPD. To elucidate functional effects of increased S1PR5 on macrophage phagocytic ability, we performed the phagocytosis assay in the presence of varying concentrations of suramin, an antagonist of S1PR3 and S1PR5. The effects of cigarette smoking on the S1P system were investigated using a THP-1 macrophage cell line model. Results We found significant increases in SPHK1/2 (3.4- and 2.1-fold increases respectively), S1PR2 and 5 (4.3- and 14.6-fold increases respectively), and SGPL1 (4.5-fold increase) in COPD vs. controls. S1PR5 and SGPL1 expression was unaffected by smoking status, suggesting a COPD “disease effect” rather than smoke effect per se. Significant associations were noted between S1PR5 and both lung function and phagocytosis. Cigarette smoke extract significantly increased mRNA expression of SPHK1, SPHK2, S1PR2 and S1PR5 by THP-1 macrophages, confirming the results in

  8. Synergistic effects of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibition with a corticosteroid in alveolar macrophages from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J; Harbron, C; Lea, S; Booth, G; Cadden, P; Wreggett, K A; Singh, D

    2011-09-01

    Corticosteroids partially suppress cytokine production by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) alveolar macrophages. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors are a novel class of anti-inflammatory drug. We have studied the effects of combined treatment with a corticosteroid and a p38 MAPK inhibitor on cytokine production by COPD alveolar macrophages, with the aim of investigating dose-sparing and efficacy-enhancing effects. Alveolar macrophages from 10 patients with COPD, six smokers, and six nonsmokers were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) after preincubation with five concentrations of dexamethasone alone, five concentrations of the p38 MAPK inhibitor 1-(5-tert-butyl-2-p-tolyl-2H-pyrazol-3-yl)-3(4-(2-morpholin-4-yl-ethoxy)naphthalen-1-yl)urea (BIRB-796) alone, and all combinations of these concentrations. After 24 h, the supernatants were analyzed for interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1ra, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein 3, macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES). The effect of dexamethasone on p38 MAPK activation was analyzed by Western blotting. Dexamethasone and BIRB-796 both reduced LPS-induced cytokine production in a dose-dependent manner in all subject groups, with no differences between groups. Increasing the concentration of BIRB-796 in combination with dexamethasone produced progressively greater inhibition of cytokine production than dexamethasone alone. There were significant efficacy-enhancing benefits and synergistic dose-sparing effects (p < 0.05) for the combination treatment for IL-8, IL-6, TNFα, GM-CSF, IL-1ra, IL-10, MDC, and RANTES in one or more subject groups. Dexamethasone had no effect on LPS-induced p38 MAPK activation. We conclude that p38 MAPK activation in alveolar macrophages is corticosteroid-insensitive. Combining a p38

  9. [Contribution to the study of the phagocytosing ability of broncho-alveolar macrophages in smokers and non-smokers (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kleisbauer, J P; Poirier, R; Colonna, J; Laval, P

    1980-01-01

    Broncho-alveolar macrophages were obtained by bronchial washing from 20 pairs of matched smokers and non-smokers. The following parameters were studied: phagocytosing ability of macrophages on silica in cell culture in the presence or absence of cotinin, a biocompound of nicotin; migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and power and level of alpha 1-antitrypsin in sera of patients. The results are reported as a function of absolute number of macrophages obtained, their viability, the amount of cigarettes smoked, and the action of cotinin. MIF was stronger in the smokers. There was no difference between the groups as far as power and level of alpha 1-antitrypsin are concerned. Cotinin provokes important lesions in the macrophages. The phagocytic power was not significantly different in smokers and non smokers, but the results were better in non-smokers. PMID:7003666

  10. Metabolism and bioactivation of 3-methylindole by Clara cells, alveolar macrophages, and subcellular fractions from rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Thornton-Manning, J R; Nichols, W K; Manning, B W; Skiles, G L; Yost, G S

    1993-10-01

    3-Methylindole (3MI), a fermentation product of tryptophan produced by intestinal and ruminal microflora, has been shown to cause pneumotoxicity in several species subsequent to cytochrome P450-mediated biotransformation. Among several species studied, rabbits are comparatively resistant to 3MI-induced pneumotoxicity, especially when compared to goats or mice. In this study, rabbit pulmonary cells and subcellular fractions were used to examine the metabolism and bioactivation of 3MI. A covalent-binding metabolite was produced in 3MI incubations by both Clara cells and macrophages. The addition of the cytochrome P450 inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole, to these incubations inhibited the production of covalent-binding metabolite(s) by 94% in Clara cells and only 24% in macrophages. In incubations of Clara cells or macrophages with 3MI and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a polar conjugate was detected and tentatively identified as an adduct of 3-hydroxy-3-methylindolenine (3H3MIN). Also identified were 3[(N-glutathione-S-yl)-methyl]-indole (3MI-GSH) and 3-methyloxindole (3MOI). In rabbit lung microsomal incubations with 3MI and glutathione (GSH), 3MI-GSH, 3MOI, indole-3-carbinol, and a GSH adduct of 3H3MIN were identified. The addition of cytosol to the microsomal incubations with GSH did not increase the rate of formation of the GSH adducts, indicating that cytosolic GSH-S-transferases are not essential in the formation of these metabolites. GSH significantly decreased the covalent binding of an electrophilic metabolite in microsomal incubations. These data suggest that GSH may be important in the mitigation of 3MI toxicity. Furthermore, the comparison of 3MI bioactivation to electrophilic intermediates in Clara cells and alveolar macrophages suggests that 3MI is metabolized by different oxidative pathways in the two different cell types, although the same metabolites were produced by the two cell types. This study shows that rabbit pulmonary enzymes are capable of

  11. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF α mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Orona, N.S.; Tasat, D.R.

    2012-06-15

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 μM). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3} 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO{sub 3}. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup −}). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNFα and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O{sub 2}{sup −} may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O{sub 2}{sup −} may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNFα route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium‐related diseases. -- Highlights: ► Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ► At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ► At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNFα. ► Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through

  12. An in vitro alveolar macrophage assay for the assessment of inflammatory cytokine expression induced by atmospheric particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Sijan, Zana; Antkiewicz, Dagmara S; Heo, Jongbae; Kado, Norman Y; Schauer, James J; Sioutas, Constantinos; Shafer, Martin M

    2015-07-01

    Exposures to air pollution in the form of particulate matter (PM) can result in excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the respiratory system, potentially causing both localized cellular injury and triggering a systemic inflammatory response. PM-induced inflammation in the lung is modulated in large part by alveolar macrophages and their biochemical signaling, including production of inflammatory cytokines, the primary mechanism via which inflammation is initiated and sustained. We developed a robust, relevant, and flexible method employing a rat alveolar macrophage cell line (NR8383) which can be applied to routine samples of PM from air quality monitoring sites to gain insight into the drivers of PM toxicity that lead to oxidative stress and inflammation. Method performance was characterized using extracts of ambient and vehicular engine exhaust PM samples. Our results indicate that the reproducibility and the sensitivity of the method are satisfactory and comparisons between PM samples can be made with good precision. The average relative percent difference for all genes detected during 10 different exposures was 17.1%. Our analysis demonstrated that 71% of genes had an average signal to noise ratio (SNR) ≥ 3. Our time course study suggests that 4 h may be an optimal in vitro exposure time for observing short-term effects of PM and capturing the initial steps of inflammatory signaling. The 4 h exposure resulted in the detection of 57 genes (out of 84 total), of which 86% had altered expression. Similarities and conserved gene signaling regulation among the PM samples were demonstrated through hierarchical clustering and other analyses. Overlying the core congruent patterns were differentially regulated genes that resulted in distinct sample-specific gene expression "fingerprints." Consistent upregulation of Il1f5 and downregulation of Ccr7 was observed across all samples, while TNFα was upregulated in half of the samples and downregulated in

  13. Phagocytosis of Histoplasma capsulatum yeasts and microconidia by human cultured macrophages and alveolar macrophages. Cellular cytoskeleton requirement for attachment and ingestion.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S L; Bucher, C; Rhodes, J; Bullock, W E

    1990-01-01

    Phagocytosis of Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc) yeasts and microconidia by human macrophages (M phi) was quantified by a fluorescence quenching technique. Phagocytosis of unopsonized Hc yeasts by monocyte-derived M phi and human alveolar M phi (AM) was rapid. After 60 min, 79% of cultured M phi and 59% of AM had ingested an average of 9.8 and 11 yeasts/M phi, respectively. In contrast, only 26% of monocytes ingested 4.5 yeasts/cell after 60 min. Phagocytosis of unopsonized microconidia by cultured M phi and by AM was equivalent. Monoclonal antibodies specific for the alpha-chains and beta-chain of the CD18 family of adhesion receptors inhibited the binding of Hc yeasts and microconidia to cultured M phi and AM. Thus, the M phi CD18 complex mediates recognition of both phases of this dimorphic fungus. Disruption of actin microfilaments with cytochalasin D inhibited both attachment and ingestion of yeasts by M phi. In contrast, nocodazole, which prevents polymerization of microtubules, did not inhibit binding or ingestion. Both drugs inhibited ingestion, but neither drug inhibited binding of C3b- and C3bi-coated sheep erythrocytes to complement receptors type one (CR1) or type three (CR3), respectively. Therefore, different signal transducing mechanisms for phagocytosis appear to be triggered by the binding of Hc yeasts to CD18, and by the binding of EC3bi to CD11b/CD18, respectively. Images PMID:2104879

  14. Effects of lead ion on immune function of rabbit alveolar macrophages: quantitation of immune phagocytosis and rosette formation by V Cr in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.; Xu, Y.H.; Chang, H.F.

    1985-05-01

    Experiments by a V Cr-labeling technique were performed to investigate the effects of lead (PbS ) on immune phagocytosis and Fc-rosette formation of rabbit pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Evidence is presented that PbS at concentrations of 10( T) and 10( and=2$)M could inhibit these functions of PAMs. The degree of inhibition corresponded to the concentration of this heavy metal ion in vitro.

  15. In vitro culture and characterization of alveolar bone osteoblasts isolated from type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dao-Cai; Li, De-Hua; Ji, Hui-Cang; Rao, Guo-Zhou; Liang, Li-Hua; Ma, Ai-Jie; Xie, Chao; Zou, Gui-Ke; Song, Ying-Liang

    2012-06-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of poor osseointegration following dental implants in type 2 diabetics, it is important to study the biological properties of alveolar bone osteoblasts isolated from these patients. We collected alveolar bone chips under aseptic conditions and cultured them in vitro using the tissue explants adherent method. The biological properties of these cells were characterized using the following methods: alkaline phosphatase (ALP) chemical staining for cell viability, Alizarin red staining for osteogenic characteristics, MTT test for cell proliferation, enzyme dynamics for ALP contents, radio-immunoassay for bone gla protein (BGP) concentration, and ELISA for the concentration of type I collagen (COL-I) in the supernatant. Furthermore, we detected the adhesion ability of two types of cells from titanium slices using non-specific immunofluorescence staining and cell count. The two cell forms showed no significant difference in morphology under the same culture conditions. However, the alveolar bone osteoblasts received from type 2 diabetic patients had slower growth, lower cell activity and calcium nodule formation than the normal ones. The concentration of ALP, BGP and COL-I was lower in the supernatant of alveolar bone osteoblasts received from type 2 diabetic patients than in that received from normal subjects (P < 0.05). The alveolar bone osteoblasts obtained from type 2 diabetic patients can be successfully cultured in vitro with the same morphology and biological characteristics as those from normal patients, but with slower growth and lower concentration of specific secretion and lower combining ability with titanium than normal ones. PMID:22473318

  16. Calcitonin Peptide Family Members Are Differentially Regulated by LPS and Inhibit Functions of Rat Alveolar NR8383 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Soultanova, Aichurek; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Pfeil, Uwe; Grau, Veronika; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Members of the calcitonin peptide family—calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), adrenomedullin (AM), and adrenomedullin2/intermedin (IMD)–exert modulatory effects upon monocytes and macrophages of various extrapulmonary origins. Utilizing the rat alveolar macrophage (AMφ) cell line NR8383, we here set out to determine to which extent these three peptides and their receptors are differentially regulated in AMφ and what specific effects they have on AMφ key functions. LPS treatment differentially up-regulated expression of the peptides and receptors. Among the three peptides, IMD mRNA content was lowest both in primary rat AMφ and NR8383 cells, whereas IMD peptide dominated in basal and LPS-stimulated secretion from NR8383 cells. Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis and TNF-α production were inhibited by AM, IMD, and CGRP, whereas pro-IL-1β mRNA was slightly down-regulated exclusively by CGRP. Neither of these peptides affected IL-6 or IL-10 production. None increased intracellular calcium concentration, but AM significantly inhibited store-operated calcium entry. In conclusion, the rat AMφ cell line NR8383 is both a source and a target of the calcitonin peptide family members AM, IMD, and CGRP. Despite sharing proteins of the receptor complexes, AM, IMD, and CGRP each showed a characteristic pattern of effects and regulation, suggesting that these closely related peptides are not just redundant members of one common signaling pathway but act in concert by addressing parallel signaling cascades. Since peptide and receptor expression are up-regulated by LPS, these signaling pathways might act as inhibitory feedback mechanisms in pulmonary bacterial infection. PMID:27737007

  17. Suppression and recovery of the alveolar macrophage phagocytic system during continuous exposure to 0. 5 ppm ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, M.I.; Hmieleski, R.R.; Stafford, E.A.; Jakab, G.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Short-term exposures to ozone (O3) are known to impair pulmonary antibacterial defenses and alveolar macrophage (AM) phagocytosis in a dose-related manner. To determine the effect of prolonged O3 exposure, Swiss mice were exposed continuously to 0.5 ppm O3. At 1, 3, 7, and 14 days, intrapulmonary killing was assessed by inhalation challenge with Staphylococcus aureus or Proteus mirabilis and by comparing the number of viable bacteria remaining in the lungs at 4 h between O3-exposed and control animals. To evaluate the effects of O3 on the functional capacity of the AMs, Fc-receptor mediated phagocytosis was assessed. Ozone exposure impaired the intrapulmonary killing of S. aureus at 1 and 3 days; however, with prolonged exposure, the bactericidal capacity of the lungs returned to normal. This trend of an initial suppression followed by recovery was reflected in the phagocytic capacity of the AMs. In contrast to S. aureus, when P. mirabilis was used as the challenge organism, O3 exposure had no suppressive effect on pulmonary bactericidal activity, which correlated with an increase in the phagocytic cell population in the lungs. Morphologic examination of the lavaged macrophages showed that after 1 day of O3 exposure, the AMs were more foamy, and contained significantly more vacuoles. There was also a significant increase in binucleated cells at 3 days. These studies demonstrate that continuous exposure to O3 modulates AM-dependent lung defenses and points to the importance of the challenge organism and exposure protocol in establishing the adverse effect of O3.

  18. Hybrid pulmonary surfactant-coated nanogels mediate efficient in vivo delivery of siRNA to murine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Lynn; Naessens, Thomas; De Koker, Stefaan; Zagato, Elisa; Demeester, Jo; Grooten, Johan; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Raemdonck, Koen

    2015-11-10

    The local delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the lungs may provide a therapeutic solution to a range of pulmonary disorders. Resident alveolar macrophages (rAM) in the bronchoalveolar lumen play a critical role in lung inflammatory responses and therefore constitute a particularly attractive target for siRNA therapeutics. However, achieving efficient gene silencing in the lung while avoiding pulmonary toxicity requires appropriate formulation of siRNA in functional nanocarriers. In this study, we evaluated pulmonary surfactant-coated dextran nanogels for the delivery of siRNA to rAM upon pharyngeal aspiration in BALB/c mice. Both the surfactant-coated and uncoated nanogels achieved high levels of siRNA uptake in rAM, yet only the surfactant-coated formulation could significantly reduce gene expression on the protein level. Surfactant-coated nanogels induced a profound downregulation of target mRNA levels, reaching 70% knockdown with ~1mgkg(-1) siRNA dose. In addition, only mild acute pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses were detected one day after nanoparticle aspiration, accompanied by a moderate neutrophil infiltration in the bronchoalveolar lumen. The latter could be substantially reduced by removal of excess surfactant from the formulation. Overall, our hybrid core-shell nanoparticles have demonstrated safe and effective siRNA delivery to rAM, providing a new therapeutic approach for treatment of inflammatory pathologies in the lung.

  19. Hybrid pulmonary surfactant-coated nanogels mediate efficient in vivo delivery of siRNA to murine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Lynn; Naessens, Thomas; De Koker, Stefaan; Zagato, Elisa; Demeester, Jo; Grooten, Johan; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Raemdonck, Koen

    2015-11-10

    The local delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the lungs may provide a therapeutic solution to a range of pulmonary disorders. Resident alveolar macrophages (rAM) in the bronchoalveolar lumen play a critical role in lung inflammatory responses and therefore constitute a particularly attractive target for siRNA therapeutics. However, achieving efficient gene silencing in the lung while avoiding pulmonary toxicity requires appropriate formulation of siRNA in functional nanocarriers. In this study, we evaluated pulmonary surfactant-coated dextran nanogels for the delivery of siRNA to rAM upon pharyngeal aspiration in BALB/c mice. Both the surfactant-coated and uncoated nanogels achieved high levels of siRNA uptake in rAM, yet only the surfactant-coated formulation could significantly reduce gene expression on the protein level. Surfactant-coated nanogels induced a profound downregulation of target mRNA levels, reaching 70% knockdown with ~1mgkg(-1) siRNA dose. In addition, only mild acute pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses were detected one day after nanoparticle aspiration, accompanied by a moderate neutrophil infiltration in the bronchoalveolar lumen. The latter could be substantially reduced by removal of excess surfactant from the formulation. Overall, our hybrid core-shell nanoparticles have demonstrated safe and effective siRNA delivery to rAM, providing a new therapeutic approach for treatment of inflammatory pathologies in the lung. PMID:26307350

  20. Cooperativity between CD8+ T cells, non-neutralizing antibodies, and alveolar macrophages is important for heterosubtypic influenza virus immunity.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, Brian J; Decman, Vilma; Ali, Mohammed-Alkhatim A; Abt, Michael C; Wolf, Amaya I; Monticelli, Laurel A; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Angelosanto, Jill M; Artis, David; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E John

    2013-03-01

    Seasonal epidemics of influenza virus result in ∼36,000 deaths annually in the United States. Current vaccines against influenza virus elicit an antibody response specific for the envelope glycoproteins. However, high mutation rates result in the emergence of new viral serotypes, which elude neutralization by preexisting antibodies. T lymphocytes have been reported to be capable of mediating heterosubtypic protection through recognition of internal, more conserved, influenza virus proteins. Here, we demonstrate using a recombinant influenza virus expressing the LCMV GP33-41 epitope that influenza virus-specific CD8+ T cells and virus-specific non-neutralizing antibodies each are relatively ineffective at conferring heterosubtypic protective immunity alone. However, when combined virus-specific CD8 T cells and non-neutralizing antibodies cooperatively elicit robust protective immunity. This synergistic improvement in protective immunity is dependent, at least in part, on alveolar macrophages and/or other lung phagocytes. Overall, our studies suggest that an influenza vaccine capable of eliciting both CD8+ T cells and antibodies specific for highly conserved influenza proteins may be able to provide heterosubtypic protection in humans, and act as the basis for a potential "universal" vaccine. PMID:23516357

  1. Synthetic Toll-like receptor 7 ligand inhibits porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection in primary porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Du, Yongkun; Du, Taofeng; Shi, Yunpeng; Zhang, Angke; Zhang, Chong; Diao, Yuwen; Jin, Guangyi; Zhou, En-Min

    2016-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a common viral pathogen, causes huge annual economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. After triggering by specific ligands, the Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7), a type of pattern-recognition receptor (PRR), induces antiviral cytokines production. Previously, we synthesized an adenine analog, designated SZU101, a TLR7-specific ligand. In this study, we assessed the inhibitory effect of SZU101 on PRRSV infection in vitro. SZU101 significantly suppressed PRRSV infection in primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, SZU101-induced inhibition involved NF-κB pathway activation in PAMs to initiate expression of TLR7-mediated cytokines and induce expression of downstream signaling IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). Chloroquine, a TLR7 inhibitor, and BAY 11-7082, an NF-κB inhibitor, reversed both the SZU101-induced antiviral effect and induction of cytokine genes and ISGs expression. Therefore, SZU101 antiviral effects depend at least in part on TLR7-NF-κB signaling pathway. Additionally, administration of SZU101 enhanced the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses against PRRSV antigens in mice. Given these results, SZU101 holds promise as an antiviral agent and a vaccine adjuvant to prevent PRRSV infection in pigs.

  2. Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 Mediates Alveolar Macrophage Pyroptosis During LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongdong; Pan, Pinhua; Su, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lemeng; Qin, Qingwu; Tan, Hongyi; Huang, Li; Li, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previously, we demonstrated that pyroptosis in alveolar macrophages (AMs) plays an essential role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unclear. Here, we show that the absence of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) in genetic knock-out mice strongly abrogates pyroptosis in AMs and alleviates the LPS-induced lung injury and systemic inflammation. Our study demonstrates that IRF-1 contributes to caspase-1 activation and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain pyroptosome formation in AMs and leads to downstream inflammatory cytokine release, including that of IL-1β, IL-18, and HMGB1. The nuclear translocation of IRF-1 is linked to the presence of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Our findings suggest that pyroptosis and the downstream inflammatory response in AMs induced by LPS is a process that is dependent on TLR4-mediated up-regulation of IRF-1. In summary, IRF-1 plays a key role in controlling caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis and inflammation. PMID:26939040

  3. Comparative in vitro cytotoxicity of nickel oxides and nickel-copper oxides to rat, mouse, and dog pulmonary alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Benson, J M; Henderson, R F; Pickrell, J A

    1988-01-01

    Metal oxides containing either Ni alone (NiO's) or both Ni and Cu (Ni-CuO's) are encountered during Ni refining. Six NiO compounds calcined at temperatures ranging from less than 650 to 1045 degrees and four Ni-CuO's containing from 6.9 to 28% Cu and 44 to 69% Ni were screened for their in vitro cytotoxicity to alveolar macrophages (AM). NiO's were less toxic to rat AM than were the Ni-CuO compounds. The toxicity of the Ni-CuO compounds increased with increasing Cu content and decreasing Ni content of the molecules, indicating that the toxicity was due to the Cu content of the molecules. AM obtained from beagle dogs, F344/N rats, and B6C3F1 mice displayed the following species sensitivities: dog greater than rat = mouse, with dog AM being most sensitive. The observed differences in species sensitivities correlated with differences in the phagocytic abilities of dog, rat, and mouse AM, with the ranking of phagocytic abilities of the AM in decreasing order of ability being dog greater than rat greater than mouse. PMID:3398078

  4. Activation of the nuclear factor-κB pathway during postnatal lung inflammation preserves alveolarization by suppressing macrophage inflammatory protein-2.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanli; Liu, Min; Husted, Cristiana; Chen, Chihhsin; Thiagarajan, Kavitha; Johns, Jennifer L; Rao, Shailaja P; Alvira, Cristina M

    2015-09-15

    A significant portion of lung development is completed postnatally during alveolarization, rendering the immature lung vulnerable to inflammatory stimuli that can disrupt lung structure and function. Although the NF-κB pathway has well-recognized pro-inflammatory functions, novel anti-inflammatory and developmental roles for NF-κB have recently been described. Thus, to determine how NF-κB modulates alveolarization during inflammation, we exposed postnatal day 6 mice to vehicle (PBS), systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or the combination of LPS and the global NF-κB pathway inhibitor BAY 11-7082 (LPS + BAY). LPS impaired alveolarization, decreased lung cell proliferation, and reduced epithelial growth factor expression. BAY exaggerated these detrimental effects of LPS, further suppressing proliferation and disrupting pulmonary angiogenesis, an essential component of alveolarization. The more severe pathology induced by LPS + BAY was associated with marked increases in lung and plasma levels of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). Experiments using primary neonatal pulmonary endothelial cells (PEC) demonstrated that MIP-2 directly impaired neonatal PEC migration in vitro; and neutralization of MIP-2 in vivo preserved lung cell proliferation and pulmonary angiogenesis and prevented the more severe alveolar disruption induced by the combined treatment of LPS + BAY. Taken together, these studies demonstrate a key anti-inflammatory function of the NF-κB pathway in the early alveolar lung that functions to mitigate the detrimental effects of inflammation on pulmonary angiogenesis and alveolarization. Furthermore, these data suggest that neutralization of MIP-2 may represent a novel therapeutic target that could be beneficial in preserving lung growth in premature infants exposed to inflammatory stress.

  5. SPI-1-encoded type III secretion system of Salmonella enterica is required for the suppression of porcine alveolar macrophage cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Barbora; Volf, Jiri; Ondrackova, Petra; Matiasovic, Jan; Stepanova, Hana; Crhanova, Magdalena; Karasova, Daniela; Faldyna, Martin; Rychlik, Ivan

    2011-01-24

    Genes localized at Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1) are involved in Salmonella enterica invasion of host non-professional phagocytes. Interestingly, in macrophages, SPI-1-encoded proteins, in addition to invasion, induce cell death via activation of caspase-1 which also cleaves proIL-1β and proIL-18, precursors of 2 proinflammatory cytokines. In this study we were therefore interested in whether SPI-1-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS) may influence proinflammatory response of macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages with wild-type S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis and their isogenic SPI-1 deletion mutants. ΔSPI1 mutants of both serovars invaded approx. 5 times less efficiently than the wild-type strains and despite this, macrophages responded to the infection with ΔSPI1 mutants by increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, TNFα, IL-23α and GM-CSF. Identical macrophage responses to that induced by the ΔSPI1 mutants were also observed to the infection with sipB but not the sipA mutant. The hilA mutant exhibited an intermediate phenotype between the ΔSPI1 mutant and the wild-type S. Enteritidis. Our results showed that the SPI-1-encoded T3SS is required not only for cell invasion but in macrophages also for the suppression of early proinflammatory cytokine expression.

  6. Toxicity of penicillic acid for rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. [Aspergillus; Penicillium

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, W.G.; Simpson, J.

    1985-12-01

    Penicillic acid (PA) is a polyketide mycotoxin produced by several species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. This mycotoxin is toxic in experimental animals and has also been reported to be carcinogenic. The cytotoxicity of penicillic acid was studied in rat albeolar macrophages (AM) in vitro. The effects of penicillic acid on membrane integrity were studied by measuring cell volume changes and /sup 51/Cr release. There was a significant decrease in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in cell cultures exposed to 1.0 mM penicillic acid for 4 hr. Inhibition of the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine into protein was both dose- and time-dependent and protein synthesis was inhibited significantly after 2 hr exposure to greater than or equal to0.1 mM penicillic acid. RNA synthesis was inhibited to a lesser extent than protein synthesis. There was significant inhibition of phagocytosis after 2 hr exposure at greater than or equal to0.3 mM penicillic acid and the ED/sub 50/ for phagocytosis was 0.09 mM. Thus phagocytosis was more sensitive to the toxic effects of penicillic acid than any other cellular process studied. The data suggest the possibility of a respiratory hazard to agricultural workers exposed to contaminated grain.

  7. Alveolar macrophages from allergic lungs are not committed to a pro-allergic response and can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness following ex vivo culture

    PubMed Central

    Pouliot, P.; Spahr, A.; Careau, É.; Turmel, V.; Bissonnette, E. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background We already demonstrated that adoptive transfer of alveolar macrophages (AMs) from non-allergic rats into AM-depleted allergic rats prevents airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). We also showed that AMs from non-sensitized, but not from sensitized, allergy-prone rats can prevent AHR following allergen challenge in sensitized allergic animals, establishing the importance of rat immunological status on the modulation of AM functions and suggesting that an allergic lung environment alters AM functions. Objective We investigated how the activation of allergic AMs can be modulated to reinstitute them with their capacity to reduce AHR. Methods AMs from sensitized Brown Norway rats were cultured ex vivo for up to 18 h in culture media to deprogram them from the influence of the allergic lung before being reintroduced into the lung of AM-depleted sensitized recipient. AHR and cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were measured following allergen challenge. AMs stimulated ex vivo with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin(BCG) were used as positive controls as BCG induces a T-helper type 1 activation in AMs. Results AMs ex vivo cultured for 4–18 h reduced AHR to normal level. Interestingly, pro-allergic functions of AMs were dampened by 18 h culture and they reduced AHR even after spending 48 h in an allergic lung microenvironment. Furthermore, transfer of cultured AMs caused an increase in the levels of IFN-γ and IL-12 in BAL when compared with their ovalbumin control. After 18 h of ex vivo culture, AMs expressed reduced levels of TNF, IL-1α, IL-6, and Arginase-2 mRNAs compared with freshly isolated AMs, suggesting that ex vivo culture exempted AMs from lung stimuli that affected their functions. Conclusions There is a significant crosstalk between lung microenvironment and AMs, affecting their functions. It is also the first report showing that sensitized AMs can be modulated ex vivo to reduce lung pro-allergic environment, opening the way to therapies targetting

  8. Inhaled microparticles of antitubercular antibiotic for in vitro and in vivo alveolar macrophage targeting and activation of phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Rajesh; Dalwadi, Sonali; Aboti, Pooja; Patel, Leena

    2014-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic infectious disease with increasing incidence of drug resistance. Oral treatment for TB and multidrug resistance-TB can have serious side effects. The causative agent of TB, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, resides in alveolar macrophages (AMs). Pulmonary administration of antitubercular (anti-TB) antibiotic can help in delivery of high concentration to AM. The ability of AM to phagocytose can also be utilized to generate mycobactericidal nitric oxide (NO) to improve efficacy of anti-TB antibiotics. The objective in this investigation was made to prepare isoniazid microparticles (IM) and polymeric microparticles of isoniazid (INH-PM) using poly-ε-caprolactone as polymer and to evaluate in vitro through cell culture techniques and in vivo through pulmonary administration of IM and INH-PM for uptake of isoniazid by AM. The hepatotoxicity was determined through serum glutamate oxaloacetate transferase (SGOT) and serum glutamate pyruvate transferase (SGPT) levels and histological examination. The results depicted that the significantly higher (P<0.05) concentration of isoniazid was found in AM with INH-PM in vitro and in vivo. NO production was also significantly higher but less than toxic level. SGOT and SGPT levels, uptake of INH by liver and histological examination were indicative of no hepatotoxicity with INH-PM and IM. Phagocytosis of IM and INH-PM leads to significantly higher drug level in AM as well as production of significantly higher levels of NO without compromising the viability of cells. The administration of IM and INH-PM as dry powder inhalation formulation may reduce the treatment time of TB and chances of drug-resistant TB.

  9. Alveolar macrophages have a dual role in a rat model for trimellitic anhydride-induced occupational asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Valstar, Dingena L.; Schijf, Marcel A.; Nijkamp, Frans P.; Storm, Gert; Arts, Josje H.E.; Kuper, C. Frieke; Bloksma, Nanne; Henricks, Paul A.J. . E-mail: p.a.j.henricks@pharm.uu.nl

    2006-02-15

    Occupational exposure to low molecular weight chemicals, like trimellitic anhydride (TMA), can result in occupational asthma. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) are among the first cells to encounter inhaled compounds. These cells can produce many different mediators that have a putative role in asthma. In this study, we examined the role of AMs in lung function and airway inflammation of rats exposed to TMA. Female Brown Norway rats were sensitized by dermal application of TMA or received vehicle alone on days 0 and 7. One day before challenge, rats received intratracheally either empty or clodronate-containing liposomes to deplete the lungs of AMs. On day 21, all rats were challenged by inhalation of TMA in air. Lung function parameters were measured before, during, within 1 h after, and 24 h after challenge. IgE levels and parameters of inflammation and tissue damage were assessed 24 h after challenge. Sensitization with TMA led to decreased lung function parameters during and within 1 h after challenge as compared to non-sensitized rats. AM depletion alleviated the TMA-induced drop in lung function parameters and induced a faster recovery compared to sham-depleted TMA-sensitized rats. It also decreased the levels of serum IgE 24 h after challenge, but did not affect the sensitization-dependent increase in lung lavage fluid IL-6 and tissue TNF-{alpha} levels. In contrast, AM depletion augmented the TMA-induced tissue damage and inflammation 24 h after challenge. AMs seem to have a dual role in this model for TMA-induced occupational asthma since they potentiate the immediate TMA-induced decrease in lung function but tended to dampen the TMA-induced inflammatory reaction 24 h later.

  10. Biologic Activity of Autologous, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Secreting Alveolar Soft Parts Sarcoma and Clear Cell Sarcoma Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, John; Fisher, David E.; Demetri, George D.; Neuberg, Donna; Allsop, Stephen A.; Fonseca, Catia; Nakazaki, Yukoh; Nemer, David; Raut, Chandrajit P.; George, Suzanne; Morgan, Jeffrey A.; Wagner, Andrew J.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Ritz, Jerome; Lezcano, Cecilia; Mihm, Martin; Canning, Christine; Hodi, F. Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Alveolar soft parts sarcoma (ASPS) and clear cell sarcoma (CCS) are rare mesenchymal malignancies driven by chromosomal translocations that activate members of the microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF) family. However, in contrast to malignant melanoma, little is known about their immunogenicity. To learn more about the host response to ASPS and CCS, we conducted a phase I clinical trial of vaccination with irradiated, autologous sarcoma cells engineered by adenoviral mediated gene transfer to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Experimental Design Metastatic tumors from ASPS and CCS patients were resected, processed to single cell suspensions, transduced with a replication defective adenoviral vector encoding GM-CSF, and irradiated. Immunizations were administered subcutaneously and intradermally weekly times three and then every other week. Results Vaccines were successfully manufactured for 11 of the 12 enrolled patients. Eleven subjects received from 3 to 13 immunizations. Toxicities were restricted to grade 1–2 skin reactions at inoculation sites. Vaccination elicited local dendritic cell infiltrates and stimulated T cell mediated delayed type-hypersensitivity reactions to irradiated, autologous tumor cells. Antibody responses to tissue-type plasminogen activator (tTPA) and angiopoietins-1/2 were detected. Tumor biopsies showed programmed death-1 (PD-1) positive CD8+ T cells in association with PD ligand-1 (PD-L1) expressing sarcoma cells. No tumor regressions were observed. Conclusions Vaccination with irradiated, GM-CSF secreting autologous sarcoma cell vaccines is feasible, safe, and biologically active. Concurrent targeting of angiogenic cytokines and antagonism of the PD-1 negative regulatory pathway might intensify immune-mediated tumor destruction. PMID:25805798

  11. Nitrated Fatty Acids Reverse Cigarette Smoke-Induced Alveolar Macrophage Activation and Inhibit Protease Activity via Electrophilic S-Alkylation

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Aravind T.; Lakshmi, Sowmya P.; Muchumarri, Ramamohan R.; Reddy, Raju C.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids (NFAs), endogenous products of nonenzymatic reactions of NO-derived reactive nitrogen species with unsaturated fatty acids, exhibit substantial anti-inflammatory activities. They are both reversible electrophiles and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists, but the physiological implications of their electrophilic activity are poorly understood. We tested their effects on inflammatory and emphysema-related biomarkers in alveolar macrophages (AMs) of smoke-exposed mice. NFA (10-nitro-oleic acid or 12-nitrolinoleic acid) treatment downregulated expression and activity of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB while upregulating those of PPARγ. It also downregulated production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and of the protease cathepsin S (Cat S), a key mediator of emphysematous septal destruction. Cat S downregulation was accompanied by decreased AM elastolytic activity, a major mechanism of septal destruction. NFAs downregulated both Cat S expression and activity in AMs of wild-type mice, but only inhibited its activity in AMs of PPARγ knockout mice, pointing to a PPARγ-independent mechanism of enzyme inhibition. We hypothesized that this mechanism was electrophilic S-alkylation of target Cat S cysteines, and found that NFAs bind directly to Cat S following treatment of intact AMs and, as suggested by in silico modeling and calculation of relevant parameters, elicit S-alkylation of Cys25 when incubated with purified Cat S. These results demonstrate that NFAs’ electrophilic activity, in addition to their role as PPARγ agonists, underlies their protective effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and support their therapeutic potential in this disease. PMID:27119365

  12. Phagosomal pH and glass fiber dissolution in cultured nasal epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages: a preliminary study.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, N F

    1994-01-01

    The dissolution rate of glass fibers has been shown to be pH sensitive using in vitro lung fluid simulant models. The current study investigated whether there is a difference in phagosomal pH (ppH) between rat alveolar macrophages (AM) and rat nasal epithelial cells (RNEC) and whether such a difference would influence the dissolution of glass fibers. The ppH was measured in cultured AM and RNEC using flow cytometric, fluorescence-emission rationing techniques with fluorescein-labeled, amorphous silica particles. Glass fiber dissolution was determined in AM and RNEC cultured for 3 weeks with fast dissolving glass fibers (GF-A) or slow dissolving ones (GF-B). The mean diameters of GF-A were 2.7 microns and of GF-B, 2.6 microns, the average length of both fibers was approximately 22 to 25 microns. Dissolution was monitored by measuring the length and diameter of intracellular fibers and estimating the volume, assuming a cylindrical morphology. The ppH of AM was 5.2 to 5.8, and the ppH of RNEC was 7.0 to 7.5. The GF-A dissolved more slowly in RNEC than in AM, and no dissolution was evident in either cell type with GF-B. The volume loss with GF-A after a 3-week culture with AM was 66% compared to 45% for cultured RNEC. These results are different from those obtained using in vitro lung fluid-simulant models where dissolution is faster at higher pH. This difference suggests that dissolution rates of glass fibers in AM should not be applied to the dissolution of fibers in epithelial cells. Images Figure 1. a Figure 1. b Figure 2. a Figure 2. b Figure 3. a Figure 3. b PMID:7882965

  13. Influence of particle size on drug delivery to rat alveolar macrophages following pulmonary administration of ciprofloxacin incorporated into liposomes.

    PubMed

    Chono, Sumio; Tanino, Tomoharu; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2006-09-01

    In order to confirm the efficacy of ciprofloxacin (CPFX) incorporated into liposomes (CPFX-liposomes) for treatment of respiratory intracellular parasite infections, the influence of particle size on drug delivery to rat alveolar macrophages (AMs) following pulmonary administration of CPFX-liposomes was investigated. CPFX-liposomes were prepared with hydrogenated soybean phosphatidylcholine (HSPC), cholesterol (CH) and dicetylphosphate (DCP) in a lipid molar ratio of 7/2/1 by the hydration method and then adjusted to five different particle sizes (100, 200, 400, 1000 and 2000 nm). In the pharmacokinetic experiment, the delivery efficiency of CPFX to rat AMs following pulmonary administration of CPFX-liposomes increased with the increase in the particle size over the range 100-1000 nm and became constant at over 1000 nm. The concentrations of CPFX in rat AMs until 24 h after pulmonary administration of CPFX-liposomes with a particle size of 1000 nm were higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration of CPFX against various intracellular parasites. In a cytotoxic test, no release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from rat lung tissues by pulmonary administration of CPFX-liposomes with a particle size of 1000 nm was observed. These findings indicate that efficient delivery of CPFX to AMs by CPFX-liposomes with a particle size of 1000 nm induces an excellent antibacterial effect without any cytotoxic effects on lung tissues. Therefore, CPFX-liposomes may be useful in the development of drug delivery systems for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by intracellular parasites, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Chlamydia pneumoniae and Listeria monocytogenes.

  14. Functional consequences for primary human alveolar macrophages following treatment with long, but not short, multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Grandolfo, Davide; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Tetley, Teresa D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are a potential human health hazard, primarily via inhalation. In the lung, alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide the first line of immune cellular defense against inhaled materials. We hypothesized that, 1 and 5 days after treating AMs with short (0.6 μm in length; MWCNT-0.6 μm) and long (20 μm in length; MWCNT-20 μm) MWCNTs for 24 hours, AMs would exhibit increased markers of adverse bioreactivity (cytokine release and reactive oxygen species generation) while also having a modified functional ability (phagocytosis and migration). Methods Primary human AMs were treated with short and long MWCNTs for 24 hours, 1 and 5 days after which toxicity end points, including cell death, reactive oxygen species generation, and inflammatory mediator release, were measured. AM functional end points involving phagocytic ability and migratory capacity were also measured. Results AM viability was significantly decreased at 1 and 5 days after treatment with MWCNT-20 μm, while superoxide levels and inflammatory mediator release were significantly increased. At the same time, there was reduced phagocytosis and migratory capacity alongside increased expression of MARCO; this coincided with frustrated phagocytosis observed by scanning electron microscopy. In contrast, the adverse bioreactivity of the shorter MWCNT-0.6 μm with AMs (and any resulting reduction in AM functional ability) was substantially less marked or absent altogether. Conclusion This study shows that after 24-hour treatment with long, but not short, MWCNTs, AM function is severely affected up to 5 days after the initial exposure. This has potentially significant pathophysiological consequences for individuals who may be intentionally (via therapeutic applications) or unintentionally exposed to these nanomaterials. PMID:25960651

  15. Age-associated differential production of IFN-γ, IL-10 and GM-CSF by porcine alveolar macrophages in response to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim; Tholen, Ernst; Tesfaye, Dawit; Looft, Christian; Schellander, Karl; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the age-related production variation of T helper (Th)-type cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ and IL-10), granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and nitric oxide (NO) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated porcine alveolar macrophages (AMs) in a time-dependent manner. For this purpose, AMs were isolated from 5-days (newborn), 40-days (post-weaned) and 120-days (young) old pigs. Cells were incubated for 24h in the absence or presence of increasing concentrations of LPS (0.0, 0.01, 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 μg/mL). IL-10, IFN-γ and GM-CSF mRNA expression was upregulated in a dose-dependent manner for all age groups (P<0.05). Age-related differences included a significantly increased IL-10 mRNA and protein production in newborn piglets compared to post-weaned and young pigs. IL-10 production pattern was similar with a higher peak between 12 and 36 h post-induction in all age groups. In contrast, IFN-γ mRNA and protein level was significantly elevated in young pigs 12h and 24h post-induction, respectively, while the time course production of IFN-γ was mostly consistent in newborn and post-weaned piglets. GM-CSF mRNA expression was significantly lower in newborn piglets than in post-weaned and young pigs. The kinetic of GM-CSF expression peaked at 12h in young and post-weaned pigs and at 24h in newborn piglets. IL-4 mRNA levels were very low and no apparent change of IL-2 expression was observed following LPS stimulation in all age groups. Only very low levels of NO were detected in the cell supernatants of young pigs. Collectively, these studies suggest age-related differences in time-dependent production of IL-10, IFN-γ and GM-CSF by porcine AMs with potential immunoregulatory consequences to be explored further.

  16. Anti-inflammatory effects of myrtol standardized and other essential oils on alveolar macrophages from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Myrtol standardized is established in the treatment of acute and chronic bronchitis and sinusitis. It increases mucociliar clearance and has muco-secretolytic effects. Additional anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties have been confirmed for Myrtol standardized, eucalyptus oil, and orange oil in several in vitro studies. Objective The aim of this study was to prove the ability of essential oils to reduce cytokines release and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production derived from ex vivo cultured alveolar macrophages. Material and methods Alveolar macrophages from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, n = 26, GOLD III-IV) were pre-cultured with essential oils (10-3-10-8%) for 1 h and then stimulated with LPS (1 μg/ml). After 4 h and 20 h respectively a) cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF), and b) TNF-α, IL-8, and GM-CSF secretion were quantified. Results In comparison with negative controls, pre-cultured Myrtol, eucalyptus oil and orange oil (10-4%) reduced in the LPS-activated alveolar macrophages ROS release significantly after 1+20 h as follows: Myrtol - 17.7% (P = 0.05), eucalyptus oil -21.8% (P < 0.01) and orange oil -23.6% (P < 0.01). Anti-oxidative efficacy was comparable to NAC (1 mmol/l). Essential oils also induced a TNF-α reduction: Myrtol (-37.3%, P < 0.001), eucalyptus oil (-26.8%, P < 0.01) and orange oil (-26.6%, P < 0.01). TNF-α reduction at 1+4 h and 1+20 h did not vary (Myrtol: -31.9% and -37.3% respectively, P = 0.372) indicating that this effect occurs early and cannot be further stimulated. Myrtol reduced the release of GMCSF by -35.7% and that of IL-8 only inconsiderably. Conclusions All essential oils tested have effective antioxidative properties in ex vivo cultured and LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages. Additionally, Myrtol inhibited TNF-α and GM-CSF release best indicating additional potent anti-inflammator y activity. PMID:20156758

  17. Macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung alveolar epithelial cells via PGE2, PGD2, and HGF

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Young-So; Lee, Ye-Ji; Choi, Youn-Hee; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2016-01-01

    Apoptotic cell clearance results in the release of growth factors and the action of signaling molecules involved in tissue homeostasis maintenance. Here, we investigated whether and how macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit the TGF-β1-induced Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process in lung alveolar epithelial cells. Treatment with conditioned medium derived from macrophages exposed to apoptotic cells, but not viable or necrotic cells, inhibited TGF-β1-induced EMT, including loss of E-cadherin, synthesis of N-cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin, and induction of EMT-activating transcription factors, such as Snail1/2, Zeb1/2, and Twist1. Exposure of macrophages to cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors (NS-398 and COX-2 siRNA) or RhoA/Rho kinase inhibitors (Y-27632 and RhoA siRNA) and LA-4 cells to antagonists of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor (EP4 [AH-23848]), PGD2 receptors (DP1 [BW-A868C] and DP2 [BAY-u3405]), or the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor c-Met (PHA-665752), reversed EMT inhibition by the conditioned medium. Additionally, we found that apoptotic cell instillation inhibited bleomycin-mediated EMT in primary mouse alveolar type II epithelial cells in vivo. Our data suggest a new model for epithelial cell homeostasis, by which the anti-EMT programming of macrophages by apoptotic cells may control the progressive fibrotic reaction via the production of potent paracrine EMT inhibitors. PMID:26875548

  18. Macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung alveolar epithelial cells via PGE2, PGD2, and HGF.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young-So; Lee, Ye-Ji; Choi, Youn-Hee; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2016-01-01

    Apoptotic cell clearance results in the release of growth factors and the action of signaling molecules involved in tissue homeostasis maintenance. Here, we investigated whether and how macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit the TGF-β1-induced Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process in lung alveolar epithelial cells. Treatment with conditioned medium derived from macrophages exposed to apoptotic cells, but not viable or necrotic cells, inhibited TGF-β1-induced EMT, including loss of E-cadherin, synthesis of N-cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin, and induction of EMT-activating transcription factors, such as Snail1/2, Zeb1/2, and Twist1. Exposure of macrophages to cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors (NS-398 and COX-2 siRNA) or RhoA/Rho kinase inhibitors (Y-27632 and RhoA siRNA) and LA-4 cells to antagonists of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor (EP4 [AH-23848]), PGD2 receptors (DP1 [BW-A868C] and DP2 [BAY-u3405]), or the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor c-Met (PHA-665752), reversed EMT inhibition by the conditioned medium. Additionally, we found that apoptotic cell instillation inhibited bleomycin-mediated EMT in primary mouse alveolar type II epithelial cells in vivo. Our data suggest a new model for epithelial cell homeostasis, by which the anti-EMT programming of macrophages by apoptotic cells may control the progressive fibrotic reaction via the production of potent paracrine EMT inhibitors. PMID:26875548

  19. Effect of triterpene acids of Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl. leaf and MAPK signal transduction pathway on inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in alveolar macrophage of chronic bronchitis rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Li, J; Meng, X M; Jiang, G L; Li, H; Cao, Q; Yu, S C; Lv, X W; Cheng, W M

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the possible therapy mechanism of triterpene acids of Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl. Leaf (TAL) in alveolar macrophage (AM) of chronic bronchitis (CB) rats. CB model was established by injection of bacillus calmette guein (BCG) plus lipopolisacharide (LPS) in rats. TAL significantly inhibited the increased NO concentration, iNOS expression and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in alveolar macrophages (AMs) of CB rats. Using in vivo test, we found that SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, (10 muM) significantly inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression in AM. This data indicate that TAL highly decreases excessive iNOS expression and NO induction, and p38 MAPK signal transduction participates in iNOS expression and NO induction in AM of CB rats. The effect of TAL on iNOS expression in AM may be related to its inhibition of p38 MAPK signal transduction. PMID:19938219

  20. cDNA microarray analysis of gene expression in rat alveolar macrophages in response to organic extract of diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Koike, Eiko; Hirano, Seishiro; Shimojo, Nobuhiro; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2002-06-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induce pulmonary diseases including asthma and chronic bronchitis. Comprehensive evaluation is required to know the effects of pollutants including DEP on these and other lung diseases. Alveolar macrophages (AM) and epithelial cells are important cellular targets for pollutants such as DEP in the lung. Alveolar macrophages encounter and phagocytose DEP in the alveolar space, and their biological responses have been implicated in DEP-induced pulmonary diseases. Expression profiles of genes induced by DEP in AM will lead to better understanding of the mechanisms involved in pulmonary diseases. To characterize the effect of the DEP extract on AM systematically, we analyzed the gene expression in AM exposed to DEP extract using the Atlas Rat Toxicology Array II. The finding in cDNA microarray was further confirmed by Northern blot analysis. AM were exposed to 10 microg/ml of DEP extract for 6 h in order to elucidate early response to DEP extract in AM. Early response to DEP extract in AM may affect the alteration of gene expression in subsequent responses so that it is important to identify the alteration in early response. In this study, the transcription of 6 genes in the cDNA microarray was significantly elevated by exposure of the AM to DEP extract. These genes were heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and -2, thioredoxin peroxidase 2 (TDPX-2), glutathione S-transferase P subunit (GST-P), NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The antioxidative enzymes such as HO, TDPX-2, GST-P, and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase may play a role in the pulmonary defense against oxidative stress caused by various pollutants including DEP. PCNA may have contributed to the repair of DNA damage and to cell proliferation caused by exposure to these pollutants. Our results suggest that cDNA microarray analysis is a useful tool to investigate the biological responses to pulmonary toxicants. PMID:12011483

  1. Effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on the autophagic activity of alveolar macrophages in a rat model of silicosis

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, HUI-XING; GAO, JUN-LING; ZHAO, MAN-MAN; LI, RAN; TIAN, YAN-XIA; WANG, XIN; ZHANG, JUAN; YUAN, JU-XIANG; CUI, JIAN-ZHONG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on the expression of the autophagy-associated proteins, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC-3) and autophagy-related gene Beclin-1 (Beclin-1), in alveolar macrophages (AMs) in a rat model of silicosis. Furthermore, the study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of BMSC treatment. A population of 60 adult female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were allocated at random into three groups, namely the control, model and BMSC treatment groups (n=20 per group). BMSCs were isolated from five male SD rats (age, 6–8 weeks) and cultured in vitro. The silicosis model was established using a single 1.0-ml infusion of silicon dioxide suspension administered via non-exposed tracheal intubation. Rats in the BMSC treatment group received a 1.0-ml transplantation of BMSCs (1×106/ml). The rats were sacrificed on days 1, 7, 14 and 28 after modeling, and AMs were extracted from the rats using bronchoalveolar lavage. Third-generation BMSCs were identified using flow cytometry with fluorescein isothiocyanate staining, and the morphological characteristics of the AMs were observed using hematoxylin and eosin staining. The expression levels of LC-3 and Beclin-1 were determined using immunocytochemistry sand western blot analysis. The expression levels of LC-3 and Beclin-1 were found to be increased at all the time points in the model group. LC-3 and Beclin-1 levels began to increase at day 1, peaked at day 14 and decreased after day 28; however, the levels remained elevated compared with the basal expression levels. The AMs of the BMSC treatment group exhibited significantly alleviated pathological symptoms compared with the model group AMs, as indicated by significantly decreased expression levels of LC-3 and Beclin-1 at each time point. Therefore, the results indicated that autophagy was promoted in the AMs of the silicosis model rats

  2. Some effects of vitamin A deficiency on the isolated rat lung alveolar type II cell.

    PubMed

    Zachman, R D; Chen, X; Verma, A K; Grummer, M A

    1992-01-01

    Alveolar Type II cells were isolated from control and vitamin A deficient rats and allowed to form a monolayer in plastic dishes for 16-18 hours. The vitamin A content (retinol plus retinyl palmitate) of deficient cells was 50-75% less than in control cells on a per mg protein basis. Isolated Type II cells took up [3H]-retinol, synthesized [3H]-retinyl palmitate, and after 4 hours, 24% of the radioactivity in the Type II cells was [3H]-retinoic acid. Deficiency did not appear to alter retinoic acid synthesis. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) and disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) synthesis, were slightly less in deficient cells compared to control (95 and 85% respectively). In addition, 10(-6) M and 10(-5) M retinoic acid in the reaction media stimulated both PC and DSPC synthesis by 120-140% in control cells. The stimulating effect of retinoic acid was present in deficient cells as well, but less pronounced (120% with 10(-5) M). Vitamin A deficient Type II cells also had less basal levels of both tissue transglutaminase and epidermal transglutaminase activity than control cells. PMID:1355470

  3. Effects of by-products from coal-gasification and fluidized bed combustion processes on alveolar macrophages of newborn dogs. Year end progress report, September 1, 1979-August 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P

    1980-01-01

    It was shown that the aqueous baghouse ashes provided by METC produce both inhibitory and stimulatory response in chemiluminescence in dog alveolar macrophages. These effects can be removed by treating the extracts with activated charcoal. This may have important implication in the handling of disposal and detoxification of these ashes.

  4. Priming of the Respiratory Tract with Immunobiotic Lactobacillus plantarum Limits Infection of Alveolar Macrophages with Recombinant Pneumonia Virus of Mice (rK2-PVM)

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Kimberly D.; Drummond, Rebecca A.; Rice, Tyler A.; Percopo, Caroline M.; Brenner, Todd A.; Barisas, Derek A. G.; Karpe, Kendal A.; Moore, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) is a natural rodent pathogen that replicates in bronchial epithelial cells and reproduces many clinical and pathological features of the more severe forms of disease associated with human respiratory syncytial virus. In order to track virus-target cell interactions during acute infection in vivo, we developed rK2-PVM, bacterial artificial chromosome-based recombinant PVM strain J3666 that incorporates the fluorescent tag monomeric Katushka 2 (mKATE2). The rK2-PVM pathogen promotes lethal infection in BALB/c mice and elicits characteristic cytokine production and leukocyte recruitment to the lung parenchyma. Using recombinant virus, we demonstrate for the first time PVM infection of both dendritic cells (DCs; CD11c+ major histocompatibility complex class II+) and alveolar macrophages (AMs; CD11c+ sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin F+) in vivo and likewise detect mKATE2+ DCs in mediastinal lymph nodes from infected mice. AMs support both active virus replication and production of infectious virions. Furthermore, we report that priming of the respiratory tract with immunobiotic Lactobacillus plantarum, a regimen that results in protection against the lethal inflammatory sequelae of acute respiratory virus infection, resulted in differential recruitment of neutrophils, DCs, and lymphocytes to the lungs in response to rK2-PVM and a reduction from ∼40% to <10% mKATE2+ AMs in association with a 2-log drop in the release of infectious virions. In contrast, AMs from L. plantarum-primed mice challenged with virus ex vivo exhibited no differential susceptibility to rK2-PVM. Although the mechanisms underlying Lactobacillus-mediated viral suppression remain to be fully elucidated, this study provides insight into the cellular basis of this response. IMPORTANCE Pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) is a natural mouse pathogen that serves as a model for severe human respiratory syncytial virus disease. We have developed a fully

  5. Isolation and cultivation of metabolically competent alveolar epithelial cells from A/J mice.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Tanja; Chougule, Anil; Borlak, Jürgen

    2014-08-01

    The A/J mouse strain is used in lung cancer studies. To enable mechanistic investigations the isolation and cultivation of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) is desirable. Based on four different protocols dispase digestion of lung tissue was best and yielded 9.3 ± 1.5 × 10(6) AECs. Of these 61 ± 13% and 43 ± 5% were positive for AP and NBT staining, respectively. Purification by discontinuous Percoll gradient centrifugation did not change this ratio; however, reduced the total cell yield to 4.4 ± 1.1 × 10(6) AECs. Flow cytometry of lectin bound AECs determined 91 ± 7% and 87 ± 5% as positive for Helix pomatia and Maclura pomifera to evidence type II pneumocytes. On day 3 in culture the ethoxyresorufin-O-demethylase activity was 251 ± 80 pmol/4 h × 1.5 × 10(6) and the production of androstenedione proceed at 243.5 ± 344.4 pmol/24 h × 1.5 × 10(6) AECs. However, 6-α, 6-β and 16-β-hydroxytestosterone were produced about 20-fold less as compared to androstenedione and the production of metabolites depended on the culture media supplemented with 2% mouse serum or 10% FCS. Finally, by RT-PCR expression of CYP genes was confirmed in lung tissue and AECs; a link between testosterone metabolism and CYP2A12, 3A16 and 2B9/10 expression was established. Taken collectively, AECs can be successfully isolated and cultured for six days while retaining metabolic competence. PMID:24681204

  6. Differential induction of tumor necrosis factor alpha in ovine pulmonary alveolar macrophages following infection with Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, Pasteurella haemolytica, or lentiviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, J A; Lairmore, M D; O'Toole, D T; Campos, M

    1991-01-01

    Soluble mediators such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) may be important in the pathogenesis of many chronic pulmonary infections. We examined the ability of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, Pasteurella haemolytica, and ovine lentiviruses (OvLV) to induce TNF-alpha secretion by pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM). Bronchoalveolar lavage cells, composed of greater than 90% PAM, were obtained from normal sheep. Bronchoalveolar lavage cells were cultured for 2, 24, 48, 72, or 168 h in endotoxin-free RPMI medium (with 10% autologous serum) or in medium containing one of the following additives: lipopolysaccharide, 1-micron polystyrene beads, C. pseudotuberculosis, P. haemolytica, or one of two plaque-cloned OvLV, 85/28 or 85/34. Lipopolysaccharide, C. pseudotuberculosis, and P. haemolytica induced TNF-alpha activity in PAM cultures as early as 2 h after inoculation, as assessed by a colorimetric cytotoxicity assay. This activity could be blocked by rabbit anti-recombinant bovine TNF-alpha serum. In contrast, medium alone, polystyrene beads, and productive infection by OvLV did not induce TNF-alpha activity in PAM cultures. Bacterial pathogens which infect pulmonary macrophages may elicit the secretion of TNF-alpha within the lungs and lead to the cachectic state associated with chronic pneumonia. Images PMID:1652561

  7. The effects of Eucheuma cottonii on alveolar macrophages and malondialdehyde levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in chronically particulate matter 10 coal dust-exposed rats

    PubMed Central

    Saputri, Romadhiyana Kisno; Setiawan, Bambang; Nugrahenny, Dian; Kania, Nia; Wahyuni, Endang Sri; Widodo, M Aris

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the effect of Eucheuma cottonii on alveolar macrophages (AM) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) in particulate matter 10 (PM10) coal dust-exposed rats. Materials and Methods: Ten groups, including a non exposed group and groups exposed to coal dust at doses of 6.25 (CD6.25), 12.5 (CD12.5), or 25 mg/m3 (CD25) an hour daily for 6 months with or without supplementation of ethanolic extract of E. cottonii at doses of 150 (EC150) or 300 mg/kg BW (EC300). The number of macrophages was determined using a light microscope. MDA levels were measured by TBARS assay. Results: EC150 insignificantly (P > 0.05) reduces the AM in CD groups compared to non treatment groups. EC150 and EC300 significantly (P < 0.05) decreased MDA levels in CD12.5 and CD25 groups relative to non treatment groups. Conclusion: E. cottonii attenuated oxidative stress in chronic exposure of PM10 coal dust. PMID:25429347

  8. BN 52021 (a platelet activating factor-receptor antagonist) decreases alveolar macrophage-mediated lung injury in experimental extrinsic allergic alveolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Arellano, J L; Martín, T; López-Novoa, J M; Sánchez, M L; Montero, A; Jiménez, A

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of research indirectly suggest that platelet activating factor (PAF) may intervene in the pathogenesis of extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA). The specific aim of our study was to evaluate the participation of PAF on macrophage activation during the acute phase of EAA in an experimental model of this disease developed in guinea pigs. Initially we measured the concentration of PAF in bronchoalvedar lavage fluid, blood and lung tissue. In a second phase we evaluate the participation of PAF on alveolar macrophage activation and parenchymal lung injury. The effect of PAF on parenchymal lung injury was evaluated by measuring several lung parenchymatous lesion indices (lung index, bronchoalvedar lavage fluid (BALF) lactic hydrogenase activity and BALF alkaline phosphatase activity) and parameters of systemic response to the challenge (acute phase reagents). We observed that induction of the experimental EAA gave rise to an increase in the concentration of PAF in blood and in lung tissue. The use of the PAF-receptor antagonist BN52021 decreases the release of lysosomal enzymes (beta-glucuronidase and tartrate-sensitive acid phosphatase) to the extracellular environment both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, antagonism of the PAF receptors notably decreases pulmonary parenchymatous lesion. These data suggest that lung lesions from acute EAA are partly mediated by local production of PAF. PMID:9705608

  9. Alveolar macrophage phagocytic activity is enhanced with LPS priming, and combined stimulation of LPS and lipoteichoic acid synergistically induce pro-inflammatory cytokines in pigs.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Pröll, Maren; Hölker, Michael; Tholen, Ernst; Tesfaye, Dawit; Looft, Christian; Schellander, Karl; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate LPS and lipoteichoic acid (LTA)-induced TLRs, associated signaling molecules and inflammatory mediators, as well as to compare their combined effect in porcine alveolar macrophages. Macrophages were incubated for 24 h with various concentrations of LPS, LTA, LPS + LTA or control. Multiple concentrations of LPS elicited marked up-regulation in mRNA for TLR2 and TLR4, CD14, MD2, MyD88, IRAK-4 and TRAF6 compared with the control. LTA had no effect on TLR4 and MD2; only higher doses up-regulated TLR2, CD14, MyD88, IRAK-4 and TRAF6 mRNA. LPS-activated cells released IL1-β, IL12-β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-10 in a dose-dependent manner, while LTA had no effect on IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ. Higher doses of LTA induced IL-12β, TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-10. Combined stimulation augmented TLR2, CD14 and MyD88 mRNA, and subsequently produced elevated levels of IL-6, TNF-α and IL-8 when compared with LPS and LTA alone. Additionally, phagocytosis of macrophages was significantly increased following low concentration of LPS treatment. Only low levels of NO (nitric oxide) were detected in the LPS group. Overall, compared with LPS, LTA was a relatively weak inducer, and co-stimulation accelerated gene and cytokine production associated with pulmonary innate immune function.

  10. PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway Modulates Influenza Virus Induced Mouse Alveolar Macrophage Polarization to M1/M2b

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiangfeng; Dai, Jianping; Xiao, Xuejun; Wu, Liqi; Zeng, Jun; Sheng, Jiangtao; Su, Jinghua; Chen, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Gefei; Li, Kangsheng

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages polarized to M1 (pro-inflammation) or M2 (anti-inflammation) phenotypes in response to environmental signals. In this study, we examined the polarization of alveolar macrophage (AM), following induction by different influenza virus strains (ST169 (H1N1), ST602 (H3N2) and HKG9 (H9N2)). Macrophages from other tissues or cell line exert alternative responding pattern, and AM is necessary for investigating the respiratory system. AM polarized toward the M1 phenotype after 4 hours of infection by all three virus strains, and AM to presented M2b phenotype after 8 hours induction, and immunosuppressive phenotype after 24 hours of induction. Protein expression assay showed similar results as the gene expression analysis for phenotype verification. The ELISA assay showed that TNF-α secretion was up-regulated after 4 and 8 hours of infection by influenza viruses, and it returned to basal levels after 24 hours of infection. IL-10 expression was elevated after 8 and 24 hours of infection. Immunofluorescence showed that iNOS expression was up-regulated but not Arg1 expression. Influenza virus notably increased phospho-Akt but not phospho-Erk1/2 or phospho-p38, and the AM polarization pattern have been changed by LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor). In conclusion, our results demonstrate the dynamic polarization of AM induced by influenza viruses, and suggested that PI3K/Akt signaling pathway modulates AM polarization to M1/M2b. PMID:25105760

  11. Cytokines secreted by macrophages isolated from tumor microenvironment of inflammatory breast cancer patients possess chemotactic properties.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mona M; El-Ghonaimy, Eslam A; Nouh, Mohamed A; Schneider, Robert J; Sloane, Bonnie F; El-Shinawi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Although there is a growing literature describing the role of macrophages in breast cancer, the role of macrophages in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is unclear. The aim of present study was to isolate and characterize tumor associated macrophages of IBC and non-IBC patients and define their role in IBC. Tumor infiltrating monocytes/macrophages (CD14+ and CD68+) were measured by immunohistochemistry using specific monoclonal antibodies. Blood drained from axillary vein tributaries was collected during breast cancer surgery and the percentage of CD14+ in the total isolated leukocytes was assessed by flow cytometric analysis. CD14+ cells were separated from total leukocytes by immuno-magnetic beads technique and were cultured overnight. Media conditioned by CD14+ were collected and subjected to cytokine profiling using cytokine antibody array. Wound healing and invasion assays were used to test whether cytokines highly secreted by tumor drained macrophages induce motility and invasion of breast cancer cells. We found that macrophages highly infiltrate into carcinoma tissues of IBC patients. In addition blood collected from axillary tributaries of IBC patients is highly enriched with CD14+ cells as compared to blood collected from non-IBC patients. Cytokine profiling of CD14+ cells isolated from IBC patients revealed a significant increase in secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α; monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/CC-chemokine ligand 2; interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 as compared to CD14+ cells isolated from non-IBC patients. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 significantly increased motility and invasion of IBC cells in vitro. In conclusion, macrophages isolated from the tumor microenvironment of IBC patients secrete chemotactic cytokines that may augment dissemination and metastasis of IBC carcinoma cells.

  12. Cytokines secreted by macrophages isolated from tumor microenvironment of inflammatory breast cancer patients possess chemotactic properties

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mona M.; El-Ghonaimy, Eslam A.; Nouh, Mohamed A.; Schneider, Robert J.; Sloane, Bonnie F.; El-Shinawi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Although there is a growing literature describing the role of macrophages in breast cancer, the role of macrophages in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is unclear. The aim of present study was to isolate and characterize tumor associated macrophages of IBC and non-IBC patients and define their role in IBC. Tumor infiltrating monocytes/macrophages (CD14+ and CD68+) were measured by immunohistochem-istry using specific monoclonal antibodies. Blood drained from axillary vein tributaries was collected during breast cancer surgery and the percentage of CD14+ in the total isolated leukocytes was assessed by flow cytometric analysis. CD14+ cells were separated from total leukocytes by immuno-magnetic beads technique and were cultured overnight. Media conditioned by CD14+ were collected and subjected to cytokine profiling using cytokine antibody array. Wound healing and invasion assays were used to test whether cytokines highly secreted by tumor drained macrophages induce motility and invasion of breast cancer cells. We found that macrophages highly infiltrate into carcinoma tissues of IBC patients. In addition blood collected from axillary tributaries of IBC patients is highly enriched with CD14+ cells as compared to blood collected from non-IBC patients. Cytokine profiling of CD14+ cells isolated from IBC patients revealed a significant increase in secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α; monocyte chemoat-tractant protein-1/CC-chemokine ligand 2; interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 as compared to CD14+ cells isolated from non-IBC patients. Tumor necrosis factor-a, interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 significantly increased motility and invasion of IBC cells in vitro. In conclusion, macrophages isolated from the tumor microenvironment of IBC patients secrete chemotactic cytokines that may augment dissemination and metastasis of IBC carcinoma cells. PMID:24291763

  13. Comparison of hGH binding to isolated rat liver macrophages and hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kover, K; Moore, W V

    1984-04-01

    The binding characteristics of hGH to rat liver macrophages ( Kupfer cells) and hepatocytes have been compared to determine the role of each in the binding of hGH to liver tissue. The time course of binding, displacement of bound 125I-hGH and effect of pH on binding was qualitatively similar for macrophages and hepatocytes. Since the macrophage isolation depends upon their phagocytosis of iron particles, we determined that exposure of the isolated hepatocytes to the iron did not affect their binding of 125I-hGH. The relative capacity of the macrophage preparations was two-fold less than the hepatocyte preparations. This indicated that the hepatocyte is responsible for the majority of the hGH binding by the liver. In contrast, the cell surface concentration of the hGH receptor on the macrophage is greater than the hepatocyte. Ovine prolactin and hPrl were equipotent in competing for the binding of 125I-hGH to the macrophage receptor while only oPrl was significantly competitive in the hepatocytes. Bovine GH and hPI exhibited minimal interaction for 125I-hGH binding in both cell preparations. We conclude that even though significant differences in 125I-hGH binding do exist between hepatocytes and liver macrophages, the macrophages contribute significantly to hGH binding by hepatic tissue. The demonstration of somatomedin production by fibroblasts in culture suggest a possible role of the hepatic macrophage in GH responsiveness of the liver.

  14. Characterization of the liver-macrophages isolated from a mixed primary culture of neonatal swine hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Miyako; Takenouchi, Takato; Sato, Mitsuru; Yamanaka, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    We recently developed a novel procedure to obtain liver-macrophages in sufficient number and purity using a mixed primary culture of rat and bovine hepatocytes. In this study, we aim to apply this method to the neonatal swine liver. Swine parenchymal hepatocytes were isolated by a two-step collagenase perfusion method and cultured in T75 culture flasks. Similar to the rat and bovine cells, the swine hepatocytes retained an epithelial cell morphology for only a few days and progressively changed into fibroblastic cells. After 5-13 days of culture, macrophage-like cells actively proliferated on the mixed fibroblastic cell sheet. Gentle shaking of the culture flask followed by the transfer and brief incubation of the culture supernatant resulted in a quick and selective adhesion of macrophage-like cells to a plastic dish surface. After rinsing dishes with saline, the attached macrophage-like cells were collected at a yield of 10(6) cells per T75 culture flask at 2-3 day intervals for more than 3 weeks. The isolated cells displayed a typical macrophage morphology and were strongly positive for macrophage markers, such as CD172a, Iba-1 and KT022, but negative for cytokeratin, desmin and α-smooth muscle actin, indicating a highly purified macrophage population. The isolated cells exhibited phagocytosis of polystyrene microbeads and a release of inflammatory cytokines upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. This shaking and attachment method is applicable to the swine liver and provides a sufficient number of macrophages without any need of complex laboratory equipments. PMID:24707456

  15. Liposomes Coated with Isolated Macrophage Membrane Can Target Lung Metastasis of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haiqiang; Dan, Zhaoling; He, Xinyu; Zhang, Zhiwen; Yu, Haijun; Yin, Qi; Li, Yaping

    2016-08-23

    Cancer metastasis leads to high mortality of breast cancer and is difficult to treat because of the poor delivery efficiency of drugs. Herein, we report the wrapping of a drug-carrying liposome with an isolated macrophage membrane to improve delivery to metastatic sites. The macrophage membrane decoration increased cellular uptake of the emtansine liposome in metastatic 4T1 breast cancer cells and had inhibitory effects on cell viability. In vivo, the macrophage membrane enabled the liposome to target metastatic cells and produced a notable inhibitory effect on lung metastasis of breast cancer. Our results provide a biomimetic strategy via the biological properties of macrophages to enhance the medical performance of a nanoparticle in vivo for treating cancer metastasis. PMID:27454827

  16. Activity testing of alveolar macrophages and changes in surfactant phospholipids after irradiation in bronchoalveolar lavage: Experimental and clinical data

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, F.; Rehn, B.; Kraus, R.; Quabeck, K.; Bruch, J.; Beelen, D.W.; Schaefer, U.W.; Streffer, C. )

    1992-07-01

    This study presents results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) after irradiation to the lungs in mice as well as clinical data. The number of BAL cells, mainly macrophages, lymphocytes, and granulocytes, changed in a time-dependent manner. The phagocytic activity of the macrophages measured as the phagocytosis of microbeads and measured as the esterase activity also showed a strong time-dependent increase during the acute phase up to 21 days after irradiation. The contents of surfactant phospholipids (SF) and sphingomyelin (SPH; as a parameter for cell death) were quantified by HPLC. Both were significantly changed between day 2 and 21 after irradiation. Three BALs of a patient with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis, who had received an allogenic bone marrow graft after total body irradiation with 10 Gy, showed similar effects in the cellular and surfactant parameters. These data indicate that there are positive interactions between the number of different BAL cells, macrophage activity, and SF and SPH content in the preclinical model of the mouse as well as in the clinical situation after lung irradiation. 30 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 2 in the Inflammatory Response and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Downregulation in Brucella abortus-Infected Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Mariana C.; Hielpos, M. Soledad; Carvalho, Natalia B.; Barrionuevo, Paula; Corsetti, Patricia P.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Oliveira, Sergio C.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) seem to constitute the main cellular target of inhaled brucellae. Here, we show that Brucella abortus invades and replicates in murine AM without inducing cytotoxicity. B. abortus infection induced a statistically significant increase of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), CXCL1 or keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-12 in AM from C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c mice, but these responses were generally weaker and/or delayed compared to those elicited in peritoneal macrophages. Studies using knockout mice for TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 revealed that TNF-α and KC responses were mediated by TLR2 recognition. Brucella infection reduced in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manner the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules induced by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in AM. The same phenomenon was induced by incubation with heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) or the lipidated form of the 19-kDa outer membrane protein of Brucella (L-Omp19), and it was shown to be mediated by TLR2 recognition. In contrast, no significant downregulation of MHC-II was induced by either unlipidated Omp19 or Brucella LPS. In a functional assay, treatment of AM with either L-Omp19 or HKBA reduced the MHC-II-restricted presentation of OVA peptides to specific T cells. One week after intratracheal infection, viable B. abortus was detected in AM from both wild-type and TLR2 KO mice, but CFU counts were higher in the latter. These results suggest that B. abortus survives in AM after inhalatory infection in spite of a certain degree of immune control exerted by the TLR2-mediated inflammatory response. Both the modest nature of the latter and the modulation of MHC-II expression by the bacterium may contribute to such survival. PMID:24478078

  18. Key role of Toll-like receptor 2 in the inflammatory response and major histocompatibility complex class ii downregulation in Brucella abortus-infected alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Hielpos, M Soledad; Carvalho, Natalia B; Barrionuevo, Paula; Corsetti, Patricia P; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Oliveira, Sergio C; Baldi, Pablo C

    2014-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) seem to constitute the main cellular target of inhaled brucellae. Here, we show that Brucella abortus invades and replicates in murine AM without inducing cytotoxicity. B. abortus infection induced a statistically significant increase of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), CXCL1 or keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-12 in AM from C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c mice, but these responses were generally weaker and/or delayed compared to those elicited in peritoneal macrophages. Studies using knockout mice for TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 revealed that TNF-α and KC responses were mediated by TLR2 recognition. Brucella infection reduced in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manner the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules induced by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in AM. The same phenomenon was induced by incubation with heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) or the lipidated form of the 19-kDa outer membrane protein of Brucella (L-Omp19), and it was shown to be mediated by TLR2 recognition. In contrast, no significant downregulation of MHC-II was induced by either unlipidated Omp19 or Brucella LPS. In a functional assay, treatment of AM with either L-Omp19 or HKBA reduced the MHC-II-restricted presentation of OVA peptides to specific T cells. One week after intratracheal infection, viable B. abortus was detected in AM from both wild-type and TLR2 KO mice, but CFU counts were higher in the latter. These results suggest that B. abortus survives in AM after inhalatory infection in spite of a certain degree of immune control exerted by the TLR2-mediated inflammatory response. Both the modest nature of the latter and the modulation of MHC-II expression by the bacterium may contribute to such survival. PMID:24478078

  19. Isolation of murine peritoneal macrophages to carry out gene expression analysis upon Toll-like receptors stimulation.

    PubMed

    Layoun, Antonio; Samba, Macha; Santos, Manuela M

    2015-01-01

    During infection and inflammation, circulating monocytes leave the bloodstream and migrate into tissues, where they differentiate into macrophages. Macrophages express surface Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which recognize molecular patterns conserved through evolution in a wide range of microorganisms. TLRs play a central role in macrophage activation which is usually associated with gene expression alteration. Macrophages are critical in many diseases and have emerged as attractive targets for therapy. In the following protocol, we describe a procedure to isolate murine peritoneal macrophages using Brewer's thioglycollate medium. The latter will boost monocyte migration into the peritoneum, accordingly this will raise macrophage yield by 10-fold. Several studies have been carried out using bone marrow, spleen or peritoneal derived macrophages. However, peritoneal macrophages were shown to be more mature upon isolation and are more stable in their functionality and phenotype. Thus, macrophages isolated from murine peritoneal cavity present an important cell population that can serve in different immunological and metabolic studies. Once isolated, macrophages were stimulated with different TLR ligands and consequently gene expression was evaluated.

  20. TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB signalling pathway regulates IL-8 production in porcine alveolar macrophages infected with porcine circovirus 2.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yao; Li, Haihua; Qiao, Jiayun

    2016-02-01

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is the primary cause of post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, in which it stimulates a strong IL-8 response that is associated with chronic inflammation as well as lesions in the lymphoid organs. However, the mechanism underlying PCV2-induced IL-8 production is still unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that increased IL-8 expression during PCV2 infection depends on Toll-like receptor (TLR2), but not TLR4 or TLR9 signalling pathways in porcine alveolar macrophages. Moreover, we found that impairment of the MyD88/NF-κB signalling pathway by MyD88 knockdown or NF-κB inhibitors markedly decreased PCV2-induced IL-8 secretion. These results suggest that PCV2 induces IL-8 secretion via the TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB signalling pathway. Therefore, it is important to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the PCV2-induced inflammatory response. PMID:26581603

  1. Effects of quartz, airborne particulates and fly ash fractions from a waste incinerator on elastase release by activated and nonactivated rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Gulyas, H.; Labedzka, M.; Schmidt, N.; Gercken, G.

    1988-01-01

    Elastase release from cultured, activated and nonactivated rabbit alveolar macrophages (AM) was investigated after stimulation by different environmentally related mineral dusts (50-1000 micrograms/10(6) cells). Eight different dusts were analyzed for element contents and grain size: one rural and three urban airborne dusts, a coarse and a fine fraction of a sieved waste incinerator fly ash, a sonicated coarse fly ash fraction, and the standard quartz dust DQ 12. The fine fly ash fraction, the sonicated coarse fly ash fraction, and the quartz dust DQ 12 enhanced elastase release by activated AM. Only one of the tested airborne dusts effected a comparable elastase release. The untreated coarse fraction of the fly ash did not cause a significant increase of extracellular elastase activities. Elastase release was dependent on particle numbers and chemical composition and correlated best with barium and tin contents. Nonactivated AM released higher elastase activities than activated AM at low-dose levels. The possible role of dust-induced elastase secretion in the pathogenesis of emphysema is discussed.

  2. Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), IL-1β secretion, and asparagine endopeptidase are critical factors for alveolar macrophage phagocytosis and bacterial killing.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Delphyne; Le Gars, Mathieu; Balloy, Viviane; Barbier, Diane; Maschalidi, Sophia; Tohme, Mira; Chignard, Michel; Ramphal, Reuben; Manoury, Bénédicte; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-31

    A deficit in early clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is crucial in nosocomial pneumonia and in chronic lung infections. Few studies have addressed the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are early pathogen associated molecular pattern receptors, in pathogen uptake and clearance by alveolar macrophages (AMs). Here, we report that TLR5 engagement is crucial for bacterial clearance by AMs in vitro and in vivo because unflagellated P. aeruginosa or different mutants defective in TLR5 activation were resistant to AM phagocytosis and killing. In addition, the clearance of PAK (a wild-type P. aeruginosa strain) by primary AMs was causally associated with increased IL-1β release, which was dramatically reduced with PAK mutants or in WT PAK-infected primary TLR5(-/-) AMs, demonstrating the dependence of IL-1β production on TLR5. We showed that this IL-1β production was important in endosomal pH acidification and in inducing the killing of bacteria by AMs through asparagine endopeptidase (AEP), a key endosomal cysteine protease. In agreement, AMs from IL-1R1(-/-) and AEP(-/-) mice were unable to kill P. aeruginosa. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that TLR5 engagement plays a major role in P. aeruginosa internalization and in triggering IL-1β formation. PMID:22307620

  3. Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), IL-1β secretion, and asparagine endopeptidase are critical factors for alveolar macrophage phagocytosis and bacterial killing

    PubMed Central

    Descamps, Delphyne; Le Gars, Mathieu; Balloy, Viviane; Barbier, Diane; Maschalidi, Sophia; Tohme, Mira; Chignard, Michel; Ramphal, Reuben; Manoury, Bénédicte; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    A deficit in early clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is crucial in nosocomial pneumonia and in chronic lung infections. Few studies have addressed the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are early pathogen associated molecular pattern receptors, in pathogen uptake and clearance by alveolar macrophages (AMs). Here, we report that TLR5 engagement is crucial for bacterial clearance by AMs in vitro and in vivo because unflagellated P. aeruginosa or different mutants defective in TLR5 activation were resistant to AM phagocytosis and killing. In addition, the clearance of PAK (a wild-type P. aeruginosa strain) by primary AMs was causally associated with increased IL-1β release, which was dramatically reduced with PAK mutants or in WT PAK-infected primary TLR5−/− AMs, demonstrating the dependence of IL-1β production on TLR5. We showed that this IL-1β production was important in endosomal pH acidification and in inducing the killing of bacteria by AMs through asparagine endopeptidase (AEP), a key endosomal cysteine protease. In agreement, AMs from IL-1R1−/− and AEP−/− mice were unable to kill P. aeruginosa. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that TLR5 engagement plays a major role in P. aeruginosa internalization and in triggering IL-1β formation. PMID:22307620

  4. Abnormal secretion of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha by alveolar macrophages in coal worker's pneumoconiosis: Comparison between simple pneumoconiosis and progressive massive fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lassalle, P.; Gosset, P.; Aerts, C.; Fournier, E.; Lafitte, J.J.; Degreef, J.M.; Wallaert, B.; Tonnel, A.B.; Voisin, C. )

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) by alveolar macrophages (AMs) harvested from patients with coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) and control subjects. We observed higher levels of spontaneous TNF alpha and IL-1 secretion by AMs from patients with CWP than in those from healthy controls. We did not find any significant difference between the two groups in the incidence of simple pneumoconiosis and progressive massive fibrosis. In the group of coal miners without radiologic signs of pneumoconiosis, we found high levels of both cytokines in a subgroup of subjects still exposed to the mineral dust but not in the subgroup of subjects removed from exposure. These results indicate that AMs are involved in chronic lung inflammatory reactions to mineral dusts, partly by way of cytokine secretion. Moreover, cytokine secretion by AMs appears to be an early event that is detectable at the moment of mineral dust exposure. The results open new perspectives in the study of the mechanisms leading to CWP.

  5. Dual Inhibition of Rip2 and IRAK1/4 Regulates IL-1β and IL-6 in Sarcoidosis Alveolar Macrophages and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Talreja, Jaya; Talwar, Harvinder; Ahmad, Nisar; Rastogi, Ruchi; Samavati, Lobelia

    2016-08-15

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown etiology that primarily affects the lungs. Our previous work indicates that activation of p38 plays a pivotal role in sarcoidosis inflammatory response. Therefore, we investigated the upstream kinase responsible for activation of p38 in sarcoidosis alveolar macrophages (AMs) and PBMCs. We identified that sustained p38 phosphorylation in sarcoidosis AMs and PBMCs is associated with active MAPK kinase 4 but not with MAPK kinase 3/6. Additionally, we found that sarcoidosis AMs exhibit a higher expression of IRAK1, IRAK-M, and receptor interacting protein 2 (Rip2). Surprisingly, ex vivo treatment of sarcoidosis AMs or PBMCs with IRAK1/4 inhibitor led to a significant increase in IL-1β mRNA expression both spontaneously and in response to TLR2 ligand. However, a combination of Rip2 and IRAK-1/4 inhibitors significantly decreased both IL-1β and IL-6 production in sarcoidosis PBMCs and moderately in AMs. Importantly, a combination of Rip2 and IRAK-1/4 inhibitors led to decreased IFN-γ and IL-6 and decreased percentage of activated CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in PBMCs. These data suggest that in sarcoidosis, both pathways, namely IRAK and Rip2, are deregulated. Targeted modulation of Rip2 and IRAK pathways may prove to be a novel treatment for sarcoidosis. PMID:27402699

  6. Distribution characteristics of telithromycin, a novel ketolide antimicrobial agent applied for treatment of respiratory infection, in lung epithelial lining fluid and alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2009-01-01

    The distribution characteristics of telithromycin (TEL), a novel ketolide antimicrobial agent, in lung epithelial fluid (ELF) and alveolar macrophages (AMs) were evaluated. In vivo animal experiments, the time-courses of the concentrations of TEL in ELF and AMs following oral administration of TEL solution (50 mg/4 mL/kg) to rats were markedly higher than in plasma, and areas under drug concentration-time curve (AUC) ratios of ELF/plasma and AMs/plasma were 2.4 and 65.3, respectively. In vitro transport experiments, the basolateral-to-apical transport of TEL through model lung epithelial cell (Calu-3) monolayers was greater than apical-to-basolateral transport. Rhodamine123 and verapamil, MDR1 substrates, reduced the basolateral-to-apical transport of TEL. In vitro uptake experiments, the intracellular equilibrated concentration of TEL in cultured AMs (NR8383) was approximately 40 times the extracellular concentration. The uptake of TEL by NR8383 was inhibited by rotenone and FCCP, ATP depletors and was temperature-dependent. These data suggest that the high distribution of TEL to AMs is due to the sustained distribution to ELF via MDR1 as well as the high uptake by AMs themselves via active transport mechanisms.

  7. Efficient drug delivery to alveolar macrophages and lung epithelial lining fluid following pulmonary administration of liposomal ciprofloxacin in rats with pneumonia and estimation of its antibacterial effects.

    PubMed

    Chono, Sumio; Tanino, Tomoharu; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2008-10-01

    The efficacy of pulmonary administration of liposomal ciprofloxacin (CPFX) in pneumonia was evaluated. In brief, the pharmacokinetics following pulmonary administration of liposomal CPFX (particle size, 1,000 nm; dose, 200 microg/kg) were examined in rats with lipopolysaccharide-induced pneumonia as an experimental pneumonia model. Furthermore, the antibacterial effects of liposomal CPFX against the pneumonic causative organisms were estimated by pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis. The time-courses of the concentration of CPFX in alveolar macrophages (AMs) and lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) following pulmonary administration of liposomal CPFX to rats with pneumonia were markedly higher than that following the administration of free CPFX (200 microg/kg). The time course of the concentrations of CPFX in plasma following pulmonary administration of liposomal CPFX was markedly lower than that in AMs and ELF. These results indicate that pulmonary administration of liposomal CPFX was more effective in delivering CPFX to AMs and ELF compared with free CPFX, and it avoids distribution of CPFX to the blood. According to PK/PD analysis, the liposomal CPFX exhibited potent antibacterial effects against the causative organisms of pneumonia. This study indicates that pulmonary administration of CPFX could be an effective technique for the treatment of pneumonia.

  8. Efficient drug targeting to rat alveolar macrophages by pulmonary administration of ciprofloxacin incorporated into mannosylated liposomes for treatment of respiratory intracellular parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Chono, Sumio; Tanino, Tomoharu; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2008-04-01

    The efficacy of pulmonary administration of ciprofloxacin (CPFX) incorporated into mannosylated liposomes (mannosylated CPFX-liposomes) for the treatment of respiratory intracellular parasitic infections was evaluated. In brief, mannosylated CPFX-liposomes with 4-aminophenyl-a-d-mannopyranoside (particle size: 1000 nm) were prepared, and the drug targeting to alveolar macrophages (AMs) following pulmonary administration was examined in rats. Furthermore, the antibacterial and mutant prevention effects of mannosylated CPFX-liposomes in AMs were evaluated by pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis. The targeting efficiency of CPFX to rat AMs following pulmonary administration of mannosylated CPFX-liposomes was significantly greater than that of CPFX incorporated into unmodified liposomes (unmodified CPFX-liposomes; particle size: 1000 nm). According to PK/PD analysis, the mannosylated CPFX-liposomes exhibited potent antibacterial effects against many bacteria although unmodified CPFX-liposomes were ineffective against several types of bacteria, and the probability of microbial mutation by mannosylated CPFX-liposomes was extremely low. The present study indicates that mannosylated CPFX-liposomes as pulmonary administration system could be useful for the treatment of respiratory intracellular parasitic infections.

  9. Distribution characteristics of clarithromycin and azithromycin, macrolide antimicrobial agents used for treatment of respiratory infections, in lung epithelial lining fluid and alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2011-10-01

    The distribution characteristics of clarithromycin (CAM) and azithromycin (AZM), macrolide antimicrobial agents, in lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and alveolar macrophages (AMs) were evaluated. In the in vivo animal experiments, the time-courses of the concentrations of CAM and AZM in ELF and AMs following oral administration (50 mg/kg) to rats were markedly higher than those in plasma, and the area under the drug concentration-time curve (AUC) ratios of ELF/plasma of CAM and AZM were 12 and 2.2, and the AUC ratios of AMs/ELF were 37 and 291, respectively. In the in vitro transport experiments, the basolateral-to-apical transport of CAM and AZM through model lung epithelial cell (Calu-3) monolayers were greater than the apical-to-basolateral transport. MDR1 substrates reduced the basolateral-to-apical transport of CAM and AZM. In the in vitro uptake experiments, the intracellular concentrations of CAM and AZM in cultured AMs (NR8383) were greater than the extracellular concentrations. The uptake of CAM and AZM by NR8383 was inhibited by ATP depletors. These data suggest that the high distribution of CAM and AZM to AMs is due to the sustained distribution to ELF via MDR1 as well as the high uptake by the AMs themselves via active transport mechanisms.

  10. TLR4-Upregulated IL-1β and IL-1RI Promote Alveolar Macrophage Pyroptosis and Lung Inflammation through an Autocrine Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    He, Xingying; Qian, Yongbing; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Erica K.; Li, Yuehua; Wu, Liang; Billiar, Timothy R.; Wilson, Mark A.; Shi, Xueyin; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major component of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) following pulmonary infection. Alveolar macrophages (AM) are at the center of the pathogenesis of the development of ALI. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is one of the key pro-inflammatory mediators, and its maturation is tightly controlled by the formation and activation of the inflammasome. The biological effects of IL-1β are mediated through IL-1 receptor (IL-1R). In this study, we investigated the influence of LPS-induced IL-1β release and IL-1RI upregulation on the development of lung inflammation. We demonstrated that in AM, LPS-TLR4 signaling not only activates Nlrp3 inflammasome activation and subsequent release of IL-1β, but also up-regulates IL-1RI expression on AM surface through MyD88 and NF-κB dependent signaling. The upregulated IL-1RI, therefore, sensitizes AM to IL-1β and results in pyroptosome formation, which in turn leads to AM pyroptosis, a type of caspase-1-dependent inflammatory cell death. We further showed that AM pyroptosis exaggerates lung inflammation. The present study demonstrates a novel mechanism underlying LPS-induced innate immunity; that is, a secondary upregulation of IL-1β-IL-1RI signaling is responsible for AM pyroptosis and augmented lung injury in response to LPS. PMID:27526865

  11. Dissolution of man-made vitreous fibers in rat alveolar macrophage culture and Gamble's saline solution: influence of different media and chemical composition of the fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Luoto, K; Holopainen, M; Karppinen, K; Perander, M; Savolainen, K

    1994-01-01

    The effect of different chemical compositions of man-made vitreous fibers (MMVF) on their dissolution by alveolar macrophages (AM) in culture and in Gamble's solution was studied. The fibers were exposed to cultured rat AMs, culture medium alone; or Gamble's saline solution for 2, 4, or 8 days. The dissolution of the fibers was studied by measuring the amount of silicon (Si), iron (Fe), and aluminum (Al) in each medium. The AMs in culture dissolved Fe and Al from the fibers but the dissolution of Si was more marked in the cell culture medium without cells and in the Gamble's solution. The dissolution of Si, Fe, and Al was different for different fibers, and increased as a function of time. The Fe and Al content of the fibers correlated negatively with the dissolution of Si by AMs from the MMVF, i.e., when the content of Fe and Al of the fibers increased the dissolution of Si decreased. These results suggest that the chemical composition of MMVFs has a marked effect on their dissolution. AMs seem to affect the dissolution of Fe and Al from the fibers. This suggests that in vitro models with cells in the media rather than only culture media or saline solutions would be preferable in dissolution studies of MMVFs. PMID:7882911

  12. Pneumocystis carinii glycoprotein A binds macrophage mannose receptors.

    PubMed Central

    O'Riordan, D M; Standing, J E; Limper, A H

    1995-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii causes life-threatening pneumonia in patients with impaired immunity. Recent studies suggest that alveolar macrophages interact with P. carinii through macrophage mannose receptors. However, the ligand(s) on P. carinii that is recognized by these receptors has not been fully defined. P. carinii contains a major mannose-rich surface antigen complex termed glycoprotein A (gpA). It was therefore hypothesized that gpA binds directly to macrophage mannose receptors and mediates organism attachment to these phagocytes. To assess this, gpA was purified from P. carinii by continuous-elution gel electrophoresis. 125I-labeled gpA bound to alveolar macrophages in a saturable fashion. In addition, gpA binding was substantially inhibited by both alpha-mannan and EDTA, further suggesting that gpA interacts with macrophage mannose receptors. Macrophage membrane proteins capable of binding to gpA were isolated with a gpA-Sepharose column. A 165-kDa membrane-associated protein was specifically eluted from the gpA-Sepharose column with EDTA (20 mM). This protein was identified as the macrophage mannose receptor by immunoprecipitation with a polyclonal anti-mannose receptor antiserum. To further investigate the role of gpA in P. carinii-macrophage interactions, 51Cr-labeled P. carinii cells were incubated with macrophages in the presence of increasing concentrations of soluble gpA, and organism attachment was quantified. Soluble gpA (2.5 mg/dl) competitively inhibited P. carinii attachment to alveolar macrophages by 51.3% +/- 3.7% (P = 0.01). Our findings demonstrate that gpA present on P. carinii interacts directly with mannose receptors, thereby mediating organism attachment to alveolar macrophages. PMID:7868247

  13. Increased secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 by alveolar macrophages consecutive to the development of the late asthmatic reaction.

    PubMed

    Gosset, P; Tsicopoulos, A; Wallaert, B; Vannimenus, C; Joseph, M; Tonnel, A B; Capron, A

    1991-10-01

    The late asthmatic reaction (LAR), consecutive to bronchial allergen challenge, is characterized both by the influx of various cells in proximal and distal airways and by the enhancement of bronchial hyperresponsiveness. However, the exact conditions for the development of the inflammatory reaction during the LAR remain to be specified. Since monokines play a key role in inflammatory processes, particularly in the lung, the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin; 1-beta (IL-1-beta) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by alveolar macrophages (AM), collected 18 to 20 hours after exposure to allergen, was evaluated in 15 allergic subjects with asthma submitted to a challenge test with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (N = 6) or with wheat flour (N = 9) and in three healthy subjects. After bronchial provocation test, four patients presented no bronchial response (group 1), and six patients, a single early reaction (group 2). In contrast, five patients developed successively an immediate plus a late response (group 3). The monokine production was compared to that from nine allergic subjects with asthma studied at baseline (group 0) and from 11 unchallenged healthy subjects (control subjects). Measurements of cytokines were evaluated for TNF-alpha and IL-1-beta by a specific immunoradiometric assay, whereas IL-6 levels were appreciated by the proliferation of 7TD1 cells. No detectable amounts of TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6 were in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid, even after a tenfold concentration. In contrast, a significant increase of TNF-alpha (10,642 +/- 3127 U/ml) and IL-6 (1250 +/- 427 U/ml) concentrations was noted in AM supernatants from patients exhibiting an LAR (group 3) compared to cells recovered from groups 2, 1, and 0 and to challenged or unchallenged control subjects (805 +/- 244, 995 +/- 521, 1269 +/- 524, 688 +/- 85, and 445 +/- 74 pg of TNF-alpha per milliliter, respectively; 190 +/- 64, 114 +/- 91, 242 +/- 95, 80 +/- 9, and 54 +/- 19

  14. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 regulates LPS-induced TLR4/MD-2 pathway activation and inflammation in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ren, Weiying; Wang, Zhonghui; Hua, Feng; Zhu, Lei

    2015-02-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) are the main lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding receptors that respond to inflammatory stimuli and mediate NF-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway in macrophages. We have previously shown that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) deletion increased lung injury induced by intratracheal instillation of LPS through downregulation of TLR4 negative regulators. However, the mechanisms by which PAI-1 regulates lung inflammation are largely unknown. The aim of this study is to assess the relationship between PAI-1 and TLR4 signaling pathways in LPS-induced NR8383 cells inflammatory reaction. The results showed that the levels of PAI-1, TNF-α, and IL-1β protein were increased remarkably in NR8383 cell supernatants after LPS stimulation. PAI-1 gene knockdown reduced TNF-α and IL-1β levels in cell supernatants and inhibited the NF-κB p65 protein expression in NR8383 cells. The upregulated mRNA and protein expressions of TLR4, MD-2, and myeloid differentiation protein (MyD88) induced by LPS were attenuated after PAI-1 gene knockdown. Conversely, overexpression of PAI-1 in NR8383 cells not only resulted in additional mRNA and protein production of PAI-1, TLR4, MD-2, and MyD88, it also aggravated the inflammatory response induced by LPS. In conclusion, PAI-1 contributes to the regulation of LPS-induced inflammatory response in NR8383 cells, likely by affecting the TLR4-MD-2/NF-κB signaling transduction pathway.

  15. Matrine displayed antiviral activity in porcine alveolar macrophages co-infected by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na; Sun, Panpan; Lv, Haipeng; Sun, Yaogui; Guo, Jianhua; Wang, Zhirui; Luo, Tiantian; Wang, Shaoyu; Li, Hongquan

    2016-01-01

    The co-infection of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is quite common in clinical settings and no effective treatment to the co-infection is available. In this study, we established the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) cells model co-infected with PRRSV/PCV2 with modification in vitro, and investigated the antiviral activity of Matrine on this cell model and further evaluated the effect of Matrine on virus-induced TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway. The results demonstrated PAM cells inoculated with PRRSV followed by PCV2 2 h later enhanced PRRSV and PCV2 replications. Matrine treatment suppressed both PRRSV and PCV2 infection at 12 h post infection. Furthermore, PRRSV/PCV2 co- infection induced IκBα degradation and phosphorylation as well as the translocation of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus indicating that PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection induced NF-κB activation. Matrine treatment significantly down-regulated the expression of TLR3, TLR4 and TNF-α although it, to some extent, suppressed p-IκBα expression, suggesting that TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway play an important role of Matrine in combating PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection. It is concluded that Matrine possesses activity against PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection in vitro and suppression of the TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway as an important underlying molecular mechanism. These findings warrant Matrine to be further explored for its antiviral activity in clinical settings. PMID:27080155

  16. Sex differences in the acute in vivo effects of different human SP-A variants on the mouse alveolar macrophage proteome

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, David S.; Umstead, Todd M.; Floros, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is involved in lung innate immunity. Humans have two SP-A genes, SFTPA1 and SFTPA2, each with several variants. We examined the in vivo effects of treatment with specific SP-A variants on the alveolar macrophage (AM) proteome from SP-A knockout (KO) mice. KO mice received either SP-A1, SP-A2, or both. AM were collected and their proteomes examined with 2D-DIGE. We identified 90 proteins and categorized them as related to actin/cytoskeleton, oxidative stress, protease balance/chaperones, regulation of inflammation, and regulatory/developmental processes. SP-A1 and SP-A2 had different effects on the AM proteome and these effects differed between sexes. In males more changes occurred in the oxidative stress, protease/chaperones, and inflammation groups with SP-A2 treatment than with SP-A1. In females most SP-A1-induced changes were in the actin/cytoskeletal and oxidative stress groups. We conclude that after acute SP-A1 and SP-A2 treatment, sex-specific differences were observed in the AM proteomes from KO mice, and that these sex differences differ in response to SP-A1 and SP-A2. Females are more responsive to SP-A1, whereas the gene-specific differences in males were minimal. These observations not only demonstrate the therapeutic potential of exogenous SP-A, but also illustrate sex- and gene-specific differences in the response to it. PMID:24954098

  17. Respiratory tract responses to dust: Relationships between dust burden, lung injury, alveolar macrophage fibronectin release, and the development of pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, K.E.; Maurer, J.K.; Lindenschmidt, R.C.; Romberger, D.; Rennard, S.I.; Crosby, L. )

    1990-10-01

    A multidisciplinary approach was used to investigate the responses of the respiratory tract to silica (SiO2) or titanium dioxide (TiO2). Rats were intratracheally instilled with 5-100 mg/kg of dust and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and total protein (TP) and ex vivo alveolar macrophage (AM) fibronectin release assessed on Days 7, 14, and 28 after exposure. Lung dust burdens were determined on Days 1, 7, and 28 after instillation. Both dusts elicited dose-related increases in BALF LDH and TP, a response which was more pronounced and progressive with SiO2. All doses of SiO2 elicited persistent increases in AM fibronectin release. TiO2 stimulated persistent increases in AM fibronectin release at greater than or equal to 50 mg/kg, with transient or no effect at less than or equal to 10 mg/kg. Increased SiO2 retention was observed for all doses and TiO2 retention was increased only at doses greater than or equal to 50 mg/kg. In vitro exposure of naive AM to SiO2 or TiO2 did not stimulate AM fibronectin release. Histopathology demonstrated fibrosis at all SiO2 doses; only TiO2 doses greater than or equal to 50 mg/kg resulted in fibrosis. These results reveal an association between increased dust retention, lung injury, activation of AM fibronectin release, and the development of fibrosis. The magnitude and temporal pattern of responses clearly differentiated SiO2 from TiO2. The correlation of BALF markers of lung injury and increased AM fibronectin release with the development of fibrosis supports the use of these parameters as predictive biomarkers of dust-induced interstitial lung disease.

  18. Seoul virus-infected rat lung endothelial cells and alveolar macrophages differ in their ability to support virus replication and induce regulatory T cell phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Klein, Sabra L

    2012-11-01

    Hantaviruses cause a persistent infection in reservoir hosts that is attributed to the upregulation of regulatory responses and downregulation of proinflammatory responses. To determine whether rat alveolar macrophages (AMs) and lung microvascular endothelial cells (LMVECs) support Seoul virus (SEOV) replication and contribute to the induction of an environment that polarizes CD4(+) T cell differentiation toward a regulatory T (Treg) cell phenotype, cultured primary rat AMs and LMVECs were mock infected or infected with SEOV and analyzed for viral replication, cytokine and chemokine responses, and expression of cell surface markers that are related to T cell activation. Allogeneic CD4(+) T cells were cocultured with SEOV-infected or mock-infected AMs or LMVECs and analyzed for helper T cell (i.e., Treg, Th17, Th1, and Th2) marker expression and Treg cell frequency. SEOV RNA and infectious particles in culture media were detected in both cell types, but at higher levels in LMVECs than in AMs postinfection. Expression of Ifnβ, Ccl5, and Cxcl10 and surface major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) and MHC-I was not altered by SEOV infection in either cell type. SEOV infection significantly increased Tgfβ mRNA in AMs and the amount of programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) in LMVECs. SEOV-infected LMVECs, but not AMs, induced a significant increase in Foxp3 expression and Treg cell frequency in allogeneic CD4(+) T cells, which was virus replication and cell contact dependent. These data suggest that in addition to supporting viral replication, AMs and LMVECs play distinct roles in hantavirus persistence by creating a regulatory environment through increased Tgfβ, PD-L1, and Treg cell activity.

  19. Organic extract of diesel exhaust particles stimulates expression of Ia and costimulatory molecules associated with antigen presentation in rat peripheral blood monocytes but not in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Eiko . E-mail: ekoike@nies.go.jp; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2005-12-15

    We hypothesized that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induce the activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in lung. The present study was designed to clarify the following about DEP: (1) whether it affects the expression of Ia and B7 molecules in alveolar macrophages (AM) as a mature cell or in peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) as an immature cell (2) if it affects the antigen-presenting (AP) activity of PBM (3) what component of DEP is responsible for the effects, and (4) whether the effect of DEP is related to oxidative stress. DEP was extracted with methylene chloride. Cells were exposed to whole DEP, organic extract, or residual particles for 24 h. Cell-surface molecules were measured by flow cytometry. AP activity was assessed by antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Whole DEP or organic extract significantly increased the expression of Ia and B7 molecules on PBM but not on AM. No significant effect of residual particles was observed. A low concentration of organic extract also increased the AP activity of PBM. When the induction of an antioxidative enzyme was assessed, heme oxygenase-1 protein was found to be significantly increased by exposure to whole DEP, and the organic extract was more effective than the residual particles. Furthermore, the organic extract-induced expression of Ia antigen on PBM was reduced by the addition of an antioxidative agent. These results suggest that DEP may act on immature APC and enhance their AP activity and that the action contributing to oxidative stress may be mediated by organic compounds of DEP.

  20. Matrine displayed antiviral activity in porcine alveolar macrophages co-infected by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na; Sun, Panpan; Lv, Haipeng; Sun, Yaogui; Guo, Jianhua; Wang, Zhirui; Luo, Tiantian; Wang, Shaoyu; Li, Hongquan

    2016-04-15

    The co-infection of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is quite common in clinical settings and no effective treatment to the co-infection is available. In this study, we established the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) cells model co-infected with PRRSV/PCV2 with modification in vitro, and investigated the antiviral activity of Matrine on this cell model and further evaluated the effect of Matrine on virus-induced TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway. The results demonstrated PAM cells inoculated with PRRSV followed by PCV2 2 h later enhanced PRRSV and PCV2 replications. Matrine treatment suppressed both PRRSV and PCV2 infection at 12 h post infection. Furthermore, PRRSV/PCV2 co- infection induced IκBα degradation and phosphorylation as well as the translocation of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus indicating that PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection induced NF-κB activation. Matrine treatment significantly down-regulated the expression of TLR3, TLR4 and TNF-α although it, to some extent, suppressed p-IκBα expression, suggesting that TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway play an important role of Matrine in combating PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection. It is concluded that Matrine possesses activity against PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection in vitro and suppression of the TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway as an important underlying molecular mechanism. These findings warrant Matrine to be further explored for its antiviral activity in clinical settings.

  1. Matrine displayed antiviral activity in porcine alveolar macrophages co-infected by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus type 2

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Na; Sun, Panpan; Lv, Haipeng; Sun, Yaogui; Guo, Jianhua; Wang, Zhirui; Luo, Tiantian; Wang, Shaoyu; Li, Hongquan

    2016-01-01

    The co-infection of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is quite common in clinical settings and no effective treatment to the co-infection is available. In this study, we established the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) cells model co-infected with PRRSV/PCV2 with modification in vitro, and investigated the antiviral activity of Matrine on this cell model and further evaluated the effect of Matrine on virus-induced TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway. The results demonstrated PAM cells inoculated with PRRSV followed by PCV2 2 h later enhanced PRRSV and PCV2 replications. Matrine treatment suppressed both PRRSV and PCV2 infection at 12 h post infection. Furthermore, PRRSV/PCV2 co- infection induced IκBα degradation and phosphorylation as well as the translocation of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus indicating that PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection induced NF-κB activation. Matrine treatment significantly down-regulated the expression of TLR3, TLR4 and TNF-α although it, to some extent, suppressed p-IκBα expression, suggesting that TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway play an important role of Matrine in combating PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection. It is concluded that Matrine possesses activity against PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection in vitro and suppression of the TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway as an important underlying molecular mechanism. These findings warrant Matrine to be further explored for its antiviral activity in clinical settings. PMID:27080155

  2. Innate immune response to a H3N2 subtype swine influenza virus in newborn porcine trachea cells, alveolar macrophages, and precision-cut lung slices.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Ortega, Mario; Melo, Sandrine; Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Ramé, Christelle; Olivier, Michel; Soubieux, Denis; Marc, Daniel; Simon, Gaëlle; Herrler, Georg; Berri, Mustapha; Dupont, Joëlle; Meurens, François

    2014-01-01

    Viral respiratory diseases remain of major importance in swine breeding units. Swine influenza virus (SIV) is one of the main known contributors to infectious respiratory diseases. The innate immune response to swine influenza viruses has been assessed in many previous studies. However most of these studies were carried out in a single-cell population or directly in the live animal, in all its complexity. In the current study we report the use of a trachea epithelial cell line (newborn pig trachea cells - NPTr) in comparison with alveolar macrophages and lung slices for the characterization of innate immune response to an infection by a European SIV of the H3N2 subtype. The expression pattern of transcripts involved in the recognition of the virus, interferon type I and III responses, and the host-response regulation were assessed by quantitative PCR in response to infection. Some significant differences were observed between the three systems, notably in the expression of type III interferon mRNA. Then, results show a clear induction of JAK/STAT and MAPK signaling pathways in infected NPTr cells. Conversely, PI3K/Akt signaling pathways was not activated. The inhibition of the JAK/STAT pathway clearly reduced interferon type I and III responses and the induction of SOCS1 at the transcript level in infected NPTr cells. Similarly, the inhibition of MAPK pathway reduced viral replication and interferon response. All together, these results contribute to an increased understanding of the innate immune response to H3N2 SIV and may help identify strategies to effectively control SIV infection. PMID:24712747

  3. ROS production and gene expression in alveolar macrophages exposed to PM(2.5) from Baghdad, Iraq: Seasonal trends and impact of chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Samera H; Schauer, James J; Antkiewicz, Dagmara S; Shafer, Martin M; Kadhim, Ahmed Kh

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of changes in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) composition on oxidative stress markers in an in-vitro alveolar macrophage (AM) model. Fifty-three PM2.5 samples were collected during a year-long PM sampling campaign in Baghdad, Iraq, a semi-arid region of the country. Monthly composites were analyzed for chemical composition and for biological activity using in-vitro measurements of ROS production and gene expression in the AM model. Twelve genes that were differentially expressed upon PM exposure were identified and their co-associations with the composition of PM2.5 were examined. Ten of those genes were up-regulated in January and April composites; samples which also exhibited high ROS activity and relatively high PM mass concentration. ROS production was statistically correlated with total PM2.5 mass, levoglucosan (a wood burning tracer) and several trace elements of the PM (especially V and Ni, which are associated with oil combustion). The expression of several cytokine genes was found to be moderately associated with PM mass, crustal materials (indication of dusty days or dust storms) and certain metals (e.g. V, Fe and Ni) in the PM. Thus, the ROS activity association with PM2.5, may, in part, be driven by redox-active metals. The antioxidant response genes (Nqo1 and Hmox1) were moderately associated with polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and showed a good correlation (r-Pearson of >0.7) with metals linked to vehicle-related emissions (i.e. Cu, Zn and Sb). Examining these associations in a larger sample pool (e.g. daily samples) would improve the power of the analysis and may strengthen the implication of these chemicals in the oxidative stress of biological systems, which could aid in the development of new metrics of PM toxicity. PMID:26618301

  4. Effects of coarse chalk dust particles (2.5-10 μm) on respiratory burst and oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuexia; Yang, Zhenhua; Feng, Yan; Li, Ruijin; Zhang, Quanxi; Geng, Hong; Dong, Chuan

    2015-08-01

    The main aim of the present study was to examine in vitro responses of rat alveolar macrophages (AMs) exposed to coarse chalk dust particles (particulate matter in the size range 2.5-10 μm, PM(coarse)) by respiratory burst and oxidative stress. Chalk PM(coarse)-induced respiratory burst in AMs was measured by using a luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) method. Also, the cell viability; lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release; levels of cellular superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and acid phosphatase (ACP); plasma membrane ATPase; and extracellular nitric oxide (NO) level were determined 4 h following the treatment with the different dosages of chalk PM(coarse). The results showed that chalk PM(coarse) initiated the respiratory burst of AMs as indicated by strong CL, which was inhibited by diphenyleneiodonium chloride and L-N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride. It suggested that chalk PM(coarse) induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in AMs. This hypothesis was confirmed by the fact that chalk PM(coarse) resulted in a significant decrease of intracellular SOD, GSH, ACP, and ATPase levels and a notable increase of intracellular CAT, MDA content, and extracellular NO level, consequently leading to a decrease of the cell viability and a increase of LDH release. It was concluded that AMs exposed to chalk PM(coarse) can suffer from cytotoxicity which may be mediated by generation of excessive ROS/RNS. Graphical Abstract The possible mechanism of coarse chalk particles-induced adverse effects in AMs.

  5. ROS production and gene expression in alveolar macrophages exposed to PM(2.5) from Baghdad, Iraq: Seasonal trends and impact of chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Samera H; Schauer, James J; Antkiewicz, Dagmara S; Shafer, Martin M; Kadhim, Ahmed Kh

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of changes in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) composition on oxidative stress markers in an in-vitro alveolar macrophage (AM) model. Fifty-three PM2.5 samples were collected during a year-long PM sampling campaign in Baghdad, Iraq, a semi-arid region of the country. Monthly composites were analyzed for chemical composition and for biological activity using in-vitro measurements of ROS production and gene expression in the AM model. Twelve genes that were differentially expressed upon PM exposure were identified and their co-associations with the composition of PM2.5 were examined. Ten of those genes were up-regulated in January and April composites; samples which also exhibited high ROS activity and relatively high PM mass concentration. ROS production was statistically correlated with total PM2.5 mass, levoglucosan (a wood burning tracer) and several trace elements of the PM (especially V and Ni, which are associated with oil combustion). The expression of several cytokine genes was found to be moderately associated with PM mass, crustal materials (indication of dusty days or dust storms) and certain metals (e.g. V, Fe and Ni) in the PM. Thus, the ROS activity association with PM2.5, may, in part, be driven by redox-active metals. The antioxidant response genes (Nqo1 and Hmox1) were moderately associated with polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and showed a good correlation (r-Pearson of >0.7) with metals linked to vehicle-related emissions (i.e. Cu, Zn and Sb). Examining these associations in a larger sample pool (e.g. daily samples) would improve the power of the analysis and may strengthen the implication of these chemicals in the oxidative stress of biological systems, which could aid in the development of new metrics of PM toxicity.

  6. Alternative activation of macrophages and pulmonary fibrosis are modulated by scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Shubha; Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Ryan, Alan J; He, Chao; Kobzik, Lester; Carter, A Brent

    2015-08-01

    Alternative activation of alveolar macrophages is linked to fibrosis following exposure to asbestos. The scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), provides innate immune defense against inhaled particles and pathogens; however, a receptor for asbestos has not been identified. We hypothesized that MARCO acts as an initial signaling receptor for asbestos, polarizes macrophages to a profibrotic M2 phenotype, and is required for the development of asbestos-induced fibrosis. Compared with normal subjects, alveolar macrophages isolated from patients with asbestosis express higher amounts of MARCO and have greater profibrotic polarization. Arginase 1 (40-fold) and IL-10 (265-fold) were higher in patients. In vivo, the genetic deletion of MARCO attenuated the profibrotic environment and pulmonary fibrosis in mice exposed to chrysotile. Moreover, alveolar macrophages from MARCO(-/-) mice polarize to an M1 phenotype, whereas wild-type mice have higher Ym1 (>3.0-fold) and nearly 7-fold more active TGF-β1 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF). Arg(432) and Arg(434) in domain V of MARCO are required for the polarization of macrophages to a profibrotic phenotype as mutation of these residues reduced FIZZ1 expression (17-fold) compared with cells expressing MARCO. These observations demonstrate that a macrophage membrane protein regulates the fibrotic response to lung injury and suggest a novel target for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Isolation of an MH2 retrovirus mutant temperature sensitive for macrophage but not fibroblast transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, S

    1986-01-01

    A conditional mutant of the MH2 avian retrovirus, termed ts41MH2, was isolated. Unlike wtMH2, ts41MH2 permitted transformed macrophages to differentiate during a 5- to 7-day temperature shift from 37 to 42 degrees C. Mutant-infected cells incubated at 42 degrees C exhibited a flattened morphology and then fused to form giant multinucleated cells that closely resembled normal macrophage maturation in vitro. These differentiated cells reacted strongly with a myeloid-macrophage-specific monoclonal antibody. The process of differentiation was inhibited when ts41MH2-transformed nonproducer clones were superinfected before the temperature shift with the myc gene-containing MC29 or OK10 viruses. By contrast, no inhibition was observed in clones superinfected with the MH2-PA200 virus that contains only the mil gene. The mutant also demonstrated a reduced oncogenic potential relative to that of wtMH2 when it was inoculated intravenously into young birds. However, in contrast to the results obtained with hematopoietic cells, none of the five fibroblast transformation parameters tested for ts41MH2 were altered from those induced by wtMH2. These results suggest that the mutation in ts41MH2 is located in a region of myc required for macrophage transformation, but not required for fibroblast transformation. Images PMID:3005642

  8. DNA damage, redox changes, and associated stress-inducible signaling events underlying the apoptosis and cytotoxicity in murine alveolar macrophage cell line MH-S by methanol-extracted Stachybotrys chartarum toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huiyan; Yadav, Jagjit S. . E-mail: Jagjit.Yadav@uc.edu

    2006-08-01

    Spore-extracted toxins of the indoor mold Stachybotrys chartarum (SC) caused cytotoxicity (release of lactate dehydrogenase), inhibition of cell proliferation, and cell death in murine alveolar macrophage cell line MH-S in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptotic cell death, confirmed based on morphological changes, DNA ladder formation, and caspase 3/7 activation, was detectable as early as at 3 h during treatment with a toxin concentration of 1 spore equivalent/macrophage and was preceded by DNA damage beginning at 15 min, as evidenced by DNA comet formation in single cell gel electrophoresis assay. The apoptotic dose of SC toxins did not induce detectable nitric oxide and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1{beta}, IL-6, and TNF-{alpha}) but showed exacerbated cytotoxicity in presence of a non-apoptotic dose of the known pro-inflammatory agent LPS (10 ng/ml). Intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level showed a significant decrease beginning at 9 h of the toxin treatment whereas oxidized glutathione (GSSG) showed a corresponding significant increase, indicating a delayed onset of oxidative stress in the apoptosis process. The toxin-treated macrophages accumulated p53, an indicator of DNA damage response, and showed activation of the stress-inducible MAP kinases, JNK, and p38, in a time-dependent manner. Chemical blocking of either p38 or p53 inhibited in part the SC toxin-induced apoptosis whereas blocking of JNK did not show any such effect. This study constitutes the first report on induction of DNA damage and associated p53 activation by SC toxins, and demonstrates the involvement of p38- and p53-mediated signaling events in SC toxin-induced apoptosis of alveolar macrophages.

  9. Monocytes/macrophages isolated from the mouse central nervous system contain infectious Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV).

    PubMed

    Clatch, R J; Miller, S D; Metzner, R; Dal Canto, M C; Lipton, H L

    1990-05-01

    Knowledge of the cells in which Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) persists is crucial to understanding the pathogenesis of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease; however, it is still uncertain whether oligodendrocytes or macrophages are the primary target for persistence. In this study, mononuclear cells (MNC) isolated directly from central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory infiltrates of TMEV-infected mice on discontinuous Percoll gradients were found to contain infectious TMEV. Macrophages appeared to be the principal MNC infected as determined by two-color immunofluorescence. Infectious center assay and double immunostaining together indicated the presence and possible synthesis of TMEV in approximately 1 in 225 to 1 in 1000 CNS macrophages, with 1 to 7 PFU produced per macrophage. On the basis of these findings, limited replication in macrophages is consistent with the total CNS virus content detected at any time during the persistent phase of the infection as well as the slow pace of the infection.

  10. Exposure of surfactant protein A to ozone in vitro and in vivo impairs its interactions with alveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; Van Iwaarden, J.F.; Van Bree, L.; Verhoef, J.; Van Golde, L.M.; Haagsman, H.P. )

    1992-01-01

    This study focused on the question of whether exposure of surfactant protein A (SP-A) to ozone affected properties of this protein that may be involved in regulating alveolar type II cell and alveolar macrophage functions. In vitro exposure of human or canine SP-A to ozone reduced the ability of this protein to inhibit phorbol-ester induced secretion of (3H)phosphatidylcholine by alveolar type II cells in culture. Ozone-exposed human SP-A showed a decreased ability to enhance phagocytosis of herpes simplex virus and to stimulate superoxide anion production by alveolar macrophages. Experiments with elastase showed that ozone-exposed canine SP-A was more susceptible to proteolysis. A conformational change of the protein could underlie this phenomenon. Surfactant isolated from ozone-exposed rats (0.4 ppm ozone for 12 h) was also less able to stimulate superoxide anion production by alveolar macrophages than surfactant from control rats, which suggested that SP-A in vivo was also susceptible to ozone. The results of this study suggest that SP-A-alveolar cell interactions can be inhibited by ozone exposure, which may contribute to the toxicity of ozone in the lungs.

  11. Effect of substratum, serum and linoleic acid on the lipid synthesis of isolated alveolar type II cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cott, G.R.; Edeen, K.E.; Hale, S.G.; Mason, R.J.

    1986-03-05

    The authors examined the effect of cellular substratum (plastic or amnionic basement membrane (ABM)) and serum additive (fetal bovine (FBS), pork, horse, rat or human) on phospholipid synthesis in alveolar type II cells. The cells were isolated from adult rats, cultured for 48 hours under the various substratum and serum conditions, and then incubated for an additional 2 hours with (1-/sup 14/C) acetate. ABM consistently caused a significant increase in the percent of radiolabel incorporated into phosphatidylcholine (PC) and/or phosphatidylglycerol (PG). Serum also had a significant effect with the highest values of PC and saturated PC being obtained with rat serum and the highest PG values with horse serum. The fatty acid composition of the sera used varied according to species with the largest variations in percent linoleic acid. Supplementing media with linoleic acid resulted in a marked increase in saturated PC values and a fall in PG values. Therefore, they conclude that: 1) ABM improves differentiated function, 2) FBS supplementation may not be optimal, and 3) the different effects of linoleic acid supplementation on PC, saturated PC, and PG values suggests an independent regulation of synthesis for these lipid species in vitro.

  12. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bokil, Nilesh J; Totsika, Makrina; Carey, Alison J; Stacey, Katryn J; Hancock, Viktoria; Saunders, Bernadette M; Ravasi, Timothy; Ulett, Glen C; Schembri, Mark A; Sweet, Matthew J

    2011-11-01

    Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that UPEC can invade and replicate within epithelial cells, suggesting that this bacterial pathogen may occupy an intracellular niche within the host. Given that many intracellular pathogens target macrophages, we assessed the interactions between UPEC and macrophages. Colonization of the mouse bladder by UPEC strain CFT073 resulted in increased expression of myeloid-restricted genes, consistent with the recruitment of inflammatory macrophages to the site of infection. In in vitro assays, CFT073 was able to survive within primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) up to 24h post-infection. Three additional well-characterized clinical UPEC isolates associated with distinct UTI symptomatologies displayed variable long-term survival within BMM. UPEC strains UTI89 and VR50, originally isolated from patients with cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria respectively, showed elevated bacterial loads in BMM at 24h post-infection as compared to CFT073 and the asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972. These differences did not correlate with differential effects on macrophage survival or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1(+) vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data suggest that some UPEC isolates may subvert macrophage anti-microbial pathways, and that host species differences may impact on intracellular UPEC survival.

  13. Effect of aqueous extract of Tinospora cordifolia on functions of peritoneal macrophages isolated from CCl4 intoxicated male albino mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The current practice of ingesting phytochemicals for supporting the immune system or fighting infections is based on centuries-old tradition. Macrophages are involved at all the stages of an immune response. The present study focuses on the immunostimulant properties of Tinospora cordifolia extract that are exerted on circulating macrophages isolated from CCl4 (0.5 ml/kg body weight) intoxicated male albino mice. Methods Apart from damaging the liver system, carbon tetrachloride also inhibits macrophage functions thus, creating an immunocompromised state, as is evident from the present study. Such cell functions include cell morphology, adhesion property, phagocytosis, enzyme release (myeloperoxidase or MPO), nitric oxide (NO) release, intracellular survival of ingested bacteria and DNA fragmentation in peritoneal macrophages isolated from these immunocompromised mice. T. cordifolia extract was tested for acute toxicity at the given dose (150 mg/kg body weight) by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Results The number of morphologically altered macrophages was increased in mice exposed to CCl4. Administration of CCl4 (i.p.) also reduced the phagocytosis, cell adhesion, MPO release, NO release properties of circulating macrophages of mice. The DNA fragmentation of peritoneal macrophages was observed to be higher in CCl4 intoxicated mice. The bacterial killing capacity of peritoneal macrophages was also adversely affected by CCl4. However oral administration of aqueous fraction of Tinospora cordifolia stem parts at a dose of 40 mg/kg body weight (in vivo) in CCl4 exposed mice ameliorated the effect of CCl4, as the percentage of morphologically altered macrophages, phagocytosis activity, cell adhesion, MPO release, NO release, DNA fragmentation and intracellular killing capacity of CCl4 intoxicated peritoneal macrophages came closer to those of the control group. No acute toxicity was identified in oral administration of the aqueous extract of Tinospora

  14. Activation of macrophages by an exopolysaccharide isolated from Antarctic Psychrobacter sp. B-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Leiye; Sun, Guojie; Wei, Jingfang; Wang, Yingze; Du, Chao; Li, Jiang

    2016-09-01

    An exopolysaccharide (EPS) was isolated and purified from an Antarctic psychrophilic bacterium B-3, identified as Psychrobacter sp., and the activation of RAW264.7 cells by B-3 EPS was investigated. The results show that B-3 EPS, over a certain concentration range, promoted cell viability, nitric oxide production, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α secretion, and phagocytic ability. Furthermore, TAK-242, an inhibitor of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) significantly reduced nitric oxide production by these cells after stimulation with B-3 EPS. Moreover, B-3 EPS induced p65 phosphorylation and IκBα degradation in these cells. In conclusion, B-3 EPS might have activated RAW264.7 cells by combining with TLR4 on cell surface and triggering activation of NF-κB signaling pathways, implying that this EPS could activate macrophages and regulate initial immune response.

  15. MicroRNA profiling of the bovine alveolar macrophage response to Mycobacterium bovis infection suggests pathogen survival is enhanced by microRNA regulation of endocytosis and lysosome trafficking.

    PubMed

    Vegh, Peter; Magee, David A; Nalpas, Nicolas C; Bryan, Kenneth; McCabe, Matthew S; Browne, John A; Conlon, Kevin M; Gordon, Stephen V; Bradley, Daniel G; MacHugh, David E; Lynn, David J

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, a major problem for global agriculture, spreads via an airborne route and is taken up by alveolar macrophages (AM) in the lung. Here, we describe the first next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq) approach to temporally profile miRNA expression in primary bovine AMs post-infection with M. bovis. One, six, and forty miRNAs were identified as significantly differentially expressed at 2, 24 and 48 h post-infection, respectively. The differential expression of three miRNAs (bta-miR-142-5p, bta-miR-146a, and bta-miR-423-3p) was confirmed by RT-qPCR. Pathway analysis of the predicted mRNA targets of differentially expressed miRNAs suggests that these miRNAs preferentially target several pathways that are functionally relevant for mycobacterial pathogenesis, including endocytosis and lysosome trafficking, IL-1 signalling and the TGF-β pathway. Over-expression studies using a bovine macrophage cell-line (Bomac) reveal the targeting of two key genes in the innate immune response to M. bovis, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) and TGF-β receptor 2 (TGFBR2), by miR-146. Taken together, our study suggests that miRNAs play a key role in tuning the complex interplay between M. bovis survival strategies and the host immune response.

  16. Activated prostaglandin D2 receptors on macrophages enhance neutrophil recruitment into the lung

    PubMed Central

    Jandl, Katharina; Stacher, Elvira; Bálint, Zoltán; Sturm, Eva Maria; Maric, Jovana; Peinhaupt, Miriam; Luschnig, Petra; Aringer, Ida; Fauland, Alexander; Konya, Viktoria; Dahlen, Sven-Erik; Wheelock, Craig E.; Kratky, Dagmar; Olschewski, Andrea; Marsche, Gunther; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2016-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin (PG) D2 is an early-phase mediator in inflammation, but its action and the roles of the 2 D-type prostanoid receptors (DPs) DP1 and DP2 (also called chemoattractant receptor–homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells) in regulating macrophages have not been elucidated to date. Objective We investigated the role of PGD2 receptors on primary human macrophages, as well as primary murine lung macrophages, and their ability to influence neutrophil action in vitro and in vivo. Methods In vitro studies, including migration, Ca2+ flux, and cytokine secretion, were conducted with primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and neutrophils and freshly isolated murine alveolar and pulmonary interstitial macrophages. In vivo pulmonary inflammation was assessed in male BALB/c mice. Results Activation of DP1, DP2, or both receptors on human macrophages induced strong intracellular Ca2+ flux, cytokine release, and migration of macrophages. In a murine model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation, activation of each PGD2 receptor resulted in aggravated airway neutrophilia, tissue myeloperoxidase activity, cytokine contents, and decreased lung compliance. Selective depletion of alveolar macrophages abolished the PGD2-enhanced inflammatory response. Activation of PGD2 receptors on human macrophages enhanced the migratory capacity and prolonged the survival of neutrophils in vitro. In human lung tissue specimens both DP1 and DP2 receptors were located on alveolar macrophages along with hematopoietic PGD synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme of PGD2 synthesis. Conclusion For the first time, our results show that PGD2 markedly augments disease activity through its ability to enhance the proinflammatory actions of macrophages and subsequent neutrophil activation. PMID:26792210

  17. Prevention of arthritis markers in experimental animal and inflammation signalling in macrophage by Karanjin isolated from Pongamia pinnata seed extract.

    PubMed

    Bose, Madhura; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Mukherjee, Debarati; Mandal, Suvra; Mishra, Roshnara

    2014-08-01

    Karanjin, the furanoflavonoid reported to possess gastroprotective and anti-diabetic properties, was investigated against experimental arthritis and its molecular signalling in inflammation was explored in macrophages. Karanjin was isolated from hexane extract of Pongamia pinnata seeds and was evaluated on arthritis markers in adjuvant induced arthritis model (AIA) in two doses (per oral; 10 mg/kg/day and 20 mg/kg/day). Karanjin dose dependently reduced collagen and cartilage breakdown markers viz. urinary hydroxyproline and glucosamine, respectively, serum lysosomal enzymes responsible for articular cartilage damage, and major proinflammatory cytokine TNFα, secreted by macrophages involved in articular inflammation and destruction. Karanjin also prevented joint damage as evidenced from arthritis score, radiographic and histopathological analysis. To delineate the molecular target of Karanjin, in vitro study on LPS induced macrophages were performed at calibrated non toxic doses (4 µg/mL and 6 µg/mL). Karanjin reduced TNFα production and also showed potent inhibitory effect on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production which is generally induced by TNFα from activated macrophages. NF-κB, the key regulator of TNFα signalling during inflammation was significantly suppressed by Karanjin. Our study for the first time highlights the anti-inflammatory role of Karanjin in experimental arthritis model as well as on macrophage signalling, thereby depicting its probable mechanism of action. PMID:24399783

  18. The replicative restriction of lymphocytotropic isolates of HIV-1 in macrophages is overcome by TGF-beta.

    PubMed

    Lazdins, J K; Klimkait, T; Woods-Cook, K; Walker, M; Alteri, E; Cox, D; Cerletti, N; Shipman, R; Bilbe, G; McMaster, G

    1992-04-01

    In vitro exposure of human blood monocyte-derived macrophages to T-cell tropic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolates fails to establish a productive viral infection. Several studies have shown that such preferential HIV-1 replication in T cells or in mononuclear phagocytes (HIV tropism) may be determined by distinct viral characteristics. In the present study it was demonstrated that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a factor known to be produced by platelets, macrophages, and other cells present at a wound site, can act as a mediator in overcoming the lymphocytotropic restriction of several well-characterized viral isolates of HIV-1 (i.e., LAV, Z84, pLAI, NY5). Macrophages infected with these isolates show cytopathic changes comparable to those seen upon infection with the monocytotropic isolate ADA. To achieve this effect with TGF-beta, the factor must be present after the infection period. The emerging virus retains its original cellular tropism. Based on these observations the authors propose a role for TGF-beta in the establishment and progression of HIV infection and disease.

  19. Activation of J77A.1 Macrophages by Three Phospholipases A2 Isolated from Bothrops atrox Snake Venom

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Juliana L.; Oliveira, George A.; Pontes, Adriana S.; Setúbal, Sulamita da S.; Xavier, Caroline V.; Lacouth-Silva, Fabianne; Lima, Beatriz F.; Zaqueo, Kayena D.; Kayano, Anderson M.; Calderon, Leonardo A.; Stábeli, Rodrigo G.; Soares, Andreimar M.; Zuliani, Juliana P.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the in vitro effects of two basic myotoxic phospholipases A2 (PLA2), BaTX-I, a catalytically inactive Lys-49 variant, and BaTX-II, a catalytically active Asp-49, and of one acidic myotoxic PLA2, BaPLA2, a catalytically active Asp-49, isolated from Bothrops atrox snake venom, on the activation of J774A.1 macrophages. At noncytotoxic concentrations, the toxins did not affect the adhesion of the macrophages, nor their ability to detach. The data obtained showed that only BaTX-I stimulated complement receptor-mediated phagocytosis. However, BaTX-I, BaTX-II, and BaPLA2 induced the release of the superoxide anion by J774A.1 macrophages. Additionally, only BaTX-I raised the lysosomal volume of macrophages after 15 min of incubation. After 30 min, all the phospholipases increased this parameter, which was not observed within 60 min. Moreover, BaTX-I, BaTX-II, and BaPLA2 increased the number of lipid bodies on macrophages submitted to phagocytosis and not submitted to phagocytosis. However, BaTX-II and BaPLA2 induced the release of TNF-α by J774A.1 macrophages. Taken together, the data show that, despite differences in enzymatic activity, the three toxins induced inflammatory events and whether the enzyme is acidic or basic does not seem to contribute to these effects. PMID:24592395

  20. Activation of J77A.1 macrophages by three phospholipases A2 isolated from Bothrops atrox snake venom.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Juliana L; Oliveira, George A; Pontes, Adriana S; Setúbal, Sulamita da S; Xavier, Caroline V; Lacouth-Silva, Fabianne; Lima, Beatriz F; Zaqueo, Kayena D; Kayano, Anderson M; Calderon, Leonardo A; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Soares, Andreimar M; Zuliani, Juliana P

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the in vitro effects of two basic myotoxic phospholipases A2 (PLA2), BaTX-I, a catalytically inactive Lys-49 variant, and BaTX-II, a catalytically active Asp-49, and of one acidic myotoxic PLA2, BaPLA2, a catalytically active Asp-49, isolated from Bothrops atrox snake venom, on the activation of J774A.1 macrophages. At noncytotoxic concentrations, the toxins did not affect the adhesion of the macrophages, nor their ability to detach. The data obtained showed that only BaTX-I stimulated complement receptor-mediated phagocytosis. However, BaTX-I, BaTX-II, and BaPLA2 induced the release of the superoxide anion by J774A.1 macrophages. Additionally, only BaTX-I raised the lysosomal volume of macrophages after 15 min of incubation. After 30 min, all the phospholipases increased this parameter, which was not observed within 60 min. Moreover, BaTX-I, BaTX-II, and BaPLA2 increased the number of lipid bodies on macrophages submitted to phagocytosis and not submitted to phagocytosis. However, BaTX-II and BaPLA2 induced the release of TNF-α by J774A.1 macrophages. Taken together, the data show that, despite differences in enzymatic activity, the three toxins induced inflammatory events and whether the enzyme is acidic or basic does not seem to contribute to these effects. PMID:24592395

  1. Proteomic expression profiles of virulent and avirulent strains of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes is able to survive and proliferate within macrophages. In the current study, the ability of three L. monocytogenes strains (serovar 1/2a strain EGDe, serovar 4b strain F2365, and serovar 4a strain HCC23) to proliferate in the murine macrophage cell line J774.1 was analyzed. We...

  2. Survival and replication of Rhodococcus equi in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hondalus, M K; Mosser, D M

    1994-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular bacterium of macrophages that can cause serious pneumonia in both young horses and immunocompromised people. Essential to understanding rhodococcus pathogenesis is a quantitative documentation of the intracellular events that follow macrophage phagocytosis of the organism. By using a bacterial immunofluorescence staining assay, we verified the intracellular survival and replicative potential of R. equi in both murine peritoneal macrophages and equine alveolar macrophages in vitro. Following an initial lag period of 6 to 12 h, the intracellular numbers of R. equi begin to rise, often reaching macrophage-compromising levels by 48 h. A quantitative determination of bacterial growth by a novel image analysis cytometry technique confirmed our fluorescence microscopic results. By 48 h postinfection, bacterial numbers had increased by more than fivefold, and the majority of infected macrophages in the monolayer contained 10 or more bacteria per cell. The intracellular organisms were viable, as evidenced by the ability to incorporate radiolabeled uracil. The use of these techniques has identified differences in the in vitro replicative capacities of a virulent strain and an avirulent strain of R. equi. A clinical isolate of R. equi expressing a 17-kDa virulence-associated plasmid-encoded antigen was able to survive and replicate within macrophages, whereas an avirulent, non-plasmid-containing strain replicated poorly. These results suggest that plasmid-encoded bacterial virulence factors may contribute to the ability of R. equi to replicate within its host cell, the macrophage. Images PMID:7927672

  3. Increased alveolar plasminogen activator in early asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cantin, A.; Allard, C.; Begin, R.

    1989-03-01

    Alveolar macrophage-derived plasminogen activator (PA) activity is decreased in some chronic interstitial lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis but increased in experimental models of acute alveolitis. Although asbestos fibers can stimulate alveolar macrophages (AM) to release PA in vitro, the effect of chronic asbestos exposure of the lower respiratory tract on lung PA activity remains unknown. The present study was designed to evaluate PA activity of alveolar macrophages and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in asbestos-exposed sheep and asbestos workers. Forty-three sheep were exposed to either 100 mg UICC chrysotile B asbestos in 100 ml phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or to 100 ml PBS by tracheal infusion every 2 wk for 18 months. At Month 18, chest roentgenograms were analyzed and alveolar macrophage and extracellular fluid PA activity were measured in samples obtained by BAL. Alveolar macrophage PA activity was increased in the asbestos-exposed sheep compared to control sheep (87.2 +/- 17.3 versus 41.1 +/- 7.2 U/10(5) AM-24 h, p less than 0.05) as was the BAL fluid PA activity (674.9 +/- 168.4 versus 81.3 +/- 19.7 U/mg alb-24 h, p less than 0.01). Among the asbestos-exposed sheep, 10 had normal chest roentgenograms (Group SA) and 15 had irregular interstitial opacities (Group SB). Strikingly, whereas Group SA did not differ from the control group in BAL cellularity or PA activity, Group SB had marked increases in alveolar macrophages (p less than 0.005), AM PA activity (p less than 0.02), and BAL PA activity (p less than 0.001) compared to the control group.

  4. An improved method for the isolation of rat alveolar type II lung cells: Use in the Comet assay to determine DNA damage induced by cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Annette; Ordoñez, Patricia; Thorne, David; Dillon, Debbie; Meredith, Clive

    2015-06-01

    Smoking is a cause of serious diseases, including lung cancer, emphysema, chronic bronchitis and heart disease. DNA damage is thought to be one of the mechanisms by which cigarette smoke (CS) initiates disease in the lung. Indeed, CS induced DNA damage can be measured in vitro and in vivo. The potential of the Comet assay to measure DNA damage in isolated rat lung alveolar type II epithelial cells (AEC II) was explored as a means to include a genotoxicity end-point in rodent sub-chronic inhalation studies. In this study, published AEC II isolation methods were improved to yield viable cells suitable for use in the Comet assay. The improved method reduced the level of basal DNA damage and DNA repair in isolated AEC II. CS induced DNA damage could also be quantified in isolated cells following a single or 5 days CS exposure. In conclusion, the Comet assay has the potential to determine CS or other aerosol induced DNA damage in AEC II isolated from rodents used in sub-chronic inhalation studies.

  5. Hematite nanoparticles larger than 90 nm show no sign of toxicity in terms of lactate dehydrogenase release, nitric oxide generation, apoptosis, and comet assay in murine alveolar macrophages and human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Freyria, Francesca Stefania; Bonelli, Barbara; Tomatis, Maura; Ghiazza, Mara; Gazzano, Elena; Ghigo, Dario; Garrone, Edoardo; Fubini, Bice

    2012-04-16

    Three hematite samples were synthesized by precipitation from a FeCl₃ solution under controlled pH and temperature conditions in different morphology and dimensions: (i) microsized (average diameter 1.2 μm); (ii) submicrosized (250 nm); and (iii) nanosized (90 nm). To gain insight into reactions potentially occurring in vivo at the particle-lung interface following dust inhalation, several physicochemical features relevant to pathogenicity were measured (free radical generation in cell-free tests, metal release, and antioxidant depletion), and cellular toxicity assays on human lung epithelial cells (A549) and murine alveolar macrophages (MH-S) were carried out (LDH release, apoptosis detection, DNA damage, and nitric oxide synthesis). The decrease in particles size, from 1.2 μm to 90 nm, only caused a slight increase in structural defects (disorder of the hematite phase and the presence of surface ferrous ions) without enhancing surface reactivity or cellular responses in the concentration range between 20 and 100 μg cm⁻².

  6. Hematite nanoparticles larger than 90 nm show no sign of toxicity in terms of lactate dehydrogenase release, nitric oxide generation, apoptosis, and comet assay in murine alveolar macrophages and human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Freyria, Francesca Stefania; Bonelli, Barbara; Tomatis, Maura; Ghiazza, Mara; Gazzano, Elena; Ghigo, Dario; Garrone, Edoardo; Fubini, Bice

    2012-04-16

    Three hematite samples were synthesized by precipitation from a FeCl₃ solution under controlled pH and temperature conditions in different morphology and dimensions: (i) microsized (average diameter 1.2 μm); (ii) submicrosized (250 nm); and (iii) nanosized (90 nm). To gain insight into reactions potentially occurring in vivo at the particle-lung interface following dust inhalation, several physicochemical features relevant to pathogenicity were measured (free radical generation in cell-free tests, metal release, and antioxidant depletion), and cellular toxicity assays on human lung epithelial cells (A549) and murine alveolar macrophages (MH-S) were carried out (LDH release, apoptosis detection, DNA damage, and nitric oxide synthesis). The decrease in particles size, from 1.2 μm to 90 nm, only caused a slight increase in structural defects (disorder of the hematite phase and the presence of surface ferrous ions) without enhancing surface reactivity or cellular responses in the concentration range between 20 and 100 μg cm⁻². PMID:22324577

  7. Cross-resistance of Leishmania infantum isolates to nitric oxide from patients refractory to antimony treatment, and greater tolerance to antileishmanial responses by macrophages.

    PubMed

    de Moura, Tatiana R; Santos, Micheli Luize Barbosa; Braz, Juciene M; Santos, Luis Felipe V C; Aragão, Matheus T; de Oliveira, Fabricia A; Santos, Priscila L; da Silva, Ângela Maria; de Jesus, Amélia Ribeiro; de Almeida, Roque P

    2016-02-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a life-threatening disease characterized by intense parasitism of the spleen, liver, and bone marrow. Antimonials have served as front-line antileishmanial therapeutics for decades, but the increasing failure rates under antimonial treatment have challenged the continued use of these drugs. Pentavalent antimonials are known to reinforce the killing mechanisms of macrophages, although the associated mechanism remains unclear. Here, for the first time, we determined whether Leishmania infantum strains isolated from patients refractory to antimony treatment (relapse cases) were cross-resistant to antimonials, liposomal amphotericin B, and/or nitric oxide, and also whether these strains modulate macrophage infection. We selected four clinical isolates from relapse cases and two clinical isolates from antimony-responsive patients (control group) for the present study. The L. infantum promastigotes from all four relapse cases were resistant to trivalent antimonial treatment and nitric oxide, while only one isolate was resistant to liposomal amphotericin B. We evaluated whether the resistant strains from relapse cases showed enhanced infectivity and amastigote survival in macrophages, or macrophage-killing mechanisms in macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide plus interferon gamma. Infection indexes calculated using macrophages infected with isolates from relapse were higher than those observed with control strains that were stimulated independently. Macrophage infection was higher with L. infantum isolates from relapse cases and correlated with enhanced interleukin 1-β production but showed similar nitrite production. Our results demonstrate that L. infantum field isolates from relapse cases were resistant to antimonials and nitric oxide and that these parasites stimulated inflammatory cytokines and were resistant to macrophage-killing mechanisms, factors that may contribute to disease severity.

  8. Isolation of Macrophage Early and Late Endosomes by Latex Bead Internalization and Density Gradient Centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, Giorgia; de Araújo, Mariana E G; Huber, Lukas A

    2015-12-01

    Immortalized macrophage lines and primary macrophages display the ability to internalize small latex beads through the endocytic pathway. This protocol describes a simple and robust method for separating endocytic organelles from macrophages on a sucrose gradient, taking advantage of the significantly lower density of the organelles containing latex beads compared with other intracellular organelles. The latex beads are retained in the endosomes as they mature; therefore, harvesting cells at different time points after internalization permits the purification of different organelle fractions, particularly early and late endosomes. PMID:26631120

  9. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER DECREASED IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGE CYTOKINE RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to ambient airborne particulate matter (PM) is associated with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including increased hospitalizations for lung infection. Normal lung immune responses to bacterial infection include alveolar macrophage cytokine production and...

  10. [Alveolar hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Traclet, J; Lazor, R; Cordier, J-F; Cottin, V

    2013-04-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is defined by the presence of red blood cells originating from the lung capillaries or venules within the alveoli. The diagnosis is established on clinical features, radiological pattern, and especially bronchoalveolar lavage. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage may have many immune or non-immune causes. Immune causes of DAH include vasculitides, connective tissue diseases, especially systemic lupus erythematosus, and antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease (Goodpasture's syndrome). Treatment is both supportive and causal, often based on high dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapy (especially intravenous cyclophosphamide). Plasma exchanges are performed in antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease and systemic lupus erythematosus, and are considered in systemic vasculitis. Non-immune causes of DAH mainly include heart diseases, coagulation disorders, infections, drug toxicities and idiopathic DAH. Treatment of non-immune DAH is that of its cause. Whatever the cause, DAH is an emergency requiring prompt assessment and early treatment.

  11. Serial bronchoscopic lung lavage in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis under local anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, K. Rennis; Vadakkan, D. Thomas; Krishnakumar, E. V.; Anas, A. Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease, characterized by alveolar accumulation of surfactant composed of proteins and lipids due to defective surfactant clearance by alveolar macrophages. Mainstay of treatment is whole lung lavage, which requires general anesthesia. Herein, we report a case of primary PAP, successfully treated with serial bronchoscopic lung lavages under local anesthesia. PMID:25814803

  12. Physico-chemical properties of quartz from industrial manufacturing and its cytotoxic effects on alveolar macrophages: The case of green sand mould casting for iron production.

    PubMed

    Di Benedetto, Francesco; Gazzano, Elena; Tomatis, Maura; Turci, Francesco; Pardi, Luca A; Bronco, Simona; Fornaciai, Gabriele; Innocenti, Massimo; Montegrossi, Giordano; Muniz Miranda, Maurizio; Zoleo, Alfonso; Capacci, Fabio; Fubini, Bice; Ghigo, Dario; Romanelli, Maurizio

    2016-07-15

    Industrial processing of materials containing quartz induces physico-chemical modifications that contribute to the variability of quartz hazard in different plants. Here, modifications affecting a quartz-rich sand during cast iron production, have been investigated. Composition, morphology, presence of radicals associated to quartz and reactivity in free radical generation were studied on a raw sand and on a dust recovered after mould dismantling. Additionally, cytotoxicity of the processed dust and ROS and NO generation were evaluated on MH-S macrophages. Particle morphology and size were marginally affected by casting processing, which caused only a slight increase of the amount of respirable fraction. The raw sand was able to catalyze OH and CO2(-) generation in cell-free test, even if in a lesser extent than the reference quartz (Min-U-Sil), and shows hAl radicals, conventionally found in any quartz-bearing raw materials. Enrichment in iron and extensive coverage with amorphous carbon were observed during processing. They likely contributed, respectively, to increasing the ability of processed dust to release CO2- and to suppressing OH generation respect to the raw sand. Carbon coverage and repeated thermal treatments during industrial processing also caused annealing of radiogenic hAl defects. Finally, no cellular responses were observed with the respirable fraction of the processed powder. PMID:27015375

  13. Physico-chemical properties of quartz from industrial manufacturing and its cytotoxic effects on alveolar macrophages: The case of green sand mould casting for iron production.

    PubMed

    Di Benedetto, Francesco; Gazzano, Elena; Tomatis, Maura; Turci, Francesco; Pardi, Luca A; Bronco, Simona; Fornaciai, Gabriele; Innocenti, Massimo; Montegrossi, Giordano; Muniz Miranda, Maurizio; Zoleo, Alfonso; Capacci, Fabio; Fubini, Bice; Ghigo, Dario; Romanelli, Maurizio

    2016-07-15

    Industrial processing of materials containing quartz induces physico-chemical modifications that contribute to the variability of quartz hazard in different plants. Here, modifications affecting a quartz-rich sand during cast iron production, have been investigated. Composition, morphology, presence of radicals associated to quartz and reactivity in free radical generation were studied on a raw sand and on a dust recovered after mould dismantling. Additionally, cytotoxicity of the processed dust and ROS and NO generation were evaluated on MH-S macrophages. Particle morphology and size were marginally affected by casting processing, which caused only a slight increase of the amount of respirable fraction. The raw sand was able to catalyze OH and CO2(-) generation in cell-free test, even if in a lesser extent than the reference quartz (Min-U-Sil), and shows hAl radicals, conventionally found in any quartz-bearing raw materials. Enrichment in iron and extensive coverage with amorphous carbon were observed during processing. They likely contributed, respectively, to increasing the ability of processed dust to release CO2- and to suppressing OH generation respect to the raw sand. Carbon coverage and repeated thermal treatments during industrial processing also caused annealing of radiogenic hAl defects. Finally, no cellular responses were observed with the respirable fraction of the processed powder.

  14. Secretion of phosphomannosyl-deficient arylsulphatase A and cathepsin D from isolated human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Muschol, Nicole; Matzner, Ulrich; Tiede, Stephan; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Ullrich, Kurt; Braulke, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The transfer of macrophage-secreted arylsulphatase A (ASA) to enzyme-deficient brain cells is part of the therapeutic concept of bone marrow transplantation in lysosomal storage diseases. Here we have investigated this transfer in vitro. The uptake of (125)I-labelled recombinant human ASA purified from ASA-overexpressing mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient for mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) receptors in a mouse ASA-deficient astroglial cell line was completely inhibited by M6P. In contrast, when ASA-deficient astroglial cells were incubated with secretions of [(35)S]methionine-labelled human macrophages or mouse microglia, containing various lysosomal enzymes, neither ASA nor cathepsin D (CTSD) were detected in acceptor cells. Co-culturing of metabolically labelled macrophages with ASA-deficient glial cells did not result in an M6P-dependent transfer of ASA or CTSD between these two cell types. In secretions of [(33)P]phosphate-labelled macrophages no or weakly phosphorylated ASA and CTSD precursor polypeptides were found, whereas both intracellular and secreted ASA from ASA-overexpressing baby hamster kidney cells displayed (33)P-labelled M6P residues. Finally, the uptake of CTSD from secretions of [(35)S]methionine-labelled macrophages in rat hepatocytes was M6P-independent. These data indicated that lysosomal enzymes secreted by human macrophages or a mouse microglial cell line cannot be endocytosed by brain cells due to the failure to equip newly synthesized lysosomal enzymes with the M6P recognition marker efficiently. The data suggest that other mechanisms than the proposed M6P-dependent secretion/recapture of lysosomal enzymes might be responsible for therapeutic effects of bone marrow transplantation in the brain. PMID:12296771

  15. A Novel Approach for Ovine Primary Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Isolation and Culture from Fresh and Cryopreserved Tissue Obtained from Premature and Juvenile Animals

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Mariola M.; Baker, Sandy T.; Wu, Jichuan; Hubert, Terrence L.; Wolfson, Marla R.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo ovine model provides a clinically relevant platform to study cardiopulmonary mechanisms and treatments of disease; however, a robust ovine primary alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell culture model is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop and optimize ovine lung tissue cryopreservation and primary ATII cell culture methodologies for the purposes of dissecting mechanisms at the cellular level to elucidate responses observed in vivo. To address this, we established in vitro submerged and air-liquid interface cultures of primary ovine ATII cells isolated from fresh or cryopreserved lung tissues obtained from mechanically ventilated sheep (128 days gestation—6 months of age). Presence, abundance, and mRNA expression of surfactant proteins was assessed by immunocytochemistry, Western Blot, and quantitative PCR respectively on the day of isolation, and throughout the 7 day cell culture study period. All biomarkers were significantly greater from cells isolated from fresh than cryopreserved tissue, and those cultured in air-liquid interface as compared to submerged culture conditions at all time points. Surfactant protein expression remained in the air-liquid interface culture system while that of cells cultured in the submerged system dissipated over time. Despite differences in biomarker magnitude between cells isolated from fresh and cryopreserved tissue, cells isolated from cryopreserved tissue remained metabolically active and demonstrated a similar response as cells from fresh tissue through 72 hr period of hyperoxia. These data demonstrate a cell culture methodology using fresh or cryopreserved tissue to support study of ovine primary ATII cell function and responses, to support expanded use of biobanked tissues, and to further understanding of mechanisms that contribute to in vivo function of the lung. PMID:26999050

  16. [Cytologic parameters of broncho-alveolar lavage state in experimental animals exposed to mechanical rubber aerosol].

    PubMed

    Zhumabekova, B K; Sraubayev, E N; Gazalieva, M A; Akhmetova, S B

    2015-01-01

    Cytologic studies covered broncho-alveolar lavage in animals exposed to mechanical rubber aerosol in subacute (2 months) and chronic (5 months) experiments. Under exposure to mechanical rubber aerosol the experimental animals developed disorders of lung protective mechanisms. Subacute dust inhalation in the experimental animals caused higher counts of neutrophils and degeneratively changed cells with increased functional activity of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils. Chronic dust inhalation in the experimental animals proved lower functional activity alveolar macrophages and neutrophils.

  17. Human macrophage ATP7A is localized in the trans-Golgi apparatus, controls intracellular copper levels, and mediates macrophage responses to dermal wounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Won; Chan, Qilin; Afton, Scott E; Caruso, Joseph A; Lai, Barry; Weintraub, Neal L; Qin, Zhenyu

    2012-02-01

    The copper transporter ATP7A has attracted significant attention since the discovery of its gene mutation leading to human Menkes disease. We previously reported that ATP7A is highly expressed in the human vasculature and identified a novel vascular function of ATP7A in modulation of the expression and activity of extracellular superoxide dismutase. We recently identified that ATP7A expression in THP-1 cells (a monocyte/macrophage model cell line) plays a role in the oxidation of low density lipoproteins, indicating that it is necessary to further investigate its expression and function in monocytes/macrophages. In the current study, we demonstrated the protein and mRNA expression of ATP7A in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. ATP7A was strongly co-localized with the trans-Golgi apparatus in PBMC-derived macrophages. Intracellular copper, detected by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy, was found to be distributed to the nucleus and cytoplasm in human THP-1 cells. To confirm the role of endogenous ATP7A in macrophage copper homeostasis, we performed inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in murine peritoneal macrophages, which showed markedly increased intracellular copper levels in macrophages isolated from ATP7A-deficient mice versus control mice. Moreover, the role of ATP7A in regulating macrophage responses to dermal wounds was studied by introduction of control and ATP7A-downregulated THP-1 cells into dermal wounds of nude mice. Infiltration of THP-1 cells into the wounded area (detected by expression of human macrophage markers MAC2 and CD68) was reduced in response to downregulation of ATP7A, hinting decreased macrophage accumulation subsequent to dermal wounds. In summary, alongside our previous studies, these findings indicate that human macrophage ATP7A is localized in the trans-Golgi apparatus, regulates intracellular copper levels, and mediates macrophage responses to a dermal wound.

  18. Human Macrophage ATP7A is Localized in the trans-Golgi Apparatus, Controls Intracellular Copper Levels, and Mediates Macrophage Responses to Dermal Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha Won; Chan, Qilin; Afton, Scott E.; Caruso, Joseph A.; Lai, Barry; Weintraub, Neal L.; Qin, Zhenyu

    2013-01-01

    The copper transporter ATP7A has attracted significant attention since the discovery of its gene mutation leading to human Menkes disease. We previously reported that ATP7A is highly expressed in the human vasculature and identified a novel vascular function of ATP7A in modulation of the expression and activity of extracellular superoxide dismutase. We recently identified that ATP7A expression in THP-1 cells (a monocyte/macrophage model cell line) plays a role in the oxidation of low density lipoproteins, indicating that it is necessary to further investigate its expression and function in monocytes/macrophages. In the current study, we demonstrated the protein and mRNA expression of ATP7A in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. ATP7A was strongly co-localized with the trans-Golgi apparatus in PBMC-derived macrophages. Intracellular copper, detected by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy, was found to be distributed to the nucleus and cytoplasm in human THP-1 cells. To confirm the role of endogenous ATP7A in macrophage copper homeostasis, we performed inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in murine peritoneal macrophages, which showed markedly increased intracellular copper levels in macrophages isolated from ATP7A-deficient mice versus control mice. Moreover, the role of ATP7A in regulating macrophage responses to dermal wounds was studied by introduction of control and ATP7A-downregulated THP-1 cells into dermal wounds of nude mice. Infiltration of THP-1 cells into the wounded area (detected by expression of human macrophage markers MAC2 and CD68) was reduced in response to downregulation of ATP7A, hinting decreased macrophage accumulation subsequent to dermal wounds. In summary, alongside our previous studies, these findings indicate that human macrophage ATP7A is localized in the trans-Golgi apparatus, regulates intracellular copper levels, and mediates macrophage responses to a dermal wound

  19. Dengue virus isolation by antibody-dependent enhancement of infectivity in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cardosa, M J

    1987-01-24

    Acute-phase serum samples collected during an outbreak of dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in Penang, Malaysia, were tested by a method involving antibody-dependent enhancement of infectivity in the mouse macrophage-like cell line, P388D1. 58 of 71 (81.7%) serologically positive cases yielded virus.

  20. Macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes from two multiply exposed, uninfected individuals resist infection with primary non-syncytium-inducing isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Connor, R I; Paxton, W A; Sheridan, K E; Koup, R A

    1996-01-01

    Despite multiple, high-risk sexual exposures, some individuals remain uninfected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). CD4+ lymphocytes from these individuals are less susceptible to infection in vitro with some strains of HIV-1, suggesting that the phenotype of the virus may influence its ability to interact with certain CD4+ cells. In the present study, we examined the susceptibility of CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophages from two exposed uninfected individuals (EU2 and EU3) to infection with a panel of biologically cloned isolates of HIV-1 having either a non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) or a syncytium-inducing (SI) phenotype. Our results indicate that CD4+ T lymphocytes from EU2 and EU3 are resistant to infection with NSI isolates of HIV-1 but are susceptible to infection with primary SI isolates. In addition, we found that macrophages from EU2 and EU3 are resistant to infection with both NSI and SI isolates. The latter finding was confirmed by using several uncloned NSI and SI isolates obtained from patients during acute HIV-1 infection. In further experiments, env clones encoding glycoproteins characteristic of NSI or SI viruses were used in single-cycle infectivity assays to evaluate infection of CD4+ lymphocytes and macrophages from EU2 and EU3. Consistent with our previous results, we found that macrophages from these individuals are resistant to infection with NSI and SI env-pseudotyped viruses, while CD4+ T lymphocytes are resistant to NSI, but not SI, pseudotyped viruses. Overall, our results demonstrate that CD4+ cells from two exposed uninfected individuals resist infection in vitro with primary, macrophage-tropic, NSI isolates of HIV-1, which is the predominant viral phenotype found following HIV-1 transmission. Furthermore, infection with NSI isolates was blocked in both CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophages from these individuals, suggesting that there may be a common mechanism for resistance in both cell types. PMID:8971004

  1. Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

  2. Influence of cadmium on isolated peritoneal macrophage populations: cadmium inhibits Fc receptor internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro experiments were performed to examine the effect of cadmium on adherent phagocytic cell populations. The authors were able to demonstrate, in vitro, a phagocytic defect that was originally observed in an in vivo system. Using in vitro methodologies, cadmium was found to inhibit opsonin-dependent but not opsonin-independent phagocytosis in two different populations of macrophages. The receptors through which the opsonized /sup 51/Cr-ElgG were internalized were characterized as Fc receptors. They were able to demonstrate that cadmium could reversibly inhibit internalization of Fc receptors. This mechanism, rather than an alteration of the receptors' binding capabilities, was responsible for the observed inhibition of Fc mediated (opsonin-dependent) phagocytosis in both populations of macrophages tested. The defect was not specific for cadmium per se. Zinc treatment caused a similar inhibition of Fc receptor mediated phagocytosis.

  3. Glycoconjugates isolated from Trypanosoma cruzi but not from Leishmania species membranes trigger nitric oxide synthesis as well as microbicidal activity in IFN-gamma-primed macrophages.

    PubMed

    Camargo, M M; Andrade, A C; Almeida, I C; Travassos, L R; Gazzinelli, R T

    1997-12-15

    In the present study, we investigated the role of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored mucin-like glycoproteins (GPI-mucins) from Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes in triggering the synthesis of nitric oxide as well as the microbicidal activity in murine macrophages. Our results show that GPI-mucins isolated from trypomastigote membranes are potent inducers of nitric oxide synthesis by IFN-gamma-primed macrophages, even at concentrations as low as 10 ng/ml. Our data also indicate the important role of glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors from GPI-mucins as the second signal responsible for induction of nitric oxide synthesis by macrophages. To further investigate the role of these parasite molecules in inducing parasiticidal function, we cultured macrophages in the presence or absence of trypomastigote GPI-mucins and/or IFN-gamma and then infected these cells with either Leishmania spp. or T. cruzi. IFN-gamma was sufficient to induce microbial activity in macrophages infected with T. cruzi trypomastigotes. In contrast, killing of different species of Leishmania was further enhanced when macrophages exposed to IFN-gamma were also costimulated with trypomastigote-derived GPI-mucins. Our results also indicate that different glycolipids obtained from Leishmania major or Leishmania donovani (i.e., lipophosphoglycans or glycoinositolphospholipids) were unable to potentiate nitric oxide synthesis and/or microbicidal activity displayed by IFN-gamma-primed macrophages.

  4. Isolation of nine gene sequences induced by silica in murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Segade, F.; Claudio, E.; Wrobel, K.; Ramos, S.; Lazo, P.S.

    1995-03-01

    Macrophage activation by silica is the initial step in the development of silicosis. To identify genes that might be involved in silica-mediated activation, RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages were treated with silica for 48 h, and a subtracted cDNA library enriched for silica-induced genes (SIG) was constructed and differently screened. Nine cDNA clones (designated SIG-12, -14, -20, -41, -61, -81, -91, and -111) were partially sequenced and compared with sequences in GenBank/EMBL databases. SIG-12, -14, and -20 corresponded to the genes for ribosomal proteins L13A, L32, and L26, respectively. SIG-61 is the mouse homologue of p21 RhoC. SIG-91 is identical to the 67-kDa high-affinity laminin receptor. Four genes were not identified and are novel. All of the mRNAs corresponding to the nine cloned cDNAs were inducible by silica. Steady-state levels of mRNAs in RAW 264.7 cells treated with various macrophage activators and inducers of signal transduction pathways were determined. A complex pattern of induction and repression was found, indicating that upon phagocytosis of silica particles, many regulatory mechanisms of genes expression are simultaneously triggered. 55 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolated from RAW 264.7 Macrophages: identification of a novel protein that contributes to the replication of serovar Typhimurium inside macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Adkins, Joshua N.; Coleman, James R.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mottaz, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Manes, Nathan P.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Wang, Haixing H.; Forbes, John; Gros, Philippe; Uzzau, Sergio; Rodland, Karin D.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-09-01

    ABSTRACT: To evade host resistance mechanisms, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM), a facultative intracellular pathogen, must alter its proteome following macrophage infection. To identify new colonization and virulence factors that mediate STM pathogenesis, we have isolated STM cells from RAW 264.7 macrophages at various time-points following infection and used a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based proteomic approach to detect the changes in STM protein abundances. Because host resistance to STM infection is strongly modulated by the expression of a functional host resistant regulator, i.e., natural resistance associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1, also called Slc11a1), we have also examined the effects of Nramp1 activity on the changes of STM protein abundances. A total of 315 STM proteins have been identified from isolated STM cells, which are largely house-keeping proteins whose abundances remain relatively constant during the time-course of infection. However, 39 STM proteins are strongly induced after infection, suggesting their involvement in modulating colonization and infection. Of the 39 induced proteins, 6 proteins are specifically modulated by Nramp1 activity, including STM3117, as well as STM3118-3119 whose time-dependent abundance changes were confirmed using Western blot analysis. Deletion of the gene encoding STM3117 resulted in a dramatic reduction in the ability of STM to colonize wild-type RAW 264.7 macrophages, demonstrating a critical involvement of STM3117 in promoting the replication of STM inside macrophages. The predicted function common for STM3117-3119 is biosynthesis and modification of the peptidoglycan layer of STM cell wall, emphasizing their important roles in the colonization of macrophages by Salmonella.

  6. M2 polarization enhances silica nanoparticle uptake by macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hoppstädter, Jessica; Seif, Michelle; Dembek, Anna; Cavelius, Christian; Huwer, Hanno; Kraegeloh, Annette; Kiemer, Alexandra K.

    2015-01-01

    While silica nanoparticles have enabled numerous industrial and medical applications, their toxicological safety requires further evaluation. Macrophages are the major cell population responsible for nanoparticle clearance in vivo. The prevailing macrophage phenotype largely depends on the local immune status of the host. Whereas M1-polarized macrophages are considered as pro-inflammatory macrophages involved in host defense, M2 macrophages exhibit anti-inflammatory and wound-healing properties, but also promote tumor growth. We employed different models of M1 and M2 polarization: granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon (IFN)-γ was used to generate primary human M1 cells and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)/interleukin (IL)-10 to differentiate M2 monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were polarized towards an M1 type by LPS/IFN-γ and towards M2 by IL-10. Uptake of fluorescent silica nanoparticles (Ø26 and 41 nm) and microparticles (Ø1.75 μm) was quantified. At the concentration used (50 μg/ml), silica nanoparticles did not influence cell viability as assessed by MTT assay. Nanoparticle uptake was enhanced in M2-polarized primary human MDM compared with M1 cells, as shown by flow cytometric and microscopic approaches. In contrast, the uptake of microparticles did not differ between M1 and M2 phenotypes. M2 polarization was also associated with increased nanoparticle uptake in the macrophage-like THP-1 cell line. In accordance, in vivo polarized M2-like primary human tumor-associated macrophages obtained from lung tumors took up more nanoparticles than M1-like alveolar macrophages isolated from the surrounding lung tissue. In summary, our data indicate that the M2 polarization of macrophages promotes nanoparticle internalization. Therefore, the phenotypical differences between macrophage subsets should be taken into consideration in future investigations on nanosafety, but

  7. A pseudopterane diterpene isolated from the octocoral Pseudopterogorgia acerosa inhibits the inflammatory response mediated by TLR-ligands and TNF-alpha in macrophages.

    PubMed

    González, Yisett; Doens, Deborah; Santamaría, Ricardo; Ramos, Marla; Restrepo, Carlos M; Barros de Arruda, Luciana; Lleonart, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, Marcelino; Fernández, Patricia L

    2013-01-01

    Several diterpenoids isolated from terrestrial and marine environments have been identified as important anti-inflammatory agents. Although considerable progress has been made in the area of anti-inflammatory treatment, the search for more effective and safer compounds is a very active field of research. In this study we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of a known pseudopterane diterpene (referred here as compound 1) isolated from the octocoral Pseudopterogorgia acerosa on the tumor necrosis factor- alpha (TNF-α) and TLRs- induced response in macrophages. Compound 1 inhibited the expression and secretion of the inflammatory mediators TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, nitric oxide (NO), interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10), ciclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) induced by LPS in primary murine macrophages. This effect was associated with the inhibition of IκBα degradation and subsequent activation of NFκB. Compound 1 also inhibited the expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, which is a hallmark of macrophage activation and consequent initiation of an adaptive immune response. The anti-inflammatory effect was not exclusive to LPS because compound 1 also inhibited the response of macrophages to TNF-α and TLR2 and TLR3 ligands. Taken together, these results indicate that compound 1 is an anti-inflammatory molecule, which modulates a variety of processes occurring in macrophage activation. PMID:24358331

  8. A Pseudopterane Diterpene Isolated From the Octocoral Pseudopterogorgia acerosa Inhibits the Inflammatory Response Mediated by TLR-Ligands and TNF-Alpha in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    González, Yisett; Doens, Deborah; Santamaría, Ricardo; Ramos, Marla; Restrepo, Carlos M.; Barros de Arruda, Luciana; Lleonart, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, Marcelino; Fernández, Patricia L.

    2013-01-01

    Several diterpenoids isolated from terrestrial and marine environments have been identified as important anti-inflammatory agents. Although considerable progress has been made in the area of anti-inflammatory treatment, the search for more effective and safer compounds is a very active field of research. In this study we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of a known pseudopterane diterpene (referred here as compound 1) isolated from the octocoral Pseudopterogorgia acerosa on the tumor necrosis factor- alpha (TNF-α) and TLRs- induced response in macrophages. Compound 1 inhibited the expression and secretion of the inflammatory mediators TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, nitric oxide (NO), interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10), ciclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) induced by LPS in primary murine macrophages. This effect was associated with the inhibition of IκBα degradation and subsequent activation of NFκB. Compound 1 also inhibited the expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, which is a hallmark of macrophage activation and consequent initiation of an adaptive immune response. The anti-inflammatory effect was not exclusive to LPS because compound 1 also inhibited the response of macrophages to TNF-α and TLR2 and TLR3 ligands. Taken together, these results indicate that compound 1 is an anti-inflammatory molecule, which modulates a variety of processes occurring in macrophage activation. PMID:24358331

  9. Immunostimulatory polysaccharide isolated from the leaves of Diospyros kaki Thumb modulate macrophage via TLR2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suel-Gie; Jung, Ji-Yun; Shin, Ji-Sun; Shin, Kwang-Soon; Cho, Chang-Won; Rhee, Young-Kyoung; Hong, Hee-Do; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the immunostimulatory effects of a polysaccharide fraction from the leaves of Diospyros kaki Thumb (PLE0) and the molecular mechanism responsible for its action in RAW 264.7 macrophages as well as in vivo effects on cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression in mice. PLE0 concentration-dependently activated the expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at the protein and mRNA levels and its promoter activity, and that these activations caused attendant increases the nitric oxide (NO) production. In addition, PLE0 increased the mRNA expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6. Molecular data revealed that PLE0 increased the transcriptional activity and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by inducing the degradation of inhibitory κBα (IκBα) and the phosphorylation of inhibitory κB kinase (IKK). Moreover, anti-toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) antibody and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)-specific siRNA significantly reduce PLE0-induced NO production in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Pretreatment with PLE0 recovered cyclophosphamide-induced reductions in thymus and spleen indices as well as neutrophil counts. Taken together, our data suggest that PLE0 up-regulates the expressions of iNOS, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 genes by activating TLR2-mediated NF-κB activations, and that these actions are responsible for its immunostimulatory effects. PMID:26093315

  10. Immunostimulatory polysaccharide isolated from the leaves of Diospyros kaki Thumb modulate macrophage via TLR2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suel-Gie; Jung, Ji-Yun; Shin, Ji-Sun; Shin, Kwang-Soon; Cho, Chang-Won; Rhee, Young-Kyoung; Hong, Hee-Do; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the immunostimulatory effects of a polysaccharide fraction from the leaves of Diospyros kaki Thumb (PLE0) and the molecular mechanism responsible for its action in RAW 264.7 macrophages as well as in vivo effects on cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression in mice. PLE0 concentration-dependently activated the expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at the protein and mRNA levels and its promoter activity, and that these activations caused attendant increases the nitric oxide (NO) production. In addition, PLE0 increased the mRNA expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6. Molecular data revealed that PLE0 increased the transcriptional activity and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by inducing the degradation of inhibitory κBα (IκBα) and the phosphorylation of inhibitory κB kinase (IKK). Moreover, anti-toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) antibody and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)-specific siRNA significantly reduce PLE0-induced NO production in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Pretreatment with PLE0 recovered cyclophosphamide-induced reductions in thymus and spleen indices as well as neutrophil counts. Taken together, our data suggest that PLE0 up-regulates the expressions of iNOS, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 genes by activating TLR2-mediated NF-κB activations, and that these actions are responsible for its immunostimulatory effects.

  11. Isolation, propagation, and HIV-1 infection of monocyte-derived macrophages and recovery of virus from brain and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Gorantla, Santhi; Che, Myhanh; Gendelman, Howard E

    2005-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (MP: monocytes, dendritic cells, and tissue macrophages) are host cells for the human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 and 2. MPs are both the first lines of defense and vehicles for viral dissemination in the infected human host. Viral infection of MP can affect the disease directly during interstitial pneumonitis and HIV encephalitis. Both revolve around MP secretions of immune regulatory and neurotoxic factors. Clearly, laboratory models that mimic disease need to include primary human MP infected with viral isolates obtained from diseased tissues. Over the past two decades our laboratory has developed state-of-the-art methods for isolation and propagation of monocytes from peripheral blood. This technology directly supports work at the University of Nebraska Medical Center as well as research performed throughout the United States, including the laboratories of Drs. Mario Stevenson, William Tyor, David Volsky, Loyda Melendez, and Mary-Jane Potash, among others. The importance of these cells as targets for virus and reservoirs of persistent infection are discussed.

  12. Rare lung diseases II: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen C; Hwang, David; Waddell, Thomas K; Downey, Gregory P

    2008-01-01

    The present article is the second in a series on rare lung diseases. It focuses on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disorder in which lipoproteinaceous material accumulates in the alveolar space. PAP was first described in 1958, and for many years the nature of the material accumulating in the lungs was unknown. Major insights into PAP have been made in the past decade, and these have led to the notion that PAP is an autoimmume disorder in which autoantibodies interfere with signalling through the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, leading to macrophage and neutrophil dysfunction. This has spurred new therapeutic approaches to this disorder. The discussion of PAP will begin with a case report, then will highlight the classification of PAP and review recent insights into the pathogenesis of PAP. The approach to therapy and the prognosis of PAP will also be discussed. PMID:18551202

  13. Characterization of clinical and environmental Mycobacterium avium spp. isolates and their interaction with human macrophages

    EPA Science Inventory

    Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are naturally occurring bacteria in the environment. A link has been suggested between M. avium strains in drinking water and clinical isolates from infected individuals. There is a need to develop new screening methodologies tha...

  14. [Macrophages in asthma].

    PubMed

    Medina Avalos, M A; Orea Solano, M

    1997-01-01

    Every time they exist more demonstrations of the paper than performs the line monocytes-macrophage in the patogenesis of the bronchial asthma. The mononuclear phagocytes cells, as the alveolar macrophages, also they can be activated during allergic methods. The monocytes macrophages are possible efficient inductors of the inflammation; this due to the fact that they can secrete inflammatory mediators, between those which are counted the pre-forming granules of peptides, metabolites of oxidation activation, activator of platelets activator and metabolites of the arachidonic acid. The identification of IL-1 in the liquidate of the bronchial ablution of sick asthmatic, as well as the identification of IL-1 in the I bronchioalveolar washing of places of allergens cutaneous prick, supports the activation concept mononuclear of phagocytic cells in allergic sufferings. PMID:9432275

  15. Inhibitory effects of the flavonoids isolated from Waltheria indica on the production of NO, TNF-alpha and IL-12 in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yerra Koteswara; Fang, Shih-Hua; Tzeng, Yew-Min

    2005-05-01

    Three flavonoids were isolated from the whole plants of Waltheria indica and biological properties investigated. On the basis of their spectroscopic data, these compounds were identified as (-)-epicatechin, quercetin, and tiliroside. These flavonoids significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the production of the inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO), and the cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-12), in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon (IFN)-gamma activated murine peritoneal macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity. The order of inhibitory activity was quercetin>tiliroside>(-)-epicatechin. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages were pre-activated with LPS/IFN-gamma for 24 h, and the inhibitory effects of the above mentioned isolates on the production of NO were determined after a further 24 h, to address the possible mechanisms of their action. The present study supports the use of W. indica for the treatment of inflammatory diseases in traditional medicine.

  16. Hereditary Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takuji; Sakagami, Takuro; Young, Lisa R.; Carey, Brenna C.; Wood, Robert E.; Luisetti, Maurizio; Wert, Susan E.; Rubin, Bruce K.; Kevill, Katharine; Chalk, Claudia; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Stevens, Carrie; Nogee, Lawrence M.; Campo, Ilaria; Trapnell, Bruce C.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: We identified a 6-year-old girl with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), impaired granulocyte-macrophage colony–stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor function, and increased GM-CSF. Objectives: Increased serum GM-CSF may be useful to identify individuals with PAP caused by GM-CSF receptor dysfunction. Methods: We screened 187 patients referred to us for measurement of GM-CSF autoantibodies to diagnose autoimmune PAP. Five were children with PAP and increased serum GM-CSF but without GM-CSF autoantibodies or any disease causing secondary PAP; all were studied with family members, subsequently identified patients, and controls. Measurement and Main Results: Eight children (seven female, one male) were identified with PAP caused by recessive CSF2RA mutations. Six presented with progressive dyspnea of insidious onset at 4.8 ± 1.6 years and two were asymptomatic at ages 5 and 8 years. Radiologic and histopathologic manifestations were similar to those of autoimmune PAP. Molecular analysis demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling was absent in six and severely reduced in two patients. The GM-CSF receptor β chain was detected in all patients, whereas the α chain was absent in six and abnormal in two, paralleling the GM-CSF signaling defects. Genetic analysis revealed multiple distinct CSF2RA abnormalities, including missense, duplication, frameshift, and nonsense mutations; exon and gene deletion; and cryptic alternative splicing. All symptomatic patients responded well to whole-lung lavage therapy. Conclusions: CSF2RA mutations cause a genetic form of PAP presenting as insidious, progressive dyspnea in children that can be diagnosed by a combination of characteristic radiologic findings and blood tests and treated successfully by whole-lung lavage. PMID:20622029

  17. Proteomic analyses of monocyte-derived macrophages infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 primary isolates from Hispanic women with and without cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Nieves, DM; Rodriguez, Y; Plaud, M; Ciborowski, P; Duan, F; Laspiur, J Pérez; Wojna, V; Meléndez, LM

    2009-01-01

    The signature for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neurovirulence remains a subject of intense debate. Macrophage viral tropism is one prerequisite but others, including virus-induced alterations in innate and adaptive immunity, remain under investigation. HIV-1–infected mononuclear phagocytes (MPs; perivascular macrophages and microglia) secrete toxins that affect neurons. The authors hypothesize that neurovirulent HIV-1 variants affect the MP proteome by inducing a signature of neurotoxic proteins and thus affect cognitive function. To test this hypothesis, HIV-1 isolates obtained from peripheral blood of women with normal cognition (NC) were compared to isolates obtained from women with cognitive impairment (CI) and to the laboratory adapted SF162, a spinal fluid R5 isolate from a patient with HIV-1–associated dementia. HIV-1 isolates were used to infect monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and infection monitored by secreted HIV-1 p24 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell lysates of uninfected and HIV-1–infected MDMs at 14 days post infection were fractionated by cationic exchange chromatography and analyzed by surface enhanced laser desorption ionization time of flight (SELDI-TOF) using generalized estimating equations statistics. Proteins were separated by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (1D SDS-PAGE) and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Levels of viral replication were similar amongst the HIV-1 isolates, although higher levels were obtained from one viral strain obtained from a patient with CI. Significant differences were found in protein profiles between virus-infected MDMs with NC, CI, and SF162 isolates (adjusted P value after multiple testing corrections, or q value < .10). The authors identified 6 unique proteins in NC, 7 in SF162, and 20 in CI. Three proteins were common to SF162 and CI strains. The MDM proteins linked to infection with CI strains were related to apoptosis

  18. Deletion of scavenger receptor A gene in mice resulted in protection from septic shock and modulation of TLR4 signaling in isolated peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Robert; Cauvi, David M; Hawisher, Dennis; Song, Donghuan; Niño, Diego F; Coimbra, Raul; Bickler, Stephen; De Maio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptor A (Sra), also known as macrophage scavenger receptor 1 (Msr1), is a surface glycoprotein preferentially present in macrophages that plays a primary role in innate immunity. Previous studies have shown that Sra is a modifier gene for the response to bacterial LPS in mice at the level of IL-10 production, in particular. In the present study, we found that Sra(−/−) mice are more resistant to septic shock induced by cecal ligation and puncture than wild-type C57BL/6 J (B6) mice. In addition, Sra(−/−) mice displayed initial elevated high density lipoprotein (HDL) circulating levels. Naïve peritoneal macrophages (PMϕs) were isolated from Sra(−/−) mice to understand the possible protective mechanism. Incubation of these cells with LPS was found to modulate TLR4 signaling, leading to a reduction in IL-10 and IL-6 mRNA levels, but not TNF-α expression, at low concentrations of LPS in comparison with PMϕs isolated from B6 mice. No differences were found in LPS binding between PMϕs derived from Sra(−/−) or B6 mice. The lack of Sra binding to LPS was confirmed after transfection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with the Sra gene. The contribution of Sra to the outcome of sepsis may be a combination of changes in TLR4 signaling pathway and elevated levels of HDL in circulation, but also LPS toxicity. PMID:22751446

  19. Bmp2 and Bmp4 accelerate alveolar bone development.

    PubMed

    Ou, Mingming; Zhao, Yibing; Zhang, Fangming; Huang, Xiaofeng

    2015-06-01

    Alveolar bone remodeling is a continuous process that takes place during development and in response to various physiological and pathological stimuli. However, detailed knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms involved in alveolar bone development is still lacking. This study aims at improving our understanding of alveolar bone formation and the role of bone morphogenetic proteins (Bmps) in this process. Mice at embryonic (E) day 13.5 to postnatal (PN) day 15.5 were selected to observe the process of alveolar bone development. Alveolar bone development was found to be morphologically observable at E14.5. Molar teeth isolated from mice at PN7.5 were pretreated with Bmp2, Bmp4, Noggin, or BSA, and grafted subcutaneously into mice. The subcutaneously implanted tooth germs formed alveolar bone indicating the role of the dental follicle in alveolar bone development. Alveolar bone formation was increased after pretreatment with Bmp2 and Bmp4, but not with Noggin. Gene expression levels in dental follicle cells from murine molars were also determined by real-time RT-PCR. The expression levels of Runx2, Bsp, and Ocn were significantly higher in dental follicle cells cultured with Bmp2 or Bmp4, and significantly lower in those cultured with Noggin when compared with that of the BSA controls. Our results suggest that the dental follicle participates in alveolar bone formation and Bmp2/4 appears to accelerate alveolar bone development.

  20. Immune Enhancing Activity of β-(1,3)-Glucan Isolated from Genus Agrobacterium in Bone-Marrow Derived Macrophages and Mice Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Jang, Beom-Su; Byun, Eui-Hong; Sung, Nak-Yun

    2016-01-01

    An effective method for activating macrophages and deriving a Th1 immune response could be used to improve the defenses of hosts. In this study, we investigated the immunomodulation effect and the related signaling mechanism of [Formula: see text]-(1,3)-glucan, isolated from the Agrobacterium species. Here, we found that [Formula: see text]-(1,3)-glucan predominantly induced the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[Formula: see text], interleukin (IL)-1[Formula: see text], IL-6, IL-12p70, and nitric oxide, which was dependent on mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-[Formula: see text]B signaling. Additionally, [Formula: see text]-(1,3)-glucan treatment significantly up-regulated the expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, and also significantly increased the expression of iNOS and Dectin-1, which is a transmembrane protein that binds [Formula: see text]-glucan and associates with macrophage activation. Importantly, the splenic T cells co-cultured with [Formula: see text]-(1,3)-glucan-treated macrophages produced the a Th1 cytokine profile that includes high levels of IFN-[Formula: see text], but not IL-4 (Th2 cytokine), indicating that [Formula: see text]-(1,3)-glucan contributes to Th1 polarization of the immune response. Taken together, our results suggest that [Formula: see text]-(1,3)-glucan isolated from Agrobacterium species can induce macrophage activation through the MAPK and NF-[Formula: see text]B signaling pathway, as well as Th1 polarization. PMID:27430908

  1. Alveolar proteinosis associated with aluminium dust inhalation.

    PubMed

    Chew, R; Nigam, S; Sivakumaran, P

    2016-08-01

    Secondary alveolar proteinosis is a rare lung disease which may be triggered by a variety of inhaled particles. The diagnosis is made by detection of anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which appears milky white and contains lamellar bodies. Aluminium has been suggested as a possible cause, but there is little evidence in the literature to support this assertion. We report the case of a 46-year-old former boilermaker and boat builder who developed secondary alveolar proteinosis following sustained heavy aluminium exposure. The presence of aluminium was confirmed both by histological examination and metallurgical analysis of a mediastinal lymph node. Despite cessation of exposure to aluminium and treatment with whole-lung lavage which normally results in improvements in both symptoms and lung function, the outcome was poor and novel therapies are now being used for this patient. It may be that the natural history in aluminium-related alveolar proteinosis is different, with the metal playing a mediating role in the disease process. Our case further supports the link between aluminium and secondary alveolar proteinosis and highlights the need for measures to prevent excessive aluminium inhalation in relevant industries. PMID:27099254

  2. Selective delivery of rifampicin incorporated into poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic) acid microspheres after phagocytotic uptake by alveolar macrophages, and the killing effect against intracellular Mycobacterium bovis Calmette-Guérin.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Aya; Matumoto, Makoto; Hshizume, Hiroyuki; Oba, Yoshiro; Tomishige, Tatuo; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Kohchi, Chie; Hino, Mami; Ito, Fuminori; Tomoda, Keishiro; Nakajima, Takehisa; Makino, Kimiko; Terada, Hiroshi; Hori, Hitoshi; Soma, Gen-Ichiro

    2006-08-01

    Macrophages and their phagocytotic abilities play a dominant role for defense against infected organisms. However, Mycobacterium tuberculosis can survive in the phagosomes of macrophages. In this study, the effective delivery of a drug and the killing effect of tubercle bacilli within macrophages were investigated utilizing the phagocytotic uptake of rifampicin (RFP) that had been incorporated into poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microspheres. The microspheres were composed of PLGA that had a monomer ratio (lactic acid/glycolic acid) of either 50/50 or 75/25. They had molecular weights from 5000 to 20,000, and diameters of 1.5, 3.5, 6.2 and 8.9 microm. The most significant factor for phagocytotic activity of macrophages was the diameter of the microspheres. By contrast, molecular weight and monomer ratio of PLGA did not influence phagocytosis. The amount of RFP delivered into cells was also investigated. RFP-PLGA microspheres composed of PLGA with a molecular weight of 20,000 and monomer ratio of 75/25 showed the highest amount of delivery (4 microg/1 x 10(6) cells). Fourteen days after infection, the survival rate of treated intracellular bacilli was 1% when compared with untreated cells. There was almost no killing effect of free RFP (4 or 15 microg/ml) on intracellular bacilli. In vivo efficacy of RFP-PLGA was also examined in rats infected with M. tuberculosis Kurono. Intratracheal administration of RFP-PLGA microspheres was shown to be superior to free RFP for killing of intracellular bacilli and preventing granuloma formation in some lobes. These results suggest that phagocytotic activity could be part of a new drug delivery system that selectively targeted macrophages.

  3. In vitro effects of pulmonary surfactant on macrophage morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Lepekha, L N; Alexandrova, E A; Erokhina, M V

    2012-02-01

    The effects of pulmonary surfactant on the morphology and functioning of young macrophages were studied on the model of monocyte/macrophage differentiation in vitro and on macrophages of the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid. Surfactant is not a differentiation inductor, but it stimulated the maturation and phagocytic activity of young macrophages. The stimulatory effect of surfactant on phagocytic activity of macrophages persisted even after its removal from the culture medium.

  4. 1,2,3,6-tetra-O-galloyl-beta-D-allopyranose gallotannin isolated, from Euphorbia jolkini, attenuates LPS-induced nitric oxide production in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Bin; Kim, Mi-Sun; Lee, Hee Sang; Lee, Seung Ho; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2010-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pleiotropic regulator, critical to numerous biological processes, including vasodilatation and macrophage-mediated immunity. Macrophages express inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and produce NO after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Gallotannins are water-soluble polyphenols with wide-ranging biological activities. Various chemical structures of gallotannins occurring in medicinal and food plants that are used worldwide showed several remarkable biological and pharmacological activities. In the present study, we examined the inhibitory effects of gallotannin 1,2,3,6-tetra-O-galloyl-beta-D-allopyranose (GT24) isolated from Euphorbia jolkini on the LPS-induced NO production and underlying mechanisms of action. GT24 dose-dependently decreased LPS-induced NO production and iNOS expression in J774A.1 macrophages. In addition, GT24 inhibited LPS-induced activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB as indicated by inhibition of degradation of I-kappaBalpha, nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB, and NF-kappaB dependent gene reporter assay. Our results suggest that GT24 possesses an inhibitory effect on the LPS-induced inflammatory reaction.

  5. Prodigiosin isolated from Hahella chejuensis suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production by inhibiting p38 MAPK, JNK and NF-kappaB activation in murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jung-Eun; Yim, Joung-Han; Lee, Hong-Kum; Moon, Eun-Yi; Rhee, Dong-Kwon; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2007-12-15

    Prodigiosin was isolated from marine bacteria Hahella chejuensis which has been recently discovered from Marado, Cheju Island, Republic of Korea. Immunosuppressive properties have been reported for prodigiosin members such as undecylprodigiosin, metacycloprodigiosin, prodigiosin and its synthetic analogue PNU156804 (PNU). However, the effect of this agent on macrophage function has not been characterized in detail. In the present study, we examined the effects of prodigiosin on the production of inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine macrophage. When thioglycollate-elicited macrophages pre-exposed to prodigiosin (1-100 ng/ml) were stimulated with LPS, pretreatment with prodigiosin resulted in the inhibition of NO production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein and mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-6 was not altered. Inhibition of iNOS protein expression appears to be at the transcriptional level, since prodigiosin decreased LPS-induced NF-kappaB activity through preventing the degradation of IkBalpha, with significant inhibition achieved following pretreatment with prodigiosin. However, prodigiosin did not exert any effect on AP-1 activity. Prodigiosin blocked phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2). These results indicate that the inhibition of these signaling molecules expression was correlated with the reduced production of NO in macrophages. Taken together, the present data suggest that prodigiosin reduces NO production and iNOS expression by inhibiting LPS-triggered p38 MAPK and JNK phosphorylation and NF-kappaB activation, thereby implicating a mechanism by which prodigiosin may exert its immunosuppressive effects.

  6. The polysaccharide isolated from Pleurotus nebrodensis (PN-S) shows immune-stimulating activity in RAW264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hai-Yan; Wang, Chang-Lu; Wang, Yu-Rong; Li, Zhen-Jing; Zhang, Ya-Nan

    2015-05-01

    A novel Pleurotus nebrodensis polysaccharide (PN-S) was purified and characterized, and its immune-stimulating activity was evaluated in RAW264.7 macrophages. PN-S induced the proliferation of RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner, as determined by the MTT assay. After exposure to PN-S, the phagocytosis of the macrophages was significantly improved, with remarkable changes in morphology being observed. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that PN-S promoted RAW264.7 cells to progress through S and G2/M phases. PN-S treatment enhanced the productions of interleukin-6 (IL-6), nitric oxide (NO), interferon gamma (INF-γ), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the macrophages, with up-regulation of mRNA expressions of interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interferon gamma(INF-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) being observed in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by qRT-PCR. In conclusion, these results suggest that the purified PN-S can improve immunity by activating macrophages.

  7. Transcriptional Response of Bovine Monocyte-Derived Macrophages after the Infection with Different Argentinean Mycobacterium bovis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Caimi, Karina; Blanco, Federico; Soria, Marcelo; Bigi, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    Infection of bovines with Mycobacterium bovis causes important financial hardship in many countries presenting also a risk for humans. M. bovis is known to be adapted to survive and thrive within the intramacrophage environment. In spite of its relevance, at present the information about macrophage expression patterns is scarce, particularly regarding the bovine host. In this study, transcriptomic analysis was used to detect genes differentially expressed in macrophages derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells at early stages of infection with two Argentinean strains of M. bovis, a virulent and an attenuated strains. The results showed that the number of differentially expressed genes in the cells infected with the virulent strain (5) was significantly lower than those in the cells infected with the attenuated strain (172). Several genes were more strongly expressed in infected macrophages. Among them, we detected encoding transcription factors, anthrax toxin receptor, cell division and apoptosis regulator, ankyrin proteins, cytoskeleton proteins, protein of cell differentiation, and regulators of endocytic traffic of membrane. Quantitative real-time PCR of a selected group of differentially expressed genes confirmed the microarrays results. Altogether, the present results contribute to understanding the mechanisms involved in the early interaction of M. bovis with the bovine macrophage. PMID:23484118

  8. An in vitro triple cell co-culture model with primary cells mimicking the human alveolar epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Andrea D; Daum, Nicole; Bur, Michael; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Gehr, Peter; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara M

    2011-04-01

    A triple cell co-culture model was recently established by the authors, consisting of either A549 or 16HBE14o- epithelial cells, human blood monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells, which offers the possibility to study the interaction of xenobiotics with those cells. The 16HBE14o- containing co-culture model mimics the airway epithelial barrier, whereas the A549 co-cultures mimic the alveolar type II-like epithelial barrier. The goal of the present work was to establish a new triple cell co-culture model composed of primary alveolar type I-like cells isolated from human lung biopsies (hAEpC) representing a more realistic alveolar epithelial barrier wall, since type I epithelial cells cover >93% of the alveolar surface. Monocultures of A549 and 16HBE14o- were morphologically and functionally compared with the hAEpC using laser scanning microscopy, as well as transmission electron microscopy, and by determining the epithelial integrity. The triple cell co-cultures were characterized using the same methods. It could be shown that the epithelial integrity of hAEpC (mean ± SD, 1180 ± 188 Ω cm(2)) was higher than in A549 (172 ± 59 Ω cm(2)) but similar to 16HBE14o- cells (1469 ± 156 Ω cm(2)). The triple cell co-culture model with hAEpC (1113 ± 30 Ω cm(2)) showed the highest integrity compared to the ones with A549 (93 ± 14 Ω cm(2)) and 16HBE14o- (558 ± 267 Ω cm(2)). The tight junction protein zonula occludens-1 in hAEpC and 16HBE14o- were more regularly expressed but not in A549. The epithelial alveolar model with hAEpC combined with two immune cells (i.e. macrophages and dendritic cells) will offer a novel and more realistic cell co-culture system to study possible cell interactions of inhaled xenobiotics and their toxic potential on the human alveolar type I epithelial wall.

  9. Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Dublin Can Lyse Macrophages by a Mechanism Distinct from Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Patricia R.; Gautier, Anne V.; Paulin, Sue M.; Bland, A. Patricia; Jones, Philip W.; Wallis, Timothy S.

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Dublin lysed primary bovine alveolar macrophages and immortalized J774.2 macrophage-like cells in the absence of either the morphological changes or DNA fragmentation characteristic of apoptosis. Macrophage lysis was dependent on a subset of caspases and an intact sipB gene. PMID:10816540

  10. TcI Isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi Exploit the Antioxidant Network for Enhanced Intracellular Survival in Macrophages and Virulence in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zago, María Paola; Hosakote, Yashoda M; Koo, Sue-Jie; Dhiman, Monisha; Piñeyro, María Dolores; Parodi-Talice, Adriana; Basombrio, Miguel A; Robello, Carlos; Garg, Nisha J

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi species is categorized into six discrete typing units (TcI to TcVI) of which TcI is most abundantly noted in the sylvatic transmission cycle and considered the major cause of human disease. In our study, the TcI strains Colombiana (COL), SylvioX10/4 (SYL), and a cultured clone (TCC) exhibited different biological behavior in a murine model, ranging from high parasitemia and symptomatic cardiomyopathy (SYL), mild parasitemia and high tissue tropism (COL), to no pathogenicity (TCC). Proteomic profiling of the insect (epimastigote) and infective (trypomastigote) forms by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry, followed by functional annotation of the differential proteome data sets (≥2-fold change, P < 0.05), showed that several proteins involved in (i) cytoskeletal assembly and remodeling, essential for flagellar wave frequency and amplitude and forward motility of the parasite, and (ii) the parasite-specific antioxidant network were enhanced in COL and SYL (versus TCC) trypomastigotes. Western blotting confirmed the enhanced protein levels of cytosolic and mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidases and their substrate (tryparedoxin) and iron superoxide dismutase in COL and SYL (versus TCC) trypomastigotes. Further, COL and SYL (but not TCC) were resistant to exogenous treatment with stable oxidants (H2O2 and peroxynitrite [ONOO(-)]) and dampened the intracellular superoxide and nitric oxide response in macrophages, and thus these isolates escaped from macrophages. Our findings suggest that protein expression conducive to increase in motility and control of macrophage-derived free radicals provides survival and persistence benefits to TcI isolates of T. cruzi. PMID:27068090

  11. Anti-inflammatory phenolics isolated from Juniperus rigida leaves and twigs in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eun Ju; Seo, Hanee; Yang, Heejung; Kim, Jinwoong; Sung, Sang Hyun; Kim, Young Choong

    2012-12-01

    Inflammation is an essential host defense system particularly in response to infection and injury; however, excessive or undesirable inflammatory responses contribute to acute and chronic human diseases. A high-throughput screening effort searching for anti-inflammatory compounds from medicinal plants deduced that the methanolic extract of Juniperus rigida S. et L. (Cupressaceae) inhibited significantly nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Activity-guided fractionation and isolation yielded 13 phenolic compounds, including one new phenylpropanoid glycosides, 3,4-dimethoxycinnamyl 9-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1). Among the isolated compounds, phenylpropanoid glycosides with p-hydroxy group (2, 4) and massoniaside A (7), (+)-catechin (10), amentoflavone (11) effectively inhibited LPS-induced NO production in RAW264.7 cells.

  12. Autophagy deficiency in macrophages enhances NLRP3 inflammasome activity and chronic lung disease following silica exposure.

    PubMed

    Jessop, Forrest; Hamilton, Raymond F; Rhoderick, Joseph F; Shaw, Pamela K; Holian, Andrij

    2016-10-15

    Autophagy is an important metabolic mechanism that can promote cellular survival following injury. The specific contribution of autophagy to silica-induced inflammation and disease is not known. The objective of these studies was to determine the effects of silica exposure on the autophagic pathway in macrophages, as well as the general contribution of autophagy in macrophages to inflammation and disease. Silica exposure enhanced autophagic activity in vitro in Bone Marrow derived Macrophages and in vivo in Alveolar Macrophages isolated from silica-exposed mice. Impairment of autophagy in myeloid cells in vivo using Atg5(fl/fl)LysM-Cre(+) mice resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity and inflammation after silica exposure compared to littermate controls, including elevated IL-18 and the alarmin HMGB1 in the whole lavage fluid. Autophagy deficiency caused some spontaneous inflammation and disease. Greater silica-induced acute inflammation in Atg5(fl/fl)LysM-Cre(+) mice correlated with increased fibrosis and chronic lung disease. These studies demonstrate a critical role for autophagy in suppressing silica-induced cytotoxicity and inflammation in disease development. Furthermore, this data highlights the importance of basal autophagy in macrophages and other myeloid cells in maintaining lung homeostasis.

  13. Autophagy deficiency in macrophages enhances NLRP3 inflammasome activity and chronic lung disease following silica exposure.

    PubMed

    Jessop, Forrest; Hamilton, Raymond F; Rhoderick, Joseph F; Shaw, Pamela K; Holian, Andrij

    2016-10-15

    Autophagy is an important metabolic mechanism that can promote cellular survival following injury. The specific contribution of autophagy to silica-induced inflammation and disease is not known. The objective of these studies was to determine the effects of silica exposure on the autophagic pathway in macrophages, as well as the general contribution of autophagy in macrophages to inflammation and disease. Silica exposure enhanced autophagic activity in vitro in Bone Marrow derived Macrophages and in vivo in Alveolar Macrophages isolated from silica-exposed mice. Impairment of autophagy in myeloid cells in vivo using Atg5(fl/fl)LysM-Cre(+) mice resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity and inflammation after silica exposure compared to littermate controls, including elevated IL-18 and the alarmin HMGB1 in the whole lavage fluid. Autophagy deficiency caused some spontaneous inflammation and disease. Greater silica-induced acute inflammation in Atg5(fl/fl)LysM-Cre(+) mice correlated with increased fibrosis and chronic lung disease. These studies demonstrate a critical role for autophagy in suppressing silica-induced cytotoxicity and inflammation in disease development. Furthermore, this data highlights the importance of basal autophagy in macrophages and other myeloid cells in maintaining lung homeostasis. PMID:27594529

  14. SP-R210 (Myo18A) Isoforms as Intrinsic Modulators of Macrophage Priming and Activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linlin; Carrillo, Marykate; Wu, Yuchieh M; DiAngelo, Susan L; Silveyra, Patricia; Umstead, Todd M; Halstead, E Scott; Davies, Michael L; Hu, Sanmei; Floros, Joanna; McCormack, Francis X; Christensen, Neil D; Chroneos, Zissis C

    2015-01-01

    The surfactant protein (SP-A) receptor SP-R210 has been shown to increase phagocytosis of SP-A-bound pathogens and to modulate cytokine secretion by immune cells. SP-A plays an important role in pulmonary immunity by enhancing opsonization and clearance of pathogens and by modulating macrophage inflammatory responses. Alternative splicing of the Myo18A gene results in two isoforms: SP-R210S and SP-R210L, with the latter predominantly expressed in alveolar macrophages. In this study we show that SP-A is required for optimal expression of SP-R210L on alveolar macrophages. Interestingly, pre-treatment with SP-A prepared by different methods either enhances or suppresses responsiveness to LPS, possibly due to differential co-isolation of SP-B or other proteins. We also report that dominant negative disruption of SP-R210L augments expression of receptors including SR-A, CD14, and CD36, and enhances macrophages' inflammatory response to TLR stimulation. Finally, because SP-A is known to modulate CD14, we used a variety of techniques to investigate how SP-R210 mediates the effect of SP-A on CD14. These studies revealed a novel physical association between SP-R210S, CD14, and SR-A leading to an enhanced response to LPS, and found that SP-R210L and SP-R210S regulate internalization of CD14 via distinct macropinocytosis-like mechanisms. Together, our findings support a model in which SP-R210 isoforms differentially regulate trafficking, expression, and activation of innate immune receptors on macrophages. PMID:25965346

  15. Effects of subchronic inhalation of low concentrations of nitrogen dioxide. 1. The proximal alveolar region of juvenile and adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.Y.; Graham, J.A.; Miller, F.J.; Ospital, J.J.; Crapo, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques were devised to isolate tissue from the epithelium of terminal airways and the alveoli proximal to the airways. One-day-old juveniles and six week old adult rats were exposed to either room air or 0.5 ppm NO/sub 2/ for 23 hrs per day seven days per week. An additional group of adult rats were exposed to 2.0 ppm NO/sub 2/ for the same duration. Two daily hour spikes to three times the background levels (0.5 to 1.5 ppm and 2.0 to 6.0 ppm) were applied Mon. through Fri. Morphometric analysis revealed that epithelial injury occurred in all exposed animals. The juvenile rats which had been exposed to 0.5 ppm NO/sub 2/ exhibited changes in the characteristics of type II epithelial cells. These cells spread to cover more alveolar surface and became thinner. Adult animals exposed to 0.5 and 2.0 ppm NO/sub 2/ showed changes in alveolar macrophages and in the alveolar interstitium in addition to changes in the epithelium.

  16. Mycobacterium Avium subsp. Paratuberculosis Isolates Induce In Vitro Granuloma Formation and Show Successful Survival Phenotype, Common Anti-Inflammatory and Antiapoptotic Responses within Ovine Macrophages Regardless of Genotype or Host of Origin

    PubMed Central

    Abendaño, Naiara; Tyukalova, Lyudmila; Barandika, Jesse F.; Balseiro, Ana; Sevilla, Iker A.; Garrido, Joseba M.; Juste, Ramon A.; Alonso-Hearn, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the early macrophage responses, including bacterial growth within macrophages, represents a powerful tool to characterize the virulence of clinical isolates of Mycobcaterium avium susbp. paratuberculosis (Map). The present study represents the first assessment of the intracellular behaviour in ovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) of Map isolates representing distinct genotypes (C, S and B), and isolated from cattle, sheep, goat, fallow deer, deer, and wild boar. Intracellular growth and survival of the selected isolates in ovine MDMs was assessed by quantification of CFUs inside of the host cells at 2 h p.i. (day 0) and 7 d p. i. using an automatic liquid culture system (Bactec MGIT 960). Variations in bacterial counts over 7 days from the baseline were small, in a range between 1.63 to 1.05-fold. After 7 d of infection, variations in the estimated log10 CFUs between all the tested isolates were not statistically significant. In addition, ovine MDMs exhibited enhanced anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic and antidestructive responses when infected with two ovine isolates of distinct genotype (C and S) or with two C-type isolates from distinct hosts (cattle and sheep); which correlated with the successful survival of these isolates within ovine MDMs. A second objective was to study, based on an in vitro granuloma model, latter stages of the infection by investigating the capacity of two Map isolates from cattle and sheep to trigger formation of microgranulomas. Upon 10 d p.i., both Map isolates were able to induce the formation of granulomas comparable to the granulomas observed in clinical specimens with respect to the cellular components involved. In summary, our results demonstrated that Map isolates from cattle, sheep, goats, deer, fallow-deer and wild boar were able not only to initiate but also to establish a successful infection in ovine macrophages regardless of genotype. PMID:25111300

  17. Mycobacterium Avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates induce in vitro granuloma formation and show successful survival phenotype, common anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic responses within ovine macrophages regardless of genotype or host of origin.

    PubMed

    Abendaño, Naiara; Tyukalova, Lyudmila; Barandika, Jesse F; Balseiro, Ana; Sevilla, Iker A; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramon A; Alonso-Hearn, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the early macrophage responses, including bacterial growth within macrophages, represents a powerful tool to characterize the virulence of clinical isolates of Mycobcaterium avium susbp. paratuberculosis (Map). The present study represents the first assessment of the intracellular behaviour in ovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) of Map isolates representing distinct genotypes (C, S and B), and isolated from cattle, sheep, goat, fallow deer, deer, and wild boar. Intracellular growth and survival of the selected isolates in ovine MDMs was assessed by quantification of CFUs inside of the host cells at 2 h p.i. (day 0) and 7 d p. i. using an automatic liquid culture system (Bactec MGIT 960). Variations in bacterial counts over 7 days from the baseline were small, in a range between 1.63 to 1.05-fold. After 7 d of infection, variations in the estimated log10 CFUs between all the tested isolates were not statistically significant. In addition, ovine MDMs exhibited enhanced anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic and antidestructive responses when infected with two ovine isolates of distinct genotype (C and S) or with two C-type isolates from distinct hosts (cattle and sheep); which correlated with the successful survival of these isolates within ovine MDMs. A second objective was to study, based on an in vitro granuloma model, latter stages of the infection by investigating the capacity of two Map isolates from cattle and sheep to trigger formation of microgranulomas. Upon 10 d p.i., both Map isolates were able to induce the formation of granulomas comparable to the granulomas observed in clinical specimens with respect to the cellular components involved. In summary, our results demonstrated that Map isolates from cattle, sheep, goats, deer, fallow-deer and wild boar were able not only to initiate but also to establish a successful infection in ovine macrophages regardless of genotype. PMID:25111300

  18. Alveolar response to experimental Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Lanken, P. N.; Minda, M.; Pietra, G. G.; Fishman, A. P.

    1980-01-01

    In order to characterize the alveolar response to Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, light and electron miscropy were used to trace the development of experimental infections with P carinii in rats treated with cortisone acetate and a low-protein diet. The first changes were found by the eighth day of treatment and consisted of the selective attachment of Pneumocystis organisms, mostly trophozoites, to alveolar Type 1 pneumocytes; the host cells were undamaged, and no inflammatory response was seen. After approximately one month of treatment, the seemingly innocuous host-parasite interaction was succeeded by focal necrosis of the Type 1 pneumocytes adjacent to organisms; hyperplasia of nearby Type 2 pneumocytes also occurred, to replace the dead Type 1 pneumocytes. Even at this stage, inflammatory reaction was conspicuously absent except for occasional alveolar macrophages in the diseased alveoli; in addition, all cells of the alveolar-capillary membrane other than Type 1 pneumocytes appeared entirely normal. Not only does the present study clarify the nature of alveolar injury caused by Pneumocystis carinii, but it also provides an experimental animal model in which selective injury of the alveolar lining cells occurs. Images Figure 5 Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 6 Figure 10 Figure 3 Figure 7 Figure 4 Figure 8 PMID:6966893

  19. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Surender; Mohapatra, Prasanta R.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare, chronic lung disease with bilateral intra-alveolar calcium and phosphate deposition throughout the lung parenchyma with predominance to lower and midzone. Although, etiology and pathogenesis of PAM is not fully understood, the mutation in SLC34A2 gene that encodes a sodium-phosphate co-transporter in alveolar type II cells resulting in the accumulation and forming of microliths rich in calcium phosphate (due to impaired clearance) are considered to be the cause of the disease. Chest radiograph and high-resolution CT of thorax are nearly pathognomonic for diagnosing PAM. HRCT demonstrates diffuse micronodules showing slight perilobular predominance resulting in calcification of interlobular septa. Patients with PAM are asymptomatic till development of hypoxemia and cor-pulmonale. No therapy has been proven to be beneficial except lung transplantation. PMID:23741096

  20. Rare Presentation of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Causing Acute Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Ryan R; Kumar, Sameer; Grossman, Ronald F; Price, Charles; Srigley, John R

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare condition characterized by dysfunctional alveolar macrophages, which ineffectively clear surfactant and typically cause mild hypoxemia. Characteristic Computed Tomography findings are septal reticulations superimposed on ground-glass opacities in a crazy paving pattern, with a clear juxtaposition between affected and unaffected parenchyma. While traditionally PAP was diagnosed via biopsy, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is usually sufficient; the fluid appears milky, and on microscopic examination there are foamy macrophages with eosinophilic granules and extracellular hyaline material that is Periodic Acid-Schiff positive. Standard therapy is whole lung lavage (WLL), although novel treatments are under development. The case presented is a 55-year-old woman with six months of progressive dyspnea, who developed hypoxemic respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation; she had typical findings of PAP on imaging and BAL. WLL was ultimately successful in restoring adequate oxygenation. Respiratory failure of this magnitude is a rare finding in PAP. PMID:27445536

  1. [Interaction of a mixture of epimastigotes and tripomastigotes from a culture of a Mexican isolate of Trypanosoma cruzi with mouse macrophages].

    PubMed

    Monteon, V M; Nekrassov, V; Zepeda, A; Aranda, A; Reyes, P A

    1992-01-01

    Chagas disease, a cause of important morbo-lethality in Latinamerica, is produced by a protozoan which has a circulating and tissular phase the Trypanosoma cruzi. Adhesion between T. cruzi and phagocytes is the first step in cellular parasitism, which has a central role in pathogenesis. Although there are studies on parasite phagocyte interaction with some strains of T. cruzi, and it is known that biological variation does exist. We now report the first studies with a mexican isolate using a mix of different phases of T. cruzi obtained from acellular culture resembling the natural conditions. Murine macrophages adheres to epimastigotes, transitional trypomastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes since the first minutes of observation, progression on cell-cell interaction was demonstrated, there were no differences among parasite faces however, in some cases there was a failed adhesion, this suggest a possible parasite evasion mechanism. These studies limited only to morphologic aspects the adhesion phenomena, should be pursued. PMID:1345303

  2. Importance of sulfate groups for the macrophage-stimulating activities of ascophyllan isolated from the brown alga Ascophyllum nodosum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zedong; Ueno, Mikinori; Nishiguchi, Tomoki; Abu, Ryogo; Isaka, Shogo; Okimura, Takasi; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2013-10-18

    To investigate the role of sulfate groups on the macrophage-stimulating activities of ascophyllan, we prepared desulfated ascophyllan, and its effects on RAW264.7 cells were compared with native ascophyllan. The chemical structural analysis revealed that nearly 21% of sulfate groups of ascophyllan were removed by desulfation reaction, while no significant changes in the molecular mass and monosaccharide composition occurred after desulfation. NO- and cytokine- (TNF-α and G-CSF) inducing activities of the desulfated ascophyllan on RAW264.7 cells were significantly decreased as compared to native ascophyllan. Furthermore, the activity of desulfated ascophyllan to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation from RAW264.7 cells decreased to almost negligible level. Our results suggest that the level of sulfate groups of ascophyllan is an important structural element responsible for the macrophage-stimulating activities. Probably, even the limited removal of sulfate residues sensitive to desulfation reaction may result in significant decrease in the bioactivities of ascophyllan. PMID:24025707

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Effects and Mechanisms of Action of Coussaric and Betulinic Acids Isolated from Diospyros kaki in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Su; Lee, Dong-Sung; Kim, Dong-Cheol; Yoon, Chi-Su; Ko, Wonmin; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Youn-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Diospyros kaki Thunb. is widely distributed in East Asian countries, its leaves being mainly used for making tea. In this study, coussaric acid (CA) and betulinic acid (BA), both triterpenoid compounds, were obtained from D. kaki leaf extracts through bioassay-guided isolation. CA and BA showed anti-inflammatory effects via inhibition of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway, providing important information on their anti-inflammatory mechanism. Furthermore, they markedly inhibited nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages, and suppressed tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels. Furthermore, they decreased protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2. Pre-treatment with CA and BA inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB. We further examined the effects of CA and BA on heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages: BA induced HO-1 protein expression in a dose-dependent manner, while CA had no effect. We also investigated whether BA treatment induced nuclear translocation of Nrf2. BA inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB-binding activity, as well as pro-inflammatory mediator and cytokine production (e.g., NO, PGE₂, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6), by partial reversal of this effect by SnPP, an inhibitor of HO-1. These findings further elucidate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of CA and BA isolated from D. kaki. PMID:27618005

  4. IL-4 induction in RSV-infected macrophages: examining the role of NFAT family members

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the leading cause of respiratory illness in infants, causing severe bronchiolitis and pneumonia. In the lung, alveolar macrophages are important antigen presenting cells responsible for pathogen clearance, antigen presentation and cytokine production. The effec...

  5. Effects of cigarette smoke on Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) macrophages.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, H J; Lea, S; Hughes, D; Khalaf, R; Abbott-Banner, K; Singh, D

    2014-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by an abnormal innate immune response. We have investigated the changes in the innate immune response of COPD alveolar macrophages exposed to both cigarette smoke and Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation. COPD and control alveolar macrophages were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) followed by TLR-2, -4 and -5 ligands [Pam3CSK4, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and phase I flagellin (FliC), respectively] or non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). CSE exposure suppressed TLR-induced tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) production in both COPD and control alveolar macrophages, but had no effect on interleukin 8 (CXCL8) production. Similarly, CSE suppressed NTHi-induced TNF-α but not NTHi-induced CXCL8 production in COPD alveolar macrophages. Gene expression analysis showed that CSE suppressed LPS-induced TNF-α transcription but not CXCL8 transcription in COPD alveolar macrophages. The dampening effect of CSE on LPS-induced cytokine production was associated with a reduction in p38, extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and p65 activation. In conclusion, CSE caused a reduced innate immune response in COPD alveolar macrophages, with the exception of persistent CXCL8 production. This could be a mechanism by which alveolar macrophages promote neutrophil chemotaxis under conditions of oxidative stress and bacterial exposure.

  6. Macrophage alteration induced by inflammatory toxins isolated from Tityus discrepans scorpion venom. The role of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Bello, Vanesa; Sevcik, Carlos; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; D'Suze, Gina

    2014-05-01

    We study the effect of all Tityus discrepans venom components on macrophage alterations. Only seven toxins called "Inflammatory Toxin" (InfTx1-7) induced cell changes. Incubation with InfTx1 through InfTx5 rose macrophage NO level at 2 h toxin exposure. Cells rose NO release by 4 h exposure with InfTx2 and InfTx5, the NO levels reached concentrations similar or higher than the induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) incubation. InfTx2, -6 and -7 increased cell TNF-α release. InfTx2 as LPS roses cell TNF-α secretion gradually in time. Macrophages were loaded with fluorescent dyes, exposed to all toxins and observed with a 3D wide field deconvolution setup. Cells exposed to whole venom or InfTx4 through InfTx7 developed pseudopodia, cytoplasm prolongations, blebs, and loss their rounded form. The molecular masses and N-terminal sequences of InfTx4 through InfTx7 were analyzed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and Edman degradation. InfTx4-7 induced a remarkable increase of intracellular Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i), measured as a rise of normalized cell green fluorescence intensity (FI) ×2.7, ×2.6, ×95 and ×2.9 the controls, respectively. InfTx6-7 action mechanisms were studied under different conditions. Results suggested that InfTx6 interact with a membrane sodium channel inducing cell depolarization with a consequent increase on intracellular [Na(+)], this would activate Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger 3 (NCX) in the reverse mode and the phospholipase C inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (PLC-IP3) signaling pathway inducing [Ca(2+)]i overload. Inftx7 should activate the NCX in reverse mode and/or should activate the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, increasing intracellular [Na(+)] which indirectly induce the activation of NCX3rv and the PLC-IP3 signaling pathway. All these mechanisms would cooperate with the [Ca(2+)]i overload. A rise of [Ca(2+)]i activates the synthesis and secretion of inflammatory molecules like TNF-α, which in turn, increases the gene transcription for inducible nitric

  7. Pulmonary and thoracic macrophage subpopulations and clearance of particles from the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, B E

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary macrophages consist of several subpopulations that can be defined by their anatomical locations as well as by other criteria. In addition to the well-known alveolar macrophages that reside on the alveolar surface, pulmonary macrophages also occur in the conducting airways, in various pulmonary interstitial regions, and, in some mammalian species, in the lung's intravascular compartment. Other thoracic macrophages of relevance to pulmonary defense and some lung disease processes are the pleural macrophages resident in the pleural space and macrophages present in regional lymph nodes that receive lymphatic drainage from the lung. Of the above subpopulations of pulmonary and thoracic macrophages, the alveolar macrophages have received the most experimental attention in the context of the pulmonary clearance and retention of deposited particles. Accordingly, less information is currently available regarding the roles other pulmonary and thoracic populations of macrophages may play in the removal of particles from the lower respiratory tract and associated tissue compartments. This report provides an overview of the various subpopulations of pulmonary and thoracic macrophages, as defined by their anatomical locations. The known and postulated roles of macrophages in the pulmonary clearance and retention of particles are reviewed, with particular emphasis on macrophage-associated processes involved in the pulmonary clearance of relatively insoluble particles. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 14. FIGURE 15. FIGURE 16. FIGURE 17. FIGURE 18. FIGURE 19. A FIGURE 19. B FIGURE 21. FIGURE 22. PMID:1396454

  8. Isolation and culture of endothelial cells, pericytes and perivascular resident macrophage-like melanocytes from the young mouse ear

    PubMed Central

    Neng, Lingling; Zhang, Wenjing; Hassan, Ahmed; Zemla, Marcin; Kachelmeier, Allan; Fridberger, Anders; Auer, Manfred; Shi, Xiaorui

    2013-01-01

    This protocol describes a growth medium–based approach for obtaining cochlear endothelial cells (ECs), pericytes (PCs) and perivascular resident macrophage-like melanocytes (PVM/Ms) from the stria vascularis of mice aged between P10 and P15 (P, postnatal day). The procedure does not involve mechanical or enzymatic digestion of the sample tissue. Explants of stria vascularis, ‘mini-chips’, are selectively cultured in growth medium, and primary cell lines are obtained in 7–10 d. The method is simple and reliable, and it provides high-quality ECs, PVM/Ms and PCs with a purity >90% after two passages. This protocol is suitable for producing primary culture cells from organs and tissues of small volume and high anatomical complexity, such as the inner ear capillaries. The highly purified primary cell lines enable cell culture–based in vitro modeling of cell-cell interactions, barrier control function and drug action. PMID:23493068

  9. Acute Stress Reduces Wound-Induced Activation of Microbicidal Potential of Ex Vivo Isolated Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Miho; Stemmer, Andreas; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychological stress delays wound healing but the precise underlying mechanisms are unclear. Macrophages play an important role in wound healing, in particular by killing microbes. We hypothesized that (a) acute psychological stress reduces wound-induced activation of microbicidal potential of human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM), and (b) that these reductions are modulated by stress hormone release. Methods Fourty-one healthy men (mean age 35±13 years) were randomly assigned to either a stress or stress-control group. While the stress group underwent a standardized short-term psychological stress task after catheter-induced wound infliction, stress-controls did not. Catheter insertion was controlled. Assessing the microbicidal potential, we investigated PMA-activated superoxide anion production by HMDM immediately before and 1, 10 and 60 min after stress/rest. Moreover, plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine and salivary cortisol were repeatedly measured. In subsequent in vitro studies, whole blood was incubated with norepinephrine in the presence or absence of phentolamine (norepinephrine blocker) before assessing HMDM microbicidal potential. Results Compared with stress-controls, HMDM of the stressed subjects displayed decreased superoxide anion-responses after stress (p’s <.05). Higher plasma norepinephrine levels statistically mediated lower amounts of superoxide anion-responses (indirect effect 95% CI: 4.14–44.72). Norepinephrine-treated HMDM showed reduced superoxide anion-production (p<.001). This effect was blocked by prior incubation with phentolamine. Conclusions Our results suggest that acute psychological stress reduces wound-induced activation of microbicidal potential of HMDM and that this reduction is mediated by norepinephrine. This might have implications for stress-induced impairment in wound healing. PMID:23431364

  10. Macrophage functions measured by magnetic microparticles in vivo and in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Winfried; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Kohlhäufl, Martin; Häussinger, Karl; Heyder, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Monodisperse ferrimagnetic iron-oxide particles of 1.4 μm geometric diameter were used to study alveolar macrophage functions (phagocytosis, phagosome transport) and cytoskeletal integrity in healthy subjects and in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as well as in cultured macrophages. Dysfunctions in phagocytosis, in phagosome transport and cytoskeletal integrity correlated with an impaired alveolar clearance and could be induced in vitro by cytoskeletal drugs.

  11. SP-R210 (Myo18A) Isoforms as Intrinsic Modulators of Macrophage Priming and Activation

    PubMed Central

    DiAngelo, Susan L.; Silveyra, Patricia; Umstead, Todd M.; Halstead, E. Scott; Davies, Michael L.; Hu, Sanmei; Floros, Joanna; McCormack, Francis X.; Christensen, Neil D.; Chroneos, Zissis C.

    2015-01-01

    The surfactant protein (SP-A) receptor SP-R210 has been shown to increase phagocytosis of SP-A-bound pathogens and to modulate cytokine secretion by immune cells. SP-A plays an important role in pulmonary immunity by enhancing opsonization and clearance of pathogens and by modulating macrophage inflammatory responses. Alternative splicing of the Myo18A gene results in two isoforms: SP-R210S and SP-R210L, with the latter predominantly expressed in alveolar macrophages. In this study we show that SP-A is required for optimal expression of SP-R210L on alveolar macrophages. Interestingly, pre-treatment with SP-A prepared by different methods either enhances or suppresses responsiveness to LPS, possibly due to differential co-isolation of SP-B or other proteins. We also report that dominant negative disruption of SP-R210L augments expression of receptors including SR-A, CD14, and CD36, and enhances macrophages’ inflammatory response to TLR stimulation. Finally, because SP-A is known to modulate CD14, we used a variety of techniques to investigate how SP-R210 mediates the effect of SP-A on CD14. These studies revealed a novel physical association between SP-R210S, CD14, and SR-A leading to an enhanced response to LPS, and found that SP-R210L and SP-R210S regulate internalization of CD14 via distinct macropinocytosis-like mechanisms. Together, our findings support a model in which SP-R210 isoforms differentially regulate trafficking, expression, and activation of innate immune receptors on macrophages. PMID:25965346

  12. Lysosomal Disorders Drive Susceptibility to Tuberculosis by Compromising Macrophage Migration

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Russell D.; Levitte, Steven; O’Sullivan, Mary P.; O’Leary, Seónadh M.; Cambier, C.J.; Cameron, James; Takaki, Kevin K.; Moens, Cecilia B.; Tobin, David M.; Keane, Joseph; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2016-01-01

    Summary A zebrafish genetic screen for determinants of susceptibility to Mycobacterium marinum identified a hypersusceptible mutant deficient in lysosomal cysteine cathepsins that manifests hallmarks of human lysosomal storage diseases. Under homeostatic conditions, mutant macrophages accumulate undigested lysosomal material, which disrupts endocytic recycling and impairs their migration to, and thus engulfment of, dying cells. This causes a buildup of unengulfed cell debris. During mycobacterial infection, macrophages with lysosomal storage cannot migrate toward infected macrophages undergoing apoptosis in the tuberculous granuloma. The unengulfed apoptotic macrophages undergo secondary necrosis, causing granuloma breakdown and increased mycobacterial growth. Macrophage lysosomal storage similarly impairs migration to newly infecting mycobacteria. This phenotype is recapitulated in human smokers, who are at increased risk for tuberculosis. A majority of their alveolar macrophages exhibit lysosomal accumulations of tobacco smoke particulates and do not migrate to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The incapacitation of highly microbicidal first-responding macrophages may contribute to smokers’ susceptibility to tuberculosis. PMID:27015311

  13. Moracin C, A Phenolic Compound Isolated from Artocarpus heterophyllus, Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide-Activated Inflammatory Responses in Murine Raw264.7 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xue; Wu, Dang; Dong, Ningning; Ouyang, Ping; Pu, Jiaqian; Hu, Qian; Wang, Jingyuan; Lu, Weiqiang; Huang, Jin

    2016-07-25

    Artocarpus heterophyllus, a popular tropical fruit commonly known as the jackfruit tree, is normally planted in subtropical or tropical areas. Since a variety of phytochemicals isolated from A. heterophyllus have been found to possess potently anti-inflammatory, antiviral and antimalarial activities, researchers have devoted much interest to its potential pharmaceutical value. However, the exact mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory activity is not well characterized. In this study, seven natural products isolated from A. heterophyllus, including 25-Hydroxycycloart-23-en-3-one (HY), Artocarpin (AR), Dadahol A (DA), Morachalcone A (MA), Artoheterophyllin B (AB), Cycloheterophyllin (CY) and Moracin C (MC) were collected. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated inflammatory response in RAW264.7 macrophages were used in this study. Among these compounds, MC significantly inhibited LPS-activated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) release without marked cytotoxicity. Furthermore, MC effectively reduced LPS stimulated up-regulation of mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and serval pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)). Mechanistic studies revealed that the anti-inflammatory effect of MC was associated with the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (including p38, ERK and JNK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways, especially reducing the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit as revealed by nuclear separation experiment and confocal microscopy.

  14. In vivo bronchoalveolar macrophage defense against Rhizopus oryzae and Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Waldorf, A R; Levitz, S M; Diamond, R D

    1984-11-01

    The ability of bronchoalveolar macrophages from normal, diabetic, and cortisone-treated mice to inhibit spore germination and kill fungal spores in vivo was investigated. The data indicated that the normal host controls different fungal infections in the lungs by different mechanisms. Prevention of mucormycosis required inhibition of fungal spore germination by alveolar macrophages. In contrast, pulmonary defense against aspergillosis depended on early killing of conidia by alveolar macrophages and not on inhibition of germination by bronchoalveolar macrophages. Bronchoalveolar macrophages in diabetic and cortisone-treated animals allowed fungal spore germination, thereby permitting infection by Rhizopus oryzae. In the cortisone-treated mouse, bronchoalveolar macrophages did not kill fungal conidia and progressive infection by Aspergillus fumigatus occurred. Fungicidal activity of bronchoalveolar macrophages was measured with a new in vivo killing assay.

  15. Alveolar development and disease.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-07-01

    Gas exchange after birth is entirely dependent on the remarkable architecture of the alveolus, its formation and function being mediated by the interactions of numerous cell types whose precise positions and activities are controlled by a diversity of signaling and transcriptional networks. In the later stages of gestation, alveolar epithelial cells lining the peripheral lung saccules produce increasing amounts of surfactant lipids and proteins that are secreted into the airspaces at birth. The lack of lung maturation and the associated lack of pulmonary surfactant in preterm infants causes respiratory distress syndrome, a common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. At the time of birth, surfactant homeostasis begins to be established by balanced processes involved in surfactant production, storage, secretion, recycling, and catabolism. Insights from physiology and engineering made in the 20th century enabled survival of newborn infants requiring mechanical ventilation for the first time. Thereafter, advances in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology led to an understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system that made possible exogenous surfactant replacement for the treatment of preterm infants. Identification of surfactant proteins, cloning of the genes encoding them, and elucidation of their roles in the regulation of surfactant synthesis, structure, and function have provided increasing understanding of alveolar homeostasis in health and disease. This Perspective seeks to consider developmental aspects of the pulmonary surfactant system and its importance in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung diseases related to alveolar homeostasis.

  16. The Salmonella virulence plasmid enhances Salmonella-induced lysis of macrophages and influences inflammatory responses.

    PubMed Central

    Guilloteau, L A; Wallis, T S; Gautier, A V; MacIntyre, S; Platt, D J; Lax, A J

    1996-01-01

    The Salmonella dublin virulence plasmid mediates systemic infection in mice and cattle. Here, we analyze the interaction between wild-type and plasmid-cured Salmonella strains with phagocytes in vitro and in vivo. The intracellular recovery of S. dublin from murine peritoneal and bovine alveolar macrophages cultured in the presence of gentamicin in vitro was not related to virulence plasmid carriage. However, the virulence plasmid increased the lytic activity of S. dublin, Salmonella typhimurium, and Salmonella choleraesuis for resident or activated mouse peritoneal macrophages. Lysis was not mediated by spv genes and was abolished by cytochalasin D treatment. Peritoneal and splenic macrophages were isolated from mice 4 days after intraperitoneal infection with wild-type or plasmid-cured S. dublin strains. The wild-type strain was recovered in significantly higher numbers than the plasmid-cured strain. However, the intracellular killing rates of such cells cultured in vitro for both S. dublin strains were not significantly different. Four days after infection, there was a lower increase of phagocyte numbers in the peritoneal cavities and spleens of mice infected with the wild-type strain compared with the plasmid-cured strain. The virulence plasmid influenced the survival of macrophages in vitro following infection in vivo as assessed by microscopy. Cells from mice infected with the plasmid-cured strain survived better than those from mice infected with the wild-type strain. This is the first report demonstrating an effect of the virulence plasmid on the interaction of Salmonella strains with macrophages. Plasmid-mediated macrophage dysfunction could influence the recruitment and/or the activation of phagocytic cells and consequently the net growth of Salmonella strains during infection. PMID:8757880

  17. DIFFERENTIAL GENE EXPRESSION BY CHAPEL HILL FINE PARTICLES IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pollutant particles (PM) induce systemic and lung inflammation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) are one of the lung cells directly exposed to PM that may initiate these responses. In this study, we determined the gene expression profile induced by Chapel Hill fine particles (PM2.5) in ...

  18. MITOCHONDRIAL OXIDANT PRODUCTION BY POLLUTANT DUST AND NO-MEDIATED APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) is a pollutant dust that stimulates production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from mitochondria and apoptosis in alveolar macrophages (AM), but the relationship between these two processes is unclear. In this study, human AM were incubated with RO...

  19. Diesel and biodiesel exhaust particle effects on rat alveolar machrophages with in vitro exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted in vitro exposures of Wistar rat alveolar macrophages (AM) to compare and contrast the toxicity of particulate matter (PM) produced in combustion of biodiesel blend (B20) and petroleum diesel (PDEP). The PM contain detectable levels of transition metals and ions howe...

  20. Fine ambient particles induce oxidative stress and metal binding genes in human alveolar machrophages

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to ambient pollutant particles (APP) increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. The alveolar macrophages (AMs) are one cell type in the lung directly exposed to APP. Upon contact with APP, AMs are activated and produce reactive oxygen species, but the scope ofthis ox...

  1. Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kevan; Dell, Sharon; Birken, Catherine; Al-Saleh, Suhail

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is often asymptomatic despite significant changes in chest imaging. Diagnosis is often made when patients become symptomatic in adulthood. There are still no proven treatments, but earlier diagnosis may allow for evaluation of preventative strategies that could improve outcome. It is an important diagnosis to consider in children who have marked radiographic findings with no or very mild symptoms or physical findings. Diagnosis can be made with imaging alone but may necessitate lung biopsy for definitive diagnosis. PMID:27445543

  2. Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, fatal developmental lung disorder of neonates and infants. This review aims to address recent findings in the etiology and genetics of ACD/MPV and to raise awareness of this poorly known disease, which may also present as milder, unclassified forms. Successively discussed are what is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnostic indicators and approaches, genetic testing, treatment, and cases of delayed onset. The review concludes with suggestions for future directions to answer the many unknowns about this disorder. PMID:21471096

  3. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Ananthaneni, Anuradha; Kuberappa, Puneeth Horatti; Srinivas, G Vijay; Kiresur, Mohammad Asif

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a malignant neoplasm of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common soft tissue sarcoma seen in childhood and adolescence. The most frequent site is the head and neck accounting for 40% of all cases and other involved sites are genitourinary tract, retroperitoneum, and to a lesser extent, the extremities. RMS is relatively uncommon in the oral cavity and the involvement of the jaws is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of 50-year-old female with oral RMS involving maxillary alveolar region with clinical, radiological, histopathological and immunohistochemical findings. PMID:27194887

  4. Moracin C, A Phenolic Compound Isolated from Artocarpus heterophyllus, Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide-Activated Inflammatory Responses in Murine Raw264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xue; Wu, Dang; Dong, Ningning; Ouyang, Ping; Pu, Jiaqian; Hu, Qian; Wang, Jingyuan; Lu, Weiqiang; Huang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Artocarpus heterophyllus, a popular tropical fruit commonly known as the jackfruit tree, is normally planted in subtropical or tropical areas. Since a variety of phytochemicals isolated from A. heterophyllus have been found to possess potently anti-inflammatory, antiviral and antimalarial activities, researchers have devoted much interest to its potential pharmaceutical value. However, the exact mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory activity is not well characterized. In this study, seven natural products isolated from A. heterophyllus, including 25-Hydroxycycloart-23-en-3-one (HY), Artocarpin (AR), Dadahol A (DA), Morachalcone A (MA), Artoheterophyllin B (AB), Cycloheterophyllin (CY) and Moracin C (MC) were collected. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated inflammatory response in RAW264.7 macrophages were used in this study. Among these compounds, MC significantly inhibited LPS-activated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) release without marked cytotoxicity. Furthermore, MC effectively reduced LPS stimulated up-regulation of mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and serval pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)). Mechanistic studies revealed that the anti-inflammatory effect of MC was associated with the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (including p38, ERK and JNK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways, especially reducing the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit as revealed by nuclear separation experiment and confocal microscopy. PMID:27463712

  5. Moracin C, A Phenolic Compound Isolated from Artocarpus heterophyllus, Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide-Activated Inflammatory Responses in Murine Raw264.7 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xue; Wu, Dang; Dong, Ningning; Ouyang, Ping; Pu, Jiaqian; Hu, Qian; Wang, Jingyuan; Lu, Weiqiang; Huang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Artocarpus heterophyllus, a popular tropical fruit commonly known as the jackfruit tree, is normally planted in subtropical or tropical areas. Since a variety of phytochemicals isolated from A. heterophyllus have been found to possess potently anti-inflammatory, antiviral and antimalarial activities, researchers have devoted much interest to its potential pharmaceutical value. However, the exact mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory activity is not well characterized. In this study, seven natural products isolated from A. heterophyllus, including 25-Hydroxycycloart-23-en-3-one (HY), Artocarpin (AR), Dadahol A (DA), Morachalcone A (MA), Artoheterophyllin B (AB), Cycloheterophyllin (CY) and Moracin C (MC) were collected. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated inflammatory response in RAW264.7 macrophages were used in this study. Among these compounds, MC significantly inhibited LPS-activated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) release without marked cytotoxicity. Furthermore, MC effectively reduced LPS stimulated up-regulation of mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and serval pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)). Mechanistic studies revealed that the anti-inflammatory effect of MC was associated with the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (including p38, ERK and JNK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways, especially reducing the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit as revealed by nuclear separation experiment and confocal microscopy. PMID:27463712

  6. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening and medical emergency that can be caused by numerous disorders and presents with hemoptysis, anemia, and diffuse alveolar infiltrates. Early bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is usually required to confirm the diagnosis and rule out infection. Most cases of DAH are caused by capillaritis associated with systemic autoimmune diseases such as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus, but DAH may also result from coagulation disorders, drugs, inhaled toxins, or transplantation. The diagnosis of DAH relies on clinical suspicion combined with laboratory, radiologic, and pathologic findings. Early recognition is crucial, because prompt diagnosis and treatment is necessary for survival. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents remain the gold standard. In patients with DAH, biopsy of involved sites can help to identify the cause and to direct therapy. This article aims to provide a general review of the causes and clinical presentation of DAH and to recommend a diagnostic approach and a management plan for the most common causes. PMID:23678356

  7. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Park, Moo Suk

    2013-04-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening and medical emergency that can be caused by numerous disorders and presents with hemoptysis, anemia, and diffuse alveolar infiltrates. Early bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is usually required to confirm the diagnosis and rule out infection. Most cases of DAH are caused by capillaritis associated with systemic autoimmune diseases such as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus, but DAH may also result from coagulation disorders, drugs, inhaled toxins, or transplantation. The diagnosis of DAH relies on clinical suspicion combined with laboratory, radiologic, and pathologic findings. Early recognition is crucial, because prompt diagnosis and treatment is necessary for survival. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents remain the gold standard. In patients with DAH, biopsy of involved sites can help to identify the cause and to direct therapy. This article aims to provide a general review of the causes and clinical presentation of DAH and to recommend a diagnostic approach and a management plan for the most common causes.

  8. SOCS-3 Regulates Alveolar Bone Loss in Experimental Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Papathanasiou, E; Kantarci, A; Konstantinidis, A; Gao, H; Van Dyke, T E

    2016-08-01

    The host immune response plays a key role in bacteria-induced alveolar bone resorption. Endogenous control of the magnitude and duration of inflammatory signaling is considered an important determinant of the extent of periodontal pathology. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are inhibitors of cytokine signaling pathways and may play a role in restraining periodontal inflammation. We hypothesized that SOCS-3 regulates alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis. Periodontal bone loss was induced in 16-wk-old myeloid-specific SOCS-3-knockout and wild-type (WT) C57Bl6-B.129 mice by oral inoculation 9 times with 10(9) colony-forming units of Porphyromonas gingivalis A7436 through an oral gavage model for periodontitis. Sham controls for both types of mice received vehicle without bacteria. The mice were euthanized 6 wk after the last oral inoculation. Increased bone loss was demonstrated in P. gingivalis-infected SOCS-3-knockout mice as compared with P. gingivalis-infected WT mice by direct morphologic measurements, micro-computed tomography analyses, and quantitative histology. Loss of SOCS-3 function resulted in an increased number of alveolar bone osteoclasts and increased RANKL expression after P. gingivalis infection. SOCS-3 deficiency in myeloid cells also promotes a higher P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response with higher secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, and KC (IL-8) by peritoneal macrophages as compared with WT controls. Our data implicate SOCS-3 as a critical negative regulator of alveolar bone loss in periodontitis.

  9. The role of alveolar epithelial cells in initiating and shaping pulmonary immune responses: communication between innate and adaptive immune systems.

    PubMed

    Chuquimia, Olga D; Petursdottir, Dagbjort H; Rahman, Muhammad J; Hartl, Katharina; Singh, Mahavir; Fernández, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells have been recognized as key players in the defense against mycobacterial infection. However, more recently, other cells in the lungs such as alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) have been found to play important roles in the defense and pathogenesis of infection. In the present study we first compared AEC with pulmonary macrophages (PuM) isolated from mice in their ability to internalize and control Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) growth and their capacity as APCs. AEC were able to internalize and control bacterial growth as well as present antigen to primed T cells. Secondly, we compared both cell types in their capacity to secrete cytokines and chemokines upon stimulation with various molecules including mycobacterial products. Activated PuM and AEC displayed different patterns of secretion. Finally, we analyzed the profile of response of AEC to diverse stimuli. AEC responded to both microbial and internal stimuli exemplified by TLR ligands and IFNs, respectively. The response included synthesis by AEC of several factors, known to have various effects in other cells. Interestingly, TNF could stimulate the production of CCL2/MCP-1. Since MCP-1 plays a role in the recruitment of monocytes and macrophages to sites of infection and macrophages are the main producers of TNF, we speculate that both cell types can stimulate each other. Also, another cell-cell interaction was suggested when IFNs (produced mainly by lymphocytes) were able to induce expression of chemokines (IP-10 and RANTES) by AEC involved in the recruitment of circulating lymphocytes to areas of injury, inflammation, or viral infection. In the current paper we confirm previous data on the capacity of AEC regarding internalization of mycobacteria and their role as APC, and extend the knowledge of AEC as a multifunctional cell type by assessing the secretion of a broad array of factors in response to several different types of stimuli.

  10. MURINE PULMONARY MACROPHAGE EXPRESSION AND PRODUCTION OF TNFA AND MIP-2 AFTER EXPOSURE TO DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES (DEP) AND EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    DEP constitute an important fraction of particulate air pollution and have been shown to cause inflammation of the airways. The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory cytokine response of alveolar macrophages exposed to DEP and DEP-extracts. A murine alveolar macr...

  11. Effect of alveolar pressure on pulmonary artery pressure in chronically hypoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Wach, R; Emery, C J; Bee, D; Barer, G R

    1987-02-01

    The effect on pulmonary artery pressure of a rise in alveolar pressure differed in chronically hypoxic rats (10% O2 for 3-5 weeks) compared with control rats. Chronically hypoxic rats have newly muscularised walls in arterioles in the alveolar region. Isolated lungs of chronically hypoxic and control rats were perfused with blood under conditions in which alveolar pressure was greater than left atrial pressure during both normoxia and hypoxia. Alveolar pressure was the effective downstream pressure. Pressure-flow lines were measured at low and high alveolar pressure (5 and 15 mmHg). During normoxia pressure-flow lines of chronically hypoxic rats had a steeper slope (higher resistance) and greater extrapolated intercept on the pressure axis (effective downstream pressure) than control rats. In both groups of rats the change from low to high alveolar pressure during normoxia caused an approximately parallel shift in the pressure-flow line similar to the change in alveolar pressure. During hypoxia, which led to an increase in slope and intercept in both groups of rats, the effect of a rise in alveolar pressure differed in chronically hypoxic from control rats. In control rats there was a small parallel shift in the pressure-flow line that was much less than the increase in alveolar pressure; in chronically hypoxic rats there was a large parallel shift in the pressure-flow line that was greater than the increase in alveolar pressure. Thus in chronically hypoxic rats hypoxic vasoconstriction probably occurred mainly in muscular alveolar vessels, whereas in control rats it probably occurred upstream in extra-alveolar vessels. At constant blood flow the relation between pulmonary artery pressure and alveolar pressure was measured while alveolar pressure was reduced from approximately 15 mmHg to zero during both normoxia and hypoxia. In control and chronically hypoxic rats the slope of this line was less than 1. At an alveolar pressure of 2-3 mmHg there was an inflection

  12. A Lys49 Phospholipase A2, Isolated from Bothrops asper Snake Venom, Induces Lipid Droplet Formation in Macrophages Which Depends on Distinct Signaling Pathways and the C-Terminal Region

    PubMed Central

    Cristina Giannotti, Karina; Leiguez, Elbio; Moreira, Vanessa; Nascimento, Neide Galvão; Lomonte, Bruno; Gutiérrez, José Maria; Lopes de Melo, Robson; Teixeira, Catarina

    2013-01-01

    MT-II, a Lys49PLA2 homologue devoid of catalytic activity from B. asper venom, stimulates inflammatory events in macrophages. We investigated the ability of MT-II to induce formation of lipid droplets (LDs), key elements of inflammatory responses, in isolated macrophages and participation of protein kinases and intracellular PLA2s in this effect. Influence of MT-II on PLIN2 recruitment and expression was assessed, and the effects of some synthetic peptides on LD formation were further evaluated. At noncytotoxic concentrations, MT-II directly activated macrophages to form LDs. This effect was reproduced by a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal sequence 115–129 of MT-II, evidencing the critical role of C-terminus for MT-II-induced effect. Moreover, MT-II induced expression and recruitment of PLIN2. Pharmacological interventions with specific inhibitors showed that PKC, PI3K, ERK1/2, and iPLA2, but not P38MAPK or cPLA2, signaling pathways are involved in LD formation induced by MT-II. This sPLA2 homologue also induced synthesis of PGE2 that colocalized to LDs. In conclusion, MT-II is able to induce formation of LDs committed to PGE2 formation in a process dependent on C-terminal loop engagement and regulated by distinct protein kinases and iPLA2. LDs may constitute an important inflammatory mechanism triggered by MT-II in macrophages. PMID:23509782

  13. Ursolic acid isolated from guava leaves inhibits inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Hye; Kim, Jin Nam; Han, Sung Nim; Kim, Hye-Kyeong

    2015-06-01

    Psidium guajava (guava) leaves have been frequently used for the treatment of rheumatism, fever, arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. The purpose of this study was to identify major anti-inflammatory compounds from guava leaf extract. The methanol extract and its hexane-, dichloromethane-, ethylacetate-, n-butanol- and water-soluble phases derived from guava leaves were evaluated to determine their inhibitory activity on nitric oxide (NO) production by RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The methanol extract decreased NO production in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxicity at a concentration range of 0-100 μg/mL. The n-butanol soluble phase was the most potent among the five soluble phases. Four compounds were isolated by reversed-phase HPLC from the n-butanol soluble phase and identified to be avicularin, guaijaverin, leucocyanidin and ursolic acid by their NMR spectra. Among these compounds, ursolic acid inhibited LPS-induced NO production in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxity at a concentration range of 1-10 µM, but the other three compounds had no effect. Ursolic acid also inhibited LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 production. A western blot analysis showed that ursolic acid decreased the LPS-stimulated inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase protein levels. In addition, ursolic acid suppressed the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, as measured by flow cytometry. Taken together, these results identified ursolic acid as a major anti-inflammatory compound in guava leaves. PMID:25753845

  14. Ursolic acid isolated from guava leaves inhibits inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Hye; Kim, Jin Nam; Han, Sung Nim; Kim, Hye-Kyeong

    2015-06-01

    Psidium guajava (guava) leaves have been frequently used for the treatment of rheumatism, fever, arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. The purpose of this study was to identify major anti-inflammatory compounds from guava leaf extract. The methanol extract and its hexane-, dichloromethane-, ethylacetate-, n-butanol- and water-soluble phases derived from guava leaves were evaluated to determine their inhibitory activity on nitric oxide (NO) production by RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The methanol extract decreased NO production in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxicity at a concentration range of 0-100 μg/mL. The n-butanol soluble phase was the most potent among the five soluble phases. Four compounds were isolated by reversed-phase HPLC from the n-butanol soluble phase and identified to be avicularin, guaijaverin, leucocyanidin and ursolic acid by their NMR spectra. Among these compounds, ursolic acid inhibited LPS-induced NO production in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxity at a concentration range of 1-10 µM, but the other three compounds had no effect. Ursolic acid also inhibited LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 production. A western blot analysis showed that ursolic acid decreased the LPS-stimulated inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase protein levels. In addition, ursolic acid suppressed the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, as measured by flow cytometry. Taken together, these results identified ursolic acid as a major anti-inflammatory compound in guava leaves.

  15. Mannheimia haemolytica and Its Leukotoxin Cause Macrophage Extracellular Trap Formation by Bovine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Aulik, Nicole A.; Hellenbrand, Katrina M.

    2012-01-01

    Human and bovine neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are protein-studded DNA matrices capable of extracellular trapping and killing of pathogens. Recently, we reported that bovine neutrophils release NETs in response to the important respiratory pathogen Mannheimia haemolytica and its leukotoxin (LKT). Here, we demonstrate macrophage extracellular trap (MET) formation by bovine monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to M. haemolytica or its LKT. Both native fully active LKT and noncytolytic pro-LKT (produced by an lktC mutant of M. haemolytica) stimulated MET formation. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy revealed a network of DNA fibrils with colocalized histones in extracellular traps released from bovine macrophages. Formation of METs required NADPH oxidase activity, as previously demonstrated for NET formation. METs formed in response to LKT trapped and killed a portion of the M. haemolytica cells. Bovine alveolar macrophages, but not peripheral blood monocytes, also formed METs in response to M. haemolytica cells. MET formation was not restricted to bovine macrophages. We also observed MET formation by the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and by human THP-1 cell-derived macrophages, in response to Escherichia coli hemolysin. The latter is a member of the repeats-in-toxin (RTX) toxin family related to the M. haemolytica leukotoxin. This study demonstrates that macrophages, like neutrophils, can form extracellular traps in response to bacterial pathogens and their exotoxins. PMID:22354029

  16. Mannheimia haemolytica and its leukotoxin cause macrophage extracellular trap formation by bovine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Aulik, Nicole A; Hellenbrand, Katrina M; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2012-05-01

    Human and bovine neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are protein-studded DNA matrices capable of extracellular trapping and killing of pathogens. Recently, we reported that bovine neutrophils release NETs in response to the important respiratory pathogen Mannheimia haemolytica and its leukotoxin (LKT). Here, we demonstrate macrophage extracellular trap (MET) formation by bovine monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to M. haemolytica or its LKT. Both native fully active LKT and noncytolytic pro-LKT (produced by an lktC mutant of M. haemolytica) stimulated MET formation. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy revealed a network of DNA fibrils with colocalized histones in extracellular traps released from bovine macrophages. Formation of METs required NADPH oxidase activity, as previously demonstrated for NET formation. METs formed in response to LKT trapped and killed a portion of the M. haemolytica cells. Bovine alveolar macrophages, but not peripheral blood monocytes, also formed METs in response to M. haemolytica cells. MET formation was not restricted to bovine macrophages. We also observed MET formation by the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and by human THP-1 cell-derived macrophages, in response to Escherichia coli hemolysin. The latter is a member of the repeats-in-toxin (RTX) toxin family related to the M. haemolytica leukotoxin. This study demonstrates that macrophages, like neutrophils, can form extracellular traps in response to bacterial pathogens and their exotoxins. PMID:22354029

  17. Particle-induced indentation of the alveolar epithelium caused by surface tension forces

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, M.; Tsuda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Physical contact between an inhaled particle and alveolar epithelium at the moment of particle deposition must have substantial effects on subsequent cellular functions of neighboring cells, such as alveolar type-I, type-II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophage, as well as afferent sensory nerve cells, extending their dendrites toward the alveolar septal surface. The forces driving this physical insult are born at the surface of the alveolar air-liquid layer. The role of alveolar surfactant submerging a hydrophilic particle has been suggested by Gehr and Schürch's group (e.g., Respir Physiol 80: 17–32, 1990). In this paper, we extended their studies by developing a further comprehensive and mechanistic analysis. The analysis reveals that the mechanics operating in the particle-tissue interaction phenomena can be explained on the basis of a balance between surface tension force and tissue resistance force; the former tend to move a particle toward alveolar epithelial cell surface, the latter to resist the cell deformation. As a result, the submerged particle deforms the tissue and makes a noticeable indentation, which creates unphysiological stress and strain fields in tissue around the particle. This particle-induced microdeformation could likely trigger adverse mechanotransduction and mechanosensing pathways, as well as potentially enhancing particle uptake by the cells. PMID:20634359

  18. Lectin binding and surface glycoprotein pattern of human macrophage populations.

    PubMed

    Kreipe, H; Radzun, H J; Schumacher, U; Parwaresch, M R

    1986-01-01

    In the present study unstimulated and stimulated human blood monocytes, untreated and phorbol ester treated U-937 cells, as well as human peritoneal and alveolar macrophages were studied with respect to their surface membrane properties. Binding of different lectins and electrophoretic patterns of tritium labeled surface glycoproteins were compared. The analysis of surface glycoproteins could be interpreted as evidence for a common origin of the analysed cell populations. Furthermore, banding patterns of glycoproteins might be useful to define certain activation states within monocyte/macrophage differentiation. In contrast, lectin binding pattern did not clearly discriminate macrophage subpopulations. PMID:3102412

  19. Biflorin, Isolated from the Flower Buds of Syzygium aromaticum L., Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammatory Mediators via STAT1 Inactivation in Macrophages and Protects Mice from Endotoxin Shock.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwi-Ho; Shin, Ji-Sun; Lee, Woo-Seok; Ryu, Byeol; Jang, Dae Sik; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2016-04-22

    Two chromone C-glucosides, biflorin (1) and isobiflorin (2), were isolated from the flower buds of Syzygium aromaticum L. (Myrtaceae). Here, inhibitory effects of 1 and 2 on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in RAW 264.7 macrophages were evaluated, and 1 (IC50 = 51.7 and 37.1 μM, respectively) was more potent than 2 (IC50 > 60 and 46.0 μM). The suppression of NO and PGE2 production by 1 correlated with inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 protein expression. Compound 1 reduced inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA expression via inhibition of their promoter activities. Compound 1 inhibited the LPS-induced production and mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6. Furthermore, 1 reduced p-STAT1 and p-p38 expression but did not affect the activity of nuclear factor κ light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) or activator protein 1 (AP-1). In a mouse model of LPS-induced endotoxemia, 1 reduced the mRNA levels of iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α, and the phosphorylation-mediated activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), consequently improving the survival rates of mice. Compound 1 showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect on carrageenan-induced paw edema and croton-oil-induced ear edema in rats. The collective data indicate that the suppression of pro-inflammatory gene expression via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and STAT1 inactivation may be a mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of 1. PMID:26977531

  20. Biflorin, Isolated from the Flower Buds of Syzygium aromaticum L., Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammatory Mediators via STAT1 Inactivation in Macrophages and Protects Mice from Endotoxin Shock.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwi-Ho; Shin, Ji-Sun; Lee, Woo-Seok; Ryu, Byeol; Jang, Dae Sik; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2016-04-22

    Two chromone C-glucosides, biflorin (1) and isobiflorin (2), were isolated from the flower buds of Syzygium aromaticum L. (Myrtaceae). Here, inhibitory effects of 1 and 2 on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in RAW 264.7 macrophages were evaluated, and 1 (IC50 = 51.7 and 37.1 μM, respectively) was more potent than 2 (IC50 > 60 and 46.0 μM). The suppression of NO and PGE2 production by 1 correlated with inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 protein expression. Compound 1 reduced inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA expression via inhibition of their promoter activities. Compound 1 inhibited the LPS-induced production and mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6. Furthermore, 1 reduced p-STAT1 and p-p38 expression but did not affect the activity of nuclear factor κ light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) or activator protein 1 (AP-1). In a mouse model of LPS-induced endotoxemia, 1 reduced the mRNA levels of iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α, and the phosphorylation-mediated activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), consequently improving the survival rates of mice. Compound 1 showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect on carrageenan-induced paw edema and croton-oil-induced ear edema in rats. The collective data indicate that the suppression of pro-inflammatory gene expression via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and STAT1 inactivation may be a mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of 1.

  1. Degradation of parathyroid hormone in macrophage endosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Diment, S.; Martin, K.J.; Stahl, P.D.

    1986-05-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is secreted as an 84 amino acid protein that is rapidly cleaved between amino acids 34 and 35 by Kupffer cells in liver. The resulting amino terminal peptide (1-34) is active at PTH target organs (kidney and bone). Cathepsin D can process PTH to 1-34 in vitro, and a cathepsin D-like protease, which may rapidly process proteins, is present in endosomes of alveolar macrophages. The authors set out to determine whether PTH is degraded to 1-34 in endosomes, and to elucidate the mechanism of hormone processing in vivo. Intracellular transport of /sup 125/I-PTH was assessed by binding to alveolar macrophages at 4/sup 0/C, followed by internalization at 37/sup 0/C. Distribution of PTH among plasma membranes, endosomes and lysosomes was determined by subcellular fractionation. Degradation of the ligand to TCA-soluble fragments in each compartment was assayed at neutral and acid pH. 1-34 in supernatants was separated from undergraded PTH by gel filtration and detected by bioassay on kidney membranes. The authors data suggest that: 1) macrophages rapidly degrade PTH to TCA-soluble fragments. 2) macrophages do not secrete proteases that degrade extracellular PTH. 3) PTH is internalized into endocytic vesicles after 5 mins, but not delivered to lysosomes within 30 mins. 4) A bioactive peptide is released into the extracellular medium after 20 mins. 5) PTH is degraded in endosomes at acid pH by a pepstatin-sensitive protease.

  2. Homegrown Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Wook; Zhang, Nan; Choi, Kyunghee; Randolph, Gwendalyn J

    2016-09-20

    Macrophages residing in different organs have diverse gene-expression programs. Mass et al. (2016) propose that this diversity develops "at home"-within those organs-after the recruitment of a common precursor that had not made prior commitments to diversity. PMID:27653599

  3. Modeling Alveolar Epithelial Cell Behavior In Spatially Designed Hydrogel Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Katherine Jean Reeder

    The alveolar epithelium consists of two cell phenotypes, elongated alveolar type I cells (AT1) and rounded alveolar type II cells (ATII), and exists in a complex three-dimensional environment as a polarized cell layer attached to a thin basement membrane and enclosing a roughly spherical lumen. Closely surrounding the alveolar cysts are capillary endothelial cells as well as interstitial pulmonary fibroblasts. Many factors are thought to influence alveolar epithelial cell differentiation during lung development and wound repair, including physical and biochemical signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM), and paracrine signals from the surrounding mesenchyme. In particular, disrupted signaling between the alveolar epithelium and local fibroblasts has been implicated in the progression of several pulmonary diseases. However, given the complexity of alveolar tissue architecture and the multitude of signaling pathways involved, designing appropriate experimental platforms for this biological system has been difficult. In order to isolate key factors regulating cellular behavior, the researcher ideally should have control over biophysical properties of the ECM, as well as the ability to organize multiple cell types within the scaffold. This thesis aimed to develop a 3D synthetic hydrogel platform to control alveolar epithelial cyst formation, which could then be used to explore how extracellular cues influence cell behavior in a tissue-relevant cellular arrangement. To accomplish this, a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel network containing enzymatically-degradable crosslinks and bioadhesive pendant peptides was employed as a base material for encapsulating primary alveolar epithelial cells. First, an array of microwells of various cross-sectional shapes was photopatterned into a PEG gel containing photo-labile crosslinks, and primary ATII cells were seeded into the wells to examine the role of geometric confinement on differentiation and multicellular arrangement

  4. Differences in Virulence of Marine and Freshwater Isolates of Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus In Vivo Correlate with In Vitro Ability To Infect Gill Epithelial Cells and Macrophages of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)▿

    PubMed Central

    Brudeseth, Bjørn E.; Skall, Helle F.; Evensen, Øystein

    2008-01-01

    Two strains of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) with known different virulence characteristics in vivo were studied (by a time course approach) for their abilities to infect and translocate across a primary culture of gill epithelial cells (GEC) of rainbow trout (RBT; Oncorhynchus mykiss). The strains included one low-virulence marine VHSV (ma-VHSV) strain, ma-1p8, and a highly pathogenic freshwater VHSV (fw-VHSV) strain, fw-DK-3592B. Infectivities toward trout head kidney macrophages were also studied (by a time course method), and differences in in vivo virulence were reconfirmed, the aim being to determine any correlation between in vivo virulence and in vitro infectivity. The in vitro studies showed that the fw-VHSV isolate infected and caused a cytotoxic effect in monolayers of GEC (demonstrating virulence) at an early time point (2 h postinoculation) and that the same virus strain had translocated over a confluent, polarized GEC layer by 2 h postinoculation. The marine isolate did not infect monolayers of GEC, and delayed translocation across polarized GEC was seen by 48 h postinoculation. Primary cultures of head kidney macrophages were also infected with fw-VHSV, with a maximum of 9.5% virus-positive cells by 3 days postinfection, while for the ma-VHSV strain, only 0.5% of the macrophages were positive after 3 days of culture. In vivo studies showed that the fw-VHSV strain was highly virulent for RBT fry and caused high mortality, with classical features of viral hemorrhagic septicemia. The ma-VHSV showed a very low level of virulence (only one pool of samples from the dead fish was VHSV positive). This study has shown that the differences in virulence between marine and freshwater strains of VHSV following the in vivo infection of RBT correlate with in vitro abilities to infect primary cultures of GEC and head kidney macrophages of the same species. PMID:18753199

  5. Toxicity of mycotoxins for the rat pulmonary macrophage in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, W.G.; Gerberick, G.F.; Lewis, D.M.; Castranova, V.

    1986-04-01

    The presence of mycotoxins in grains is well documented. Workers in grain handling occupations are commonly exposed to grain dust aerosols. Work in our laboratory has shown that T-2 toxin is highly toxic to rat alveolar macrophages in vitro, causing loss of viability, release of radiolabeled chromium, inhibition of macromolecular synthesis, inhibition of phagocytosis, and inhibition of macrophage activation. Similarly, patulin caused a significant release of radiolabeled chromium, decrease in ATP levels, significant inhibition of protein and RNA synthesis, and inhibition of phagocytosis. The data show that both T-2 toxin and patulin are highly toxic to rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The data further suggest that the presence of these mycotoxins in airborne respirable dust might present a hazard to exposed workers.

  6. IL-36γ is secreted in microparticles and exosomes by lung macrophages in response to bacteria and bacterial components.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Melissa A; Singer, Benjamin H; Newstead, Michael W; Zeng, Xianying; Moore, Thomas A; White, Eric S; Kunkel, Steven L; Peters-Golden, Marc; Standiford, Theodore J

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin-36 is a family of novel interleukin-1-like proinflammatory cytokines that are highly expressed in epithelial tissues and several myeloid-derived cell types. Like those of classic interleukin-1 cytokines, the secretion mechanisms of interleukin-36 are not well understood. Interleukin-36γ secretion in dermal epithelial cells requires adenosine 5'-triphosphate, which suggests a nonclassical mechanism of secretion. In this study, murine pulmonary macrophages and human alveolar macrophages were treated with recombinant pathogen-associated molecular patterns (intact bacteria: Klebsiella pneumoniae or Streptococcus pneumoniae). Cell lysates were analyzed for messenger ribonucleic acid by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and conditioned medium was analyzed for interleukin-36γ by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, with or without sonication. In addition, conditioned medium was ultracentrifuged at 25,000 g and 100,000 g, to isolate microparticles and exosomes, respectively, and interleukin-36γ protein was assessed in each fraction by Western blot analysis. Interleukin-36γ mRNA was induced in both murine and human lung macrophages by a variety of pathogen-associated molecular patterns, as well as heat-killed and live Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae, and induction occurred in a myeloid differentiation response gene 88-dependent manner. Secretion of interleukin-36γ protein was enhanced by adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Furthermore, extracellular interleukin-36γ protein detection was markedly enhanced by sonication to disrupt membrane-bound structures. Interleukin-36γ protein was detected by Western blot in microparticles and exosome fractions isolated by ultracentrifugation. Interleukin-36γ was induced and secreted from lung macrophages in response to Gram-negative and -positive bacterial stimulation. The results suggest that interleukin-36γ is secreted in a non-Golgi-dependent manner by lung macrophages in response to Gram

  7. Immunological characterization of pulmonary intravascular macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitko-McKown, C. G.; Reddy, D. N.; Chapes, S. K.; McKown, R. D.; Blecha, F.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) are lung macrophages found apposed to the endothelium of pulmonary capillaries. In many species, they are responsible for the clearance of blood-borne particulates and pathogens; however, little else is known about their roles as immunologic effector cells. We compared PIMs with pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) to determine the relative immunological activities of these two cell populations. Our results suggested that both populations possess similar phagocytic and bactericidal activities. In assays measuring cytotoxicity, PIMs were more cytotoxic than PAMs against virally infected target cells; however, differences between these macrophage populations were not as marked when noninfected targets were used. LPS-stimulated PIMs produced more T-cell proliferative cytokines than PAMs, and both populations of nonstimulated macrophages produced similar amounts of the cytokines. In contrast, PAMs produced more TNF alpha and NO2- than PIMs when both populations were stimulated with LPS; however, nonstimulated PAMs and PIMs produced similar amounts of TNF alpha and NO2. These data suggest that bovine PIMs are immunologically active. Differences between the degrees of activity of PIMs and PAMs indicate that these macrophage populations may have different roles in lung surveillance.

  8. Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning.

    PubMed

    Louis, P J

    2001-09-01

    Nerve repositioning is a viable alternative for patients with an atrophic edentulous posterior mandible. Patients, however, should be informed of the potential risks of neurosensory disturbance. Documentation of the patient's baseline neurosensory function should be performed with a two-point discrimination test or directional brush stroke test preoperatively and postoperatively. Recovery of nerve function should be expected in 3 to 6 months. The potential for mandibular fracture when combining nerve repositioning with implant placement also should be discussed with the patient. This can be avoided by minimizing the amount of buccal cortical plate removal during localization of the nerve and maintaining the integrity of the inferior cortex of the mandible. Additionally, avoid overseating the implant, thus avoiding stress along the inferior border of the mandible. The procedure does allow for the placement of longer implants, which should improve implant longevity. Patients undergoing this procedure have expressed overall satisfaction with the results. Nerve repositioning also can be used to preserve the inferior alveolar nerve during resection of benign tumors or cysts of the mandible. This procedure allows the surgeon to maintain nerve function in situations in which the nerve would otherwise have to be resected. PMID:11665379

  9. Interferon-alpha inhibits murine macrophage transforming growth factor-beta mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Dhanani, S; Huang, M; Wang, J; Dubinett, S M

    1994-06-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional polypeptide is produced by a wide variety of cells and regulates a broad array of physiological and pathological functions. TGF-beta appears to play a central role in pulmonary fibrosis and may contribute to tumor-associated immunosuppression. Alveolar macrophages are a rich source of TGF-beta and are intimately involved in lung inflammation. We therefore chose to study TGF-beta regulation in murine alveolar macrophages as well as an immortalized peritoneal macrophage cell line (IC-21). Murine macrophages were incubated with cytokines to evaluate their role in regulating TGF-beta mRNA expression. We conclude that IFN-alpha downregulates TGF-beta mRNA expression in murine macrophages. PMID:8088926

  10. Chronic alcohol ingestion changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium.

    PubMed

    Downs, Charles A; Trac, David; Brewer, Elizabeth M; Brown, Lou Ann; Helms, My N

    2013-01-01

    Similar to effects of alcohol on the heart, liver, and brain, the effects of ethanol (EtOH) on lung injury are preventable. Unlike other vital organ systems, however, the lethal effects of alcohol on the lung are underappreciated, perhaps because there are no signs of overt pulmonary disorder until a secondary insult, such as a bacterial infection or injury, occurs in the lung. This paper provides overview of the complex changes in the alveolar environment known to occur following both chronic and acute alcohol exposures. Contemporary animal and cell culture models for alcohol-induced lung dysfunction are discussed, with emphasis on the effect of alcohol on transepithelial transport processes, namely, epithelial sodium channel activity (ENaC). The cascading effect of tissue and phagocytic Nadph oxidase (Nox) may be triggered by ethanol exposure, and as such, alcohol ingestion and exposure lead to a prooxidative environment; thus impacting alveolar macrophage (AM) function and oxidative stress. A better understanding of how alcohol changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium can lead to improvements in treating acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for which hospitalized alcoholics are at an increased risk. PMID:23509726

  11. Theophylline improves lipopolysaccharide-induced alveolarization arrest through inflammatory regulation.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Chen, Fei; Ni, Wensi; Li, Jianhui; Zhang, Yongjun

    2014-07-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is characterized by alveolar simplification with decreased numbers of alveoli and increased airspace. BPD, frequently suffered by very low birth weight infants, has been closely associated with intrauterine infection. However, the underlying mechanisms of BPD remain unclear. In the present study, it was identified that administration of intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to pregnant rats on embryonal day 16.5 (E16.5) induced significant alveolarization arrest similar to that of BPD in neonatal pups, and theophylline injected subcutaneously into the newborns improved the pathological changes. To further investigate the underlying mechanism of the morphogenesis amelioration of theophylline, cytokine antibody arrays were performed with the lung lysates of neonatal rats. The results indicated that LPS upregulated a series of pro-inflammatory cytokines and theophylline significantly attenuated the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor‑α, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α and MIP-2, and markedly elevated the production of tumor growth factor (TGF)-β family members TGF-β1, TGF-β2 and TGF-β3, which are anti‑inflammatory cytokines. Accordingly, it was hypothesized that theophylline may protect against BPD and improve chorioamnionitis‑induced alveolar arrest by regulating the balance between pro‑and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression.

  12. Human macrophage hemoglobin-iron metabolism in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Custer, G.; Balcerzak, S.; Rinehart, J.

    1982-01-01

    An entirely in vitro technique was employed to characterize hemoglobin-iron metabolism by human macrophages obtained by culture of blood monocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Macrophages phagocytized about three times as many erythrocytes as monocytes and six times as many erythrocytes as pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The rate of subsequent release of /sup 59/Fe to the extracellular transferrin pool was two- to fourfold greater for macrophages as compared to the other two cell types. The kinetics of /sup 59/Fe-transferrin release were characterized by a relatively rapid early phase (hours 1-4) followed by a slow phase (hours 4-72) for all three cell types. Intracellular movement of iron was characterized by a rapid shift from hemoglobin to ferritin that was complete with the onset of the slow phase of extracellular release. A transient increase in /sup 59/Fe associated with an intracellular protein eluting with transferrin was also observed within 1 hour after phagocytosis. The process of hemoglobin-iron release to extracellular transferrin was inhibited at 4 degrees C but was unaffected by inhibitory of protein synthesis, glycolysis, microtubule function, and microfilament function. These data emphasize the rapidity of macrophage hemoglobin iron metabolism, provide a model for characterization of this process in vitro, and in general confirm data obtained utilizing in vivo animal models.

  13. Genesis of amorphous calcium carbonate containing alveolar plates in the ciliate Coleps hirtus (Ciliophora, Prostomatea).

    PubMed

    Lemloh, Marie-Louise; Marin, Frédéric; Herbst, Frédéric; Plasseraud, Laurent; Schweikert, Michael; Baier, Johannes; Bill, Joachim; Brümmer, Franz

    2013-02-01

    In the protist world, the ciliate Coleps hirtus (phylum Ciliophora, class Prostomatea) synthesizes a peculiar biomineralized test made of alveolar plates, structures located within alveolar vesicles at the cell cortex. Alveolar plates are arranged by overlapping like an armor and they are thought to protect and/or stiffen the cell. Although their morphology is species-specific and of complex architecture, so far almost nothing is known about their genesis, their structure and their elemental and mineral composition. We investigated the genesis of new alveolar plates after cell division and examined cells and isolated alveolar plates by electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, FTIR and X-ray diffraction. Our investigations revealed an organic mesh-like structure that guides the formation of new alveolar plates like a template and the role of vesicles transporting inorganic material. We further demonstrated that the inorganic part of the alveolar plates is composed out of amorphous calcium carbonate. For stabilization of the amorphous phase, the alveolar vesicles, the organic fraction and the element phosphorus may play a role. PMID:23228488

  14. Genesis of amorphous calcium carbonate containing alveolar plates in the ciliate Coleps hirtus (Ciliophora, Prostomatea).

    PubMed

    Lemloh, Marie-Louise; Marin, Frédéric; Herbst, Frédéric; Plasseraud, Laurent; Schweikert, Michael; Baier, Johannes; Bill, Joachim; Brümmer, Franz

    2013-02-01

    In the protist world, the ciliate Coleps hirtus (phylum Ciliophora, class Prostomatea) synthesizes a peculiar biomineralized test made of alveolar plates, structures located within alveolar vesicles at the cell cortex. Alveolar plates are arranged by overlapping like an armor and they are thought to protect and/or stiffen the cell. Although their morphology is species-specific and of complex architecture, so far almost nothing is known about their genesis, their structure and their elemental and mineral composition. We investigated the genesis of new alveolar plates after cell division and examined cells and isolated alveolar plates by electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, FTIR and X-ray diffraction. Our investigations revealed an organic mesh-like structure that guides the formation of new alveolar plates like a template and the role of vesicles transporting inorganic material. We further demonstrated that the inorganic part of the alveolar plates is composed out of amorphous calcium carbonate. For stabilization of the amorphous phase, the alveolar vesicles, the organic fraction and the element phosphorus may play a role.

  15. The Cryptococcal Enzyme Inositol Phosphosphingolipid-Phospholipase C Confers Resistance to the Antifungal Effects of Macrophages and Promotes Fungal Dissemination to the Central Nervous System†

    PubMed Central

    Shea, John M.; Kechichian, Talar B.; Luberto, Chiara; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, sphingolipids have emerged as critical molecules in the regulation of microbial pathogenesis. In fungi, the synthesis of complex sphingolipids is important for the regulation of pathogenicity, but the role of sphingolipid degradation in fungal virulence is not known. Here, we isolated and characterized the inositol phosphosphingolipid-phospholipase C1 (ISC1) gene from the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans and showed that it encodes an enzyme that metabolizes fungal inositol sphingolipids. Isc1 protects C. neoformans from acidic, oxidative, and nitrosative stresses, which are encountered by the fungus in the phagolysosomes of activated macrophages, through a Pma1-dependent mechanism(s). In an immunocompetent mouse model, the C. neoformans Δisc1 mutant strain is almost exclusively found extracellularly and in a hyperencapsulated form, and its dissemination to the brain is remarkably reduced compared to that of control strains. Interestingly, the dissemination of the C. neoformans Δisc1 strain to the brain is promptly restored in these mice when alveolar macrophages are pharmacologically depleted or when infecting an immunodeficient mouse in which macrophages are not efficiently activated. These studies suggest that Isc1 plays a key role in protecting C. neoformans from the intracellular environment of macrophages, whose activation is important for preventing fungal dissemination of the Δisc1 strain to the central nervous system and the development of meningoencephalitis. PMID:16988277

  16. Alveolar hemorrhage in vasculitis: primary and secondary.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Jean-François; Cottin, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) in primary and secondary vasculitis occurs when capillaritis is present. The diagnosis of DAH is considered in patients who develop progressive dyspnea with alveolar opacities on chest imaging (with density ranging from ground glass to consolidation) that cannot be explained otherwise. Hemoptysis, a valuable sign, is often absent. A decline of blood hemoglobin level over a few days without hemolysis or any hemorrhage elsewhere should be an alert for DAH. Bronchoalveolar lavage, retrieving bright red fluid, is the best diagnostic clue. Lung biopsy is not recommended. A search for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCAs) is mandatory. Once DAH is diagnosed and hemodynamic as well as infectious causes have been excluded, ANCA-associated vasculitis is taken into account (mainly microscopic polyangiitis or Wegener granulomatosis, and, exceptionally, Churg-Strauss syndrome). Drug-induced DAH, especially antithyroid drugs such as propylthiouracil may be coupled with ANCA. Isolated DAH with capillaritis with or without ANCA is rare. DAH in systemic lupus erythematosus is either associated or not with capillaritis. Treatment of DAH should target the underlying disorder. In the primary vasculitides, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants, especially cyclophosphamide, are the mainstay of therapy, but plasma exchange, particularly in severe DAH, is the rule, although evidence of its effectiveness is awaited.

  17. Isolation and characterization of a resistant core peptide of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF); confirmation of the GM-CSF amino acid sequence by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Tsarbopoulos, A.; Pramanik, B. N.; Labdon, J. E.; Reichert, P.; Gitlin, G.; Patel, S.; Sardana, V.; Nagabhushan, T. L.; Trotta, P. P.

    1993-01-01

    A trypsin-resistant core peptide of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) was isolated and analyzed by high-energy Cs+ liquid secondary-ion (LSI) mass spectrometric analysis. This analysis provided successful detection of the high-mass disulfide-linked core peptide as well as information confirming the existence of disulfide pairing. Similarly, LSI mass spectrometric analysis of the peptide fragments isolated chromatographically from a Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digest of rhGM-CSF provided rapid confirmation of the cDNA-derived sequence and determination of the existing disulfide bonds between cysteine residues 54-96 and 88-121. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was employed to measure the molecular weight of the intact protein and to determine the number of the disulfide bonds in the protein molecule by comparative analysis of the protein before and after reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol. PMID:8268804

  18. Macrophage Akt1 Kinase-Mediated Mitophagy Modulates Apoptosis Resistance and Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Deshane, Jessy S; Ryan, Alan J; Thannickal, Victor J; Carter, A Brent

    2016-03-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating lung disorder with increasing incidence. Mitochondrial oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages is directly linked to pulmonary fibrosis. Mitophagy, the selective engulfment of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagasomes, is important for cellular homeostasis and can be induced by mitochondrial oxidative stress. Here, we show Akt1 induced macrophage mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitophagy. Mice harboring a conditional deletion of Akt1 in macrophages (Akt1(-/-)Lyz2-cre) and Park2(-/-) mice had impaired mitophagy and reduced active transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Although Akt1 increased TGF-β1 expression, mitophagy inhibition in Akt1-overexpressing macrophages abrogated TGF-β1 expression and fibroblast differentiation. Importantly, conditional Akt1(-/-)Lyz2-cre mice and Park2(-/-) mice had increased macrophage apoptosis and were protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, IPF alveolar macrophages had evidence of increased mitophagy and displayed apoptosis resistance. These observations suggest that Akt1-mediated mitophagy contributes to alveolar macrophage apoptosis resistance and is required for pulmonary fibrosis development.

  19. The Interplay of Lung Surfactant Proteins and Lipids Assimilates the Macrophage Clearance of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ruge, Christian A.; Schaefer, Ulrich F.; Herrmann, Jennifer; Kirch, Julian; Cañadas, Olga; Echaide, Mercedes; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Casals, Cristina; Müller, Rolf; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2012-01-01

    The peripheral lungs are a potential entrance portal for nanoparticles into the human body due to their large surface area. The fact that nanoparticles can be deposited in the alveolar region of the lungs is of interest for pulmonary drug delivery strategies and is of equal importance for toxicological considerations. Therefore, a detailed understanding of nanoparticle interaction with the structures of this largest and most sensitive part of the lungs is important for both nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. Astonishingly, there is still little known about the bio-nano interactions that occur after nanoparticle deposition in the alveoli. In this study, we compared the effects of surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) on the clearance of magnetite nanoparticles (mNP) with either more hydrophilic (starch) or hydrophobic (phosphatidylcholine) surface modification by an alveolar macrophage (AM) cell line (MH-S) using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Both proteins enhanced the AM uptake of mNP compared with pristine nanoparticles; for the hydrophilic ST-mNP, this effect was strongest with SP-D, whereas for the hydrophobic PL-mNP it was most pronounced with SP-A. Using gel electrophoretic and dynamic light scattering methods, we were able to demonstrate that the observed cellular effects were related to protein adsorption and to protein-mediated interference with the colloidal stability. Next, we investigated the influence of various surfactant lipids on nanoparticle uptake by AM because lipids are the major surfactant component. Synthetic surfactant lipid and isolated native surfactant preparations significantly modulated the effects exerted by SP-A and SP-D, respectively, resulting in comparable levels of macrophage interaction for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanoparticles. Our findings suggest that because of the interplay of both surfactant lipids and proteins, the AM clearance of nanoparticles is essentially the same, regardless of different

  20. Human in vivo fluorescence microimaging of the alveolar ducts and sacs during bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Thiberville, L; Salaün, M; Lachkar, S; Dominique, S; Moreno-Swirc, S; Vever-Bizet, C; Bourg-Heckly, G

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess fibred confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM) as a tool for imaging the alveolar respiratory system in vivo during bronchoscopy. A 488-nm excitation wavelength FCFM device was used in 41 healthy subjects including 17 active smokers. After topical anaesthesia, the 1.4-mm miniprobe was introduced into the bronchoscope working channel and advanced distally to the alveoli. Morphometric and cellular analyses were performed on selected frames harbouring a minimal compression effect. In vivo acinar microimaging was obtained from each lung segment except for the apical and posterior segments of both upper lobes. Reproducible patterns, corresponding to the elastic framework of the axial and peripheral interstitial systems, were recorded from 192 separate acini. The mean+/-sd thickness of the acinar elastic fibres was 10+/-2.7 microm. Alveolar mouth diameters (mean+/-sd 278+/-53 microm) were normally distributed but appeared smaller in the right upper lobe and right medial basal segment. Lobular microvessels (median diameter 90 microm) were equally distributed throughout the lungs. Alveolar macrophages were not detectable in nonsmokers, whereas a specific tobacco-tar-induced fluorescence was observed in smoking subjects, providing fine details of the alveolar walls and macrophages. A strong correlation was found between the number of cigarettes smoked per day and the amount of large and mobile macrophages observed in vivo, as well as with the intensity of the macrophage alveolitis. Fibred confocal fluorescence microscopy enables accurate exploration of the peripheral lung in vivo in both smokers and nonsmokers. PMID:19213792

  1. Inhibition of intracellular growth of Histoplasma capsulatum yeast cells by cytokine-activated human monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S L; Gootee, L; Bucher, C; Bullock, W E

    1991-01-01

    Human monocytes/macrophages (M psi) were infected with Histoplasma capsulatum yeast cells, and intracellular growth was quantified after 24 h of incubation in medium alone or in medium containing cytokines. Yeast cells multiplied within freshly isolated monocytes, cultured M psi, and alveolar M psi with intracellular generation times of 14.2 +/- 1.4, 18.5 +/- 2.1, and 19.9 +/- 1.9 h (mean +/- standard error of the mean), respectively. Monocytes and M psi inhibited the intracellular growth of yeast cells in response to cytokine supernatant; maximum inhibition was obtained when cytokines were added to cell monolayers immediately after infection. Opsonization of yeast cells in normal serum or in H. capsulatum-immune serum did not affect the intracellular generation time of yeast cells in either control M psi or cytokine-activated M psi. PMID:1898916

  2. Methyl 9-Oxo-(10E,12E)-octadecadienoate Isolated from Fomes fomentarius Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Response by Blocking Phosphorylation of STAT3 in Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Ji-Hyun; Yi, Young-Joo; Lee, Myeong-Seok; Seo, Dong-Won

    2015-01-01

    Fomes fomentarius is a fungus of the Polyporaceae family and is used in traditional oriental therapies. Although the anti-inflammatory activities of this species have been previously reported, the identity of the bioactive compounds responsible for this activity remains unknown. Here, we investigated whether methyl 9-oxo-(10E,12E)-octadecadienoate (FF-8) purified from F. fomentarius exerts anti-inflammatory activity in murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). FF-8 suppressed secretion of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 through downregulation of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression induced by LPS. In addition, pretreatment of cells with FF-8 led to a reduction in levels of secreted inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in macrophages stimulated with LPS. Conversely, FF-8 did not affect nuclear factor κB, p38, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathways. Instead, FF-8 specifically interfered with signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation induced by LPS. Collectively, this study demonstrated that FF-8 purified from F. fomentarius suppresses inflammatory responses in macrophages stimulated with LPS by inhibiting STAT3 activation. Further studies will be required to elucidate the anti-inflammatory effect of FF-8 in vivo. PMID:26539049

  3. Isolation and characterization of a glucose/mannose-specific lectin with stimulatory effect on nitric oxide production by macrophages from the emperor banana.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jack Ho; Ng, T B

    2006-02-01

    Emperor banana (Musa basjoo cv. 'Emperor Banana') is a banana cultivar that has not been studied previously. In this study, a glucose/mannose-specific lectin has been purified from the emperor banana by affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on Mono S and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. This lectin was composed of two identical 15-kDa subunits with N-terminal amino acid sequence similarity to other lectins from other Musa species. Emperor banana lectin stimulated [3H-methyl]-thymidine uptake by mouse splenocytes and nitric oxide production by mouse macrophages. In contrast to Con A, the mitogenic activity of emperor banana lectin toward mouse splenocytes but not its stimulatory effect on nitric oxide production by mouse macrophages could be abrogated by 200 mM glucose. Emperor banana lectin also inhibited proliferation of leukemia cell (L1210) and the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. In summary, this is the first report of the macrophage-stimulating, antiproliferative and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibiting activities of a banana lectin.

  4. The Role of Angiotensin II and Cyclic AMP in Alveolar Active Sodium Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ismael-Badarneh, Reem; Guetta, Julia; Klorin, Geula; Berger, Gidon; Abu-saleh, Niroz; Abassi, Zaid; Azzam, Zaher S.

    2015-01-01

    Active alveolar fluid clearance is important in keeping airspaces free of edema. Angiotensin II plays a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, heart failure and others. However, little is known about its contribution to alveolar fluid clearance. Angiotensin II effects are mediated by two specific receptors; AT1 and AT2. The localization of these two receptors in the lung, specifically in alveolar epithelial cells type II, was recently reported. We hypothesize that Angiotensin II may have a role in the regulation of alveolar fluid clearance. We investigated the effect of Angiotensin II on alveolar fluid clearance in rats using the isolated perfused lung model and isolated rat alveolar epithelial cells. The rate of alveolar fluid clearance in control rats was 8.6% ± 0.1 clearance of the initial volume and decreased by 22.5%, 28.6%, 41.6%, 48.7% and 39% in rats treated with 10-10 M, 10-9 M, 10-8 M, 10-7 M or 10-6 M of Ang II respectively (P < 0.003). The inhibitory effect of Angiotensin II was restored in losartan, an AT1 specific antagonist, pretreated rats, indicating an AT1 mediated effect of Ang II on alveolar fluid clearance. The expression of Na,K-ATPase proteins and cAMP levels in alveolar epithelial cells were down-regulated following the administration of Angiotensin II; suggesting that cAMP may be involved in AngII-induced reduced Na,K-ATPase expression, though the contribution of additional factors could not be excluded. We herein suggest a novel mechanism of clinical relevance by which angiotensin adversely impairs the ability of the lungs to clear edema. PMID:26230832

  5. Targeting of the pulmonary capillary vascular niche promotes lung alveolar repair and ameliorates fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhongwei; Lis, Raphael; Ginsberg, Michael; Chavez, Deebly; Shido, Koji; Rabbany, Sina Y; Fong, Guo-Hua; Sakmar, Thomas P; Rafii, Shahin; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-02-01

    Although the lung can undergo self-repair after injury, fibrosis in chronically injured or diseased lungs can occur at the expense of regeneration. Here we study how a hematopoietic-vascular niche regulates alveolar repair and lung fibrosis. Using intratracheal injection of bleomycin or hydrochloric acid in mice, we show that repetitive lung injury activates pulmonary capillary endothelial cells (PCECs) and perivascular macrophages, impeding alveolar repair and promoting fibrosis. Whereas the chemokine receptor CXCR7, expressed on PCECs, acts to prevent epithelial damage and ameliorate fibrosis after a single round of treatment with bleomycin or hydrochloric acid, repeated injury leads to suppression of CXCR7 expression and recruitment of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1)-expressing perivascular macrophages. This recruitment stimulates Wnt/β-catenin-dependent persistent upregulation of the Notch ligand Jagged1 (encoded by Jag1) in PCECs, which in turn stimulates exuberant Notch signaling in perivascular fibroblasts and enhances fibrosis. Administration of a CXCR7 agonist or PCEC-targeted Jag1 shRNA after lung injury promotes alveolar repair and reduces fibrosis. Thus, targeting of a maladapted hematopoietic-vascular niche, in which macrophages, PCECs and perivascular fibroblasts interact, may help to develop therapy to spur lung regeneration and alleviate fibrosis.

  6. Identification of molecular markers related to human alveolar bone cells and pathway analysis in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, X; Ren, Q H; Bai, L; Feng, Q

    2015-10-28

    Alveolar bone osteoblasts are widely used in dental and related research. They are easily affected by systemic diseases such as diabetes. However, the mechanism of diabetes-induced alveolar bone absorption remains unclear. This study systematically explored the changes in human alveolar bone cell-related gene expression and biological pathways, which may facilitate the investigation of its mechanism. Alveolar bone osteoblasts isolated from 5 male diabetics and 5 male healthy adults were cultured. Total RNA was extracted from these cells and subjected to gene microarray analysis. Differentially expressed genes were screened, and a gene interaction network was constructed. An enrichment pathway analysis was simultaneously performed on differentially expressed genes to identify the biological pathways associated with changes in the alveolar bone cells of diabetic humans. In total, we identified 147 mRNAs that were differentially expressed in diabetic alveolar bone cells (than in the normal cells; 91 upregulated and 36 downregulated mRNAs). The constructed co-expression network showed 3 pairs of significantly-expressed genes. High-enrichment pathway analysis identified 8 pathways that were affected by changes in gene expression; three of the significant pathways were related to metabolism (inositol phosphate metabolism, propanoate metabolism, and pyruvate metabolism). Here, we identified a few potential genes and biological pathways for the diagnosis and treatment of alveolar bone cells in diabetic patients.

  7. Inhibitory effects of β-chamigrenal, isolated from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis, on lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 production in RAW 264.7 macrophages [corrected].

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji-Sun; Ryu, Suran; Cho, Young-Wuk; Kim, Hyun Ji; Jang, Dae Sik; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2014-06-01

    Much is known about the bioactive properties of lignans from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis. However, very little work has been done to determine the properties of sesquiterpenes in the fruits of S. chinensis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory potential of new sesquiterpenes (β-chamigrenal, β-chamigrenic acid, α-ylangenol, and α-ylangenyl acetate) isolated from the fruits of S. chinensis and to explore their effect on macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide.